Proceedings of the Board of Regents (1901-1906)
University of Michigan. Board of Regents.

Page  1 NOVEMBER MEETING UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, AN\N ARiBOR, NOV. 26, I90I. The Board assembled in the Regents' room at I0 o'clock A. xi., the full Board being present. The Secretary read the minutes of the last meeting, whicl w\ere, on motion of Regent Hill, approved and ordered printed. Communications which had reached the President were placed in the hands of the standing committees of the Board, for consideration. Professors Davis, Adams, Spalding, Greene, and Carhart appeared before the Board to press the needs of their departments for additional room. The following con-mmunications from Professor Kelsey were laid before the Board. The Board accepted the gifts, and voted that the thanks of the Board be transmitted to the doniors. ANN ARBOR, MICH., Nov. 25, I901. PRESIDENT JAMI S B. ANlGELL, UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN: Dear,Mr. Prcsidet: I [ have pleasure in repeating that MTr. Tlleodore D. Bluhl, of Detroit, has contributed the sum of five hundred dollars for a classical felloNwship for the year 190I-1902, and that, by the unani1mous recolmmendationl of the Greek and Latin staff, the fellowship has been awarded to Mr. WValter David Hadzsits, A.B. (1897), A.M. (898), who was appointed Scott Classical Fellow for I900-1901, and on the recommendation of the commlittee, spent last year in Rolle. Sincerely yours, FRANCIS XW. KELSEY. ANN ARBOR,. MICH.. Nov. 25, I90I. PRESIDENT JAMIES B. ANGELL, UNIVERSITY OF AMICHIGAN: Dear Mr. President: As you are aware, for some years past friends of the University of Michigan have made contributions toward the expenses of the American School of Classical Studies in Rome. The payment of one hundred dollars a year by the University makes it possible to have a representative from the classical staff upon the managing com

Page  2 2 ANOVEMBER MEETING, 1901. inittee of the School, and also entitles graduates of the University of Michigan to participate in its privileges without the payment of tuition. In the past seven years twenty former students of the University have availed themselves of this opportunity, several of them for more than one year. I have pleasure in reporting that during the past year the sum of one hundred and ten dollars was given to the University for the School in Rome by the following persons: Miss Clara Avery, Detroit. Mr. Frank S. Bigler, Detroit. Mr. C. H. Campbell, Detroit. Mr. Claude H. Candler, Detroit. Mr. Chas. L. Freer, Detroit. Hon. C. H. Hackley, Muskegoln. Col. Frank J. Hecker. Detroit. Mr. James E. Scripps, Detroit. Mr. A. F. Temple, Muskegon. Sincerely yours, FRANCIS AV. KIr..sIE-. AN-N ARiIO, i., NvICH., 1901. To THE HONORABLE, THE1 BOARD OF REGENTS, UNIVERSITY OF MICHIG\AN: Genitlemlent: I have much pleasure in reporting to you that the Library of the University has received, as a gift from the Hon. D. M. Ferry, cf Detroit, two large and valuable works on the history of early Christian art. The first of these is the Roma Sotterranea, by the famous De Rossi, and the second is the Storia dell' Arte Christiana, by Raffaele (; arrucci. In regard to the importance of the work first mentioned. a better statement can hardly be given than. that in Lowrie's -Handbook of Christian Archxology, which has just been published, page i8: "It was through. the work of Giovanni Battista de Rossi that Christian arclhaology first assumed its modern forml and importance; it was he who first made it a science." De Rossi was a voluminous writer, but the Roma Sotterranea was the most important of his works, that in which he laid the foundations of his science. The number of copies printed was very limited, and the work for many years has been out of the market. This copy has an additional interest from the autograph and dedication of De Rossi himself, which will be found, with his portrait, on the fly leaf of the fourth and last volume containing the plates. The history of Christian art by Garrucci consists of six large volumes of plates, with explanatory text. Of this work Mr. Lowrie says, page 422: 'This great work, which covers the entire field of early Christian pictorial art, is the product of learning, as well as of labor. On account of its illustrations it must remain quite indispensable to the student of

Page  3 NO V11~iBfJLJ? i MEETING,.190l. 3 this subject, till the same ground has been covered with equal complete ness by photographic reproductions." The addition of these works to the Library, in a department which is now attracting so much attention, is a matter of no ordinary interest. Respectfully submitted, FRANCIS W. KELLSEY. ()n motion, the Board took a recess until 2 o'clock p. M. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock p. AM. Professor Hlutchins stated that the ILaw Faculty were desirous of publishing a Law journal in the interests of the department. He asked the Board to make the publishers a guarantee loan of S8oo, to launch the project, said loan to be paid from the first income from the publication. Regent Lawtton submitted the following resolution, which was adopted on a call vote: Resolved, That the Regents, having listened to the remarks of Professor l:utchins, Dean of the Law Department, regarding the proposition to publish a journal by the Law Department of the University, we do hereby declare that such a proposition meets with our approval, and that we shall be ready to lend our assistance to the undertaking in the manner and to the extent that he requests, that is, to the extent of not exceeding eight hundred dollars, to be considered as a loan, and to be drawn upon by the Lawr Department as their needs require. and to be returned to the Treasurer of the University from the first funds that shall be received from the enterprise. Regent Kiefer presented and read the following communication from Dr. V. C. Vaughan: ANN ARBOR, MICH., Nov. 2, I90I. HONORABLE HERMANN KIlEFER, CITAIRMAN OF MEI)ICAL COMMITTEE OF THill BOARD OF REGENTS, DETROIT, MICH.: Dear Sir: I am instructed by the Medical Faculty to ask you to confer at your next meeting the degree of M.D. upon Earle M. Brown as a member of the class of I90o. Mr. Brown had not completed all of ihis studies last June, but since that time he has complied with all the requirements for graduation. I desire to inform you officially that Messrs. Parke, Davis & Co., of Detroit, have very liberally placed at the disposal of myself, as director of the Hygienic Laboratory, a number of large animals, calves and horses, for experimental work on tuberculosis. The firm not only

Page  4 NOV(l EBER MEElTIiA;G, )19l. furnishes these animals, but takes tare of them while they are being experimented upon. This means a gift of considerable importance to the Department of Medicine and Surgery, and I suggest that the Board of Regents pass a resolution of thanks to Messrs. Parke, Davis & Co. for their generosity. I desire also to inform you officially that Dr. E. H. Wells, of Meshoppen, Pennsylvania, has presented to the Medical Library of the University of Michigan fifteen volumes of valuable, old, rare medical books. I have personally thanked Dr. Wells for this gift. but I take the liberty of suggesting that the Board of Regents might lass a resolution thanking him also. V. C. VnAUG;IN. On motion of Regent Kiefer, the degree of Doctor of Medicine was conferred upon Earle M. Brown, as recommended by the Faculty. And the President was requested to transmit the thanks of the Board to Parke, Davis & Co., and to Dr. E. I-H. Wells, for their gifts to the University. The Hospital 1-aculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery reported that Ada L. \Vaters and Miinne E. Gartung had completed the course in the Training School for Nurses, and were entitled to certificates of graduation. Oil motion of Regent Kiefer, the President and Secretary were authorized to issue the proper certificates, and attach the seal of the University thereto. Regent Kiefer presented the resignation of Mr. Lee A. \Watling, assistant in the Dental College, which was, on motion, accepted; anld Mr. John J. Scott was appointed to fill the place, at a salary of $300. On motion of Regent Butterfield, the degree of Bachelor of Arts was conferred upon Charles Jefferson Ewald, and the (legree of Master of Arts upon Sara Whedon, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts. On lmotion of Regent Lawton, ege nt gent Farr was requested to look over the vacant property in Detroit owned hy the University, and report its condition at the next meeting. M\r. Ohlinger, publisher of the Inlanlder, a monthly magazine published by the student body, offered to furnish a sufficient number of copies of the nagazines at fifty cents pef copy, to enable the Board to place it in the hands of every school having diploma relation with the University. On motion of Regent Sutton, the matter was referred to the Auditing Board, with power.

Page  5 XOV:EM IBER MEIETIA \,.1901. On motion of Regent Lawton, Geo. D. K. Hendry, B.S., was appointed to the second Rockefeller fellowship in Hygiene, w\ithout cost to the University. On motion of Regent IawNton, MIr. Markham Cheever was appointed Assistant to the Superin-tendent of Shops for one year from October 1st, at a salary of $200, by the full vote of the Board. (n motion of Regenlt Lawton, Dr. Geo. A. lMay was appointed Instructor in the \Vaterman (;ymnalsilm for onle year, salary $1,200, )y the full vote of the Board. Regent Butterfield moved that repairs to the extent of $ioo be made on a certain house in Grand Rapids, owned by the University, to enable the agent to sell the property. It was so ordered. On motion of Regenit Fletcher, the Au(liting Board were (lirected to pav the bill of Professor J. B. IDavis of $87.20 for surveying the Homoceopathic Hospital groun(ls. rThe Secretarv stated that the Sulerintendent of Uliversity Ilospital ren(ldered a bill to the county, on the basis of $5 per (lay, for nursing a smallpox case at the H-Ioslital, which bill was paid by the county. In the meantime, the University had settled w;ith the nurse for $3. per (lay. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Auditing Board were instructed to return to the county the overpayment. Regent Kiefer moved that the Committee on 1Bildings and (rounds procure plans for a new engineering btuilding, to cost $ioo,ooo, including heating. The motion was carried as follows: - Ayes: Regents Kiefer, Fletcher, Farr, Hill, Lawton, Dean, and Sutton. Nays: None. Reg'ent Butterfield not voting. On motion of Regent Fletcher, it was voted to buy a new pump for use in the boiler house at a cost of $247.50. Regent Fletcher moved that the Secretary contract with the Ridgway Dynam-o and Engine Company, of Ridgway, Pa., for a 200 K. W\. dynamlo, and one I7x28x20 engine, at a cost of $7,000. The motion was carried bv the unanimous vote of the Board. The senior medical class, having torn out the seats in the amphitheatre at University Hospital, on motion of Regent Fletcher, the Superintendent of Buildings was instructed to

Page  6 (6,NO IEMBERl MEET'ING', -190 1. p)ut in new folding seats, and( that the senior class be required to pay the sum of one dollar each. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Auditing Board were directed to provide additional facilities for storing ice for use in the hospitals during the coming year, either by enlarging the present house, or by building a new one. On motion of Regent Fletcher, $1o,ooo was appropriated for the purpose of completing the Woman's Gymnasium, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher, Regent Dean was authorized to purchase the First Ward school building and grounds, at a sum not exceeding $I6,ooo. On motion, the Board adjourned to Friday, December 20, at io o'clock A. M. JAMEIS H. WADE, Secretary.

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Page  7 DECEMBER MEETING 1901. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, MICH., Dec. 20, 90oI. The Board assembled in the Regents' room at io o'clock A. M., the full Board being present, except Regent Butterfield. The Secretary read the minutes of the last meeting, which were, on motion of Regent Hill, approved and ordered printed. Communications which had reached the President were placed in the hands of the standing committees of the Board, for consideration. Regent Dean, who was authorized by the Board, at its last meeting, to purchase of the Board of Education of the city of Ann Arbor the First Ward school building and grounds, at a cost not exceeding $I6,000, submitted the following communication from Eugene F. Mills, President of the Board, as his report: - ANN ARBOR, MICH., Dec. 5, I90I. HON. H. S. DEAN, Dear Sir: The acceptance of our proposition to sell the Perry School building and grounds to the University of Michigan for sixteen thousand dollars ($i6,ooo.oo) cash, has been duly received. The Board of Education at its next meeting, December io, will formally ratify the sale, and possession will be given at the close of the present school year, June 30, 1902. Yours sincerely, EUGENE F. MILLS, Presidentt Board of Education. On motion of Regent Lawton. the degree of Doctor of Philosophy was conferred tupon Otto E. Lessing, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of Literature, Science, and the Arts. Regent Hill moved that Professor John 0. Reed be appointed chairman, and John R. Effinger secretary, of the Sum

Page  8 8 )DECEMBER MEETING, 1901. mer School Faculty, for the ensuing year, and that each be allowed $Ioo for such service. It was so ordered on a call vote. On motion of Regent Farr, the Treasurer was authorized to extend the time of payment of the Alger loan of ten thousand dollars for one year, at five per cent. Regent Farr submitted the following resolution, which was adopted by the full vote of the Board: Resolved, That a sale is hereby authorized of Lot 1122 of the sub-. division of the Walter Crane farm, private claim No. 39, according to the plot in Liber 5, page 29 of plats, in the Register's office, Wayne County, Mich., to Daniel Rowen, of Detroit, Mich., for a consideration of four hundred dollars, and the president and secretary are hereby authorized and directed to execute such deed for and in behalf of the Board of Regents. Regent Kiefer presented and read the following communication from Dr. V. C. Vaughan, and the recommendations therein contained were approved by the Board: ANN ARBOR, MICH., Dec. 18, I901. HONORABLE HERMANN KIEFER, DETROIT, MICH., Dear Sir: I am requested by the Medical Faculty to present the following to the Honorable Board of Regents: First: We ask that Dr. E. M. Houghton be appointed special lecturer on the Manufacture and Preparation of Medicines, without other pay than his actual expenses. Dr. Houghton has an important position with Messrs. Parke, Davis & Co. He is a graduate of the Medical Department, and will give our students some valuable lectures upon the preparation of medicines. Second: Inasmuch as the medical students are compelled, in passing from one ward of the hospital to the other, to go around the north end of the nurses' ward, we ask your Honorable Body to provide for a light on the outside and at the north end of the nurses' home. There are steep places at this place, and these are often covered more or less with snow and ice, and the descent in the dark is somewhat dangerous. We ask this in order to prevent serious accident. Respectfully, V. C. VAUGHAN. Miss Marion A. Lawton, a daughter of Regent Lawton, a graduate of the Literary Department, and now a teacher in the Philippine Islands, sent a box'of fine cigars to the Board, with Christmas greetings. On motion of Regent Farr, the President was requested to transmit the cordial thanks of the Board to Miss I.awton for her kind Christmas remembrance. Regent Kiefer read a communication from a majority of

Page  9 DECEMBBER MEETING,.1901. 9 the H-ospital Committee of University Hospital, asking that when the Palmer \WAard is built, it be set apart for administrative purposes and a ward for ophthalmology. Also a communication from Dr. Dock, asking that the said ward be used only for tuberculosis patients. He moved that the matter be referred to the MVedical Committee and the chairman of the Building Committee for consideration, and report at the next meeting of the Board. It was so ordered by a full vote. Regent Kiefer presented and read the following communication from Dr. A. B. Prescott, Director of the Chemical Laboratory, and the recommendations therein contained were approved by the Board on a call vote: ANN ARBOR, MICH., Dec. I9, I9OI. To THE HONORABLE, THE BOARD OF REGENTS: Gentlem7zen: Mr. Perry F. Trowbridge presents herewith his resignation as Accountant and Instructor in the Chemical Laboratory, to take effect on January i, 1902, with the provision that if desired he will continue his service as instructor for one day each week from Christmas vacation to the end of the semester, February 7. With this provision, I recommend the acceptance of the resignation. Mr. Trowbridge resigns in order to accept a responsible position in the beet-sugar industry, to the chemistry of which he has for some time devoted his investigations. While I regret the loss of his services in this laboratory, I have confidence in the work he will carry out in this important Michigan industry. I recommend the appointment of Mr. Edward Lucas as Dispensing Accountant in the Chemical Laboratory, at the rate of nine hundred dollars per year, to begin January i, 1902. Also the employment of Mr. Robert J. Colgrove as dispensing helper in the Chemical Laboratory at the rate of three hundred dollars per calendar year, from January i to June 30, 1902. With these employees it will be undertaken to carry the chemical supplies, but this will not be without increased labor on the part of the director and his colleagues until the experience of the new supply agent shall be found sufficient. To fill the vacancy in the teaching force in the second semester, so far as the elective studies which have been in Mr. Trowbridge's hands cannot be distributed and deferred, I recommend that Walter H. Blome, Ph.C., now assistant in pharmacy with duties largely in first semester, be employed in the second semester, with $200 additional compensation, his work to be fully in charge of Assistant Professor A. B. Stevens. In 1902-03 the work of the sugar chemistry will be provided for in the branch of chemical technology. Very respectfully submitted, A. B. PRESCOTT.

Page  10 10 DECEBER M1EETING, 1901. The monthly reports of both hospitals were read, compared, and placed on file. The Homceopathic Faculty reported that Lily A. BenOliel, Gertrude E. Mulhollen, Eddeva A. Pomeroy, and Clara G. \Williams had completed the required work in the Training School for Nurses, and were recommended for graduation. On motion of Regent Dean, the President and Secretary were authorized to issue the proper certificate, and attach the seal of the University thereto. Regent Farr stated that Instructor Dwyer, who has been acting as Assistant Law Librarian, with a salary of $300, desired to be relieved from further service in that capacity. It was voted that Assistants Miss Woodard and Mr. Loomis be requested to take the work heretofore performed by Mr. Dwyer, and that Miss Woodard be paid at the rate of $900 per year, she to pay Mr. Loomis for any extra time that may be required of him in order to carry out this arrangement. On motion of Regent Iawton, the title of Professor Chas. S. Denison was changed to Professor of Stereotomy, Mechanism, and Drawing. On motion of Regent Lawton, Mr. George P. Burns, Ph.D., was appointed Assistant in Botany for one year from October Tst, at a salary of $200; and Florence Hedges, Charles R. Eckler, and Anna L. Rhodes were appointed Assistants in Botany for one year, without pay, by the full vote of the Board. On motion, the Board took a recess until 2 o'clock p. M. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock p. I. On motion of Regent Farr, the Secretary was directed to notify the Auditor-General that the cost of the new medical building, now in course of construction on the campus, would be $I25,000, as follows: Contract for the building, $86,00o; heating and lighting, $15,000; estimated cost of equipment, $24,000. Mason and Kahn, architects of the new engineering building, submitted sketch plans and an elevation of the proposed building. After some discussion by the Board, the architects were requested to prepare another elevation, and submit the same at the next meeting of the Board. On motion of Regent Kiefer, it was voted to pay Spier

Page  11 DEC(AEMBEkR MIETI NG,!/901. 11. and Rohns $1,200 for preparing the drawings and specifications for a new science building, which the Board subsequently decided not to build. These plans and specifications are to be deposited with the University. Regent Farr moved that Spier and Rolns be paid 32 per cent for the plans and for the supervision of the new medical building. Regent Kiefer moved to amend by making it 4 per cent. The vote on Regent Kiefer's amendment resulted as follows: Ayes: Regents Kiefer and Fletcher. Nays: Regents Farr, Hill, Dean, Lawton, and Sutton. A vote was then taken on the original motion, which resulted as follows: Ayes: Regents Farr, Hill, Dean, Lawton, and Sutton. Nays: Regents Kiefer and Fletcher. On motion of Regent Hill, the Secretary was authorized to allow Dr. Huber to use $Io from the budget fund of his department to pay the freight on microscopes, for which a special appropriation had been made by the Board. On motion of. Regent Fletcher, Mr. Charles Baird was reappointed Director of Outdoor Athletics for one year, at the same salary and on the same conditions as last year, viz.: that $I,200 be paid him from the general fund and $800 from the proceeds of the gate receipts from the Regents' Field. On motion, Regent Fletcher wvas requested to get bids on two more new tubular boilers, 250 horsepower each, to take the place of two old boilers, now out of use. On motion of Regent Kiefer, the Committee on Buildings and Grounds were authorized to move the heating plant at University Hospital to a point farther down the hill, where a sidetrack from the railway can reach it. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the vote requesting the Medical Committee and the Chairman of the Building Committee to confer with the Hospital Committee as to the use to be made of the Palmer Ward, when constructed, was rescindel, and the Board voted to use the building for a children's ward. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Building Committee were authorized to employ architect John Scott, to prepare plans for an extension to the Nurses' Home at University Hospital, to be known as the Palmer Ward.

Page  12 12 )DECEMBElR iEETING, 190 1. On motion of Regent Fletcher, it was voted that arrangements be made at the heating plant, by which the firemen and coal-handlers shall work on eight-hour shifts, and that the firemen be paid at the rate of $I.50 per day, and the coalhandlers at the rate of $I.35 per day. The President delivered an address at the meeting of the " Federation of Wlomen's Clubs," and the Club requested the Board to furnish them three hundred copies for distribution. On motion of Regent Farr, the request was granted, by the full vote of the Board. The Ishpeming Hiigh School foot-ball team appealed to the Board to relieve them of a part of the expense of the team's coming to Ann Arbor to contest with Kalamazoo for the championship of the State. The gate receipts left a deficit in their expense account of $269. The Secretary was directed to say that the Board recognizes the importance of the high schools of the State coming in contact with the University in this way, and they would be glad, indeed, to relieve the team of this expense, if it was in their power to do so; but they are unable to see by what authority they could make an appropriation for this purpose. The Board authorized the chairman of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds to employ John Scott, architect, to prepare plans for the finishing of the basement of the Barbour Gymnasium. On motion, the Board adjourned to Friday, Tanuary 17, 1902. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

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Page  13 JANUARY MEETING 1902. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, f ANN ARBOR, MICH., Jan. 24, 1902. The Board assembled in the Regents' room, at io o'clock A. M. Present: Regents Fletcher, Farr, Hill, Lawton, Dean, Sutton, and Carey. Absent: Regent Butterfield. The Secretary read the minutes of the last meeting, which were, on motion of Regent Fletcher, approved and ordered printed. Communications which had reached the President were placed in the hands of the standing committees of the Board, for consideration. On motion of Regent Fletcher, Regents Farr, Lawton, and Dean were appointed a committee to make a recast of the standing committees of the Board, and report the same to the Board for approval. After a brief period, the committee made the following report, which was, on motion of Regent Farr, adopted by the full Board: Executive Committee: The President, Regents Butterfield and Dean. Finance Committee: Regents Farr and Hill. Committee on Literary Department and Athletics: Regents Hill and Dean. Committee on Engineering Department: Regents Dean and Fletcher. Committee on Medical, Dental, and Pharmaceutical Departments: Regents Lawton and Farr. Committee on Law Department: Regents Butterfield and Sutton. Committee on Homceopathic College: Regents Cary and Butterfield. Committee on Library and Museum: Regents Sutton and Carey. Committee on Buildings and Grounds: Regents Fletcher and Lawton.

Page  14 14 JANUARIY lMEETING, 190)2. On motion of Regent Hill, the degree of Bachelor of Lettcrs was conferred upon Ralph Henry Kellogg, as of the class ofl 1895, in accordance with the recomnmendation of the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts. Professor M. E. Cooley reported that the American Radiator Company, of Chicago, had presented to the University several cast-iron radiators, for experimental purposes. On motion, the President was requested to transmit to this company the thanks of the Board. The President submitted the following report of the action of the Executive Committee during the interim of the Board, and on motion of Regent Dean, the report was adopted by the full vote of the Board: ANN ARBOR, MICH., Jan. 13, I902. To THE BOARD OF REGENTS:. The Executive Committee beg leave to report as follows: Owing to the death of Mr. Parker, it became necessary to appoint an instructor in Mechanical Engineering at once. After conference with Dean Greene and Prof. M. E. Cooley, we invited Mr. John C. Thorpe, B.S., to fill the place for the remainder of the year, at a salary of $900.o0. Mr. Thorpe is a graduate of the Engineering Department of the University of Illinois, and has been for some time employed by the Burlington and Quincy Railroad Company, For the Committee, JAMES B. ANGELL. The President presented and read the following communication from the Registrar of the Literary Faculty: ANN ARBOR, MICH., Jan. 8, 1902. To THE HONORABLE, THE BOARD OF REGENTS: Gentlemtenl: When I presented to you the list of candidates for the Bachelor's degree, which you granted at the meeting of October I6, I inadvertently omitted to mention that the degree conferred on Richmond Henry Kirtland was voted by the Faculty to be given as of the year 1900. I now beg your -honorable body to make that correction in the minutes of said meeting. Respectfully submitted, P. R. DE PONT, Registrar. On motion of Regent Hill, the correction indicated in the foregoing communication was niade, by the full vote of the Board. Regent Farr submitted the following resolutions, which were adopted by the full Board:

Page  15 JANUARY MEETING,.1902. 15 Resolved, That the sum of $I96.83 is appropriated to repay Professor Kelsey for money advanced by him for freight and storage upon gifts to the University of Roman antiquities. Resolved, That hereafter no purchases of property, employment of persons, or any pledge of the credit of the University, made by any person without the authority of the Board of Regents, will be recognized, and all such purchases, employment, or pledging of the credit of the University is hereby forbidden. The secretary is hereby directed to notify all persons connected with the University of this action. Regent Butterfield reported that he had sold to Lanis Seigle and Katie Seigle, his wife, the house and lot in the Hunnamun and Reed addition to the city of Grand Rapids, for the sum of $500 (less $40 commission to agent, $460), said property being a part of the WVilliams fund. He desired the Board to confirm this sale, and authorize the execution of the deed. On motion of Regent Farr, the President and Secretary were authorized to execute the deed in the name of the Board. On motion of Regent Farr, the Secretary was directed to pay George S. Field $50, for services in keeping the books and records of the Williams fund, from Jan. I,.I9oI, to Jan. I, I902, under the direction of Levi L. Barbour, who is custodian of a portion of this fund. On motion of Regent Dean, Professor V. M. Spalding was granted leave of absence from February Io to April TI, without expense to the University, he to employ Dr. Burns to take his work during his absence. On motion of Regent Fletcher, Regent Farr and the Secretary were requested to go to Lansing, for the purpose of conferring with the Auditor-General on University matters. Regent Farr submitted the following resolution, which was adopted by the full Board: Resolved, That the release by the President and Secretary of the Dopeta Mortgage, so called, in South Omaha, Nebraska, is hereby authorized, sanctioned, and approved. On motion of Regent Lawton, Mary Leach was appointed fellow in Physiological Chemistry. A communication from.the Clinical Faculty of University Hospital, asking the Board to extend the course in the Training School for Nurses to three years was, on motion of Regent Fletcher, referred to the Med.ical Committee for consideration. On motion of Regent Hill, Frederick Tyndall Swan was

Page  16 16 JAJNUARY MlEETING, 1902. appointed Assistant in Latin for the remainder of the year, without pay. On motion of Regent Dean, it was voted that an Assistant in Descriptive Geometry and Drawing be appointed for the second semester, and that the compensation be $400 for the half year's service. Regent Hill moved that $I50 be appropriated for the purpose of securing additional assistance in the department of Greek during the second semester. It was so ordered on a call vote. On motion of Regent Hill, Mr. W\illiam H. Faust was appointed Quiz-master in Commercial Law for one year, beginning October Ist last, at a salary of $300. Regent Lawton submitted the following communication from the Committee on Forestry, and the recommendations therein contained were approved on a call vote of the Board: ANN ARBOR, MICH., Jan. 24, 1902. In view of the fact that a number of citizens of Michigan have offered to make over to the University tracts of land for forestry purposes, and that in order to complete the transfer it will be necessary for a duly authorized representative of the University to conduct negotiations and transact business pertaining thereto, we recommend that the instructor in forestry, Mr. Charles A. Davis, be authorized to spend such time as may be required during the early months of the present year in securing titles to such lands, and that a sum not exceeding one hundred dollars be appropriated for traveling and other necessary expenses for this purpose. V. M. SPALDING, for Commlittee on Forestry. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Secretary was authorized to contract with the Sterling Company for two boilers, 338 H. P. each, to have 3,I43 square feet of heating surface, for the sum of $5,760, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Hill, it was voted to correct the minutes of the June meeting, i9oi, to show that the degree of Bachelor of Arts conferred on Gen. Bluford Wilson was not an honorary degree, but "as of the class of 1865; " also that the name of James Roy Furman should be included in the list of graduates of the College of Dental Surgery in 1899. On motion, the Board took a recess until 2 o'clock P. r.

Page  17 JANUARY. MEETING, 1902. 1', AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock p. m. On motion of Regent Farr, the Law Faculty were allowed to draw on the guarantee fund made by the Board, to the extent of $200, for immediate use, by the full vote of the Board. Regent Fletcher moved that Mason and Kahn, architects, be instructed to complete the plans and specifications for the new Engineering building, according to their sketch plan marked A, except that the testing tank should be extended to 300 feet, and that the specifications should require bidders to submit estimates of the work, both with tile and slate roof, with expanded metal or wood floors, with and without plate glass. It was so ordered by the full Board. The Dean of the Law Faculty asked permission of the Board to invite Sir Frederick Pollock, of England, to deliver a course of lectures before the Law students. On motion of Regent Farr, the request was granted. On motion of Regent Farr, it was voted that architect John Scott be instructed to prepare the plans and specifications for the Palmer Ward, and that the compensation be three per cent for the plans only. Regent Fletcher moved that the contract for the marble work in the Barbour Gylnnasium be awarded to the Detroit Marble Company, for the sum of $6,789; and that the contract for the plumbing be awarded to Hutzel and Company, of Ann Arbor, for the sum of $949. The motion was carried by the unanimous vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher, it was voted that the Secretary purchase one pipe-cutting machine, '" to 2", at a cost not exceeding $342. On motion of Regent Htill, Assistant Professor Drake was made Junior Professor of Latin and Roman Law; salary not to exceed $2,000 for both subjects. On motion of Regent Fletcher, architects Mason and Kahn were authorized to complete the plans for the Psychopathic \vard, under the directions of Drs. Herdman and Vaughan, provided the building can be built for $45,000, including expanded metal floors. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Board adjourned to February 27, 902.' JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

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Page  19 FEBRUARY MEETING. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, } ANN ARBOR, MICH., Feb. 27, I902. The Board assembled in the Regents' room at io o'clock A. M. Present: Regents Fletcher, Butterfield, Farr, Lawton, Dean, Sutton, and Carey. Absent: Regent Hill. The Secretary read the minutes of the last meeting, which were, on motion of Regent Fletcher, approved and ordered printed.:Communications which had reached the President were. placed in the hands of the standing committees of the Board,. for consideration. The President presented the following communication from Librarian Davis, and it was voted that the thanks of the Board be transmitted to the government of France for its valuable contribution to the General Library of this University: ANN ARBOR, MICH., Feb. 26, 1902. To PRESIDENT ANGELL: The following is submitted for the consideration of the Board of Regentst. The General Library of the University of Michigan has recently received the following volumes from the Ministere de 'Instruction Publique et des Beaux-Arts (France). They were solicited by President Angell through the State Department at Washington, at the suggestion of Professor Kelsey. I. Inventaire General des Richesses d'Art de la France, Paris, Monuments Civils, Tomes I, 2, 2 vols.; Province, Monuments Civils, Tomes 1-3, 5-6, 5 vols.; Province, Monuments Religieux, Tome i, I vol.; Paris, Monuments Religieux, Tomes i, 2, 2 vols.; Archives du Musee des Monuments Francais, Parts 1-3, 3 vols.- II. Reunion des Societes Savantes des Ddpartements a la Sorbonne, 1877, I878, 1879; Reunion des Societes des Beaux-Arts, I880, i88i, 1882, 1883, 1884, I885, I886, 1887; Reunion des Societes des Beaux-Arts des Departements, Salle de 1'Hemicycle, a l'Ecole Nationale les Beaux-Arts, I888, I889, 1890, I891, 1892, 1893, 1894, 1895, I896,

Page  20 20 FEBRUARY MEETING, 1902. 1897, 1898, 1899, I9oo; also Table Analytique, 1877 a 1896; 25 vols.III. Correspondence des Directeurs de 1'Acad6mie de France a Rome, pubilee par Anatole Montaiglon et Jules Guiffrey, Vols. I, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, o1 (I666-I753).-IV. Restaurations des Monuments Antiques par les Architectes Pensionnaires de l'Acad6mie de France a Rome depuis 1788 jusqu' a nos Jours, Publi6es sous les Auspices du Gouvernement Francais: -. La Colonne Trajane, par Charles Percier.- 2. Basilisque Ulpienne, par Jeanne B. Lesueur.- 3. Temples de Paestum, par Henri Labrouste.- 4. Temple de la Pudicit6, par L. A. Dubut.- 4. Temple de Vesta, par J. A. Coussin.- 5. Temple de Jupiter Panhellenien, par Charles Garnier.- 6. Temple de Marc-Aurele, par Alexandre Villain.7. Thermes de Diocletien, par Edmond Paulin. (7 vols.) In all 54 -voliumes. Very respectfully, RAYMOND C. DAVIS, Librarian. On motion of Regent Lawton, the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery was conferred upon Henry Shute Downing, Herbert Lowes, Roland Herbert Neelands, Charles Frederick Keyser, Benjamin Masselink, and Fred Evart Robinson, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty. On motion of Regent Farr, Dr. Watling was granted leave of absence for four weeks, he to provide for his work during his absence. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Secretary was authorized to purchase a twelve-inch pipe-cutting machine, at a cost of $420 and freight, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher, it was voted that when the school building recently purchased of the city comes into possession of the University, it shall be devoted to the use of the Literary Department, and shall be known as West Hall. Professors Carhart, Vaughan, and Prescott appeared before the Board, and discussed matters relating to graduate work in the University. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the matter was referred to the Committee on the Literary Department. On motion of Regent Farr, the Board took a recess until 2 o'clock p. M. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock P. M., Regent Hill being present. On motion of Regent Hill, Regent Dean was asked to take the chair during the absence of the President. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Committee on Buildings

Page  21 FEBRUARY MEETING, 1902. 21 and Grounds were authorized to arrange with the Engineering Department to superintend the wiring and piping of the New Medical Building. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Secretary was authorized to pay Spier and Rohns $750 for services as architects of the New Medical Building. On motion of Regent Dean, Mr. Frederick Charles Wilson was appointed undergraduate assistant in Descriptive Geometry and Drawing. The expenditure for this appointment was made at the last meeting of the Board. Regent Farr submitted the following resolution, which was adopted by the Board: Resolved, That conveyance by the. President and Secretary is hereby authorized of the N. Y2 of Lot 82, of Nelson's addition to the city of Omaha, State of Nebraska; and of Lot IT, Block 13, Jetter's addition to the city of Nebraska aforesaid; the first at $I,ooo, and the last at $425; and that conveyances heretofore made by the President and Secretary are hereby confirmed. Regent Farr presented and read the following communication fromn Margaret E. Hunt, formerly of Detroit, but now residing in Ann Arbor: ANN ARBOR, MICH., Feb. 26, I902. To THE REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, MICH. Dear Sirs: The tract of land which I herewith offer to the Regents of the University,-in trust for the endowment of scholarships, is situated in Humboldt County, in the State of California. It is about fifty miles south of Eureka, the county seat, on the line of the projected railroad from San Francisco to Eureka, now in process of construction. I understand this road will be finished to a point I70 miles north of San Francisco the coming year. There is a road from Eureka to the Pacific Lumber Co.'s mill, about forty miles south, leaving a gap of perhaps a hundred miles to be built to complete the connection between San Francisco and Eureka. The topography of the country will bring this road through this land on one side or the other of the south fork of the Eel River, which passes through the tract. The river here is wide and deep enough for all purposes of lumbering. The Pacific Lumber Co.'s mill is a short distance below, on the Eel River. There are from sixteen to twenty million feet of lumber on the land, and. a part of it is of the thickest growth. On the next claim below, where the timber is of the same character, the owner manufactured one million feet sawn lumber from two measured acres of ground. As soon as the railroad is completed, this timber will be worth

Page  22 22 FEBRUARY MEETING,.1902. from five to eight dollars per thousand feet stumpage, as it will cut about eighty per cent clear lumber. It is my intention to pay the taxes on these lands as long as they remain in the possession of the University; but if by any chance the University should be called upon to pay the taxes, there is provision made in the deed to refund any such payments from the first receipts of the income. In this transaction I am endeavoring to benefit my family in what I conceive to be the best manner, by providing them with a permanent income during their lives, and insuring to their children the means of fitting themselves for useful and honorable lives. I have reserved a part of the principal for myself, if the sale is made in my lifetime, in order to provide for my family if they should need it, or to reinvest in timber lands, thus increasing the amount for a future endowment. I have named one of the scholarships the James B. Hunt Scholarship, in memory of my husband's father, who was a prominent man in the early days of the State. He was the Acting Commissioner of Internal Improvement, who constructed the central railroad from Detroit to Ann Arbor, and other internal improvements. He was afterward the Representative in Congress for the Third District of Michigan. Ever since I purchased this land I have intended to give it to the University for the endowment of scholarships, and when at one time I seemingly faced the inevitable end, I rejoiced that I had made the proper provisions in my will for this purpose. It is the fulfillment of the purpose of a lifetime. With my best wishes for the success of our University, and for the prosperity of each of you, I remain, yours sincerely, MARGARET E. HUNT. The following is the deed of the lands referred to in the foregoing communication: THIS INDENTURE, made this twenty-sixth day of February, in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and two, between Margaret E. Hunt and Charles J. Hunt, her husband, of the city of Ann Arbor, county of Washtenaw, and State of Michigan, parties of the first part, and the Regents of the University of Michigan, a corporation created by the laws of the State of Michigan, party of the second part, Witnesseth, that the said parties of the first part, for and in consideration of the sum of one dollar, to them in hand paid by the said party of the second part, the receipt whereof is hereby confessed and acknowledged, have granted, bargained, sold, remised, released, aliened, and confirmed, and by these presents do grant, bargain, sell, remise, release, alien, and confirm unto the said party of the second part, and to their successors and assigns, forever, all those pieces or parcels of land, situate and being in the county of Humboldt, and State of California, and described as follows, to wit: The east half of the southeast quarter of section thirteen. in township two south, of range two east,

Page  23 FEBRUARY MEETING, 1902. 23 and lot three of section eighteen in township two south, of range three east, of Humboldt meridian, California, containing one hundred and fifteen and eighty-eight hundredths acres of land, according to the government survey, be the same more or less, In trust for the following purposes; viz.: I. To sell and dispose of the above-described lands and appurtenances at a price not less than eighty thousand dollars, or at such time and for such a price as may hereafter be requested in writing by the said parties of the first part, or the survivor of them, and after the death of the said parties of the first part, at such price as to the said party of the second part may seem best. 2. To invest one half of the money arising from the sale of said lands and appurtenances in the bonds of the State of Michigan, or in such other manner or in such other securities as shall seem to the said Regents of the University of Michigan most suitable and proper to produce a steady interest or income, and to reinvest the same from time to time, as may be necessary. 3. To refund to. the said party of the second part, from the interest or income derived from the said half of the money arising from the sale of the said lands and appurtenances, any and all moneys the said party of the second part shall have expended in the care and preservation of said lands. 4. To pay over to the said parties of the first part, and to the survivor of them, as soon as received, the net interest or income derived from the said half of the money arising from the sale of the said lands and appurtenances, during their lives and the life of the survivor of them. 5. After the termination of the said life interests, to establish one or more scholarships in the undergraduate course o.f studies in the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts, in the University of Michigan. To pay from the interest or income derived from the said half of the money arising from the sale of said lands and appurtenances, to each of the first two scholarships, the sum of two hundred dollars, annually, and to each of the other scholarships the sum of one hundred and fifty dollars, annually, and in such amounts, and at such times, and under such rules and regulations as from time to time shall be prescribed by the said Regents of the University of Michigan, and during the time prescribed in the rules and regulations of the said University of Michigan, in force at such period, for the completion of the said undergraduate course of studies in the Department of Literature, -Science, and the Arts, in the said University of Michigan. That the said Regents of the University of Michigan shall from time to time prescribe the physical, moral, and mental requisites and requirements, and all necessary rules and regulations in regard to the application for, and the granting these scholarships, and the amount of education or scholarship requisite to entitle such applicant to the appointment to such scholarship, but which shall not be more than that required from time to time by the rules and regulations of the said University of

Page  24 24 FEBRUARY MEETING, 1902. Michigan, for the admission of undergraduates of the first year in the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts of said University of Michigan, but such applicants may be admitted to an advanced standing on the same requirements as other undergraduates, and shall be entitled to all the benefit and advantage of said scholarships. The said Regents of the University of Michigan shall have the right and power to suspend the payment of any of said annuities, and to revoke, cancel, and annul the appointment to any scholarship at any time they may deem it expedient and necessary. 6. The first of the said scholarships hereby created shall be known as the James B. Hunt Scholarship, in memory of the father of the said Charles J. Hunt. The second of said scholarships shall be known as the Charles J. Hunt Scholarship. All the other scholarships hereby created shall be known as the Margaret Smith Hunt Scholarships. 7. To give the scholarships which are hereby endowed from the said fund, consisting of the said half of the money arising from the sale of the said lands and appurtenances, to such residents of the State of Michigan as shall apply for the same, preferably to such applicants who would otherwise be unable to attend or study at said University of Michigan. Such benefit to be shared: equally as may be by the girls and boys, the division, of the appointments to be made under the direction of the Regents of the University of Michigan. 8. In case any of the said interest or income derived from the fund, consisting of the said half of the money:arising from the sale of said lands and appurtenances, shall be unexpended and unappropriated at the close of any collegiate year, then such-remaining interest.or income shall become and remain a part of the principal of the fund for the maintenance of the scholarships hereby created, and shall be invested in the same manner by the said Regents of the University of Michigan. 9. To pay over as soon as received the remaining half of the money arising from the sale of said lands and appurtenances to the said Margaret E. Hunt, in case the said sale should have been made in her life time. But in case the said sale should not have been made and completed in her life time, then and in that case, to invest the said remaining half of the money arising from the sale of said lands and appurtenances in the bonds of the State of Michigan, or in such other manner, or in such other securities, as shall seem to the said Regents of the University of Michigan most suitable and proper to produce a steady interest or income, and to reinvest the same, from time to time, as may be necessary. Io. To pay from the interest or income derived from the last aforesaid half of the money arising from the sale of said lands and appurtenances, an annuity of three hundred dollars per annum to Miss Josephene A. Williams, of Ionia, Michigan, during her natural life. 11. To pay the remainder of the interest or income derived from the last aforesaid half of the fund arising from the sale of the said lands and appurtenances to James:O. Smith, the brother of the said grantor, Margaret E. Hunt, Elizabeth M. Smith, Jay Green Smith, and Vera

Page  25 FEBRUARY MEETING, 1902. 25 Smith, children of James 0. Smith, share and share alike, during their natural lives. And upon the termination of the life estate of the said Josephene A. Williams, the amount of her annuity shall be divided and paid to the last aforesaid persons, equally, share and share alike, during their natural lives. 12. As soon as any and each and all of the last above-mentioned life interests shall be terminated; the part or portion of the last aforesaid half of the fund derived from the sale of said lands and appurtenances, so released by the termination of any of said life interests, shall become a part of and be incorporated with the principal of the fund hereinbefore appropriated, designated, and assigned for the establishment and maintenance of scholarships in the undergraduate course- of studies in the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts in the University of Michigan, and shall be invested in the same manner, and used for the same purposes, by the said Regents of the University of Michigan. To pay to the first of the scholarships hereby endowed the sum of three hundred dollars per annum, and which shall be given to any one of the family or kin of the said grantor, Margaret E. Hunt, who may apply for the same; but in case no one of said grantor's family or kin should apply for said scholarship, then in that case the said annuity shall be divided and one hundred and fifty dollars per annum paid to each of two scholarships. To pay to each, of the other scholarships hereby endowed the sum of one hundred and fifty dollars per annum. The scholarships hereby created shall be known as the Margaret Smith Hunt Scholarships. Together with all and singular the hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining, and the reversion and reversions, remainder and remainders, rents, issues, and profits thereof, and all the estate, title, interest, or demand whatsoever of the said parties of the first part, either in law or equity, of, in, and to the abovebargained premises, with the hereditaments and appurtenances. To have and to hold the said premises unto the said party of the second part, their successors, and assigns forever. And the said parties of the first part, for themselves, their heirs, executors, and administrators, do covenant, grant, bargain, and agree to and with the said party of the second part, their successors and assigns, that at the time of the ensealing and delivery of these presents they were well seized of the premises above described as of a good, sure, perfect, absolute, and indefeasible estate of inheritance, in the law in fee simple; and that the said lands are free from all incumbrances whatever, and that the above-bargained premises in the quiet and peaceable possession of the said party of the second part, their successors and assigns, against all and every person or persons lawfully claiming or to claim the whole or any part thereof, they will forever warrant and defend.

Page  26 26 'FEBRlUARY I MEETING, 1 902. In witness whereof the said parties of the first part have hereunto set their hands and seals the day and year first above written. Signed, sealed, and delivered in presence of JAMES H. WADE. BELLE KLINE. MARGARET E. HUNT. L. S. CHARLES J. HUNT. L. S. STATE OF MICHIGAN, SS COUNTY OF WASHTENAW. On this 27th day of February, in the year one thousand nine hundred and two, before me, a Notary Public, in and for said county, personally appeared Margaret E. Hunt and Charles J. Hunt, known to me to 'be the same persons described in, and who executed the within instrument, who severally acknowledged the same to be their free act and deed. BELLE KLINE, Washtenaw County, Mich. On motion of Regent Farr, the trust was accepted by the unanimous vote of the Board, and the President was requested to convey to Mr. and Mrs. Hunt the cordial thanks of the Board for their generous gift for the encouragement of advanced study in the University. On motion of Regent Hill, Miss Bertha Stewart was appointed assistant in the Barbour Gymnasium for the remainder of the college year, salary $5o, by the full vote of the Board. Regent Hill moved that an appropriation of $3oo be made for the purpose of securing the full time of Assistants Pyle and Colton for the remainder of the year in the Department of Physics; and $150 for the employment of a competent person to assist in correcting manuscripts in the Department of English. It was so ordered on a call vote. Regent Hill moved that Mr. C. E. Galloway and David Olsen be appointed assistants in Psychology for the remainder of the year, at a salary of $50 each. It was so voted by the Board. Regent Lawton presented and read the following communication from Dr. V. C. Vaughan, Dean of the Medical Faculty: ANN ARBOR, MICH., Feb. 26, I902. HONORABLE CHARLES D. LAWTON, CHAIRMAN OF THE MEDICAL COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS: Dear Sir: I am requested by the Medical Faculty to ask the Honorable Board to consider the following: I. The Faculty requests that Dr. Guy M. Winslow, of Boston, be appointed Instructor in Anatomy in place of Dr. Bourland, who will resign at the end of this year, at the same salary. Dr. Winslow's work, if he be appointed, will begin at the beginning of the next

Page  27 PFEBRUARY MEETING, 1902. 2'7 session, and his appointment should date from October i, 1902. The object in asking that the appointment be made at this time is that Dr. Winslow may have definite information, and may arrange his matters accordingly. Dr. Winslow has been teaching Anatomy for some years in Tufts College. He has written several original articles, and is recommended highly both on account of his thorough learning and as a teacher. 2. The Medical Faculty desires that the honorable Board of Regents should at the proper time fit up what is now known as the Anatomical Laboratory, for the teaching of Electrotherapeutics. Dr. Herdman, who has charge of Electrotherapeutics, will be glad to furnish the Board, whenever it is desired, a statement concerning the changes which will be necessary in order to convert this building into a suitable laboratory. 3. It gives me pleasure to inform the Board that the woman in Denver who has been impersonating Dr. Emma W. Mooers, of Boston, has been tried, convicted, and sentenced. I have recovered the certificate given this woman by Mr. Wade. I hope that this ends very satisfactorily to the University a matter which has given us no little annoyance. The Medical Faculty has extended to the Secretary of the State Board of Medical Examiners, of Colorado, and to the Assisting Prosecuting Attorney, at Denver, its thanks for the energy with which they have prosecuted this suit. The Faculty has also thanked Dr. Henry Sewall, of Denver, who held a chair in our school at the time when the real Dr. Mooers was a student here, and whose testimony aided in the conviction of the fraudulent woman. I have turned over to Secretary Wade a bill of expenses in this case. All of which is respectfully submitted. V. C. VAUGHAN, Dean. On motion of Regent Lawton, Dr. Guy M. Winslow was appointed Instructor in Anatomy for the year I902-1903, salary $9goo, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Lawton, the Secretary was authorized to pay the expenses of Dr. Emma W. Mooers in going from Boston to Denver as a witness in the suit indicated in the foregoing communication. On motion of Regent Hill, the Committee on Buildings and Grounds were authorized to purchase wire and piping for the New Medical Building, not exceeding the amount of $3,000. This motion wfas carried on a call vote. On motion of Regent Fletcher, it was voted to purchase a magazine and book rack for use in the Alumni room, to cost not exceeding $25. The President presented the following list of names of persons nominated to give instruction in the Summer Session of 1902, with the compensation fixed in accordance with the rules

Page  28 28 iEBRtUARY MEETING, 1902, of the Board (see Proceedings for January, 900o, page 477); and, on motion of Regent Butterfield, the list was approved, and the appointments made by the full vote of the Board: APPOINTMENTS FOR FACULTY OF SUMMER SESSION, DEPARTMENT OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS, 1902. Professor I. N. Demmon, English Literature..................$250 oo Professor W. -W. Beman, Mathematics........................ 250 00 Professor Volney M. Spalding, Botany......................... 250 00 Professor W. H. Payne, Pedagogy......................... 250 00 Professor T. C. Trueblood, Elocution and Oratory............ 250 00 Professor J. C. Rolfe, Latin............................. 250 oo 'Professor R. M. Wenley, Philosophy......................... 250 oo Professor J. A. Woodburn (Indiana State University), History. 250 oo Professor F. M. Taylor, Political Economy.................. 200 oo Professor A. S. Whitney, Pedagogy......................... 200 oo Professor J. O. Reed, Physics............................... 200.00 Professor J. H. Drake, Latin.................0................ 00 Professor W. H. Sherzer (Michigan State Normal College), Geology and Physical Geography...................... 200 oo Assistant Professor J. L. Markley, Mathematics.............. 240 oo Assistant Professor Moritz Levi, Spanish and Italian........... 60 oo Assistant Professor George Rebec, Psychology................ 60 00 Assistant Professor Moses Gomberg, Chemistry............... 240 oo Assistant Professor J. R. Effinger, French.................... 240 oo Assistant Professor K. E. Guthe, Physics.................... 240 oo Professor AT. H. Munson (Winona, Minn., State Normal), Zoology............................................. 240 oo Instructor George 0. Higley, Chemistry...................... 180 oo Instructor D. M. Lichty, Chemistry.......................... 80 oo Instructor Tobias Diekhoff, German......................... 180 oo Instructor J. A. C. Hildner, German........................ 120 00 Instructor J. AW. Glover, Mathematics....................... 180 oo Instructor H. J. Goulding, Drawing.......................... 8 o00 Instructor W. VW. Florer, German............................ 20 00 Instructor E. C. Sullivan, Chemistry......................... 150 oo Instructor H. A. Sanders, Greek............................ 180 00 Instructor H. M. Randall, Physics........................... 150 00oo Instructor J. M. Thomas, English............................ oo oo Instructor F. L. Dunlap, Chemistry...................... 150 oo Instructor C. B. Teetzel (Mich. State Normal College), Physical Training............................................ 50 oo Total................................. $6,540 oo

Page  29 FEBRUARY MEETING, 1902. 29 The following persons are provisionally appointed to give instruction in the University during the Summer Session, on condition that any course which is not elected by at least six students shall be withdrawn: Instructor Geo. P. Burns, Botany. Instructor C. L. Meader, Latin. Instructor J. C. Thorpe, Mechanical Engineering. On motion of Regent Butterfield, it was voted that students of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts, who are pursuing a combined course, and, in consequence, are registered at the same time in one of the professional departments, are required to pay the annual fee due from students of such professional departments. On motion, the Board adjourned to Friday, March 14, at o o'clock A. M. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  30

Page  31 MARCH MEETING. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, l ANN ARBOR, March 14, 1902. The Board assembled in the Regents' room at I0o o'clock A. M. Present, Regents Fletcher, Butterfield, Hill, Lawton, Dean, Sutton, and Carey. Absent, Regent Farr. The Secretary read the minutes of the last meeting, which were, on motion of Regent Dean, approved and ordered printed. Communications which had reached the President were placed in the hands of the standing committees of the Board for consideration. Professor Cooley reported that the Engineering Laboratory had received from Tate, Jones & Co., of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, a gift of one of their Fuel Oil Burners for experimental use in the laboratory. The Board requested the President to make official acknowledgment of this gift, with the thanks of the Board. On motion of Regent Hill, Miss Frances J. Dunbar was appointed Assistant in Zoology in place of Mr. George Wagner, resigned. Salary at the rate of $I50.oo per year. Professor Stanley reported that Mr. J. C. Henderson, of the Ann Arbor Organ Co., had presented the Museum with a very unique and valuable specimen of one of the earliest makes of upright pianos in France. On motion of Regent Hill, the President was asked to transmit the thanks of the Board to Mr. Henderson. Alderman Hamilton addressed the Board in relation to paving State Street. On motion of Regent Butterfield, the Board went into executive session to confer with the Auditor General.. On motion of Regent Sutton, the Board took a recess until 2 o'clock P. M. 31

Page  32 32 3MARlCH MEETING. 1902. AFTERNOON SESSION The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock p. M. On motion of Regent Lawton, the course in the Training School for Nurses, in both Hospitals, was extended to three years, to take effect July I, next. The salary to be $50, $75, and $75 per year. The following report of the Finance Committee was adopted by the full vote of the Board: " Your committee, to whom was referred the memorial for the establishment of a Graduate School as a separate department, beg to report that it has considered the same, along with the protest lodged against such action, and the committee recommend that no action be taken." The Treasurer reported that Mr. E. B. Robinson, of Detroit, desired to make a loan of $2,500.00 on a house and lot on Second Avenue, Detroit. On motion of Regent Hill, the matter was placed in the hands of the President and the Secretary to investigate, and if satisfied that the security is ample, to make the loan from the gift funds of the University. The following communication from the Dean of the Engineering Department was submitted by Regent Dean, and on his motion the recommendations therein contained were approved by the full vote of the Board. ANN ARBOR, MICH., Feb, 15, I902. To THE HONORABLE BOARD OF REGENTS, UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN: Gentlemien.' In carrying out the arrangement for work in the summer session between the third and fourth years of the engineering course, which was proposed in a memorial addressed to your honorable body last year, and was sanctioned by you, the arrangement of work is as follows: For the Civil Engineering students, survey and field work. For the Mechanical Engineering students, dynamo electrical machinery, and a course in the designing of boilers and engines. For the Electrical Engineering students, a course in foundry work, and in design of boilers and engines. For the Chemical Engineering students, a course in dynamo electrical machinery. The Faculty of the Department of Engineering at their meeting January 23, resolved: that the Board of Regents be asked formally to require for graduation this six weeks of work during one summer, out of term time, for which not to exceed six hours' credit shall be given toward the requirements for graduation, and that this summer work shall be without increase of the present dues paid by the student.

Page  33 MA-RCH MEETING, J902. 33 An appropriation of $50o.oo for services of an instructor to take charge of the field work for the Civil Engineering students was made in the last budget. It is desired that an appropriation of $150.oo for the instructor who takes charge of the course in design of boilers and engines, and of $200.0o-for the junior professor who will conduct the course in dynamo electrical machinery should also be made. And in connection with request for this appropriation, I would respectfully inquire whether such expense will be properly chargeable to the budget for I901-2, or for I902-3. The items just enumerated have been placed in the list of requests made by the Department of Engineering for the year to come. Respectfully submitted, CHAS. E. GREENE, Dear, On motion of Regent Hill, the Secretary was requested to send the departmental requests for the budget of next year to the chairmen of the standing committees of the Board, who will examine the same, and report to the Finance Committee their recommendations covering the needs of the departments they represent. On motion of Regent Hill, Regent Carey was added to the Finance Committee for the present year. Regent Fletcher submitted the following resolution, which was adopted by the unanimous vote of the Board: Resolvcd, That the Board accept the plans and specifications submitted by Mason & Kahn, architects, for a new Engineering Building, provided a contract can be made for the work, at not more than $I20.000, and that the Secretary notify the Auditor General that the Board has set apart $I20,000 for said Engineering Building, and $Io,ooo for repairs in the Barbour Gymnasium. [In compliance with the foregoing resolution of the Board, the Secretary addressed the following letter to the Auditor General: HON. PERRY F. POWERS, AUDITOR GENERAL, LANSING, MICH.: Dear Sir: I am directed by the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan to transmit to your office a copy of the following resolution introduced by Regent Fletcher, and passed by the unanimous vote of the Board at their meeting held on the I4th inst.: Resolved, That the Board accept the plans submitted by Mason & Kahn, architects, of Detroit, for a new Engineering Building for this University, and that the sum of $I20,000 be and is hereby set aside for the construction of said building, and also the sum of $io,ooo for repairs in the Barbour Gymnasium; and that the Secretary be requested to notify the Auditor General's office of this action of the Board. Yours truly, JAMES H. WADE, Sec'V.]

Page  34 34 3MAIICHI MIEETING, 1902. On motion of Regent Fletcher; the Secretary was directed to advertise for bids for the construction of the Palmer Ward, according to the plans and specifications prepared by John Scott, architect, said bids to be submitted to the Board at the next meeting. On motion of Regent Butterfield, the report of the State Accountant, showing the result of an examination made by him of the books of the Treasurer of the University, was referred to the Finance Committee. Professor Demmon, who had been at work for nearly three years compiling a new General Catalogue of the Alumni of the University, reported that he had completed the work, and a copy of the book had been placed on the Regents' desks for inspection. On motion of Regent Butterfield, it was voted that the thanks of the Board are due to Professor Demmon for his untiring efforts to produce a book of rare value and excellence. On motion of Regent Fletcher, it was voted that $5,000 be set apart for the purpose of making certain changes in the Boiler House at University Hospital. On motion of Regent Hill, it was voted that holders of fellowships and scholarships are required to pay the matriculation fee (if not already paid), the annual fee, the diploma fee, laboratory expenses, and similar charges, the same as other students of the department in which their work lies. Regent Lawton presented and read the following communication from the Hon. D. M. Ferry: DETROIT, MICH., March 12, I902. To THE HONORABLE BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN: Having learned that the athletic field of the University now in use is inadequate for the outdoor recreation and exercise of the students as a body, and also that a more accessible field for the regular University games is desirable, I am pleased to make the following proposal to this Honorable Board, trusting thus to meet the need stated: I will purchase and present to the University of Michigan, if this Board shall be pleased to accept the same upon the conditions herein named, the following described lands to be used for athletic purposes in addition to and in connection with the present grounds, known as Regents' Field: Description: The lands lying between the north boundary of the present athletic field and Edwin Street, and bounded on the east by

Page  35 MARCH MEETING, 1902. 35 South State Street, and on the west by a line parallel to, andforty-five rods west of, State Street. D. M. FERRY, Per D. M. F., Jr. On motion of Regent Lawton, the Board requested the President to convey to Mr. Ferry their acceptance of his gift, and their high appreciation of his great generosity whereby it is now made possible for the whole student body to get much needed outdoor exercise; also, that hereafter the entire field shall be known as the Dexter M. Ferry Athletic Field. And that the board of control of athletics shall have the charge of said grounds. On motion of Regent Hill, it was voted that the dwelling house on the new athletic field be turned over to the Board of Control, for athletic purposes, until further action. On motion, the Board adjourned to Friday, April ii, I902. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

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Page  36

Page  37 APRIL MEETING. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, } ANN ARBOR, April 23, 1902. The Board assembled in the Regents' room at IO oclock A. M. Present, Regents Fletcher, Farr, Lawton, Dean, Sutton, and Carey. Absent, Regents Butterfield and Hill. The Secretary read the minutes of the last meeting, which were, on motion of Regent Dean, approved and ordered printed. Communications which had reached the President were placed in the hands of appropriate committees of the Board for consideration. The President presented and read the following communication from Librarian R. C. Davis: ANN ARBOR, MIICH., April 22, 1902. To PRESIDENT ANGELL: I have the pleasure of reporting to you, for the consideration of the Board of Regents, the following gifts to the Library: I. From Yale University, a set of the Yale Bicentennial Publications, 29 Vols. I quote the letter in which the gift is announced:YALE UNIVERSITY, SECRETARY'S OFFICE. NEW HAVEN, CONN., March I8, 1902. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN. Gentlemen: The President and Fellows of Yale University offer for the kind acceptance of the University of Michigan, the series of publications issued in connection with the Bicentennial Anniversary of the University, a list of which is here inclosed. Twenty-three volumes are now forwarded; the remainder will follow later. Very truly yours, ANSON PIIELPS STOKES, Jr., Secretary. 2. From Mr. William J. Howard, of Toronto, Canada, eighty volumes relating to the Society of Friends. The standard histories of the Society are represented in this collection, and the writings of the principal exponents of its doctrines. Our books of this kind were very few, and this addition to the number is highly appreciated. Mr. Howard presents them as a memorial of his late wife, Annie Halleck Kelsey Howard, a graduate of the Law Class of 1880. Very respectfully, RAYMOND C. DAVIS, Librarian. 37

Page  38 38 APuRIL MEETING, 1902. On motion, the Board requested the President to transmit their cordial thanks to the President and Fellows of Yale University, and to Mr. William J.- Howard, of Toronto, Canada, for their valuable gifts to the Library of this University. The following communication from Professor Gabriel Campbell, of Dartmouth College, was presented and read to the Board: DARTMOUTH COLLEGE, HANOVER, N. H., April 12, 1902. HON. JAMES H. WADE, SECRETARY OF BOARD OF REGENTS, UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN: Dear Sir: Accompanying this letter I forward to you, by express, the well-worn family Bible of Chancellor Tappan, the first President of Michigan University. During my student life in Germany, above thirty years ago, I conferred with President Tappan, who was then a resident of Frankfurt on the Main, in regard to the purchase of his private library for the University of Minnesota, where at that time I held the chair of Philosophy. Subsequently, as result of correspondence with Dr. Tappan, and with Judge Beakes, of Ann Arbor, his financial agent, the governing Board of Minnesota University requested me to proceed to Ann Arhor, and examine the books. President Tappan's library of nearly 3,000 volumes had been carefully stored in one of the business houses on Main Street. Mr. Vance, the obliging custodian, opened the boxes and afforded every facility to ascertain the character of the collection, which proved to be made up of choice editions, evidencing scholarly taste and wide learning in the selection. The offer for the library made by the Minnesota Regents was accepted. The books arrived in due time, and became the " Tappan Collection" in the Minnesota State University library. This was perhaps a natural sequence of the opening of the Minnesota University in 1867, when, following the recommendation of our Michigan President, which Minnesota had requested, two Michigan graduates were appointed to organize the University in that State. Finding that the Tappan family Bible contained the record of marriage and of the birth and death of his children, together with scripture and poetic quotations, in President Tappan's own handwriting, I secured the volume for my personal possession; and it has been preserved as one of my most precious treasures. I am assured, however, that the other Alumni and friends of my Alma Mater would prize highly this sacred memorial. It is therefore a deep and genuine pleasure to forego my own personal claim, and to entrust through you to the Governing Board of the University this center, divinely inspired, of the, home life of one of the noblest of men, who won for himself the profound admiration, the worshipful affection of a host of youthful hearts; and it proves to be an undiminishing love. You will pardon me then, if I entreat the honorable members of the Regents' Board, and as well those who in the coming years shall pre

Page  39 APR IL, MEETING, 1902. 39 side in their places, to conserve with a thoughtful care this hallowed representative of the early days. To the youth of the generations yet to be, even the broken binding may testify eloquently of the unbroken devotion to God's eternal truth of him who led our beloved Michigan Alma Mater to her recognized place, foremost among the State Universities. Please present to President Angell and the other gentlemen of the Board of Regents, assurances of my high esteem. And may a gracious Heaven continue to bless my Alma Mater. Very sincerely yours, GABRIEL CAMPBELL, '65. Professor of Philosophy. Regent Farr moved that the President be requested to convey to Professor Campbell the grateful acknowledgments of the Board for his gift of the family Bible of that great and good man, Chancellor Tappan, and that the book be placed in the General Library for safe-keeping. It was so ordered. Aldermen Hamilton and Coon addressed the Board in relation to the paving of State Street. They stated that the city would pave all street crossings, and pay twenty per cent of all paving between streets, and that the total cost to the University would not exceed $5000.00 for asphalt blocks. The Board voted unanimously to direct the Secretary to sign the petition for the Board, asking the City Council to do the work. Regent Dean moved that $250.00 be appropriated for the purpose of printing special announcements in the Literary Department. It was so ordered by a full vote. On motion of Regent Lawton, $73.00 was added to the budget of the Laboratory of Materia Medica in the Department of Medicine and Surgery, to cover a bill of goods of equal amount which was received too late to be paid from the budget of last year, and a corresponding amount from last year's budget was turned back into the general fund. On motion of Regent Lawton, the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery was conferred upon Frederick Aloysius Gill, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the College of Dental Surgery. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Secretary was directed to advertise for bids for the erection and completion of the new Engineering Building, as soon as he is notified by Professor Cooley and Mr. Reeve that the specifications are completed, and that the bids be returnable on the first day of June next.

Page  40 40 A PRIL MEE'TfNG, 1902. On motion of Regent Dean, the Senior Literary Class was granted permission to erect a drinking fountain on the campus as a class memorial. On motion of Regent Farr, it was voted to offer par for $35,000 Van Buren County four-per-cent bonds, as an investment for a part of the trust funds of the University. The Board then took a recess until 2 o'clock p. m. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock p. M. The following bids were received for the erection and completion of the Dr. A. B. Palmer Memorial Ward, for which the sum of $20,000 was named in the will of the late Love M. Palmer: Geering Bro's, D etroit......................................$27,660 A. Hild & Son, Detroit..................................... 25,975 Henry Carew & Co., Detroit............................. 26,900 Koch Bro's, Ann Arbor.................................... 24,395 Regent Fletcher moved that the Board accept the bid of Koch Bro's, and the Secretary be authorized to execute the contract; and that the Board appropriate the sum of $4,395.00 to supplement the bequest and cover the cost of the building. A call vote being taken resulted as follows: Ayes: Regents Fletcher, Lawton, Dean, Sutton, Carey. Nays: Regent Farr. Professor M. L. D'Ooge, executor of the Palmer estate, turned over to the Board $20,000, being a part of the amount bequeathed to the University by the late Love M. Palmer. On motion of Regent Farr the Secretary and Treasurer were directed to receipt to the executor for the amount named above. Regent Lawton moved that eight additional nurses be allowed University Hospital. Regent Farr moved to amend by making it four. There being no second to the original motion, the amendment prevailed, and the Superintendent was directed to provide for housing them outside the Hospital at a cost of not exceeding one dollar per week, each. On motion of Regent Farr, the Board adjourned to Thursday, May I5, at Io o'clock A. M. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  41 MAY MEETING. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, MICH., May 15, 1902. The Board assembled in the Regents' room at 10 o'clock A. M., full Board present. The Secretary read the minutes of the last meeting, which were, on motion of Regent Lawton, approved and ordered printed. Sundry communications which had reached the President were placed in the hands of the standing committees of the Board for consideration. Regent Fletcher moved to accept the proposal of the ShawKendall Engineering Company of Toledo, Ohio, to furnish one 66-inch, I6-foot, horizontal, tubular boiler for the Hospital plant, as per specifications, with fronts to match those of the other boilers in the same plant, for the sum of $I,040. The motion was carried by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher, an appropriation of $5,000 was made for the purchase of pipe, wire, sinks, and plumbing goods for the new Medical Building, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Secretary was authorized to pay John Scott & Co. the sum of $731.85, for services as Architect of the Palmer Ward, and $232.11 for the finish of the Woman's Building. By a unanimous vote of the Board, the Secretary was authorized to pay the Ridgway Dynamo and Engine Company $5,000 on account, for engine and dynamo furnished the University. On motion of Regent Butterfield, the Medical Committee of the Bo'ard were requested to investigate and ascertain the maximum number of patients each Hospital will accommodate, and report at the next meeting of the Board.. On motion of Regent Hill, Assistant Professor Pillsbury was 41

Page  42 42 MAY MEETING, 1902. granted leave of absence from June 2 to the close of the college year, for the purpose of going abroad. On the recommendation of Professor E. D. Campbell, Mr. Max Emil Mueller was appointed as holder of the Fellowship in Gas Engineering supported by the Michigan Gas Association, for one year. Librarian Davis reported that the Library had recently received from Dr. H. S. Jewett, of Dayton, Ohio, nineteen volumes of rare and valuable miscellaneous books. On motion of Regent Sutton, the President was requested to transmit the cordial thanks of the Board to Dr. H. S. Jewett, for his interest in, and valuable gift to, the Library of this University. On motion of Regent Hill, the leave of absence of Instructor J. S. P. Tatlock was extended for one year, to enable him to complete his work for the Doctor's degree at Harvard University. The President presented and read the following communication from Professor J. O. Reed: ANN ARBOR, MICH., April 2I, 1902. PRESIDENT JAMES B. ANGELL, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN: Dear Sir: I am requested by my brother-in-law, Dr. Harry McNeal, to present to the University Museum a collection of South American birds and butterflies, to be known as the Dr. Jessie Ruby McNeal Collection. Dr. Harry McNeal graduated from the Literary Department of this University in 1883, and from the Medical Department in 1900. His wife, Dr. Jessie Ruby McNeal, graduated from the Literary Department in I895, and from the Medical Department in I897. During the year 1901, Dr. McNeal and wife spent several months in travel in Europe and in South America. On their homeward voyage, Dr. Jessie Ruby McNeal was lost overboard from the steamship Belgenland, off Nantucket Shoals, November 24, 1901. The collection of birds comprises over one hundred specimens, representing some fifty different species. These were collected and prepared by Dr. McNeal and his wife during their stay in Paraguay. The collection of butterflies numbers some two hundred and forty specimens, representing about -- species. These were collected and prepared for Dr. McNeal by Dr. William Foster, of Asuncion, Paraguay. Very respectfully, JOHN 0. REED. On motion of Regent Carey, the President was requested to convey to Dr. Harry McNeal the cordial thanks of the Board f his gift of this valuable collecti n to the Museum.

Page  43 MAY MEETING, 1902. 43 Regent Lawton presented and read the following communication from the Superintendent of University Hospital: ANN ARBOR, MICH., May 14, 1902. MR. JAS. H. WADE, SEC'Y BOARD OF REGENTS, CITY: Dear Sir: The following nurses have successfully passed their examinations, entitling them to diplomas in the Training School for Nurses. Will you kindly bring this matter to the attention of the Board at the meeting to-morrow, that the diplomas may be authorized them, as the graduating exercises are set for June 4? Lurain Smith Tracy, Fleda Gertrude Dowell, Zada Chase, Inez Bates, Minnie L. Mead, Sarah Cooley Swift, Helen Christine Hirth, Inez Barton, Ruth Elizabeth Ellsworth, Zola Amanda Bailey, Nan F. Johnston, May Elmina Williams, Elsie Calkins, Addie Wood, Mabel Adelphia Williams. Respectfully, E. S. GILMORE, Supt. On motion of Regent Lawton, the President and Secretary were authorized to issue the proper certificates of graduation, and attach the seal of the University thereto. The President presented and read the following communication from Dr. Eliza M. Mosher: ANN ARBOR, MICH., March 14, 1902. TO THE HONORABLE, THE BOARD OF REGENTS, UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN: Gentlemen: Having completed the work of organization which I left my chosen profession six years ago to undertake, and believing that another can now be found to take the position which I have the honor to hold in the University, I hereby respectfully tender my resignation, to take effect October i, 1902. With great respect, ELIZA M. MOSHER. On motion of Regent Hill, the resignation of Dr. Mosher was accepted. On motion, the Board adjourned to to-morrow morning, at 9 o'clock.

Page  44 44 MAY MEETING, 1902. MORNING SESSION. The Board assembled at 9 o'clock. The Board then took up the budget, item by item, and after careful consideration it was approved as follows: BUDGET. Estimated receipts for the year I902-1903. One fourth mill tax..................................... $394,500.00 Students' fees.......................................... 202,500.00 Interest on endowment................................. 38,500.00 Homceopathic act....................................... 6,ooo.oo Summer Hospitals act.................................. 3,000.00 Receipts from University Hospital....................... 30,000.00 Receipts from Homceopathic Hospital................... 10,000.00 Receipts from sale of Dental supplies................. 4,000.00 Receipts from Summer school............................ 5,500.00 Receipts from Diplomas................................. 7,000.00 Receipts from sale of General Catalogue................. 2,500.00 Interest on Deposits....................................,000.00 Earnings of Engineering Shops......................... 400.00 $704,900.00 Estimated Expenditures. Department of Greek......................... $ I00.00 Half time of one Instructor........................ 600.00 Department of Latin........................... 200.00 Half time of one Instructor....................... 600.00 One set of Greek and Roman Portraits.... o o0...... 100.00 Department of German............................... I00.00 Increase of Prof. Winkler's salary................. 500.00 Promotion of Instructor Diekhoff................. 400.00 Department of French................................. Promotion of Prof. Levi...................... 400.00 Department of English................................. 50.00 Increase of Instructor Abbott's salary............... 30.00 Department of Mathematics............................ Instructor A. G. Hall to return at former salary, $1,200, one Instructor at $900 to be dropped.............. 300.00 Department of Political Economy........................ Duplicate Books.................................... 200.00 Additional Lecturers................................ 500.00 Department of Pedagogy.............................. Promotion of Prof. Whitney......................... 500.00 Department of Geology................................. 115.00 Specimens, $50; Maps, $50........................ Io0.00 Department of Botany.............................. 558.00 Microscopes....................................... 50.00 Promotion of Assistant Burns...................... 300.00 Botanical Garden................................. 300.00

Page  45 MAY MEETING, 1902. 45 Forestry.......................................... 475.00 Department of Zoology................................. 8oo.oo Other apparatus................................... 300.00 Promotion of Assistant Pearl........................ 400.00 Department of Philosophy.............................. 500.00 Department of Music.................................. 200.00 Increase of Prof. Stanley's salary................... 200.00 Department of History................................. 50.00 Increase of Instructor Cross's salary................ 300.00 Duplicate books.................................... 200.00 Department of American History........................ 50.00 One Assistant...................................... 500.00 Duplicate books.................................... 200.00 Department of Law..................................... 1,200.00 Increase of Professor Mechem's salary.............. I,000.00 Increase of Professor Wilgus's salary.............. 200.00 Expenses of delegate to Bar Association.............. 50.00 Guarantee fund. Law Journal....................... 800.00 Clerical help for Secretary.......................... 50.00 One Assistant Professor............................ 1,600.00 Deficit in Library budget........................... 220.00 Special lectures on Irrigation...................... 200.00 Increase of Instructor Dwyer's salary............... 300.00 Increase of Instructor Rood's salary................ 300.00 Department of Engineering, Dean's Office.............. 350.00 Secretary's office................................... 50.00 Professor Greene................................... 95.00 Department of Civil Engineering, Geodesy, and Surveying.. 750.00 Steel tapes....................................... 40.00 Models and cases, Professor Denison................0. 0oo.00 Instructor, summer work............................ I50.00 One Instructor, if needed........................... 900.o0 Promotion of Professor Campbell.................... 500.00 Case of Pigeon Holes to be made in shop.......... Mechanical Engineering................................ 710.00 Increase of Instructor Anderson's salary............ 300.00 Actual expenses of Instructor on tour of inspection, not to exceed........................................ 100.00 Marine Engineering................................ 177.00 Electrical Engineering............................. 640.00 Instructor, summer work........................... 200.00 One 20-horse power motor......................... 400.00 Promotion of Instructor Wrentmore................. 400.00 Engineering Shops................................... I,6oo.oo Increase of four shop Instructors, twenty-five cents per day for one year only........................... 300.00 Department of Semitics................................ I00.00 Museum.............................................. 500.00 Appointment committee................................ 300.00 Printing, postage, etc............................. 150.00

Page  46 46 MAY MEETING, 1902. Observatory........................................... 240.00 General Library...............................535.00 Salary of Miss G. M. Lane........................ 400.00 Salary of Miss A. Belser.......................... 400.00 One sewing-machine for bindery................... 140.00 Additional assistance............................. 750.00 Additional cataloguing............................ 500.00 Cases m ade in shop................................ Waterman Gymnasium.................................. 300.00 Increase of Director Fitzpatrick's salary............. 500.00 Barbour Gymnasium................................... 200.00 Increase of Dr. Synder's salary.................... 30 00 O ne assistant...................................... aoo.oo Mineralogy............................................ 50.00 Chemical Laboratory................................... 12,876.18 Deduct $2,500 if Physiological Chemistry is transferred to H ygiene...................................... Increase of Instructor Sullivan's salary............. 300.00 D uty, if needed.................................. 3 0.00 General Chem istry...................................... Increase of Instructor Hulett's salary.............. 300.00 Department of Physics..................................,I00.00. Dental Department..................................... 5,000.00 Quiz Master....................................... 300.00 Additional Demonstrator............................ 200.00 One Porcelain Furnace............................. 50.00 Medical Department.................................... 800.00 Increase of Novy's salary........................... 500.00 Additional Janitor in new building................. Laboratory of Hygiene................................. 2,500.00 Assistant for water analyses.......................... 30 00 Twelve m icroscopes................................ 700.00. Twelve balances................................... 360.00 One assistant in Bacteriology, in place of two resigned. Anatomical material................................ 2,000.00 Anatomical Laboratory................................. 435.00oo Histology......................................7.... 700.00 Fifteen microscopes............................. 60.oo Ophthalmology...................................... 50.00 Materia Medica....................................... 450.00 Additional equipment............................... 325.00 Theory and Practice.................................... 250.00 Special apparatus.................................. 365.00 Pathology............................................ 750.00 Surgical Laboratory and Clinic.......................... 577-00 One assistant..................................... I00.00 Dermatology...................................... 50.00 Diseases of women and children......................... 225.00 Laboratory assistant........................... 500.00 Instruments..................................... 75.00

Page  47 MAY MEETING, 1902. 47 Physiology............................................ 600.00 Increase of Assistant Bowen's salary................ 400.00 Electrotherapeutics.................................. 4I5.00 Nervous Diseases...................................... 197.00 University Hospital..................................... 30,000.00 One head nurse.................................... 540.00 Apparatus......................................... 400.00 Assistant head nurse to receive $40 per month during the absence of the head nurse..................... Homceopathic Hospital.................................. 4,000.00 Homceopathic College.................................. 500.00 Prof. T. C. Trueblood, to attend debates and oratorical contests, not to exceed.............................. I00.00 Printing the proceedings of Schoolmasters' Club.......... 70.00 Books for Libraries.................................. 15,000.00 Contingent expenses.................................... I0,000.00 Repairs............................................ 0,000.00 Fuel................................................ 25,000.00 Lights................................................ 4,500.00 Postage.............................................. 3,000.00 M iscellaneous printing.................................. 3,500.00 Sum m er School........................................ 8,500.00 Carpenter Shop supplies................................ 1,500.00 School inspection....................................... 700.00 Commencement expenses................................ 850.00 Diplomas............................................. 1,200.00 Care of team s.......................................... 1,200.00 W ater supply.......................................... 3,000.00 Electrical supplies...................................... 2,000.00 H eating supplies....................................... 2,000.00 Increase of G. D. W illcox's salary...................... I50.00 Increase of Fred East's salary.......................... I00.00 Increase of George Lutz's salary........................ o00.00 Increase of E. C. Burdick's salary....................... I50.00 Increase of R. Jones's salary........................... I00.00 General pay roll........................................ 365,42I.00 $568,226. i8 At the last meeting of the Board it was voted that the University offer par for $35,000 Van Buren County 4-per-cent bonds, as an investment for a part of the gift funds of the University. Regent Farr reported that the bid was accepted, and the University was in possession of $35,000 of said bonds. The Board voted to request Regent Farr to go to Omaha, Nebraska, and look over the property of the University in that city, with power to make such repairs as in his judgment may seem wise.

Page  48 48 MAY MEETING, 1902. Regents Farr and Hill were requested to investigate, and report on the advisability of the University investing a part of its gift funds in St. Louis Elevator bonds. The following promotions, appointments, and re-appointments were made by the unanimous vote of the Board, to take effect Oct. I, next: PROMOTIONS. Acting Professor Max Winkler, Ph.D., to Professor of the German Language and Literature, salary............... $2,500.00 Junior Professor Edward D. Campbell, B.S., to Professor of Chemical Engineering, salary......................... 2,500.00 Junior Professor Allen S. Whitney, A.B., to Professor of Pedagogy and Inspector of Schools, salary.............. 2,500.00 Assistant Professor Moritz Levi, A.B., to Junior Professor of French, salary....................................... 2,000.00 Instructor C. G. Wrentmore, M.S., to Assistant Professor of Descriptive Geometry and Drawing, salary.............. i,600.00 Instructor T. Diekhoff, Ph.D., to Assistant Professor of German, salary......................................,6oo.oo REAPPOINTMENT OF ASSISTANT PROFESSORS FOR THREE YEARS. J. L. Markley, Ph.D., Mathematics, salary................. $,6oo.oo J. O. Schlotterbeck, Ph.D., Pharmacognosy and Botany, salary. I,6oo.oo E. W. Dow, A.B., History, salary......................... I,6oo.oo C. H. Cooley, Ph.D., Sociology, salary...................... I,6oo.oo M. Gomberg, Sc.D., Organic Chemistry, salary..............,60o.oo J. A. Fairlie, Ph.D., Administrative Law, salary............,6oo.oo REAPPOINTMENT OF ASSISTANT PROFESSOR FOR SHORTER TIME. S. L. Bigelow, Ph.D., General Chemistry, until Professor Freer returns, salary.................................... $1,200.00 REAPPOINTMENT OF INSTRUCTORS FOR THREE YEARS. C. L. Meader, Ph.D., Latin, salary......................... $1,200.00 A. G. Hall, Ph.D., Mathematics, salary..................... 1,200.00 E. C. Sullivan, Ph.D., Analytical Chemistry, salary.......... 1,200.00 A. L. Cross, Ph.D., History, salary......................... I,200.00 G. A. Hulett, Ph.D., General Chemistry, salary.............. 1,200.00 H. C. Anderson, M.E., Mechanical Engineering, salary....... I,200.00 REAPPOINTMENT FOR ONE YEAR. W. L. Miggett, B.S., Supt. of Engineering Shops, salary..... $,600.00 INSTRUCTORS REAPPOINTED FOR ONE YEAR. S. J. Holmes, Ph.D., Zoology, salary....................... $900.00o J. Dieterle, A.B., German. salary.........................900..00 Alice L. Hunt, Drawing, salary............................ 900.00 Frederick L. Dunlap. Sc.D., Analytical Chemistry, salary.... 900.00 Edward B. Escott. M.S.. Mathematics, salary.............. 900.00

Page  49 MAY MEETING, 1902. 49 Wm. Marshall, M.S., Mathematics, salary.................. 900.00 Herbert D. Carrington, Ph.D., German, salary.............. 900.o Carl F. A. Lange, A.M., German, salary.................... 00oo.oo Colman D. Frank, Ph.B., French and Spanish, salary........ 900.00 Charles A. Davis, A.M., Forestry, salary.................... 00.00 Harrison M. Randall, Ph.M., Physics, salary................ 900.00 Joseph M. Thomas, Ph.B., English, salary................... 900.00 Wm. E. Bohn, A.M., English, salary....................... 900.00 Winthrop H. Chenery, A.M., French, salary................. 900.00 Clarence B. Morrill, B.L., English, salary................. '900.00 Carl E. Eggert, Ph.D., German, salary...........0........... g00o. John W. Scholl, A.B., German, salary.................... 900.00 Fred M. Green, B.S., Civil Engineering, salary............. 900.00 Royal A. Abbott, Ph.B., English, salary..................... 900.00 John C. Thorpe, B.S., Mechanical Engineering, salary........ 900.00 INSTRUCTORS APPOINTED FOR ONE YEAR. Duane E. Stuart, Ph.D., Greek and Latin, salary........... $I,200.00 Raymond Pearl, A.B., Zoology, salary..................... 900.00 OTHER APPOINTMENTS. FOR ONE YEAR. H. S. Smalley, A.B., Assistant in Economics, salary........ $500.00 D. W. Springer, B.S., Lecturer on Science of Accounts, salary 500.00 On motion, the Board adjourned to Tuesday, June 17, at TO o'clock A. M JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

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Page  50

Page  51 JUNE MEETING. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, June 17, I902. S The Board assembled in the Regents' room at Io o'clock A. M.; full Board present except Regents Butterfield and Sutton. The Secretary read the minutes of the last meeting, which were, on motion of Regent Lawton, approved and ordered printed. Communications which had reached the President were referred to the standing committees of the Board for consideration. The Zoological Department gave notice that a gift of $50 was received from Mr. Bryant Walker, of Detroit, to pay the tuition of a student during the summer session, at the Marine Biological Laboratory, at Woods Hole, Mass. On motion, the President was requested to transmit the thanks of the Board to Mr. Walker. The President presented and read the following communication from Professor Rolfe: ANN ARBOR, MICH., June 5, I902. To THE HONORABLE, THE BOARD OF REGENTS: Dear Sirs: Having accepted a professorship of Latin in the University of Pennsylvania, I hereby offer you my resignation of my professorship in the University of Michigan, to take effect at the end of the present academic year. I wish to thank you for the favors which I have received from you during my connection with the University of Michigan, and to assure you that I shall always feel a strong personal interest in the fortunes of the University. Respectfully yours, JOHN C. ROLFE. On motion of Regent Hill, the resignation of Professor Rolfe was accepted. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the consideration of the bids on the Engineering Building was made the special orfder for 2 o'clock P. M. 51

Page  52 52 2JUNE MEETING, 1902. Communications were received from the several Faculties, recommending candidates for the degrees to be conferred on commencement day, and on motion of the chairmen of the appropriate committees, the recommendations were approved and the degrees ordered to be conferred as indicated in the lists given below, by the full vote of the Board: CANDIDATES FOR DEGREES. Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts. BACHELOR OF ARTS. Hugh E. Agnew, Lucius Ephraim Allen, Clara Janet Allison, Francis Miller Bacon, D.D.S., Mary Jeannette Bain, Ella May Baldwin, Frederick Amos Baldwin, M.D., Bessie Laura Barber, Carrie Anna Barber, Julius Earle Barton, Edson Sunderland Bastin, Ernest Sutherland Bates, David Elijah Beardsley, Beatrice Ollie Belford, John Alonzo Bennett, Robert Louis Benson, Charles Lorton Best, Ruth Ellen Blackman, Faye Bodmer, Jessie Partridge Boswell, Lucy Margaret Brooksbank, Amy Louisa Broome, Etta Neville Brown, Forest Buffen Harkness Brown, Henry Jefferson Brown, Jr., Jesse Webster Coe Brown, Thomas Ross Brown, Arthur Graham Browne, Dora Gilberg Buchhalter, Mia Elizabeth Buckingham, Thomas Bingham Buell, Jr., George Gathwaite Burns, Philip Everette Bursley, Chal:-s Sumner Bush, Edith Mary Carey, Jesse Bryant Carpenter, Charles Howard Carrick, Herbert Porter Carrow, Katherine Forrest Chapman, Clara Abigail Chase, Adelaide Winifred Childs, Sara Gertrude Chubb, William Henry Harrison Clayton, May Belle Coldren, May Frances Conlon, Vera Nancy Connor, Otis Merriam Cope, Frank William Copley, Lizzie May Corey, B.S., Olivet College, John Francis Cotter, Granville Malcom Cox, John Hunt Crosby, Frederick William Cummer, Edna Florence Cumming, Nora Felicia Dake, George Green Damon. Louise Marie Davis, Robert Dawson, Genevieve Decker, Nellie Marian DeLaForce, Mary Leone Dennis, Henri Pierre de Pont, Fred Gray Dewey, Margaret Nora Dodds, John Arnold Doelle, Harry Shurtleff Durant, Lucy Jeannette Durfee, Laura Lucile Eames, Orrin Kinsley Earl,

Page  53 JUNE MEETING, 1902. 53 Gertrude Agnes Edwards, Daniel Irvin Elder, John Alexander Elliott, Ralph Henry Elsworth, Ralph David Engle, Mary Jane Erwin, Curtis Evans, Teresa Elizabeth Evans, Gertrude Claire Falk, Florence Fallass, Frances Indiana Farr-, Lillian Mae Farthing, Abram Henry Felker, Lauretta May Ferguson, Mary Ellen Ferris, Ida May Finley, Florence Sara Fisher, Walter Turner Fishleigh, Richard Louis Flynn, Walter Wright Fox, Auguste Richard Frank, Bernice Frederick, Charles Edwin Galloway, Allen Wynand Gardener, Isabel Grace Gay, Willis Lord Gelston, Adelaide Gemberling, Harry Gerber, Sarah Eleanor Gibson, Neva Julia Gilbert, Selma Gilday, Verna Elzada Glascock, Clarence Samuel Gorsline, M.D., Gladys Mary Graham, Stanley Richard Granger, Chester Higbee Griggs, Orel Samuel Groner, B.S., Mich. Agricultural College, Arthur Kent Hanchett, Martin Hanson, Verna Louise Harris, Caroline Campbell Harvey, Xenia Beatrice Haskins, John Frederick Haussman, Julia Wright Heath, Earl Heenan, Jessie Josephine Heller, William Henry Herrnstein, Eva Amelia Hillman, Emma Noble Holbrook, Ida Louise Holden, Richard Dennis Teall Hollister, Frank Sylvester Honberger, Clara May Hosie, Mary Frances Houston, Theresa Florence Hummel, Harriett Adelle Hurrey, Roscoe Burhans Houston, Anna Katherine Hutchenreuther, Mary Florence Jacoby, Estelle Calphernia Jenney, Julia V. Johnson, Roy Howard Johnson, Thomas Henry Keeshan, Dora lone Keller, Mortimer Bailey Kennedy, Fannye S. Kerngood, Dan Arnold Killian, Carl Otto Kloepfer, Ezra Charles Knapp, Amy Lydia Krolik, Emma Ellen Larson, Nellie Leona LaVigne, Louise Mueller Lenhart, David J. Levy, Harry Martin Limbach, Benjamin Chester Loder, Sidney Lyon, Edith Lucia Lyons, Nellie Mabel McCormick, Rosa McDougall, Ph.B., Hillsdale College, Mabel Estelle McGraw, A.B., Saint Mary's College, Carl Hugh McLean, B.Ag., Iowa State College, Ph.M., ibid., Ralph Van Deman Magoffin, Ellen Viola Maher, Frank Burr Marsh, Lucile Virginia Matchett, Charles Salmon Matthews, Howard Adleman Matthews, Frank Mayr, Jr., Augusta Barbara Meiser, Harry Miltz Mess, Clarabel Milliman, Owen Joseph Mink, Jessie Jean Mitchell, Conrad Henry Moehlman, Edgar McClelland Moore,

Page  54 54 JUNE MEETING, 1902. Livia Annette Moore, Grace Foote iviorehouse, Lena Lee Morey, Max Emil Mueller. James Frederick Munson, Edwin Spencer Murray, Margaret Parthenia Murrell, Elmer A. Myers, Thomas Emory Newcomer, Aaron G. Newell, Bessie Amalie North, Ralph Clarke Nowland, Edwin Prime Nutting, Bertha von Verson O'Brien, Eleanor Taylor Oliver, David Olson, Josephine Gertrude Osborne, James Edward O'Sullivan, Christopher Gregg Parnall, Hugh Morton Parrish, Florence Peters, James Taft Pilcher, Frank Fraser Potter, Luella Jane Read, Robert Uriah Redpath, Arthur Patterson Reed, Mary Virginia Rice, 'Henry Jasper Richmond, Clarence Bingham Ripley, Jessie Louise Roe, Louise Marie Roesch, Augustus Henry Roth, Camilla Teresa Ryan, Ross T. Sanford, Dorothy Mae Sass, Philip Louis Schenk, Edith Louise Scheurman, George Fontaine Schmid, Daniel Dwight Schurtz, Ruth Gage Scott, Laura Kinne Seeley, Elisha Sipke Sevensma, Mary Stewart Seymour, Gem Sherman, Ruth Mabel Sinclair, Charles Herschel Sisam, Flora Slayton, Herbert Caldwell Smith. Ira Orval Smith, Etta Northey Snell, Neil Worthington Snow, Albert Alexander Snowdon, Edna Gai Solis, David Louis Stern, Sybil Aylsworth Stewart, Lyman Edgar Stoddard, Carrie Lucile Stone, Florence Elizabeth Stryker, Alice Kerr Sturm, Clarence Eugene Sutliff, Cora Emma Taber, Earle Melvin Terry, Clarence Fred Thompson, Edith Edna Todt, Herbert Carmi Tooker, Bessie Rebecca Trowbridge, Claude Thorne Tuck, James Turner, Scott Turner, Leslie Ullrich, Clifford Brewster Upton, Stuart Wells Utley, Edward Curtis Van Duzer, Charles Van Keuren, Frank Van Vliet, John Walter Vaughan, Oscar William Voedisch, Lucia Isabelle Voorhees, Bella Jane Walker, Mattie Louisa Waterman, Earle Wayne Webb, Melville Samuel Welt, Harry Augustus Weston, Edith Adeline Wheeler, Milo Armstrong White, Jacob Howard Merton Wiest, Alice Emily Wilcox, Merlin Ludlow Wiley, Henry Wyatt Willis, John Arthur Winter, John Walter Woodhams, Bernice Worth, Fannie Louise Young, Kate Blanche Young, Marie Zimmerman. 260

Page  55 JUNE MEETING, 1902. 55 MASTER OF ARTS. Paul Agnew, B.L., Hillsdale Col- Harry Edwin King, B.L., lege, Otto Charles Marckwardt, A.B., Robert Earle Anthony, A.B., South- Felicitas Mareck, B.L., University western Baptist University, of Minnesota, Henry Herbert Armstrong, A.B., John Castelar Parker, B.S., Lois LeBaron Avery, B.L., Julia Magruder Phillips, A.B., Samuel Bauman, B.L., German John William Scholl, A.B., Wallace College, Marvin Manam Sherrick, A.B., Coe Mary Ella Bennett, Ph.B., College, John Knight Munro Berry, A.B., Flora Ann Sigel, Ph.B., Kenyon Leech Butterfield, B.S., Mabel Alice Steward, A.B., Bates Mich. Agr. College, College, Alvin Nelson Cody, B.S., Albion Mary Courtland Vanderbeek, A.B., College, Smith College, Ruie Ann Connor, Ph.B., Elizabeth May Vickers, A.B., Univ. Albert Robinson Crittenden, A.B., of Kansas, David D. Culler, Ph.B., De Pauw Lawrence Root Waldron, B.S., University, North Dakota Agr, College, Colman Dudley Frank, Ph.B., Agnes Wegener, A.B., NorthwestFred Fullerton, B.S., Alma College, ern University, M.S., ibid., Lewis Hart Weld, A.B., UniverIda Augusta Green, Ph.B., Oberlin sity of Rochester, College, Mary Bessie Wiley, A.B., Antioch Arthur Joseph Hoare, A.B., College. Irving Benjamin Hunter, A.B., Jane E. Work, B.L., Jessie Gertrude Jennings, A.B., Theophil John Zimmerman, A.B. 35 DOCTOR OF SCIENCE. Joseph William Tell Duvel, B.S., Ohio State University. i DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY. Edwin Newton Brown, A.M., L.L.B.,Harlow Stafford Person, A.M., Charles Edward Marshall, Ph.B., Raymond Haines Pond, M.S., KanYoshinaga Mikami, Keio College, sas Agr. College, Aura Maud Miller, A.M., Harrison McAllester Randall, Ph.M. Raymond Pearl, A. B., Dartmouth 8-304 College, Department of Engineering. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (IN MARINE ENGINEERING). Ernest Charles Stroebe. I BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING). William Ninde Chaffee, Otto Sorg Schairer, A.B., Adolphus Mansfield Dudley, William Davidson Shaw, Ray Philip Jackson, Warren Merle Vandersluis, Merritt Charles McNeil, Floyd Jerome Wood. Albert Pruessman, 9

Page  56 JUNE MEETING, 1902. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING). Aikman Armstrong, Homer Britton, Charles Vaughn Conover, Ward Arnold Detwiler, Robert Morrison Hall, William Sylvester Hazelton, Fred Merriam Hopkins, Henry Imhof, Roscoe Bradbury Jackson, Edmund Peaslee Kinne, Forest Henry Lancashire, John Elmer Linabury, Percy William Martin, A.B., Ralph Moross Roosevelt, David Dennis Starr, Louis Napoleon Udell. i6 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (IN CIVIL ENGINEERING). Arthur Merritt Barrett, Arthur Hart Bennett, Chason Winslow Brooks, John Leo Dickey, Harry Fayette Johnson, Roylance Russell McCloy, Robert Hall Merrill, Frederick Charles Wilson. 8 MASTER OF SCIENCE. Harry J. Sproat, B.S. CIVIL ENGINEER. Clarence Warren Noble, B.S., Clarence George Wrentmore, M.S. 2-37 Department of Medicine and Surgery. DOCTOR OF MEDICINE. Ralph Clark Apted, B.S., Albert Julius Geiger, Patience Bourdeau Archer, Frank James Gibson, Norman Irving Baker, John Henry Gilpin, Frederic Peter Benjamin Bender, John Albert Gray, Aileen Marjory Betteys, Arthur Emery Greene,. Oscar Henry Bruegel, John Goold Harvey, Austin Frederick Burdick, A.B., Sidney Zell Herbert, Charles Wesley Burgwin, John Bennett Herff, Charles Ernest Clark, A.B., Dart- Henry Albert Herzer, Ph.C., mouth College, Harry Hiram Hewitt, Grace M. Clarke, Albert Edward Hillis, Prentiss Bowden Cleaves, John Newell Holcomb, Richard D. Clippinger, A.B., Ken- Walter Sanford Holmquist, yon College, Leonard Counsellor Honesty, A.B., James Harry Cox, Edward Vernard Howlett, Harold Medoris Doolittle, Jane Catherine Hughes, George A. Downs, B.S., Purdue Perry Robert Hungerford, University, Cecil McKee Jack, Ph.B., William J. Durant, Sarkis P. Jamgotchian, Ph.B., TayAlice Barker Ellsworth, lor University, Carl Meridith Erb, Clyde Watkins Jump, B.S., William Albert Evans, Thomas Victor Keene, Burdette Serage Frary, Neal Kellogg, Clark Betern Fulkerson, Theron Sparhawk Langford,

Page  57 JUNAE MEETING, 1902. 57 George William Lawton, Robert Owen LeBaron, B.S., Harold James Levis, Francis William Lockwood, Harry Stowe McGee, William E. McNamara, Russel Ross Marble, B.S., Mich. Agr. College, Thomas Philip Martin, Ralph Luther Morse, Roger Sylvester Morris, A.B., Harry Kavanaugh Morrison, Frederick Henry Newberry, Charles Frederick Nieder, Donald Platt Osborne, Thomas Woodburn Paton, Charlei Lanphier Patton, Velura Elma Powell, Katherine Jane Rayl, Clarence Bingham Ripley, Clifford Clarence Robinson, George Fred Ronneburger, Frederick William Sauer, Ph.G., Northern Indiana School of Pharmacy, Harry Arthur Schirrmann, Francis Lavelle Smith, Frank Robert Spencer, Henry Morris Spofford, Hannah Ophelia Staufft, A.M., Bucknell University, Charles Edward Street, A.B., Williams College, John Backus Taylor, B.S., Frank Hartwell Thomas, Lynn J. Tuttle, Charles Adam Ulmer, Victor Clarence Vaughan, Jr., A.B., Raymond Abraham Wallace, B.S., Carleton College, Charles Curtis Wallin, A.B., William Daniel Whitten. Orlando Curtis Wicks, Emily Jane Widdecombe, Edwin Richard Williams, Edward Augustus Willis, Charles Webb Yarrington. 85 Department of Law. BACHELOR OF LAWS. Barnie Alexander, Ben A. Bickley, Delos Andrew Alig, Frank Luther Bihlmeier, Winfred Murrell Alston, David Bonar Bird, Edward Williams Amsden, Clifford Alonzo Bishop, Harry Ruthven Archbald, Charles Fred Bliss, Anthony Marion Arntson, Joseph D. Blunt, William Fleming Atterholt, A.B., Menno Boersema, Mount Union College, Norman Turner Boose, John William Bailey, Orrin Medberry Bowen, Nathan Edgar Bailey, George Austin Breaden, Orlando Herbert Baker, Harlan Paul Briggs, Oscar William Baker, Roy Frank Britton, Clarence Wesley Barber, Archie Broomfield, Lee Thomas Barkenbus, Charles Eggleston Brown, Horace Thomas Barnaby, Jr., John Breton Brunot, William Frederick Basler, James Henry Burgess, Frederick Barnard Bassmann, Wilber Newton Burns, Carter Braxton Bearss, Harry William Cable, Jose Eladio Benedicto, A.B., Mad- Roscoe Call, rid University, Ira Alexander Campbell, B.L., Manuel Raul Benedicto, A.B., Mad- Leander Randall Canfield, Ph.B., rid University, Ohio State University,

Page  58 58 JUNE MEETING, 1902. Harry Montague Carpenter, Gaylord Harold Case, Wilbur Kenyon Chamberlin, William Newton Chambers, Gilford Arthur Chappell, William J. Clark, Duane Perry Cleghorn, Dayton W. Closser, Charles Francis Clyne, Joseph Robert Collier, Jr., Ward Burroughs Connine, George Washington Bryant Conrad, James Ernest Converse, Bernard Thomas Corrigan, Harry Crosby Cotter, John Alexander Craig, Charles Sylvanus Crane, Bryant Scofield Cromer, Avon Horace Crook, John Dalton, John Fletcher Davis, Frederick Wilson Defoe, John Lorraine DeGroot, Marinus Den Herder, Ernest Albert Densmore, Andrew Donovan, Major Alexander Downing, Charles Bruce DuBois, Joseph Henry Dunnebacke, Harvey Stowe Durand, Frank Hector Dusenbury, Wayne Hamilton Dyer, Frederic Jefferson Eaton, David Garfield Einstein, Edward Walton Eskridge, Gordon Daniel Eveland, Ora Earl Farnham, Edwin Faull, William Harry Faust, Grad. U. S. Naval Academy, Louis A. Feibel, Arthur Ivan Field, Jose Edvardo Figueras, William Augustine Findlay, Charles Wesley Firke, Arthur Michael FitzGerald, Michael G. Flaherty, Lewis Fogle, James Edward Forrest, Edward Delos Foster, Walter Seymour Foster, B.L., Claude Colville Frazer, Oscar Friedrich, Richard Gailey, Walter Winfred Garnhart, Frederick Gates, Americo de J. Geigel, A.B., Institute of Porto Rico, Myer Geleerd, Samuel Reginald Goldsmith, John Maxwell Gould, William Arthur Grimshaw, Edward T. Grua, Rafael Guillermety, A.B., University of Barcelona, Frederick Charles Hack, A.B., University of Chicago, Shirley Ray Hadley, Robert Emmet Haley, Willard Hanson, Kirk Hawkins, Earl Bedford Hawks, Asa Kingsbury Hayden, William Lionel Heap, Fred Edward Helwig, Guy Josephus Hely, George James Hibbard, Andrew Napoleon Hildebrand, Ivan Roy Hill, Harry Edwin Hobart, Clarence Sanford Holmquist, Craig Alexander Hood, Percy Hilton Howe, Bert Lloyd Hubbell, Robert Smith Hunter, Eugene Osbert Irish, A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University, Alonzo Blair Irvine, Henry Francis Jacob, Ph.B., George John Jochem, Richard Saxe Jones, Harry Snader Kessler, B.S., University of Omaha, Clyde William Ketcham, Charles Harry King, Edward Michael Kirchen, Benjamin Hamilton Kizer, George Henry Klein, William Henry Klose, James Chester Knight,

Page  59 JUNE MEETING, 1902. 59 Cassius McClellan Knowles, Carl Homer Pelton, A.B., Theodore Koffel, William Henry Pendell, Charles Denniston Kountz, Fred Wirt Potter, Walter Emery Lancaster, B.S., Malcolm Barton Proper, Knox College, Asahel Jay Read, Oliver Wolcott Latham, William Addison Riner, A.B., Univ. Thomas Ambrose Lawler, of Southern California, Lewis Cass Lawson, B.L., W. Va. Charles LeRoy Robertson, University, Thomas Linton Robinson, Ph.B., Harry Oscar Ledgerwood, Clifford Griffith Roe, B.L., Frank Kingsley Leighton, Jesse Hart Root, Lewis Walter Leisenring, Oran Burnam Root, George Edward Leonard, Lloyd Alton Rowland, A.B., OuaLawrence Lafayette Lewis, B.S., chita College, Northern Indiana Normal Amasa Miller Rust, School, Arthur Houston Ryall, Guy Carpenter Lillie, Broussaix Sallee, Alexander Lindsay, Jr., Joseph Thomas Schiappacasse, A.B., William Arthur Love, B.S., Knox Saint Mary's College, College, Henry Edward Schmiedeskamp, Roy Myron Ludlum, Clarence Childs Schmohl, Willard Hayes Lyon, Edwin Lee Schooler, Donald Barnum McAlpine, Clinton Miranda Searl, George Frederick McAulay, A.B., William Charles Seefeld, Ohio Normal University, Abram William Sempliner, Homer James McBride, Abram Griffith Senior, Nathan William MacChesney, Gustavus Adolphus Shallberg, Charter Oak McCray, Edgar Sharp, John Francis McDonough, Thomas Hall Shastid, A.B., HarWilliam Clarence McHenry, yard University, M.D., UniChristian Ellsworth McNemar, versity of Vermont, A.M., B.S., Eureka College, Walter White Shaw, Duncan McPherson, Jr., Lloyd Montgomery Shepard, Margaret McVean, David John Sholes, Curtis Asa Manchester, A.B., North-John Siggins, Jr., eastern Ohio Normal College, Milton Newberger Simon, Harry Dean Mann, Louis George Slaughter, John Alfred Mansfield, Albert Elwood Snow, Roy Darwin Matthews, Harry Algernon Souther, Philip Starkey Maycock, Almon Clark Spencer, Leonard Othello Meigs, Robert Edmund Springett, Richard Robert Mitchell, Robert Louis Stanley, Fleming Nevin, Arthur Dickey Stansell, B.L., Charles Peregrine Noon, Gustav Stein, Leroy Northrup, John Jar Sterling, Frank Joseph O'Brien, Arthur Benjamin Stern, Andrew Joseph O'Conor, Ward Alerton Stevens, Gustavus Adolphus Ohlinger, A.B.,Herman LeRoy Stevens, B.S., Lyle Burton Orr, Samuel Frederick Stewart, Leslie Peck, Frederic Hubert Stone,

Page  60 60 JUNE MEETING, 1902. Joseph Homer Sullivan, Arthur William Taylor, Isaac Daniel Taylor, A.B., Uni sity of Kansas, Verner Taylor, Daniel TenCate, Daniel Hadlond Thomas, Percy Folsom Thomas, Arthur Scott Thompson, Delino Henry Thompson, Vernal Emery Thompson, John William Titcomb, James Alexander Veasey, Louis La Moron Wallace, John Anthony Ward, Lyford Wilson Warfield, B.L., George Orvil Warner, George Crittenden Watson, Jr. Harrison Samuel Weeks, Vernon Dwight Wells, Charles Fillmore Welsh, B. Geneva College, Oswald Fritz Wencker, Edward Speer White, A.B., State \ver- University of Iowa, Hugh White, Ph.B., Herbert Porter Whitney, A.B., Amherst College, Clarence Chauncy Wightman, B.S., Northern Indiana Normal School, Wilbur Davis Wilkin, Burt James Williams, A.B., Doane College, John Webb Willmott, A.B., State College of Kentucky, Ebin Wilson, Floyd Arthur Wilson, William Henry Wilson, Daniel Wallace Woodard, Roy Church Woodworth, B.L., Roscoe Tracy York, S., Edward Russel Young. 256 MASTER OF LAWS. Stonewall Jackson Dodson, LL.B., Cumberland University, LL.B. 1-257 School of Pharmacy. PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMIST. Hugh Alexander Clotworthy, William L. Dawson, William Edmund Dillon, Charles Ralph Eckler, Casriel Fishman, James Howard Flagg, Frank Ice Hard, Martin Edgar Luther, Arthur George Lyon, Arthur Leo Randall, Silas Franklin Scott, B.S., Mich. Agricultural College, Helmer William Smidt, Ph.G., Purdue University, Arthur Garfield Smith, Homer Charles Washburn, Harold Cole Watkins. 15 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (IN PHARMACY). Walter Henry Blome, Ph.C., Louis Theodor Wilhelm Hogrefe, Herbert William Emerson, Ph.C., Ph.C. 3-18 Homceopathic Medical College. DOCTOR OF MEDICINE. Harley Armand Haynes, Harry Lyman Imus, Carl Emil Johnson, George Cantwell Lamb, Frederick Henry Mosher Long, M.D., Chicago Homoeopathic C(gcge, Roy Joseph Pelton, Fred Johnston Schulz. 7

Page  61 JUNE MEETING, 1902. 61 College of Dental Surgery. DOCTOR OF DENTAL SURGERY. John Frederick Allen, Morris Aloysius Anglim, Clarence Charles Bowen, Russell Welford Bunting, John Oscar Butler, Edward Beach Caldwell, Ralph Aretus Calkin, James Rolland Cannan, B.S., TriState Normal College, Fred Martin Capron, George Chalmers, Charles Jeffrey Colling, Walter Leon Crego, Frank Leo Cunningham, Lewis Ward Curtis, Percy Lewis Day, William Dick, William Patrick Finlan, Perry Layfield Fritz, William Fuller Gates, William Edward Haller, Charles Adams Hawley, Cyrus B. Hayner, Frederick Louis Hermann, Harold Lee Howver, Matthew Edward Kearney, William Charles Kinietz, Joseph Henry Kirby, Stanley Morris Kirby, Harry Gardner Kittell, Arthur Barnard Lawson, Arthur William Lewis, Carlos Joseph Light, William Millard Lyle, George Malcom Madden, Stuart Anthony Mercer, Allan Singleton Moore, Hugh Edwin Neelands, Arthur John Norman, Lura Frances Owen, Harry Oliver Quackenbush, Fred Sterner Randles, Shirley Abner Randolph, Orrin Riemenschneider, Eldred George Robbins, Guy Porter Saville, Maurice George Skinner, Andrew Gregor Smith, Shilon Selwyn Smith, Ernest Edgar Snow, Frank Rutherford Snow, Roy Lee Spaulding, William Frederick Spies, George Albert Stegeman, James Robert Stewart, Edwin Freeman Swinehart, Clarence George Taylor, B.S., Worcester Polytechnic Institute, M.E., ibid., Henry Wensel Tobias, Frank Vandeburg, Ph.B., Vern Margaret Van Fossen, Otto Clemens Vogeli, Marcus Llewellyn Ward, Louis Gordon Watkins, Charles Morris Welch, William Henry Weybright, Jonathan Charles Whatley, Frank Henry Wilkinson, Frank Edwin Williams, Albert Croswell Wilson, Eric Zincke. 69 Total number of candidates, 777. On motion of Regent Lawton, the title of Professor E. D. Campbell was made Professor of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Chemistry. On recommendation of the Director of the Chemical Laboratory, and on motion of Regent Lawton, the following appointments were made in that Department, for one year:

Page  62 62 JUNE MEETING, 1902. Walter H. Blome, B.S., to be Assistant in Pharmacy, salary.... $300.00 Hobart H. Willard, Assistant in Qualitative Analysis, salary... I50.00 Henry W. Berger, Assistant in Organic Chemistry, salary...... Ioo.oo Francis D. Shenk, Assistant in Analytical Chemistry, salary.... ioo.oo Mortimer B. Kennedy, A.B., Assistant in Quantitative Analyses, salary........................................ 200.00 Frank S. Honberger, A.B., Assistant in Chemical Technology, w ithout salary...................................... Leonard D. Haigh, B.S., Assistant in Organic Chemistry, salary. 200.00 The Auditing Board were authorized to employ a dispensing helper in the Chemical Laboratory, at $25 per month, for ten months. On motion of Regent Farr, the following reappointments were made in the Law Department for the next college year, by the full vote of the Board: John W. Dwyer, Instructor in Law, salary................... $I,200.00 John R. Rood, Instructor in Law, salary................... 1,200.00 Judge Henry H. Swan, non-resident Lecturer, salary........ 350.00 Dr. Melville M. Bigelow, non-resident Lecturer, salary...... 500.00 John B. Clayberg, non-resident Lecturer, salary............. 300.00 Frank F. Reed, non-resident Lecturer, salary................ 00oo.oo Albert H. Walker, non-resident Lecturer, salary............. 300.00 Dallas Boudeman, non-resident Lecturer, salary.............. 500.00 Harlow P. Davock, non-resident Lecturer, salary............ 100.00 Gertrude E. Woodard, Assistant Law Librarian, salary....... 900.00 Charles R. Loomis, Assistant in Law Library, salary......... 300.00 Resident Lecturers without salary: Professor A. C. McLaughlin, Dr. V. C. Vaughan, Professor Richard Hudson, Professor H. C. Adams, Dr. W. J. Herdman, and Professor J. H. Drake. On motion of Regent Farr, $200 was appropriated for expenses of foreclosure of two mortgages belonging to the Bates Fund, on property in Omaha, Nebraska. Regents Farr and Hill, special committee appointed to investigate and report as to the advisability of the University investing a part of its gift funds in the bonds of the St. Louis Elevator Company, reported that in their judgment it was unwise to do so. On motion of Regent Hill, Mr. Herman W. March was appointed Assistant in Astronomy for one year, salary $300. On motion of Regent Hill, it was voted that Dr. Alice G. Snyder be given the title of Director of the Barbour Gymnasium. On motion of Regent Hill, Mr. A. M. Clover was appointed

Page  63 JUNE MEETING, 1902. 63 Instructor in General Chemistry for one year, salary $900; and Assistant Professor S. Lawrence Bigelow was continued as Acting Director of the Laboratory of General Chemistry until Professor Freer's return, he to be paid from the general fund at the rate of $I,600 per year. Regent Hill presented and read the following communication from Parke, Davis & Co., of Detroit: DETROIT, MICH., U. S. A., April 21, I902. DR. S. LAWRENCE BIGELOW, CHEMICAL LABORATORY, UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, MICH. Dear Sir: We beg leave to acknowledge receipt of your communication of the 29th ult., addressed to the Chief of our Analytical Department, and to express in reply the willingness of our Board of Directors to continue for another year the Parke, Davis & Co. Fellowship (October, 1902, to June, I903). Our preference is to have the Fellowship disposed of, and its beneficiary selected in the manner previously followed. Please, therefore, consider yourself at liberty to make such announcement as may seem to you fitting. Assuring you that it gives us no ordinary pleasure to offer this testimony of our admiration for the University and its great work, we remain, Very sincerely yours, PARKE, DAVIS & CO. On motion, the President was requested to transmit to Parke, Davis & Co., the cordial thanks of the Board. On motion of Regent Hill, an appropriation of $Ioo was made to pay the traveling expenses of Instructor Glover, in visiting the large Insurance Companies of the country, for the purpose of securing information relating to the application of Mathematics to the problem of Insurance, in connection with the higher commercial courses in the University. Regent Hill Dresented and read the following communication from the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and the recommendation therein contained was approved by the Board: ANN ARBOR, MICH., June 16, 1902. To THE HONORABLE, THE BOARD OF REGENTS: Gentlemen: I have the honor to report that the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts recommend to you: That the $50.00 required to be deposited with the treasurer by the candidates for the Doctorate degrees as a guarantee for the publication

Page  64 64 JUNE MEETING, 1902. of their thesis, be forfeited to the University if the thesis is not published within two years after the conferring of the degree. Respectfully submitted, P. R. DEPONr, Registrar. On motion of Regent Hill, Mr. Maurice G. Fulton, A.M., Assistant to Professor Scott, and holder of the Pilgrim Fellowship last year, was reappointed for one year, with a salary of $300, by the full vote of the Board. Regent Hill stated that during the last college year, the sum of $450 was allowed the department of English for correcting essays. As the work is unduly heavy,, he moved that the full time of an instructor be allowed for this work, and that the salary be $900 for one year. It was so ordered by the full vote of the Board. The Director of the Waterman Gymnasium presented his annual report, which was accepted and placed on file. On motion of Regent Hill, the repairs in the Waterman Gymnasium were referred to the committee on Buildings and Grounds. On motion of Regent Farr, Walter B. Ford was reappointed Instructor in Mathematics for one year, salary $900, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Hill, Mr. Frederick Tyndall Swan, A.M., and Arthur Joseph Hoare, A.M., were appointed Assistants in Latin for one year, without salary. On motion of Regent Farr, the sum of $800 was appropriated from the Bates fund for repairs on real estate in Omaha, Nebraska, and $62.50 for expense incurred by Regent Farr in going to Omaha to look over the property of the University in that city by request of the Board. On motion of Regent Hill, Walter Dennison, Ph.D., was appointed Junior Professor of Latin, in place of Professor Rolfe resigned, at a salary of $2,000, and Henry A. Sanders, Instructor in Latin, was raised to Assistant Professor, with salary of $I,600 by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Secretary was authorized to pay the Ridgway Dynamo and Engine Company $7,000, that being the full amount of their account for engine and dynamo furnished the University, On motion, the Board took a recess until 2 o'clock P. M.

Page  65 JUNE MEETING, 1902. 65 AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock P. M. Regent Lawton moved that $2,500 be transferred from the budget of the Chemical Laboratory to the budget of Hygiene. It was so ordered on a call vote. Regent Lawton moved that $I,ooo be appropriated for the purchase of an X-ray outfit for use in University Hospital. The motion was carried on a call vote. On motion of Regent Dean, Mr. Markham Cheever was appointed Assistant in the Engineering Shops for one year, salary $200; and Benjamin F. Bailey was reappointed Instructor in Electrical Engineering for one year, salary $900; and Mr. Lyman F. Morehouse was appointed Instructor in Physics for one year in place of two assistants, the compensation being the same, $900. The above appointments were made on a call vote. Regent Dean moved that Frederick C. Wilson, B.S., be appointed Instructor in Descriptive Geometry and Drawing, for one year, salary $900. The motion was carried by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Dean, one additional Instructor was allowed in Chemical Engineering, for one year, with salary of $900, by the full vote of the Board. Regent Dean submitted the following resolutions, which were approved by the full vote of the Board: Resolved, That hereafter the use of University Hall shall be governed by the following regulations: i. The University Musical Society shall be allowed the use of the Hall for concerts in the Choral Union Series in each college year, it being understood that the University Musical Society shall not include lectures in this series, or use the Hall for any entertainments other than musical entertainments. 2. The Students' Lecture Association shall be allowed the use of the Hall for lectures or readings in each college year, it being expressly provided that in this series of lectures or readings no concerts shall be included, and that the Hall shall not be used by the Students' Lecture Association for any other purpose than the giving of lectures or readings, the choice of lecturers to be subject to the approval of the President of the University; and this regulation shall apply to any other organization that may be granted the use of the Hall for lectures or readings. 3. The use of University Hall for any other purposes or occasions

Page  66 66 JUNE MEETING, 1902. than those indicated in the first and second resolutions, shall be referred to a committee consisting of the President, the Secretary, and the Dean of the Literary Department, with power. On motion of Regent Dean, the following appointments and reappointments were made in the Homoeopathic Medical College for one year: R. C. Olin, M.D., non-resident Lecturer on Theory and Practice. 0. R. Long, M.D., non-resident Lecturer on Mental Diseases. W. A. Polglase, M.D., non-resident Lecturer on Nervous Diseases. F. E. Westfall, M.D., Assistant in Theory and Practice. H. A. Haynes, House Physician at Hospital, at a salary of $200. On motion of Regent Dean, it was voted to put awnings on the Homceopathic Hospital, at a cost of $I40, finish one room on the third floor, change diet kitchen to basement and plumb the same, and put light and gate on the elevator. Regent Dean moved that two additional nurses be allowed in the Homceopathic Hospital, and that $400 be appropriated for the purchase of instruments. The motion was carried on a call vote. On motion of Regent Carey, $50 was added to the budget of the General Library for current expenses, to cover a deficit of equal amount, by the full vote of the Board. Regent Hill moved that George Plumer Burns, Ph.D., be appointed Instructor in Botany for one year, at a salary of $900. The motion was carried on a call vote. On motion of Regent Farr, the Secretary was authorized to advance $300 of the guarantee fund, set apart in the budget for the Law Review Journal. Regent Farr moved that Kenyon L. Butterfield, A.M., be appointed Instructor in Rural Sociology for one year, at a salary of $500, $300 of which shall be taken from the lectureship fund already set apart in the budget for Political Economy and So-:iology. It was so ordered on a call vote. Regent Fletcher moved that Assistant Professor E. W. Dow be made Junior Professor, with salary of $2,000. A call vote being taken resulted as follows: Ayes: Regents Fletcher, Hill, Dean, and Carey. Nays: Regent Farr. Regent Lawton not voting. Regent Fletcher moved that the Secretary be authorized to contract with the Venetian Marble and Mosaic Art Company, of Detroit, to lay a floor in all the rooms on the first floor of

Page  67 JUNE MEETING, 1902. 67 the General Library Building, except the book room, at a cost of twenty-three cents per square foot for the floors, and twentyfive cents per lineal foot for 2-inch cove base in toilet rooms, or a gross sum of $2,3I4 for the entire work. The motion was carried on a call vote. On motion of Regent Farr, the Secretary was directed to have curtains placed under the skylights in the Art Gallery, to protect the paintings from the direct rays of the sun, at a cost not exceeding $I20, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Lawton, the following reappointments and appointments were made in the Department of Medicine and Surgery, for one year, by the full vote of the Board: Cyrenus G. Darling, M.D., Lecturer on Genito-Urinary and M inor Surgery, salary.................................$500.00 Willard H. Hutchings, B.L., M.D., First Assistant in Surgery, salary............................................... 200.00 Conrad Georg, A.B., M.D., Second Assistant in Surgery, salary. ioo.oo Frederick R. Waldron, Ph.B., M.D., Third Assistant in Surgery, without pay. Ira D. Loree, M.D., Fourth Assistant in Surgery, without pay. Jeanne C. Solis, iJ.D., Demonstrator of Nervous Diseases and Electrotherapeutics, salary............................ 500.00 Vernon J. Willey, B.S., Instructor in Electrotherapeutics, salary 600.00 Theophil Klingmann, Ph.C., M.D., Assistant in Diseases of the Mind and Nervous System, salary....................... 200.00 Charles W. Edmunds. M.D., Assistant in Pharmacology. in place of C. A. Good, salary.................................. 500.00 Thomas S. Burr, A.B., M.D., Demonstrator of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women, salary............................. 500.00 George R. Pray, M.D., First Assistant in Obstetrics and Diseases of Women, salary................................. 200.00 William H. Morley, Ph.B., M.D., Second Assistant in Obstetrics and Diseases of Women, without pay. Ralph L. Morse, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics and Diseases of Women, in charge of laboratory work, salary............. 500.00 Alice B. Ellsworth, M.D., Third Assistant in Obstetrics and Diseases of Women, without pay. James R. Arneill, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Internal Medicine and Demonstrator of Clinical Medicine, salary............ 9oo.oo David M. Cowie, M.D., First Assistant in Internal Medicine, salary................................................. 300.00 Prentiss B. Cleaves, M.D., Second Assistant in Internal Medicine in place of Dr. Grim, salary............................ 200.00 Frank R. Spencer, M.D., Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy in place of Frank Holdsworth, salary........................ 200.00

Page  68 68 JUNE MEETING, 1902. Augustus H. Roth, Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy, salary. 200.00 George G. Richards, Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy, salary 200.00 Elsie S. Pratt, B.L., Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy, salary 200.00 Lydia M. DeWitt, M.D., B.S, Instructor in Histology, salary.. 600.00 Louis M. Gelston, A.B., Assistant in Hygiene, salary.......... 400.00 Donald R. Maclntyre, Special Assistant for Water Analysis, salary................................................ 300.00 May Wheeler. A.B., Rockefeller Scholar in Hygiene, without pay. Mary F. Leach, A.B., Fellow in Physiological Chemistry, without pay. George F. Richmond, B.S., Assistant in Physiological Chemistry, in place of Chas. L. Bliss, salary......................... 600.00 William G. Carhart, Assistant in Hygienic Laboratory, salary.. 300.00 Ward J. MacNeal, Assistant in Hygienic Laboratory, salary.... 300.00 Edward A. Willis, M.D., Demonstrator of Ophtlalmic and Aural Surgery, Rhinology and Laryngology, in place of Dr. Noyes, salary................................................. 500.00 Raymond D. Sleight, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmic and Aural Surgery, in place of Dr. E. A. Willis, salary............ 200.00 James F. Breakey, M.D., Assistant in Dermatology, salary...... 200.00 James P. Briggs, Ph.C., Pharmacist, University Hospital, salary 750.00 Helen Balcom, Superintendent of the Training School for Nurses, salary $60 per month. Frederick A. Baldwin, M.D., Assistant in Pathology, salary.... 500.00 Joshua G. Manwaring, M.D., House Physician, in place of H. W. Clouchek, salary.................................... 400.00 Chas. L. Patton, M.D., Interne in Hospital, in place of J. G. Manwaring, salary................................... I25.00 Frank J. Gibson, M.D., Interne in Hospital, in place of C. W. Edmunds, at salary of.................................. 25.00 John H. Gilpin, Interne in Hospital, in place of M. B. McCausland, salary........................................ 125.00 Oscar H. Bruegel, M.D., Interne in Hospital, in place of George E. Fay, salary.......................................... I25.00 Carl M. Erb, M.D., Interne in Hospital, in place of George H. Lamley, salary.......................................... 125.00 Walter H. Pillsbury, Ph.D., Special Lecturer on Physiological Psychology, without pay. Aldred S. Warthin, Ph. D., M.D., Junior Professor of Pathology, salary........................................... 2,000.00 Cressy L. Wilbur, M.D., Superintendent of Vital Statistics, was reappointed Special Lecturer on Vital Statistics. Henry B. Baker, A.M., M.D., Secretary State Board of Health, was reappointed Special Lecturer on the Administration of Health Laws. William M. Edwards, M.D., Superintendent of Michigan Asylum, was reappointed Special Lecturer on Insanity. James D. Munson, M.D., Superintendent of Northern Michigan Asylum, was reappointed Special Lecturer on Insanity. Edmund A. Christian, A.B., M.D., Superintendent of Eastern Michigan Asylum, was reappointed Special Lecturer on Insanity.

Page  69 JUNE MEETING, 1902. 69 George L. Chamberlain, M.D., Superintendent of Newberry Asylum, was reappointed Special Lecturer on Insanity. Elijah M. Houghton, Ph.C., M.D., was reappointed Special Lecturer on the Preparation of Medicines. Regent Hill moved that $I50 be appropriated for the purchase of a sextant for the use of the Professor of Astronomy. The motion was carried on a call vote. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Secretary was authorized to pay Spier & Rohns, architects, $,000o on account of the new Medical Building. On motion of Regent Farr, $210.50 was added to the budget of the Botanical Laboratory to correct an error in footing. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds was directed to construct a large cistern to take care of the water from the new Medical Building. Regent Farr presented the report of the Hon. Levi L. Barbour, on the condition of the Williams fund. The report was accepted and ordered printed in the minutes. The following is the report: THE WILLIAMS PROFESSORSHIP FUND In account with Levi L. Barbour, Dr. 1901 Aug. 31 Paid Loan on note and m'tg., J. B. Ottenbacher.... $ Sept. 2 " Loan on note and m'tg., L. Logiodice........ " Crosby com. on collection of interest, $70.72.. 30 " Loan on note and mortgage, L. Logiodice, second loan........................... Oct. 16 " City taxes 19go on Schleass property, Grand R apids............................... 625.00 400.00 3.54 200.00 2.70 I9QO May June Aug. Sept. 12 " Loan on note and mortgage, Wm. P. Lane... I,ooo.oo " Reg. of Deeds fees, recording Logiodice, Lane, and Bissell papers..................... 2.75 Total Debit...............$2,233.99 Cr. 30 Balance, cash on hand per statement rendered..... $ 823.77 4 Interest, Hedquist from Feb. 4, 'oi to Aug. 4, 'OI... O1.50 2. " Principal and taxes in full, of BaragerGies loan.......................... 678.72 " Becker from Oct. 15, 'oo to Apr. 15, 'oI... 10.50 " Depuy from Dec. 2, 'oo to June 2, 'oi.... 10.50 " Clement's from Nov. 24, 'oo to May 24, 'oi. 21.00 II " Carroll from Apr. I0. 'oo to Oct. Io, 'oo and interest on interest.............. I.OO

Page  70 JUNE MEETING, 1902. Sept. 17 Interest, Drake from March i, 'oi to Sept. i, 'oi.. 18 " Stevenson (Walker) and prin, in full..... " Pierce, from Dec. i, 'oo to Dec. i, 'oI.... Payment, Pierce to apply on principal of contract... Oct. i6 Interest, Becker, from Apr. 15, 'oi to Oct. 15, 'oi.. 17 " Field from Mar. II, 'oi to Sept. ii, 'o... Nov. II " Carroll, from Oct, o1, 'oo to Apr, io, 'oI, 'and interest on interest.............. 21 " Clements, from May 24, 'oi to Nov. 24, 'OI 29 " Depuy, from June 2, 'oi to Dec. 2, 'oi... Dec. i " on deposits in bank...................... 17 " Ottenbacher from June 17, 'oI to Dec. 17................... 23 " Pankow, first loan, from Feb. 12, 'OI to A ug. I2, '0I........................ " Pankow, second loan, from March 26, 'oI to Sept. 26, 'o..................... 27 " Haines, from June 23, 'Oi to Dec. 23, '0o.. 1902 Feb. 3 " Hedquist, from Aug. 4,'02 to Feb. 4,'02... 14 Payment, Siegel on Schleass property............. Mar. Io Interest, Field, from Sept. II, 'o to Mar. 1, '02... Payment, Field, on principal of mortgage.......... I5 Interest, Drake, fromn Sept, I, 'oi to March I, '02.. 25 " Fayweather, from Jan. 11, 'oi to Jan. 1I, 6.oo 222.60 48.00 50.00 10.50 32.50 Io.75 21.00 10.50 5.89 I8.75 I5.oo 45.00 60.oo 10.50 146.24 32.50 300.00 6.oo Apr. May June 3I I0 I3 26 " i "C 02................................ I7.50 Logiodice on both mts. to Mar. 30, '02.... 20.28 Carroll, from Apr. io, 'o to Oct. Io, '02.. IO.50 Becker, from Oct. 15, 'oI to Apr. 15, '02.. 1o.50 Depuy, from Dec. 2, 'oi to June 2, '02.... Io.50 on deposits in Bank.................... I3.35 ]lements from Nov. 24, 'OI to May 24, '02. 21.00 Total Credit........$2,721.35 Total Debit........ 2,233.99 Balance, cash.......................... 487.36 June 17 1,,.,.. MORTGAGES. Hedquist, N. E..(8oa., Wexford Co.), Int. pd. to Feb. 4, '02.. Drake, L. E. (3oa. Charlevoix Co.). Int. pd. to March I, '02.. Depuy, G. C. (Lot in Grand Rapids). Int. pd. to June 2, '02.. Carroll, J. (8oa., Wexford Co.). Int pd. to Oct. Io, 'oI....... hayweather, WV.. J. oa., Clinton Co.). Int. pd. to Jan. i1, '02. Becker, C. W. (Lot in Grand Rapids). Int. pd. to Apr. I5, '02. Clements, E. A. (Lot in Grand Rapids) Int. pd. to May 24, '02. Haines, W. A. (ioa., Wayne Co.). Int. pd. to Dec. 23, 'oI.... Pankow, W. F. ( 2 lots in Detroit). Int. pd. to Aug. 12, 'OI,.. Pankow, W. F. (2 lots in Detroit). Int. pd. to Sept. 26, 'oI... Field, G. S. (Lot in Detroit). Int. pd. to March 11, '02...... $ 300.00 170.00 300.00 300.00 250.90 300.00 600.00 2,000.00 500.00 1,500.00 1,000.00

Page  71 JUNE MEETING, 1902. 71 Ottenbacher, J. B. (Lot in Detroit). Int. pd. to Dec. I7, 'oi... 625.00 Logiodice, L. (Lot in Detroit). Int. pd. to March 3,'02...... 400.00 Logiodice, L. (Lot in Detroit). Int. pd. to March 3I, '02...... 200.00 Siegel, L. (Lot in Grand Rapids). None due................ 300.00 Lane, W. P. (Lot in Detroit). None due................. I,000.00 Total...................... $9,745.00 LAND CONTRACTS. Pierce, F. L. (Teeter lands, Isabella Co.), Int. pd. to Dec. i, 'o, $750.00 REAL ESTATE. Schnepp prop., (4oa., Gratiot Co.). Cost Society at sale....... $ 260.42 Clark prop., (64oa., Newaygo Co.). Cost Society at sale...... I,I29.08 Earl prop. (8oa., Osceola Co.). Cost Society at sale...... 377.60 Total................ $1,767.10 RECAPITULATION. June 17, I902 Cash on hand........................... $ 487.36 Mortgages on real estate.................. 9,745.00 Land contracts.......................... 750.00 Real Estate............................. 1,767.10 Assets, June 17, I902............... $I2,749.46 Net gain over June 30, I90I..................$ 606.59 On motion of Regent Farr, Professor Pettee was requested to audit the accounts of the Treasurer and the Secretary, the compensation for the work to be the same as heretofore. On motion, the Board adjourned to to-morrow morning at 9 o'clock. MORNING SESSION. The Board reassembled at 9 o'clock. Regent Lawton presented and read the following communication from Dr. W. H. Dorrance: ANN ARBOR, MICH., June I8, I902. To THE HONORABLE, THE BOARD OF REGENTS: I hereby offer my resignation of the chair of Prosthetic Dentistry and Metallurgy, to take effect at the close of this college year. W. H. DORRANCE. On motion of Regent Farr, the resignation was accepted. On motion of Regent Hill, the following appointments were made in the Department of Botany, by the full vote of the Board:

Page  72 72 JUNE MEETING, 1902. Howard S. Reed, Assistant in Plant Physiology, salary........ $200.00 Clara H. Hasse, Assistant in Botany, salary.................. 50.00 Axel vv. Pierson, Assistant in Botanical Laboratory, salary.... 50.00 Regent Hill moved that Merlin L. Wiley, A.B., be appointed Assistant in Elocution, for one year, salary $300, and Richard D. T. Hollister, A.B., Assistant in Elocution, for one year, salary $200. The motion was carried on a call vote. Regent Hill presented and read the following communication from Professor T. C. Trueblood: ANN ARBOR, MICII., June I8, 1902. To THE HONORABLE, THE BOARD OF REGENTS: I respectfully request that the same amount ($300.00), which was contributed by the Board last year, for the support of the debating and oratorical contests, be given this year to make up the deficit of the Oratorical Association. It is confidently expected that with the new provision of the Board of Regents for the future, and certain new regulations of the Oratorical Board, in regard to personal expenses of contestants, that this request will not have to be repeated. Very truly yours, THOMAS C. TRUEBLOOD. On motion of Regent Hill, $300 was appropriated for the purpose named in the foregoing communication, and upon the conditions stated therein, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher, Regents Farr and Dean and the Secretary were appointed a special committee, with power to settle any difference that may exist between the University and the Blair Coal Company, growing out of their failure to furnish the University coal, at contract prices, during the whole college year. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Secretary was authorized to advertise for bids for the erection and completion of a Psychopathic Ward on the Hospital grounds of the University, and th_.. said bids be returnable on the s5th day of July next. Regent Farr moved that the following sums be appropriated for the support of the Alumni Association: For advertising the University in the Alumnus............... $300.00 For publishing the News Letter............................ 300.00 For editing the News Letter............................... 300.00 For general catalogue revision............................ 500.00 The motion was carried unanimously. The Board then took a recess until 2 o'clock p. M.

Page  73 JUNE MEETING, 1902. 73 AFTERNOON SESSION. The Governor of the State, having appointed the Hon. Levi L. Barbour to the place on the Board of Regents made vacant by the resignation of Regent Eli R. Sutton, and Mr. Barbour being present, the oath of office was administered to him, and he assumed the duties of Regent of the University of Michigan, and was assigned to the places on the standing committees of the Board previously held by Regent Sutton, and was also added to the committee on Buildings and Grounds. The following resolution, introduced by Regent Farr, was adopted by the Board: Resolved, That hereafter no purchase of property, employment of persons, or any pledge of the credit of the University made by any person without the authority of the Board of Regents, will be recognized. And all such purchases, employment, or pledging the credit of the University is hereby forbidden. The Secretary is hereby directed to notify all persons connected with the University of this action. Provided, however, That the Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds shall have the power to hire and discharge the men under him, subject to the approval of the Board, and that all janitors, carpenters, laborers, and mechanical employees of the University are under the supervision of the said Superintendent, and that he shall report to the Board all changes in the force, from time to time. On motion of Regent Farr, $2,I50 was appropriated for the purchase of an ice machine for the care of anatomical material in the new Medical Building, and $950 for installing the same. This appropriation was made on a call vote. On motion of Regent Fletcher, $Io,ooo was appropriated for the purchase of pipe, fittings, radiators, sinks, and plumbing materials in the new Medical Building by the full vote of the Board. Regent Farr submitted the following resolution, which was adopted by the full Board: Resolved, That the method suggested by the State Accountant in his l1tter of June 9, for bringing the books of the Auditor General's office and the books of the Treasurer of the University into harmony, be adopted. The President being called away, Regent Hill was asked to take the chair. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Secretary was authorized

Page  74 74 JUNE MEETING, 1902. to enter into contract, in the name of the Board, with the American Blower Company, of Detroit, for heating and ventilating the Library Building, according to the specifications, for the sum of $2,375, not including pedestals. This action was taken on a call vote. Regent Barbour moved that $Ioo be appropriated to defray the traveling expenses of Librarian Davis, on a tour of inspection of the Public Libraries of the East, with the view of securing,etter methods of administration for our own Library. The m,,otion:aas carried by the full vote of the Board. The Board then took a recess until 7:30 P. M. EVENING SESSION. The Board reassembled at 7: 30 P. M. The following bids were received for the construction of a new Boiler House at University Hospital, according to the revised plans and specifications: Henry Carew & Company, of Detroit......................$23,877.00 Shaw, Kendal & Company, of Toledo.:................... 24,848.oo Regent Fletcher moved that the contract be awarded to Henry Carew & Co., for the sum of $23,877. It was so ordered on a call vote. The Board then proceeded to open the bids for the construction of the new Engineering Building, with the following results: Koch Brothers, Ann Arbor............................... $56,86I.00 Henry Carew & Company, of Detroit................... I47,999.00 Charles A. Sauer, Ann Arbor............................ I69,III.o0 Geering Brothers, Detroit............................... 46,000.00 Charles Hoertz & Son, Grand Rapids..................... I40,000.00 R. Robertson, Detroit.................................. I62,000.00 Regent Hill moved that the contract be awarded to Charles Hoertz & Son, of Grand Rapids, for the sum of $I40,000, including tile roof. If tile partitions are used in place of wood, $200 shall be added to this contract. If tile is used in place of brick partitions on third floor, an additional sum not exceeding $I,ooo, shall be added to the contract. The contractor shall furnish all additional steel in floors required to make them carry the pr\scribed load, and shall complete said building, and turn the same over'to owners on or before the I5th day of June, I903.

Page  75 JUNE MEETING, 1902. 75 They shall also give two security company's bonds of $25,000 each; one for the faithful performance of the contract, and the other for the protection of the material men. After said building is inclosed, the owners agree to heat the same to 40~, if necessary. A call vote was taken on this motion, and the motion was carried by the unanimous vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Lawton, the degree of Doctor of Medicine was conferred upon DeWitt Clinton Wade, as of the class of I86I, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery. On the recommendation of the Executive Committee, the President was authorized by the full vote of the Board to confer the following honorary degrees on the persons named: MASTER OF ARTS. Harry Gray Sherrard, A.B., 1882, eminent teacher of Ancient Classics. Florus Alonzo Barbour, A.B., 1878, Professor of English Literature, State Normal College, Austin White Alvord, M.D., i868, eminent physician. DOCTOR OF MEDICINE. Hermann Kiefer, ex-Regent of the University. DOCTOR OF LAWS. William Henry Beadle, A.B., i86i, President of the South Dakota Normal School. Bernard M.oses, Ph.B., 1870, Professor of History in the University of California, and United States Commissioner to the Philippines. Major Walter Reed, United States Army, eminent investigator of the causes of yellow fever. Henry Harrison Swan, United States District Judge, Detroit. On the recommendation of the Executive Committee, Hermann Kiefer, M.D., was appointed, by the full vote of the Board, Professor Emeritus of the Practice of Medicine, in the Department of Medicine and Surgery. On motion, the Board adjourned to meet at Regent Barbour's office, in Detroit, on Thursday, June 26, at io o'clock. A. M. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

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Page  76

Page  77 SPECIAL JUNE MEETING. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, 1 ANN ARBOR, June 26, I902. The Board assembled in the office of Regent Barbour, in the city of Detroit, at 10 o'clock A. Mr. Present: The President, Regents Farr, Fletcher, Lawton, Dean, Barbour, and Carey. Absent: Regents Butterfield and Hill. The Secretary read the minutes of the previous meeting, which were, on motion of Regent Lawton, approved and ordered printed. Prof. V. M. Spalding gave notice that the Hon. D. M. Ferry had continued for the coming academic year the Botanical Fellowship of $500 that bears his name. On motion of Regent Lawton, the President was requested to transmit the thanks of the Board to Mr. Ferry for his generous gift. On motion of Regent Farr, the leave of absence of Prof. P. C. Freer, now in the Philippine Islands, was extended to February next, without salary. Regent Farr moved that Mrs. Myra Beach Jordan be appointed Women's Dean for one year, with salary of $1,200. On a call vote, the motion was carried unanimously. On.motion of Regent Carey, the Building Committee were empowered to contract for the furniture for the new medical building. On motion of Regent Fletcher, Superintendent Reeve was directed to go to Grand Rapids and Holland, and confer with Regents Butterfield and Carey, with the view of inducing manufacturers at both these points to submit estimates of the cost of furniture for the new medical building. On motion of Regent Farr, the custody of the Williams Fund was transferred from Regent Barbour to Mr. George S. Field, of Detroit, and a bond of $5,ooo was required.

Page  78 78 SPECIAL JUNE MEETING, 1902. Regent Farr moved that the salary of Prof. H. B. Hutchins 1)e made $4,000, and $I,ooo additional as Dean of the Law Department. A call vote on this motion resulted as follows: Ayes- Regents Farr, Fletcher, Lawton, Dean, Barbour, and Carey. Nays - None. The Secretary was instructed to ask Mr. Hopwood to get bids on sinks for the new medical building. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Finance Committee were authorized to invest $30,000 of the gift funds of the University in municipal bonds. On motion, the Board adjourned to Thursday, July 17, at IO o'clock A. M. JAMES H. WADE, Sccrctary.

Page  79 JULY MEETING. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, July 17, 1902. The Board assembled in the Regents' room at Io o'clock i. M. Present: Regents Farr, Hill, Lawton, Barbour, and Fletcher. Absent: Regents Butterfield, Dean, and Carey. The Secretary read the minutes of the last meeting, which were, on motion of Regent Lawton, approved and ordered printed. Commlunications which had reached the President were referred to the standing committees of the Board for consideration. On motion of Regent Hill, Dean W. Myers, M.D., was appointed assistant to the Chair of Ophthalmology and Otology, in the Homceopathic Medical College, for one year, without salary. The following pay roll for the summer school was presented and read by Regent Hill, and on his motion was passed by the full vote of the Board:PAY ROLL FOR SUMMER SESSION, 1902. DEPARTMENT OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS. Prof. I. N. Demmon, English Literature....................$ 250 oo Prof. W. W. Beman, Mathematics.......................... 250 oo Prof. Volney M. Spalding, Botany.......................... 250 oo Prof. Thomas C. Trueblood, Elocution...................... 250 oo Prof. John C. Rolfe, Latin............................... 250 oo Prof. Robert M. Wenley, Philosophy........................ 250 oo Prof. W. H. Payne, Pedagogy............................. 250 oo Prof. J. A. Woodburn (Indiana State Univ.), History........ 250 oo Prof. F. M. Taylor, Political Economy..................... 200 oo Prof. A. S. Whitney, Pedagogy............................ 200 oo Prof. J. O. Reed, Physics................................... 200 oo Prof. J. H. Drake, Latin.................................. 200 oo Prof. W. H. Sherzer, Geology (State Normal)......... 200 oo Assistant Prof. J. L. Markley, Mathematics................. 240 oo

Page  80 80 JULY MlEETING, 1902. Assistant Prof. George Rebec, Psychology................... 60 o0 Assistant Prof. Moses Gomberg, Chemistry................... 240 00 Assistant Prof. Karl E. Guthe, Physics..................... 240 00 Assistant Prof. Edward D. Jones, Commercial Geography.... 80 oo Assistant Prof. John R. Effinger, French..................... 240 00 Prof. W. H. Munson (Winona, Minn., State Normal), Zoology 240 00 Instructor Geo. 0. Higley, Chemistry....................... 80 oo Instructor D. M. Lichty, Chemistry......................... 80 oo Instructor Tobias Diekhoff, German......................... 20 00oo Instructor J. A. C. Hildner, German......................... I20 o0 Instructor J. WV. Glover, Mathematics..................... i80 oo Instructor H. J. Goulding, Drawing......................... I80 oo Instructor W. WV. Florer, German........................ 120 oo Instructor E. C. Sullivan, Chemistry....................... 150 oo Instructor H. A. Sanders, Greek............................ 180 oo Instructor H. M. Randall, Physics.......................... 150 00oo Instructor F. L. Dunlap, Chemistry...................... 150 oo Instructor C. B. Teetzel (Mich. State Normal), Physical Training.................................................. 150 O Instructor J. M. Thomas, English........................... 0oo oo Instructor C. D. Frank, French and Spanish................ 00 oo Instructor D. W. Springer (Ann Arbor High School), Science of Accounts........................................ 50 oo The following persons were appointed to give instruction in the University during the Summer Session, on the condition that any course which was not elected by at least six students should be withdrawn:Instructor C. L. Meader, Latin.............................$ i80 oo Instructor Geo. P. Burns, Botany............................ 100 oo Instructor John C. Thorpe, Mechanical Engineering........ 100 00 $6,930 oo ADMINISTRATION. John 0. Reed, Chairman of Executive Committee............$ o00. 00 John R. Effinger, Secretary of Executive Committee......... 00 00 $7,130 00 On motion of Regent Hill, William G. Smeaton, A.B., was appointed Instructor in Chemical Engineering for one year, at a salary of $900, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Hill, the following appointments were made in Zoology for one year by the full vote of the Board: Miss Maud M. DeWitt, B. S., Assistant in Zoology,, salary.. $300 oo Mr. Mark Marshall, Assistant in Zoology, salary............. 50o oo Albert W. Dorr, Assistant in Zoology, salary............... 150 oo

Page  81 JULY MEETING, 1902. 81 C. F. Curtis Riley, B. S., Assistant in Zoology, salary........ 150 oo Mr. Wilbur N. Fuller, Assistant in Zoology, salary.......... I50 oo Mr. R. H. Wormley, Assistant in Zoology, salary............ 50 oo Miss Frances Dunbar, Assistant in Zoology, salary........... 50 oo Regent Hill moved that the following appointments be made in the Dental Department for one year: Dr. Cyrenus G. Darling, Lecturer on Oral Pathology and Surgery, salary........................................... $500 oo Dr. Ira D. Loree, Demonstrator of Oral Surgery, salary...... 200 oo Dr. John J. Scott, Assistant to the Professor of Operative and Clinical Dentistry, salary............................... 500 oo Dr. Marcus L. Ward, Assistant to the Professor of Operative and Clinical Dentistry, salary.......................... 500 oo Dr. Charles M. Briggs, Instructor in Clinical Dentistry, salary.. oo0 oo Dr. Robert B. Howell, Instructor in Prosthetic Technics and Comparative Odontology, salary......................... 800 oo Elmer L. Whitman, Assistant in Prosthetic Technics, salary... 200 oo A call vote being taken, resulted as follows: Ayes, Regents Farr, Hill, Lawton, Barbour, and Fletcher. Nays, none. On motion of Regent Fletcher, Mr. R..B. Jackson was appointed to assist the Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds until October first next, salary $70 per month. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the treasurer was requested to pay Mason and Kahn, Architects of the new engineering building $2,400, on account. On motion of Regent Lawton, Mrs. Addie Wheaton was appointed matron at University Hospital in place of Miss Mary Close, resigned, salary $30 per month. The appointment was made on a call vote. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Finance Committee were authorized to purchase with the gift funds of the University $40,000 face value of the bonds of the city of Enid, Oklahoma Territory, at such a rate as will net the University 438 per cent, if upon investigation they are satisfied that said bonds have been legally issued. Regent Barbour moved that Rufus H. Pettitt, B. S., be appointed curator of the Museum for one year at a salary of $9goo, he to give his entire time to museum work during the academic year, and to make himself responsible for such work as it is necessary to carry on during vacations. The appointment was made on a call vote.

Page  82 JuLY 1JfEE7ING, 19o0. Regent Barbour moved that Edson R. Surderland, LL.B., be reappointed Instructor in Law for one year at a salary of $I,200, it being understood that the $200 named in the budget for a course in irrigation be applied on this salary, and that the course in irrigation be dropped for next year. It was so ordered by the full vote of the Board. Regent Barbour presented and read the following communication from the Law Librarian: ANN ARBOR, MICH., July i6, I902. PROF. HARRY B. HUTCHINS, DEAN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LAW, UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN: Dear Sir: I take pleasure in announcing thaf the children of the late Judge Thomas M. Cooley have been pleased to present to the University of Michigan, for its Law Library, the list of volumes hereto appended. I think it the hope on the part of the donors that these books may be kept as a collection which may serve as a memorial of their father and his relation to the Department of Law. We have no conveniences now for shelving them separately from the general collection of books in the Library. The donors of this collection have indicated to me that upon the return, by Professor Rogers, of Yale, of the manuscripts of Judge Cooley, they would be glad to make a selection from these to add to this collection. Professor Rogers is using them temporarily in writing a biography of Judge Cooley. When these are received, if a case suitable for holding them could be placed somewhere in the Library, I am sure it would meet the wishes of those who have so generously remembered the Department. Yours sincerely, V. H. LANE, Law Librarit(ln. BOOKS PRESENTED TO THE LAW LIBRARY BY THICHILDREN OF JUDGE THOMAS M. COOLEY. Cass Code. Manuscript. Woodard Code. Manuscript. Curtis. Important federal statutes. U. of M. Res Gestae, '95. Michigan Supreme Court Rules. Bench and Bar. Vol. I. Story. Commentaries. Ed. 4, by T. M. Cooley. 4 vols. Kent. Commentaries. Ed. 12. 4 vols. Blackstone. Commentaries. By T. M. Cooley. Ed. 3. 2 vols. Blackstone. Commentaries. Christian, Chitty, 4 vols. Blackstone. Commentaries. HIargrave, Sweet, 4 vols. Blackstone. Commentaries. Coleridge. 4 vols. Cooley. Law of torts.

Page  83 JULY7: EETING, 19032. 83 Cooley. Constitutional Limitations. Editimns i, 2, 4, 5, 6. Cooley. Constitutional Law. Ed. 2. Hamilton. Federalist. Broom. Constitutional Law. Michigan Session Laws. 5 vols. Total 42 vols. On motion of Regent Bar)our, it was voted that the gift be accepted, and that a proper case be provided for the reception of the books and manuscripts, and the President was requested to convey to the children of Judge Cooley the high appreciation of the Board for their valuable gift to the Law Library of the University. On motion of Regent Barbour, Frank L. Sage, B. S., LL.B., was appointed Assistant Professor of Law, at a salary of $I,600, and Paul J. lMunter was appointed clerk in the offices of the Dean and Secretary of the Law Department, at a salary of $I75. These appointments were made on a call vote. On motion of Regent Barbour, $47 was taken from the contingent fund of the Law Department for the purchase of a bookcase for the Law Library. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Secretary was authorized to purchase a tent for the use of the patients in the Homoeopathic Hospital, at a cost of $24, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Hill the Students' Christian Association was allowed $50, to aid them in publishing a handbook of information for new students, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Hill, Regents Lawton, Farr, Carey, Barbour, and the Secretary were appointed a special committee to submit the plans and specifications of the New Psychopathic Ward to the Board of Corrections and Charities for their approval. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the bid of the Buffalo Forge Company to heat and ventilate the Psychopathic ward, for the sum of $6,651, was accepted by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the contract to furnish 650 chairs for the lecture room and the Amphitheatre in the new Medical building was awarded to the Grand Rapids School Furniture Company, at $4 each, by the unanimous vote of the board. Regent Fletcher submitted the following bids for the erection and completion of the new Psychopathic ward, according

Page  84 84 JUL Y ME TING, 1902. to the plans and specifications prepared by Mason and Kahn, Architects, of Detroit: Koch Bros, of Ann Arbor.............................. $39,508 oo Charles A. Sater & Co., of Ann Arbor.................. 39,227 oo H. J. Spikeir, of Toledo.............................. 48,492 oo Davis and Toppinger, of Toledo......................... 39,383 oo Henry Carew & Co., of Detroit.......................... 49,650 oo Hoertz and Son, of Grand Rapids...................... 49,333 oo On motion of Regent Fletcher, the contract for the Psychopathic ward was awarded Charles A. Sauer & Co., subject to the approval of the Board of Corrections and Charities, for the sum of $39,227, by the full vote of the Board, except Regent Hill, not voting. The proposition of the Woodward Lumber Company of Atlanta, Georgia, to furnish the furniture and fixtures for the new Medical building, for the sum of $r7,135.15, was accepted bv the Board on a call vote. Regent Farr moved that the auditina board be authorized to purchase the necessary sinks for the new Medical building. The motion was carried on a call vote. On motion of Regent Farr, the Auditing Board were authorized to put window shades on the east, west, and south sides of the new Medical building, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Lawton, $35 was allowed for shelving in the cold storage room in the new Medical building, and Mr. Reeve was directed to paint the brick walls back of all cases and shelving in the building. On motion, the Board adjourned to Friday, September 19, 1902. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  85 SEPTEMBER MEETING. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, Sept. 0o, I902. The Board assembled in the Regents' room at 10 o'clock A. M. Present: Regents Farr, Hill, Lawton, Dean, Barbour, and Fletcher. Absent: Regents Butterfield and Carey. The Secretary read the minutes of the last meeting, which were, on motion of Regent Lawton, approved and ordered printed. Communications which had reached the President were referred to the standing committees of the Board for consideration. The President presented and read the following communication from Professor Kelsey: ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, July I6, I902. TO THE HONORABLE, THE BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN: Gentlemen: I have pleasure in reporting to you that Mr. Frederick Stearns, of Detroit, has contributed to the University the sum of five hundred dollars for a Fellowship in the History of Music, for the year 902- 1903. I would respectfully request that Mr. Phillip L. Schenk (A. B., I902) be appointed to the Fellowship; he has already commenced work upon the manuscript of the catalogue of the Stearns Collection of musical instruments. Respectfully submitted, FRANCIS W. KELSEY. Regent Lawton moved that Mr. Phillip L. Schenk be appointed as the holder of the Stearns Fellowship for one year, and that the President be requested to convey to Mr. Stearns the thanks of the Board for his gift to the Department of Music. The motion was carried by the unanimous vote of the Board.

Page  86 86 SEP TEMIBER MEETINVG, 1902. On the recommendation of Professor Greene, and on motion of Regent Dean, Fred G. Frink, M.S., was appointed Instructor in Civil Engineering for one year in place of Fred M. Green, resigned, salary $900. This appointment was made on a call vote. Regent Lawton moved that Assistant Professor Moses Gomberg be made Junior Professor, with salary of $2,000, to take effect October I, I903. The motion was laid on the table until the next meeting of the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher, $2,546 was appropriated for the purchase of instruments for use in the Department of Geodesy and Surveying, by the full vote of the Board. Regent Farr moved that the sum of $60 be appropriated for the purchase of copies of the Inlander (a college publication), to be sent to the High Schools having diploma relations with the University. The motion was carried on a call vote. On motion of Regent Farr, the building committee were authorized to furnish all necessary equipment for the new Medical building. On motion of Regent Fletcher, Mr. R. B. Jackson was continued as Assistant to the Superintendent of Buildings and grounds at a salary of $60 per month. Mr. Markham Cheever was also employed as assistant to the Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds, at a salary of $50 per month, these salaries to continue while building operations are in progress. The Board then took a recess until 2 o'clock Ir. MI. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock p. M. Regent Carey being present. On motion of Regent Farr, the President and the Secretary were authorized to execute a deed to John F. Stout of the west forty feet of lots 23 and 24 in block 5, Hanscom Place, in the city of Omaha, Nebraska, the purchase price being $5,363, also to execute discharge of the following mortgages: One made by C. M. Cady and Sarah B. Cady, his wife, and one by George M. Schmidt and Lillian iMX. Schmidt, his wife, both in the county of Adair, Iowa. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Finance Committee were authorized to hold bank draft for $40,000 which was drawn to

Page  87 SEPTEMBER MEETING, 1902. 87 purchase Oklahoma bonds, until further action can be taken to legalize said bonds. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the contract to furnish the University supply of coal for the ensuing year was awarded to the Blair Coal Company of Toledo, Ohio, as follows: Pittsburg No. 8, R. of M., per ton F. 0. B., Ann Arbor........ $2 25 Pittsburg No. 8, Slack, per ton F. 0. B., Ann Arbor........... I 90 Massillon, Slack, per ton F. 0. B., Ann Arbor.............. I 95 Jackson, Run of Mines, per ton F. 0. B., Ann Arbor.......... 2 80 Pittsburg No. 8 or Hocking Valley Nut and Slack, per ton.... 2 15 The following resolution introduced by Regent Farr was adopted by the Board: Resolved, That the Treasurer is hereby authorized and directed to collect from the Superintendent of University Hospital the sum of $204.73, being money received by said Superintendent, and which was afterward stolen from him, and that the Treasurer account to the State therefor. On motion of Regent Lawton, Louis P. Hall was reappointed Assistant Professor of Dental Anatomy, Operative Technique, and Clinical Operative Dentistry, for three years, salary $I,6oo. On motion of Regent Barbour, Mr. Augustus Henry Roth was appointed first Assistant in Anatomy for one year, salary $500, and Mr. Frank S. Bachelder Second Assistant in Anatomy, for one year, salary $400. These two appointments are to take the place of Dr. Guy M. Winslow, resigned. On motion of Regent Fletcher, Muehlig and Schmid were awarded the contract to cover, with zinc, fifty-three dissecting tables for the new Medical building, and also furnish galvanized buckets for each table, for the sum of $I02. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the bid of J. Chrysler, Son & Co., of Detroit, to furnish fifty Coburn hangers, and fifty feet of track, and place the same in the new Medical building, for the sum of $I35, was accepted by the full vote of the Board. On motion, the Board adjourned to Thursday, October 9, 1902, at 10 o'clock A. M. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  88

Page  89 OCTOBER MEETING. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, October Io, 1902. The Board assembled in the Regents' room at o1 o'clock A. M. Present-Regents Butterfield, Farr, Lawton, Dean, Hill, Barbour, Fletcher, and Carey. The Secretary read the minutes of the last meeting, which were, on motion of Regent Lawton, approved and ordered printed. Communications which had reached the President were placed in the hands of the standing commnittees of the Board for consideration. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Treasurer was instructed to take no further action with the Auditor General, in relation to the burglary at University Hospital, unless further instructed by the Board. The President stated that his annual report had been prepared, and was held subject to the wishes of the Board. It was the desire of the Board that the report be read by the President, which was done after calling Regent Barbour to the chair. THE PRESIDENT'S REPORT. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: I have the honor to present to you my Report for the year ending June 30, I902. No important changes have been made in the scope or methods of work during the past twelve months, but the year has been characterized by quiet, orderly, and successful labor. While it is recognized by the public that this University has always been ready, unhampered as it is by too many obstruc

Page  90 90 OCTOBER MEE'TING, 90 2. tive traditions, to try with courage and enterprise promising experiments in education, yet it has tried to be wise and conservative enough not to introduce innovations rashly, merely for the sake of being thought progressive. There must be a certain degree of steadiness in the policy of an institution like this, if it is to command the confidence of serious men and to secure the best results for its students. If, therefore, its record for the year presents little that is exceptional or eventful, we are not to draw an unfavorable inference, but rather to conclude that the fact is one for congratulation, and that steady and undisturbed work has earned its legitimate harvest. The completion of the General Catalogue has enabled us to gather some interesting facts. The following may be noted here. Degrees have been conferred in the several departments, down to 19go, as follows: Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts........................... 4,553 Department of Engineering...................................................... 786 Department of Medicine and Surgery.......................................... 3,523 D epartm ent of Law................................................................ 6,657 School of Pharm acy................................................................ 8 840 Homceopathic Medical College................................................. 372 College of Dental Surgery........................................................,005 Honorary Degrees......................................... 151 17,887 Deducting 703, the number of persons who have received degrees in more than one department, we have the total number of persons who have received degrees, namely, 17,I84. Of these, 1,835 were women. The number of deaths recorded in our books being 2,186, the number of graduates supposed to be living at the date of this report is 14,998. The number of graduates for each of the last five years has been: 1898, 708; 1899, 722; 1900, 777; I901, 766; 1902, 823. The number of persons, matriculated prior to the beginning of the year I897-98,,who have pursued studies in some department, but have not graduated, is 12,623, of whom 2,I45 are known to be deceased. It thus appears that the General Catalogue contains the names of 29,728 persons (excluding recipients of honorary degrees), who had, for a longer or shorter time, been enrolled

Page  91 OCTOBER MEETING, 1902. 91 in the University. Of these, it is probable that about 25,000 are now living. These simple figures must impress one deeply with the extent of the work which the University has accomplished in its comparatively brief life. Its children are found engaged in honorable and useful pursuits in all parts of the earth. It has made the name of Michigan known and respected throughout the civilized world. Yet the total cost to the State of its support of the University has been less than the cost to the nation of a first-class battleship. Owing to our increased requirements for admission and for graduation, there was a slight falling off in attendance on the Schools of Medicine, Law, and Dentistry last year. On the other hand, there was a slight increase (31) in the Literary Department, and a large increase (130) in the Engineering Department. The total attendance, exclusive of that in the Summer Session, was 3,508, a gain of 26 over that of the preceding year. Including the Summer Session, the aggregate attendance was 3,709. The year previous it was 3,7I2. The students from Michigan numbered 2,I56, or I2 more than in the preceding year. The numbers from other States still continue large; for example, from Illinois, 326; Ohio, 246; Indiana, 144; New York, 144; Pennsylvania, I02; Iowa, 84; Missouri, 58. Every State, save Delaware and Louisiana, and our new possessions, the Hawaiian Islands, Porto Rico and the Philippines, and every Territory, except Alaska, are represented. So, also, are Ontario, Quebec, Bristish Columbia, South Africa, Jamaica, Japan, Turkey, England, Bulgaria, China, Egypt, and Mexico. The cosmopolitan feature, which has so long characterized our student population, is thus still conspicuous. The attendance of women (not counting that in the Summer School) was as follows: Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts.............................. 668 Department of Medicine and Surgery........................................... 35 Department of Law........................................................... 5 School of Pharm acy.................................................................. 3 H omceopathic M edical College..................................................... 7 College of D ental Surgery........................................................... 7 725

Page  92 92 OCTOBER MEETING, r90o. In the year preceding, the number was 720. There has, therefore, been no appreciable change in the relative number of women and of men. The women form twenty per cent of the total attendance, and forty-seven and seven-tenths of the attendance in the Literary Department. Last year we allowed the first year students in the Literary Department a larger liberty of election of studies than had been permitted before. They were required to take three hours of English in each semester, and were asked to choose the remaining studies from a list of nine specified branches. The elections were scrutinized by a committee of the Faculty, which was charged with the duty of seeing that the rule was complied with, but which had the power to grant some modifications of the rule in certain cases, and also of advising the students in making their elections. On the whole, the elections seem to have been wisely made. There was less deviation from the elections made under our previous requirements than was generally expected. The largest losses were sustained, as was anticipated, by Greek (about 45 per cent), Latin (33 per cent), and Mathematics (about 55 per cent). The largest gains were in German and History. The Languages, History, and Mathematics mainly absorbed the attention of the class. The increase in the number of students in the Engineering Department is making heavy demands on us. It has compelled us to enter on the erection of a large building. The call for our engineering graduates is greater than we can meet. Our best men speedily gain important and remunerative positions. Some of our most important industrial establishments have filed with us requests to send them at any time the names of our most promising graduates, whom they desire to put in the path to highly responsible' positions. Our provisions for instruction in the construction of vessels are attracting much attention. We have deemed it wise to establish the degree of Bachelor of Science in Marine Engineering. So large training in the sciences and their application is now needed to fit men for conspicuous service in the various departments of engineering, that we have found the four years'

Page  93 OCTOBER MEETING, I902. 93 curriculum scarcely adequate to furnish it. We have, therefore, decided that the engineering students must give six weeks of the summer at the end of the third year of their course to special work: the students in' civil engineering to surveying and field work; in mechanical engineering to a course in dynamo-electrical machinery and in designs of boilers and engines; in electrical engineering to foundry work and the designing of boilers and engines; and in chemical engineering to a course in dynamo-electrical machinery. We furnish the instruction without additional cost to the students. It may be questioned whether there has been greater improvement in any department of education during the last twenty years than in medical education. To no department have recent scientific discoveries been more directly useful. In the methods of instruction in none have they compelled greater changes. The laboratory methods have, to a great extent, superseded the communication of knowledge by lecturing. This fact has called for the large additional expense in the provisions made by all the strong medical schools. Our school, which was one of the first in the country to be furnished with a chemical laboratory for medical students, has long been conspicuous for its laboratory work in other sciences than chemistry. The completion of our new and spacious building for medical laboratories adds greatly to our facilities for such instruction. We have every reason to expect that the Department of Medicine and Surgery will continue to maintain the high rank it has so long held among the leading medical schools of the country. The scientific researches of members of its Faculty have given it a position which is recognized abroad as well as in our own land. Although law schools of good standing are multiplying in the West, our school still continues to lead all others in the country in the number of its students. The demands made upon them by the course of instruction grow more exacting every year. We have not deemed it necessary or wise to require a collegiate training as the condition precedent to entering upon the study of law, though we encourage those who can procure such training to avail themselves of their

Page  94 94 OCTOBER MEETING, Io02. opportunity to do so. We are glad to observe that the proportion of those who bring college diplomas at their entrance is increasing. The Law Faculty have given a signal proof of their devotion to the interests of the school by establishing a law journal, which most creditably represents the Department. Although heavily burdened by their regular work as teachers, they have undertaken this task without any compensation. The proceeds of the Journal are to be appropriated to the increase of the Law Library. It is to be hoped that our Law Alumni will heartily co-operate with them in the maintenance of this magazine. The Homceopathic Medical College is pursuing the even tenor of its way, and receiving as large share of patronage as can perhaps be expected for a school which holds higher standards of attainment for admission and graduation than most of the Homceopathic schools in the country. Its students reap the advantages of instruction in most of the scientific laboratories of the Department of Medicine and Surgery. The School of Pharmacy shows no tendency to growth in numbers, but meets an increasing demand for advanced instruction for a limited number of students. The Dental School, having led the way in lengthening its course to four years, fell off somewhat in numbers, as was anticipated. But we do not regret that fact. Other strong schools are finding themselves compelled to follow our example. We have no solicitude about the attendance, if we can only see our way clear to the erection of a suitable building for the accommodation of the School. The attendance of students in the Summer Session of six weeks of 1902 was as follows: Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts.............................. 349 Department of Medicine and Surgery......................................... 70 Department of Law............................................... 44 Total....................................................................... 463 Of these, 189 were regularly connected with some department. The number of new students was, therefore, 274.

Page  95 OCTOBER MEETING, I902. 95 Though the Summer Session causes us some expense, the usefulness of it, especially to teachers, is so great that it seems to be our duty to continue it. The hospitals still have their capacity tested by applicants for medical and surgical attention. In the University Hospital, 2,307 patients were treated, and in the Homceopathic Hospital, I857. About one-fourth of the patients were farmers or farmers' wives. Representatives from seventy-six counties were received and cared for, and not a few persons who were supported at the public expense were restored to health, and thus enabled to earn their own living. From the Librarian's Report it appears that we had, on June 30, I902, in all the libraries, 65,ooo00 volumes. The number added during the year is 9,539. The periodicals regularly received number I,000. The recorded circulation of books, estimated not to exceed one-half of the actual use, was 167,949 volumes. We have for some years had reason to suspect that diplomas, especially our medical diplomas, had occasionally been fraudulently obtained. It happens, of course, that now and then a diploma is either lost in the transportation of baggage or destroyed by fire. For some years we issued a duplicate diploma on the simple request by letter of the holder of the original. Of late years we have required the applicant to send us an affidavit, swearing to the loss of the diploma and to the circumstances of the loss. We write the word " duplicate" in red ink on the new diploma. But even these precautions do not furnish an absolute safeguard against fraud. This very year we found that a woman, who had an undesirable reputation as a practitioner, was exhibiting one of our diplomas bearing the name of one of our graduates, which she had assumed. She had procured the diploma by writing to our offices under this assumed name, and asking for it on the ground that her old one had been destroyed. We have deemed it our duty to protect our genuine diplomas by bringing her into court and securing her punishment. Fortunately, we were able to secure the presence in court of the woman whose name she had borrowed.

Page  96 96 OCTOBER MEETING, I902. The services of the Faculty Committee of Appointment, which aids students in finding suitable positions as teachers, are proving of greater and greater value, both to students and to schools. The school boards who are in quest of competent teachers in many cases come directly to our Committee, who strive to make the best selections to meet the particular conditions in each school. The labor and responsibility thrown upon the Committee are very considerable. I take pleasure in recognizing the great value of the services rendered by the Students' Christian Association, the Young Men's Christian Association, and the Women's League in aiding new students in finding suitable homes and also employment, by which they can earn something toward their support. The great body of our students have very limited means, and many of them are glad of the opportunity to gain something by honorable toil, however menial. In accordance with thewise policy recently adopted of purchasing, when our means were adequate, some desirable pieces of land adjacent to our campus, the Regents embraced the opportunity presented to them to buy the school building and grounds opposite the University, on State Street. That is a good site for a fine building, which may be erected when needed. Meantime, the school building can at once be made available for relieving the overcrowded state of the rooms in University Hall. We have given to the building the name of West Hall, and classes in English, in the Modern Languages, and in Forestry have already been assigned quarters there. We have had in hand an unprecedented amount of work in repairs and construction, much of which is still unfinished. The continued growth of the University for years has been making these demands for reconstruction and enlargement. But not until now have we had the means to meet the demands. Happily, the recent addition to our income has enabled us to attempt to erect some, though not all, of the buildings we greatly need. i. We have completed the Barbour Gymnasium for Women, an act which was not only desirable in itself, but which was

Page  97 OCTOBER MEETING, I902. 97 necessary to comply with the conditions of some of the private subscriptions through which the building was erected. 2. We have constructed a new floor in the Reading Room and in the Librarian's rooms in the General Library, and have so arranged the seating of the Reading Room as to accommodate a half more students than before. We have also improved the ventilation of those rooms. These steps were of pressing necessity for the comfort and even for the health of the readers. 3. We have begun the construction of a new boiler house and laundry for the University Hospital. We shall remove the boilers from the basement of the Nurses' Home, where an explosion would have caused great loss of property and life. This change is costly, but deemed absolutely necessary. 4. We have erected a building for the accommodation of the following laboratories of the Department of Medicine and Surgery: Hygiene, Physiological Chemistry, Anatomy, Bacteriology, and Pathology. The accommodations for these in our old buildings were inadequate, and the space they occupied was, for the most part, urgently needed for other purposes. For instance, the laboratories of Hygiene and Bacteriology were in the upper story of the Physical Laboratory, every inch of which was needed by the Department of Physics. 5. The Palmer Ward, built primarily for the care of children in the University Hospital, we owe to the generous bequest of Mrs. Love M. Palmer, who gave it and an endowment fund as a monument to her husband, the late Professor Palmer. It will soon be ready for occupancy. 6. The Psychopathic Ward, now in process of erection, is built by a special appropriation of the Legislature, to care for patients suffering from nervous ailments akin to insanity. It is hoped that great benefits may accrue to them from the treatment here, and that thus the pressure upon our asylums for the insane may be somewhat relieved. 7. The Engineering Building will be the most costly of our new structures. The growth of the Engineering Department for the last few years has been so extraordinary that we were

Page  98 98 OCTOBER MEET[ING, 1902. compelled to provide larger and better accommodations for it. We deemed it wise to make our new building large enough to meet our needs for some few years to come, though the demand for thoroughly trained engineers is so great that it will not be surprising if before many years still ampler room will be needed. It will be remembered that Mr. Charles J. Hunt (A.B., 1846) and his wife, Margaret E. Hunt, have already deeded to us a large tract of valuable timber land in California. Mrs. Hunt has now deeded to the Regents in trust another large tract of timber land, situated in Humboldt County, California, for the endowment, after the termination of certain life interests, of scholarships in the Literary Department. One of them is to be named for her husband's father, James B. Hunt, who was formerly a representative in Congress from this State. Our thanks are again due to the Hon. D. M. Ferry, Parke, Davis & Co., Frederick Stearns & Co., Nelson, Baker & Co. and Mr. Theodore Buhl, of Detroit, Hon. Peter White, of Marquette, and the Michigan Gas Association, for the continuance of graduate fellowships which they have been supporting for the last few years; and to the Rockefeller Research Fund for two new fellowships in Bacteriology. We are still looking with hope for the permanent endowment of at least a few fellowships for graduates. We have also to thank Hon. D. M. Ferry for presenting us with a tract of land, some seventeen acres, adjacent to our athletic field. This furnishes a spacious field, in which not only the ball teams can have their practice, but in which the great body of students can simultaneously have outdoor exercise. No gift could be more acceptable or more useful to the students generally. Previously the advantages of the field were for the most part limited to the comparatively small number of students who composed the teams. Our well-equipped gymnasiums and the large field, embracing nearly thirty acres, now afford every facility for physical training. Notwithstanding the welcome addition which has been made to our buildings, certain of the pressing wants mentioned in my last Report are still unprovided for; namely, an enlarge

Page  99 OCTOBER 1MEETING, i9o2. 99 ment of the Library Building, furnishing seminary rooms for advanced students and more book room; a suitable building for the Dental School, which is now badly housed; an enlargement of the Physical Laboratory; and the erection of a laboratory building for the work in Zoology and Botany, and perhaps of Psychology. An endowment for a certain number of fellowships for graduate students is also greatly needed. These should yield an income of four hundred or five hundred dollars a year for each fellowship. If our present income is not curtailed, we hope, by careful economy, to be able in due time to supply most of these lacking buildings, although most of the larger universities in the country, even those which have fewer students than we, are conducted at an expense from fifty to sixty per cent greater than this institution, while Harvard annually expends just about double our income. We are constantly threatened with the loss of some of our ablest professors, because our scale of salaries is below that of several other universities. We have indeed suffered some such losses. It is owing to the loyalty and devotion to us of some of our best men that alluring temptations to go elsewhere have been resisted by them. We enter upon the work of another year with the confident hope that the people of the State, for whose welfare the University was founded and is conducted, will continue to cherish pride in its success and to furnish it their hearty support. JAMES B. ANGELL. Regent Fletcher moved that the report be accepted and adopted and that io,ooo copies be printed for general distribution. It was so ordered by the full vote of the Board. Librarian Davis presented and read his annual report which is as follows: LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. JULY I, I90 —JUNE 30, 1902. To the Honorable, the Board of Regenls.: GENTLEMEN:-In accordance with the By-Law of the University requiring the librarian to make an annual report on

Page  100 100 OCTOBER MEETING, 1902. the growth and condition of the library, I have the honor to submit the following as my report for the year 1901-1902. There were in all of the libraries, June 30, 1902, I65,000 volumes and 1,500 pamphlets.* Of these, 130,654 volumes and 1,250 pamphlets were in the General Library; I9,627 volumes were in the Law Library; 12,062 volumes and 200 pamphlets were in the Medical Library; 1,120 volumes were in the Dental Library; and 1,537 volumes and 50 pamphlets in the Library of the Homoeopathic Medical College. In my report for the year I892 I referred to the fact that we were binding the more important of our unbound pamphlets, and dwelt at some length upon the reasons for doing so. At that time we could not make much haste in the matter, but after the establishment of the bindery it was possible to move faster, and the work has been pushed as rapidly as possible. For the last three or four years it has not seemed expedient to report the number of pamphlets left unbound, as nothing definite could be reported. Now, however, the change has gone so far that an enumeration on the new basis may be begun. In passing to this new enumeration 1 will state briefly what has been done. Of what had before been called unbound pamphlets simply, we made three classes: I. Those of special interest for any reason, and those containing considerable matter were bound singly, and each one was called a volume and counted as a volume. 2. Those of sufficient importance to catalogue, but not of sufficient importance to bind singly, were classified and bound in volumes. Disposed of in this way they were no longer counted singly, but collectively as volumes. 3. Those worthy of preservation, but not of sufficient importance to catalogue, were classified and disposed of in such a manner as to be available if wanted. These are known as pamphlets and reported as such. Of the first class, that is, those of sufficient interest to bind singly, 3, I oo have been bound. Of the second class, 3,185 * The above number of volumes is the number remaining after a reduction has been made for lost and worn out books.

Page  101 OCTOBER MEET1ING, [902. 101 have been bound in 163 volumes, averaging about 20 to the volume. Where there have not been enough of a class to form a volume, a volume has been begun in a temporary case. These temporary cases receive the proper volume number and go upon the shelves, and the pamphlets they contain are catlogued. When a sufficient number to form a volume have accumulated they are permanently bound and the temporary case is available for similar use again. Of the third class, 1,500 have been disposed of in the manner already described. In regard to the quality of the binding put upon these pamphlets, experience has demonstrated that when a number are bound together, good material and good workmanship are necessary, and this experience has guided us in the binding of the classified pamphlets. The greater number of pamphlets bound singly have generally been inexpensively bound. Such as were rare and of exceptional value received coverings to correspond with their contents. The new arrangement of our maps, to which I alluded in my last report, and which we hoped to accomplish during the year, we were obliged to postpone for various reasons. The total additions for the year were 9,539 volumes, distributed as follows: General Library, 7,355 volumes; Law Library, 800 volumes; Medical Library, 1,163 volumes; Dental Library, io6 volumes; Homeeopathic Library, 115 volumes. The number of periodicals regularly received was o000. Of these 739 came to the General Library; 20 to the Law Library; 200 to the Medical Library; i6 to the Dental Library, and 25 to the Homceopathic Library. Your appropriation for the purchase of books for the year, including subscriptions to periodicals and the maintenance of the bindery, was $i6,ooo.oo. You divided this sum among the several libraries as follows: G eneral Library................................................................,580 00 Law L ibrary................................................................... 2,460 oo M edical Library............................................................. 2,460 00 D ental L ibrary................................................................. 250 00 Hom oeopathic Library........................................................ 250 oo Total................................................................. 6,ooo oo

Page  102 102 OCTOBER MEETING, r9o2. THE GENERAL LIBRARY. ADDITIONS.-Of the 7,355 volumes added to the General Library, 3,711 were purchased, 3,085 were presented, and 559 were the result of binding periodicals. EXPENDITURES. -The bills certified to by me for this library, exclusive of the bindery bills, amounted to $8,649.47. Of this sum $7,003.82 was for books and periodical publications received irregularly, and $1,645.65 was for annual subscriptions to periodicals for the year 1902. For miscellaneous expenses for the year, you assigned to the library the sum of $I,I96.00. The expenditures were as follows: Day Attendant in Cloak Room.......................................... 171 00 Evening Attendant in Cloak Room....................................... 64 98 Stationery and Postage...................................................... 04 39 Sundries, Catalogue Cards, Readers' Slips, Etc....................... 278 80 Pay of two young ladies doing general work........................... 619 52 *Total...................................................................$ 1,238 69 This account was therefore overdrawn $42.69. The expenditures from the endowment funds were as follows: Expended of the income of the Ford-Messer Fund......................$977 58 Expended of the income of the Coyl Fund................................. 80 99 No draft was made upon the Goethe Fund. According to the Treasurer's books the condition of the three funds, July i, I902, was as follows: Ford-Messer Fund ($20.000ooo) with unexpended interest added.....$24,375 77 Coyl Fund ($io,ooo) with unexpended interest added.................2,659 38 Goethe Fund with interest (see below).................................... 206 09 IMPORTANT PURCHASES. - It has been the policy of the Library Committee to use the income of the Ford-Messer and Coyl Funds for the purchase of important sets of books and not for single volumes. On this account the greater number of the following valuable additions to the library for the year must be credited to those funds. *This sum is accounted for here as money used entirely for the General Library. It should be said that it was drawn upon, also, for the miscellaneous expenses of the Medical, Dental, and Homceopathic Libraries.

Page  103 OCTOBER MEETING, I902. 103 I. Sargent's Silva of North America, Vols. I-I2 (Volumes 13 and 14 are yet to be supplied).......................................... $350 oo 2. Dugdale's Monasticon and History of St. Pauls. 9 Vols... I60 oo 3. De Rossi Bullettino di Arte Cristiana,I862-I895............. I01 00 4. La Grande Encyclopeedie. 30 Vols.............................. 97 oo 5. Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. Vols. I-39, Pt. 2, and Index, I785-I888............................................ 250 oo 6. Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, Ist and 2nd series. 40 Vols........................................................................... 28 75 7. The Studio. 23 Vols................................................. 75 oo 8. Canina's L'Arichitettura Antica. 9 Vols. of Text and 3 Vols. of Plates.6........................................................ 62 74 9. Acaddmie Royale des inscriptions et des belles-lettes. Paris: I707-I808. 50 V ols............................................................ 52 50 o1. Revue generale des Sciences pures et appliqudes. Vols 1-15. 45 90 II Galileo. Le opere. Edizione Nazionale. 9 Vols.............. 58 37 12. Mazois et Gau. Ruines de Ponpei. 4 Vols.................... 42 50 I3. Somer's Tracts. 13 Vols............................................ 37 50 THE SHAKESPEARE AND GOETHE COLLECTIONS.-Mr. McMillan was not called upon for any contribution to the Shakespeare Library during the year. There were added to it, however, by purchase from the Library funds, frorm money obtained by the sale of duplicates (about $50.00), and by gifts from various individuals, 64 volumes. The whole number of volumes is now 5,082. The original Goethe fund, contributed by German-American citizens of the State and others was $I,300.00. By resolution of the Board, June, i886, the President of the University, the Professor of the Germanic Languages, and the Librarian were charged with the expenditure of the money subject to the condition that when $1,ooo.oo had been used the balance should be reserved as a fund and only the income of it expended. The sum constituting the fund would therefore be $300.00. Unexpected continuations of some works carried the expenditure beyond the specified amount ($i,ooo.oo). There will, therefore, be no further payments from this fund until by the addition of interest or further contributions to the fund, the present balance is raised to the required sum. Some additions to the collection were made during the year from the regular book appropriation of the German department, and these have raised the total of the collection to 1,024 volumes. GIFTS.-The friends of the University have kept the Li

Page  104 104 OCTOBER MEETING, I902. brary in remembrance as is evidenced by the number of volumes presented, viz., 3,085. The Duke of Loubat has continued to send the reproductions of ancient Mexican manuscripts executed for him. Two were received during the yearI. The Tonalamatl, of the Aubin Collection. Edited by Edw. Seler. A reproduction of an old Mexican MS. in the National Library of France with notes in English. 2. Codex Fejervary-Mayer, edited by Edw. Seler. A reproduction of a MS. in the Liverpool Free Public Museum. Volumes 144 and 145 of their " Minutes" were received from the Institution of Civil Engineers of Great Britain. From Miss Sarah Dorsey, of Marshall, Michigan, were received the two following works (bound together), of the celebrated Dr. Konrad Gesner, viz., I. Thierbucz. 2. Fischbuch. These are parts of his Historia Animalia which was a summary of the knowledge of his time in regard to animal life. The illustrations, which are numerous, are very curious. A complete file of the Evening News (Detroit) for the year was received from the publisher, James E. Scripps, Esq. The Rev. Henrj C. Granger, of Chicago, of the Class of '7I, whose gifts have been frequent and valuable, gave 56 volumes and 77 pamphlets. The greater part of these were Catholic works and they strengthen much our weak collection of the books of that church. From Mr. Peter Schmidt, of Pontiac, were received the numbers of the German periodical, Die Ilzustrirte Zeitung, for sixteen years. Mr. Kendall P. Brooks gave sets of the Baptist Missionary Magazine, the Home Magazine (Baptist), and various church reports. The Missionary magazines are valuable not only for the religious matter that they contain, but also for the geographical, ethnological, and linguistic matter contributed by foreign missionaries.

Page  105 OCTOBER M1EETING, 1902. 105 From H. P. Davock, Esq., of Detroit (Class of '70), 287 volumes of miscellaneous books were received. A number of these were rare and valuable. Dr. Mary M. Cutler, of the Medical Class of '88, and now of Seoul, Corea, has for several years been sending us a number of the periodical publications of that country. She gave us last year 50 volumes of Corean books to which reference was made in my report. Later she added another volume to her gift. This was "An Atlas of the Chinese Empire, compiled in the time of the Emperor Kung Leung of the Ching Dynasty." It consists of 12 parts, brought together and held between board covers by cords. From Mr. William J. Howard, of Toronto, Canada, 8o volumes relating to the Society of Friends were received. They relate to the history and doctrines of the society. It would be difficult to find eighty works on this subject of more value than these. They were presented by Mr. Howard as a memorial of his late wife, Anna Halleck Kelsey Howard, a graduate of the Law Class of i880. Mr. William Viennot, of the National Library of France, sent volumes 6 and 7 of the Catalogue of printed books of that library. He had previously sent the earlier volumes. On my representation that we had a few numbers of the Journal of the Diocese of Western Michigan, the Rt. Rev. George D. Gillespie, Bishop of the Diocese, kindly sent such others as were available for distribution. These went'far towards completing our set. In the disposition of the books of President Tappan, his Bible, in which he had himself recorded the marriage, births, and deaths of the family, was secured by Professor Gabriel Campbell, now Professor of Philosophy in Dartmouth College. Professor Campbell had for some time had the feeling that the University ought to possess the volume, and in April it was presented by him, and it now has its place in the Library with other memorials of the first president of the University. In response to a solicitation made by President Angell through the State Department at Washington, 54 volumes

Page  106 106 OCTOBER MEETING, 1902. relating to the Art Collections of France were received from the government of that country. From the same source we have for a number of years received, as published, the volumes of the great historical publication Collection de Documents inedits sur l'histoire de France. Two additional volumes of this series came during the year. This generosity on the part of the French government is highly appreciated. Yale University issued in connection with her Bicentennial Anniversary a series of publications representing the work Of members of her Faculties. Copies of these publications, 29 in number, were sent to us with the compliments of Yale University. We received also from the University a copy of the " Literary Diary of Ezra Stiles," edited by Franklin B. Dexter, 3 volumes. Mr. Louis F. Post, editor and publisher of " The Public," contributed Vols I-4 of that publication, bound. Hon. A. M. Todd, of Kalamazoo, presented through Dr. A. B. Prescott, a copy of Das Buch zu Distilierendie, von Hieronimus Brunsschwig, Strasburg, 1532. In this volume the operations of distilling, as then practiced, are profusely illustrated by two hundred quaint wood cuts. Dr. H. S. Jewett, of Dayton, Ohio, of the Class of '68, gave 19 volumes. Among them were three exceedingly rare medical books of the sixteenth century for which we had been looking for some time without success. There was also a fine copy of the third edition of Dr. Johnson's Dictionary, 2 vols,, folio, 1765. Professor Kelsey, during his residence in Rome in I900 -I90o, as Director of the American School of Classical Studies, found for sale at exceptionally low prices, a number of exceedingly valuable books for the work of his department. As it was impossible to pay for the more expensive ones from the Library Fund he represented the matter to Hon. D. M. Ferry, of Detroit, who authorized the purchase at his own expense. They were the great work of De Rossi, La Roma Sotterranea Cristiana, in 4 folio volumes, and Garrucci's Storia della arte Cristiana, in six folio volumes.

Page  107 OCTOBER MEETING, I902. 107 Professor J. M. Hart, of Cornell University, gave five important works on literary subjects. It gives me pleasure to acknowledge here a very courteous act on the part of the Canadian government. I had applied to the Secretary of the Interior at Ottawa for maps showing the Forests Reserves of the Dominion. He replied that these were not on any maps, but that he would have their location shown, in color, on existing maps, and forward them. After a very little delay the maps, eight in number, with the promised additions, were received. Sundry gifts of books and pamphlets are acknowledged from President Angell, from Professors Adams, Kelsey, Hempl, Demmon, and Freer; from Dr. S. A. Green, of Boston, Edwin S. Balch, of Philadelphia, Miss Pease, of this city, the Ann Arbor High School, and many other sources. On solicitation, the following trade journals of the country were sent to the library by their proprietors: I. Illustrated Glass and Pottery World. Chicago. 2. American Carpet and Upholstery Journal. Philadelphia. 3. St. Louis Lumberman. St. Louis. 4. Butchers and Packers Gazette. St. Louis. 5. Dry Goods Economist. New York. 6. National Provisioner. New York. 7. The Tradesman. Chattanooga, Tenn. 8. The Manufacturers Record. Baltimore. 9. Book-Keeper. Detroit. Io. Horseshoers' Journal. Detroit. If. Indicator and National Journal of Insurance. Detroit. 12. Motorman and Conductor. Detroit. I3. Trade and the "Storekeeper." Detroit. I4. The Grand Rapids Furniture Record. I5. Threshermen's Review. St. Joseph, Michigan. I6. The Chicago Grocer. I7. The Lumber Trade Journal. New Orleans. USE OF THE LIBRARY ---The report of Mr. Finney, assistant in charge of circulation, sustains the opinion expressed during the year that there was an unwonted activity on the part of our readers. The recorded use of books was as follows: Recorded circulation in Reading Room and Seminary Rooms...I58,o36 vols. Drawn for home use by Professors....................................... 9,913 " Total......................... 67,949 "

Page  108 108 OCTOBER MEETING, 102. This is io per cent. over the recorded circulation of last year. As I have had occasion to say before, this recorded use represents no more (if actually that) than one-half of the use of the library. Our inter-library loans amounted to 6i volumes.* The daily average of readers in the Reading Room was I75. The occasions were frequent when all of the seats (2Io) were filled, and no temporary accommodation that we could provide was adequate. At such times we felt obliged to permit an overflow to the stairways in the halls. The number of students admitted to the stacks under the two-months rule was 75-the full number entitled to admission. During the two semesters, 424 students were admitted to the Seminary Rooms, as follows: 120 to the East Room for the study of History, Political Economy, Pedagogy, Philosophy, and Mathematics; 304 to the West Room for the study of Language, Literature, and Art. It should be said here that these rooms are overcrowded, while many whose work requires facilities of this nature cannot be accommodated at all. During the holiday vacation a scarcity of coal made it necessary to shut off the heat from all buildings except the Hospitals and that part of University Hall devoted to administration. As a number of students were remaining in town in order to use the library, which was of course uninhabitable, the rule requiring the use of books in the building was suspended and the doors opened for an hour each day for issuing books to students to use in their rooms. About oo volumes were issued daily in this way and no losses resulted. CONDITION OF THE LIBRARY.-I have several times referred to the favorable influences exerted upon the condition of the library by the presence of the bindery. With the ability to make necessary repairs at once there is no excuse for broken bindings * For some years it has been the practice of the better equipped institutions to loan their books, if not in demand at home, to scholars in other institutions who desired to consult them for short intervals. The loan is not made directly to the individual, but to the library of the institution with which he is connected, which assumes financial responsibility for the loan, and is responsible also for the cost of transportation.

Page  109 OCTOBER MEETING, I902. 109 and loose leaves, and I am glad to say that in the particular of repairs the library is in good condition. For the first time in several years we have been able to make an inspection of the departmental, or outlying, collections. This was done by Mr. Severance, the General Assistant. I am sorry to report that some of these collections were found in a very unsatisfactory condition. The action of the Board for their establishment was taken March 21, I894. Two things required by the resolution adopted were: i. Proper cases for the reception of the books. 2. Responsibility of the head of the department for their safety. It was found that in some cases'this responsibility had been delegated to persons whose tenure of office was of a brief nature, and whose successors did not take over this duty. This has been to the detriment, or loss, of the books. In the most serious case-that of the Nurses' Library at the Hospital-I have withdrawn the. books until their safety shall be better assured. It is quite evident that in the case of these collections frequent inspection by the library force is necessary. The completion of the reclassification of the library last year made an examination of them possible during the year under consideration. An annual examination is on our schedule of work for the future-and oftener if circumstances seem to require it. There were many volumes that could not be found when the library was reclassified and the outlying collections examined. The result of a painstaking search by Mr. Finney during the summer was the finding of about half of these. He is of the opinion that careful observation and checking during the coming year will reduce the number much more. The books missed in the operations of the year, and of which no traces have been yet found, are more than I have ever before reported for a single year. The list is as follows: Adams, H. C.-Science of Finance. 1898. Baker, G. P.-Principles of Argumentation. I895. Bennett, C. E.-Latin Grammar. I895. Diez, F.-Zwei altromanische Gedichte. 1852. Fiske, John.-Destiny of Man. I866. ' " -Idea of God. 1887.

Page  110 110 OCTOBER MEETING, T902. Hegel.-Introduction to the Study of the Fine Arts. Tr. by Bosanquet. I886. McLaughlin, A. C.-Lewis Cass (American Statesmen Series). Marshall, A.-Principles of Economics. Vol. I. All published. 1891. Matthews, Brander.-Introduction to the Study of American Literature. I896. Matson, H.-References for Literary Workers. 1892. Roosevelt, T.-Winning of the West. Vols. I-3. Russell, I. C.-Glaciers of North America. I897. " " " — Lakes of North America. 1895. 2 copies. " " " -Rivers of North America. 1898. Strong, Josiah.-The New Era. 1893. Ten Brink.-Five Lectures on Shakespeare. Weil, H.-Order of Words in the Ancient Languages. Tr. by Super. I887. In all, 21 volumes. It should be said that almost all of these were books of reference, permanently shelved in the Reading Room and accessible to all, or placed there as temporary reference books in response to requests from professors. This experience has led to the locating of all books behind the desk, except those of common reference. Some mutilations of books and periodicals were discovered during the year, but not many. Attempts were made to discover the persons who had been guilty of these outrages, but without success. THE WORK OF THE YEAR.-This has been very largely the routine work only. The unusual increase in the use of the library with which the year began, and the fact that the desk attendants are all of them new to the work, made an addition to this branch of the force necessary. At the October meeting of the Board relief was given in this particular by the employment of two additional attendants. The following may be specified as extra work accomplished: I. Completion, practically, of the change in the method of disposing of pamphlets. 2. Examination of outside collections. 3. Completion of an additional case for engravings and photographs, and the preparation and placing of these,

Page  111 OCTOBER MEETING, 1902. 111 4. Completion, as far as possible, of files of college catalogues and reports, and their systematic arrangement. 5. Much more reference work than heretofore. 6. Solicitation of free material on a wider scale than usual. THE FORCE AND WORK FOR I902-Iq03. —Mr. Jordan, Mr. Finney, and Mr. Severance remain in the discharge of the duties heretofore performed by them. Miss Lane and Miss Belser will continue the work which they have been accustomed to do. The desk attendants will be Mr. R. E. Andrews, Mr. G. W. Barnum, Mr. M. A. Hodgdon, Mr. H. E. Olson, Mr. E. W. Waldron, Mr. R. I. K. Wood, and Mr. H. M. Comins. The two last named together cover only the full time of one man. Mr. Ernest S. Bates will have charge of the East Seminary Room and Mr. F. F. Potter charge of the West Room. At its May meeting the Board authorized the employment of a person whose duty it should be to receive all books drawn in the Reading Room, when returned, duly credit them, and arrange and classify them for return to the shelves. The compensation allowed was $750.0o. The employment of an assistant cataloguer was also authorized at $500.00. Mr. Edwin N. Brown has been engaged for the former work at $600.00, and Mr. L. L. Forsythe to assist him at $I50.oo. Miss Esther Braley has been engaged as assistant cataloguer. There are three things that we shall try to accomplish, over and above the routine work. i. The Improvement of the Catalogues. —An item of the library budget passed by you in May was the enlargement of the case containing the official catalogue. This will enable us to put that important instrument in order. Both catalogues, the official and the public, need to have many cards rewritten. There are those that were not properly written at the outset, and there are many others that are worn and soiled by constant use. The assistant cataloguer whose employment was authorized by you, will aid greatly in bringing this improvement about. 2. An Improved Arrangement of the Maps.-This arrangement we had planned to make last year, but failed to bring it

Page  112 112 OCTOBER MEETING, I902. about. You have authorized the furnishing of the map room, and I do not think we shall fail to bring about the desired result this year. In a former report I referred to the importance that maps have assumed in the work of instruction. 3. An Improved Arrangement of the Current Numbers of Periodicals.-We have added considerably to the number of our periodicals without any addition to our facilities for handling them. You have authorized the construction of new pigeon holes, which was a necessary preliminary of this work. At the same time, by the proposed removal of the greater number of the newspapers from the East Room to the basement, we shall be able to afford the members of the faculties much needed facilities for using the periodicals. A NEED OF THE LIBRARY.-There is a matter that I think it my duty to bring to your notice at this time. It is the greater demand that is now made upon the fund set apart for the purchase of books. For several years the annual appropriation of $I5,000.00 met the demand in a very gratifying way. The current literature relating to existing departments of instruction was kept up fairly well and we were able each year to do something towards acquiring the desirable books of past years. But the addition of new subjects to the curriculum in recent years has changed this. Within three years the following new courses of instruction have been established, viz: Administrative Law, Naval Architecture, Higher Commercial Education, Forestry, Insurance-five new courses of instruction. Except for a few books, having a bearing on other subjects also, and touching these subjects only incidentally, there was nothing in the library to serve as working material for these courses. The absolutely necessary books have been provided -at the expense, of course, of the old subjects-but a large outlay will be necessary to bring the literature of the new subjects up and, afterwards, to keep it up. I do not forget that more room is needed for books and for readers, but this is already known to you and I will not take time with what must be repetition.

Page  113 OCTOBER AMEETING, I902. 113 THE OTHER LIBRARIES. THE MEDICAL LIBRARY.-The additions to the Medical Library were I,I63 volumes and 200 pamphlets. Of these, 716 volumes were purchased, 297 presented, and I50 were the result of binding periodicals. The total of bills certified to by me for this library was $2,388.I5. Of this sum, $1,625.69 was for books and irregular periodical publications, and $762.46 was for subscriptions to periodicals for I902.* The gift of some rare volumes to this library, by Dr. H. S. Jewett, of Dayton, Ohio, has already been referred to in this report. You appropriated in June, I901, $1,ooo.oo from the Bates Professorship Fund, to be expended by the new Bates Professor of the Diseases of Women and Children, Dr. Peterson, in bringing up the literature of his subject. Of this appropriation, $869.04 had been expended June 30, 1902, and unfilled orders were out, covering the balance of $I30.96. THE LAW LIBRARY.-The additions to the Law Library were 800 volumes. Of these, 656 were purchased and I44 presented. The following particulars in regard to this library I quote from the report of Professor V. H. Lane, Law Librarian: "Our library force is made up of Miss Gertrude Elstner Woodard, as Assistant Librarian, with Mr. Charles R. Loomis assisting her. These persons, with what time I give to the work of the library, seem to be caring very well for our present needs. There has been put into the library during the summer vacation one large case for additions to our State Reports. I think our accommodations are now adequate for our needs for at least a year or two, provided we had a few feet of additional shelving to relieve our text-book section, which could be put in at a very little expense. I am pleased to note that during the past year we have commenced a card catalogue for our *Of the above sum of $2,388.15, a part, $31I.09, was drawn from an accumulation of money appropriated for the Dental Library. The literature of one department in this case is in part identical with that of the other,

Page  114 114 OCTOBER MEETING, I902. text-book section of the library and shall increase it during the present year as time can be found to do so. We hope soon to have it in a condition where it will serve a very positive need in the library. "Since the close of the last college year the heirs of the late Judge Thomas M. Cooley have very generously donated to the library a number of books from his library as a memorial collection. Our Faculty appreciate very deeply this remembrance of one who was so long associated with this Department, and whose great fame and learning gave to it so much of that impetus which has carried it to its present high standing. "Judge Henry H. Swan, of the Eastern District of Michigan, has generously contributed Puffendorff's 'Observations of the Universal Law,' and Grotius' 'War and Peace,' both of which are fine copies of old editions bound in vellum." THE DENTAL LIBRARY.-The additions to this library were Io6 volumes, of which 20 were bought, 56 presented, and 30 were the result of binding periodicals. The bills certified to by me for dental literature strictly, amounted to $76.73. There was in addition a draft upon this appropriation of $311.09 for medical literature to which reference has already been made. THE HOMCEOPATHIC LIBRARY. —The additions to this library were 115 volumes and 50 pamphlets. Of these, 63 volumes were bought, and 42 volumes and 50 pamphlets were presented. The principal gifts were a set of the Homeopathische Monatsbldtter, I873-1901, from Dr. Richard Haehl, the editor, and a quantity of desirable medical matter, consisting of books, pamphlets, transactions and proceedings of societies, etc., from Dr. G. W. Bowen, of Fort Wayne, Indiana. The total of bills certified to was $218.52.

Page  115 OCTOBER MEETING, I902. 115 THE BINDERY. The outlay for the bindery during the year was as follows: W ages.......................................................................... $2, 52 Materials, less $I8.oo for waste gold recovered.......................... 444 6I Total.........................................................$....2,596 71 The two following tables, prepared by Mr. Hollands, the binder, show the nature of the work done, the cost of it, and the distribution of the work among the departments. The prices charged in making up the estimate of cost are those generally charged in outside binderies. Statement of Binding-July I901 to June 1902. No. of Estima- Expense Summary. ted Ex- per Pieces pense. Volume. Bound and rebound, leather, vols....... 1,348 $,292.10 o0.96 Bound and rebound, cloth, vols......... 2,558 805.75 0.32 Repaired, resewed, etc., vols...........,060 269.33 0.25 Maps, charts, etc.................. 64. 175 Labels and bookplates........347 s08.14 Covers, cases, etc..................... 58 6.50 Extra lettering, class numbers.........,649 49.47 Plates guarded..................... 541 9. 8 Special work......................... 55 3500oo Total..........................$2,597.85

Page  116 116 OCTOBER MEETING, I902. Distribution by Departments. No. of Estima- Per Cent Share General Library. ted Ex- of Ex- of Vol'mes. pense. pense. Expense. Bound and rebound, leather........... 998 $950.90 Bound and rebound, cloth............. 2,213 7I5.55 Repaired, resewed, etc................ 771 I40.63 Maps, charts, etc.................. 64 I.75 Labels and bookplates............... 469. 80 Covers, cases, etc..................... 58 16.50 Extra lettering, class numbers......... x,649 49-47 Plates guarded....................... 541 9.8 Special work........................ 55 35.00 6,928 I,931.41 74.4 $I,93.95 Law Library. Bound and rebound, leather........... 142 136.60 Bound and rebound, cloth............. 7 3.50 Repaired, resewed, etc............... 279 I24.50 Labels............................... 3,878 I06.34 4306 370.94 I4.3 37.33 Medical Library. Bound and rebound, leather........... I68 I67.50 Bound and rebound, cloth............ 296 71.50 Repaired, resewed, etc............... 7 3.00 472 242.00 9.3 241.49 Homoeopathic Library. Bound and rebound, leather........... 8 750 Bound and rebound, cloth............ 34 II05 42 i855 0.7 i8. 8 Dental Library. Bound and rebound, leather........... 32 29.60 Bound and rebound, cloth............. 8 4.I5 Repaired, resewed, etc............... 3 2.20 43 34.95 I.3 33.76 00o.0 $2,596.71 It is seen by referring to the first table that the cost of the work at ordinary prices was $2,597.85. Comparing this with

Page  117 OCTOBER MEETING, 1902. 117 the actual cost for labor and materials, $2,596.7I, there is a balance in favor of the bindery of $I.I4. This is the smallest balance yet reported, but such balances must always be affected by the amount of material bought, as compared with that used during the year. The number of employees was one less than in the year before, and, in consequence, both output and expense were considerably reduced. On the basis of the percentages shown in the second table, the expense to be borne by each of the libraries is as follows: General Library............................................................ $,93I 95 Law Library.................................................................... 37 33 Medical Library............................................................. 24I 49 Homoeopathic Library.......................................... I8 I8 D ental Library.................I.............I................................... 33 76 Dental Lbrary..33 76 Total........................................................................ 2,596 7 The above amounts have been charged to the appropriations for the several libraries. The following statement in regard to the bindery, from its establishment in February, 1896, to July I, I902, will be of interest: Value of work done, based on outside prices... $I5,263 59 Cost of Plant........................................ 715 90 Paid out in wages.................................... II,37I 58 Cost of materials..................................... 3,18I 24 I5,268 72 Excess of outlay over value of work........ 5 13 Value of Plant and Material on hand..... 1,200 00 To the credit of the bindery......... $ I,94 87 I trust you will pardon me if, in concluding this report, I call attention to the fact that it is my twenty-fifth annual report as Librarian of the University, and that this year completes my twenty-ninth year of service in the Library. When I assumed the duties of librarian in October, I877, the Library occupied a part of the lower floor of the old Law Building; now the Library Building is one of the largest on the Campus; then there were upon the shelves 26,409 volumes; now there are I65,ooo volumes; then the number of period

Page  118 118 OCTOBER MEETING, i902. icals taken was 88; now I,ooo are taken; then the recorded use of the Library, which was practically the whole use, was less than 50,000 volumes annually; now the recorded use, which does not exceed one-half of the actual use, is 167,949 volumes; then the accessions for the year were 667 volumes; this year 9,539 volumes were added; then the Library was open for use IO1 hours daily; now it is open I44 hours; then the force consisted of the Librarian, a lady doing clerical work, and a lad to assist in serving readers; now the force consists of the librarian, three assistants in charge of departments of work, three other assistants, eight desk attendants, two persons in charge of seminary rooms, and a bindery force of four persons. Probably in no department of the University are the great changes wrought in the last quarter century more apparent than in this one. The increase in the number of volumes in the time is creditable, but in this respect we have been outstripped by a number of other Universities. In the use of our books, however, I am convinced that we have surpassed all others. I will repeat what I have said in an earlier report, that the characteristic of the Ann Arbor student is the reading habit. Very respectfully submitted, RAYMOND C. DAVIS, Librarian. October I. I902. On motion of Regent Barbour, the report was accepted and ordered printed in the minutes, and it was also ordered that 500 copies be furnished the Librarian for exchange with other libraries.

Page  119 OCTOBER MnEETING, 9go2. 119 The Treasurer presented and read his annual report, which was accepted and ordered printed in the minutes. TREASURER'S REPORT. FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, I902. To the Finance Committee, Board of Regents, University of Michigan: GENTLEMEN: Herewith I submit my annual report for the fiscal year ending June 30, I902. Respectfully, H. SOULE, Treasurer. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901.......................... $ 21,857 91 From State Treasurer, on acct. 1 mill tax for General Expenses............................................ 331,422 50 From accumulation of the '1 mill tax, Special Expenses, 71,298 35 From State Treasurer, on acct. of Special Appropriations........................................... 9,000 00 From State Treasurer, on account of University interest 38,285 47 Earnings and Miscellaneous Receipts..................... 269,245 26 $741,109 49 Disbursements. Paid on account of General Expenses...................... 603,818 70 Paid on account of Special Appropriations.............. 8,850 25 Paid on account of Accumulation of Savings............. 77,394 41 Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1902............... 51,046 13 741,109 49 GENERAL FUND. RECEIPTS TO THE GENERAL FUND. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901..........................$ 27,017 78 From State Treasurer, acct. University Interest......... 38,285 47 From State Treasurer, acct. of 14 Mill Tax............... 331,422 50 From Interest on Deposits................................. 898 73 From University Hospital Earnings..................... 39,204 33 From Homoeopathic Hospital Earnings................... 14,942 71 From Dental Operating Rooms............................ 5,027 66 From Engineering Shops.......................... 661 83 From Miscellaneous Sources.............................. 5,110 81 From General Library, Duplicate Books Sold........... 101 94 From Students' Fees: Literary Department..................$ 55,180 00 Literary Dept., Summer School....... 5,115 00 Engineering Department.............. 21,365 00 Medical Department................... 20,995 00 Medical Dept., Summer School.......... 1,150 00 Law Department..................... 40,195 00 Law Dept., Summer School............ 1,158 00 Dental Department.................... 8,335 00 Homceopathic Medical Department... 2,820 00 Pharmacy Department................. 3,225 00 Chemical Laboratory................... 11,731 75 Hygienic Laboratory................. 2,100 00 Zoological Laboratory................. 592 00 Botanical Laboratory.................. 476 00 Physiological Laboratory.............. 168 00 Pathological Laboratory.............. 1,640 00 Histological Laboratory........... 1,771 00 Anatomical Laboratory............... 1,895 00 Mechanical Laboratory................ 3,520 00 Pharmacological Laboratory.......... 120 00 Electrotherapeutical Laboratory...... 112 00 Dental Laboratory..................... 555 00 Medical Demonstrations............. 5,890 00

Page  120 120 OCTOBER MEETING, I902. Electrical Engineering, Physics....... $631 00 Key Deposits............................ 465 00 Drawing Boards....................... 297 00 Waterman Gymnasium................ 2,917 50 Barbour Gymnasium................. 638 00 Diplomas............................... 8,240 00 $203, Total Fees......................$ 203,297 25 Fees refunded.......... 6,872 99 Students' Fees, Net............$ 196,424 26 DISBURSEMENTS FROM THE GENERAL FUND. General Pay Roll..............................$ 176,579 44 Summer School, Literary, Pay Roll....... 6,545 00 $183,] Summer School, Literary, Current Expenses, Law Department, Pay Roll.................... 39,184 00 Summer School, Law, Pay Roll.............. 1,556 00 40,7 Summer School, Law, Expenses.......... Law Library, Books...................... 2, Law Department Expenses.................... Medical Department, Pay Roll........... 38,785 00 Medical Dept., Summer School, Pay Roll.. 803 75 39,1 Medical Department, Expenses............... Medical Dept., Summer School, Expenses... Medical Department, Books...............2,] Pharmacy and Chemical Dept., Pay Rolls.... 24,453 26 24, Pharmacy Department, Expenses..........12,( Homoeopathic Medical College, Pay Roll..... 5,175 00 5,] Homoeopathic Medical College,'Expenses.... Homoeopathic Medical College, Books....... Dental College, Pay Roll....................... 13,240 00 13, Dental College, Expenses......................6,( Dental College, Books.................... Engineering Department, Pay Roll...... 42,686 38 42,( Engineering Department, Expenses........... University Hospital, Pay Roll.......... 12,791 83 12,] University Hospital, Expenses........22,( Homceopathic Hospital, Pay Roll......... 4,337 09 4,I Homceopathic Hospital, Expenses.............14,1 Book Bindery, Pay Roll........................ 2,152 10 2,] Repairs, Pay Roll.............................. 783 25 Addition to Heating Plant, Pay Roll.......... 913 90,297 25 $ 665,971 01 124 44 372 77 740 00 81 28 135 77 805 82 588 75 131 70 31 75 124 31 153 26 )55 64 175 00 [54 34 118 38 240 00 )38 29 364 33 386 38 370 34 791 83 324 52 137 09 534 94 152 10 783 25 )13 90 501 14 336 90 731 59 206 36 580 69 134 30 135 15 372 17 302 34 151 35 287 25 578 33 742 71 123 19 )97 04 )94 98 199 72 557 04 509 04 125 76 352 45 144 51 216 91 122 44 187 26 L11 90 133 09 101 59 10 00 Amount of Salaries Paid from General Fund, $369,986 00 Contingent account....................... Repairs account................................ Fuel account.................................... Lights account.................................. Books for General Library..................... Current Expenses for General Library....... Materia Medica.............................. Postage.......................................... Advertising and Printing...................... Museum............................. Botanical Gardens.............................. Botanical Laboratory..................... Histological Laboratory....................... Hygienic Laboratory........................... Zoological Laboratory.................... Anatomical Laboratory........................ Engineering Laboratory....................... Pathological Laboratory....................... Physiological Laboratory...................... Engineering Shops............................. Civil Engineering............................ School Inspection.............................. Observatory........................... Physics, Electrical Engineering............... Surgical Demonstrations...................... Surgical Clinic.............................. Electrotherapeutics........................... Nervous Diseases.............................. Mineralogy.................... 9,P 10,f 19,1 2,f 8,1 1,] 1,( 2,1 3,1 2,| 1,1 ] ] ]

Page  121 OCTOBER MEETING, I902. 121 Waterman Gymnasium........................ Barbour Gymnasium.......................... Students' Fees Refunded...................... Philosophy..................................... Carpenter Shop Supplies..................... Teams..................................... Geology........................................ Electrical Supplies............................. Ophthalmology............................... Dermatology................................... Latin............................................ Music........................................... Theory and Practice........................... Heating Supplies............................... General Catalogue............................ Commencement Expenses.................... Appointment Committee..................... G erm an........................................ Diplomas....................................... Greek......................................... Addition to Heating Plant.................... University Laundry............................ Water Supply................................. Alumni Association........................... Asylum Pathologist........................... English Philology..................... E nglish......................................... Semitics....................................... Naval Architecture............................ American History............................. History......................................... French.......................................... Michigan Law Review........................ Refunded to State Treasurer.................. Transfer to Accumulation of Savings-Special A ccount.................................. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1902........ $862 19 130 85 6,872 99 246 71 1,078 95 1,227 30 201 04 720 77 23 89 18 92 390 39 160 94 165 75 1,721 06 2,920 26 966 45 118 70 16 45 1,547 45 185 26,135 26 4,556 80 1,858 57 1,400 00 29 81 500 49 28 227 48 298 79 40 85 52 52 11 75 300 00 42,082 30 1,255 34 60,896 97 $665,971 01 SPECIAL FUND ACCOUNTS. Homoeopathic Medical College. Receipts. From State Treasurer.............................$. Disbursements. Balance Overdrawn, July 1,1901..................... Paid Vouchers, Pay Roll.......................... Electric Light Plant. Receipts. Balance Overdrawn, June 30, 1902........................ Transfer from General Fund account.................... Disbursements. Balance Overdrawn, July 1, 1901.......................... Summer Hospitals. Receipts. From State Treasurer..................................... Disbursements. 6,000 00 174 35 5,825 65 184 54 55 34 239 88 $ 6,000 00 6,000 00 239 88 239 88 3,000 00 3,000 00 3,000 00 Paid Vouchers.............................................. 3,000 00 Accumulation of Savings, Law Building. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901........................ Disbursements. Paid Vouchers............................ 12 51 12 51 12 51 12 51

Page  122 122 OCTOBER MEETING, I902. Psychopathic Ward. Receipts. Balance Overdrawn, June 30, 1902........................ $24 60 $24 60 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers............................................ 24 60 24 60 Accumulation of Savings, New Science Building. Receipts. Transfer from General account........................... 1,200 00 1,200 00 Disbursements. Balance Overdrawn, July 1, 1901.......................... 500 00 Paid Vouchers............................................. 700 00 1,200 00 Accumulation of Savings, New Homoeopathic Hospital. Receipts. From State Treasurer.................................... 4,258 15 4,258 15 Disbursements. Balance Overdrawn July 1, 1901.......................... 4,258 15 4,258 15 Accumulation of Savings. New Engineering Building. Receipts. Balance Overdrawn, June 30, 1902......................... 24 70 24 70 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers.......................................... 24 70 24 70 Accumulation of Savings, New rledical Building. Receipts. From State Treasurer..................................... 67,040 20 Balance Overdrawn, June 30, 1902........................ 9,147 02 76,187 22 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers............................................. 76,187 22 76,187 22 Accumulation of Savings, Repairs to Barbour Gymnasium. Receipts. Balance Overdrawn, June 30, 1902......................... 469 98 469 98 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers......................................... 469 98 469 98 Summary of Special Fund Balances. Overdrawn. Electric Light Plant......................................... 184 54 New Engineering Building................................ 24 70 New Medical Building...................................... 9,147 02 Repairs to Barbour Gymnasium.......................... 469 98 Psychopathic W ard........................................ 24 60 $ 9,850 84 GIFTS AND TRUST FUNDS. Under this head are included gifts and other funds which the Regents have received from time to time from benefactors for special purposes. The new accounts which have been opened by your treasurer during the year are as follows: From the estate of Mrs. Love M. Palmer, twenty thousand dollars for a ward to be built at the University Hospital, as a memorial to her husband, the late Dr. Alonzo B. Palmer; from Theodore Buhl, of Detroit, a

Page  123 OCTOBER MEETING, I902, 123 fund to be called the Buhl Classical Fellowship Fund; and from the sale of Detroit land, the fund named the Walter Crane Fund. Philo Parsons Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901..........................$ $105 27 Interest..................................................... 3 19 $ Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1902........................ 108 46 Goethe Fund. 108 46 108 46 Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901........................ Interest..................................................... Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30,1902......................... 200 02 607 206 09 206 09 206 09 Elisha Jones Classical Fellowship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901......................... Interest..................................................... Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1902........................ Coyl Collection. Receipts. 8 95 21 9 16 9 16 9 16 Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901.......................... Interest..................................................... Disbursements. Paid Vouchers............................................. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1902......................... Buhl Law Library Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901..................... Interest..................................................... Disbursements. Paid Vouchers.............................................. Balance in Treasury, June 30,1902......................... Seth Harrison Scholarship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1,1901......................... Interest..................................................... Disbursements. Paid Vouchers.............................................. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1902........................ 12,299 20 539 30 12,838 50 179 12 12,659 38 12,838 50 602 42 16 08 618 50 75 75 542 75 618 50 27,874 15 1,778 16 29,652 31 600 00 29,052 31 29,652 31 Class of Ninety=Four Scholarship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901.......................... Contributions Interest........................................... Disbursements. 1,450 67 31 00 44 74 1,526 41 Balance in Treasury, June 30, 190......................,. 1,526 41 1,526 41

Page  124 124 OCTOBER MEETING, I902. Ford-Messer Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901.......................... Interest......................... $25,424 70 917 54 $26,342 24 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers............................................. 1,966 47 Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1902..................... 24,375 77 26,342 24 The Phillips Scholarships Funds. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901......................... Interest.................................................... From estate rentals....................................... Disbursements. Paid Vouchers, Expenses.................................. Paid Vouchers, Scholarships Awarded.................... Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1902......................... Ilusic Hall Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901.......................... Interest..................................................... Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1902........................ 651 10 15 79 146 90 113 24 150 00 550 55 813 79 813 79 1,291 58 39 18 1,330 76 1,330 76 1,330 76 Class of Ninety=Seven Scholarship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901.......................... 160 95 Interest................................................... 16 58 Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1902..................... 177 53 Class of Ninety=Eight Scholarship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901.......................... Interest................................................... Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1902....................... American School at Rome. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901.......................... Interest..................................................... Contributions...................................... Disbursements. Paid Vouchers....................................... Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1902......................... Parke, Davis & Co. Fund. Receipts. Contribution............................................. Disbursements. Paid Vouchers.............................................. Stearns Pharmacy Fellowship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901.......................... Contribution............................................... Disbursements. Paid Vouchers............................................. Balance in Treasury, June 30,1902......................... 279 14 7 56 286 70 10 00 11 280 00 290 00 11 177 53 177 53 286 70 286 70 290 11 290 11 500 00 500 00 500 00 500 00 1 56 350 00 350 00 1 56 351 56 351 56

Page  125 OCTOBER MEETIN~G, roo2. Library of Early Christian Literature. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901........................ Interest.................................................. Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30,1902......................... Special Latin Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901.................. Interest.................................................... Contributions.............................................. Disbursements. Paid Vouchers....................... Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1902......................... Good Government Club. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901.......................... Interest..................................................... Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1902........................ Peter White Fellowship. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901.......................... Contribution............................................... Interest................................................... 125 $8 08 12 $8 20 8 20 8 20 31 99 32 63 36 93 35 2 32 634 71 19 18 653 89 95 67 95 67 653 89 653 89 837 94 422 14 400 00 15 80 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers....................................... 400 00 Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1902........................ 437 94 837 94 Woman's Professorship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901........................ 10,525 00 Interest............................................... 696 95 11,221 95 Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30,1902................... 11,221 95 11,221 95 Ninety-Nine Law Class Scholarship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901....................... 31 40 Interest...................................................... 72 32 12 Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1902........................ 32 12 32 12 Williams Professorship Fund. The care of the Williams Professorship Fund has been partly in the hands of the Treasurer, and partly in the hands of Hon. Levi L. Barbour, of Detroit. In June, I902, Mr. Barbour, on being appointed Regent, withdrew from the active management of the fund, and presented a report covering the transactions to the I7th of that month. His place has been taken by Mr. George S. Field. A summary of the report of Mr. Barbour is given in an appendix to the present report (See Appendix A). The report on the portion in the hands of the Treasurer is as follows: Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901.....................$ Interest................................ Disbursements. Paid V ouchers.............................................. Balance in Treasury, June 30,1902............. 4,027 67 121 87 4,149 54 50 00 4,099 54 4,149 54

Page  126 126 OCTOBER MEETING, r902. Biological Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901......................... Contribution............................................... Disbursements. Paid Vouchers.......................................... Balance.in Treasury, June 30, 1902....................... Morris Alumni Fund, Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901......................... Interest.................................................... Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1902......................... Bates Professorship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901, Cash and Loans....... Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901, Property.............. Interest.................................................. From Rentals............................................. From Sale of Property.................................... Disbursements. Annuity to Legatee................................... Salaries of Professors and Assistants................... Instruments, Apparatus, and Laboratory Supplies...... B ooks................................................. Care of Property, Expenses, Taxes, etc................... Loss on Loan....................... Transfer to Cash acct., Property Sold................... Balance in Cash acct. June 30, 1902........................ Balance in Property acct. June 30, 1902.................. D. M. Ferry Botanical Fund, $50 00 50 00 50 00 50 00 $100 00 100 00 2,590 75 127 92 2,718 67 2,718 67 2,718 67 103,761 18 30,710 48 3,470 94 3,646 51 1,287 05 1,200 00 2,700 00 1,084 63 862 36 3,740 00 325 00 1,287 05 102,253 69 29,423 43 142,876 16 142,876 16 Receipts. Contribution............................................... Disbursements. Paid Vouchers............................................ Class of Ninety=Nine Memorial Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901......................... Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1902....................... Newton Van der Veer Loan Fund, 500 00 500 00 500 00 500 00 6 35 6 35 6 35 6 35 Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901.......................... Contribution............................................... Interest..................................................... Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1902........................ Students' Lecture Association Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901.......................... Interest........................................... Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1902...................... 155 14 50 00 5 45 210 59 966 94 38 39 210 59 210 59 1,005 33 1,005 33 1,005 33

Page  127 OCTOBER MEETING, I902. Liquid Air Plant. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901......................... Interest..................................................... Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1902......................... 127 $12 40 09 12 49 $12 49 12 49 James W. Scott Classical Fellowship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901.......................... Interest................................................... Disbursements. Paid Vouchers................................... Balance in Treasury, June 30,1902......................... International Club Scholarships. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901.......................... Interest................................................. Money Returned to the Fund............................ Disbursements. Annual Allowance to Students............................ Special Allowance to Students.......... Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1902........................ 342 91 76 326 74 16 93 343 67 343 67 4,565 00 116 25 100 00 4,781 25 1,155 00 100 00 3,526 25 4,781 25 Hannah EF Davis Allopathic Hospital Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901.......................... Interest..................................... Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1902....................... Pilgrim Publishing Co. Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1,1901.......................... Disbursements. Paid Vouchers............................................ Warner Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901.......................... Interest.................................................... Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1902........................ Gas Association Fellowship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901....................... Contribution...................... Balance Overdrawn June 30,1902.......................... Disbursements. Paid Vouchers............................................. 2,100 59 63 71 2,164 30 2,164 30 2,164 30 300 00 300 00 300 00 300 00 1 02 03 1 05 1 05 1 05 43 28 500 00 42 43 585 71 585 71 585 71 Nelson, Baker & Co. Fellowship Fund. Receipts. Contribution.............................................. 500 00 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers........................... 500 00 500 00 500 00

Page  128 128 OCTOBER MEETING, I902. Palmer Memorial Ward. Receipts. From Estate of Mrs. Love M. Palmer..................... Disbursements. Paid Vouchers........................................ Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1902....................... Walter Crane Fund. Receipts. From Sale of Property.................................... Interest............................................... Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30,1902........................ Chemical Apparatus Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1901.......................... Interest....................................... Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1902...................... Buhl Classical Fellowship. Receipts. Contribution..................................... Disbursements. Paid Vouchers............................................. $20,000 00 $20,000 00 2,067 70 17,932 30 20,00 00 1,165 60 3 00 1,168 60 101 00 6 67 107 67 1,168 60 1,168 60 107 67 107 67 500 00 500 00 500 00 500 00 SUMMARY OF TRUST FUND BALANCES. CASH IN BANK. Philo Parsons Fund................$ 108 46 Elisha Jones Fund.................. 9 16 Goethe Fund..................... 206 09 Buhl Law Library Fund............. 542 75 Coyl Collection Fund............... 4 659 38 Seth Harrison Scholarship Fund.. 16,552 31 '94 Scholarship Fund............... 1,526 41 Ford-Messer Library Fund....... 15,875 77 Stearns Pharmacy Fellowship Fund 1 56 Phillips Scholarships Fund.......... 550 55 American School at Rome Fund.... 11 Special Latin Fund................ 2 32 Early Christian Literature Fund... 8 20 International Club Fund........... 3,526 25 Biological Fellowship Fund......... 50 00 '97 Class Scholarship Fund........... 127 53 '98 Class Scholarship Fund........... 286 70 '99 Class Memorial Fund....-....... 6 35 '99 Law Class Scholarship Fund..... 32 12 Bates Professorship Fund.......... 17,313 69 Bates Professorship, Real Estate.... Morris Alumni Fund................ 2,243 67 Williams Professorship Fund.... 4,099 54 Williams Professorship in charge of Mr. George S. Field......... 487 36 Good Government Club Fund....... 653 89 Woman's Professorship Fund....... 11,221 95 Newton Van der Veer Loan Fund.. 210 59 Students' Lecture Association Fund 705 33 Liquid Air Plant Fund.............. 12 49 Hannah Elizabeth Davis Allopathic Hospital Fund........ 2,164 30 Peter White Fellowship Fund....... 437 94 INVESTED IN LOANS OR TOTAL. REAL ESTATE. 108 46 9 16 206 09 542 75 8,000 00 12,659 38 12,500 00 29,052 31 1,526 41 8,500 00 24,375 77 1 56 550 55 11 2 32 8 20 3,526 25 50 00 50 00 177 53 286 70 6 35 32 12 84,940 00 29,423 43 131,677 12 475 00 2,718 67 12,262 10 16,849 00 653 89 11,221 95 210 59 300 00 1,005 33 12 49 2,164 30 437 94

Page  129 OCTOBER MEETING, Io02. 129 Music Hall Fund..................... $1,330 76 $1,330 76 Chemical Apparatus Fund.......... 107 67 107 67 Warner Fund................... 1 05 1 05 James W. Scott Fellowship Fund.... 16 93 16 93 Walter Crane Fund.................. 1,168 60 1,168 60 Palmer Memorial Ward.............. 17,932 30 17,932 30 $ 104,180 08 $ 156,450 53 $ 260,630 61 Gas Association Fund, Overdrawn.. 42 43 42 43 $ 104,137 65 $ 156,450 53 $ 260,588 18 APPENDICES. APPENDIX A. WILLIAMS PROFESSORSHIP FUND. In July, 1898, by order of the Board of Regents, a portion of the property belonging to the Williams Professorship Fund was placed in the hands of Hon. Levi L. Barbour, of Detroit, for management. The following statement, compiled and rearranged from the report of Mr. Barbour, shows the changes in the condition of the fund from June 30, 1901, to June 17, 1902: Receipts. Cash Balance, June 30, 1901................................$ 823 77 Mortgages (Payments on Principal)..................... 1,132 00 Land Contract (Payment on Principal).................. 50 00 *Sale of Land (Cost $400.00)..................... 446 24 Interest on Loans, Contracts, and Deposits.............. 569 34 $ 3,021 35 Disbursements. Loans on Mortgages....................................... 2,525 00 T axes.................................................... 2 70 Com m issions............................................... 3 54 Fees...................................................... 2 75 Cash Balance, June 17, 1902.............................. 487 36 3,021 35 The value of the property in the hands of Mr. Barbour, June 17, 1902 (partly estimated) is given as follows: Cash Balance........................................... $ 487 36 Real Estate Mortgages................................... 9,745 00 Land Contract........................................... 750 00 Real Estate, Cost........................................... 1,767 10 $12,749 46 Value, June 30,1901..................................... 12,142 87 Net Gain during Year.................................. $ 606 59 APPENDIX B. Contributions to the Ninety-four Class Scholarship Fund during the year ending June 30, 1902: George Ingersoll........................................................... 11 00 Lewis Grover Seeley.......................................................... 20 00 31 00 * In Mr. Barbour's report (see proceedings of June Meeting, pages 70 and 71), this transaction appears as a receipt of $146.24 in cash, and an addition of $300.00 to the amount of mortgages held.

Page  130 130 OCTOBER MEETING, I902. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Librarian was requested to ascertain the feasibility of using a small printing press in connection with the bindery of the University, and to report at the next meeting of the Board. On motion of Regent Dean, the Library Committee of the Board were authorized to furnish the necessary tables and cases required in the Library. The President presented the following communication from the Dean of the Engineering Department, and the change in the record therein asked for was ordered: ANN ARBOR, MICH., October i, I902. To the Honorable Board of Regents. GENTLEMEN-The minutes of the meeting of the Board in October, I90o (Proceedings, page 732, line 6), show that the degree of Bachelor of Science (in Mechanical Engineering) was conferred on Mr. W. S. Baldwin. Mr. Baldwin was recommended by the Faculty of the Department of Engineering for the degree of Bachelor of Science (in Chemical Engineering). I trust it will be possible to change the records of the Board to conform to the recommendation of the Faculty. Yours respectfully, CHAS. E. GREENE, Dean of the Department of Engineering. On motion of Regent Hill, Mr. E. S. Corwin was appointed Assistant in History for one year at a salary of $500 by the full vote of the Board. The President stated that the terms of service of the following persons had expired, and that they should be reappointed for the present eollege year: H. B. Hutchins, LL. D., Lectureiron Medical Jurisprudence in the Department of Medicine and Surgery, without salary. Norman A. Wood, Taxidermist, salary.................................... $700 H. O. Severance, Assistant in Library, salary........................... 9oo E. S. Gilmore, Superintendent of University Hospital, salary........ 1,500 R. E. Atchison, M. D., Superintendent of Homoeopathic Hospital, salary............................................................... 8oo G. A. May, M. D., Instructor in Waterman Gymnasium, salary......,200 The foregoing appointments were made on a call vote of the Board.

Page  131 OCTOBER MEETING, 1902. 131 On motion of Regent Dean, Mr. Roscoe B. Jackson, B. S., was reappointed for one year as assistant to the Dean of the Engineering Department, salary, $300, and Mr. Charles B. Davis was appointed Instructor in Surveying for the first semester only at a compensation of $450, by the full vote o'f the Board. Regent Dean presented and read the following communication from the Dean of the Department of Engineering, and the degrees recommended were conferred upon the persons named therein by the full vote of the Board: ANN ARBOR, MICH., October 7, I902. To the Honorable Board of Regents, University of Michigan.GENTLEMEN-By a vote of the Faculty, I have the honor to submit the names of the following students for degrees: Clifford' Moses Pritchard for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering. William Cornelius Swartout for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering. Henry Archibald McLean, B. S. in Mechanical Engineering, Class of 900o, for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering. Richard William Runge, B. S. in Mechanical Engineering, Class of 900o, for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering. Royal John Mansfield, B. S. in Civil Engineering, Class of 900o, for the degree of Civil Engineer. Respectfully yours, CHAS. E. GREENE, Dean of the Department of Engineering. The following communication from the Dean of the Engineering Department was presented by Regent Dean, and the recommendations therein contained were approved by the Board: ANN ARBOR, MICH., October 7, I902. To the Honorable Board of Regents, University of Michigan.. GENTILEMEN-As Professor Cooley has been detained longer than he expected to be, on account of an engagement which he had made previous to the opening of the semester, and as it was necessary to arrange for the carrying on of his

Page  132 132 OCTOBER MEETING, 1902. work in his absence, at his suggestion the services of Mr. Willcox have been secured for this purpose. Mr. Willcox is the gentleman who had charge of Professor Cooley's work during his absence on the state railroad appraisal last year. Mr. Willcox will, of course, be paid by Professor Cooley, but I thought it desirable to obtain your sanction for his employment as a substitute. Professor Cooley now expects to be here early next week. Very respectfully yours, CHAS. E. GREENE, Dean of the Department of Engineering. The Board requested Regent Farr to act as Secretary during the temporary absence of Secretary Wade. In his absence the following action was taken by the Board: Resolved, That the Board of Regents give to Secretary Wade a leave of absence for two months, to be taken at such time as he may see fit, and in case he shall desire to devote the whole or any part of the time to an examination of the system of finance in force at Eastern colleges, that the sum of two hundred dollars be and is hereby appropriated by the Board to cover his expenses, and that the salary of the Secretary be continued during his absence. GEORGE A. FARR, Acting Secretary. On motion of Regent Butterfield the Treasurer was requested to have his annual report printed and to send proof sheets of same to each member of the Board for consideration. The request of Dr. Prescott that the $2,500, which was transferred from the budget of the Chemical Laboratory to that of Hygiene, be returned to his department to provide for new lines of work to be taken up when physiological chemistry is transferred to hygiene, was referred to the Medical and Literary Committees for consideration with the request that they report their conclusions at the afternoon session of the Board. Regent Lawton moved that the resolution submitted at the last meeting, whereby it was proposed to make Dr. Moses Gomberg a Junior Professor, with a salary of $2,000, be taken

Page  133 OCTOBER MEETING, 1902. 133 from the table and put upon its passage. The motion prevailed, and a call vote was taken with the following result: Ayes-Regents Butterfield, Lawton, Dean, Hill, Barbour, and Fletcher. Regents Farr and Carey not voting. The Board then took a recess until 2 o'clock p; m. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock p. m. On motion of Regent Farr, the Treasurer was directed to open on the books of the University a special fund account with the Walter Crane gift of certain real estate in the City of Detroit, and to credit the said account with the proceeds of the sale of certain lots therefrom recently sold to the City of Detroit. The request of Professor Patterson that the Board substitute steel girders in certain rooms in the new Engineering Building, thereby doing away with the necessity of using columns to support the floors, was denied. On motion of Regent Farr, one hundred dollars, or so much thereof as may be necessary, was appropriated for the purpose of defraying the traveling expenses of Instructor Kenyon L. Butterfield in working up his course in Rural Sociology, by the full vote of the Board. The request of Ernest Lutz, Janitor in the Library, for an increase of $Ioo in his salary, was laid on the table for one month. On motion of Regent Butterfield, the degree of Bachelor of Laws was conferred upon Willard A. Knight, Edmund H. Griffin, Charles N. Sumner and Joseph H. Drake, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Department of Law. The President stated that Mr. Theodore D. Buhl, of Detroit, had contributed $500 for a Classical Fellowship for the year 1902-03, and the classical staff desired the appointment of Charles Rufus Morey as the holder of said fellowship. The Board confirmed the appointment of Mr. Morey and requested the President to convey to Mr. Buhl the thanks of the Board for his generous gift.

Page  134 134 OCTOBER MEETING, 1902. The President presented and read the following communication from Professor F. W. Kelsey: ANN ARBOR, September 30, 1902. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan. GENTLEMEN-I have pleasure in reporting to you that the annual contribution of one hundred dollars in the name of the University. to the support of the American School of Classical Studies in Rome was duly forwarded for the year I90I-02, the sum having been generously provided by the following friends of the University in Detroit: Messrs. George W. Bates, J. H. Berry, Frank S. Bigler, John S. Gray, Frank J. Hecker, Charles H. Jacobs, E. H. Nelson, Mrs. Samuel L. Smith, and Mr. J. N. Wright. Respectfully submitted, FRANCIS W. KELSEY. Regent Hill presented the following communication from the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and the degrees indicated were conferred upon the persons named in the communication, by the full vote of the Board: ANN ARBOR, MICH., October 6, I902. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents. GENTLEMEN-I have the honor to report that the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts recommend to you the following students for the degree indicated: FOR BACHELOR OF ARTS. George John Balzer, William Leslie Bowler, Walter Channing Boynton, Allen Meason Broomhall. Carey Herbert Conley, Will Stanley Cookson, Lloyd Hugo Eriesson, Clara Gertrude Fitzpatrick, Roy Romanzo Peck, Benjamin Rice Phelps, Nina Streeter, Oswald William Visscher, Estus Eugene Webster, Robert Dawson Williamson.

Page  135 OCTOBER MEETING, IQo2. 135 FOR MASTER OF ARTS. Winifred Campbell Daboll, Victor Dean Hawkins, Mary Olive Hunting, Lindley Pyle, Vernon Justin Willey. FOR DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY. Walter David Hadzsits. Respectfully submitted, P. R. DEPONT. On motion of Regent Hill, one additional Instructor in Mathematics was authorized for the first semester of the present college year, with a salary of $450, by the full vote of the Board. Regent Hill moved that the salary of Mr. J. W. Scholl be increased from $225 to $600 because of the additional work required of him to meet the requirements of the Engineering Department. The motion was carried on a call vote. Regent Fletcher presented an itemized bill of $5,554.70 for extra work done by the contractor of the new Medical Building, all of said work having been previously authorized by action of the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher the account was allowed and the Treasurer was authorized to pay Koch Brothers, contractors, $5,000 on account. On motion of Regent Barbour, the bid of the Woodward Lumber Company to furnish additional furniture for the new Medical Building was laid on the table until the next meeting. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Treasurer was authorized to pay the American Blower Company $2,000 on account of heating and ventilating the Library Building, by the unanimous vote of the Board. The Ann Arbor Ice Company submitted a proposition to supply the University with ice by the year at $I.50 per ton, the same to be delivered at the various University buildings as needed. After some discussion it seemed to be the consensus of opinion that the University should own and control its own ice supply. On motion of Regent Farr, the Committee on Buildings

Page  136 136: OCTOBER MEETING, 19a2. and Grounds were empowered to purchase and install elevators in the new Medical Building. On motion of Regent Farr, it was voted that one Assistant in Philosophy be employed for one year at a salary of $450. The Board voted to give Professor F. W. Kelsey a leave of absence of twenty-five days to enable him to give a course of lectures at various points in the West. On motion of Regent Lawton, $2,500 was added to the budget of the Chemical Laboratory, by the full vote of the Board. Regent Lawton presented and read the following communication from Dr. A. B. Prescott, and the recommendations therein contained were approved by the full vote of the Board. ANN ARBOR, MICH., October 7, 1902. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents. GENTLEMEN-I beg to recommend the following named appointments for 1902-o3: Mr. Edward Lucas to be continued as Dispensing Accountant in the Chemical Laboratory at $900 (Minutes, December, 1901, page 9). Charles W. Edmunds, M. D., to succeed Dr. C. A. Good as Assistant in Pharmacology with $200 from the budget of the School of Pharmacy in addition to the $500 already granted from budget of Department of Medicine and Surgery (October, I901, page 735, and June, 1902, page 67). Mr. Grant T. Davis, as Assistant in Organic Chemistry, at $ioo, in place of Henry W. Berger, resigned (June, 1902, page 62). Lemuel W. Famulener, Ph.C., to be continued as holder of the Nelson, Baker & Co. Fellowship of $500 and as Assistant in Pharmaceutical Research without salary from the University (October, I90o, page 735). Mr. Harold C. Watkins to be continued as Assistant in Research in Pharmacognosy, and Mr. Darrell H. Davis to succeed C. R. Eckler as Assistant in Pharmaceutical Research, both as holders of the Fellowship supported by the gift of Messrs. Frederick Stearns & Co. of $350 for I902-03, and both without salary from the University. Thanks are due to the generous donors above mentioned for their continued support of research in this University. Respectfully submitted, ALBERT B. PRESCOTT.

Page  137 OCTOBER MEETING, I902. 137 On the request of the United States Government, the leave of absence of Professor P. C. Freer, who is now in the service of the government in the Philippine Islands, was extended to September, 1903. Regent Lawton submitted the following communication from Dr. V. C. Vaughan, Dean of the Medical Department, and the recommendations therein contained were approved, as indicated below, by the full vote of the Board: ANN ARBOR, MICH., October 8, I902. To the Honorable Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN-I am instructed by the Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery to present to your Honorable Body the following requests: I. That the title of Professor F. G. Novy be changed to that of Professor of Bacteriology, and that his salary be $2,500 a year. Last spring in granting the requests in the budget, you provided for this increase in Dr. Novy's salary, but you have never taken any formal action, changing his title from junior to full professor. 2. That the title of Wilbur F. Bowen be changed from Assistant in Physiology to Instructor in Physiology at a salary of $900 a year. You also provided for this increase in the budget last June but have never changed Mr. Bowen's title. 3. That John H. Crosby, A. B., be appointed Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy in place of Augustus Roth, who was advanced to the grade of assistantship at your last meeting, at a salary of $200 a year. 4. That Miss Lillie T. Roche be appointed Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy in place of Miss Pratt. Miss Pratt's health will not permit her to continue this work. The salary, of course, is to be $200. 5. That George H. Curtis, A. B., be appointed Dispensing Clerk in the Electrotherapeutical Laboratory in place of Mr. Terry and at the same salary. As Director of the Hygienic Laboratory I wish to request that David J. Levy, A. B., be appointed Rockefeller scholar in Bacteriology, without expense to the University. All of which I have the honor to respectfully submit. V. C. VAUGHAN, Dean.

Page  138 138 OCTOBER MEETING, 1902. Regent Lawton submitted the following communication from Professor S. Lawrence Bigelow, Acting Director of the Laboratory of General Chemistry, and the recommendations therein contained were approved by the Board: ANN ARBOR, MICH., October 7, 1902. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN-I respectfully request that the following appointments be made for the current year, 1902-I903, to fill vacancies: R. L. Benson, A. B., as Assistant in General Chemistry at a salary of $300, in place of R. T. Sanford. A. C. Houghton as Assistant in General Chemistry at a salary of $150, in place of N. F. Harriman. L. H. Duschak as Assistant in General Chemistry at a salary of $50, in place of L. E. Allen. E. B. Scott and P. E. Demmler as Assistants in General Chemistry, without salary, in place of W. H. Haughey and L. H. Duschak. I also beg to recommend that H. W. Emerson, Ph.C., B. S., be appointed to the Parke, Davis & Co. Fellowship for the current year in place of G. F. Richmond. Yours respectfully, S. LAWRENCE BIGELOW. On motion of Regent Butterfield it was voted that all requests for equipment in the new Medical Building be referred to the Building Committee, with power. The City of Ann Arbor proposed to turn over to the Board of Regents the ground comprising Felch Park, and what is known as the cat-hole, to be used as a botanical garden. The matter of accepting this property was referred to Regents Butterfield, Barbour, and Farr for consideration. Regent Hill moved that Mr. Charles C. Adams be appointed Curator of the Museum to date from January i, 1903, at a salary of $900, he to take the place of Mr. Pettitt, who was appointed at the last meeting, but now desires to withdraw, and that Mr. Sargent, the present Curator, be continued until January 1, 1903. Also that Mr. Earl H. Frothingham be appointed Student Assistant in Museum for the academic year at a salary of $150. This motion was carried on a call vote.

Page  139 OCTOBER MEETING, I902. 139 On motion of Regent Hill, the Department of French was authorized to select one additional Instructor for one year at a salary of $900, and to report the name of the person so selected to the next meeting of the Board for confirmation. This motion was carried on a call vote. The Department of History stated that last year the Board allowed them two assistants with a combined salary of $650. They now ask that the sum be raised to $i,ooo for this year on account of the greater amount of work to be done. If the request is granted, they will present the names of persons selected for the work at the next meeting of the Board for formal appointment. Regent Hill moved that the request be granted, which was done on a call vote of the Board. Treasurer Soule gave notice that Mr. Fred M. Green, who was Instructor in the Engineering Department last year, had contributed one-tenth of his salary, $90, to the class fund of I898. On motion of Regent Dean the gift was accepted and the President was requested to convey to Mr. Green the thanks of the Board for his generous gift. The Board then adjourned to Wednesday, November I9, at 0o o'clock a. m. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  140

Page  141 NOVEMBER MEETING. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, November 21, 1902, The Board assembled in the Regents' room at Io o'clock A. M. Present: Regents Butterfield, Lawton, Dean, Barbour, Fletcher, and Carey. Absent: Regents Farr and Hill. The Secretary read the minutes of the last meeting, which were, on motion of Regent Lawton, approved and ordered printed. Communications which had reached the President were placed in the hands of the standing committees of the Board for consideration. The President presented and read a resolution of thanks, from the Kappa Kappa Gamma Fraternity, for the use of the Barbour Gymnasium for their National Convention. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Treasurer was authorized to pay the bill of 45 francs for maps purchased in Paris, by the department of Romance Languages. On motion of Regent Barbour, an appropriation of $940 was made for the purchase and installation of a printing press in the bindery of the University by the full vote of the Board. Regent Barbour presented and read the following communication from the Dean of the Engineering Department, and on his motion, the matter was laid on the table for the present. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ) DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING, ANN ARBOR, NOV. I4TH, I902. ) To the Honorable, the Board of Regents, University of Michigan GENTLEMEN.-At a.recent meeting of a standing committee of the Faculty of the Department of Engineering, consisting of Professors Cooley, Carhart, Davis, Denison, Campbell, and the Dean, it was decided that econ

Page  142 142 NOVEMBER MEETING, 1902. omy in planning the equipment for the laboratories in the new engineering building would be promoted by a careful study of the facilities enjoyed and the plants already installed in some of the leading engineering schools of the country, and it was decided to ask the Board of Regents to authorize a committee of three or more to visit such schools as the Magill University in Montreal, Harvard, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Columbia, and Pennsylvania, for the purpose of securing all information possible in regard to laboratory equipment and for planning the best installation for our new building, —this work to be done prior to the submission of the budget for next year. And this committee would respectfully ask that a sum which may appear reasonable to your honorable body be appropriated for the expenses of this committee. Very respectfully yours, CHAS. E. GREENE, Dean. Regent Barbour submitted the following preamble and agreement, which were adopted by the full Board, with the proviso that the balance of Lot D, not described below, and Lot 14, adjoining, be included in the proposition. WHEREAS, The City of Ann Arbor has acquired certain lands, and has undertaken by condemnation proceedings and purchase to acquire certain other lands, all of which lands are hereinafter described and referred to as ' the park," and WHEREAS, The said City has, by resolution of its Common Council, authorized and empowered its Mayor, Royal S. Copeland, on behalf of said City, to enter into and close a contract with the Regents of the University of Michigan, whereby said City of Ann Arbor, upon perfecting its title to said park, agrees to place and perpetually protect the said Board of Regents in the full and undisturbed possession of said park, upon condition that said Board of Regents shall undertake and agree to perpetually maintain said lands as a "park," and beautify and care for the same and relieve the said City from any and all costs, charges and expenses 'in connection therewith. Now, Therefore,- this Agreement Witnesseth, That the said Board of Regents hereby agrees with the said Royal S. Copeland, acting as the Mayor of the said City of Ann Arbor, and under the authority vested in him by resolution of said Common Council and the general authority vested in him as Mayor, that upon the perfection of the title in said City of Ann Arbor to the said park, and the transfer to the said Board of Regents of the title, or lease for nine hundred and ninety-nine years thereof, and the full possession thereof, to be maintained undisturbed, that the said Board will proceed in due time to lay out, arrange and form the said park lands into a botanical garden and arboretum, to be used for scientific purposes in connection with the departments of instruction in said University, in such manner and with such buildings and constructions as shall seem best to the

Page  143 NOVEMBER MEETING, 1902. 143 Board of Regents to carry out the general purposes designed; except no building shall be erected on Felch park; that the said park and grounds shall be open to the public daily at such reasonable times and in such manner and under such rules for the preservation of flowers, shrubbery, trees, and other.property as the Board of Regents shall prescribe; and that it will perpetually maintain and care for and beautify said lands and retain the same under its protection and jurisdiction for all future time during the period of said lease, and relieve the said City from all charges and expenses in connection therewith, except in so far as police protection may be at any time necessary, which said protection upon demand of the said Board of Regents, its President, or Secretary, the said City of Ann Arbor hereby agrees promptly and adequately to furnish. The said park lands with reference to which this agreement is made are described as follows: I. Felch Park as now platted, being bounded on the North by the South line of Huron Street, on the East by the East line of the West one-half (2) of the Northwest one-quarter (4), Section twenty-eight (28), Town 2, S., R 6 East; on the South by the North line of Washington Street; on the West by the East line of Twelfth Street. 2. "Cat Hole Property," being Lots one (I), two (2), three (3), four (4), and five (5), Block two (2), South, Range thirteen (I3) East, and the land lying East of said Lots extending to the East line of the West one-half (2) of the Northwest one-quarter ('4) Section twenty-eight (28), Town 2, South, Range 6 East. 3. The West one hundred and two (0I2) feet in width extending the entire length of Lot No. "D," in Block three (3), Range South, Smith Third Addition to City of Ann Arbor; also commencing at the South line of Lot " D'.until it intersects the East line of first described property: All these lands being located in the City of Ann Arbor, County of Washtenaw, State of Michigan. On motion of Regent Dean, Ethel W. B. Chase and Forest B. H. Brown were appointed assistants in Botany for one year, without pay. Regent Carey moved that Harley A. Haynes be appointed House Physician in the Homceopathic Hospital for one year at a salary of $400, and William T. Miller, M.D., Lecturer on Surgery, without pay. The motion was carried on a call vote. The President submitted the following report of the Exec

Page  144 144 NOVEMBER MEETI-NG, 90o2. utive Committee of the Board, which was adopted on a call vote: PRESIDENT'S OFFICE, UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, Nov, 21, I902. To the Board of Regents. Your Executive Committee beg leave to make the following report of appointments which they have authorized since your last meeting in accordance with provisions which you made at that meeting and at previous meetings: Instructor in Mathematics at the rate of $900, Mr. F. A. LaMotte, M. S. Mr. Roy R. Peck, Instructor in French, at the same rato. Miss Bertha S. Stuart, $400, assistant in the Gymnasium. Miss L. R. Albright, at $350; Miss Florence M. Hall, $200; Miss Caroline E. Pattengill, at $225; Mr. Carl C. Eckhardt, at $225, assistants in History. On the Homceopathic Hospital staff: Miss Myrta Woodson, principal of the Nurses' Training School, at $45 a month; Mrs. M. O. Ronaldson, matron at $35; Miss Elsie Morrison, head nurse, at $30. Mr. Ernest S. Bates, A.B., at $300; Mr. Harold P. Breitenbach, A.B., at $300, assistants in English. Mr. J. E. Wallace Wallin, Ph.D., assistant in Philosophy, at the rate of $450 a year. Andre Beziat de Bordes, instructor in French, in place of V. E. FranSois, resigned. Salary $900. JAMES B. ANGELL, ROGER W. BUTTERFIELD, HENRY S. DEAN. On motion of Regent Lawton, the degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist was conferred upon Percy Seaman Peck, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy. The Secretary of the Homoeopathic Medical College reported through Regent Carey, that the persons named below had completed the course in the Training School for Nurses and were recommended for Certificates of Graduation. On motion of Regent Carey, the President and Secretary were authorized to issue Certificates of Graduation in the name of the Board, to the persons named in the communication, and to attach the seal of the University thereto. Katherine A. Case, Carrie Dafener, Katheryn Fiske, Eva Lawson, Anna L. Nellis, Myrtle Showerman, Inez B. Wilson, and Blanche Wood.

Page  145 NTOVEMBER MlEETING, I902. 145 On motion of Regent Barbour, Mr. S. W. Smith was authorized to use the title of " Editor of the News Letter." On motion of Regent Hill, Mr. Carl C. Tarbox was appointed Assistant in English for the remainder of the college year. Salary at the rate of $300. On motion of Regent Lawton, Mr. Edward Lucas was reappointed Dispensing Accountant in the Chemical Laboratory, and his salary was fixed at the rate of $i,ooo from January ist, 1903, by a full vote of the Board. The Board then took a recess until 2 o'clock p. M. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock P. M. On motion of Regent Dean, the Department of Mechanical Engineering was allowed a shop credit of $300, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Butterfield, the degree of Bachelor of Laws was conferred upon Eugene H. Winkworth, in accordance with the recommendation of the Law Faculty. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Treasurer was authorized to pay Mason and Kahn, architects, $820, on account of professional services on Psychopathic ward, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Treasurer was authorized to pay the Woodward Lumber Company $Io,ooo, on account of furniture for the new Medical Building, by the unanimous vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Treasurer was authorized to pay the Kroeschell Bros. Ice Machine Company $2Io0, for Refrigerating plant placed in the new Medical Building, as per contract. This action was taken on a call vote. On motion of Regent Dean, Mr. A. L. Colton and Mr. H. L. Curtis were appointed assistants in the Department of Physics, for the remainder of the college year, at a salary of $15 per month each, by the full vote of the Board. Regent Fletcher moved that the Detroit Marble Works be paid $164 for additional work done in the Barbour Gymna

Page  146 146 NOVEMBER MEETING, I902. sium in excess of their contract. It was so ordered on a call vote. The Gardner Elevator Company of Detroit having submitted a proposal to put three hand power elevators in the new Medical Building, one to run to the first floor, and the other two to run to the third floor, for the total sum of $700; on motion of Regent Dean, the Secretary was directed to accept the proposition, provided the company would agree to wainscoat the three platforms four and one-half feet high. This action was taken on a call vote. On motion of Regent Fletcher, Superintendent Reeve was directed to move the dirt on the north side of the new Boiler House at University Hospital. Regent Fletcher moved, that a sum, not exceeding $1,300, be appropriated for pipe covering in the tunnel, the new Medical Building, the Boiler House, and the fan system, and that Professor Cooley and Mr. Hopwood be requested to take charge of the work. The motion was carried on a call vote. On motion of Regent Fletcher, Superintendent Reeve was requested to put in one new closet in West Hall, and connect the same with the sewer. On motion of Regent Fletcher, it was voted.that the salaries of Milton H. Rix, Assistant Engineer, and G. Sodt, engineer helper, be made $850 and $700, respectively, and that the fireman and helpers at University Hospital be placed on three shifts per day, with a salary of $1.50 per day each. On motion of Regent Barbour, the question of increasing the salaries of the plumbers on the campus was placed in the hands of Regent Fletcher, with power. On motion of Regent Butterfield, the purchase of a crematory for use in the new Medical Building, was referred to the Building Committee and the President and Secretary with power, the cost not to exceed $500, exclusive of installation. On motion of Regent Fletcher, it was voted that the Finance Committee sign the printed financial report. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Secretary was directed to cancel the bond of Koch Brothers, contractors of the new Medical Building, and to pay the said contractors all moneys.

Page  147 NOVEMBER MEETING, I902. 147 that may be due them under their contract, excepting $500, which is held to cover some unfinished work which cannot be completed until after the furniture for said building is in place. On motion of Regent Barbour, it was voted to request the contractor of the new Engineering Building, to continue the cut stone around the first story of North wing of said building at an additional cost of $I25, in order that the exterior of the building may be uniform in appearance. Regent Lawton moved that the income from the Davis and Treadwell bequests, be placed in the hands of the President to be expended for needy patients in the Hospital, upon the recommendation of the Hospital Committee. Also that the Board permit the transfer of portraits of past members of the Medical Faculty to the faculty room in the new Medical Building on completion of the same. The motion was carried by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Lawton, it was voted that a sum, not exceeding $ioo, be appropriated for the purpose of placing in University Hospital, memorial tablets in honor of those who have made substantial bequests to the Hospital. Regent Barbour submitted the following resolutions, which were adopted by the Board: Resolved. That when a Professor, Instructor, or Assistant, has accepted an appointment from this Board, the interests of the University require, and this Board will insist, that he shall not accept an appointment or duty inconsistent with the continuance of the performance of the duties of such appointment to the end of the college year, without the consent of this Board, or, in case of the necessity of prompt action, the consent of the Executive Committee of the Board. Resolvedfurther, That the officers of the University be, and they are hereby, instructed not to employ any Professor or Instructor who is in the employment of any other institution of learning, including High Schools, in this or any other State-such employment to commence before the succeeding college or high school year-without the assent of the authorities of such institution of learning. On motion, the Board adjourned to Friday, December g9th, 1902, at Io o'clock A. M. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  148

Page  149 DECEMBER MEETING. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, Friday, December 19, I902. The Board assembled in the Regents' Room at Io o'clock A. M. Present: Regents Hill, Lawton, Dean, Barbour, Fletcher, and Carey: Absent: Regents Butterfield and Farr. The Secretary read the minutes of the last meeting which were, on motion of Regent Dean, approved and ordered printed, Communications which had reached the President were placed in the hands of the standing committees of the Board for consideration. Professors Payne and Whitney appeared before the Board and urged the establishment in the near future of a Model School of Practice, where our students could have access to the classes, and see the best methods of teaching in the class room. On motion of Regent Barbour, Professor Payne was requested to consult with the State Board of Education, and all others who should be consulted, and submit to the Board a plan for inaugurating the work. The President read the following report of the Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Summer School, which was ordered printed in the minutes. December 8, I902. To the President and Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts. GENTLEMEN.-As Chairman of the Executive Committee I have the honor to present my report upon the Ninth Annual Summer Session of the University of Michigan. The session opened June 25th and closed August 8th, I902. The enrollment numbered, in the

Page  150 150 DECEMBER MEETING, 1902. Men. 214 Women. I35 Literary Department............................ 349 Law Department................................. 44 Medical Department............................. 70 Engineering Department....................... 33 Total number in residence... 496 In the Literary Department the enrollment by States was as follows Michigan.................. 201 O hio....................... 42 Pennsylvania................ 8 Illinois............. 17 Indiana.................... New York.................. I Missouri.................... 7 Iowa...................... 5 K ansas..................... 4 Massachusetts.............. 4 Colorado................... 3 Ontario................... 2 Minnesota.................. 2 New Jersey................ 2 Utah.................... 2 Japan..................... Manila, P. I................. Alabama.................. Arkansas................. Idaho...................... Jamaica.................... M aine..................... Montana..... Tennessee.................. Texas..................... Vermont................. Wyoming.................. Washington............. Sandwich Islands............ 2 2 I I I I I I I I I I I I (f the 349 students enrolled in the Literary Department, 182 were teachers, 131 were students enrolled in some department of the University, and 46 either preparatory students or unclassified. Of the 131 students in the University doing work in the Summer Session, IOI were from the Literary Department; 12 from the Department of Engineering; 8 from the Department of Law; 8 from the Department of Medicine and Surgery; and 2 from the School of Pharmacy. Of those in attendance, 123 were graduates of normal schools, colleges, or universities; of this number, 37 came from the University of Michigan, 31 from the Michigan State Normal, 6 from Olivet, 5 from Albion College, 6 from Ohio Wesleyan, 2 each from Alma College, Buchtel College, Michigan Agricultural College, Kansas State Normal, Tri-State Normal, and Ohio State University; and one each from Baldwin, Wooster, Denison, Johns Hopkins, Notre Dame. and Northwestern Universities, from the state Universities-of Kentucky, Indiana, Missouri and Washington; also one each from Adrian, Carthage, Dartmouth, Gale College, Hope College, Illinois Women's College, Kalamazoo, Luther College, Marietta College, Mount Holyoke, Wellesley, Oberlin, Penn College, Wittenberg College, and one person who had graduated from Emory College, from the University of Georgia, and from the University of Nashville. There were offered in the various subjects I07 courses, conducted by 40 instructors, namely: 8 full Professors, 6 Junior Professors, 8 Assistant Professors, and 18 Instructors, not counting the two Professors giving regular work in the Department of Engineering. A study of the election blanks of the students of the Summer Session shows the following distribution of work elected among the different

Page  151 DECEMBER MEETING, 1902. 151 branches. In each case an election is counted as five recitation periods for the week; double courses are counted elections were as follows: Greek................... I5 Courses. Latin..................... 52 " French................ 33 " Italian-.................. 4 Spanish................. 6 " German................. 46 " English................. Eng. and Rhet. 48 Eng. Lit......... 62-I I "1 Elocution............... 41 History................ 51 " Philosophy, Philosophy...... 29 Psychology...... 25- 54 " During the Session a series of as two courses; upon this basis the Pedagogy................. Political Economy...... Mathematics............ Physics............. Chemistry............... Geology................ Zoology.................. Botany.................... Drawing.................. Shop Practice........... Mechanical Engineering........................ Electrical Engineer'ng Ioo Courses. 48 " 87 " 85 " 80 33 " I I 44 3I 12 " I0 4 6 instructive and entertaining evening lectures were given by members of the University Fteulty. These lectures were open alike to the students of the Summer Session and to the citizens of Ann Arbor. The attendance was excellent and much interest was manifested. For this feature of the work especial thanks are due to the lecturers, Professor Russell, Professor Payne, Professor Kelsey, Professor McLaughlin, and Professor D'Ooge. FINANCIAL REPORT. For several years the Regents have appropriated at the beginning of each year $2,500.00, or such part thereof as shall be necessary, to conduct the Summer Session in accordance with the recommendations of the President and Faculty. This fund being regarded as a part of the income of the Summer Session, the account for the year I902 is as follows: Receipts. Tuition, 349 students at $I5.oo00................ $5,235 oo Appropriation...................................... 2,500 00 Total Receipts............................... Expenditures. Pay Roll............................................. Administration.................................. Advertising........................................ Printing........................................... Library......................................... Postage, mailing, blanks, etc................. Janitor........................................... Total expenditures.......................... Balance................................. $7,735 oo $6,930 oo 200 00 238 i8 94 63 25 00 21 86 3 00 $7,512 67 $7,512 67 222 33 $7,735 00 J. 0. REED, Respectfully submitted,

Page  152 152 DECE.MBER MEETING. 1902. On motion of Regent Barbour, the President and Secretary were requested to consider and report upon the desirability of the University issuing a handbook of information for general distribution. Dr. Wm. H. Jackson presented to the University, through Regent Dean, A Manuscript Copy of the Early History of the Dental Department, which was accepted and placed in the Library, and the President was requested to convey to Dr. Jackson the thanks of the Board. On motion of Regent Barbour, $500.00 was appropriated for the purchase of a sterilizer for use in the University Hospital. Regent Lawton presented and read the following communication from Professor Novy, and the recommendations therein contained were approved by the Board. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, December I6, 1902. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents of the University. GENTLEMEN.-Inasmuch as Mr. W. G. Carhart, Assistant in Bacteriology, desires to be relieved of his work because of pressure of other duties, I beg to request that his wish be granted, to take effect January I, I903. I also would ask that J. Walter Vaughan, A. B., '02, be appointed to the vacant position to serve from January I to October I, I903, at the same salary which would have been paid to Mr. Carhart. Respectfully yours, F. G. NovY. On motion of Regent Dean the following degrees were conferred upon the persons named in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts. Bachelor of Arts.-Jean Dawson and Flora L. White. Master of Arts.-Victor E. Frangois and Helen M. St. John. Doctor of Philosophy.-George Depue Hadzsits. Mr. Kenyon L. Butterfield, Instructor in Rural Sociology desired to be relieved from duty on and after April ist next. On motion of Regent Dean the request was granted. His salary stops when resignation takes effect. Regent Dean presented and read the following communication from Professor F. N. Scott.

Page  153 DECEMBER MEETING, 1902. 153 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, DEcember 17, 1902. To the fHonorable, the Board of Regents. Mr. A. C. Wihner, of Battle Creek, who last year gave a sum of money for the Fellowship in English Composition known as the Pilgrim Fellowship, has sent $1oo to the Treasurer and desires that the fellowship be continued. It is possible that the sum may be increased before the end of the year. I would recommend the appointment to this fellowship of Miss Mary Lowell, of Union City, a graduate of the Class of I901, and would also suggest that she be appointed Assistant in Rhetoric without pay. Respectfully, F. N. SCOTT. Regent Dean moved that the gift of Mr. A. C. Wisner be accepted, with the thanks of the Board, and that the recommendations contained in the communication of Professor Scott be approved. The motion was carried by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Treasurer was authorized to make a loan to James Hoban, of Detroit, of $7,ooo for three years at 5 per cent, from the Gift Funds of the University. On motion of Regent Barbour, it was voted that at the time of giving the Annual Junior Hop in the Gymnasium, the music be required to stop at 2:30 o'clock A. M., and that the lights be turiTed off the building at 3 o'clock A. M. Ayes-Regents Hill, Dean, Barbour, and Carey. Nays-None. Regents Lawton and Fletcher not voting. On motion of Regent Barbour, it was voted to request Regent Fletcher to execute to the Board a quit claim deed of waste lands in Michigan under his control, the same to be used by the University for Forestry purposes. On motion of Regent Barbour, Superintendent Reeve was directed to install the new printing press, and furnish all necessary lights; and that the Auditing Board furnish printers' supplies to the extent of $200. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Chairman of the Building Committee was authorized to take such action as he shall deem best to prevent the waste of light and power on the Campus. The Board then took a recess until 2 o'clock P. M.

Page  154 154 DECEMBERl MEE EATING, I902. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock p. M. Mr. D. W. Springer and Mr. J. P. Clegg appeared before the Board and stated, that the State Association of Accountants desired the incoming Legislature to pass a law requiring accountants to pass an examination, and to work under a license to be issued by the Board of Regents of the University. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Committee on Buildings and Grounds were requested to consider the matter of placing fire escapes on University Hospital and adjacent buildings and report to the Board. On motion of Regent Dean, the Engineering Committee were authorized to procure plans for the enlargement of the Physical Laboratory. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Secretary was directed to send copies of the resolution of the Board relating to the employment of Professors, to such Universities and Colleges as may be thought best. On motion of Regent Lawton, Dr. W. H. Morley was appointed first assistant in Gynaecology and Obstetrics in place of Dr. Pray, resigned. The appointment to date from December ist, 1902. Salary at the rate of $200. Regent Fletcher presented and read the following communication from the City Ice Company in relation to the University ice supply. ANN ARBOR, November 20, 1902. To the Board of Regents, University of Michigan. GENTLEMEN.- We will sell you one acre of land located on the Hurpn River with the privilege of cutting all the ice needed by the University for its own use for one thousand dollars, including right of way out to the road. THE CITY ICE COMPANY, JAS. R. BACH, Sec'y. Regent Lawton moved that the following apparatus be purchased for the new Medical Building: One air compressor, one air receiver, and one motor at a total cost of $100; waste crocks, $50; 4 pair trucks, $54; one hundred feed boxes, $25; and a furnace for disposing of small infected animals, $25.

Page  155 DECEMBER MEETING, 1902, 155 A call vote on this motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Hill, Lawton, Barbour, and Carey. Nays-Regents Fletcher and Dean. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Treasurer was directed to pay the Stirling Boiler Co. $2,000 on their contract, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher it was voted to put steel beams, ten feet apart, over ship tank in new Engineering Building to carry the cement floors. On motion of Regent Hill, the degree of Bachelor of Arts was conferred on George Wendell Maxey. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Finance Committee and the Building Committee jointly, were requested to consider the investment of our trust funds in real estate in the city of Detroit, and report their conclusions to the Board. Regent Fletcher submitted the following resolution which was adopted by the full vote of the Board. Resolved, That the Board appropriate the additional sum of 25,00ooo for finishing and equipping the new Medical Building, and that the Secretary cause a copy of this resolution to be filed with the Auditor General On motion of Regent Barbour, Mr. Burton K. Wheeler was appointed clerk in Administrative Offices of the Department of Law, in place of Mr. Munter, resigned. No change in salary. On motion of Regent Dean, Regents Hill, Fletcher, and Carey were made a special committee to consider the best means of consuming the smoke from the furnaces on the Campus, and to report their conclusions to the Board. On motion the Board adjourned to Friday, January 23, 1903, at 10 o'clock, A. M, JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  156

Page  157 JANUARY MEETING. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, January 9, 1903. The Board assembled in the Regents' room at Io o'clock A. M. Present-Regents Hill, Lawton, Dean, Barbour, and Carey. Absent-Regents Butterfield, Farr, and Fletcher. The Secretary read the minutes of the last meeting, which were, on motion of Regent Dean, approved and ordered printed. Communications which had reached the President were placed in the hands of appropriate committees of the Board for consideration. Regent Hill presented and read the following list of appointments for the Faculty of the Summer School, which were, on his motion, approved by the full Board. PAY ROLL FOR SUMMER SESSION OF 1903. Professor I. N. Demmon, English Literature.....$250 oo Professor W\. W. Beman, Mathematics........... 250 oo Professor Robert M. WVenley, Philosophy........ 250 oo Professor W. H. Payne, Pedagogy.............. 250 oo Professor A. S. Whitney, Pedagogy............. 250 oo Professor J. A. Woodburn, (Indiana University), H istory................................ 250 oo Professor A. Ziwet, Mathematics................ 00 oo Professor F. M. Taylor, Political Economy....... 200 oo Professor John 0. Reed, Physics............... 200 oo Professor Joseph H. Drake, Latin................ 200 oo Professor Moritz Levi, Spanish and Italian....... 200 oo Professor Moses Gomberg, Chemistry............ 200 oo

Page  158 158 JJANUARY MEETING, I903. Professor Mark S. W. Jefferson (Michigan State Normal College), Geology................ 200 oo Assistant Professor K. E. Guthe, Physics....... 240 oo Assistant Professor W. B. Pillsbury, Psychology.. I60 oo Assistant Professor John R. Effinger, French..... 240 oo Assistant Professor Tobias Diekhoff, German.... I60 oo Assistant Professor Henry A. Sanders, Greek.... 80 oo Assistant Professor H. S. Jennings, Zoology..... 80 oo Instructor Geo. 0. Higley, Chemistry......... I80 oo Instructor D. M\. Lichty, Chemistry......... 8 oo Instructor C. L. Meader, Latin................. 800 oo Instructor Arthur G. Hall, Mathematics.......... I80 oo Instructor James W. Glover, Mathematics and Insurance.............................. oo Instructor F. C. Wilson, Drawing............... I50 oo Instructor W. W. Florer, German...............120 oo Instructor J. B. Pollock, Botany................ I80 oo Instructor J. A. C. Hildner, German........... 20 oo Instructor E. C. Sullivan, Chemistry............ I80 oo Instructor H1. nM. Randall, Physics............. I50 oo Instructor F. L. Dunlap, Chemistry............ 50 oo Instructor Duane R. Stuart, Greek.............. I50 oo Instructor J. M. Thomas, English................ 00 oo Instructor Geo. P. Burns, Botany.............. I50 oo Instructor W.' G. Smeaton, Physical Chemistry... 50 oo Instructor William Marshall, Mathematics...... I00 oo Instructor C. C. Adams, Zology............... 50 oo Instructor C. T. Teetzel (Michigan State Normal College), Physical Training................50 oo Francis X. Carmody (Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute), Elocution.......................... 200 oo The following persons were provisionally appointed to give instruction in the University during the Summer Session, on condition that any course which is not elected by at least six students shall be withdrawn: Assistant Professor H. A. Sanders, Latin (two courses)........................... $160 oo Instructor W. G. Smeaton, Physical Chemistry (two courses).............................. 00 00

Page  159 JANUARY MEETING, I903. 159 Instructor J. C. Thorpe, Mechanical Engineering.. o00 oo Assistant Professor H. S. Jennings, Zo6logy (two courses)................................. 6 0 oo On motion of Regent Hill, Charles Baird was reappointed Graduate Director of Outdoor Athletics for the term of three years with a salary of $1,200 from the University funds and $8oo from the gate receipts of the Athletic Association. The request for cases in the museum of the new Medical Building was referred to the Medical Committee, to report at the next meeting of the Board. On motion of Regent Carey, Architect Kahn was requested to get bids on the plumbing, heating and ventilation of the new Engineering Building and submit the same to the Board at their next meeting. On motion of Regent Barbour, it was voted that at the time of the Junior Hop in the Gymnasium, dancing shall cease at 2 o'clock A. M. and the lights in the building shall be turned off at 2:30 o'clock standard time. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Secretary was requested to have a schedule of the professors' rooms and hours prepared. The following resolution was submitted by Regent Hill and adopted by the full Board: Resolved, That as to all proposed legislation originating in the University and affecting its interests, that it shall be submitted to this Board for its consideration and approved before such legislation is requested of the legislative body. On motion of Regent Carey, the Secretary was requested to ascertain, and report to the Board, the total amount that has been appropriated for the new Medical Building, and the amount that has been paid, including all outstanding bills, and to request the Dean of the Department to make an estimate of any and all material still needed to complete the building ready for use. On motion of Regent Dean, Professor M. E. Cooley was requested to procure bids on pipes, radiators and iron tanks for the new Engineering Building and submit them at the

Page  160 160 JANUARY MEETING, 1903. next meeting of the Board; but if it becomes necessary to have these goods before the Board meeting, the chairman of the Building Committee shall have full power to make the purchase. On motion the Board adjourned to Thursday, March 5th, at io o'clock A. M. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  161 MARCH MEETING. TNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, March 5th, 1903. The Board assembled in the Regents' room at Io o'clock A. M. Present-Regents Farr, Lawton, Dean, Barbour, Fletcher, and Carey. Ab:;cnt-R:.ieg;ents Butterfield and Hill. The Secretary read the minutes of the last meeting, which were, on motion of Regent Dean, approved and ordered printed. Conmunications which had reached the President were placed in the hands of the standing committees of the Board for consideration. The Board then went into executive session and listened to Mr. Filibert Roth, who addressed them on the subject of Forestry. Regent Fletcher moved that Mr. Filibert Roth be appointed Professor of Forestry at a salary of $2,500, services to begin with the next college year. The motion was carried by the unanimous vote of the Board. The President presented and read the following communication from Professor Thomas C. Trueblood: ANN ARBOR, March 2, 1903. Xlo the Honorable Board of Regents: Gentlemen: —I have the honor to report to you that Senator Russell A. Alger has offered to contribute $75.00 a year (until such time as he shall notify us to the contrary.) for the purpose of providing suitable medals for the University Honor Debaters. Very truly yours, THOS. C. TRUEBLOOD.

Page  162 162 MtARCH MEETING, 1903. On motion the President was requested to convey to Senator Alger the thanks of the Board for his gift to this University. On motion of Regent Lawton, Professor A. C. McLaughlin was granted leave of absence for one year without salary to accept the directorship of Historical Research in the Carnegie Institution at Washington, D. C. He was requested to report to the next meeting of the Board what arrangements can be made to carry his work during his absence. Regent Lawton submitted the following resolution, which was adopted by the Board: Resolved, That the Medical Faculty of the University Hospital are hereby instructed to arrange in the new Palmer Ward for the present accommodation of the work of Diseases of Women under Doctor Peterson. Regent Lawton moved that the Secretary be authorized to contract with the Library Bureau of Chicago for the following museum cases for the Medical Museum, according to the specifications on file in the Secretary's office: One wall case, 27 feet long........................$ 500 One double case, 6 feet long...................... 200 One double case, 12 feet long...................... 400 Two low cases with drawers, each Io feet long...... 300 $1400 On motion of Regent Barbour, Regent Farr was authorized to make a loan of $15,000 to W. W. Hannan of Detroit from the gift funds of the University, and also $Io,oo0 to I. P. B. Sands of Detroit, if in his judgment the security is ample. On motion of Regent Lawton, the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery was conferred upon John Boggs Felker, Louis Frederick Theurer, and Harry Seymour White, in accordance with recommendation of the Dental Faculty. Regent Dean presented and read a communication from the Engineering Faculty, asking that the required number of hours for graduation be raised to 136. The communication carried with it the disapproval of the Dean of the Department, and was on motion laid on the table.

Page  163 M.ARCH MEETING, I903. 168 Regent Dean presented the following communication from the Dean of the Engineering Department and the recommendations therein contained were approved by the Board: ANN ARBOR, February 28, 1903. I'RESIDENT JAMES B. ANGELL, University of Michigan: Dear Sir:-An appropriation of $900.00 for an additional instructor in the Department of Engineering was allowed in the last budget, if the necessity for his employment should arise. During the first semester Mr. Chas. B. Davis was employed as instructor in surveying. At the request of Prof. MI. E. Cooley I now ask that Mr. Markham Cheever and Mr. Albert J. Becker, two students in mechanical engineering, may be appointed as student assistants in mechanical engineering for the second semester, for work in the Mechanical Laboratory, where there is a great increase in the number of students; and that the compensation for each be $225.00, making, together, the $450.00 allotted for the second semester. Prof. Cooley has asked in next year's budget for two student assistants, theneed of which he already feels. Respectfully submitted, CHAS. E. GREENE, Dean. On motion of Regent Dean, Professor Patterson was authorized to use $50 of the budget of the Electric Engineering Department'to defray his expenses while visiting important electrical engineering centers with his class. On motion of Regent Dean, Professor V. M. Spalding was granted leave of absence, with salary, for the academic year of 1903-04 for the purpose of study abroad, he to make satisfactory provisions for his work, and the direction of the Botanical Department during his absence. On motion of Regent Dean, Mr. Walter D. Hadzsits was appointed Instructor in Latin for the second semester without compensation. On motion of Regent Dean, Professor Reighard was granted leave of absence from the spring vacation until the end of the college year, for the purpose of taking up research

Page  164 164 4MARCH MEETING, 1903. work with the United States Fish Commission. He to provide a substitute to do his college work. On motion of Regent Dean, is was voted that the salaries of H. L. Curtis and A. L. Colton, assistants in the Physical Laboratory, be made $30 per month each for the second semester. Regent Dean presented and read a communication from Professor P. C. Freer, now on leave of absence in the Philippine Islands, stating that the Government had offered him $6,ooo per year to remain in charge of the Bureau of Government Laboratories, and stating the conditions on which he would return to the University and take up his work again. The Board did not accede to Professor Freer's request. The communication was referred to the President for reply. The following preamble and resolution, submitted by Regent Lawton, were adopted by the Board: In view of the importance of instruction in Chemistry in the courses of study in the University, and of the fact that the science in its various phases has outgrown the facilities provided for the work in the present Laboratory, so that to meet the demands of this Department the old Laboratory needs to be greatly enlarged and improved, or that the building be discarded for the purpose for which it is now used, and a new Laboratory be erected that shall be adequate to the modern requirements of the Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy in the University; therefore be it Resolved, That it is the purpose of the Board of Regents to construct a new Chemical Building as soon as the funds at the disposal of the Board shall permit. Regent Barbour presented the following resolution, which was adopted on a call vote: Resolvzed, That when the Ann Arbor Railway Company shall have delivered upon Ferry Field, under the direction of the Board in Control of Athletics, so much gravel and soil as said Board shall direct, not exceeding ten thousand cubic yards, a conveyance of a strip of land off the westerly side of what was formerly known as Regents' Field, ten feet in width and extending the whole length of said field,

Page  165 MARCH MEETING, I903. 165 be executed and delivered to the said railway company. And that said railway company shall remove the present fence to its new position ten feet east and shall continuously and forever protect and preserve the embankment between the proposed ditch and fence from undermining and degradation. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the salary of Keene Fitzpatrick, director of the Waterman Gymnasium, was made $3,000 from October next by the unanimous vote of the Board. Regent Fletcher presented the request of certain parties in the State, that the Board should establish a chair of Architecture in the University. The request was referred to the Engineering Committee for consideration. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Laboratory of Hygiene was directed to analyse the city water every two weeks and furnish the Board of Health with a copy of their report. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Auditing Board were authorized to purchase the necessary electric cable for transmitting light to the new medical building and to the Hospitals. On motion of Regent Fletcher, Architect Kahn was directed to fireproof the third story and roof of the Psychopathic Ward. On motion the Board then took a recess until 2 o'clock P. M. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock p. M. On motion of Regent Barbour, the sum of $80 was appropriated for the purchase of the Gibbs collection of Skins of Michigan Birds and Mammals, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Director of the Museum was authorized to exchange duplicates of American or foreign specimens, and also single specimens of foreign species not required for purposes of instruction or exhibition. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Secretary was re

Page  166 166. MARCH MEETIVNG, 903. quested to notify the Librarian that the Board declines to appropriate $500 to cover an overdraft in the book budget of the Medical Department as requested by him, and to request him to say why this budget was allowed to be overdrawn. On motion of Regent Barbour, an appropriation of $167.75 was made for the purchase of two typewriters for use in the General Library by the full vote of the Board. Regent Lawton presented the request of Dr. Taft for an assistant for the remainder of the college year at a salary of $25 per month, and moved that the request be granted. The motion was lost on a call vote as follows: Ayes-Regents Lawton and Barbour. Nays-Regent Carey. Regents Farr and Dean not voting. On motion of Regent Barbour, the degree of Bachelor of Laws was conferred upon Frank Robley Fisher, Frank Austin Boyer and Claud Burton, in accordance with the recommendation of the Law Faculty. On motion of Regent Barbour, Mr. Hopwood was directed to connect certain pipes on third floor of the Museum. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Dean of the Law Department was authorized to extend an invitation to Sir Frederick Pollock of England to deliver a course of lectures before the Law classes, cost not to exceed $250. On motion of Regent Carey, the degree of Doctor of Medicine was conferred upon Ernest Dean Reed, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Homceopathic Medical College. On motion of Regent Carey, Professor Dean T. Smith was granted leave of absence from May until October, for the purpose of going abroad for study. Regent Farr moved that the Board establish a Pasteur Institute in the University, and that Thomas M. Cooley, A. B., M. D.*, be appointed Assistant Professor of Hygiene in charge of such Institute at a salary of $T,600, and that $900 be appropriated for its maintenance. The motion was carried by the unanimous vote of the Board.

Page  167 MARCH MEETING, 1903. 167 On motion of Regent Fletcher, the contract to furnish one pressure tank for the new Engineering Building according to blue prints submitted, was awarded to Wickes Brothers of Saginaw for the sum of $385, f. o. b. Ann Arbor, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher, Hutzel & Co. were allowed $119.44 for extra plumbing in the new Medical Building by the full vote of the Board. The Board requested Regent Carey to investigate as to the best method of supplying our Library chairs with rubber tips. On motion of Regent Fletcher, Pond & Pond, Architects of Chicago, were authorized to complete their plans for an addition to the Physical Laboratory. On motion of Regent Barbour, the bids for heating and plumbing the new Engineering Building were referred to the Building Committee with power. The Board then adjourned to April 22, at 10 o'clock A. M. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  168

Page  169 APRIL MEETING. UJNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, April 22, I903. The Board assembled in the Regents' room at IO o'clock A. M. Present-Regents Farr, Lawton, Dean, Barbour, Fletcher, and Carey. Absent-Regents Butterfield and Hill. The Secretary read the minutes of the last meeting, which were, on motion of Regent Barbour, approved and ordered printed. Communications which had reached the President were referred to the standing committees of the Board for consideration. Regent Dean presented and read the following communication from Professor Scott, and on motion the President was requested to return to the Macmillan Company of New York the thanks of the Board for their gift to the Library of this University. To the Honorable Board of Regents: I have pleasure in announcing that I have just received from the Macmillian Company, publishers, of New York City, a collection of 330 volumes intended as the nucleus of a department library of Rhetoric. The books are given without condition, but with the understanding that they will be placed in the Rhetorical Seminary Room in West Hall (Room 6). The collection consists of standard works in rhetoric, literature and psychology, and is valued at $260o I respectfully suggest that your honorable body make a suitable acknowledgement of the gift. Respectfully, F. N. SCOTT.

Page  170 170 APRIL MEETING, 1903. Professor Demmon appeared before the Board and presented and read the following communication: ANN ARBOR, April 22, I903. To the Honorable Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN:-Having examined the proposition of the Herndon Company, of Boston, for the sale of the stereotyped plates (i68 pages) and other material, including manuscripts, cuts, subscriptions, etc., for the History of the University of Michigan, and having also examined the terms of the University Press, of Cambridge, Mass., where the work has thus far been done, for completing the manufacture of the volume, we estimate the total cost to the University for an edition of two thousand (2,000) copies, bound in cloth, all material and work to be of the highest grade, to be not more than five thousand ($5,000) dollars. This estimate includes all expenses for the preparation of additional material, for seeing through the press, and for advertising and selling. Respectfully submitted, ISAAC N. DEMMON. WM. H. PETTEE. Regent Barbour submitted the following resolution: Resolved -That the University purchase the plates and material of the Hinsdale History of the University of Michigan at a cost not to exceed $1,500, and that Professors Demmon and Pettee be authorized to proceed with the publication and sale of an edition of two thousand volumes of said history, the total cost not to exceed $5,000, including the purchase of plates and material. A call vote taken on this resolution resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Lawton, Dean, Barbour, Fletcher, and Carey. Regent Farr not voting. Regent Dean submitted a communication from the Engineering Faculty asking the Board to establish courses in Electrochemical and Electrometallurgical Engineering. The Board declined to establish'such courses. Regent Dean presented the request of Mr. Ralph H. Miller, instrument maker, endorsed by fifteen others, asking that the salary of Mr. Miller be increased from $3 to. $4 per day. The request was laid on the table.

Page  171 APRIL MEETING, I903. 171 On motion of Regent Barbour, Regents Fletcher and Carey were asked to look after the coal supply for the University and provide storage for the same. The following resolution, introduced by Regent Farr, was adopted by the Board: Resolved: That a committee of three be appointed by the President to examine and report upon the question of erecting an apartment building in city of Detroit, said building, if erected, to be upon the so-called Barbour property on Woodward Avenue, and to be an investment of special bequests to the University. The President appointed Regents Farr, Lawton and Fletcher as such committee. Regent Farr submitted the following resolution, which was adopted by the full Board: Resolved: That the President and Secretary are hereby authorized to sign and deliver in and for the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan a petition for repaving Leavenworth street, between Twenty-ninth Avenue and Thirty-seventh Street in the City of Omaha and State of Nebraska, the property of the Board of Regents affected by said repaving being the west 64~/2 feet of the east 585'2 feet of Block I6 of Bartlett's addition to said City of Omaha. On motion of Regent Dean, Regent Farr and Barbour were requested to go to Omaha, Nebraska, and look after the property of the University in that city. The following resolution, introduced by Regent Farr, was adopted by the full Board: Resolved: That the President and Secretary be and they are hereby authorized to execute and deliver a conveyance of the N. E. /4, Section 35, T. 31, R. 22, Brown Co., State of Nebraska, for a consideration of $800, one-half in cash and the balance to be secured by mortgage upon the property at six per cent. interest. Regent Farr submitted the following resolution, which was adopted by the Board: Resolved: That the Finance Committee be authorized to take steps as it may deem proper for the collection of such debts and securities in the Bates Fund as may due and unpaid.

Page  172 172 APRIL MEETING, 1903. On motion of Regent Dean, the title of Professor I. N1 Demmon was changed to Professor of English, and the title of Professor Fred N. Scott was made Professor of Rhetoric by the full vote of the Board. Regent Dean presented and read the following communication from Professor Greene, Dean of the Engineering Department, and the recommendations therein contained were approved by the full Board. ANN ARBOR, MICH., April 15, 1903. PRESIDENT JAMES B. ANGELL, Ann Arbor, Mich.: Dear Sir:-As all engineering students are required to stay to one Summer term, the present class of chemical engineers will have to remain this coming summer. As some of the class are irregular in their course, there will probably not be over six or eight of these who will have to be here; these will all take three hours work in dynamo-electric machinery. This is the only prescribed work they must take. Under the present rules if they take elective work to fill up their time to the six hours which is expected of Summer School students they will have to pay the Summer School fee of twenty dollars. As they 'are required to stay it does not seem exactly just that they should have to pay this fee or else take only half work. I would like, therefore, to have you request the Regents to allow. the chemical engineering students, who are required to remain to the Summer School to take dynamo-electric machinery, to elect such other work as may best suit their needs up to three hours without payment of the Summer School fee. Very truly yours, CHAS. E. GREENE. Professor M. L. D'Ooge, executor of the estate of Love M. Palmer, tendered securities amounting to $10,907.04, together with his check for $4,092.96, in full payment of the Palmer bequest for free beds in University Hospital. On motion of Regent Farr, the obligations were accepted in full payment of said bequest, and the same were turned over to the Treasurer with instructions to issue his receipt to the executor. On motion the Board took a recess until 2 o'clock P. M.

Page  173 APRIL MEETING, rQo3. 173 AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock p. M. On motion of Regent Farr, the consideration of the Blair coal contract with the University was deferred until the next meeting of the Board. Regent Dean presented and read a communication from Professors Kelsey and D'Ooge asking the Board to print six thousand copies of the Graduate Announcement for the year 1903-04. On motion the communication was placed on file and the Auditing Board were directed to print the usual number only. On motion of Regent Lawton, the salaries of James Galbraith, steamfitter, and T. Backus, plumber, were made $3 per day by the full vote of the Board. Regent Fletcher moved that the Treasurer be authorized to pay the following accounts: The H. W. Johns Manville Company, for covering the steam pipes in new Medical Building (contract)................................... $1,251 97 And bill of extras on same work............... 93 82 $1,345 79 The Sturtevant Company, for heating and ventilating new Medical Building (on account).....$5,0oo oo The Gardner Elevator Company (on account).... 500 oo Hoertz & Company, for extra work done on new Engineering Building (in full).............. 1,398 25 Spier & Rohns, architects, for services on new Medical Building (in full).........1......... I,182 20 The Morse-Boulger Destructor Company, for material furnished for crematory (in full)....... 500 oo The motion was carried by the unanimous vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher, it was voted that metal treads be placed on the outside and first story stairs of the new Medical Building at a cost of $275.

Page  174 174 APRIL MEETING, I903. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Athletic Association was allowed the use of the small brick building near West Hall at a rental of $Io per month. On motion of Regent Carey, $6,ooo was added to the budget of the Homceopathic Hospital for current expenses by the unanimous vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher, it was voted to put a new hood and balance case in the Laboratory of Materia Medica at a cost of $75. Regent Fletcher moved that the architect be authorized to contract with Charles A. Sauer, contractor of the Psychopathic Ward, for fire-proofing the second story and the roof of said building at a cost of $4,545.21. The motion was carried by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the bill of Albert Kahn, architect, for services rendered in connection with the Psychopathic Ward building, $300, and the new Engineering building, $700, was referred to the Secretary with power. Assistant Professor H. S. Jennings was granted a leave of absence for one year for the purpose of going abroad for study, his salary to lapse during his absence. On motion of Regent Carey, the salary of Miss Carrie Daferner, head nurse in the Homncopathic Hospital, was made $300 per year from January Ist, I903, by the full vote of the Board. Regent Fletcher presented and read the following communication from Professor E. D. Campbell, and the recommendations therein contained were approved by the full Board: ANN ARBOR, MICH., April 21, 1903. To the Board of Regents, University of Michigan: GENTLEMEN: —About a year ago Mr. Alfred C. Lane, State Geologist, wrote to both Dr. Prescott and myself, inquiring as to whether we could make arrangements whereby analyses could be made in this Chemical Laboratory for the Geological Survey. We, Dr. Prescott and myself, considered the matter. and wrote that if there was quite, an amount of work to be done, enough to pay the salary of an assistant, we would request the Board of Regents to appoint an assistant to do the work and the Survey would pay for

Page  175 APRIL MEETING, 1903. 175 the analyses, Mr. Lane could not at that time promise any definite amount of work and no further action was taken. He now has about two hundred determinations which he would iike to have done as soon as possible and says that there will probably be three hundred or so next year. I think it only right for this laboratory to co-operate as far as practicable with the State Geological Survey. Our present force cannot attend to this work but I would make the following proposition: That I be empowered to appoint an assistant to make such analyses as are called for by the State Geologist. That this assistant receive no compensation from the University. That the State Geologist pay one dollar for each determination made and that of this amount the assistant receive three-fourths and one-fourth go to the University, to the credit of the chemical laboratory, to pay for the chemicals and apparatus used in the work. Dr. Prescott has requested me to attend to this matter and I will take charge of the work if the Board wishes, without compensation for myself. The University can in this way materially assist the work of the Geological Survey and more than reimburse itself for the materials used in the work. I would request that I be authorized to select such an assistant and to begin thrc wTrk at once. Respectfully submitted, E. D. CAMPBELL. On motion of Regent Fletcher, it was voted that a contract be made with the Johnson Service Company of Milwaukee for the regulation of heat in the new Engineering Building according to the plans and specifications, for the sum of $7,500. On motion the following appointments and reappointments were made: ASSISTANT PROFESSORS REAPPOINTED FOR THREE YEARS. John R. Allen, M. E., Mechanical Engineering..... $i,6oo Karl E.Guthe, Ph. D., Physics................... I,6oo George Rebec, Ph. D., Philosophy............... 1,6oo Walter B. Pillsbury, Ph. D., Philosophy, and Director of the Psychological Laboratory............... I,600

Page  176 176 APRIL MEETING, 1903. INSTRUCTORS REAPPOINTED FOR TIREE YEARS. George 0. Higley, M. S., General Chemistry....... 1,200 David M. Lichty, M. S., General Chemistry....... 1,200 William H. Butts, A. M., Mathematics............. 1,200 ASSISTANTS REAPPOINTED FOR THREE YEARS. Fred P. Jordan, A. B., Assistant in Library....... 1,200 Byron A. Finney, A. B., Assistant in Library...... 1,200 INSTRUCTORS REAPPOINTED FOR ONE YEAR. John Dieterle, A. M., German.............. go900 Alice L. Hunt, Drawing................ 900 Frederick L. Dunlap, Sc.D., Analytical Chemistry... 900 Edward B. Escott, M. S., Mathematics........... 900 William Marshall, M. S., Mathematics........... 900 Herbert D. Carrington, Ph. D., German.......... 900 Carl F. A. Lange, A. M., German (half time)...... 450 Colman D. Frank, A. M., French and Spanish..... 900 Harrison M. Randall, Ph. D., Physics........... 900 Joseph M. Thomas, Ph. D., Rhetoric........... 90oo William E. Bohn, A. M., Rhetoric............... 900 Royal A. Abbott, A. M., Rhetoric............... 900 Winthrop H. Chenery, A. M., French.............. 900 Clarence B. Morrill, B. L., Rhetoric................ 900 Carl E. Eggert, Ph. D., German................. 900 John W. Scholl, A. M\., German (partial time)...... 600 George A. May, M. D., Physical Examiner in Gymnasium (rank of Instructor)................... 1,200 John C. Thorpe, B. S., Mechanical Engineering...... 900 Alphonso M. Clover, B. S., General Chemistry...... 900 Duane R. Stuart, Ph. D., Greek and Latin........ 1,200 Lyman F. Morehouse, B. S., Physics............. 900 Frederick C. Wilson, B. S., Descriptive Geometry and Drawing.............................. 900 William G. Smeaton, A. B., Chemical Engineering.. 900 Fred G. Frink, M. S., Civil Engineering......... 900 Charles C. Adams, M. S., Curator of Museum (rank of Instructor)............................... 900 Roy R. Peck, A. B., French..................... 900 Andre Beziat de Bordes, Ph. D., French........... 900

Page  177 APRIL MEETING, I903. 177 OTHER APPOINTMENTS FOR ONE YEAR. Myra B. Jordan, Women's Dean.................. I,200 William L. Miggett, B. S., Superintendent of Engineering Shops.............................,600 Claude H. Van Tyne, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of H istory.....................I................,600 Edward S. Corwin, Ph. B., Assistant in History..... 650 Professor A. B. Hart (Harv. Univ.), Special Lecturer in History............................. 250 Professor F. J. Turner (Univ. of Wis.), Special Lecturer in History.......................250 Professor J. F. Jameson (Univ. of Chicago), Special Lecturer in History. 150 Professor A. C. McLaughlin, Special Lecturer in History 300 H istory. *........................................ 300 On motion the Board adjourned to Thursday, May 14, I903, at Io o'clock A. M. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  178

Page  179 MAY MEETING. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, 1 ANN ARBOR, May 14, 1903. S The Board assembled in the Regents' room at 10 o'clock A. M. Present: Regents Farr, Lawton, Dean, Barbour, Fletcher, and Carey. Absent: Regents Butterfield and Hill. The Secretary read the minutes of the last meeting, which were, on motion of Regent Lawton, approved and ordered printed. Communications which had reached the President were referred to the standing committees of the Board for consideration. Some time was spent on the budget, and then the Board took a recess until 2 oclock p. ir. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock P. M. On motion of Regent Fletcher a contract was entered into with the Sunday Creek Coal Company to furnish 1o,ooo tons slack coal at $2.10 and 3,000 tons run of mines at $2.55, F. O. B., Ann Arbor. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Secretary was instructed to notify the Fidelity and Deposit Company of Baltimore, Md., that the Blair Coal Company had failed to carry out their contract with this Board, and that the Board would look to the bond for damages. The Superintendent of University Hospital reported that the following persons had completed the course in the

Page  180 180 illMAY MEETING, 1903. Training School for Nurses and were recommended for graduation: Martha Culver Hollister, Kate Louise Yourex, llnez Alma Bryant, Charlotte Dell Easton, lEdith Mildred Harker, Bessie Caroline Brown, Florence Mabel Lee, Grace Emily Jones. Bertha Lucretia Knapp, Edith lone Dickson, Grace Elizabeth Eisele, Katherine Clyde Johnston, Aldina Elfrida West, Lelia Emily Jackson, Mabel Margaret Boyer, Loise Maud Marsden. On motion of Regent Lawton the President and Secretary were authorized to issue the proper certificates of graduation and affix the seal of the University thereto. On motion of Regent Barbour, the degree of Bachelor of Laws was conferred upon Stephen Arthur McGlynn in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Department of Law. Regent Barbour submitted the following resolution which was adopted by the full Board: Resolved, That the thanks of this Board be tendered to Mr. James B. Dill for his generous gift to the Law Library of the following artist's proofs of Imperial Japan Vellum etchings: One of Justice Joseph Story, one of Chief Justice Fuller, one of Justice Peckham, one of Hon. Elihu Root, one of Hon. William M. Evarts. The following resolution, introduced by Regent Barbour, was adopted by the full vote of the Board: Resolved, That a library fee of Two Dollars be hereafter added to the yearly dues of students in the Department of Law, the money so collected to be credited to the Department as a separate fund for use in replacing books that have been worn out and in making permanent additions to the Law Library. A communication was received from Dr. W. B. Hinsdale, Health Officer of the City of Ann Arbor, stating that the City Council was desirous of acting jointly with the University in the erection of a detention hopsital. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Council was requested to submit a proposition at the next meeting of the Board.

Page  181 MAY MIEETING, 1903. 181 Regent Farr submitted the following resolution, which was, on motion of Regent Barbour, adopted: Resolved, That the President and Secretary are hereby authorized and directed to execute and deliver to Ellen D. Scott a conveyance of the east half of lot (14), in block (3), in Summit Place addition to the City of Omaha, Neb., for the sum of $3,250.00. Regent Dean presented a communication from Dr. Vaughan and fifty others asking the Board to establish in the University a graduate school, and on his motion the matter was laid on the table. On motion of Regent Lawton, G. Carl Huber was made Professor of Histology and Embryology, with salary of $2,500, by the full vote of the Board. Regent Dean presented and read the following communication from the Director of the Chemical Laboratory: ANN ARBOR, MICH., May 6, 1903. To the Honorable Board of Regents: Gentlemen-I am asked by Assistant Professor Alviso B. Stevens to present his request for a leave of absence for the next two college years without salary for the purpose of study in Europe. The Faculty of the School of Pharmacy recommend that this request of Professor Stevens be granted, looking forward to his return to his post with added strength. He has served as assistant professor since 1892, his last reappointment being two years ago (Minutes, 1901, June, page 672). His subject, the Technique of Pharmacy, is important to the school. Its alumni are strongly attached to him, and the Faculty and Dean unite with them in desiring the long continuance of his services in the school. In providing for the work of Professor Stevens during his absence, it is recommended, I. That Assistant Professor Schlotterbeck be charged with the superintendence of the class and laboratory work in the Technics of Pharmacy, and (by help of assistants) with the teaching of the course in the Chemistry of Alkaloids, also that he serve as Secretary and Registrar. 2. That Walter H. Blome, B.S., T902, for the last three vears Assistant in Pharmacy, be appointed as Acting In

Page  182 182 MAY IMEETING, 1903. structor in Pharmacy at $900 a. year for the next two years (not looking forward to reappointment). 3. That it be further authorized to obtain the services of a non-resident lecturer or laboratory teacher for a part or the whole of the second semester in Professor Stevens' subjects at an expenditure of $3oo each year. This will leave $400 unexpended on account of absence of Professor Stevens. I have recommended on personal grounds the advancement of Assistant Professor J. 0. Schlotterbeck to be Junior Professor under the salary budget of the coming year. I desire now to propose this promotion for the added reason of his increased responsibility during the next two years, and because this expenditure will be covered for the next two years by the unexpended residue of Mr. Stevens' salary. - (Blome, $90oo; non-resident teacher, $300; balance to apply on salary of Dr. Schlotterbeck, $400; total, $I,600.) Therefore, this promotion of Professor Schlotterbeck would require in the work of Pharmacy and Pharmacognosy no expenditure beyond that of the present year until two years hence, and then an annual increase of $400. Respectfully submitted, ALBERT B. PRESCOTT. On motion of Regent Dean, leave of absence was granted to Professor A. B. Stevens for two years without salary, and the distribution of his work as recommended in the foregoing communication was approved, except that the title of Professor Schlotterbeck be not changed, and that the $400 added to his salary for the next two years shall cease on the return of Professor Stevens. On motion of Regent Dean, Carl C. Tarbox, A.B., was appointed Instructor in Rhetoric in the Engineering Department for one year at a salary of $900, by the full vote of the Board. Regent Dean moved that Stephen E. Slocum, Ph.D., and Burt L. NewTkirk, Ph. D., be appointed Instructors in Mathematics for one year in place of F. A. La Motte and W. B. Ford, resigned. It was so ordered by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher,.the Treasurer was

Page  183 MfA Y MEETING, 1903. 183 directed to pay Henry Carew & Co., of Detroit, the sum of $3,958.18 in full payment of their contract for the erection and completion of the new boiler house at University Hospital, by the full vote of the Board. Regent Dean moved that Professor H. S. Jennings be granted leave of absence for one year without pay, and that his work and salary be distributed as follows: That Dr. Raymond Pearl and Dr. S. J. Holmes be each assigned a part of the work and receive $300 each- for such additional service. That Mr. George Wagner be made Instructor in Zoology for one year, salary $9oo; and that $IoQ be used towards paying the salary of an assistant for the same work. This arrangement to continue for one year only. The motion was carried on a call vote. On motion of Regent Barbour, the salary of Miss Bertha S. Stuart, assistant in the Barbour Gymnasium, was increased from $400 to $450 for the next college year by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Farr, it was voted that Professor Pettee be requested to audit the books of the Treasurer and the Secretary for the year ending June 30th, 1903, at the usual compensation, $I50. On motion of Regent Barbour, Mr. Frank M. Longanecker was appointed Assistant in Latin for one year without pay. The Finance Committee submitted the following as the budget for the ensuing year, and the same was adopted by the unanimous vote of the Board. BUDGET FROM JULY I, 1903 'T JUNtE 30, 1904. Estimated Receipts. 4 Mill Tax........................$.. 394,500 oo Students' Fees................... 96,000 oo Interest on Endowment Fund.............. 38,500 00 Homoeopathic Act....................... 6,000 oo Summer Hospitals........................ 3,000 oo Receipts from University Hospital....... 36,000 oo Receipts from Homceopathic Hospital..... I5,000 oo Receipts from sale of Dental Supplies... 5,000 oo Receipts from Summer School............ 00 Receipts from Diplomas.................. 8,ooo oo

Page  184 184 MA Y MEETING, 1903. Interest on Deposits...................... 900 oo Earnings of Engineering Shops........... 600 oo In Building Fund at Lansing prior to Dec. 31, 1902..............................65,000 oo Turned over to Building Fund Jan. I, 1903.. 78,000 oo-$851,500 oo Estimated Disbursements. Department of Greek..................... 50 oo Department of Latin...................... 200 oo Department of German................... 100 oo Department of French................00 oo Department of English and Rhetoric....... 50 oo Department of English Philology.......... 50 oo Department of Political Economy.......... I,00 00oo Department of Geology.................. I 00o Department of Botany.................... 600 oo Space in Green House................ 100 oo Botanical Garden..................... 300 oo Department of Forestry................... 315 oo Department of Zoology................... 800 oo Department of Philosophy................ 500 oo Department of American History.......... 25 oo Assistant Professor................... I,600 00 Assistant............................. 650 oo Three Special Lecturers................ 950 oo Department of Semitics................... 100 oo Department of Music............... 200 oo Department of General History............ 50 oo Assistants............................ 1,050 00oo Museum............................... 300 oo Appointment Committee.................. 450 oo Observatory............................. 289 oo General Library........................... 520 oo General Library Attendant on Woman's Side 245 oo Department of Law (Current)............ 1,200 00 Clerical Help........................ 25 oo Expense of Delegate.................. 50 oo Lecturer on Irrigation................ 200 00 Increase of Professor Bogle's Salary... I,000 oo Assistant Librarian................... 50 oo Increase of Professor Lane's Salary... 400 oo Increase of Professor Goddard's Salary 700 oo One Instructor....................... 900 oo

Page  185 MIA Y MEETING, 1903. 185 Whole time of Professor Sage........ 800 oo Sir Frederick Pollock's Lectures....... 250 oo Department of Engineering, Dean's Office.. 375 oo Stenographer......................... 100 oo Secretary's Office..................... 60 oo Typewriter........................... 85 oo Civil Engineering, Professor Greene........ 100 oo Geodesy and Surveying................... 730 oo Board of Assistants in Field........... Io5 oo Three Wall Tents................... 10. 5 oo Five Levels.......................... 650 oo Five Leveling Rods................... 50 oo Drawing, Professor Denison.............. 50 oo One Instructor....................... 00oo Mechanical Engineering (Current)........ 880 oo Instructor with Class................. 00 00 Instructor, Summer Session.......... 150 oo Electrical Engineering (Current).......... 150 oo Instructor, Summer Session........... 200 00 Engineering Shops....................... 1,852 oo Waterman Gymnasium................... 300 oo Barbour Gymnasium...................... 200 oo Mineralogy............................... 50 oo Chemical Laboratory (Gross).............. 12,000 oo Department of Physics....................,o68 oo Department of Medical Physics............ I50 oo Dental Department....................... 5,000 oo Medical Department...................... 800 oo Increase of Professor Huber's Salary.. 500 oo Hygienic Laboratory (Current)........... 5,00o oo Microscopes......................... 250 oo Balances.............................. 250 oo Anatomical Material...................... 2,000 oo Anatomical Laboratory................... 320 oo Histology (Current)...................... 700 oo Additional Apparatus............... 600 oo Glassware............................ 200 oo Ophthalmology........................... 60 oo MAateria Medica........................... 600 oo Electrotherapeutics........................ 396 oo Nervous Diseases......................... 216 oo Theory and Practice...................... 260 oo Pathology........................ 750 oo Three Museum Cases................. 900 oo

Page  186 186 MAY MEETING, 1903. Surgical Laboratory and Clinic............ 63I oo Dermatology.............. 50 oo Physiology.............................. 600 oo University Hospital....................... 33,500 00 Homceopathic Hospital.................. I8,000 oo Homceopathic College.................... 500 oo Laundry.................................. 6,oo0 oo Printing Supplies and Expenses........... 1,500 00 Printing Proceedings, School Masters' Club 70 oo Alumnus................................. 1,400 00 Books for Libraries....................... I5,000 00 Repairs.................................. 0,000 oo Contingent Expenses...................... Io,o0 oo Fuel...................................... 30,000 00 Lights................................... 4,500 oo Postage................................. 3,000 oo Miscellaneous Printing.................... 3,500 oo Summer Schools.......................... 8,000 oo Commencement Expenses................ 850 oo Carpenter Shop Supplies.................. 1,500 00 School Inspection......................... 700 oo Diplomas.....I........................... 1,200 00 Care of Teams........................... 1,200 00 Water Supply............................ 3,500 00 Electric Supplies.......................... 2,000 00 Heating Supplies.......................... 2,0 000 Salary of Professor Roth................... 2,500 00 General Pay Roll.........................401,310 00 Increase of Mr. Fitzpatrick's Salary........ 500 o0 Due on Medical Building................. 31,072 00 Due on Engineering Building............. I6o,ooo 00 Due on Hospital Boiler House............. 4,000 oo To Complete the Palmer Ward............ 0,0ooo 00 To Complete the Psychopathic Ward....... I0,000 oo Due on Heating Plant..................... 5,985 oo Paving State Street....................... 5,000 oo Prof. T. B. Cooley's Salary.................,600 00 Expenses of Pasteur Institute.............. oo 00 Mr. Holland's Salary to General Pay Roll.. 1,200 00 Hinsdale's History of the University..... 5,000 oo Increase of Salary of Plumber and Steam Fitter............................... I60 oo Increase of Salary of Nurse in Homceopathic Hospital, I8 months at $o.oo.......... I80 oo

Page  187 MA Y MEETING, i903. 187 Addition to Homoeopathic Hospital Budget for year ending June 30, 1903........ 6,000 oo Metal Treads on Stairs, Medical Building.. 275 oo Overdraft on Coal Supply................. 6,ooo oo-$866,464 oo Deduct the following items which are now covered in the General Pay Roll. Political Economy........................ $,100o oo American History......................... 3,200 00 General History.......................... 1,000 0oo- $5,300 00 $861,164 oo Regent Fletcher moved that the sum of $I,600 be appropriated for the purchase of pipe and fittings to connect the new boiler house with the Hospital building. It was so ordered on a call vote. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the pay of the laundry help (except the foreman) was increased 25 cents per day for a ten-hour day, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Farr, Mir. R. H. Miller's salary was made $I,ooo, for twelve months work, by the full vote of the Board. The Board then took a recess until the next morning at TO o'clock. MORNING SESSION. The Board reassembled at 10 o'clock A. M. On motion the following distribution was made of the money set apart in the budget for the purchase of books: General Library............$I, 00 Law Library........................... 2,475 oo Medical Library............ 2,025 oo Homeopathic Library............................ 250 oo Dental Library................250 00 $15,000 00 On motion of Regent Fletcher it was voted to pay the Athletic Association 25 cents per cubic yard for all dirt they may remove from the Hospital grounds to the Athletic field.

Page  188 188 MAY' MEETING, 1903. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Treasurer was directed to pay Koch Brothers the sum o'f $3,277.70, in full of their contract for the erection and completion of the Palmer Ward, which amount includes all extra work done on said building. On motion of Regent Fletcher, it was voted to contract with the Gardner Elevator Company of Detroit to put six automatic gates on the elevators in the new M/edical Building at a cost, complete, of $125. Regent Barbour moved that the Professor of Elocution be allowed $ioo, or so much thereof as may be necessary, to cover his traveling expenses while conducting contests at other Universities, and that $500 be allowed for assistants in Elocution for the ensuing year. The motion was carried on a call vote. Regent Fletcher moved that the entire roof of the new Engineering Building (except the boiler room) be fireproofed at a cost of $2,127.06. The motion was carried oin a call vote. A communication was received from Dr. Peterson which was, on motion of Regent Barbour, referred to the Dean of the Medical Faculty. On motion of Regent Dean, Mr. Norman A. Wood was reappointed Taxidermist for one year, salary, $700. Regent Farr, from the committee to consider the advisability of the University using its gift funds in the erection of an apartment house on vacant property in the city of Detroit belonging to the University, reported as follows: To the Honorable Board of Regents: Gentlem nen-Your committee appointed to investigate and report upon the advisability of investing a certain amount of your trust funds in the erection of an apartment house in the City of Detroit, upon the premises donated to the University by the Hon. L. L. Barbour, one of the mem — bers of your honorable body, respectfully report: That we visited Detroit upon the i th day of May last for the purpose of the inquiry to which we had been appointed. We found that there are a number of apartment houses in the city, now constructed and in full operation, and others in course of construction. The cost of these houses

Page  189 lMA Y AMEETING, 1903. 189 ranges from fifty to two hundred thousand dollars, the cost of the land upon which they are built being from 12 to 30 per cent of the entire cost. These buildings appear to be in great and increasing demand, and when finished are quickly rented. Indeed, they have been rented in advance of completion in some instances, and it is claimed might have been in all had the owners permitted. These appear to pay a fair, in many cases a large, interest upon the investment. The smallest per cent appears in the case of the Palms, which is about 6.8 per cent. The highest we found to be 19 per cent. Of the cost of maintaining these houses, nearly 2 per cent is for taxes. The question now arises whether it is good policy to use a large part of the trust funds in the erection of a building upon your property on Woodward avenue. The principal of these funds is to be kept intact, and the interest to be used for the purposes of the respective trusts. We have two considerations before us as to these funds: First, safety, which is of primary and controlling importance; second, the income to be secured. This trust property now consists of real estate, mortgages and bonds. It now yields a net income of nearly 5 per cent, and is fairly well invested. The following reasons might be urged against the use of the trust funds in the erection of such a building: I. It would absorb a large part of the trust funds and be putting, to use a homely adage, too many eggs in one basket. 2. The changing character of locations in cities, and notably in Detroit, as for instance in the vicinity of the Biddle House, and of Michigan avenue. 3. The danger that the business of building apartment houses in the city of Detroit may be overdone. 4. That there will be a constant depreciation of the property by use. The above objections are worthy of consideration. Upon the other side there appears to your.committee many arguments in favor of such investment. Among them we may state the following: T. That investing in this manner will bring the larger part of the trust funds within easy reach, and they can thus

Page  190 190 MAY MEETING, 1903. be readily managed from Ann Arbor, and the oversight \would be comparatively inexpensive. 2. The trust funds are not sufficiently large to warrant the employment of a fiscal agent, and the control and employment must then necessarily devolve upon the Finance Committee of the Board, and this is a heavy burden upon men oppressed with personal affairs and often living at a distance from the University. 3. We now have more than ten per cent o~ the cost of building in the site, at present wholly unproductive. 4. This site is in the best resident district of the city and in all human probability likely to remain so. 5. In such an investment the University would have nearly 2 per cent the advantage of private owners in the immunity from taxation. 6. In the opinion of the committee, from the facts presented to it, an income sufficiently large could be derived from such a building to yield an income of 5 per cent ani to leave a balance for a sinking fund to more than provide for any depreciation. Your committee would therefore respectfully report in favor of the erection of an apartment house upon the Barhour property (so called) in the city of Detroit, the details as to cost, plans, etc., to be left to the future action of the Board. Also we recommend the purchase of 54 feet adjoining said premises on the south at a cost of not more than $6,ooo. GEO. A. FARR. CHARLES D. LAWTON. FRANK W. FLETCHER. The report was accepted and laid on the table until the, next meeting. Mr. Rembert Jones, Assistant Electrician, who was requested to inspect the plant on the campus and ascertain if there is unnecessary waste of light and power, and if so what means should be taken to prevent such waste, made an exhaustive and intelligent report covering the whole subject, with a number of recommendations, which, if carried out, would, in his judgment, materially reduce the waste of light. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the report was accepted and

Page  191 M-A Y MIEETING, 1903.;91 placed on file, and the Building Committee were authorized to carry out the recommendations therein contained. Regent Dean stated that after the general budget for the ensuing year had been adopted by the Board, the Engineering Faculty raised a committee on classification and schedule of hours, and that said committee would require an allowance of $40 to cover postage, stationery and printing. He moved that the secretary be requested to furnish the needed supplies to the extent of $4o and charge the same to the postage budget for general purposes. It was so ordered by the full Board. On motion the Board adjourned to Tuesday, June 16, at 10 o'clock A. M. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

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Page  193 JUNE MEETING. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ) ANN ARBOR, June I6, I90o. ) The CBard assembled in the Regents' room at 10 o'clock A. M. Present: Regents Butterfield, Farr, Lawton, Dean, Barbcur, Fletcher, and Carey. Absent: Regent Hill. The Secretary read the minutes of the last meeting, which were, on motion of Regent Butterfield, approved and ordered printed. Communtications which had reached the President were placed in the hands of the standing committees of the Board for consideration. Communications were received from the several Facultie-; recom.mendling candidates for the degrees to be conferred on commencement lay, and on motion of the chairmen of the appropriata committees the recommendations were approved and the degrees ordered to be conferred as indicated in tlie lists given below, by the full vote of the Board. CANDIDATES FOR DEGREES DEPARTMENT OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS BACHELOR OF ARTS M\ay Davidson Agnew, A.B., Al- Edith Alice Barnard bion College Louis Arthur Barton Mlaude Eliza Allen Melvin Eugene Bassett Tillie Vary Allen Florence Baxter Sarah Aimee Alloway Cora Beardslee Mabel Pugsley Andrews Grace May Beebe Robert Edmund Andrews Charlotte Anna Belger Ida Monson Andrus William Annin Benscoter Samuel Ball Earl Forest Benson Katharine Forrest Ballentine Georgiana Bilby

Page  194 194 JUNE illMEETING, 1903. Charlotte Secor Bissell Olive Blanchard Katherine Bogle Bernice Bort Albert James Bower Warren Cushman Boyd Eloise Sweet Bradshaw Ernest Frank Briggs Charles Henry Brown Elizabeth Stryker Brown Ida Loyola Brown Josephine Mercy Brown Florence Helen Brownell Martha Errington Buckingham Roberta Jane Bull Mollie Drew Butts Harold Swift Campbell William Garretson Carhart Edith Christene Carter Elisha Wilbur Caster Adeline Derrick Christopher Carolyn McMechan Chubb Edith Irene Clarke Vernon Burnham Cleverdon Minnie Pamelia Clough Harry M\ason Comins Thurlow Emmett Coon Cornelia Alice Copeland Georgia Chesbrough Coppock Clarence Clifford Corl Anna Belle Corson Nellie Evelyn Crane Frederick Charles Crumpacker Harry Lewis Crumpacker Owen Lucas Crumpacker Harriet Culver Robert Myron Cutting Hagopos Toros Daghistan Henry Thomas Danforth M:ary Jane Daniells Grant Train Davis Robert Hamilton Dawson Edith Louise De Long Mary Hannah Dewey Robert Gardiner Dillaway Albert Wilford Dorr, A.B., Hillsdale College Robert Walter Douglas, Jr. Estelle Downing Anna Elizabeth Drummond Frances Jewett Dunbar Frank Aaron Edson Lucy Elvira Elliott Ruth Ellis Lemuel William Famuelener Ph. C. John Alexander Ferguson William Joseph Field MIax Finkelstein Lena MIabel Foote Mark Foote Caroline Edith Foulke Jane Ridgway Fowler Sabra Ann Fralick Harry Alverson Franck Theodore Ferdinand Freeman Louise French, Ph.B., Univ. of Wooster Hugo Abraham Freund Frank Frederick Fromyer Thomas Urban Fuller Jura Cadot Fullerton, Jr. Katherine Reeves George Fredericka Botsford Gillette Effie Godfrey Miriam Deborah Goldman Francis Lee Dewey Goodrich Ephraim George Gray Clarence Wilson Greene Florence Wentworth Greene Christine Henrietta Haller Nellie May Hamilton Weir Mitchell Hamilton Clara Henriette Hasse Mildred Clara Hathaway Frances Newton Heath Fannie Elizabeth Henion Albert Ernest Herrnstein NMax Robertson Hodgdon Emma Mabel Holbrook Mary Edith Holmes Ralph Harmon Holmes Edward Potter Hopkins Alice Jeanne Houle Earle Ingersoll Houston Lillian Elise Howard Mary Fuller Howes Abigail Hubbard Edward Godfrey Huber Helen Marian Hume Genevieve linus Mabel Kathryn Inglesh Albert Jacobson Mark Jampolis Charles Lloyd Justice Paula Kahn Katherine May Killeen Thomas Hill Kingsley Richard Ray Kirk James Ross MIcAfee Kirker Milton Sylvester Koblitz Jacob Sylvester Kohn

Page  195 JUNE MEETING, 1903. 1 95, Anna MIargaret Kremer Samuel Bovyer Laird, A.B., McKendree College, A.M., ibid. Dean Lawrence Helen Lee Charles Albert Lehman Julia M\aude Liskow M/ay Elizabeth Loose William Robinson Lyman Lily Virginia Lyon Schuyler Colfax, McAlpine Douglas Macduff Lila McGaughan Clyde McGee Margaret Annie McGregory Donald Ross Maclntyre Earl James MlcLaughlin Marie Lotuise McLean Mary Josephine McNerney Walter Carson McNiel Fred Maichele Georgia Manning Anna Elizabeth lMa.,;hall Berthena Matilda M\arshall Edward Ross Marshall Carl Morton Marston Gertrude Belle Matautner Royal Loren Melendy Frank John Mellencamp Gertrude Agnes Miller taul Scott Miller Lucy Evelyn Monroe Margaret Montgomery Winifred Lillian Mlorse Jennie 'Mullenbach Helen Elizabeth Munger, A.B., Earlham College Duray F. Munger Agnes Murdock Eva Marie Myers Lena Frances Mlyers Sidney Cleveland Niles Arthur Holmes Norton Charles Hardy Norton Julius Jerry Nufer Lloyd Lynn Osborn Roy Melbourne Overpack Claude Irwin Palmer Una Palmier Harriet Louise Peckham Olive May Pepper Zora Mack Perkey Ida Pierce James Austin Poole Helen Post Florence Bculah Schuyler Pratt Harriet Pearl Putnamn, B.S., Albion College -Harris Phelps Ralston Howard Sprague Reed James Ross Reed John Byron Reed Grace Adeline Reynolds Emanuel Ernest Rimbach Eleanor Anne Rinn John Clifford Roberts, A.B., Penn College John Fletcher Robinson John Sherman Robinson Mabel Eugenia Ross George Peters Rowell Elizabeth Morrison Rowland Abbie E. Roys Fred McKemy Ruby James Herbert Russell Edward Hildreth Ryder Lillian Keal Sabine Martha Sargent Elsie Louise Sawyer Samuel Schaefer Ruben Stephen Schmidt Louise Schweitzer Roy Wood Sellars Rufus Clark Shellenbarger, A. B.. Wittenberg College Vera Gertrude Skiles Nathaniel Ellmaker Slaymaker, Jr. Esther Anna Smith Grace Smith Laurence Worthington Smith Stephen Herbert Smith Charles Frederick Smurthwaite Grace Anna Snitseler Alza Starret Paul Frederick Steketee Mary Elizabeth Stellwagen Don Search Stevens Jessie Louise Strong Bertha Sabin Stuart Donald Clive Stuart Helen Amelia Sullivan Margaret Mary Sullivan Florence Sunderland Carolina Auguste Supe Carrie Louise Taylor Hletty Mary Taylor Pearl Blanche Taylor Grace McDonald Thompson Eleanor Worthiigton Toowar

Page  196 196 JUNE MEETING, 1903. Katherine Mary Tower Marguerite Griffith Tyler Jessie Naomi Vail Clarice Lowry Van Eman Edith Charlotte Van Slyke Ray Van Winkle Herbert Hunter Vaughan Jessie Millicent Vivian Frank Allison Waite May Frances Walsh Carlton Wood Washburn Harry Booth Washburn Agnes Ermina Wells Cora Edna Wells Mary Alice Whitney Rose May Whitney John Walter Whitson Austin Elgin Wilber Hobart Hurd Willard Thomas Victor Williams John Carter Williamson Angeline Wilson Mary Margaret Wood Mildred Layton Woodruff Fred Leroy Woods Guilford Worth Woodworth Orpha Evelyn Worden William Hoyt Worrell William Robins Wright Karl Wilhelmj Zimmerschied 262 MASTER OF SCIENCE Forest Buffen Harkness Brown, A.B. Leonard Dixon Haigh, B.S. Frank Sylvester Honberger, A. B. Mortimer Bailey Kennedy, A.B. Hanji Shimotome, Tokyo Polytechnic Institute MASTER OF ARTS Ellen Botsford Bach, A.B. Ella May Baldwin, A.B. Ernest Sutherland Bates, A.B. Harold Prell Breitenbach, A.B. Charles Sumner Bush, A.B. Lotta Elizabeth Clark, A.B., Ripon College Seymour Beach Conger; A.B. Harvey Lincoln Curtis, Ph.B. Jean Dawson, A.B. Caroline Elizabeth DeGreene, Ph.B., Earlham College Clifford LeRoy Hare, M.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute Richard Dennis Teall Hollister, A.B. Dora lone Keller, A.B. Blanche Louise King, A.B., Olivet College Louise [Mueller Lenhart, A.B. Mary Lowell, A.B. Clarence Burton Morrill, B.L. Joseph Raleigh Nelson, A.B. Flora Prowdley, Ph.B. Luella Jane Read, B.L., Tabor College William Rinck, A.B., Hlope College, A.B. Annie Laurie Rooney, Ph.B. Warren Hadley Smith, Ph.B. Joseph Morris Thomas, Ph.B. Harry Conrad Thurnau, A.B. Alonzo Hubert Tuttle, A.B. Ada Maude Vickers, A.B. Sylvia Sanders Videtto, Ph.B. George Wagner, Ph.C., A.B., University of Kansas Robert Isaac White, A.B., Albion College 30 DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Kakujiro Akamatsu, A.B. Louis Merwin Gelston, A.B. Charles Willis Johnson, B.S. (Phar.) Carl Frederick Augustus Lange, A.B., A.M., Harvard Univ. M ary Frances Leach, A.B. Harrison Standish Smalley, A.B. Frederick Tyndall Swan, A.M. M-ay Wheeler, A.B. 8-305

Page  197 JUNE MEETING, 1903. DEPARTIMENT OF ENGINEERING BACHELOR OF SCIINCE (IN MARINE ENGINIERING) William Liddell Wills BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING) 197 Henry Maurice Mi'lburn Hovhannes Ekazar Russian Francis Duncan Shenk Leslie Joseph Tefft, A.B. Harry Probasco Wherry BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING) Willis Frederick Bickel Harry Lansing Clute James Vernon Davidson Albert Chamberlain Fitch John Wilhelm Kiehle Ralph Hayward Morton Merritt Leigh Runner Ernst Antcn Schaeberle 8 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING) John Ghio Barada Albert John Becker Homer Webb Benton Austin Perry Biggs Markham Cheever Willard John Dolpli John Orne Emerson Edward Anton Epple Fay Leone Faurote Neal Charles Fenkell Harold Richards Finney. Walter Hugh Himes Stephen Asa Hoag Charles Willard Howard Harry Crocker Hutchins BACHELOR OF SCIENCE Harry Hurd Atwell Max Hayden Barber Charles Porter Chester Arthur Pierson Clark Richard DeYoung Sidney Morris Fechheimer Donald MAcHardy Ferguson Milton Harvey Freeman William John Fyan Ralph Dickinson Goodrich Jay Butler Harris Earle Kelly Knight Stuart Kelsey Knox William Arthur Lafler Frank Irwin Louckes Howard B. Keeney Arthur George Lodewyck, A.B., Detroit College Robert Burns -Otis Fred Styles Parmenter M'oraldus Pierce Dene Ernest Polglase Earle Francis Potter Firederick Clarence Purcell ilenry Alexander Rademacher William Henry Radford Edward Prickett Rich James Moses Taggart W7illiam Franklin Temple Jerome Adams Utley 29 (IN CIVIL ENGINEERING) Don Egbert Marsh William Raymond Morley Verner Lee Page Karl Holbrook Pratt Frederick MIoritz Rademacher John Ross William Robertson Ryan Herbert Lincoln St. John Albert Henry Schuett Roie Claire Seery Stuart Henry Sims Frederic Cushing Stevens I)aniel W;arren Webster Arthur Chambers Wheeler Fred Alonzo Wyckoff 30 MECHANICAL ENGINEER Walter MacGregor, B.S. John Charles Thorpe, B.S., University of Illinois 2

Page  198 198 JUNE MEETING, 1903. CIVIL ENGINEER Murray Blanchard, B.S. DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY DOCTOR OF MEDICINE 1-76 Duncan Lorne Alexander Alfred Eugene Allder Abel Wilson Atwood George Lewis Bond Blanche Christine Boyle, A.B. Frances Nichols Boynton John Charles Bradfield Carl Augustus Oscar Breitenbach James Herbert Briley, B.S., Mich Agr. Coll. Irene Ballou Bullard George Henry Bunch, A.B., South Carolina College Marjorie Bonthrone Burnham Ulysses Schuyler Colfax Busch, B.S., N. Ind. Normal School George H. Caldwell Simeon Lewis Carson Charles Lewis Chambers Ernest Cleverdon, B.S. James Monroe Cooper Leslie Benton Dickinson Sumner Egbert Douglas Lucy Nash Eames, B.S. Warren Philo Elmer George Wesley Evarts Wilfrid Stedman Fisher Meldrum Burley Floyd Ralph Deems Fox, A.B., Illinois Wesleyan University John Elwin Gleason, A.B., Yale University Henry Burton Grimes Andros Gulde Arthur Field Harrington Herbert Harrison Hills Maude Goodale Hinman Arthur James Hood, B.S., Adrian College Andrew Jackson Hosmer Franklin Arthur Jones Roderick Duncan Kennedy Arthur Stevens Kimball, A.B., Dartmouth College Edward Dunster Kremers Arthur Ivan Laughlin Louis A. Levison George Hubert Lynch Bertha May Louise Lypps Elba Denton McCarty Cesar Peele McClendon, A.B., Lincoln University Francis Joseph McCue, A.B. Norman Percy McGay Charles Summers Marsden Curtis Campbell Mechling, A.B., Grove City College Charles Bowman Morden Edgar Leon Morrison Samuel Osborn, B.S. Walter May Peck Francis Clark Penoyar Roy Carleton Perkins Adoniram Judson Pettis, A.B. Eugene Bennett Pierce, A.B., Williams College Edward Andrew Pillsbury, A.B., University of Nebraska Arthur Patterson Reed, A.B. Gordon Warren Rice, B.S., Fremont College Frank Thomas Roach Melvin D. Roberts Andrew C. Roche Henry Michael Rooney, A.B., Boston College Melvin John Rowe James Arthur Rowley John Gustavus Rulison Charles Lewis Rumph William Holmwood Sellars Frank Albert Shaver William Samuel Shipp Benjamin Arnauld Smillie DeVerne Churton Smith David Ellicott Squiers William Henry Stackable William Henry Steele John Scott Sterling Carl Clifton Stevens Edward Osband Sutton William Ellwood Tew Edwin Leeson. Thirlby

Page  199 JUNE MEETING, 1903. 199 Pius Lee Thompson Edwin Rank VanderSlice, B.S., University of Nebraska William Henry Veenboer, A.B. Harry Samuel Wagner, Ph.B., Denison University Charles Andrew Warmer Homer M/elvin Wellnan Herbert Tock White Guy Holland Williams John Ralston Williams John Roy Williams Charles Hodge Williamson, B.S., Lenox College William John Zalesky 92 DEPARTMENT OF LAW BACHELOR OF LAWS Clinton James Ahern Frank Merrill Ayer John Henry Bailey, Jr. Thomas Gilbert Baillie Burt Etheridge Barlow George Murphy Barnard Guy Bartlett Theodore Russell Bartlett Jessie Belle Bassett Norman Peter Beebe William Cameron Beer Charles Eugene Berry Willard Earl Bishop Clarence Hovey Bissell Donald Leroy Blackstone Harry Vernon Blakley Hugh Armstrong Boale Norman Henry Boardman Francis Borrelli Elba Harvey Boyd Edward Harold Boylan Emerson Richard Boyles Amasa Kellogg Brown Arthur Henry Brown George Chester Bryce James Edgar Burdett John F. Burket, Ph.B., Oberlin College Roger Champlin Butterfield, A.B. Harry William Byrne Allen Hersy Calley Henley Anderson Calvert John Basso Calvi Frank Sylvester Campbell Richard Andrew Caswell,ouis Wreford Chapple George Maitland Clark James Gerald Conlan, LL.B., Southwestern Baptist Univ. George Percy Cook Earl Cooley, Ph.B., Colorado College John Delbert Copley George Wilbanks Crawford Mark A. Crawford George Edward Cryer Harvey Jackson Curtis George Mark Davison DeStelle DeLappe James Joseph Divine Harry Augustus Dow, A.B., Yale University Elbridge Hudson Duff, A.B., Monmouth College Percy Joseph Edwards Frank Lewis Egger Gilbert Alfred Elliott Allen Merton Elsworth Walter Anthony Eversman, A.B. James Hepburn Eymon Ambrose Augustus Featherston, Jr. Albert Lorrimer Felt, B.S., Knox College John Alwin Fesenbeck, Ph.B., State University of Iowa William Edwin Fisher Hereford G. Fitch Frank Morrill Fogg Orville Stanton Franklin, B.S., Iowa State College Clifton Whitfield Frazier Roy Clinton Freeman Lloyd Edward Gandy, A.B. George T. Geran George Bruckner Goodspeed Herschell Levant Goodspeed Herman Julius Guckenberger Charles Arthur Haggart Frank Rollin Hahn David Miles Haigh Pearl Marshal Haller Merton Warner Hanford Neil Cameron Hardin, Jr.

Page  200 200 JUNE MEETING, 1903. Jesse Lee Harnage, A.B., University of the State of Mo. Don Elkin Harris Aubrey George Harrison Wallace Benton Harrison Henry Bates Harts Don Valentine Harwood John Arthur Haver, A.B., College of Emporia William Christel Helmers, A.B. Raymond Bernard Hendricks Alfred Henry John Robert Herren, A.B., Northern Ind. Normal School John Lawrence Hibbard, A.B. Arthur Pomeroy Hicks,'A.B. Anderson Bonapart Hildebrand Harry Henry Hilgemann Edward George Hoffman, A.B., Nor. Indiana Normal School Robert Arthur Howard Charles Herman Hummrich Ralph Harry Husson Ralph James Hyde Charles Warren Hymer i)avid Jacobson John Wenceslaus Jedlan, LL.B., Illinois College of Law Francis Arthur Jeffs Ethel Jenney Clare Peter Johnson David Ira Johnston John Jones Michael Alfred Jordan Leon Price Kelley John Duncan Kerr Arthur E. Kidder Cochrane LeRoy Kilgore George Washington Killelea John Hallard King Morton M. Kingsley, B.S., Knox College Thomas AMiner Kirby Albert H-erman Klasen Herman Charles Kleene Frank Frederick Kleinfeld Herman Frederick Kohl George Washington Kratsch John' Franklin Kumler, Jr. David H enry Lawrence Mason Benedict Lawton Emert Hugh Leaton Peter Bernard Lennon Elisha Linder Emil Frank Link Charles Russell Loomis James McCarren, Ph.B., Iowa State University Clinton McGee Francis Arthur McGraw Francis James McGreevy Robert Webster McKenzie William Nissley McNair, A.B., Pennsylvania College Eugene Alexander McNally Eugene Joseph Marshall Ralph DeLeon Matteso1n John Benniah Means Harold Christy Meek Charles McClellan Meng Harry Frederick Mercer Hugh Dickson Merrifield Frederick Baldwin Mertsheimer Edgar Willis Mettler, B.S., Valparaiso College Lorenz Paul Michaelis Alfred Samuel AMiller Almond Des Moines Miller Rufus Rhines Morse Benjamin Alexander Morton Philip Wilder Mothersill, A.B. Ralph Henry Munro Max Edward Neal Daniel Nicolas Nies John McKean Niven, A.B., University of Wisconsin Bert Verne Nunneley Joseph James O'Connor James Arthur O'Neill James Robert Patterson George Wesley Pennington Eugene Dickey Perry, B.S., Iowa State College Sylvester Pheney Arthur Garfield Poorman, A.B., Union Christian College Cheston Adam Price Perry Riley Price Hermann Adolph Priebe LaVere Ward Prince William Sargent Putnam Robert James Quail Rolleigh Burton Ranes Robert Percival Reade, A.B., Trinity College James Mlonroe Reasoner, A.B. Curtis Gerald Redden Jesse Meharry Richards Howard Richardson, A.B. Jesse Jay Ricks, A.B.

Page  201 JUNE MIEETING, 1903. 201 William Edward Robb John Lester Rockwell Thomas Jackson Royal -lermann Frederick Ruoff Harry Lawton Ryan Samuel Jefferson Sackett Charles Clarence Sackmann James Penfield St. Cerny Alfred Henry Sauer Philip John Schlagenhauf Daniel McGregor Scotten Orville Roc Seiter Benjamin Severance Charles Vance Smith Harry Dwight Smith, Ph.B., Antioch College Ralph Archibald Smith Ray William Smith Jesse Louis Snapp Hershel Robert Snavely Gobin Stair Joseph Gardner Standart Norman Sedgwick Sterry Walter Russell Stevens James Franklin Strenick Joseph Eugene Sweeney Cecil Edmund Sydner Albert Joel Taft, Ph.B., Iowa College John Taper Fred Frank Thill Edward Avery Thompson, B.L. Delbert Marcus Tibbetts Fred Trumbull Sol Drullard Tucker Edward William Tuttle Arthur Grant Urquhart Cornelius Vander Meulen, A. B., Hope College Aldrich Collins Van Patten Alfred Anson Vibber Frank Evan Vickery Ernest William Wagner Robert Eugene Walker Edward Gay Wasey Leon Philetus Welch Emil Eugene Werk Daniel Johannes Wessels Clarence Madison White Edwin Prilay Whiting Harry Hoit Whittemore William Edmund Wider George Russell Wilbur James Cammack Wilhoit Fitch Robert Williams Leroy James Williams Frederick August Wolf John Morledge Woy Homer Niland Young, A.B., Pennsylvania College 228 MASTER OF LAWS Clarence Wesley Barber, LL.B. Charles Fred Bliss, LL.B. Roy Frank Britton, LL.B. James Edward Forrest, LL.B. Lewis Cass Lawson, B.L., West Virginia University, LL.B. 5-233 SCHOOL OF PHARMACY PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMIST Anthony Edgar Block Mary Louise Boynton Alfred Napoleon Carpenter Lester Hyatt Carragan Robert Joseph Colgrove, Ph.G., Detroit College of Medicine Thomas Harold Dexter Elgar Otis Eaton Fred John Frueh Kent Kane Gimmy Sidney Hauenstein Benjamin Homer Haug John Helfman Perley Willis Hickman James Richard Huber Frederick Jacob Carl Klocke Earl Williams Salsbury Charles Antoine Schurrer Louis Theodore Schurrer, M.D., Western Reserve University Harry Max Vandeburg Lewis Eugene Warren 20 BACHELOR OF. SCIENCE (IN PHARMACY) Robert Josepli Colgrove, Ph.G., John Helfman Detroit College of Medicine 2-22

Page  202 202 JUNEL MEETING, 1903. HOM(EOPATHIC MEDICAL COLLEGE DOCTOR OF ME DICI NE Oliver R. Austin Edwin George Henry Beck Lucy Hazlett Black Edwin Scott Blair Obed Cooley May Hannah Cravath, AB., University of North Dakota James Lawrence Huffman, M.B., University of Toronto Adolph Ernest Ibershoff Cornelius D. Mulder, A.B., Hope College Arthur Justus Reynolds Gustave Wilson Erastus R. Zimmerman 12 COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY DOCTOR OF DENTAL SURGERY Richard Allan Francis Gordon Anspach Ernest Ellsworth Argetsinger Charles Henry Baker Robert Clifton Baker Thomas. Adelbert Bamborough George Watson Baylis Sigurd Becker Mabelle Marie Bennett Carl Henry Borgmeier Joseph Michael Brown Charles Joseph Burke Nelson Amos Burr, M.D., Columbus Medical College Clarence Walker Clarke Rush Poore Crawford Herbert Raymond Davis William Robert Davis, A.B., Hiram College William Durand Charles Sumner Eberly Frederick Taylor Evans Charles T. Ferries Gaylord Nelson Finch Percy O'Connell Finigan Boyd S. Gardner Robert Bruce Gatiss Jerry Bernard Gibbons Elmer Orland Gillespie Kathryn Ednah Goette Frank Archie Graham Wilfred Morgan Hawkins Claude Prindle Hildreth W\illis Scott Howlett Eugene William Johnson Louis John Kennedy William Webster Kimmel Peter Cornelius Krupp William James Larder Harrold Byron Lehner Willis Albert Litle Frederic Curtis Locklin Louis Owen Ludlum Henry Goodrich McCormick Allan Watson McCredie John Edwin MacDonough William Dominy McFadden J. Bain McGilvray H1asell Humphrey Madigan Frederick Charles Mellish Hugh John Morrison Jay Milton Osborne aye Palmer Bert R. Parrish Norman William Payne Norman Ellis Phelps Harry Wells Putnam Arthur Rickel Charles Homer Robison, B.S., Michigan Agricultural Coll. Arthur Dodwell Saunders Arthur Henry Savage Halsey Caleb Sayrs William Frederic Setzler Frank Elliott Sharp Arthur Kaye Steen Anna Stukey Peter Stukey Nicholas Louis Swykert Irvin Lynn Terry George Benjamin Thuerer Herbert Lee Toney, B.S., McMlinnville College John Jacob Travis Alex Mitchell Traxler William A. Vance, Jr.

Page  203 JUNE MEETING, 1903. 203 Mlyron Cornelius Verburg Hlarry Glen Wiggins Alphonsus Garrett Wall Thomas Albert Wilhelm Theodore Landon Watson Charles Julian Woodhams L,ewis Ganneti: Welch Frank Rodman Woods A'rthur Palmer Whittemore 8I Representatives of the Blair Coal Company were present and discussed with the Beard their failure to carry out their contract to furnish the University's supply of coal for tlle past year. On motion of Regent Dean, George M. Bartlett was appointed Instructor in Descriptive Geometry and Drawing. in the Department of Engineering for one year, salary: $9g0, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Carey, Mr. Erastus R. Zimmerman was appointed Clinical Assistant to, the Chair of Gynaecology in the Holnmopathic Medical College for one year without salary. A communication wras received from Dr. A. B. Prescott asking a conference with the Board by a committeee who are interested in the establishment of a graduate council in the University. The commnunication was referred to the Literary Committee for consideration. Professor S. Lawrence' Bigelow submitted the following communication from Parke, Davis & Co. of Detroit: DETROIT, MICH.., UT. S. A., May 9, 1903. PROF. S. LAW\RENCE BIGELOW, Chemical Iaboratory, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich.: Dear Sir-Permit us to answer your letter of April 30 placed before us by Doctor Francis. We have pleasure in continuing the Parke, Davis & Co. fellowship for another year. Kindly make the proper announcement to the authorities. It is a satisfaction to be able to make this contribution to the great work of M/ichigan's University, and we sincerely hope that it may continue to bear good fruit. Faithfully yours, PARKE, DAVTS & Co. W. M. WARREN, Gen'l Manager. On motion of Regcent Barbour, the President was re

Page  204 204 JUNE MEET'ING, 1903. quested to transmit the thanks of the Board to Parke, Davis & Company for the continuance of their fellowship in chemistry. Professor Stanley gave notice that 1Mr. J. E. Ecker of Toledo, Ohio, had presented to the University a grand piano mnade in upper Austria in 1837 and brought to this country in I857, which is supposed to be the first attempt to use iron in the construction of a piano case, and also to use hammers on the strings. The instrument is to be placed with the Stearns collection in the Museum. On motion of Regent Barbour, the gift was received, and the President was requested to transmit the cordial thanks of the Board to Mr. J. E. Ecker for his valuable gift to the Museum. On motion of Regent Barbour, Mr. Robert L. Benson, A.B., was appointed Assistant in General Chemistry for one year at a salary of $300, and Alexis C. Houghton Assistant in General Chemistry for one year at a salary of $I50, by the full vote of the Board. On recommendation of Professor E. D. Campbell, and on motion of Regent Dean, Mr. Samuel Ball was appointed as holder of the Gas Engineering Fellowship, supported by the Michigan State Gas Association, for the coming year. On motion of Regent Carey the Committee on Buildings and Grounds were authorized to provide some means of disposing of the refuse matter at the Homceopathic Hospital. Regent Butterfield presented and read the following communication from the Dean of the Law Department, and the recommendations therein contained were approved by the Board on a call vote: ANN ARBOR, June 15, 1903. To the Honorable Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: Gentlemzen-I respectfully recommend the following: The appointment of Mr. Henry M. Bates as Tappan Professor of Law, salary, $3,000. The appointment of Mr. Edwin C. Goddard as Professor of Law and Secretary of the Law Faculty, salary, $2,500. The appointment of Mr. Gustav Stein as Instructor in Law, salary, $900.

Page  205 JUNE MIEETING, 1903. 205 I further respectfully recommend the following appointnents for one year: Mr. John W. Dwyer as Instructor in Law, salary, $I,200. Mr. John R. Rood as Instructor in Law, salary, $1,200. Mr. Edson R. Sunderland as Instructor in Law, salary, $1,200. Hon. Henry H. Swan, Non-resident Lecturer on Admiralty, salary, $350. Dr. Victor C. Vaughan, Lecturer on Toxicology in its Legal Relations, without salary. Mr. Melville M. Bigelow, Non-resident Lecturer on Insurance, salary, $500. Mr. John B. Clayberg, Non-resident Lecturer on Mining Law and on Irrigation Law, salary as Lecturer on Mining Law, $300; Irrigation, $200. Mr. Richard Hudson, Lecturer on Comparative Constitutional Law, without salary. MIr. Henry C. Adams, Lecturer on the Railroad Problem, with — out salary. Mr. Joseph H. Drake, Lecturer on Roman Law, salary as provided, $400. Mr. Frank F. Reed, Non-resident Lecturer on Copyright Law and the Law of Trademarks, salary, $Ioo. Mr. Albert H. Walker, Non-resident Lecturer on Patent Law, Salary, $300. Mr. Dallas Boudeman, Non-resident Lecturer on Statute Law, salary, $500. Dr. William J. Herdman, Lecturer on Neurology, Electrology, and Railway Injuries, without salary. Mr. Harlow P. Davock, Lecturer on Practice in Bankruptcy, salary, $Ioo. Mr. James W. Glover, Lecturer on Mathematics of Annuities and Insurance, without salary. Miss Gertrude Elstner Woodard, Assistant Law Librarian, salary, $900. Mr. Clarence N. Boord, Assistant in Law Library, salary, $350. Mr. Don D. Williams, Clerk, salary, $200. H. B. HUTCHINS, Dean. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Secretary was directed to pay the overdraft on the budget of Hygiene, and carry the deficit to their budget for the coming year. Regent Barbour stated that Mlr. T. F. Parker had made

Page  206 206 JUNE MIEETING, 1903. application for two loans, one of $o0,000 and one of $7,000, from the gift funds of the University. The matter was referred to the Finance Committee with power. On motion of Regent Lawton, the following appointments were made in the Hygienic Laboratory for the ensuing year: Louis M. Gelston, reappointed Assistant in Hygiene, salary, $400. Ward J. MacNeal, reappointed Assistant in Hygienic Laboratory, salary, $300. Gordon Berry, A.B., Special Assistant in Hygienic Laboratory in charge of water analysis, salary, $300. The Board then took a recess until 2 o'clock P. M. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock P. Ai. Some time was spent by the Board in considering the case of Mr. Percy 0. Finigan, a studclent in the Dental Department who had successfully passed all the work required for graduation, but the Faculty were in doubt about recommending hin for the degree on account of certain rules of the State Dental Association requiring longer time in residence. The Board requested the Faculty to send in his name for graduation. [M\r. Finigan's name is included in the list of graduates on a preceding page.] Doctors Taft, Watling and four students were called before the Board for conference on matters pertaining to the Dental Department. After a full investigation of the trouble in the Dental Faculty, the Board instructed the President to call for the resignations of Dr. Watling and Dr. Briggs. On motion of Regent Dean, Mr. Herman W. March was reappointed Assistant in Astronomy for one year. Salary, $300. On motion of Regent Lawton, the Medical Committee were requested to formulate a code of rules, defining the duties of the Superintendent and the duties of the Clinical Faculty in the government of the Hospital. On motion of Regent Lawton, the leave of absence of Professor P. C. Freer, who is now in the employ of the

Page  207 JUNE MEETI NG, 1903. 207 government in the Philippine Islands, was extended to October I, 1904. On motion of Regent Dean, Mr. Richard R. Kirk was appointed Assistant in Rihetoric for one year. Salary, $300. On motion of Regent Fletcher, Assistant Professor J. R. Allen was made Junior Professor, salary, $2,000, and Instructor H. C. Anderson was made Assistant Professor, salary $I,6oo, by the full vote of the Board. Regent Fletcher presented the following resolution, which was adopted by the full Board: Resolved, That Prof. M. E. Cooley be paid $500 from the Building Fund for making plans for the heating and plumbing in the new buildings under construction and for supervising the work. Mr. George S. Field of Detroit, who is now the custodian of a part of the Williams fund, submitted his annual report, which was, on motion, referred to the Finance Committee for consideration. The Board then took a recess until 7:30 o'clock. EVENING SESSION. The Board reassembled at 7:30 o'clock. Regent Lawton presented the following communication from the Dean of the Department of Medicine and Surgery, and the recommnendations therein contained were approved as indicated below by the full vote of the Board. ANN ARBOR, June IO, I903. H-ONORABLE CHARLES D. L\AWTON, Chairman of the Committee of the Board of Regents on the Department of Medicine and Surgery: Dcar Sir-I am instructed by the Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery of the University of Michigan to present to the Honorable Board of Regents the following requests: 1. The Medical Faculty endorses the action of the Hospital Committee with reference to the work in x-Ray diagnosis and lr-Ray therapy and photography. The recommendation from the Hospital Committee bearing on this point

Page  208 208 JUNE MEETING, 1903. has already gone to you through another channel. The Hospital Committee recommends that all the work with the,r-Ray apparatus be placed under the charge of Mr. Vernon J. Willey, Instructor in Electrotherapeutics. Unless work with the.j-Ray apparatus is placed under the charge of some responsible and competent person, there is great danger that injury may be done the apparatus. 2. The Medical Faculty requests that your Honorable body address a letter to the Joint Asylum Board asking that Board to co-operate with the Board of Regents in inaugurating the work of the Psychopathic Ward. I may say in explanantion of this request that it is the intention of both Medical Faculty and the superintendents of the various Insane Asylums in the State, with your sanction, to employ Dr. August Hoch, Medical Superintendent of the Psychopathic WAard and Junior Professor of Psychiatry and Neural Pathology, and Pathologist to the State Asylums, with the proviso that the Joint Board of the asylums will pay Dr. Hoch's salary. Dr. Herdman or the Dean, or both of us, will be glad to appear before your Board, if you deem it necessary, and explain the details of the proposed arrangement. 3. The Medical Faculty recommends that Dr. A. S. Warthin be given the title of Professor of Pathology and Director of the Pathological Laboratory. The reason for this action lies in the fact that Dr. Warthin's position appears to medical men in other faculities as somewhat anomalous. Moreover, it has been stated that we have no full Professor of Pathology, and the fact that Pathology is under the control of the Professor of Theory and Practice has led to some criticism. Compliance with this request does not carry with it the necessity of changing or advancing Dr. Warthin's salary at the present time. 4. The Medical Faculty requests that the title of Dr. Frederick Baldwin be changed to Instructor in Pathology. Dr. Baldwin is at present Assistant in Pathology and has a salary of $500 a year. The change in title, it should be understood, does not provide for any increase in salary unless your Honorable body feel that it can comply with the request made by the Faculty in the budget already submitted. Dr. Baldwin has done his work faithfully, has been with us for a number of years, and the only inducement

Page  209 JUNE MEETINrG, 1903. 209 that he has to stay is the hope that he may be called elsewhere. The chances of his being called elsewhere will be greatly enhanced by this proposed change in title. 5. The Medical Faculty earnestly requests that you provide for an extra interne in the Hospital. This seems to be necessary in order that the increased number of patients in the Hospital may receive proper and prompt treatment. In the list of instructors to be given later we make a recommencation for the filling of this position. There are six departments in the Hospital, and as there are only five internes, it has been found that it is impossible to give the patients in each department the prompt and proper treatment which they should have. 6. The following recommendations for appointments to subordinate positions in the Medical Department, for the year 1903-04, are herewith submitted: That Dr. Jeanne C. Solis be reappointed Demonstrator of Nervous Diseases and Electrotherapeutics, salary, $500. That Vernon J. Willey, Instructor in Electrotherapeutics, be reappointed, salary, $6oo. That Dr. Theophil Klingmann be reappointed Assistant in Diseases of the Mind and the Nervous System, salary, $200. That George Herbert Curtis be reappointed Dispensing Clerk in the Electrotherapeutical Laboratory, salary, $oo00. That Dr. Cyrenus G. Darling be reappointed Lecturer on Genitourinary and Minor Surgery and Demonstrator of Surgery, salary, $500. That Dr. Ira D. Loree be appointed First Assistant in Surgery in the place of Dr. Willard H. Tlutchings and at the same salary, $200. That Dr. Conrad Georg, Jr., be reappointed Second Assistant in Surgery, salary, $ioo. That Dr. Frederick R. Waldron be reappointed Third Assistant in Surgery without salary. That Dr. Ralph D. Fox be appointed Fourth Assistant in Surgery without salary. That Dr. Edward A. Willis be reappointed Demonstrator in Ophthalmic and Aural Surgery, Rhinology, and Larylngology, salary, $500. That Dr. Raymond Duane Sleight be reappointed Assistant in Ophthalmic and Aural Surgery, salary, $200.

Page  210 210 JUNE MEETING, 1903. That Dr. Roger S. Morris be appointed Instructor in Internal Medicine and Demonstrator of Clinical Medicine in the place of Dr. James R. Arneill, and at the same salary, $900. That Dr. David M. Cowie be reappointed First Assistant in Internal Medicine, salary, $300. That Dr. Warren P. Elmer be appointed Second Assistant in Internal Medicine in place of Dr. Prentiss B. Cleaves and at the same salary, $200. That Dr. Charles W. Edmunds be reappointed Assistant in Pharmacology, salary, $500. That Dr. Simon M. Yutzy be reappointed Instructor in Osteology and Demonstrator of Anatomy, salary, $1,200. That August Henry Roth, A. B., be reappointed First Assistant in Anatomy, salary, $500. That Frank S. Bachelder, B. S., be reappointed Second Assistant in Anatomy, salary, $400. That Dr. Frank R. Spencer be reappointed Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy, salary, $200. That George G. Richards be reappointed Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy, salary, $200. That Lucius A. Farnham be appointed Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy in place of John H. Crosby and at the same salary, $200. That Lily T. Roche be reappointed Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy, salary, $200. That Dr. Thomas S. Burr be reappointed Demonstrator of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women, salary, $500. That Dr. William H. Morley be reappointed First Assistant in Obstetrics and Diseases of Women, salary, $200. That Dr. Charles L. Patton be appointed Second Assistant in Obstetrics and Diseases of Women without salary, unless provision be made for a salary as asked for in Dr. Peterson's budget. That Dr. Arthur P. Reed be appointed Third Assistant in Obstetrics and Diseases of Women without salary. That Dr. Rowland L. Parmeter be appointed Assistant to the Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women without salary. That Dr. Ralph L. MIorse be reappointed Assistant in Obstetrics and Diseases of Women in charge of laboratory work, salary, $500oo. That Harry N. Torrey, B. S., be appointed Assistant in Bacteriology in place of J. W. Vaughan, at the same salary, $300. That Dr. Frederick A. Baldwin be reappointed Assistant (or Instructor, see above) in Pathology without change in salary, $500. That Dr. James F. Breakey be reappointed Assistant in Dermatology, salary, $200.

Page  211 JUNE MEETING, 1903. 211 That Dr. John Henry Gilpin be appointed House Physician in place of Joshua G. Manwaring, salary, $400. That Dr. Duncan L. Alexander be appointed Interne in University Hospital in place of Dr. John H. Gilpin, with same salary, $I25. That Dr. Edward D. Kremers be appointed Interne in University Hospital in place of Dr. Frank J. Gibson, and at the same salary, $I25. That Dr. Samuel Osborn be appointed Interne in University Hospital in place of Dr. Carl M. Erb, and at the same salary, $125. That Dr. Ulysses S. C. Busch be appointed Interne in University Hospital in place of Dr. Oscar H. Bruegel, and at the same salary, $125. That Dr. Wilfrid S. Fisher be appointed Interne in University Hospital in place of Dr. Charles L. Patton, and at the same salary, $125. Provided your Honorable Board complies with the request for Another interne in University Hospital, the Faculty recommends that Dr. William S. Shipp be appointed Sixth Interne in the Hospital, and at the same salary as the others, $I25. That James P. Briggs be reappointed Pharmacist in University Hospital, salary, $750. That Miss Ida M. Tracy, now Acting Superintendent of the Training School for Nurses, be appointed Superintendent for one year. That Walter B. Pillsbury be reappointed Special Lecturer on Physiological Psychology without salary. That Dr. Cressy L. Wilbur, Superintendent of Vital Statistics, be reappointed Special Lecturer on Vital Statistics under present arrangement, whereby his expenses while giving these lectures are paid. That Dr. Henry B. Baker, Secretary of the State Board of Health, be reappointed Special Lecturer on the Administration of Health Laws under the present arrangement for paying his expenses. That Dr. William M. Edwards, Superintendent of Michigan Asylum, be reappointed Special Lecturer on Insanity under the present arrangement. That Dr. James D. Munson, Superintendent of Northern Michigan Asylum, be reappointed Special Lecturer on Insanity under present arrangement. That Dr. Edmund A. Christian, Superintendent of Eastern Michigan Asylum, be reappointed Special Lecturer on Insanity under the present arrangement. That Dr. George L. Chamberlain, Superintendent of Newberry

Page  212 212 JUNE MEETING, 1903. Asylum, be reappointed Special Lecturer on Insanity under the present arrangement. That Dr. Elijah AM. HIoughton be reappointed Special Lecturer on the Preparation of Mledicines under the present arrangement. All of which is respectfully submitted. V. C. V\TxUGJGHXN, Dean. The Board took a recess until tomorrow (Wednesday) morning at 9 o'clock. MORNING SESSION. The Board reassembled at 9 o'clock, Regent Carey being absent. On motion of Regent Barbour, the services of AV. H. Payne, Professor of the Science and the Art of Teaching, were reduced to half time with salary of $s,500, and the President was authorized to offer Lewis B. Alger, A.B., a Junior Professorship in Pedagogy with a salary of $2,000. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Secretary was directed to send notice of the meetings of the Board c,f Regents to the Superintendent of Public Instruction, Lansing, Mich. The President presented the following communication from Assistant Professor Karl E. Guthe, and on motion his resignation was accepted: ANN ARBOR, June 17, 1903. To the Honorable Board of Regents, University of Michigan: Gentlcimein-I have received an appointment as a meniber of the National Bureau of Standards at Washington, D. C. Since this position offers the greatest facilities in America for work in Physics and since the advantages for research work are excellent; I am obliged to resign my position as Assistant Professor of Physics at the University of Michigan, this resignation to take effect October I. Yours very respectfully, K. E. GUTHE.

Page  213 JUNE MEETING, 1903. 213 Regent Farr submitted the following resolution, which was adopted by the full Board: Rcsolved, That the President is requested to notify Drs. Watling and Briggs that their resignations from the Dental Department are desired, and that Dr. Taft be retained in the Department, but relieved of the duties of Dean, at a salary of $1,500, the position of Dean to be filled hereafter. Harrison S. Smalley, A.B., was appointed Instructor in Political Economy for one year in place of two Assistants, resigned. Salary, $0oo. The appointment was made on a call vote. Regent Fletcher presented and read the resignation of Mr. Milton H. Rix as Assistant Engineer, which was accepted by the Board. On motion of Regent Barbour, Superintendent Reeve was authorized to purchase a team of horses for the Universitv. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the salary of August Ritz was increased from $500 to $550, and the salary of Frederick East reduced from $6oo to $550, by the full vote of the Board. The President presented the resignation of Floyd R. Mechem, Tappan Professor of Law, and the same was accepted by the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Treasurer was authorized to pay the American Blower Company of Detroit the sum of $669, balance of their contract for heating the Library building, and also the sum of $92.75 for additional regulation in same building. On motion of Regent Fletcher, it was voted that the IUniversity contract with the American Radiator Company of Chica-go for the radiation needed in the new Engineering Buildin-, on the basis of their proposition now on file in t1he Secretary's office. On motion of Regent Iaw-ton, the Superintendent of Buildings wias directed to put awnings on the Palmer ward, at a cost of $I60, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Lawton, S. Lawrence Bigelow was reappointed Assistant Professor of General Chemistry and

Page  214 214 JUNE MlEET'ING,l 1'03. Acting' Director of the Labloratory of General Chemistryfor one year. Salary, $l,60o. Regent _Lawtoln pIresented the following' conmmunication from Dr. A. B. Prescott, Director of the Chemical Laboratory, and the recommlendations therein contained were approved by the fill vote of the Board: ANN ARBOR, June i, 1903. To the HIonorable the Board of Regents: Gcltlelmenil I beg' leave to recommend for appointment for the year I903-04, lnder the budget of salaries in tlhe Chemical Laboratory and the School of Pharmacy, as follows Homer C. Washburn, Ph.C., Assistant in Pharmacy, to succeed Walter H. Blome, at same salary, $300. Karl W. Zimmerschied, Assistant in Quantitative Analysis, to succeed M. B. Kennedy, at same salary, $200. Paul E. Demmler, Assistant in Quantitative Analysis, to succeed H. H. Willard, at same salary, $I50. William Seymour, Assistant in Analytical Chemistry, to succeed F. D. Shenk, at same salary, $Ioo. Nelson E. Tousley, Assistant in Organic Chemistry, to succeed G. T. Davis, at same salary, $Ioo. Lee H. Cone, B. S., Assistant in Research, without salary from the University and as supported by a grant of the Carnegie Institute for work under Professor Gomberg. Edward Lucas, Dispensing Accountant in the Chemical Laboratory, to be continued for the year to come, at the same salary, $I,ooo. James Glover, to be employed as Dispensing Helper in the Chemical Laboratory, for I903-04, at a salary of $300, in place of Geo-ge Lutz, Jr., and other temporary assistance. V'erv respectfully, ALI ERT B. PRIESCOTT, Director. The Board voted to give Professor Kelsey a leave of absence of twenty-five days during November next to enable him to give a course of lectures at various points in tlhe West. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Secretary was instructed to decline to pay the bill of the Ohio and Michigan Coal Company of $82, balance on coal shipped the Univer

Page  215 JUNE MEETING, 1903. 215 sitv to cover an emergency il our coal supply, which w'as to be an immniediate delivery, 1ut said coal did not reach us for more than four weeks after the order was given. We therefore decline to pay more than our contract price. The Board then took a recess until 2 o'clock p. iM. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reasenmbled at 2 o'clock p. Mi., Regent Dean in the chair. On motion of Regent Fletcher, it was voted to purchase six fire extinguishers for the Palmer ward at a cost of $63. Regent Barbour moved that an edition of 2,000 copies of an address delivered by Professor H. C. Adams before the Farmers' Club be printed for distribution. It was so ordered by the full Board. The resignation of Dr. Chas. MI. Briggs was received and accepted byv the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the salary of Thomas Hopwood, chief engineer, was raised from $1,400 to $I,6oo l)b the full vote of the Board. The Board by a unanimous vote reorganized the Dental Department as follows: Dr. Cyrenus G. Darling, Acting Dean and Lecturer on Oral Pathology and Surgery, salary, $I,ooo. Dr. Jonathan Taft, Professor of the Principles and Practice of Oral Pathology and Surgery, salary, $I,500. Dr. Nelville S. Hoff, Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry, salary, $2,000. Dr. Louis P. Hall, Professor of Operative and Clinical Dentistry, salary, $1,6oo. Dr. Egbert L. Loeffler, Professor of Dental Therapeutics, salary, $2,000. Instructor in Crown and Bridge Work to be filled, $900. Robert B. Howell, D.D.S., Instructor in Comparative Anatomy and Prosthetic Technics, salary, $800. Marcus L. WTard, Instructor in Operative Technics and Operative Dentistry, salary, $500. Elmer L. Whitman, Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry, salary, $300. Viola HIubbard, Cashier, salary, $450. Henry Purfield, Janitor, salary, $550.

Page  216 216 JUNE MIEETING, 1903. On motion of Regent Butterfield, James E. Burdett and Norman S. Sterry, candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Law s, were excused from attending the commencement exercises on account of illness. On motion of Regent Lawton, the degree of Doctor of MIedicine was conferred upon Dr. Peter Folk, of Deavertown, Ohio, as of the class of r868. The degree of Civil Engineer was conferred upon William Augustus Otis of Chicago as of the class of 1878. The degree of Bachelor of Laws was conferred upon Melville Madison 3igelow, A.B., Dean of the Law School (f Boston University, as of the class of i868. On the recommendation of the Executive Committee, the President was authorizedC bv the full vote of the Board to confer the following honorary degrees upon the persons named: l,'fastcr of ArtS. Jose Celos Barbosa, M. D., of San Juan, Porto Rico. Stuart Edward White, Ph.B., of Grand Rapids. George Proctor Wanty, LL.B., United States Judge for the Western District of MAichigan. John Jacob Abel, Ph.B., Professor in Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Flemrming Carrow, Professor of Ophthalmology in the Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Michigan. Doctor of Lazes. The Very Rev. Andrew MIorrissey, A. M., President of Notre Dame University. Jeremiah Whipple Jenks, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science in Cornell University. Joseph Very Quarles, A. B., United States Senator from Wisconsin. On motion the Board adiourned to Thursday, July I6, at Io c/clock A r. JAMIES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  217 JULY MEETING UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, July I6, I903. The Board assembled in the Regents' room at IO o'clock M. M. Present: Regents Butterfield, Farr, Lawton, Dean, and Barbour. Absent: Regents Hill, Fletcher, and Carey. The Secretary read the minutes of the last meeting, which were, on motion of Regent Dean. approved and ordered printed. Comlnmunications which had reached the President were placed in the hands of the standing committees of the Board for consideration. On motion of Regent La.wton, tie salary of Professor Louis P. Hall was made $2000, by the full vote of the Board. Professor Roth addressed the Board on the subject of Forestry. The Board then took a recess until 2 o'clock p. M. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2?. M Regent Farr submitted the following resolution, which was adopted by the full Board: Resolved, That the matter of Free Beds in the Palmer Ward be under the superintendence and control of the Medical Faculty subject to the approval of the Board. The. net income of the Palmer Fund shall be used for the maintenance of the same. 'No expenditure for the support of Free Beds in such ward shall be made in excess of the net income of said fund in the hands of the Treasurer. The immediate control of the admission to the privileges of said Free Beds shall be left with such member of the Medical Faculty as shall be designated by it, and no person shall be admitted to the

Page  218 218 JULY MEETING, 1903. privilege of such beds except upon the order of the person so selected by the Medical Faculty. Orders for the expenses of such Free Beds shall be. drawn by the person having charge of the same upon the Treasurer, and when approved by the President and Secretary shall be paid out of the funds in the hands of the Treasurer set apart for that purpose and not otherwise. On motion of Regent LawTton, the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery was conferred upon Hyacinth Lloyd Field, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Barbour, the matter of arranging the course in Forestry was referred to the President and Professor Roth with power. Regent Barbour stated that the State Forestry Commission was anxious to retain the services of Instructor Charles A. Davis in the work of the Commission and had agreed to pay $iooo per year towards his salary, provided the University would pay $200, making his total salary $I200. He moved that this arrangement be concurred in by the Board, which was done on a call vote. On motion of Regent Lawton, the salary of Instructor Vernon J. Willey, in the Department of Medicine and Surgery, was made $1ooo for one year, on a, call vote. On motion of Regent Lawton, Professor Novy was authorized to use $30o from the budget fund of the Hygienic Laboratory for the purchase of a' photographing apparatus. Regent Dean moved that Mr. Howard B. Merrick, B.S., be appointed Instructor for one year in surveying in place of Charles B. Davis who filled the place the first semester of last year, salary $900; also that Mr. R. B. Jackson be reappointed Assistant to the Dean of the Engineering Department for one year at a salary of $300. The motion was carried on a call vote. On motion of Regent Dean, Mr. Clarence B. Morrill and Mr. Claude H. Van Tyne were appointed Instructors in the Summer School at salaries of $50 and $60 respectively by the full vote of the Board. Regent Dean submitted the following communication

Page  219 JULY MEETING, 1903. 219 from Professor Hudson, and the recommendations therein contained were approved by the Board. ANN ARBOR, July 2, I903. PRESIDENT J. B. ANGETL, Dear Sir-The Board of Regents appropriated the sum of $1050 for the payment of three assistants in History. For these positions we have already selected two persons. The third will be selected later on. I have the honor to nominate Frank Burr Marsh as assistant in History at a salary of $60o a year, and Caroline E. Pattengill as assistant in History at a salary of $250 a year. Respectfully yours, R. HuDsoN. Regent Dean presented and read the resignation of A. G. Hall, Instructor in Mathematics, which was on motion accepted. On the recommendation of Professor Beman, and on motion of Regent Dean, Peter Field, Ph.D., and John N. James, A.B., were appointed Instructors in Mathematics for one year, salary $900. Regent Butterfield submitted the following communication from Dr. W. B. Hinsdale, Dean of the Homoeopathic College, and the recommendations were approved by the full board. ANN ARBOR, July 15, 1903. To the Honorable The Board of Regents: Gentlemen-It is recommended that the following appointments be made for one year: Gustave Wilson, M..D., Interne in hospital, salary $200. A. J. Reynolds, M.D., Interne in hospital, salary $200. A. E. Ibershoff, M.D, Assistant to Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology, without salary. O. R. Long, M.D., Lecturer on Mental Diseases, without salary. W. A. Polglase, M.D., Lecturer on Nervous Diseases, without salary. R. H. Stevens, M.D., Lecturer on Dermatology, without salary. Respectfully submitted, W. B. HINSDALE. On motion of Regent Lawton, Mr. Lionel Herman Duschak was appointed Assistant in General Chemistry for one year, salary $Ioo.

Page  220 220 JULY MEETING, 1903. Regent Barbour moved that the Board purchase 53 feet front on the south side of the University lot on Woodward avenue, in the City of Detroit, for the sum of $500o-payment to be made from the gift funds of the Universityand that the Finance and Building 'Committees procure plans for an apartment house to be erected on' said lots, and determine the funds from which the money shall be taken for the erection of said building. They shall also determine the value of the University lot, and transfer from the gift funds a. corresponding amount to the general fund to reimburse the general fund for a part, of the money expended in the completion of the Barbour Gymnasium, for which purpose the gift of the land in question was originally made. (See Regents' Proceedings, January, I898, p. I85). It was so ordered on a call vote. On the recommendation of Professor Reighard, and on motion of Regent Dean, J. E. Duerden, Ph.D., was appointed Acting Assistant Professor of Zoology for one year in place of Instructor George Wagner, resigned, salary $1 150. The appointment was made on a call vote. Regent Barbour submitted the following, resolution, which was adopted by the Board: Resolved, That the Secretary be directed to inform Charles Hoertz and Company, the contractors of the new engineering building, that unless they proceed with the prompt completion of their contract, the Board of Regents will take into its own hands the completion of the said building and charge the contractors with the expenses thereof. Regent Dean presented alnd read the following communication from the Board of Directors of the School of Music, and their request was granted upon the conditions named in said communication. To the Honorable Board of Regents: The University School of Music respectfully requests the Board of Regents to furnish electrical power for the organ in use in the School of Music building, compensation for same to be made by the School of lMusic, at the same rates which are now being paid to the ci y company. In explanation of this request, the following statement is made: The organ is supplied with a low-tension motor and with other

Page  221 JULY MEETING, 1903. 221 apparatus designed for low-tension service. The city company is now changing to high-tension service. By an exchange of motors, which would entail considerable expense upon the school, we could operate the organ with the new power, except the appliances for furnishing: electricity to the key-board; this cannot be operated with the high-tension system, and, we must, therefore, secure some other source of power or be practically deprived of the use of our organ. The amount of power used is small, a boy being able to furnish the force necessary; the power will be required for a period of sev(ral hours daily during' the season when the school is in session; the hours during 'which the organ is used are during the day time, almost entirely. We dislike exceedingly to bother the Board of Regents with this matter, but there seems no other source available. Respectfully submitted by the Board of Directors of the school. G. F. ALLMENDINGER, Chr. Finance Con. Professor Beman stated that he was unable to secure such men as the University ought to have, as Instructors in Mathematics, to fill the places now vacant, for a salary of $900. Regent Barbolur moved that he be allowed to offer a salary of $1200 for each of the two men needed. The motion was carried. as follows: Ayes-Regents Butterfield, Barbour and Dean. Nays-Regents Farr and Lawton. Regent Barbour moved that Instructor James W. Glover be made Assistant Professor of Mathematics with salary of $i600. The motion was carried by a unanimous vote. On motion of Regent Dean, Professor Asaph Hall was retained as Professor of Astronomy for one year at a salary of $2000. Mr. Holland, in charge of the bindery and printing plant, asked permission to purchase a numbering machine at a cost o!f $I5. The expenditure was allowed. On motion of Regent Farr, the Secretary was directed to print in the proceedings of the Board that portion of the will of the late Love M. Palmer which describes her bequest to the University, as follows: "Eighth-I hereby give and bequeath to the Regents of the

Page  222 222 JULY MEETING, 1903. University of Michigan the sum of twenty thousand dollars ($20,ooo) to be expended by them in the erection [of] an appropriate and handsome ward of the University Hospital, to be known as 'The Dr. A. B. Palmer Memorial Ward.' And I also give to said Regents of the University of Michigan the further sum of fifteen thousand dollars ($15,000) in trust, the income from the same to be devoted to the support and maintenance of free beds, in said building or ward, known as the 'Dr. A. B. Palmer Memorial Ward.'" On motion of Regent Dean, the salary of A. S. Berry, carpenter in the engineering shops, was made $2.25 per day, by the full vote of the Board. A committee of the city council appeared before the Board and stated that the council had voted to submit to the voters of the city a proposition to raise by tax the sum of $20,000 for the erection and completion of a joint detention hospital, provided the University will heat and light the same, and provide nurses and medical attendants. In other words, the University should maintain said hospital and care for all city patients with contagious diseases. Regent Farr moved that the proposition by the city to erect a joint hospital for the treatment of contagious diseases commends itself to the Board and will have their careful consideration. This motion was carried by the full Board. On motion the Board adjourned to Wednesday, Sept. 9, at Io o'clock A. M. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

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Page  223 SEPTEMBER MEETING UNIVERSITY OF M/ICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, Sept. 9, 1903. The Board assembled in the Regents' room at io o'clock A. M. Full Board present except Regent Butterfield. The Secretary read the minutes of last meeting, which were, on motion of Regent Hill, approved and ordered printed. Communications which had reached the President were placed in the hands of the standing committees of the Board for consideration. On motion of Regent Fletcher,the Secretary was authorized to sign the lease submitted by the Ann Arbor railway for ground on which to store University co'al, after certain changes have been made as indicated by the Board. )n motion of Regent Barbour, the President was requested to transmit the thanks of the Board to Mr. C. M. Burton, of Detroit, for making an abstract of the Whitney lot in that city without expense to the University. Regent Barbour moved that a case of drawers be constructed for maps in the Library, and temporary shelving be placed on the walls of the first and second stories of the addition to the book room, at a cost not exceeding $200, and if the work cannot be begun by our own men by October I it shall then be given to outside contractors. It was so ordered by the full Board. Regent Farr moved that Superintendent Reeve be authorized to purchase a new mangle and washer for the laundry all set in place ready for use, according to the proposal of the American Laundry Machinery Company now on file, for the sum of $I368, and the old mangle. This motion was carried on a call vote. The question of supplying the University laundry with soft water was referred to the Committee on Buildings and Grounds.

Page  224 224 SEPTEMBER MEETING, 1903. Tile President then presented and read his annual report, after calling Regent Barbour to the chair. The report is as follows: THE PRESIDENT'S REPORT. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: I have the honor to present to you my Report for the year ending September 30, 1903. During that period your attention has been largely directed to the construction of new buildings. Never before in the history of the University has so much work of that kind been proceeding at once. The addition of some special gifts to our regular resources has made this possible, though the exceptionally great cost of building at this time has made a draft upon our treasury which we would gladly have been spared. We have completed and taken possession of the new Medical Building. It is admirably adapted to the purposes for which it was designed, and adds very greatly to the strength of our medical instruction. We have also completed and occupied the Palmer Ward, which the generous bequest of the late Mrs. Dr. Palmer enabled us to erect as a memorial to her husband. But we deemed it wise to add an expenditure of about $5,000 to, adapt the building completely to the needs of the Hospital of which it forms a part. We have also finished the large building which contains the new boiler house and the laundry adjacent to the University Hospital. We shall now be able to heat the new Psychopathic Ward as well as the University Hospital from this house. We have a sense of relief at the removal of the boilers from the basement of the building, in which the nurses lodged, since the danger to them from accidental explosion is thus removed. The spacious laundry now easily cares for the needs of both the University Hospital and the Homoeopathic Hospital. The Psychopathic Ward, for which the State made a special appropriation, at last approaches completion, and will soon be occupied. We regret exceedingly the long delay in the erection of this structure and tlso what we regarded as

Page  225 SEPTEMBER MIEETING, 1o03. 225 the necessity of adding $5,000 from the University treasury to fire-proof the upper part of the building. But we thought that we should hardly be acquitted of blame if from lack of secure construction any of the peculiar class of patients who are expected to occupy that ward should be harmed in case of fire. The new Engineering Building, which is to be the largest and most costly structure on our grounds, is well advanced, but to our regret is far from being completed. Large as it is, there is every indication that owing to the strong inclination of students at this time for engineering branches every foot of room in it will be needed by the time it is ready for occupancy. Let it not be thought that we are constructing more buildings than are necessary. The rapid and continuous increase in the number of our students, the need of the very best facilities for instruction, the enlargement of the plant for heating and lighting, which the addition of new buildings or the enlargement of old ones calls for, have compelled us to incur an expense which we would gladly have avoided. Indeed, nothing but the limits to our means prevent us from carrying still further this work of construction. As has been intimated in previous reports, we need at once a considerable addition to the Physical Laboratory, an entirely new building for the Dental Department, which is wretchedly housed, an enlargement of the Library for seminary rooms and more book room, the reconstruction of the interior of the old Medical Building, which is worn out, not to speak of ampler accommodations for the students of History and Eco:nomics, of a laboratory for the Natural Sciences and of a new Chemical Laboratory. For some time to come all the money we can accumulate for our building fund, after making provision for the work of instruction, is sure to be required to meet really pressing wants. It is a problem, of no little delicacy and difficulty to decide how much of our income we can annually set aside for buildings without curtailing unduly our appropriations for apparatus, books and salaries. While we cannot be blind to the urgent need of the repair or enlargement of our oldbuildings and of the addition of new

Page  226 226 SEPTEMBER MEETING, 1903. buildings, we cannot properly overlook the facts that good teachers rather than fine structures make a good university, that with our modest scale of salaries we are constantly exposed to the danger of losing some of- our most useful professors, and that with our growing classes we must have an increasing number of instructors or be content with a diminution in the efficiency of our teaching. Whether we consider merely the prosperity of the University or the welfare of the State at large, it is most encouraging to observe how the weaker high schools of the State are becoming strong, and how the stronger schools are improving the quality of their work. It is not many years since some of the leading college men in the East were disposed to speak rather slightingly of high schools as preparatory schools for colleges, and to look with sympathy mainly upon the academies and private schools as the nurseries of college students. But that day has passed even in New England, and it has hardly ever been known in Michigan. While we have a few excellent private schools and academies in this State, yet both here and in the Western states generally the great mass of students are and will continue to be trained for college in the public lAgh schools. It is therefore a cause for the greatest satisfaction on our part that the improvement in the high schools already established in the West is going on so rapidly and that the number of such schools which can properly prepare students for college work is multiplying at a most gratifying rate. One of the first ambitions of every western town, whose population and wealth will permit it, is to have a good high school. The law which has now been passed, permitting the centralization of the school districts in a township, is likely to encourage the providing of high school instruction in many towns where it has been impracticable heretofore. Such instruction may thus be brought within the easy reach of a large number of youths to whom it has been inaccessible. It is highly probable that a similar cause will operate to increase largely the demands on the colleges and universities in all the Western states. It is not extravagant, therefore, to predict that at no distant day, from this and other

Page  227 SEPTEMBER MEETING, 1903. 227 cooperative causes, the number of students at this University will be doubled, as it has already been doubled within the last fifteen years. The number of Michigan schools from which we receive students on diploma, after an inspection of such schools by the University Examiner, is 127. Ten years ago the number was 78. Several of these schools have been strengthened through the sympathetic encouragement and counsel of the University authorities, until they have worthily gained a place upon our list. Not the least important part of the work of the University has been its influence, exerted both directly and indirectly, in the development of the high schools. In its earliest days it accomplished excellent results by the establishment of the branch schools, which were finally transformed into the earliest high schools organized in the State. In I870 it inaugurated the plan, ever since followed, of visiting and examining schools and of receiving without examination the graduates of such schools as were found prepared to fit scholars for our classes. That plan, borrowed with adaptations from the German system, has been adopted generally by the colleges and universities in the states west of us, and by not a few in the East. Under sharp discussion it has gained rather than lost ground. We have established this so-called diploma relation with a considerable number of schools in the states adjacent to Michigan. Since it is burdensome to us to visit schools in those states, the official examiners of this University and of our sister universities in those states are endeavoring, with good prospects of success, to fix upon some plan by which each university may safely receive the verdict of the other universities on the merits of at least the stronger schools in their respective states. If the plan meets in practice our expectations, it must bring us into close relations with a considerable number of schools remote from us and probably cause a substantial addition to our body of students. This cooperation of the universities in a spirit so free from jealousy is most gratifying. In truth, there is no ground for jealousy in respect to students. For the rapidly increasing population of the Northwest, the prosperity of its inhabitants, the general desire for

Page  228 228 SEPTEJMBER MEETING, 1903. higher education, and the development of the high schools all contribute to crowd the halls of colleges, universities and technological schools in our section of the country. The problem is not so much to secure students as to provide for the proper accommodation and education of those who throng the halls of the better institutions. And in the history of our country there is nothing finer than the generous provision which Michigan and her sister states in the West have made for education. If the sums which the legislatures appropriate for universities are capitalized at the rate 'of four or five per cent, it will be found that they represent amounts fairly comparable with the permanent endowments of most of the ancient and stronger universities in the Eastern states. The total attendance' during the past year, 3,792, differs but very little from that of the previous year, 3,782. Excluding the Summer School there was a gain of 21, including that school,'a gain of Io. -The slight loss in some departments, and the heavy loss in the Dental Department, were more than made good by the unusually large gain of I20 in the Engineering Department. The same causes which were operative in cutting down the numbers in the Dental School last year still held back the attendance this year, namely, the high requirements for admission and the lengthening of the course to four years. But it is expected now that most of the other strong schools will this year redeem their promise to establish the four years' course in imitation of ours. In that case we may reasonably hope that our school will regain its relative attendance within a year or two. For the first time, I think, in the history of the University we can record the interesting fact that among our students were one or more representatives from every one of the states of our. Union. All of our territories, except Alaska, and all of our new possessions, the Hawaiian Islands, Porto Rico, and the Philippines, and the following foreign states and provinces were represented, Japan, China, India, South Africa, Turkey, Austria, Germany, England, Bulgaria, Mexico, Jamaica, Ontario, Quebec. The number in attendance from Indiana, Ohio, New York and Pennsylvania con

Page  229 SEPTEMBER MEETI.NG, 1903. 229 tinues to increase, being respectively 165, 306, I58, I27, while the number from Illinois, though 12 less than the preceding year, is still 314. From New England we received 36. This widespread and undiminished appreciation of the work of this University is most gratifying. By ministering to the sons and daughters of the whole Union, this institution is repaying in some degree the debt which it owes to the nation, which, through the Congressional grant of two townships of land, furnished the original endowment for its foundation and support. The State, on the other hand, recognizes with gratitude the fact that other states have contributed to her many of her most useful citizens, who, having as students been attracted hither by the University, have taken up their permanent abode here and enriched her by their lives. The number of women in attendance (exclusive of the Summer School) was as follows: Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts....... 654 Department of Medicine and Surgery.............. 35 Department of Law. 5 Department of Law............................. 5 School of Pharmacy.............................. 3 Homceopathic Medical College.......... 12 College of Dental Surgery......................... 5 714 An inspection of the figures of the preceding year shows that there is this year a slight decrease in the attendance of women as compared with that of men, namely, of five-tenths of one per cent in the entire University and of seven-tenths of one per cent in the Literary Department. The discussion of the expediency of the co-education of the sexes has been reopened in some quarters, because one large university has decided to try the experiment of separate instruction of the sexes during the first two years of the undergraduate course, and two or three other privately endowed universities have been considering the wisdom of limiting the number of women whom they will admit. Without attempting to judge whether there are any peculiar conditions in these institutions which call for the action they propose, it is safe to say that the state universities are not

Page  230 230 SEPTEMBER MEETING, 1903. likely to change their policy with respect to the admission of women. So far as I know, nothing in their experience suggests the necessity of considering the question, whether their long established policy needs to be modified. In accordance with its desire and aim to be of the utmost service to Michigan, the University is strengthening its work in training men in the science and the art of Forestry. One of the gravest economic problems in our State is presented by the desirableness of restoring, if possible, the forests which have been destroyed and of properly caring for the woodlands which are still left. Many millions of acres, which have been stripped of valuable pine, are lying comparatively worthless. Over six millions of acres of such lands have reverted to the State because the owners chose to surrender them rather than pay the taxes on them. Through the generosity of Regent F. W. Fletcher a tract of over eight thousand acres has come into the possession of the University. Mr. Filibert Roth, B. S., one of our graduates, who has been an Instructor in Forestry in Cornell University and who has been engaged in work in Forestry under the National Agricultural Department, has now been appointed Professor. Through him we expect to cooperate with our State Forestry Commission in directing public attention to the high importance of improving our woodlands, while we are preparing young men for taking responsible positions in caring wisely for the woodlands we have and for the useful service, if it proves practicable, of reforesting waste lands which have been denuded of their forests and left in barrenness. It is believed that our situation affords special facilities for students of forestry, and the instruction in the scientific branches required is already provided for. There is now sufficient call for the courses in forestry to indicate that we have not entered upon this work too early. With the purpose of meeting a pressing public need we also made provision in the Department of Medicine and Surgery last April for the treatment of patients who had been bitten by mad dogs. It was observed that in this State and in adjoining states there was great danger of loss of life from hydrophobia. A considerable number of persons were bitten.

Page  231 SEPTEMBER MEETING, 1903. 231 As they could be successsfully treated only by going to Chicago or New York and by being subjected to pretty large expense, we undertook to care for Michigan patients gratuitously, and some twenty-three from various parts of the State have been relieved. This act has, it is believed, been warmly appreciated by the public. Our Hospitals are of course always rendering a gratuitous service to a great number of needy patients. In the University Hospital there were during the year 2,526 patients, and in the Homceopathic Hospital I,875. A majority of these are persons who earn their living by manual toil. They are treated without any charge for the medical and surgical care they receive. Among them are residents of seventy-nine counties of this State. The Library contained on June 30 last 174,740 volumes and 3,300 pamphlets. The recorded circulation of books was I68,603. We are suffering for the want of room for the storage of books, and even more for the lack of seminary rooms for advanced students. As the Library is the very heart of a university, it is to be hoped that the day is not distant when our building can be enlarged. The Report of the Curator of the Museum shows that it is visited by an average of nearly a hundred persons daily. It becomes a serious question in the administration of such a museum, which is intended primarily to contain scientific collections, how far it shall receive objects which are simply rare or curious, but which have no special scientific value. Some of them are interesting to visitors, and so attract attention. But unless a conservative policy in regard to accepting everything which is offered to us, is followed, we shall soon have much of the room in the building occupied by articles of no great scientific importance. It is noteworthy that museums are apt to be better supplied with scientific specimens from remote regions than from their immediate neighborhood. We should like it to be understood that specimens illustrating the flora and fauna and archaeology of our own state are especially desirable and will be very gratefully received.

Page  232 232 SEPTEM3BER MEETING, 1903. The general work of the University in all its departments was carried on in a vigorous, earnest and orderly manner, which is the best indication of a healthy life, but which calls for no special remark in this Report. The Summer School during this past season had a larger attendance than ever before, namely: Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts....... 382 Department of Medicine and Surgery................ 68 Department of Law............................... 74 524 Of these I50 were regular students of the University. The others are chiefly teachers, most of them from high schools, but some from colleges. They are very earnest workers. The value of the school to them and to the University is beyond question. Not a few of the teachers, who have not had the opportunity to gain a college education, are inspired while here to return and enter upon a regular collegiate course. It were much to be desired that we had the means for publishing in the name of the University the results of many of the scientific, literary, economic and historical researches made by members of our Faculties. They form valuable and distinct contributions to knowledge. They now appear, if at all, in various magazines, journals and proceedings of learned societies, not infrequently in journals published by other universities, which thus rather than we gain the reputation accruing from such publications. The professors of the ancient classics are about to bring out a collection of papers which will bear the name of the University. If it is successful, it is hoped it may directly or indirectly open the way for the University at little expense to publish other series. I know of no way in which a private contribution, which need not be very large, would be more useful than in the aid of an enterprise for the publication of the results of University researches. I am confident that the friends of the institution, as well as scholars generally, would be surprised to see how many and how creditable they are.

Page  233 SEPTEMBER MEETING, 1903. 233 Grave as are the problems which the continuous growth of the University and the constantly rising standard of higher education in this country press upon the Board of Regents and the Faculties for consideration, we enter upon another year with confidence and hope, because we witness so many gratifying evidences that the State of Michigan is willing and eager to sustain the University with liberality, and that far beyond her borders, in this land and in foreign lands, there is a hearty appreciation of the work she does. JAMES B. ANGELL. On motion of Regent Hill the report of the President was accepted and an edition of 8000 copies was ordered printed for distribution. The President presented and read the following communication from Professor Albert A. Stanley: ANN ARBOR, September 8, 1903. To the Honorable Board of Regents: 'Gentlemnen-Through the kindness of M\r. C. M' Post of the firm of Lyon & Healy of Chicago, Illinois, the Stearns Collection of Musical Instruments of the University of Michigan has been enriched by the gift of several unique instruments. These instruments are reproductions of famous and historical instruments and were especially constructed for exhibition at the Columbian Exposition of I893. Since then they have been on view at the Field Museum, but the firm were willing and desirous that they should be part of a permanent collection consisting entirely of musical instruments. WQ have also received several models of actions from Mr. H. H. Drummond, head of the pianoforte department of the above named firm. Respectfully, AIBERT A. STANLEY. On motion the President was requested to transmit the thanks of the Board to Mr. C. M. Post, and through him to Messrs. Lyon & Healy, for their valuable gift to our museum. On motion of Regent Hill, the salary of Duane R. Stuart in the summer school for 1903 was fixed at $I80, and that of J. C. Thorpe at $150. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Chairman and Secretary of the summer school were requested to take up with

Page  234 234 SEPTEMBER MEETING, 1903. the railroads the question of special rates to students, not only for the summer session, but for the regular session as well. On motion of Regent Hill, Mr. Charles Bruce Vibbert was appointed as assistant to the Professor of Philosophy for one year, salary $250, and the sum of $450 was appropriated for an Assistant in Psychology, to be named later, by the full vote of the Board. Regent Hill presented and read the resignations of H. S. Jennings, Assistant Professor of Zoology, and Herbert D. Carrington, Instructor in German, which were, on motion, accepted by the Board. Regent Hill moved that the following routine appointments be made in the Department of Zoology and in the Museum for one year: Mr. W. N. Fuller, Mr. C. F. C. Riley, A.B., Mr. G. A. Ruthven, B.S., Mr. Ellis Michael and Miss Jean Dawson to be Assistants in Zoology, at a salary of $I50 each; Miss Frances Dunbar, Assistant in Zoology, salary $Ioo; and Mr. M. Raymond Harrington to be Assistant in the Museum, salary $150. The motion was carried on a call vote. On motion of Regent Hill,,the following appointments were made in the Department of Physics for one year by the full vote of the Board: Mr. B. F. Bailey, Instructor in Electrical Engineering, salary $900; C. M. Jansky and Frank L. Cooper to be Assistants in Physics, salary $300 each. On motion of Regent Hill, Mr. Luis M. Perez was appointed Assistant in History for one year, salary $200, by the full vote of the Board. The President submitted the following report of the action of the Executive Committee since the last session of the Board, which was approved by the full Board. ANN ARBOR, September 9, 1903. To the Board of Regents: The Executive Committee have appointed Mr. A. B. Pierce and Mr. T. R. Running Instructors in Mathematics for one year at the salary of $I200 a year each. And also they have appointed Arthur W. Smith, Ph. D., Instruc

Page  235 SEPTEMBER MEETING, 1903. ':35 tor in Physics for three years at the salary of $I200 a year. This appointment is made necessary by the resignation of Assistant Professor Guthe. -JAMES B. ANCELL. Regent Hill presented and read the following communication from Professor Scott: ANN ARBOR, Sept. 8, 1903. To the Honorable Board of Regents: Gentlemen-I have pleasure in calling your attention to a proposition recently submitted to me by Willis J. Abbot, editor of the Pilgrim Magazine. Mr. Abbot offers to deliver to our students without expense to them or to the University, a course of six lectures on Modern Journalism in the United States, covering the following subjects: I. Journalism as a Profession; 2. The Organization of a Newspaper; 3. The Collection and Treatment of News; 4. Magazines and Weekly Publications. The lectures would form a part of the course in newspaper writing which I have announced in the Department of Rhetoric for the coming semester. Mr. Abbot is a graduate of the Literary Department in the class of 1884. He has had wide experience in newspaper work and is an author of repute. The proposed lectures would doubtless be an original and a valuable contribution to a subject that is just now attracting considerable attention. Respectfully, F. N. ScoTT. On motion of Regent Hill, the proposition of Mr. Abbot was accepted by the full Board. The Board then took a recess until I:30 o'clock p. M. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at I:30 o'clock P. M. Regent Hill moved that the sum of $50 be appropriated for the purpose of aiding the Students' Christian Association in publishing a handbook of information for new students. The motion was carried on'a call vote. Regent Lawton submitted the following communication from Dr. A. B. Prescott, and on his motion the Board expressed their willingness to make the salary of Assistant Professor Schlotterbeck permanent at $2000 on the return of Professor A. B. Stevens.

Page  236 236 SEPTEMBER MEETING, 1903. ANN ARBOR, Sept. 3, I903. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents, Regent Lawton, Chairman of Department Committee: Dear Sir-Circumstances make it important to learn, if possible, from the Board, whether or not the advance which has just been made for next two years in the salary of J. 0. Schlotterbeck, $600o to $2000, can be made a permanent advance by action of the Board one year hence. This increase was made, at last May meeting, by reason of the leave of absence of Assistant Prof. A. B. Stevens for two years. That is, the Stevens' salary discontinued, $I600, was applied for next two years to pay Instructor Blome $900, increase to Schlotterbeck $400, and authorize $300 for a non-resident lecturer. Now Dr. Schlotterbeck is solicited by a large manufacturing house to take a position with them at not less than 3000 dollars. He has replied, certainly not for the next year, being obligated to remain here that time. He has then been assured that, if arranged now, the same offer would be open to him one year hence. Dr. Schlotterbeck says he would like to know now, if he is to resume the rate of $1600 upon the return of Prof. Stevens in I905, as in that case, though with great regret, he would be compelled to leave the University a year hence and take this offer, in justice to his professional interests. He has been an assistant professor since I896. It seems to me a fair question on the part of Dr. Schlotterbeck. 'I stated my judgment, as to retaining his services, in my report on the salary budget for next year. I know of no personal claims that stand in the way of his permanent advance to junior professorship. Its effect on the salary budget would begin two years hence, and then make an increase of $400. I do not ask that his title be now changed to junior professor, with permanent appointment at $2000, not if the Board find this inadvisable, but I respectfully ask that the Board express their intention, or expectation, of this action one year from now. Very respectfully, A. B. PRgscoTT. Regent Lawton moved that the salary of Dr. M. L. Ward, Assistant in 'Clinical and Operative Dentistry, be increased to $8oo, and that Mir. R. W. Bentley be appointed Assistant to the Dean of the Dental Department and to the Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry, without salary. The motion was carried on a call vote. The question of appointing Dr. Taft as Librarian of the

Page  237 SEPTEMBER IMEETING, 1903. 237 Dental Library with salary of $500, was deferred until the next meeting. Regent Lawton submitted a code of rules for the government of the hospitals which were referred to the Medical Committee for consideration. On motion of Regent Lawton, Lydia M. DeWitt was appointed Instructor in Histology for one year, salary $600, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Hill, Harrison M. Randall, Ph.D., was reappointed Instructor in Physics for one year, salary $I200, by the full vote of the Board. Regent Dean moved that Superintendent Miggett, be authorized to employ a pattern maker in the engineering shops at $2.50 per day. The motion was carried unanimously. On motion of Regent Dean, Mr. W. L. Miggett, superintendent of shops,, was made a member of the Engineering Faculty. On motion of Regent Fletcher, Architect Kahn was directed to have the kitchen for the pyschopathic ward placed in the north end of the building. Regent Fletcher moved that the contract to furnish pipe and fittings for the new 'engineering building, according to the specifications and schedule, be awarded to the John Davis Company of Chicago, they being the lowest bidders, for the sum of $4582.88. It was so ordered by the full Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher, Mr. Fred McDonald was, appointed assistant engineer in charge of the lighting plant for one year in place of Mr. Rix, resigned, salary $850, by the full vote of the Board. Regent Fletcher moved that the Secretary be authorized to pay Mr. R. B. Jackson, assistant superintendent olf the new engineering building, an additional compensation of $30 per month for the months of July and August. The motion was carried on a call vote. On motion of Regent Fletcher, it was voted to pay the contractor of the new engineering building $85 for making conduits or channels in the fire proofing in order that the steam and water pipes may be exposed.

Page  238 238 SEPTEMBER MEETING, 1903. The request of the firemen for an increase of pay was deferred until the next meeting. On motion of Regent Fletcher, it was.voted to pay Albert Kahn, architect, $700 for professional services on the new engineering building, and $300 on the account of the psychopathic ward. On motion of Regent Barbour, the bill of Pond & Pond, architects, for making plans for an extension to the Physical Laboratory, was laid on the table until the next meeting. Regent Hill moved that the contract for covering all the exposed pipes and surfaces in the new boiler house, the tunnel to the psychopathic ward, and in the Palmer ward, be awarded to the Philip Carey Mf'g Company of Detroit for the sum of $I62I.I4. The motion was carried on a call vote. On motion of Regent Farr, the Treasurer was directed to make a loan from the class fund of 1894, to Miss Mary Louise Smith of $80 and the interest on the entire fund for two years. This action was taken on the recommendation of a committee of said class. The President presented the resignation of Judge A. V. McAlvay, as Professor of Law, to take effect October I, 1903. On motion the resignation was accepted. The Faculty of the Homceopathic Hospital gave notice that the following persons had completed the -ork in the Training School for Nurses, and were recommended for graduation: Florence Atchison Alma Howard Ida Lockhart Bessie Sinclair Geneva Allen Hattie Wilson. On motion of Regent Carey, the President and Secretary were authorized to issue the proper certificates of graduation and attach the seal of the University thereto. M'r. W. A. Hurst, Assistant Secretary of the State Commission of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, was present for the purpose of ascertaining whether the University desired to make an exhibit at St. Louis. After some discussion the matter was referred to the President and Secretary

Page  239 SEPTEMBER MEETING, 1903. 239 and Regent Dean, for consideration and report at the next meeting of the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the proposition of J. E. Bolles & Company, of Detroit, to put fire escapes on the nurses' ward at University Hospital was accepted, provided they will place them on the east and west sides, instead of the north end, at a cost of $I75. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the proposition of the Powers Regulator Company, of Chicago, to install one of their automatic tank regulators with four valves in the psychopathic ward for the sum of $II5, was referred to the Auditing Board with power. On motion the Board adjourned to Wednesday, Oct. 14, at o1 o'clock A. M. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

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Page  241 OCTOBER MEETING. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, 1 ANN ARBOR, October 14, I903. The Board assembled in the Regents' room at 10 o'clock A. M. Present-Regents Butterfield, Hill, Lawton, Barbour, Fletcher, and Carey. Absent-Regents Farr and Dean. The Secretary read the minutes of the last meeting, which were, on motion, approved and ordered printed. Communications which had reached the President were placed in the hands of the standing committees of the Board for consideration. On motion of Regent Barbour, it was voted that the fire escapes at University Hospital be placed on the north end of the buildings. Professors D'Ooge, Demmon, and Whitney, on behalf of the contributors to the fund for the purchase of the portrait, then presented to the Board an excellent oil portrait of the late Professor B. A. Hinsdale. On motion of Regent Lawton, the picture was accepted by the Board, and the Secretary was directed to have it hung in the Art Gallery of the University. Professor Demmon, chairman of a committee raised by the University Senate, to consider the advisability of the University making an exhibit at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, was present and made the following report: ANN ARBOR, Oct. I2, I903. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: The Committee of the University Senate, appointed by the President to consider and report on the question of an exhibit at

Page  242 242 OCTOBER MEETING, 1903. the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, beg leave to present the following facts and suggestions for the consideration of your honorable body: We have ascertained by correspondence that the leading universities of the country-Harvard, Yale, Cornell, Chicago, Wisconsin, and Illinois, together with several smaller institutions, will make exhibits of greater or less scope. We are also informed that the exposition authorities, without any suggestion from this University, have set apart a room 22'2X3I feet in the Palace of Education for the use of the University of Michigan. If we are to occupy this space, the Committee thinks the exhibit should consist, in the main, of the following: I. An illustrated pamphlet of from thirty to fifty pages containing a readable account of the rise and growth of the University, with cuts of the buildings, tables of statistics, etc.,-this to be distributed freely to all visitors who care for it. (Such a pamphlet would have permanent use for distribution from the offices here also.) 2. Bound volumes of reprints, so far as obtainable, showing the results of scientific research at the University. This should also include copies of printed theses accepted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at this University; also, a carefully prepared bibliography of publications by the various officers of instruction. 3. Models, charts, drawings, photographs of buildings, etc. For this exhibit, there are about one thousand square feet of space at our disposal. In addition to these attractions it is thought desirable to make this room a sort of headquarters for Michigan University graduates while at the Fair. This would necessitate providing chairs and other suitable furniture. It would be necessary also to employ a competent attendant who should receive visitors, dispense documents, and answer inquiries. The Committee estimates that the expense of preparing, transporting, setting up, and caring for such an exhibit during the Fair would approximate the sum of twenty-five hundred dollars. All of which is respectfully submitted. ISAAC N. DEMMON. ALBERT B. PRESCOTT. CHARLES S. DENISON. CARLI HUBER. EDWARD D. JONES. SHIRLEY W. SMITH.

Page  243 OCTOBER MEETING, 1903. 243 On motion the report was referred to Regents Hill and Carey for consideration. Librarian Davis presented and read his annual report of the present condition of the Library, and the use made of it during the year ending June 30, I903. The report is as follows: LIBRARIAN'S REPORT FOR THE YEAR I902-I903. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN:-I have the honor to submit to you my twenty-sixth annual report as librarian of the University. There were in all of the libraries June 30, 1903, 174,740 volumes and 3,300 pamphlets.* Of these, I39,002 volumes and 3,000 pamphlets were in the General Library; 20,170 volumes were in the Law Library; I2,62I volumes and 230 pamphlets were in the Medical Library; 1,183 volumes were in the Dental Library; and 1,764 volumes and 70 pamphlets were in the Library of the Homceopathic College. The total additions for the year were 8,053 volumes and i,800 pamphlets, distributed as follows: General Library, 6,660 volumes and 1,750 pamphlets; Law Library, 543 volumes; Medical Library, 560 volumes and 30 pamphlets; Dental Library, 63 volumes'; and the Homoeopathic Library, 227 volumes and 20 pamphlets. The number of periodicals regularly received was I,070. Of these 780 came to the General Library; 20 to the Law Library; 220 to the Medical Library; I6 to the Dental Library, and 34 to the Homceopathic Library. Your appropriation for the purchase of books for the year, including subscriptions to periodicals and the mainten*One thousand, seven hundred and fifty-one (1,751) volumes, produced by binding the 5,000 pamphlets of the Parsons Library, are included in the above number. It is at the same time exclusive of the lost and worn out books of the year, and of the collection of duplicates for reference work, numbering 1,456 volumes. The rearrangement of the maps has not yet progressed far enough to make an accurate report of them possible.

Page  244 244 OCTOBER MEETING, 1903. ance of the bindery, was $I5,000.00. This sum you divided among the several libraries as follows: General Library................$......,000 oo Law Library.......................................... 2,475 00 M edical Library...................................... 2,025 oo Dental Library................ 250 oo Homeeopathic Library.................................. 250 oo Total............................................. $I5,000 oo THE GENERAL IIBRARY. REPAIRS AND IMPROVEEENTS. The wooden floors of the Reading Room, the halls, and the offices, which had become loose and decayed, were replaced at the close of the summer school by a Venetian Mosaic floor. This in the matter of appearance is very satisfactory, and it has proved less noisy to the tread than had been anticipated. For some reason, however, it has not worn well and in places has cracked badly. It is hoped that these faults may be remedied in a large degree by repairs to be made during the summer. At the same time the old desks and fixed chairs of the Reading Room were replaced by tables and movable chairs. This change brought the seating capacity up from 210 to 300. An additional toilet room was secured on the east side by a rearrangement of the space occupied by the cloak and toilet rooms used by the ladies. The East Room, which had been devoted to a number of uses, such as the shelving of bound volumes of newspapers and the Patent Office Reports, the storing of duplicate matter, etc., was, the larger part of it, given up to the Faculty as a reading room. The other part, about one-quarter of the whole, was retained as a convenient place for keeping the most used of the bound newspapers, and for a work room for the reception of periodicals and their preparation for use. The small room on the west side of the delivery desk, known as the Dictionary Room, was removed, its value as a separate room not justifying its existence. The space thus gained will enable us to extend the public catalogue of authors, something of which we already feel the need.

Page  245 OCTOBER MEETING, i903. 245 Changes were made in the desk at which books are delivered and to which they have been returned, by which it was divided into two parts somewhat removed from each otherone for the delivery of books and one to which they were to be returned. Of all the changes made, however, that which has given the most satisfaction is the introduction of the new system of ventilation for the Reading Room, the offices and the Seminary Rooms. Heretofore there has been no ventilation at all except such as could be secured by raising windows. The experience of the year has proved all of the changes to be decided improvements. ADDITIONS.-Of the 6,66o volumes and 1,750 pamphlets added to the General Library, 4,196 volumes were purchased, 1,943 volumes and 1,750 pamphlets were gifts and 521 volumes were the result of binding periodicals. EXPENDITURES.-The bills certified to by me for this library, exclusive of those incurred for the bindery and those drawn on the endowment funds, and the contingent fund, amounted to $7,411.55. Of this sum $5,857.94 was for books and periodical publications issued irregularly, and $I,553.61 was for annual subscriptions to periodicals for the year I903. For miscellaneous expenses for the year you assigned to the Library the sum of $702.75. The expenditures were as follows: Day attendant in Cloak Room.......................... 7 50 Evening attendant in Cloak Room......................... 65 oo One Smith Premier Typewriter............................ go oo One Densmore Typewriter................................ 77 75 Stationery and postage................................... 24 58 Sundries, as catalogue cards, readers' slips, etc........... 95 28 *Total..................................$7. Ii *This sum is described above as money used entirely for the General Library. It should be said that it was drawn upon also for the miscellaneous expenses of the Medical, Dental, and Homceopathic Libraries.

Page  246 246 OCTOBER MEETING, 1903. This account was therefore overdrawn $7.36. The expenditures from the endowment funds were as follows: Expended of the income of the Ford-Messer Fund......$1,276 32 Expended of the income of the Coyl Fund................ 326 89 The income of the Goethe Fund was untouched. As explained in my last report, none of the income of this fund will be used until by contributions and added interest it shall amount to $300.00. According to the Treasurer's books the condition of the three above funds July I, I903, was as follows: Ford-Messer Fund ($20,000), with unexpended interest added............................................$22,834 15 Coyl Fund ($o0,000), with unexpended interest added... 12,085 63 Goethe Fund......................................... 212 33 There have been, and still are, in the hands of the Treasurer certain sums of money given by friends of the University for the purchase of books and material for the library. I have not reported these sums as funds, inasmuch as they have been, or are to be, expended entirely. It has seemed better to report the purchases made with the money as gifts from those supplying it. THE SHAKESPEARE AND GOETHE COLLECTIONS.-The death of Senator James McMillan, to whose generosity the University owes the greater part of the Shakespeare collection, was an event of a grievous nature. Inexpensive books were purchased for it from the library funds. When, however, anything of a costly nature that we desired came to sale, or a number of small things, making a large aggregate, Senator McMillan was appealed to, and never, to my knowledge, in vain. This resource and the industry of Professor Demmon in the examination of sale catalogues of books and of current bibliography, have made the University the possessor of the most extensive collection of Shakespeare literature in the West, if not in the whole country. It is a cause of great gratification that Mr. W. C. McMillan has begun to follow in the footsteps of his father in this matter.

Page  247 OCIOBER HMEETING, 1903. 247 The additions of the year to this collection were I8I volumes. It now numbers 5,263 volumes. The additions to the Goethe library were 13 volumes. The cost of these was borne by the regular appropriation for German literature. The collection now numbers I,037 volumes. IMPORTANT PURCHASES.-It is the case, as stated in my last report, that the greater number of our important purchases are made from the income of the Ford-Messer and Coyl funds. There has come to be such a minute division of the regular library appropriation into portions to be used in the purchase of special books that the purchase of any costly set from it is impossible, unless there is a combination of departments for the purpose, and that is something that rarely occurs. The more important purchases for the year have been as follows: Bought with the income of the Ford-Messer Fund: I. Roman Academy (R. Accademia 'dei Lincei) complete set of publications................................. $75 62 2. Turin Academy (R. Accademia delle scienze de Turino) complete set of publications......................... 719 65 3. Journal of Society of Arts, Iondon, 50 volumes......... 200 oo 4. American Museum of Natural History, complete set of publications.................................. 0..... I04 25 5. Anglo Saxon Review, Io volumes...................... 25 oo 6. Babylonian Talmud (Trans. into English) vols. i-i6... 30 00 Bought with the income of the Coyl Fund: 7. Acta Sanctorum, 65 vols............................. 480 oo 8. Selden Society Publications, I5 vols.................... 70 87 9. Surrey Archaeological Society Collections, I6 vols..... 48 75 lo. Archaeologia (London), vols. 55-57, Pt. 2.............. 47 50 TI. The World's Best Essays, edited by Justice Brewer..... 40 oo Bought from the General Fund: 12. Palaeontographical Society Publications, vols. 3I-55..... 87 50 13. Schreiber, W. L.-Manuel de 1'Amateur de la Gravure sur Bois et sur Mdtal au XV Sidcle, 8 vols........... 21 87 14. Chatelain-Palaeographic des Classiques Latins, vol. 2.. i8 90 GIFTS.-The gifts of the year were less in number than those of last year by nearly a thousand volumes. To no

Page  248 248 OCTOBER MEETING, 1903. small extent those received were from persons, or associations, whose names have already appeared in these reports as benefactors of the Library. It is proper that I should enumerate a few of the more important of these gifts. The Macmillan Co., publishers of New York, gave at the suggestion of Professor Scott, 330 volumes of their publications which they valued at $260.00. Mr. W. C. McMillan, of Detroit, son of Senator McMillan, as a result of a communication from Professor Demmon, sent a check for $1oo0oo to be used in making additions to the McMillan Shakespeare Library. Continuing his benefactions, the Duke of Loubat sent the following: I. Codlex Vaticanus No. 3773. fine altmexikanische Bilderschrift Vatekanische Bibliothek. Ed. Eduard Seler, 2 parts. 2. Congres International des Americanistes XIIe Session. 3. Gesammelte Abhandlungen zur Amerikanischen Sprach-und Alterthumskunde. Von Eduard Seler. Bd. I. Certain publications of the French government have continued to come. Of these there were received during the year the following: I. Collection de Documents inedits sur Flhistoire de France, 2 v oi0. 2. Inventaire general des richesses d' Art de la France, 3 vols. A copy of the Journal fur Gasbeleuchtung was generously contributed by the Michigan Gas Association. Vols. I-43, with two volumes of Indexes, were bought at a cost of $93.50. It has since been taken at the expense of the Association at an annual subscription of $5.37. From the Institution of Civil Engineers (London) we received vols. 146, I47, 148, I49, I50 and 151, 6 vols. of Proceedings. This is supplied regularly by the Institution. Continuing his gifts Mr. William Viennot, of the National Library of France, sent the following: I. Vols. 10, II, T2 and 13 of Catalogue general des livres imprimes de la bibliotheque nationale. Auteurs. 2. Three (3) volumes relating to Dante. 3. Bibliographie des Travaux de M. Leopold Delisle. 4. Photograph of Deslile.

Page  249 OCTOBER MEETING, 1903. 249 Twenty-six (26) pamphlets on legal and historical subjects were received from their author, Dr. Vladimir Pappafava, Advocate, of Zara, Austria. Dr. H. S. Jewett of the class of '68, who gave us 19 volumes last year, this year gave 29 volumes of miscellaneous books. Col. Cornelius Cadle, Recording Secretary of the Society of the Army of the Tennessee, gave a set of the Reports of the Society from the beginning, except the 28th, in 15 volumes. This is a very valuable addition to our Americana. Thomas W. Lawson, Esq., gave a copy of "The Lawson History of the America's Cup." This is a beautifully illustrated volume. Mr. H. M. Utley, Librarian of the Detroit Public Library, sent to the library on behalf of the compiler, Jas. Taylor Aulls, a volume entitled "Catalogues and Addresses," University of Michigan. Mr. Aulls, of the class of '6I, inscribes this to the University of Michigan for the class of '6I. The volume was loaned to Mr. Utley for use in preparing the history of this class. It contains besides catalogues and addresses, programmes of various kinds, class songs, Palladiums, etc. There was received from Mrs. Washington A. Roebling of Trenton, N. J., a copy of a book entitled "The Journal of the Reverend Silas Constant," Pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Yorktown, N. Y., with some of the Records of the Church and a list of his marriages, 1784-1825; together with notes on the Nelson, Van Cortlandt, Warren, and some other families mentioned in the Journal. By Emily Warren Roebling. This copy was No. I54 of an edition of 300. It is a book having a considerable historical importance. Rev. John D. Parker of the class of '59 contributed a copy of the second edition of his work entitled "The Sabbath Transferred." James E. Scripps, Esq., publisher of the Evening Neuws (Detroit), has continued to supply us with a copy of that paper for preservation. Professor Mechem, before his departure for Chicago, presented to the Library 50 volumes of miscellaneous books and

Page  250 250 OCTOBER MEETING, Q903. a large number of pamphlets and odd numbers of periodicals. Some of these were duplicates, but there were many things that proved to be valuable additions. Mr. V. E. Francois, formerly an instructor in the University, gave 15 volumes consisting of works on literary history, and classical texts. Forty-eight (48) volumes of new books of a miscellaneous character were presented by Professor A. C. McLaughlin. President Angell, who has every year contributed generously to our resources, has this year put us under greater obligations than on any former occasion. Gifts have also been received from Professors Demmon, Hempl, Kelsey, Greene, Adams, Stanley and Ziwet; also from Dr. Cross, Mr. Severance, Mr. Hollands and many others. There have also been the usual documents from the National, State and city governments, and from many societies and business associations whose publications are found useful in the work of the University. I desire at this point to supply an omission from the report of last year. In that report the gift of a copy of Konrad Gessner's Thierbuch and Tischbuchl, from Miss Sarah Dorsey Parsons, of Marshall, Mich., appears as from Miss Sarah Dorsey. I regret very much the occurrence of this omission. USE OF THE LIBRARY.-During the College year the Library is open continuously I4'2 hours daily-that is, from 7:45 A. M. until Io P,. M. The only holidays are Thanksgiving day, Christmas and New Years, and in the summer the Fourth of July. From Commencement Day until the close of the Summer School it is open from 8 A. M. until 5 P. M., and from the close of the Summer School until work is resumed in the autumn, from 9 A. M. to 12 M., and from 2 to 5 P. M. The following statistics are drawn from the report of Mr. Finney, the assistant in charge of circulation:

Page  251 OCTOBER MEETING, 1903. 251 Recorded circulation in Reading Room and Seminary Rooms....................................... I57,37I vols. Drawn for home use by Professors................... 11,232 vols. 168,603 vols. This is but a slight increase over the recorded circulation of last year. That the increase was not greater is due to the interruption of reading in the Reading Room while the new floor was going down. It is desirable to state here, as I have done in former reports, that this recorded use is only about one-half of the whole use of the Library. The inter-library loans amounted to 55 volumes and 30 photographs. The daily average of readers in the Reading Room was I80. The highest number reported by Mr. Finney as present in the room at one time was 275. This is 65 more than the seating capacity of the room heretofore and lacks only 25 of exhausting the new seating. Under the rule admitting advanced students to the book room for a period of two months, 75 were admitted. As the number to be admitted at one time is I5, this was the full number entitled to the privilege for the year. Numerous temporary admissions were granted. During the two semesters, 350 students were admitted to the Seminary Rooms, as follows: IIo to the East Room for the study of History, Political Economy, Pedagogy, Philosophy, and Mathematics; 240 to the West Room for the study of Language, Literature, and Art. CONDITION OF THE LIBRARY.-Attention was given, as usual, to the condition of individual books and to the collection as a whole. To keep the Library in good condition as to the accessibility of books, grows more difficult each year on account of lack of room. It is always difficult to preserve the classification of a library in which there are already many books and to which the annual additions are numerous. Not to preserve the classification is to handicap readers in their use of the books. We shall continue to do the best we can under the circumstances, and trust you will find it possible to increase our facilities in the near future.

Page  252 252 OCTOBER MEETING, i903. Mr. Finney -reports a larger number of books missing at the end of the year than has been reported for any previous year-44 volumes. Experience teaches us that some of these will be found. Of the 21 volumes reported missing last year four (4) have been found. A book misplaced is practically a book lost, and as a large number of persons have access to the shelves, misplacements cannot be avoided. Mr. Finney reports two examinations of the shelves during the year, resulting in the discovery of I,029 volumes out of place. Fourteen volumes, chiefly reference books, have been entirely worn out and have been retired from use. Mr. Severance, the general assistant, made his second annual inspection of the outlying libraries. The condition of some of these remains unsatisfactory. If, after efforts that we are now making, conditions are not improved it shall be for you to consider whether the existence of these particular collections of which no care is taken shall not be ended. THE WORK OF THE YEAR.-We entered upon the year with the intention-and the expectation, also-of accomplishing three important pieces of work in addition to the routine work of the Library. These were: I. The improvement of the official catalogue. 2. An improved arrangement of the current numbers of periodicals. 3. An arrangement of the maps. The first two were in a great degree accomplished. The third, the arrangement of the maps, was not accomplished. By correspondence with libraries that have large map collections we learned of the methods of caring for these in vogue in each of them, and were able to devise a satisfactory scheme for recording and cataloging our own. Preparations for carrying out the scheme were made by printing the necessary headings on sheets and binding them. We were, however, unable to begin the work as the necessary drawers were not made by the carpenter. We were, however, able to accomplish a piece of work that we had not planned to do. This was the reclassification and recataloging of the Parsons Library and the making of

Page  253 OCTOBER MEETING, 1903. 253 some changes in its status. This collection was received in i869, and was reported by Professor Ten Brook, who was then librarian, to consist of 4,325 volumes and 5,o00 pamphlets. The volumes were almost entirely in paper covers. At Professor Ten Brook's request some of these volumes were bound at Mr. Parsons' expense, but for reasons with which I am not acquainted this was not carried far. I thought it desirable on many accounts to bind all of the remainder that promised to be of service, and in all ways to make the use of the collection as convenient as possible. Following the example already set in dealing with pamphlets in general, such as were of sufficient importance were bound singly and the remainder were classified and bound in volumes. As this library now stands it consists of 6,076 volumes and no pam',iphlets. Some of the matter was of such a nature that Professor Ten Brook was unable to determine whether it was really a part of the collection or waste matter put in the boxes to improve the packing. To be on the safe side he preserved it all. This doubtful matter we classified roughly and tied up in bundles, placing it where it can be examined by any one who cares to do so. This Awork on the Parsons library was almost entirely performed by Mr. Severance, assisted by Miss Lane. There was much in the nature of the matter to perplex and much in its condition that made the handling of it unpleasant. I wish to commend their performance of the work. THEI- LIBRARY FORCE FOR 1903-'04.-The office force remains the same as last year. MIr. J. F. Halliday has charge of the East Seminary Room and M\r. G. L. Wait of the West. Appointees to the Return Desk are G. WV. Barnum, W. D. Moriarty and T. E. AVagner. These serve five hours daily, each. The Delivery Desk attendants are twelve in number, each one serving two and one-half hours daily. Formerly each attendant at this desk served five hours daily. So decided a preference has been shown for the shorter service, however, and so well has it worked that we have adopted it. The total amount paid for the service is not changed. The

Page  254 254 OCTOBER MEETING, 1903. names of the twelve are as follows: H. E. Olson, C. E. Parry, V. L. Minor, J. H. McCandless, H. K. Stone, G. F. Blanchard, F. D. Koelbel, B. H. De Priest, I. W. Long, E. J. Creighton, H. P. Farnham, L. F. Cleveland. THE WORK FOR I903-'04.-There remains the work on the maps to which reference has been made. This will be taken up as soon as the necessary drawers are made. Beyond this nothing is planned except what might be called the general improvement of the Library. THE NEEDS OF THE LIBRARY.-In my report last year I called attention to the new courses of instruction established by you in recent years as they affect the Library. I specified the five new courses which had been established within three years, viz.: Administrative Law, Naval Architecture, Higher Commercial Education, Forestry, and Insurance. I referred to the fact that the Library contained but little on these subjects and that there was an immediate demand oh the part of the instructors for books and periodicals. In the last year a new department, Chemical Engineering, has been created, and Rhetoric has been detached from the department of English and made a separate Chair. According to the policy of the Library Committee in regard to the distribution of the Library funds, appropriations for special books have, in compliance with requests from Professors Scott and Campbell, been made for these two departments. It has been necessary to provide for all of these special needs from a reserve regularly kept for bibliographical books, and books of general interest, and for securing at advantageous prices at the auction sales and from antiquarian book catalogues, rare and out of print books. These drafts upon this reserve for general purposes have so depleted it that little remains. If the appropriation made by you for the purchase of books cannot be increased I think it would be wise.when instruction in a new subject is authorized, to couple with the authorization a sum of money sufficient to start it in books and periodicals. The instructor should be able to tell what sum would be necessary for the purpose.

Page  255 OCTOBER AJEETIAG, 90o3. 255 I am constrained to speak again of the great desirabilityperhaps 1 ought to say necessity-of more room for the storage of books, and for connecting more intimately the Library and the work of instruction. In visiting one large, new public library (Providence, R. I.) this summer and in reading of others just completed, or in process of.erection, I have been impressed by the revolution that has taken place in libraries of this character. They have connected the library and the elementary schools in such a manner that the children in the lower grades have greater facilities for the seminary methods of instruction than do our graduate students. I have not in any report failed, I think, to represent the importance of the Library in the work of the University. You may have regarded this as simply perfunctory, or as a somewhat natural attempt on my part to magnify the importance of the work with which I am connected. This has not been so in the past, and it is less likely to be so now that the time approaches when I must lay down the work, and when I perfectly understand that there cannot come to me either credit or emolument for any library expansion that the future may hold. DUPLICATES FOR CLASS USE.-You will recall that at your October meeting you voted $200.00 to each of the following departments for the purchase of duplicates to be used in the instruction-to the departments of General History, American History, and Political Economy. There were already in use a number of duplicates of historical books which had been purchased with money contributed by the classes needing the books. All of these books-those bought with student contributions and those bought with money specifically appropriated by you, number 1,495 volumes. They are handled as other books of the Library are, but they are entered upon a separate accession book and it is understood that they are to serve as nuclei of departmental libraries whenever the departments have the necessary accommodation for them.

Page  256 256 OCTOBER MEETING, 1903. THE OTHER LIBRARIES. THE MEDICAL LIBRARY. The additions to the Medical Library were 560 volumes and 30 pamphlets. Of these 285 volumes were purchased, 52 volumes and 30 pamphlets were presented, and 223 volumes were the result of binding periodicals. The total of bills certified to by me for this library was $1,364.9I. Of this sum $880.06 were for books and irregular periodical publications and $484.85 was for subscriptions to periodicals for I903.* Gifts were received from Doctors Vaughan and Dock and others. From Dr. Abraham Jacobi, of New York, was received a copy of the third edition (1903) of his "The Therapeutics of Infancy and Childhood." Of the $I30.96, balance remaining of the appropriation of $1,000.00 from the Bates Professorship Fund, made June, I901, $1OI.86 fell due and was paid. THE LAW LIBRARY.-I quote as follows from the report of Professor V. H. Lane, Law Librarian: "The total number of volumes accessioned and unaccessioned is 20,I70, and of this number 17,843 are in daily use by the students. "All books, with the exception of texts and encyclopedias, are on open shelving easily accessible to those desiring them. The texts and encyclopedias are drawn from the delivery desk which is in charge of an assistant who gives all necessary aid to those using the library. The card catalogue which was commenced one year ago last May is being steadily enlarged and will in time greatly increase the working facilities of the library. "Two assistants, Miss Gertrude Elstner Woodard and Mr. Clarence N. Boord, have immediate charge of the library, working under the direction of the Librarian. *Of the above sum of $1,364.9I a part, $98.26, was loaned from the appropriation for the Dental Library. The students of the Dental College have frequent occasion to make use of the books of the Medical Library.

Page  257 OCTOBER MEETING, z903. 257 "During the summer the walls of the library, consultation and faculty reading rooms, have been painted, decidedly improving their appearance. "There have been recently presented to the library several etchings of prominent jurists and lawyers, five by the law class of 1898, five by the Honorable James B. Dill, of New York, and one by Mr. W. H. Bond, of the class of I90o. The class of I903 presented to the library a portrait in oil of Professor Bogle, by Percy Ives. "While we shall be able to get through the coming year without any substantial additions to the shelf room, it seems quite apparent that additional accommodations will be needed in the near future." THE DENTAL LIBRARY.-The additions to this library were 63 volumes, of which 41 volumes were bought, two were presented and 20 the result of binding periodicals. The bills certified to by me for Dental literature purely amounted to $84.39. There was in addition to this a draft upon the Dental appropriation of $98.26 for medical literature, as already reported. A gift of great interest and value to the University was received from Dr. Walter H. Jackson of Ann Arbor, a student and an instructor in the Dental College i'n its beginning. The gift was "A Compilation of Historical Data, referring to the Dental Department of the University of Michigan from the earliest conception of a desire to have said department established. Together with such oral handings down as seem to have foundation in truth, down to reports of June, 1902, inclusive. By Walter H. Jackson, D. D. S." THE HOMOEOPATHIC LIBRARY.-The additions to this library were 227 volumes and 20 pamphlets. Of these 198 volumes were bought, 22 volumes and 20 pamphlets were presented and 7 volumes were the result of binding periodicals. The total of bills certified to by me was $176.75. Of this $170.75 was for books, and $6.oo for periodicals for the year I903.

Page  258 258 OCTOBER MEETING, i903. THE BINDERY. The entire cost of maintaining the bindery for the year was $2,745.09. The expenditure for labor was........................$2,304 IO The expenditure for materials was...................... 440 99 $2,745 09 As heretofore I append tables showing the nature of the work done, the cost of it at the ruling prices for such work, and its distribution by departments. What I have called the ruling prices are the average prices for' different materials, paid on contract by twenty colleges and public libraries in different parts of the country. The prices paid at these libraries were ascertained by correspondence with them. Statement of Bindingf —Jdyl, I902-June, i9g3. SUMMARY NO. OF ESTIMATED EXPENSE PIECES EXPENSE PER VOL. Bound and rebound, leather...... 1,448 $1,9I4 27 $I 32 Bound and rebound, cloth........ 1,813,053 60 58 Repaired, resewed, etc.,.......... 893 157 65 Maps, charts, etc................. I40 27 90 Labels and bookplates............ 846 2 12 Covers, cases, etc................ 19 6 65 Special work..................... 99 72 73 Work for printing plant.......... 64 55 Total.................... $3,299 47 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _.1 _ _ _ _~~~~~~~

Page  259 OCTOBER MEETING, 90o3. Distribution by Departments. 259 GY NO. OF ESTIMATED PER CENT. SHARE OF GENERAL IBRARY PIECES EXPENSE OF ACTUAL PIECES EXPENSE EXPENSE COST Bound and rebound, leather 968 $1,309 75 Bound and rebound, cloth.. 1,597 924 81 Repaired, resewed, etc...... 784 119 30 Maps, charts, etc........... I33 25 I5 Labels and book plates..... 846 2 12 Covers, cases, etc........... 19 6 65 Special work............. 99 72 73 Work for printing plant.... 64 55 Total............. $2,525 o6 76.73 2,106 31 MEDICAL LIBRARY Bound and rebound, leather 203 264 72 Bound and rebound, cloth.. 82 88 26 Repaired, resewed, etc..... 3 45 Total.............. 354 43 io.65 292 35 LAW LIBRARY Bound and rebound, leather 242 314 50 Bound and rebound, cloth.. I 75 Repaired, resewed, etc...... I04 36 20 Total.............. 351 45 Io.56 289 88 DENTAL LIBRARY Bound and rebound, leather 16 16 73 Bound and rebound, cloth.. 7 5 84 Total.............22 57 1.38 i8 67 HOMOEOPATHIC LIBRARY Bound and rebound, leather 6 8 57 Bound and rebound, cloth.. 42 33 94 Repaired, resewed, etc..... 2 70 Maps, charts, etc........... 7 2 75 Total 45 96 oo.68 37 88 Grand Total....... 100.00 $2,745 09

Page  260 260 OCTOBER MEETING, 90o3. By reference to the first table it will be seen that the cost of the work at prices charged generally by binderies, was $3,299.47. Comparing this with the cost of labor and materials for the year, which was $2,745.09, there appears a balance in favor of the bindery of $554.38. To this should be added $29.58 for waste gold recovered, making a total in favor of the library of $583.96. Hitherto in estimating the cost of the work at outside binderies the figures were based on prices ruling in 1896, when the bindery was established. If the advance of these from year to year had been ascertained and taken into consideration the balances for recent years would have been greater than reported. On the basis of the percentages shown in the second table the expense to be borne by each of the libraries is as follows: General Library............................$2,6 3 Medical Library.................................... 292 35 Law Library...................................... 289 88 Dental Library....................................... 8 67 Homceopathic Library............................... 37 88 T otal............................................$2,745 09 The following is a list of the persons now employed in the bindery, exclusive of Mr. Hollands: George Dengler................................ $700 per year Lydia Schleyer................................ $28 oo per month George Roth........................ $20 00 per month Frances Pattison................................ 50c per day The pay of these is charged to the book appropriation of $ 5.000o00. Mr. Hollands, in charge of the bindery, whose pay has hitherto been drawn from that source, is now paid from the current expense fund. The establishment of a printing press in connection with the bindery, of which press he also has charge, altered the conditions existing before as far as he was concerned. Very justly there was at the same time an increase of his salary.

Page  261 OCTOBER MEETIVNG, 1903. 261 The single addition to the equipment of the bindery was a sewing machine at a cost of $I40.00. In concluding my report I wish to renew the recommendation made in my annual budget last spring for an increase of pay for the three chief assistants in the library. Mr. Jordan, Mr. Finney and Mr. Severance. It was not found possible to make such an increase when the budget was before you, but conditions change. I should much regret if through fault of mine these men were overlooked in any new consideration of salaries. Very respectfully submitted, RAYMOND C. DAVIS, Librarian. Oct. 14, 1903. THE PRINTING PLANT. To the Librarian: DEAR SIR:-The following report of the Printing Plant in the General Library, established in January, I903, under your direction, is submitted for the period ending June 30, 1903: Of your appropriation of $940.0o for plant, $938.91 has been expended. The equipment consists of a 13xI9 Universal press with a one-half horse power Browning motor, 3I fonts of type in two cabinets of 41 cases, proof.press, imposing stone, perforator, wire stitcher, lead and rule cutter, stock cases, etc. The equipment is adequate for nearly all the small work of the University, but six months experience has shown that an occasional order is received requiring a greater quantity of some special sorts than has been purchased for the plant. Of the $200.00 appropriated for stock $198.66 has been expended and the stock will nearly always approximate this amount. As the basis for charging work to the several departments, 60% of the price list compiled by D. Ramaley, and used by the Typothetae, is used. This list is made on a 33/3% profit basis, and the 40% discount was deemed a fair reduction for comparative uses.

Page  262 262 OCTOBER MEETING, 1903. The plant has filled i8I orders, which at the above named charging prices amount to $696.66. During the same period $246.22 have been paid for wages, and $I50.67 for stock, exclusive of the $200.00 appropriated by you for that purpose. Nearly the whole amount of wages has been paid to three students, two in the Law Department and one in the Literary. For the coming year five students will be employed, an average of 12 hours per week each, on a time schedule which allows one man at nearly all hours in the office. Two of these are from the Law, two from the Literary, and one from the Engineering Department. In addition there are registered two Law, one Dental and one Mledical student, who can be called upon for special occasions. The efficiency of the plant could be increased by a small outlay from time to time as work calling for special additional equipment is encountered, the expense of such special sorts to be charged to the order requiring it. Very respectfully, W. C. HOLLANDS. Oct. 14, I903., Regent Hill moved that the report be accepted and printed in the minutes, and that 500 extra copies be furnished the Librarian for distribution. It was so ordered. On motion of Regent Barbour, it was voted to place 29 yards of rubber matting in the reading room of the General Library at a cost not exceeding $35. On motion of Regent Hill, $200 was appropriated for the purchase of duplicate books for the department of English by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Hill, the President was requested to transmit the thanks of the Board for several flashlight photographs of wild deer, taken by Mr. George Shiras, and presented through the Hon. Peter White. The President read the following report of the action of the Executive Committee during the intermission of the Board.

Page  263 OCIOBER MEETING, 1903. 263 ANN ARBOR, Oct. I9, I903. To the Board of Regents: The Executive Committee beg leave to report that at the opening of the semester it became necessary to make certain appointments which had been authorized by you, as follows: E. M. Bragg, B.S., instructor in Marine Engineering and Naval Architecture for one year, at the salary of $900. F. L. Dunlap, Sc.D., promoted to the senior instructorship in Analytical Chemistry at the salary of $1,200 a year, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Dr. Sullivan. Hobart H. Willard, A.B., assistant in Analytical Chemistry for one year at the salary of $700 a year. JAMES B. ANGELL. ROGER W. BUTTERFIELD. Professor Kelsey gave notice that Mr. Theodore D. Buhl had contributed the sum of $500 for a Classical Fellowship for the year I9o3-'04, and that the classical staff desired to divide this Fellowship between Mr. Henry H. Armstrong and Robert E. English. On motion the President was requested to transmit the cordial thanks of the Board to Mr. Buhl for his generous gift to this University, and that the selection of the holders of this Fellowship by the classical staff is hereby confirmed. Professor Kelsey gave notice that Mr. Frederick Stearns, of Detroit, had renewed, for the year 19o3-'04, the Stearns Fellowship in Music, which has again been awarded to Mr. Philip Louis Schenk. On motion of Regent Hill, the President was requested to return to Mr. Stearns the sincere thanks of the Board for this evidence of continued interest in this University. The appointment of Mr. Schenk as the holder of this Fellowship was confirmed by the Board. The President stated that the following persons should be reappointed for one year, and on motion of Regent Hill the appointments were made by the full vote of the Board: Samuel J. Holmes, Ph.D., Instructor in Zoology, salary, $1,200, for one year only; Raymond Pearl, Ph.D., Instructor in Zoology, salary, $1,200, for one year only; Charles A. Davis, A.M., Instructor in Forestry, salary, $200; Henry O. Severance, A.M., Assistant in General Library, salary, $900; Floyd E. Westfall, M.D., Assistant to the Chair of

Page  264 264 OCTOBER MEETING, o903. Theory and Practice of Medicine in the Homceopathic Medical College, without salary; Eugene S. Gilmore, Superintendent of University Hospital, salary $I,500; Russell E. Atchison, M.D., Superintendent of Homceopathic Hospital, salary, $800; Bertha S. Stuart, Assistant in Barbour Gymnasium, salary, $450; George F. Richmond, M.S., Assistant in Physiological Chemistry, salary, $6oo00; Merlin L. Wiley, A.B., Assistant in Elocution, salary, $500. On motion of Regent Barbour, the purchase of a new cutting machine for the bindery was referred to the Auditing Board, with power, by full vote of Board. On motion of Regent Barbour, the President was asked to convey the thanks of the Board to Hon. David Heineman, of Detroit, for fine photograhic pictures, both of the exterior and the interior of the old church at Stratford, England, where Shakespeare is buried. On motion of Regent Butterfield, the Library Committee of the Board were requested to consider the practicability of securing additional seminary rooms in the Library building, with cost of same. Regent Lawton moved that the sum of $225 be added to, the budget for the department of Forestry for the present academic year. The motion was carried on a call vote. Professor J. O. Reed, chairman of the Summer School Committee, presented and read the following report of the work of the school during the last session. ANN ARBOR, MlICH., Oct. I4, I903. To the President and Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: GENTLLEMENS-I have the honor to present herewith my report upon the work of the tenth annual Summer Session of the University. The session opened in the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts on July I and closed August 14. In the Department of Law work began June 22 and ended August 14. In the Department of Medicine and Surgery the session extended from June 22 to August 7, while in the Department of Engineering the required work for the summer extended from June 22 to July 31.

Page  265 OCTOBER MEETING, I903. 265 The enrollment in the various departments was as follows: Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts............... 382 Departm ent of Law........................................... 74 Department of Medicine and Surgery........................ 68 Department of Engineering................................... I07 Total enrollment........................................ 63 Of the 382 students enrolled in the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts, the distribution by states is as follows: Michigan, 213; Ohio, 36; Indiana, 29; Illinois, 24; New York, I6; Pennsylvania, 13; Iowa, 7;. Missouri, 6; Kansas, 5; Minnesota, 4; Maine, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Montana, California, Georgia, Kentucky, Washington, South Dakota, District of Columbia, and Ontario each 2, and one each from Nebraska, Utah, Arkansas, Colorado, Massachusetts, Japan and the Philippine Islands. Of the enrollment in this department 230 were new names and 152 were those of persons already enrolled in some department of the University. Of the 230 new students, those actually engaged in teaching numbered I79. The enrollment of teachers thus formed 43.2% of the total enrollment in the department, or 77.8% of those in attendance in the University for the first time. Of those already enrolled in the University, 102 were members of the Literary Department, 35 belonged in Engineering, 8 in Medicine, 6 in Law, and one in Pharmacy. There were also in attendance two students from Purdue, two from Cornell, and one from Vassar College. Of the total enrollment in this department, I42, or 37.2%, were graduates of Normal Schools, Colleges or Universities. Of these 40 were from this University, 34 from the Michigan State Normal College, 7 from Albion, 6 from Olivet, 6 from the Indiana State Normal, and the remaining 49 from institutions in various parts of the United States. In the Announcement of work in this department for the Summer Session of 1903 there were offered o09 courses in 24 different branches, distributed as follows: Greek 5, Latin 9, French 3, Spanish I, Italian I, German 6, English Literature 2, Rhetoric and English Composition 3, Elocution and Oratory 2, History 3, Philosophy 4, Pedagogy 4, Political Economy 2, Mathematics Io, Physics 8, Chemistry II, Geology 2, Zoology 5, Botany 5, Drawing 4, Physical Training 4, Shop Practice 7, Mechanical Engineering 6, Electrical Engineering I. The instruction in the above courses was given by 47 men, apportioned among the various subjects as follows: Latin and Greek 4, French I, Italian and Spanish I, German 3, English Literature I, Rhetoric and English Composition 2, Elocu

Page  266 266 OCTOBER MEETING, o903. tion I, History 2, Philosophy 2, Pedagogy 2, Political Economy I, Mathematics 4, Physics 3, Chemistry 6, Geology I, Zoology 2, Botany 2, Drawing I, Physical Training I, Shop Practice 4, Mechanical Engineering 2, Electrical Engineering I. A study of the election blanks shows the following number of electons in each subject, beginning with the highest. In this list each election is rated upon the basis of two-hour credit; thus a four-hour course is rated as two two-hour courses, and a six-hour course as three two-hour courses. Mathematics 103, Pedagogy 87, Chemistry 84, Physics 74, Philosophy 60, History 60, English Literature 59, Rhetoric and Composition 53, German 57, Latin 53, Engineering Shops 39, Political Economy 39, Geology 38, French 36, Drawing 34, Elocution and Oratory 31, Botany 28, Zoology 26, Mechanical Engineering 17, Electrical Engineering 7, Spanish 3, Italian 3. FINANCIAL REPORT. At their meeting in January, 900o, the Board of Regents appropriated $2,500.00, or such part thereof as should be necessary, to conduct the Summer Session in accordance with the recommendations of the President and Faculty. This sum has been set aside each subsequent year as a subsidy or sinking fund for the conduct of the Summer Session. RECEIPTS, AND EXPENDITURES. Receipts. Tuition: 380 students at $I5.00................................ $5,700 oo 2 students at $.oo................................. 20 00 Appropriation.......................................... 2,500 oo0 Total receipts......................... $8,220 00 Expenditures. Pay roll................................................$7,570 00 Announcement...................I..................... 178 50 Printing circulars, postage, sundries....................... 75 55 Addressing and mailing of Announcements............... Io 00 Advertising in periodicals............................... I86 04 Librarian............................................... 25 oo Janitor for lectures...................................... Io 00 Total expenditures.............................$8,o55 09 Balance................................ 64 91 $8,220 00

Page  267 OCTOBER MEETING, I903. 267 An interesting feature of the Summer Session was the series of open lectures by members of the University Faculty. The series this year comprised lectures by President Angell, Professors Carhart, Adams, Stanley, and Assistant Professors Cooley and VanTyne. The attendance was most generous, and the interest and enthusiasm of the student body was gratifying in the extreme. It is certainly very desirable that those in attendance upon the Summer Session, of whom so large a percentage are teachers, should have liberal opportunity to hear and to meet prominent members of all the University Faculties. In no way can the University influence be more properly or effectively diffused among the people and schools of Michigan and the surrounding States. The work in the various classes during the Summer Session is characterized by earnestness and zealous application, the large proportion of the student body who either have been or are now actively engaged in teaching renders the interest in the subjects pursued more vital and real than that usually manifested in the same subjects during the college year. It is the testimony of practically all the Professors engaged in Summer work that the class of students found in the University during the Summer Session leaves nothing to be desired on the score of interest and willingness to work. While lack of sufficient preparation is notable in some cases, yet in very few cases has insufficient preparation been found accompanied by an indisposition to serious and strenuous effort. The University offers great advantages to persons of limited opportunities in allowing them to enter the classes freely and derive therefrom all the inspiration and benefit which they are capable of receiving. In no way can the University more effectually gain and retain a firm hold upon the schools of Michigan and of the Middle West than by guarding and promoting the relations of mutual helpfulness and mutual interest established during the Summer Session. Teachers from small or remote High Schools, with vague ideas of the needs or the functions of a properly organized secondary school and with insufficient preparation or with no preparation for the work they have been attempting to do, are awakened and inspired to attempt things undreamed of before. No branch of activity of this department reaches so far or takes hold so firmly upon the schools and the people of the State as does the work of the Summer Session. It bears something of the same relation to the work of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts, that the University Hospital does to that of the Department of Medicine and Surgery. It makes friends for the University, except in cases of educational mal-practice, in every corner of the State, and transforms the lukewarm or indifferent school into an enthusiastic feeder of the University.

Page  268 268 OCTOBER MEETING, 1903. The system of University inspection in maintenance of the diploma relation is a very efficient means of promoting and maintaining the best relations between the schools and the University, as it leads to better acquaintance and better understanding. But the work of the Summer Session goes farther. It begins where the other leaves off. The inspector, be he ever so observant, can see little beyond the surface indications as to the efficiency and workings of the school, although that is usually considerable, and be he ever so eloquent he can only speak for the University while he stands before the school. The teacher, however, who has become acquainted with the workings of the University through attendance upon the Summer Session, and has become imbued with the aims and methods of University men, goes back to that school to stay, and to talk University of Michigan during the entire year, to an audience that is both familiar and easily influenced. If there were no other reason for its existence, the Summer Session is worth three times what it costs simply as a means of advertising the University and of strengthening its hold upon the good will of the people of the State. Another feature of the work of the Summer Session that. is deserving of attention is that of graduate study. In this respect the showing of the University during the year is by no means as strong as it should be. During the past collegiate year there were enrolled 97 persons classified as graduates, and in June, 1902, there were conferred 53 higher degrees-42 M.A., I Sc.D., and io Ph.D. During the Summer Session there were 14 graduate students actu-. ally doing work toward the Master's or Doctor's degree. During the past Summer Session there were more bona fide graduate students working for the Master's or Doctor's degree, in the Department of Physics, than were enrolled in the same department during the collegiate year of I902-1903. It seems reasonably clear that one of the best ways to build up graduate work in the University is to offer better facilities and more encouragement to persons competent to undertake graduate work in the Summer Session. The State has many teachers of collegiate or University training, who are anxious to go further in their special lines of work, and who would more of them enroll for higher degrees if suitable courses were offered and proper provision were made for assigning and arranging their work. Many of us know that with the majority of men, post-graduate study, like collegiate study itself, is largely a matter of getting started; once the decision is made and the work begun, the rest is easier. Whatever any one may think of the possibility of doing graduate work during the summer, two facts are well assured;

Page  269 OCTOBER MEETING, 1903. 269 first, that graduate work has been done, and is being done during the summer, and second, that those departments that are really anxious to have graduate work done, will find students in the Summer Session ready and competent to begin such work. In the hope of gaining additional information upon important phases of summer work in American Colleges and Universities, it has been my pleasant task to collect a consderable body of statistics pertaining to the work in the leading institutions in this country. To this end, a circular letter containing numerous questions regarding the organization, attendance and management of summer work, was sent to some thirty-five of the leading colleges and universities of the United States. The results of these inquiries are embodied in a table herewith submitted. (Omitted in printing.) A glance at the table shows the following significant facts: I. The majority of the Summer Sessions represented on the table have been organized since 1890. 2. During the past summer there were over I2,ooo students engaged in summer work in the United States. 3. Professional schools are to be found in a large majority of the institutions giving summer work. 4. The Universities Harvard, Columbia, Cornell, University of California, have about one-fourth to one-fifth of their total enrollment in the Summer Session. In the case of Missouri and Chicago, it is approximately one-half. 5. The larger Summer Sessions with the exception of Chicago, which has special trains, all enjoy the advantages of reduced rates from the railroads. 6. The acccepted length of term seems to be six weeks. Even where two terms are attempted, the six-week term is made the unit. With the knowledge and approval of the President, I have the honor to submit the following suggestions for the betterment of the Summer Session: SUGGESTIONS FOR BETTERMENT OF SUMMER SESSION. I. Establishment of some modus vivendi with the Departments of Law, Medicine and Surgery, and of Engineering, so that there may be some degree of uniformity in regard to date of opening, tuition fees for students taking work in two departments, registration, etc. 2. That strenuous effort be made to secure for students of the Summer Session the same concessions from the railroads as are granted to the students of Harvard, Columbia, Cornell and the University of Colifornia.

Page  270 270 OCTOBER MEETING, 1903. 3. Establishment of a Biological Station at some suitable station on the lakes of Michigan, for the study of Botany and Zoology and for accommodation of persons desiring to do advanced work in those lines. 4. Establishment of Courses in Library Training, in connection with the University Library; the same to form part of the work of the Summer Session. 5. Establishment of one or more Courses in Pharmacy, in the Sum1mer Session. 6. That a more liberal policy be adopted as regards the printing and distribution of the Announcements for the Summer Session work, including the preparation of appropriate views of Ann Arbor, lists of students, etc. 7. That the question of an advance in the salaries of men doing work in the Summer Session be carefully considered, and if possible that some plan be adopted whereby those giving instruction in Summer Session may be given the option between a salary for such work and vacation during the regular semesters. Respectfully submitted, JOHN 0. REED, Chairman Summer Session. On motion of Regent Barbour, the President was requested-to appoint a committee consisting of two members of the Board and one member from each of the Faculties directly interested in the work of the Summer Session, which committee shall consider all questions relating to said school, with the view of devising some plan of building up and enlarging the work, and report their conclusion to the Board. On motion of Regent Butterfield, the reports of the Treasurer and of the Auditor were referred to the Finance Committee for consideration, and with power to print. The report of the Treasurer is as follows:

Page  271 OCTOBER MEETIA G, 1903. 271 TREASURER'S REPORT. FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1903. To the Finance Committee, Board of Regents, University of Michigan: GENTLEMEN: Herewith I submit my annual report for the fiscal year ending June 30, I903. Respectfully, H. SOULE, Treasurer. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, 1902.............. $51,046 13 From State Treasurer, acct. /4 mill tax for General Expenses................................. 315,620 00 From Accumulation of the 1/4 mill tax for Special Expenses................................. 167,959 80 From State Treasurer, acct. Special Appropriations 37,000 oo From State Treasurer, acct. University Interest.... 39,255 23 From Earnings and Miscellaneous Sources........ 278,016 2i $888,897 37 Disbursments. Paid on account of General Expenses............ $668,072 35' Paid on account of Accumulation of 1/4 mill tax.... 156,437 20 Paid on account of Special Appropriations......... 31,063 46 Balance in Treasury June 30, I903............... 33,324 36 $888,897 37 GENERAL FUND. RECEIPTS TO THE GENERAL FUND. Balance in Treasury, July I, 1902.............. $60,896 97 From State Treasurer, acct. University Interest.... 39,255 23 From State Treasurer, acct. /4 mill tax.......... 315,620 00 From Interest on Deposits....................... 1,124 41 From University Hospital Earnings.............. 43,939 46 From Homceopathic Hospital Earnings........... 18,341 99 From Dental operating Rooms.................... 6,362 03 From Engineering Shops......................... 383 From General Library Duplicate Books Sold..... 49 34 From Miscellaneous Sources..................... 4,932 91 From Students' Fees: Literary Department........... $55,280 00 Literary Dept., Summer School. 1,395 00 Engineering Department....... 27,365 00 Medical Department........... 18,255 00 Medical Dept., Summer School.. 1,195 00 Law Department.............. 41,785 00 Law Dept., Summer School.....,635 00 Dental Department............ 5,260 00 Homoeopathic Medical Depart... 3,315 oo Pharmacy Department......... 3,270 00 Chemical Laboratory........... 10,252 97 Anatomical Laboratory........ -,625 00 Hygienic Laboratory........... 2,130 00 Zoological Laboratory.......... 452 oo Botanical Laboratory.......... 631 00 Physiological Laboratory....... II 0oo Pathological Laboratory........ I,6Io 00 Pharmacological Laboratory.... I50 oo Histological Laboratory........,00o8 00 Engineering Laboratory........ 3,670 00 Dental Laboratory............ 381 oo Waterman Gymnasium......... 2,855 oo Barbour Gymnasium........... 600 oo Electric Engineering........... 847 oo Medical Demonstrations........ 6,685 00 Electrotherapeutics............ 944 oo Key Deposits................. 592 oo Drawing Boards.............. 444 oo

Page  272 272 OCTOBER MEETING, 9po3. Diplomas..................... 8,720 00 Combined Courses............ 360 00 Total Fees............. $202,822 97 Fees Refunded......... 7,689 64 Students' Fees, Net...... $I94,752 33 $202,822 97 $693,728 41 DISBURSEMENTS FROM THE GENERA] General Pay Roll.................... $193,586 86 Literary Pay Roll, Summer School..... 7,55 00 Literary Current Expenses, Summer School....................... Law Department Pay Roll............ 44,029 50 Law Dept. Pay Roll, Summer School.. 995 72 Law Dept., Current Expenses......... Law Library Books.................. Law Dept. Expenses, Summer School.. Medical Department, Pay Roll......... 41,823 62 Medical Dept., Pay Roll, Summer School 1,126 25 Medical Dept., Expenses Summer School Medical Dept., Current Expenses...... Medical Department, Books.......... Pharmacy and Chemical Dept., Pay Roll 24,400 00 Pharmacy and Chemical Dept., Expenses Homceopathic Medical College, Pay Roll 6,600 00 Homceopathic Medical College, Expenses Homceopathic Medical College, Books.. Dental College, Pay Roll............ 12,720 oo Dental College, Expenses........... Dental College, Books.......... Engineering Department, Pay Roll.... 48,958 o6 Engineering Department, Expenses.... University Hospital, Pay Roll........ 13,788 24 University Hospital, Expenses........ Homceopathic Hospital, Pay Roll...... 4,712 95 Homoeopathic Hospital, Expenses...... Amount of Salaries Paid from General Fund......................... $399,896 20 Contingent Account................. Repairs Account........ Fuel Account....................... Lighting Account............. Books for General Library (including Bindery Pay Roll)................ Current Expenses for General Library Postage..................... Advertising and Printing............ Museum....................... Botanical Gardens................... Botanical Laboratory................ Histological Laboratory............. Hygienic Laboratory............... Zoological Laboratory............... Anatomical Laboratory, Material...... Anatomical Laboratory, Expenses...... Engineering Laboratory.............. Pathological Laboratory.............. Physiological Laboratory............ M ateria M edica..................... Engineering Shops.................. Civil Engineering................... School Inspection................... Astronomical Observatory............ Physics............................ Surgical Department................. Electrotherapeutics................... Nervous Diseases.................. Waterman Gymnasium............... Barbour Gymnasium................. Students' Fees Refunded............. L FUND. $200,74I 86 370 64 45,025 22 787 57 1,677 33 133 98 42,949 87 32 75 257 62 1,290 47 24,400 0o. 9,882 q4 6,6o0 oo 420 36 I82 59 12,720 00 5,734 42 190 8i 48,958 o6 660 73 13,788 24 27,538 00 4,712 95 15,713 35 29,144 88 8,813 38 30,377 87 2,301 60 12,064 49 694 3 1,217 20 3,4I 77 488 46 235 6i 649 13 1,221 o6 6,732 84 974 02 1,870 58 354 28 661 48 585 39 416 12 712 13 1,531 83 3,545 76 479 85 302 65 i,86s I5 297 o6 418 67 I84 59 165 59 64 I9 7,689 64

Page  273 OCTOBER MEETING, i903. 273 Philosophy.......................... 337 73 Carpenter Shop Supplies............ 1,262 86 Teams.............................. I,543 15 Geology............................. 189 86 Electrical Supplies.................. 1,422 I Ophthalmology...................... 40 31 Dermatology....................... 17 02 Latin............................... 269 87 Music.............................. I02 90 Theory and Practice.................. 551 oI Heating Supplies.................... I,615 27 General Catalogue................... 362 22 Commencement Expenses............. 756 94 Appointment Committee............. 74 81 German............................. 90 52 G reek.............................. 2 28 Diplomas........................... I,4.35 50 University Laundry................. 5,026 38 W ater Supply...................... 2,496 55 Alumni Association..................,400 oo Repairs in General Library........... 9,239 63 Hospital Boiler House................ 3 I,853 I2 Mtichigan Law Review................ 500 00oo American History................... 230 55 English.......................... 45 28 Forestry............................ 144 39 Political Economy................... 321 99 H istory............................. 261 86 Psychology.......................... 60 Palmer Memorial Hospital;Vard...... 7,656 94 Naval Architecture................... 47 76 Printing Plant...................... 360 93 Pasteur Institute Laboratory......... 84 93 Addition to Heating Plant............ I4,090 15 $668,072 35 Balance in Treasury, June 30, I903 25,656 o6 $693,728 41 SPECIAL FUND ACCOUNTS. Homoeopathic Medical College. Receipts. From State ''reasurer............................ $6,0oo oo $6,000 oo Disb tirsements. Paid Vouchers.................................. 4,400 oo Balance in Treasury, June 30, I903................,600 oo 6,000 oo Electric Light Plant. Receipts. From Earnings................................. 60 oo Balance Overdrawn, June 30, 1903................. I24 54 184 54 Disbltrsemenzts. Balance Overdrawn, July i. I902.................. 184 54 184 54 Summer Hospitals. Receipts. From State Treasurer............................ $6,ooo oo $6,000 oo Disbursements.. Paid Vouchers................................... 3,000 oo Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1903................ 3;ooo oo 6,00o oo

Page  274 274 OCTOBER MEETING, 1903. Psychopathic Ward. Receipts. From State Treasurer............................ 25,000 00 5,000 o o Disbursements. Balance Overdrawn, July i, 1902................... 24 60 Paid Vouchers.................................. 23,663 46 Balance in Treasury, June 30, I903.................,311 94 25,000 oo Accumulation of Savings, New Engineering Building. Receipts. From State Treasurer............................ 75,000 oo 75,000 oo Disbursements. Balance Overdrawn, July I, 1902.................. 24 70 Paid Vouchers................................. 69,836 34 Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1903................ 5.138 96 75,000 00 Accumulation of Savings, New Medical Building. Receipts. From State Treasurer............................ 82,959 80 Balance Overdrawn, June 30, 1903................ 4,597 32 87,557 12 Disbursements. Balance Overdrawn, July I, 1902.................. 9,147 02 Paid Vouchers.................................... 78,410 o0 87,557 i2 Accumulation of Savings, Repairs to Barbour Gymnasium. Receipts. From State Treasurer............................ 10,00 00 0,000 00 Disblurse1ments. Balance Overdrawn, July I, 1902................... 469 98 Paid Vouchers.................................. 8,190 76 Balance in Treasury, June 30, I903............... 1,339 26 Io,000 oo Special Funds. Summary of Balances, June 30, 1903. Iomoeopathic Medical College, Balance in Treasury.. I.6o0 oo Summer Hospitals, Balance in Treasury........... 3,000 oo Psychopathic Ward, Balance in Treasury...........,311 94 New Engineering Building, Balance in Treasury.... 5,138 96 Repairs to Barbour Gymnasium, Balance in Treasury 1,339 26 12,390 i6 Overdraft. New Medical Building........................... 4,597 32 Net Balance in Treasury.......................... $7,792 84 GIFTS AND TRUST FUNDS. Under this head are included gifts and other funds which the Regents have received from time to time from benefactors for special purposes. The new accounts opened during the year are the Alice Freeman Palmer Memorial Fund, the McMillan Shakespeare Fund, the Stearns' Music Fellowship Fund, and the A. B. Palmer Memorial Free Bed Fund,

Page  275 OCTOBER MEETING, 1903. 275 Philo Parsons Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, 902................. io8 46 From Interest.................................. 3 28 i1 74 Disblursc-enellts. Balance in Treasury. June 30, 1903................ I I 74 I 74 Goethe Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, I902................. 206 09 From Interest................................... 6 24 212 33 Disbursenments. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1903................ 212 33 212 33 Elisha Jones Classical Fellowship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, 1902.................. 9 16 From interest................................... 28 9 44 Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1903................ 9 44. 9 44 Coyl Collection. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, 1902.................. 12,659 38 Interest......................................... 537 77 I3,I97 15 Disblursemnents. Paid Vouchers................................ 321 52 Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1903............. 12,875 63 I3,I97 I5 Buhl Law Library Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, 1902................. 542 75 Interest..........................5 I5 55 558 30 Disbursements. Paid V ouchers.................................. 60 oo Balance in Treasury, June 30, I903 498 30 558 30 Seth Harrison Scholarship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, 1902................ 29,052 31 Interest......................................... 1,174 51 30,226 82 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers................................... 800 00 Balance in Treasury, June 30, I903................ 29,426 82 30,226 82 Class of Ninety-Four Scholarship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, I902................. 1,526 41 Contributions.................................... 20 00 Interest......................................... 35 08 1,581 49 Disbiurselmenits. Balance in Treasury, June 30, I903................... I,581 49,58 49

Page  276 27 6 OCTOBER MEE TING, z903. Ford-Messer Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, 1902................. 24,35 77 Interest......................................... 868 75 25,244 52 Disbursements. Paid for Premium on Bonds Bought................ I,228 50 Paid V ouchers.................................., 87 Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1903................. 22,834 I5 25,244 52 The Phillips Scholarships Funds. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, 9o2................... 550 55. Interest...................................... 5 45 From the Estate Rentals.......................... I93 98 759 98 Disbursemlents. Paid Vouchers Scholarships Awarded.............. 150 oo Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1903............... 609 98 759 98 Music Hall Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, 1902................. 1,330 76 Interest......................................... 32 77 1,363 53 Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1903.................,363 53 1,363 53 Class of Ninety-Seven Scholarship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, 1902................. 177 53 Interest......................................... 3 87 i8i 40 Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1903................ 181 40 i8I 40 Class of Ninety-Eight Scholarship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, I902.................. 286 70 Contributed..................................... 90 oo Interest........................................ 12 36 389 o6 Disbursenments. Balance in Treasury, June 30, I903...................... 389 o6 389 o6 American School at Rome. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, 1902................. 11 From Contributions............................. 1-41 Io 141 21 Disbburse men1 ts. Paid Vouchers................................... 40 00oo Transfer to Special Latin Fund................... I I0 Balance in Treasury, June 30, I903................ I 41 2I Parke, Davis & Co. Fund. Receipts. Contribution.................................... 500 oo 500 oo Disburselments. Paid Vouchers.,...................... 500 oo 500 oo

Page  277 OCTOBER MEETING, i903. 277 Stearns Pharmacy Fellowship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, 1902................. I 56 Contribution..................................... 350 oo 351 56 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers................................... 350 00oo Balance in Treasury, June 30, I903................ i 56 351 56 Library of Early Christian Literature. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, 1902................. 8 20 Interest........................................ 28 Contributions.................................... 45 oo 53 48 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers................................... 50 89 Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1903................ 2 59 53 48 Special Latin Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, I902.................. 2 32 Transfer from American School at Rome.......... I 10 3 42 Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1903................ 3 42 3 42 Good Government Club. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, 1902................. 653 89 Interest.21 OI Interest....'..................................... 21 o From Contributions.............................. 75 oo 749 90 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers................................... 25 00 Balance in Treasury, June 30, I903............... 724 90 749 90 Peter White Fellowship. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, I902................. 437 94 Interest......................................... 6 48 Contributions.................................... 400 oo 854 42 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers................................... 400 00 Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1903................. 454 42 854 42 Woman's Professorship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, 1902.................. 11,221 95 Interest......................................... 369 36 11,591 31 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers................................... 94 80 Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1903................ 11,496 51 I1,591 31

Page  278 278 OCTOBER MEETING, i903. Ninety-Nine Law Class Fellowship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, 1902.................. 32 I2 Interest......................................... 97 33 09 Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30, '1903................ 33 09 33 09 Williams Professorship Fund. The care of the Williams' Professorship Fund has been partly in the hands of the Treasurer, and partly in the hands of Mr. George S. Field. A summary of the report of Mir. Field is in an appendix to the present report. (See Appendix). The report on the portion in the hands of the Treasurer is as follows: Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, 1902.................. Interest......................................... Disbursements. Paid Vouchers.................................. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1903................ Biological Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, 1902................ Disbursements. Paid Vouchers................................... Morris Alumni Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, 1902.................. Interest....................................... Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1903................ Bates Professorship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, 1902, Cash and Loans.. ic Balance in Property............................. 2 Interest......................................... From Rentals................................... Disbursements. Care of Property, Expenses, Taxes, etc............. B ooks........................................... Salaries of Professors and Assistants............. Instruments, Apparatus and Laboratory Supplies.... Premium on Bonds Bought....................... Paid Legatee................................... Balance in Cash Acct., June 30, 1903.............. Ic Balance in Property Acct., June 30, 1903......... 2 D. M. Ferry Botanical Fund. Receipts. Contribution.................................... Overdrawn, June 30, I903........................ Disbursements. Paid Vouchers................................... 4,099 54 93 62 50 oo 4,143 i6 4,193 i6 4,193 i6 50 oo 50 00 50 oo 500oo 2,718 67 73 74 2,792 41 02,253 69 29,423 43 5,924 74 3,676 24 4,030 33 139 62 2,700 00 328 09 2,047 50 1,200 00 )2,606 10 28,226 46 450 00 50 00 2,792 41 2,792 41 141,278 I0 141,278 o1 500 00 500 00 500 oo

Page  279 OC OBEER lMEETING, 1903. 279 Class of Ninety-Nine Memorial Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, 1902................. 6 35 6 35 Disbiursem ents. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1903............... 6 35 6 35 Newton Van der Veer Loan Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, 1902................... 20 59 From Interest................................... 7 89 From Contributions.............................. Io 00 318 48 Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1903................ 318 48 318 48 Students' Lecture Association Fund., Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, 1902................. I,005 33 Interest......................................... 25 67 1,031 00 Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1903................ 1,031 00 1,031 1o Liquid Air Plant. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, 1902................. I2 49 12 49 Disbursemsients. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1903................ 2 49 12 49 James W. Scott Classical Fellowship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, 1902................. i6 93 Interest......................................... 28 17 21 Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1903................ 17 21 17 21 International Club Scholarships. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, 1902................. 3,526 25 Interest......................................... 120 00 Contribution from the Club....................... 500 oo 4,146 25 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers................................... 1,365 00 Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1903............... 2,781 25 4,146 25 Hannah E. Davis Allopathic Hospital Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, 1902.................. 2,164 30 Interest......................................... 49 02 2,213 32 Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1903................ 2,213 32 2,213 32

Page  280 280 OCTOBER MEETING, 1903. Warner Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, 1902................. I 05 Interest......................................... 05 I 10 Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30, I903................ I 10 I Gas Association Fellowship Fund. Receipts. From Contribution.............................. 565 00 565 oo Disbursements. Balance Overdrawn, July I, 1902.................. 42 43 Paid Vouchers.................................. 479 97 Balance in Treasury, June 30, I903................ 42 60 565 0o Nelson, Baker & Co. Fellowship Fund. Receipts. Contribution................................ 500 500 oo Disbursements. Paid Vouchers..............................0.... 500 o 500 oo Palmer Memorial Ward. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, I902................. 17,932 30 17,932 30 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers.................................. I7,036 74 Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1903................ 895 56 I7,932 30 Walter Crane Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, I902................. 1,168 60 Interest......................................... 26 o6 I,I94 66 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers.................................. 623 40 Balance in Treasury, June 30, I903............... 57I 26 I,I94 66 Chemical Apparatus Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, 1902.................. I07 67 Interest.......................................... 80 io8 47 Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30, I903................. Io8 47 io8 47 Buhl Classical Fellowship. Receipts. Contribution..................................... 500 oo 500 00 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers................................... 494 64 Balance in Treasury, June 30, I90o3............... 5 36 500 00

Page  281 OCTOBER MEETING, 90o3. 281 Alice Freeman Palmer Memorial Fund. Receipts. From Contributions.............................. Io 00 Interest....................................... 15 Io 15 Disbursements. Balance in Treasury, June 30, I903................ Io 15 IO 15 McMillan Shakespeare Fund. Receipts. From Contributions.............................. D isb ursements. Paid V ouchers.................................. Balance in Treasury, June 30, I903................ Treadwell Free Bed Fund. I00 00 23 57 76 43 I00 00 100 00 Receipts. From Interest from Endowment Fund............ 91 67 91 67 Disb urscnlienzts. Paid Vouchers.................................. 38 57 Balance in Treasury, June 30, I903................ 53 Io 91 67 Stearns Music Fellowship Fund. Receipts. From Contribution............................ 500 oo 500 oo Disb 1'lse l C lts. Paid Vouchers.................................. 498 Io Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1903................ I 9 500 00 Palmer Free Bed Fund. Receipts. From Contribution.............................. 15,000 oo 15,000 oo Disburseiments. Balance in Treasury, June 30, I903................ I5,000 oo0 5,000 oo SUMMARY OF TRUST FUND BALANCES. IN BANK AND LOANS CASH. AND PROPERTY. Philo Parsons Fund................ $III 74 Goethe Fund.................... 212 33 Elisha Jones Fellowship Fund..... 9 44 Coyl Library Fund................ 2,875 63 I0,000 00 Buhl Law Library Fund.......... 498 30 Seth Harrison Fund.............. 4,426 82 25,000 00 '94 Scholarship Fund............. 8i 49 1,500 00 Ford-Messer Library Fund........ 2,834 15 20,000 00 Phillips Scholarships Fund......... 609 98 Music Hall Fund................. 363 53 1,000 00 '97 Class Scholarship Fund........ 181 40 '98 Class Scholarship Fund........ 389 o6 American School at Rome Fund.... II1 Stearns Pharmacy Fellowship Fund I 56 Library of Early Christian Literature Fund................... 2 59 Special Latin Fund............... 3 42 Good Government Club Fund...... 724 90 Peter White Fellowship Fund..... 454 42 TOTAL. $11 74 212 33 9 44 12,875 63 498 30 29,426 82 1,58I 49 22,834 15 609 98 1,363 53 3896I 11 I 56 2 59 3 42 724 90 454 42

Page  282 282 OCTOBER IEETING, 1903. Woman's Professorship Fund...... '99 Law Class Scholarship Fund.... WVilliams Professorship Fund....... WVilliams Professorship Fund....... In charge of George S. FieldMorris Alumni Fund.............. Bates Professorship Fund.......... Bates Professorship Property Fund. '99 Class Memorial................ Newton Van der Veer Loan Fund.. Students' Lecture Association Fund. Liquid Air Plant Fund............ Fames W. Scott Fellowship Fund... Internat. Club Scholarship Fund;.. Hannah E. Davis Allopathic Hospital......................... W\ arner Fund.................... Michigan Gas Association Fund..... Palmer Memorial Ward Fund...... Palmer Memorial Free Bed Fund... \alter Crane Fund.............. Chemical Apparatus Fund.......... Buhl Classical Fellowship Fund.... Alice Freeman Palmer Memorial Fund....................... McMillan Shakespeare Fund........ Treadwell Free Bed Fund.......... Stearns Music Fellowship Fund.... 496 51 11,oo000 oo,496 5I 33 09 33 09 143 i6 4,000 00 4, 43 I6 13,442 26 13,442 26 542 41 2,250 00 2,792 41 17,806 Io 84,800 oo 102,606 o0 28,226 46 28,226 46 6 35 6 35 318 48 318 48 14I oo 890 oo 1,031 00 12 49 I2 49 17 21 17 21 2,781 25 2,781 25 2,213 32 2,213 32 I10 I I10 42 60 42 60 895 56 895 56 4,300 00 I0,700 00 15,000 00 571 26 571 26 I08 47 Io8 47 5 36 5 36 I0 I5 I0 15 76 43 76 43 53 Io 53 Io I 90 I 90 $44,358 17 $2I2,808 72 $257,166 89 APPENDIX. Williams Professorship Fund. In July, 1898, by order of the Board of Regents, a portion of the property belonging to the Williams Professorship Fund was placed in the hands of Hon. Levi L. Barbour, of Detroit, for management, and upon his assuming the duties of Regent, the management was turned over to Mr. George S. Field, of Detroit, by direction of the Board. The following statement, compiled and rearranged from the report of Mr. Field shows the changes in the condition of the fund from June I7th, 1902, to June I5th, 1903: Receipts. Cash Balance, June 17, 1902..................... Mortgages. (Payments on Principal).............. Land Contract. (Payment on Principal)........... Interest on Loans and Contracts................... Loan from City Savings Bank on note to complete Loan to Mr. Logiodice..................... Disbursements. Paid for Mortgage, Wm. Voorheis, Jr $700 oo and Accrued Interest........ 16 68 Loans on M ortgages............................. Paid City Savings Bank on Note................... Balance Cash on Hand, June 15, 1903............ $487 36 1,o50 75 290 00 681 13 438 oo $2,947 24 716 68 2,050 00 119 oo 61 56 2,947 24 The value of the property in the hands of Mr. Field, June 15, 1903, (partly estimated) is given below: Cash Balance.................................... Mortgages on Real Estate........................ Land Contracts................................. R eal E state..................................... Owe balance on Note to Bank, Principal and Interest to make up Loan to Mr. Logiodice........... 61 56 11,444 25 495 oo 1,767 io 13,767 9I 325 65 $I3,442 26 The Board then took a recess until I:30 p. r.

Page  283 OCTOBER _MEETINGG, 90o3. 283 AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at I:30. M., Regent Dean being present. On motion of Regent Butterfield, the degree of Bachelor of Laws was conferred upon Francis W. Balcomb, William Everett Keenan, John Henry Lynch, and Salem Jewell Rice, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Department of Law. On motion of Regent Hill, the degree of Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering was conferred upon James Vernon Davidson, as recommended by Engineering Faculty. Regent Hill presented and read the following communication from the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and the degrees indicated were conferred upon the persons therein named by the full vote of the Board: Tle Honorable, the Board of Regents. GENTLEMEN:-I have the honor to report to you that the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts recommend to you the following named persons for the degrees indicated: FOR BACHELOR O)r ARTS. Loouis Ascham, WValter Gelvin Bain, Leila Jane Carlisle, Erie Elsworth Clippinger, Darrell Hanug Davis, William D. Henderson, Ralph Chester Lane, William Russell Lloyd, Evelyn Olive MacNaughton, Iuiz Marino Perez, W'alter Boughton Pitkin, Anna Amelia Schryver, Hubert Chester Sharp, Manson Alexander Stewart, John Raymond Thrasher, Zadia Elvira Udell, Joseph Vernor Voorheis.

Page  284 284 OCTOBER MEETING, 1903. FOR MASTER OF ARTS. Frank Fraser Potter, Charles William Mickens. Respectfully submitted, P. R. DE PONT. The President stated that he had received from Mir. Joseph Bradford Whittier, of Saginaw, Mich., by the hand of the Hon. Peter White, a check for $4,000, for the endowment of a Fellowship in Botany, in memory of his mother, Angeline Bradford Whittier. Regent Barbour moved that the gift be received, and that the Fellowship shall be known as the "Angeline Bradford Whittier Fellowship in Botany," and the President be requested to convey to Mr. Whittier the sincere thanks of the Board for his generous gift to the University. It was so ordered. On motion of Regent Hill, Mr. Alexander Linn Trout and William Duncan McNally were appointed assistants in General Chemistry for one year without salary, and Oscar William Voedisch was designated as the holder of the Parke, Davis & Company Fellowship in General Chemistry for the present academic year. On motion of Regent Hill, Miss Inis H. Weed was appointed Assistant in Rhetoric for one year without compensation. Regent Hill presented and read the resignation of Eugene C. Sullivan as Instructor in Analytical Chemistry, which was accepted by the Board. Regent Hill moved that the following appointments be made for one year: George P. Burns, Ph.D., Instructor in Botany, salary........$900 Alfred Dachnowski, A.M., Assistant in Botany, salary......... 200 A. W. Pierson, Assistant in Botany, salary................. Ioo Wesley Bradfield, A.B., Assistant in Botany, salary......... Ioo John W. Scholl, A.M., Instructor in German, salary............. oo Harry W. Dub6e, A.M., Instructor in German, a little more than half time, salary................................... 500 James P. Bird, A.B., Instructor in French (Engineering), salary. 930

Page  285 OCTOBER MEETING, 90o3. 285 The request of Professor Wenley for an appropriation for the purpose of framing photographs and engravings of the principal philosophers and psychologists, living and dead, which he had purchased and presented to the University to be placed on the walls of the philosophical iooms, and in the psychological laboratory, was referred to the Auditing Board with power. On motion of Regent Hill, MAr. William D. Henderson, A.B., was appointed Assistant in Physics for one year at a salary of $30 a month, by the full vote of the Board. Regent Lawton presented the following communication from Dr. A. B. Prescott, Director of the School of Pharmacy, and the appointments recommended were approved by the unanimous vote of the Board. ANN ARBOR, Oct. I3, I903. To the -HoInorable, the Board of Regentis: GENTIrMEN: —I beg leave to recommend for appointment under the present salary budget of the Chemical Laboratory and School of Pharmacy, for the year 1903-1904, as follows: Silas F. Scott, Ph.C., B.S., to be Assistant in Organic Chemistry in place of L. D. Haigh and at same salary, $200.00. (Minutes. June, 190o, p. 62.) Chas. W. Edmunds, M.D., Assistant in Pharmacology in Departmnent of Medicine, to be continued for instruction in School of Pharmacy with $2oo.oo from the budget of this department, the same as last year. (Minutes, October, I902, p. I36.) Harold W. Ryland, to be Assistant in Analytical Chemistry at $200.00, according to my request through the Executive Committee in filling the instructorship resigned by Dr. E. C. Sullivan since the last meeting of the Board. Elmer E. Ware, to be Assistant in Chemical Technology and Analyst for the State Geological Survey, without salary, and in place of F. S. Hornberger. (Minutes, 1902, June, p. 62.) Johannes Korselt, Ph.D., to be Assistant in Research and holder of the fellowship supported by Messrs. F. Stearns & Co., to whom thanks are due for continuation of the support for 1903-04, this appointment to be without salary from the University. (Minutes, October, I902, p. 136.) Respectfully submitted, A. B, PREscort.

Page  286 286 OCTOBER MEETING, 1903. The resignation of Dr. John A. Watling was presented by the President and accepted by the Board. On motion of Regent Lawton, the degree of Doctor of Medicine was conferred upon James George Cumming, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery. Regent Lawton presented and read the following communication from the Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery, and the recommendations therein contained were approved by the full Board. To the Honorable Board of Regents: GgNTLI'MEN:-I am instructed by the Medical Faculty to present to you the following requests: 1. That David J.,evy may be appointed Assistant in Bacteriology in place of Ward J. MacNeal, A.B., at the same salary, $300. 2. That Ward J. MacNeal, A.B., be appointed Rockefeller Fellow in Bacteriology, for the present year, without expense to the University. 3. That Harold Voltman be appointed, for this year, Rockefeller Fellow in Pathology without expense to the University. 4. That Mary F. Leach, Ph.D., be appointed for the present year, Ford Fellow in Physiological Chemistry, without expense to the University. 5. That May Wheeler, Ph.D., be appointed, for the present year, Vaughan Fellow in Hygiene without expense to the University. 6. Inasmuch as the Instructor in Physiology has resigned, and Dr. Lombard has not been able up to the present time to find one competent to fill the place, the Faculty recommends that Dr. Lombard be authorized to appoint three student assistants, each one to give half his time to the work, at three hundred dollars each. I may state that Dr. Bowen's salary was $900.00. This, therefore, does not necessitate any increased expenditure. At present Dr. Lombard is prepared to recommend Fred M. Abbott as one of these assistants, and I respectfully ask his appointment. 7. Dr. William H. Morley has resigned his service on the Gynecological staff, and Dr. Peterson requests that Charles L. Patton, M.D., be advanced to First Assistant in Obstetrics and Diseases of Women at the same salary as Dr. Morley, $200; also that Arthur P. Reed, A.B., M.D., be advanced to occupy the position thus vacated by Dr. Patton, and that Rolland L. Parmeter, M.D., be advanced to the position occupied by Arthur P. Reed. These changes do not necessitate nor ask for any increased expenditures. All of which is respectfully submitted, V. C. VAUGHAN.

Page  287 OCTOBER MEETIAG, 90o3. 287 On motion of Regent Lawton, the Auditing Board were authorized to select and purchase a bronze tablet to be placed in the Palmer Ward at the University Hospital, as a memorial to the late Doctor A. B. Palmer, for many years Dean of the Department of Medicine and Surgery. On motion of Regent Barbour, the bill of Pond & Pond, architects, for making plans for an addition to the Physical Laboratory, was referred to the Secretary with power. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Secretary was authorized to pay the bill of the Gardner Elevator Company, amounting to $325, if upon inspection he finds they have performed their work in accordance with the terms of their contract. On motion of Regent Fletcher, it was voted that the Auditing Board employ such clerical help in the office of the Dean of the Engineering Department as may, in their judgment, seem necessary. Regent Fletcher moved that the contract to furnish a new booster for the lighting plant be awarded to the Northern Electrical Manufacturing Company, of Chicago, for the sum of $576, F. O. B., Madison, Wisconsin. The motion was carried on a call vote. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Auditing Board were authorized to purchase 50 lockers for the Barbour Gymnasium. Regent Fletcher moved that the Johnson Service Company be paid the sum of $3,605.40 on their contract for heat regulation in the new Engineering building. The motion was carried on a call vote. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the following appointments were made in Mechanical Engineering for one year by the full vote of the Board: Frank Merrill Dunlap, Mech. E., Acting Assistant Professor in Mechanical Engineering. Salary paid by Professor M. E. Cooley. Austin Perry Biggs and Lewis Chubb Rogers to be Assistants in Mlechanical Engineering. Salary $200 each. Roscoe Bradbury Jackson, B.S., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. Salary, $90goo.

Page  288 288 OCTOBER MEETING, 1903. On motion of Regent Barbour, it was voted that the Engineering students taking summer work in the field, shall be required to pay a fee of $io each for the use of the outfit; and such fee shall constitute a fund for the purpose of keeping the outfit in order. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Department of Mechanical Engineering was granted a shop allowance of $300, by the full vote of the Board. Regent Lawton submitted the following Rules and Regulations for the Administration of Affairs in the University Hospital, which were adopted by the full vote of the Board. PLurES AND REGULATIONS FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OI AFFAIRS IN THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL. (I) The conduct of the affairs of the University Hospital shall be in accordance with such rules and instructions as may from time to time be afforded by the Board of Regents, and to this body must be referred all questions of disputed authority or other matters that may not be otherwise easily adjusted. Matters of difference arising between heads of clinics in the hospital or between the heads of clinics and the Superintendent on medical affairs shall be submitted to the Dean of the Medical Department and his decision shall be final unless subsequently overruled or modified by the Board of Regents. The Dean of the Medical Department shall also exercise general supervision over the clinical affairs of the hospital and over the Superintendent in matters pertaining to the medical affairs of the institution. (2) The Superintendent is the responsible administrative officer of the hospital. FI-s authority extends over all the business affairs of the institution and over all who are residents there, whether employes or patients, in everything except in matters pertaining to the treatment of the sick. He is the executive officer of the Board of Regents at the hospital; the purchasing agent for food and supplies. He shall pass upon the admission of patients to the hospital as hereinafter set forth and also upon the admission of visitors, it being understood that in this latter he shall strictly follow the requirements regarding any patient given by the hospital physician who is administering to such patient. The Superintendent shall engage the nurses and all other employes of the hospital, other than the internes, by and with the consent of the Auditing Board of the University, and they shall be

Page  289 OCTOBER MEETING, 1903. 289 subject to their direction and control, it being understood, however, that the nurses in caring for patients shall in such duty be subject to the instructions of the physician in charge. No pupil nurse may be discharged except by action of the Hospital Committee. The Superintendent shall see to and provide for all the housekeeping necessities of the,institution. But in all matters pertaining to the administration of the affairs of the hospital and the purchasing of supplies it shall be the duty of the Superintendent to consult with the President and Secretary of the University, and to keep them fully informed regarding its condition and-especially of particular' facts as' they'may arise. In the purchasing' of supplies and the hiring of help and discharging employes the Superintendent shall consult with the Auditing Board of the University and shall not act without their consent, 'The Superintendent shall be a member of the Hospital Committee,. which;Committee shall otherwise, consist of the heads of the se~eral clinics.. The Hospital Committee shall employ and control the action and duties of the internes subject to the Regents. This. Committee shall control the medical treatment of patients and the attendance of students' at the lectures andat clinics and shall have jurisdiction over any and ail matters, purely medical, pertaining to the clinical department of the' Hospital. 'But it is understood that the head of every clinic shall have full-jurisdiction in the medical -matters in his own department. The internes shall be subject to the Superintendent only, in matters, pertaining, to the business affairs of the Hospital. In,all other questions they shall be subject to the order of: the head of the clinics in which they are serving.The House Physician shall make the assignments of cases to the clinics and when the head of any clinic sends in a case as an emergency, the house physician shall accept it as such, otherwise he shall determine on the first arrival of the patient as to the emergency of cases and his decision shall be final, 'but subject to subsequent revision, if necessary, by the Hospital Committee. The House Physician shall be chosen..by the Superintendent subject to the approval of the Hospital Committee and preference shall be given in this matter of making a selection to retiring internes; it being assumed that by so doing the liability for mistaken choice would be greatly lessened. The Superintendent is expected 'to take cognizance of everything in the hospital and to be mindful of everything that transpires; to see that quiet and good order prevails; to see that proper cleanliness is secured; to see that wastefulness is eliminated and due economy in the consumption of food and materials is adhered

Page  290 290 OCTOBER MEETING, 1903. to; and that the employes are all careful, respectful and duly attentive. to their work. 'rhe Superintendent is not expected to interfere in any matter pertaining purely to the medical or surgical treatment of patients, but this may not exclude him from noticing if there be any seeming neglect of the treatment and care of patients and from calling the attention of the head of the clinic to such neglect if he finds it to occur. On motion of Regent Barbour, Regents Fletcher and Carey were appointed a committee to secure the services of a good mason by the year, at a salary of $900. Regent Hill moved that $I50 be appropriated for the purpose of meeting certain expenses in connection with the meeting of the State Teachers' Association, which will convene in Ann Arbor on December 28th, I903. This motion was carried on a call vote. The state commission on the Louisiana Purchase Exposition having requested the loan of the model of the works of the Calumet & Hecla Mining Company (now the property of the University), for exhibition at St. Louis, Regent Butterfield moved that the request be granted, provided they guarantee the safe return of the property and assume the entire cost of packing and transportation. It was so ordered. The President presented and read the following communication from Professor M. L. D'Ooge, and the President was requested to convey the thanks of the Board to the persons named in the communication as contributors to the fund for the maintenance of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. ANN ARBOR, MICH., Oct. 14, I903. To the President and the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: CGENTLEMEN: —I respectfully beg you to pass a vote of thanks to the persons named below, who for the past twenty years have made it'possible for this University by their generous contributions to cooperate with the other leading Universities of this country in the maintenance of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, thereby enabling the graduates of our University to enjoy the advantages of this school without any cost.

Page  291 OCTOBER MEETINVG, 1903. 291 During this period these friends of the University have contributed four thousand one hundred and eighty ($4,I80) dollars to this object, and unless your honorable body shall deem it proper to vote an appropriation for this purpose from the funds of the University, as is done by most of the contributing colleges, it will be necessary to rely in the future as in the past upon the generosity of our friends, most of whom are alumni, to support this worthy enterprise. The funds contributed have come into my hands or been senon to the Treasurer of,the school. It might be more satisfactory to all who are interested if hereafter these funds should pass through the hands of the Treasurer of the University, who could then include them regularly in his official statement of gifts to the University. The persons to whom thanks are due are the following: Hon. D. M. Ferry and Mrs. Ferry, Detroit; Hon. T. W. Palmer, Detroit; Hon. Win. A. Moore, Detroit; Mr. Frank H. Walker, Detroit; Dr. E. T. Tappey, Detroit; Hon. Wm. Savidge, Spring Lake; Mr. A. M. Henry, Detroit; Mr. Wm. H. Butler, Jr., Detroit; Mr. E. H. Butler, Detroit; Hon. W. E. Quinby, Detroit; Miss Clara A. Avery, Detroit; Mrs. Sarah Savidge, Spring Lake; Mrs. Helen H. Newberry, Grosse Point; Mrs. Dwight Cutler, Grand Haven; Mr. E. W. Pendleton, Detroit; Mr. Bryant Walker, Detroit; Mr. C. M. Burton, Detroit; Hon. E. W. Meddaugh, Detroit; Mr. Henry Russel, Detroit; Mr. John T. Michau, St. Joseph, Mo.; Prof. John Stewart, Bay City; Prof. H. G. Sherrard, Detroit; Mr. John S. Gray, Detroit; Mr. O. H. Dean, Kansas City, Mo.; Hon. Lawrence Maxwell, Cincinnati, Ohio; Dr. L. S. Pilcher, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Mr. Marcus Baker, Washington, D. C.; Prest. Jas. B. Angell, Ann Arbor; Mr. D. J. Haff, Kansas City, Mo.; Hon. Sidney D. Miller, Detroit; Mr. R. M. Wright, Fort Dodge, Iowa; Mr. Wm. J. Gray, Detroit; Mr. F. L. Geddes, Toledo; Mr. Floyd B. Wilson, New York City; Prof. T. B. Bronson, Lawrenceville, N. J. Respectfully submitted by MARTIN L. D'OOGe. Regent Butterfield submitted the following preamble and resolution, which were adopted by the unanimous vote of the Board: It having been suggested to this Board by a communication from Hon. C. B. Grant, Chairman Committee of Alumni,,bat there was a desire on the part of some of the Uuniversity Aiumni that a

Page  292 292 OCTOBER 3MEETING, 1903. building should be erected on the Campus in memory of those of our students who have lost their lives in the Civil and Spanish wars, Resolved, That the Board cordially approve of such suggestion and agree that they will furnish space on the Campus for such building and will assume its maintenance when constructed. The request for eight additional nurses in the University Hospital was, on motion of Regent Butterfield, deferred, and the Superintendent was requested to furnish the Board a statement in detail of the service rendered by each nurse, and the value thereof. Also whether nurses are being used outside the Hospital, and if so, to what extent. On motion the Board adjourned to Tuesday, November 24th, at io o'clock A. M. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  293 NOVEMBER MEETING. UTNIVERSITY OF Ml\fICHIAN,, ANN ARBOR, Nov. 24, 1003. The Board assembled in the Regents' room at io o'clock A. M. Present: Regents Farr, Hill, Lawton, Dean, Barbour, Fletcher, and Carey. Absent: Regent Butterfield. In the absence of Secretary Wade, Professor Pettee served as Secretary pro ternt. The minutes of the previous meeting were read, approved, and ordered printed. Communications which had reached the President were placed in the hands of the standing committees of the Board for consideration. The President read the following report of the Executive Committee, and, on motion of Regent Hill, the action of the committee was ratified by the full vote of the Board. To ihe Board of Regents: The Executive Committee beg leave to make the following report of their action since your last meeting. On Octcber Igth they appointed John Frederick Shepard, B.S., Assistant in Psychology for the current year, at the salary of $450, this sum having been appropriated by you for the purpose. They also appointed George Livingstone Hamilton, Ph.D., Instructor in French' f6r the current year, at the salary of $900, in place of Mr. Beziat de Bordes, resigned. In order to provide in Dart for the instruction in Civil Engineering after the death of Professor Charles E. Greene, on October 27th they appointed Albert Emerson Greene, Ph.B., B.S., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering, for the remainder of the year, at the salary of $i600. JA4MrS B. ANGELt,. H. S. D-LAN. The President read the following letter from Mr. J. D. Hawks, President of the Detroit and Mackinac Railway

Page  294 294 NOVEMBER MEETING, 1903. Company, and, on motion of Regent Barbour, the President was requested to return to Mr. Hawks the thanks of the Board for his valuable gift. DETROIT, MICH., Oct. 26, 1903. Mr. James B. Angell, LL. D., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. DEAR SIR:-I am sending you by American Express an album of photographs illustrating log handling in Michigan between the woods and the saw mill. It is unnecessary to call attention to the fact that Michigan owes much of her wealth to her timber. These photographs will gain in interest as the years go by. Logging operations are almost a thing of the past, in the Lower Peninsula, and it will be only a few years before it will be impossible to gather together such a set of pictures. Allow me to express the hope that the album may be saved, as far as possible, for the future student of our lumbering operations. Yours truly, J. D. HAWKS. The President called the attention of the Board to the fact that the plate for the Bachelor of Arts diploma had become so worn by long use that it was desirable to have a new plate made, and that the plate for the Bachelor of Laws diploma needed retouching. On motion of Regent Farr, it was voted that a sum not exceeding $325 be appropriated for a new plate for the Bachelor of Arts diploma, and that the diploma should be in English, and that the further sum of $ioo be appropriated for retouching the plate for the Bachelor of Laws diploma. These appropriations were made by the full vote of the Board. The President named Regents Barbour and Hill, and Professors Hudson, Vaughan, Hutchins, and Reed as a special committee on the Summer Schools, as provided at the previous meeting of the Board. On motion of Regent Lawton, the sum of $4,ooo was appropriated out of the income of the Bates Fund for the Department of Diseases of Women and Children for the current year, by the full vote of the Board,-the sum to be distributed as follows: Salary of Professor Peterscen.....................$o....$2 co Salary of Demonstrator.................................. 500 oo Salary of Laboratory Assistant........................... 500 Salary of First Assistant................................. oo00 oo Salary of Second Assistant.............................. 200 oo Surgical instruments and rubber gloves.................. 75 00 Current expenses, including laboratory supplies........... 325 oo $4000 co

Page  295 NO VEMABER MEETING, i903. 295 The following communication from the Dean of the Department of Medicine and Surgery was presented, and, on motion of Regent Lawton, the appointments of Mr. Barrack, Mr. Wiggers, and Dr. Cumming were made as requested, by the full vote of the Board, with the understanding that the salary of Dr. Cumming is to be paid from the appropriation, previously made in the Budget, for the current expenses of the Pasteur Institute. No action was taken upon the request for the renting of a house. ANN ARBOR, Nov. I7, 1903. Honorable Charles D. Lacltonl, Chairman of the Medical Committee of the Bcard of Regents: DGal SIR: —I am instructed by the Medical Faculty to lay before you the following requests: I. That Mr. Iewis A. Barrack be appointed dispensing clerk in the Electrotherapeutical Iaboratory in place of Mr. George H. Curtis and at the same salary, $ioo. 2. That Mr. Carl J. Wiggers be appointed second student assistant in Physiology at a salary of $300. You will remember that at your last meeting the Board authorized Dr. Lombard, at the request of the Faculty, to divide the $9oo, which had previously gone to his instructor, among three student assistants. Dr. Lombard is not. yet ready to name the third assistant. 3. On the motion of Dr. Peterson the following resolution was passed unanimously by the MNedical Faculty: "Resolved, That the Board of Regents be requested to rent a separate house near the hospital for the use of obstetrical cases in order that these cases may receive proper care and also in order that the Palmer Ward may be. utilized to better advantage." Dr. Cooley requests that Dr. James G. Cumming be appointed laboratory assistant in the Pasteur Institute at a salary of $500 a year. \You will remember that provision for this appointment was made last spring when the Pasteur Institute was established. Dr. Cuirming has been assisting Dr. Cooley ever since the opening of the Institute; but inasmuch as Dr. Culmming had not received his degree at that time and it was not conferred upon him until your last meeting, I have refrailed from asking for his appointment. I now ask that this appointment be made and that it date from November I, I903. All of which' is respectfully submitted. V. C. VAUGHAN, Dean. A communication from the Dean of the Department of Medicine and Surgery, relating to the Palmer Ward, was presented by Regent Lawton, and, on motion of Regent Barbour, was referred to Regents Lawton, Farr, and Fletcher for consideration and report at the next meeting of the Board.

Page  296 296 2VNO VEMBER MEE TING, 903. The following communication was received from the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and degrees were conferred, as requested, upon the persons named. A NN ARBOR, MICI-I., Nov. 20th, I903. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: GEINTL'EMEN: —I have the honor to report that the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts recommend to you the following named persons for the degrees indicated: Bachelor of Arts-Ethel Winifred Bennett Chase, Ross V. Dilley. Master of Arts-Charles Edward Cullen. Doctor of Philosophy-George Henry Allen. Respectfully submitted, P. R. dePoNT. Regent Lawton presented a report relating to affairs at the University Hospital and recommended the appointment of eight additional nurses. On motion of Regent Hill, the matter was postponed for consideration at the next meeting of the Board. Professors Vaughan and Hinsdale and Dr. Wessinger addressed the Board in relation to a proposed detention hospital for infectious diseases, and, on motion of Regent Barbour, Regents Lawton, Carey, and Hill were appointed a committee to represent the Board in conference with a committee of the County Board of Supervisors upon the proposition named. Professor Reighard presented the report of the Curator of the Museum. On motion of Regent Barbour, an edition of 500 copies of the report was ordered printed, at a cost not to exceed $I6, by full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Barbour, the question of ceiling the attic of the Museum was referred to the Committee on Buildings and Grounds, with power, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Dean, Don Byron Webster was appointed office assistant in the engineering shops for the year beginning October I, I903, at a salary of $200, by the full vote of the Board. A communication from the Standing Committee of the

Page  297 VOV EMBER MEETING, 1903. 297 Faculty of the Department of Engineering in relation to the appointment of a Dean in place of Charles E. Greene, deceased, was, on motion, referred to the Committee on the Department of Engineering for consideration and report at a subsequent meeting o'f the Board. The following communication was presented and read, and, on motion of Regent Fletcher, the request contained therein was granted, subject as to details to the decision of the Committee on the Department of Engineering. ANN ARBOR, MICH., Nov. 23, I903. To the Ilonorable Board of Regents, Ann Arbor; Michigan: GENTIEMEI:N:-At a mass meeting of the students of the Engineering Department immediately after the demise of the Dean of the Department, Professor Charles E. Greene, it was decided by a unanimous vote that some fitting and lasting tribute in the way of a permanent memorial be obtained and placed in the new Engineering building. The conmmittee appointed at the meeting, after conference with the Faculty of the Engineering Department, decided that the memorial should take the form of a bronze tablet with an appropriate inscription. The committee therefore requests your permission to have such a tablet placed either in the archway leading through the building or in some suitable place on one of the inner walls. Respectfully yours, MORRIS H. STIMSON, For the Students. ALEXANDER ZtW WT, For the Faculty. On motion of Regent Carev, Mrs. Jaennie M. P. Brown was appointed, by request of the Faculty of the Hommopathic Medical College, matron of the University Hospital (Homceopathic) at a salary of $35 a month, by full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Barbour, Regent Hill was appointed a committee to consider the question of an exhibit by the University at the St. Louis Exposition and report at the next meeting of the Board. On motion of Regent Barbour, the degree of Bachelor of Laws was conferred upon John Amos Belford, Samuel Hurd Davis, and John Struthers Stewart, A.B., in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Department of Law. On motion, the Board took a recess until 2 P. MI.

Page  298 298 28 NOVEMBER MEETING, 1903. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 p. M,, Regent Butterfield being present, and Regent Carey absent. During the tem — porary absence of the President the chair was occupied by Regent Farr. Regent Barbour presented a request for alterations at the Barbour Gymnasium, involving double windows for the two French doors, storm doors at the outside basement door, finishing a vacant room in the basement, putting a partition through the toilet room, and providing two additional washbowls; and on his motion, the matter was referred to the Auditing Board, with power, by the full vote of the Board. Regent Barbour called the attention of the Board to an opportunity for improving certain pieces of unoccupied real estate held by the University in Detroit and to a proposition from Mr. James Holden in connection therewith; and moved that the thanks of the Board be extended to Mr. Holden for his offer of services in this connection; also that a communication from Mr. E. WV. Garpow relating to! a proposed purchase of a piece of land, be referred to Mr. Holden for inquiry and report at the next meeting of the Board. The motion was carried. Regent Barbour presented a request from Librarian Davis for changes in the library building and library administration covering the following items: (i) A large radiator for the woman's cloak-room; (2) drop lights in the Faculty readingroom; (3) new fastenings for windows in book-room; (4). additional fire protection at the south end of the book-room; (5) renewal of curtains in seminary room; (6) repair of radiator in coin room; (7) increase of Miss Lane's salary; (8) the use of an unexpended balance of $250, appropriated for service at the return-desk, in increasing the efficiency of the service at the delivery-desk; and (9) an additional table for readers in the reading-room. On motion the foregoing request was referred to the Auditing Board, with power except as to the proposed increase of salary, by the full vote of the Board. The following communication from the Acting Dean of the Dental Faculty was presented, and, on motion of Regent

Page  299 NIO VMEBER M~EETING, 1903. 299 Lawton, the requests therein contained were granted by the full vote of the Board. To the Hlonorable Board of Regents: DIneA S.IRS:-At a meeting of the Dental Faculty held November I6th, these resolutions were unanimously adopted: That the Regents be requested to appropriate the sum of four hundred dollars, to be expended under the direction of the Faculty, in providing three or four non-resident lecture courses for the present session. These lectures will not only assist us in caring for the work done by Dr. Taft, but will enable us to present to the students some modern methods in special lines of work in the technical departments. Owing to the fact that our library is not now available to the students in the evening, we request that fifty dollars be appropriated for securing an attendant to look after it. Respectfully submitted, C. G. DARLING, Dean of Dental Faculty. On motion, Regents Dean, Lawton, and Hill were appointed a committee to consider the feasibility of ascertaining, as early as the opening of the second semester in each year, whether the junior professors, assistant professors and instructors in the several departments of instruction are willing to remain in the service of the University, in their respective positions during the following academic year. On motion of Regent Butterfield, the Committee on Buildings and Grounds was authorized to proceed with the construction of a refrigerator room at the University Hospital. provided the work can be done in a satisfactory manner at a cost not exceeding $2,000, by the full vote of the Board. On motion, the Board adjourned to Tuesday, December 22, at TO A. M. JAMES H. WADE. Secretar.

Page  300

Page  301 DECEMBER MEETING. UNIVERSITY OF MIICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, December 22, I903. The Board assembled in the Regents' room at 10 o'clock A. M. Present-Regents But'terfield, Farr, Hill, Lawton, Dean, Barbour, and Fletcher. Absent-Regent Carey. The Secretary read the minutes of the last meeting, which were, on motion of Regent Dean, approved and ordered printed. Communications which had reached the President were placed in the hands of the standing committees of the Board for consideration. The following resolution, introduced by Regent Farr. was adopted by the full Board. Resolved, That the Auditor General be and is hereby requested to transfer the undrawn balance of $53,905.00 of the Aid fund for I902 to the "Accumulation of Savings account;" apd that $1o,ooo of said sum so transferred be set aside for the completion of the new Medical building, and the remaining sum be set aside for completion of the new Engineering building. On motion of Regent Lawton, it was voted that the sum of $500 be added to the book fund of the Department of Medicine and Surgery for the purpose of enabling said department to continue their files of medical journals. Regent Farr introduced the following resolution, which was adopted by the full vote of the Board: Resolved, That the President and Secretary be and are hereby authorized to execute a deed of lot 3, block I, Ralph place in the City of Omaha, Nebraska, to Leopold Hahn, for the consideration of $1,700, warranting the title thereof.

Page  302 302 DECEMBER MEETING, 1903. On motion of Regent Hill, Mr. Stephen I. Miller and Edward H. Ryder were appointed assistants in Political Economy without pay. Regent Hill, Chairman of the Committee on the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, reported that he had visited St. Louis and found that the space assigned to this University was totally inadequate for the purpose of making an exhibit. Regent Dean moved that Regent Barbour be added to the committee, and unless space can be secured that shall be satisfactory to the committee, either in the main building or in the Michigan building, that no exhibit be made; otherwise the committee be authorized to expend a sum not exceeding $2,500, in making said exhibit. It was so ordered by the full Board. On motion of Regent Dean, the degree of Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering was conferred upon George Grant, Jr., in accordance with the recommendation of the Engineering faculty. On motion of Regent Dean, Mr. W. C. Willard was appointed as instrument maker at a salary of $3 per day by the full vote of the Board. Regent Lawton presented and read the resignation of Mr. A. M. Clover, instructor in General Chemistry, which was accepted by the Board to take effect at the close of the first semester. On motion of Regent Lawton, Wm. Jay Hale, Ph. D., was appointed Instructor in General Chemistry for the second semester of the present academic year, in place of Mr. A. M. Clover, resigned, salary $9oo per year, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Re'ent Barbour, the Building Committee were requested to confer with Drs. Vaughan and Hinsdale. and report on the feasibility of putting in a plant for the manufacture of ice for use in the hospitals, and also the cost of procuring suitable ice for that purpose from other sources. Regent, Lawton moved that all restrictions as to the time of closing the Junior Hop be removed. Regent Butterfield, as a substitute, moved that the time for closing be fixed at 3 o'clock A. MI., and that the lights be turned off at 3:30. The substitute was carried as follows:

Page  303 DECEMBER MiEETING, I903. 303 Ayes-Regents Farr, Hill, Lawton, Butterfield, Dean, dnd Fletcher. Nays-Regent Barbour. Regent Barbour moved that the President and Secretary be authorized to sell by contract or by deed the six lots owned by the University on Cavalry Avenue in the City of Detroit for a sum not less than $2,000. It was so ordered by the full vote of the Board. Regent Barbour, chairman of the Special Committee on Summer School, submitted the following report, which was adopted by the Board: To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN:-Your committee appointed to consider the advisability of uniting the Summer Sessions held in the Departments of Literature, Science, and the Arts, of Engineering, of Law, and of Medicine and Surgery, under the general direction and control of the Board of Regents, beg to report as follows: At a meeting of the committee, at which were present the President, Deans Hudson, Vaughan, Hutchins, and Mr. Reed, the question was considered and the committee were unanimously of the opinion that, providing the details could be satisfactorily arranged, the placing of the various schools now held or to be held in the University of Michigan, during the summer, under the direction and control of the Board of Regents would be of material advantage both to the schools and to the University. The working out of the details of a practical scheme of administration, hours, salaries, etc., has been entrusted to a committee consisting of Messrs. Reed, Goddard, Huber, and Goulding. This committee has begun work upon the question, and if it be the pleasure of the Board, will have a detailed scheme, duly ratified by the various faculties, ready to submit to the Board at the January meeting. LEVI L. BARBOUR, For the Committee. The Board then took a recess until 2 o'clock P. AM. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock P. M. On motion of Regent Farr, Regents Fletcher, Lawton and Dean were appointed a special committee to make a recast of the Standing Committees of the Board and report the same to the next meeting of the Board for approval.

Page  304 304 DECEMBER MEE TIn G, 1 903. Regent Barbour moved that Professor J. R. Allen be asked to furnish the Board an estimate of the cost of providing water, twice a week, for the swimming tank in the Barbour Gymnasium, with the cost of heating the same. And also to consider whether the roof of said building would furnish the necessary water. It was so voted. Professor Newcombe reported that Mr. Lewis Foote, a former student of the University, had sent to the Botanical Laboratory six boxes of pressed plants numbering two thousand species. On motion of Regent Hill the gift was accepted, and the President was requested to transmit the thanks of the Board to Mr. Foote for this evidence of his interest in the University. On motion of Regent Lawton, eight additional nurses were allowed the University Hospital by 'the full vote of the Board. Regent Lawton presented the request of Mrs. J. Taft that the salary of Dr. Taft (deceased) be continued for the remainder of the college year. On motion the matter was laid on the table until the next meeting of the Board. On motion of Regent Barbour, Dr. W. P. Lombard was requested to present at the next meeting of the Board, a plan for the repairs on the old M'edical building for consideration. On motion of Regent Barbour, Superintendent Reeve was requested to inspect the cold storage plant at Harper Hospital, and, if possible, get other bids for the erection of such a plant in University Hospital. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the contract for covering pipes in the new Engineering building, as per specifications, was awarded to Philip Carey Manufacturing Company, of Detroit, for the sum of $2,400, by the full vote of the Board. On motion the Board adjourned to Tuesday, January T2th, at IO A. M. JAMIES H. WADE. Secretary.

Page  305 JANUARY MEETING. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, January 14, I904. The Board assembled in the Regents' room at Io o'clock A. M. Present-Regents Hill, Lawton, Dean, Barbour, Fletcher, Carey, Knappen, and White. Absent-None. The Secretary read the minutes of the last meeting, which were, on motion, approved and ordered printed. Communications which had reached the President were placed in the hands of the standing committees of the Board for consideration. Regent Dean, from the committee appointed at the last meeting to make a recast of the standing committees of the Board, submitted the following report, which was adopted by the full vote of the Board: To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: Your committee appointed to recommend Standing Committees of the Board, beg to present the following: Executive Committee. The President, Regents Dean and Barbour. Finance Committee. Regents Barbour and Hill. Committee on Literary Department and Athletics. Regents Hill and Barbour. Committee on Engineering Department. Regents Dean and Fletcher.

Page  306 306 JANUARY IMEETING, 1904. Committee on Medical, Dental, and Pharmaceutical Departments. Regents Lawton and Knappen. Committee on' Law Departnment. Regents Knappen and-Carey. Committee on Homweopathic Department. Regents Carey and White. Committee on Library and Museum. Regents White and Dean. Committee on Buildings: and Grounds. Regents Fletcher and Lawton. F. W. FLETCHER, C. D. LAWTON, H. S. DEAN, Committee. Regent Lawton presented and read the following communication from the Dental Faculty, and the recommendations therein contained were approved by the full Board: ANN ARBOR, January 14, I904. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: GENTLMEN:-The Faculty of the College of Dental Surgery has arranged with Dr. W. T. Reeves, of Chicago, and Dr. E. B. Spalding, of Detroit, eminent specialists in their lines, to give a course in porcelain filling, crown and bridge work, during the first and second weeks in February. It is the desire of the Faculty to open this course to a limited number of practitioners. As there are not now any special University fees covering such cases, the Dental Faculty recommends that a fee of twenty-five dollars be authorized, to be collected from practitioners attending the course, the same to be used in defraying the expense involved. It is confidently expected that these fees will be sufficient to cover all expenses, and at the same time this valuable instruction will be secured to the two upper classes without expense to the University. Respectfully, N. S. Hors, Secretary of the Dental Faculty.

Page  307 JANUARY MEETING, 1904. 307 On motion of Regent Barbour, the consideration of questions relating to the Summer School was made the special order for 2 o'clock P. M. Regent Knappen was requested to define the powers of the Board under the Stranahan'gift for scholarships, and report at the next meeting of the Board. Regent Barbour presented and read a protest of citizens of Detroit against the University building an apartment house in that city, and on his motion the matter was referred to a special committee, consisting of Regents Hill, Knappen, and Carey for consideration, and to report their conclusions at the next meeting of the Board. Regent Lawton, from the special committee appointed by the Board, to meet a like committee of the Board of Supervisors of Washtenaw County, for the purpose of considering the advisability of joint action by the county and the University in the erection and maintenance of a detention hospital for the treatment of the more serious contagious diseases, submitted the following report, which was adopted by the Board, and the Secretary was directed to transmit a copy of the same to the Board of Supervisors: Your committee appointed to confer with a committee of the Board of Supervisors of Washtenaw County, on the matter of the establishment of a hospital for the treatment of the more serious contagious diseases, such as smallpox, diphtheria and scarlet fever, report as follows: First: They find that the County Clerk has been ordered by the Board of Supervisors to submit to the voters of the county at the spring election the question of issuing $30,000 of bonds, and, with the proceeds, building a hospital for the treatment of these contagious diseases. It has been deemed desirable by the Supervisors to learn upon what basis the University will undertake the care and management of such hospital, and Messrs. Miner and Damon, of the Board of Supervisors, met with your committee at the office of the County Clerk for that purpose. Second: In order to learn what might fairly be asked of the University in such connection, a joint inspection was made of the accounts showing expenditures by the county in connection with contagious diseases, from which it was learned that the annual expense therefor is at the rate of from $I6,00o to $I8,ooo.

Page  308 308 JANUARY MEETING, 1904. It further appeared from a statement prepared by the County Clerk, that as far as the bills were audited, the proportionate expenses were as follows: Physicians................................. 6% N urses..................................... I7% Provisions........................ % Property destroyed......................... % Drugs and disinfecting.................... 4% Total..................................100% Third: Your committee recommend that the University be authorized to enter into a contract to furnish medical attendance, light, heat and water for such hospital without cost to the county. All other expenses connected therewith to be borne by the county. The University further to supply nurses and medicines at cost, and board at ordinary hospital rates. This would reduce the expense to the county on account of contagious diseases at least one-half, besides furnishing the most enlightened, effective and humane treatment to the patients. As to the University, it would furnish students an opportunity to study these deadly diseases with safety to themselves (as the patients are viewed through glass partitions), and with great ultimate benefit in learning to detect and treat these diseases. Under such an arrangement, the county should purchase a site satisfactory to the Uhiversity authorities, and erect the hospital thereon, under plans to be jointly agreed upon, and convey the property to the University, which on its part, should assume entire control, under a proper contract, binding it in perpetuity. It will be observed that it will cost the county only $I,200 per year, being the interest on $30,000 at 4 per cent. per annum, to furnish the University with a hospital building, while the University will expend about that sum in supplying light, heat and water, besides the leading item of medical attendance. Further, there will be a reduction to the county in the other items of exepnse, such as nursing, medicines, etc., with an improvement in personnel of attendance and quality of material. Dr. Vaughan and Dr. Hinsdale, and Regent Dean were present during a portion of the conference, and participated in it, and concur with the committee. Respectfully submitted, HENRY W. CAREY, CHARLES D. LAWTON, ARTHUR HILL.

Page  309 JANUARY MEETING, 1904. 309 On motion of Regent Lawton, Mr. Boyden Nims, Ph.G., was appointed assistant in Physiological Chemistry, in place of Geo. F. Richmond, resigned, salary at the rate of $600 per annum, by the full vote of the Board. On the recommendation of Professor H. C. Adams, and on motion of Regent Hill, Professor Frank H. Dixon, of Dartmouth College, was appoinnted to lecture on political economy in place of Professor Adams, from March I6th to April I4th, without pay from the University. On motion of Regent Hill, an appropriation of $375 was voted, for the purchase of a surveyor's transit, for use at the Observatory. On motion of Regent Carey, the degree of Doctor of Medicine was conferred upon Cecil Jordan, and William Don Brooks, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Homceppathic Medical College. Regent Fletcher presented the resignation of Roscoe B. Jackson, as instructor in Mechanical Engineering, to take effect February ist. The resignation was accepted by the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Secretary was directed to pay Roscoe B. Jackson the sum of $II7.50 for services as Superintendent of the New Engineering Building during the months of October, November, and December. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the salary of Rembert Jones (Electrician), was increased from $750 to $850, beginning January ist, I904, by the full vote of the Board. The question of paying the salary of the employees on the Campus twice a month, was referred to the Finance Committee for consideration. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Secretary was instructed to have the indemnity bond of Chas. A. Sauer, contractor of the Psychopathic ward, renewed for three months at the expense of the University. On motion of Regent Lawton, the Building Committee were authorized to expend a sum not exceeding $300, in fitting up a room at University Hospital for X-ray apparatus. On motion of Regent Dean, Mr. Vernon L. Page was

Page  310 310 JANUARY MEETING, 1904. appointed Instructor in Descriptive Geometry and Drawing for the second semester, salary at the rate of $900 per year, by the full vote of the Board. The Board took a recess until 2 o'clock p. M. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock P. M. On motion of Regent Hill, it was voted that the effort to unify the Summer Schools be abandoned for the coming year, unless the President can bring them together on some plan that will not materially increase the expense to the University. The Homoeopathic Faculty gave notice that the following persons had completed the course in the Training School for Nurses, and were recommended for certificates of graduation: Geneva Allen, Emma Hassenzahl, Ida J. Lockhart, Lizzie Goodwin, Mattie Wilson, Bessie Edwards. Ida Teresa Bogner, On motion of Regent Carey, the President and Secretary were authorized to issue the proper certificates of gradu, ation, and to attach the seal of the University thereto. Regent Hill presented the University with a deed of eighty acres of land, located about three miles west of Ann Arbor, this land to be used for forestry purposes, and to be known as the Saginaw Forestry Farm. On motion of Regent Dean, and by a unanimous vote, the Board accepted the gift, and expressed to Regent Hill their gratitude for his great generosity to this University. On motion of Regent Hill, Regents Carey and White were appointed a special committee to devise a plan of accounting, by which the accounts of the University may be brought into perfect harmony with the books of the Auditor General. On motion of. Regent Barbour, the Chairman of the Finance Committee was authorized to make minor repairs on the University property in the City of Omaha, Nebraska.

Page  311 JANUARY MEETING, 1904. 311 - Regent Fletcher moved that the Secretary be authorized to make a contract with the McCray Refrigerator Company, of Detroit, to build a special cooler at University Hospital, according to the specifications on file in the Secretary's office, for the sum of $I,820, and to move the old cooler to the Psychopathic ward and rebuild the same, for the sum of $I85. This motion was carried by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Secretary was authorized to pay Pond & Pond, architects, of Chicago, $500, for making plans for the enlargement of the Physical Laboratory, provided they furnish the University three sets of blue-prints, and the specifications, and release the University from all further claims on account of said work. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the p,urchase of an elevator for the Palmer ward, was laid on the table for further bids. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the proposition of Philip Christa & Sons, of Detroit, to furnish and set all the marble work in the New Engineering Building (except such marble as the University has on hand that can be used), according to the plans and specifications, for the sum of $1,247, was accepted by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Barbour, Professor Pettee was requested to examine the collection of minerals owned by Anne Gillet Houghton, of Detroit, and report their value to the Board. Regent Fletcher moved that the Building Committee get bids on the necessary equipment for the two upper stories of the New Engineering Building, and report the same at the next meeting of the Board. On motion of Regent Dean, Professor M. E. Cooley was made Dean of the Engineering Department, with a salary of $3,500, and Professor J. B. Davis was made Associate Dean, with a salary of $2,750, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the bill of the Ridgway Dynamo and Engine Company of $530.4I for repairs on engine in lighting plant, was referred to Professor Cooley for consideration.

Page  312 312 JANUARY MEETING, 1904. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the estimate of the Buffalo Forge Company of $I,025, for heating the Psychopathic ward, was laid on the table until the next meeting of the Board. On motion the Board adjourned to Friday, February 12th, at o0 o'clock A. M. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  313 FEBRUARY MEETING. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, February T2, I904. The Board assembled in the Regents' room at Io o'clock A. M. Full Board present except Regent Carey. The Secretary read the minutes off the previous meeting, which were, on motion of Regent Lawton, approved and ordered printed. Communications which had reached the President, were placed in the hands of the standing committees of the Board for consideration. Professor J. O. Reed submitted the following report on the Summer Session, and on motion o'f Regent Hill, the report and recommendations were accepted and adopted by the full vote of the Board: ANN ARBOR, Mich., February II, 1904. To the President and Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: G1ENTLEMEN:-The committee charged with the arrangement of details for the amalgamation of the various Summer Sessions now conducted in the University of Michigan, in order to effect the more efficient operation of them under the direction and control of the Board of Regents, respectfully submit the following recommendations: I. In the opinion of the committee, it is highly desirable that the Summer Schools now existing in the Departments of Literature, Science, and the Arts, of Law, of Medicine and Surgery, and of Engineering should be under the direction and control of the Board! of Regents, and it is hereby recommended that they be so operated and controlled under the title of the Summer Session of the University of Michigan. 2: That the management of the summer work in the Departments of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and of Engineering remain as at present, in charge of a Chairman and Secretary, appointed by the Board of Regents, and that the work in the Depart

Page  314 314 FEBRUARY MEETING, 1904. ments of Law, and of Medicine and Surgery be placed in charge of the Dean and Secretary of the respective departments. 3. That the compensation of the Chairman, and of each of the three Secretaries, above mentioned, be fixed at $oo00.00 each for each Summer Session. 4. In the opinion of the committee, it is especially desirable that instructors be given the option between a time allowance during the regular session of the University and financial compensation for services in the Summer Session; and it is recommended that any instructor whose yearly salary is $2,500.00, or less, who shall serve for four Summer Sessions, teaching fifteen hours per week, without compensation, be allowed a year's leave of absence on full salary, and that leave of absence for one semester, under the above conditions, be granted for two summers' work. In. all cases the leave of absence is to be arranged with the President, so as to interfere as little as possible with the regular work of the University. 5. That the compensation for teaching in the Summer Session be based on the number of hours taught; that two hours of laboratory work be reckoned as equivalent to one hour of recitation or lecture work; that one course reciting five times a week during the Summer Session in the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts be counted as 30 hours, and pro rata in other departments. 6. That the compensation for men, of various professional rank for instruction in the Summer Session be based on the following schedule: (a) Instructors whose yearly salary is $2,500.00, or more, to receive $5.00 per hour, and no such instructor to receive pay for more than 60 hours' work in any one session. (b) Instructors whose yearly salary is $2,000.00 to receive $4.00 per hour, and no such instructor to receive pay for more than 60 hours in any one session. (c) Instructors whose yearly salary is $I,6oo.oo to receive $3.00 per hour, and no such instructor to receive pay for more than 90 hours in any one session. (d) Instructors whose yearly salary is $I,200.00, or less, to receive $2.25 per hour, and no such instructor to receive pay for more than 90 hours in any one session. 7. That a sum not less than that expended in 1903 by the separate schools for incidental expenses and advertising be set aside for such purposes for the current year, to be expended under the direction of a committee consisting of one executive officer from each department. 8. That each student be required to register in the department in which the major part of his work is done, and if he desire to

Page  315 FEBRUARY JMEETING, 1904. 315 take work in another department where the tuition fee is higher, that he be required to pay an additional fee of $5.00 for each course elected in such department. 9. That each instructor be required to furnish to the Secretary of the department, not later than the fifth day of the Summer Session, an official list of all students attending each class taught by him, and in case a course is not elected by at least five students, the instructor offering such course may at his option either withdraw the course, or continue to give it, and receive as compensation therefor 75 per cent. of the fees paid by the students electing such course. Io. That the tuition in; the Summer Session be as follows, it being understood that in all cases where. laboratory or demonstration fees are required, such fees are to be paid in addition to the regular tuition fee: In the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts, $I5.00. In the Department of Law, $25.00 for full work, or $Io.oo for a single course. In the Department of Medicine and Surgery, $25.00 for clinical courses, and $I5.00 for all other courses, this recommendation to be subject to approval of the Medical Faculty. II. (a) That a regular budget be made for the Summer Session, and that there be constituted a standing committee of the Board of Regents on the Summer Session. (b) That the budget for the present year be fixed as follows: Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts (including the work in Engineering)...................... $8,830 oo0 Department of Law............................,8oo 00 Department of Medicine and Surgery................. 1,900 00 Contingent Fund..................................... 340 00 Total............................................. $12,870 00 (c) It is further recommended that for the present year the pay roll for instruction in the Departnent of Law be $I,375.00, and that this amount be apportioned among the 'instructors by the Dean and the Secretary of that department. Respectfully submitted, JOHN 0. REED, EDWIN C. GODDARD, G. CARL HUBER, H. J. GOULDING, Committee.

Page  316 316 FEBRUARY MEETING, 1904. The President submitted for approval the following list of persons to give instruction in the Summer Session, and on motion of Regent Barbour, the list was approved by the Board, and the President was authorized to make such changes in the list as may be found necessary. ISAAC N. DEMMON, LL.D., English Literature. WOOSTER W. BEMAN, A.M., Mathematics. ROBERT M. W]NLEY, Sc.D., LL.D., Philosophy. WILLIAM H. PAYNE, LL.D., D.LITT., Pedagogy. ALLEN S. WHITNEY, A.B., Pedagogy. FRED M. TAYLOR, Ph.D., Political Economy. JOHN 0. REED, Ph.D., Physics. JOSEPH H. DRAKE, Ph.D., LL.B., Latin. MORITZ LEVI, A.B., Spanish and Italian. MosEs GOMBERG, Sc.D., Chemistry. JOSEPH L. MARKLEY, Ph.D., Mathematics. GEORGE REBEC, Ph.D., Philosophy. JOHN R. EFPINGEIR, Ph.D., French. TOBIAS DIEKHOEF, Ph.D., German. JAMES W. GLOVER, Ph.D., Mathematics. CLAUDE H. VAN TYNE, Ph.D., History. GEORGE O. HIGLEY, M.S., Chemistry. CLARENCE L. MEADER, Ph.D., Latin. LOUIS A. STRAUSS, Ph.D., English Literature. HE;RBERT J. GOULDING, B.S., Drawing. WARREN W. FLORER, Ph.D., German. JAMES B. POLLOCK, Sc.D., Botany. GEORGE A. HULETT, Ph.D;, Chemistry. JONATHAN A. O. HILDNtR, Ph.D., German. FREDERICK L. DUNLAP, Sc.D., Chemistry. WILLIAM MARSHALL, M.S., Mathematics. HARRISON M. RANDALL, Ph.D., Physics. JOSEPH M. THOMAS, A.M., Rhetoric. CLARENCE B. MORRILL, A.M., Rhetoric. DUANE R. STUART, Ph.D., Greek. GEORGE P. BURNS, Ph.D., Botany. WILLIAM G. SMEATON, A.B., Chemistry. CHARLES C. ADAMS, M.S., Zoology. ARTHUR W. SMITH,.Ph.D., Physics. WILLIAM J. HALL, Ph.D., Chemistry. JOSEPH A. BURSLEY, B.S., Mechanical Engineering. RICHARD D. T. HOLLISTER, A.B., Elocution. LIONEL H. DUSCHAK, Chemistry. CLAYTON T. TvEZL, LL.B., Physical Training.

Page  317 FE.BR UARY MEETING, 1904. 311 The Secretary called the attention of the Board to the matter of a mortgage, which had been taken by the Superintendent of University Hospital some years ago, as security for the expenses of a patient while under treatment. The land had been sold for taxes, and there only remained ten days for redemption under the tax sale. On motion, the matter was referred to Regents White and Barbour, with power. The Secretary read a letter from Pond & Pond, architects, of Chicago, in relation to their bill of $500, for making plans for the enlargement of the Physical Laboratory. On motion of Regent Barbour, the matter was laid on the table for another month. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Secretary was directed to place curtains on the north and east windows of the second floor of the Physical Laboratory. Regent Fletcher presented and read the following communication from Charles Hoertz, contractor, who was asked to examine the old Medical Building as to its safety, and report his conclusions: "GENTLIMEN:-I carefully examined the old Medical building on January I2th, and again on February IIth, and during that time there did not appear to be any change in its condition. In my judgment, the building is as safe for the next six months as it has been for the past twelve months, and I do not think there is any danger in occupying the building." Regent Fletcher read communications from M. J. Murphy, J. S. Gray, and W. P. Halliday, of Detroit, relating to the erection of the proposed apartment house in Detroit. The communications were placed on file with the Secretary. Regent Fletcher presented the proposition of Charles A. Sauer, to finish the basement of the Psychopathic ward for kitchen purposes, and on his motion, the contract was awarded to Mr. Sauer for the sum of $,,543.28, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the bill of Philip Carey Manufacturing Company of $I,494.75, for covering Steam pipes at Psychopathic ward, was ordered paid. J. E. Bolles & Co., of Detroit, presented their bill of $430,

Page  318 318 3FEBRUARY MEETING, 1904. for putting fire escapes on the Nurses' House at University Hospital. On motion of Regent Fletcher, it was voted to pay them $275, that being the contract price for the work. On motion of Regent Fletcher, it was voted to pay the Buffalo Forge Company $I,025 for covering steam pipes in the Palmer ward and Boiler House at University Hospital. On motion of Regent Dean, Mr. Joseph A. Bursley was appointed Instructor in Mechanical Engineering, in place of Roscoe B. Jackson, resigned. Salary at the rate of $900, and service to begin February ist. Regent Dean moved that the salary of Professor J. B. Davis, as Associate Dean for the first semester of the current year, be fixed at $500, and that the annual salary of $2,750, as provided at the last meeting of the Board, begin with the second semester. It was so ordered on a call vote. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Department of Electrical Engineering were allowed to expend at once, under the direction of the Auditing Board, the sum of $1,500, as a part of the sum needed for the equipment of the New Laboratory. Carried on call vote. On motion of Regent Dean, Mr. George G. Stroebe, Ph.B., was appointed Assistant in Descriptive Geometry for the second semester, at a salary of $250 for the semester, by the full vote of the Board. Regent Barbour moved that the President and Secretary be authorized to sell (under the recommendation of the Finance Committee) the real property in the City of Omaha, Nebraska, belonging to the University, provided an amount can be obtained equal to, or more, than the value estimated by Mr. Farr and Mr. Graham. The motion was carried on a call vote. Regent Barbour moved that the University print an edition of 2,000 copies of an address delivered by Professor I. C. Russell, on "Research in State Universities," at a cost not exceeding $50, and that the distribution thereof be referred to the President and Mr. Shirley Smith. This motion was carried by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Hill, an allowance of $50 was made to put the model of the Calumet and Hecla Mill in better

Page  319 FEBRUARY MEETING, 1904. 319 order for exhibition at the Louisiana Purchase Exhibit. The work to be done by the State Commission. On motion of Regent Barbour, Professors Adams, Taylor, and Jones were requested to make a report to the Board upon the courses in Commercial Education; this report to be comprehensive in character, and to include a brief sketch of the work done up to the present time, and an enumeration of the special courses of lectures offered, a statement of the relation which the courses in Higher Commercial Education sustain to the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and suggestions for the further development and more perfect organization of the work, having in mind practical as well as educational aims. Regent Barbour moved that Regents White and Lawton, and Professor Pettee be authorized to examine the Houghton Collection of Minerals in Detroit, and to purchase the same, if in their judgment it seems best to do so. The motion was carried by the full vote of the Board. Regent Fletcher presented the request of certain employees on the Campus for semi-monthly' payment of salaries. No action was taken on this request. On motion the Board took a recess until 2 o'clock p. M. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock p. M., Regent Carey being present. Judge C. B. Grant appeared before the Board as a representative of the Alumni Association, with reference to a proposed Memorial Hall, in memory of students who died in the Civil war, and in the Spanish war. The Board expressed their interest in the matter, and authorized a circular relating thereto to be printed and distributed as a special edition of the News Letter. On motion of Regent Fletcher, it was voted that the Secretary purchase one dozen additional fire extinguishers, for use in the Engineering and other buildings. Regent Fletcher moved that 57 pieces of marble be purchased from the Detroit Marble Works, as per list furnished, for use in the New Engineering Building, at a cost of $35.

Page  320 320 FEBRUARY MEETTIG, 1904. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Building Committee were authorized to procure the furniture for the New Engineering Building. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Building Committee were requested to procure estimates as to the cost of additional fire escapes for University Hall. Regent Fletcher moved that the Building Committee be authorized to construct fire escapes from the second story of the sun rooms at University Hospital. The motion was carried on a call vote. On motion of Regent Hill, Miss Ada L. Wickel, and Mr. Clyde F. Karshner were appointed Assistants in Zoology for the second semester, in place of Jean Dawson, and Ellis Michael, resigned. Salary for the semester, $75 each. Regent Hill presented and read the following communication from the "Michigan State Federation of Women's Clubs," and transmitting $3,000 as a part of the fund proposed to be raised by the Federation for the establishment of the "Lucinda Hinsdale Stone Supplementary Loan Scholarship Fund." On motion of Regent Hill, the gift was accepted, upon the conditions named in the letter of transmittal, and the President was requested to transmit to the Federation the thanks of the Board for their interest in the work of this L; niversity. Owosso, Mich., January 14, I904. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: GENTLEMEN:-The Michigan State Federation of Women's Clubs desires to give at this time to the University of Michigan the sum of three thousand dollars, which is only a part of the sum that this Federation expects to give, to be used for the benefit of women students in the University. As President of the State Federation for the present year, it becomes my pleasant duty to inform you relative to the history of this "New Year's Gift," for as a Federation of Clubs is not a financial organization, a gift, even of this amount, has a history. The prime object for which our organization exists, and upon which its permanency depends, is "for the general advancement of women." In view of this, and as citizens of Michigan, our members are proud to recall the fact that "for the advancement of women" our State University was the first institution of its kind

Page  321 FEBIUUARY MEETING, 1904. 321 to throw wide open its doors to women students. And thrice proud is the membership of Michigan State Federation of the contribution made to the intelligence and culture of our State and Nation through the noble influence of the women graduated from its halls. In the records of the acts of the Governing Board of the University, it is stated that the first woman upon whom the honorary degree of Doctor of Philosophy was conferred never was graduated either from a college or a university; but Lucinda Hinsdale Stone, for she it was, was a woman who, when university doors were closed against her sex, because endowed by nature with fine mind and an indomitable purpose, attained so high an order of scholarship that the University Board thought it wise and fitting to confer upon her a degree. Mrs. Stone's life work was to raise higher the standard of educated womanhood, and in this memorial gift to our University, the Michigan State Federation desires through that institution to honor the memory of the revered founder of the Michigan State Federation, and also to perpetuate her life work for the higher education of women through the benefits that may accrue to women students in the University of Michigan through this gift. We ask, therefore, that you will accept the gift, first pledged to the University at the eighth annual meeting of the State Federation, held in Muskegon, October, I902. At this meeting Mrs. Goodenow, President of the Twentieth Century Club, of Kalamazoo, Mrs. Stone's own club, was introduced and outlined the plan of that club for establishing a memorial to Lucinda Hinsdale Stone, and presented, in behalf of that club, a nucleus of the sum of one hundred dollars ($Ioo.oo) for a Michigan University Scholarship, trusting that the State Federation would carry on the work in some way. Miss Clara A. Avery, of Detroit, then stated the information received from the Secretary of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, and moved: "That this generous offer of a nucleus for a memorial to Mrs. Lucinda Hinsdale Stone, of Kalamazoo, be accepted by the Federation from the Twentieth Century Club of Kalamazoo, and that the individual clubs and club members be requested to try to complete by subscription the sum of five thousand dollars ($5,000.00) for this Scholarship." Miss Avery's motion was carried, and at the ninth annual meeting of the State Federation, held in the City of Grand Rapids, October, 1903, the following resolution was adopted by the convention: "Resolved, That when three thousand dollars shall be in the hands of the Treasurer of the fund, she shall turn it over to the

Page  322 322 2FEBRUARY 2MEET'ING, 1904. Treasurer of the Michigan State Federation of Women's Clubs, and the Board of the Michigan State Federation shall forward it at once to the Regents of the University for investment, the balance to be paid when the full amount shall be raised." Today, enclosing to you a draft for the sum of three thousand dollars, we ask that this sum shall be known by the name, and administered by you as provided in the following resolution: "Resolved, That the fund raised by the Michigan State Federation of Women's Clubs, for the Stone Memorial Scholarship, shall be called The Lucinda Hinsdale Stone Supplementary Loan Scholarship Fund. That it shall be given to the University of Michigan for the benefit of women who are students in the University; and that the interest on the amount shall be administered by the President of said University, the Dean of the Women's Department, and a third person of their.appointment (who shall be a woman)." Very sincerely, JOSEPHINE M. GOULD. Regent Lawton presented communications from Dr. Vaughan and Dr. Lombard, relating to the condition of the old Medical Building. No action was taken on them by the Board. On motion of Regent Dean, Regent Carey was requested to consider the feasibility of providing a sprinkler system for fire purposes in University Hall, and report at a later meeting. Regent Fletcher moved that the Secretary contract with George H. Barnes, of Toledo, for the incandescent fixtures needed in the New Engineering Building, as per specifications on file with the Secretary, at a cost of $5I5.80. Also with the Fort Wayne Electric Works for 102 arc lights, at a cost of $I,496. It was so ordered on a call vote. The Ridgway Dynamo and Engine Company presented a bill of $530.4I for repairs and expressage on broken engine. The bill was referred to Professors Cooley and Allen for consideration, and they reported that the company agreed to do the work for actual cost, and in their opinion $349.9I would be a fair settlement. Regent Fletcher moved that $349.91 be paid for the work. It was so voted on call. Regent Knappen made a verbal report on the Seth Harrison Fund, to the effect that both parties are bound by the terms of the contract. On motion of Regent Hill, Mr. W. D. Henderson, who is now doing half work as Assistant in Physics, was em

Page  323 FEBRUARY MEETING, 1904. 323 ployed as a full assistant, at $60 per month for the remainder of the year, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Hill, the sum of $557 was appropriated for the purpose of beginning work on the "Saginaw Forestry Farm," according to plans submitted by the Professor of Forestry. On motion of Regent Fletcher, it was voted to purchase ii radiators and-6 wall coils for University Hospital. Regent Hill moved that the Scharf Company, of Ypsilanti, be paid $350, on account of smoke consumers placed on boilers at University Hospital, and that Professor J. R. Allen be requested to make a scientific test, to determine the efficiency of the device in the consumption of smoke, and also in the saving of fuel, if any. The motion was carried by the full vote of the Board. Regent Knappen moved that the Building and Finance Committees be requested to make a report on the cost of the proposed Apartment House, the expected income, and the amount by which the General Fund shall be reimbursed for the lot required for the site. And that the Finance Committee be asked to report on the amounts, nature, and availability of the several trust funds, and the amount necessary to be reserved to secure the income from the funds while the house is in the process of erection. Carried by the full vote of the Board. On motion the Board adjourned to Friday, March the IIth, at Io o'clock A. M. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

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Page  325 MARCH MEETING. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, Ann Arbor, March I I, I904. The Board assembled in the Regents' room at o1 o'clock A. M. Full Board present except Regent Carey. The Secretary read the minutes of the last meeting, which were, on motion, approved and ordered printed. Communications which had reached the President were placed in the hands of the standing committees of the Board for consideration. Regent Fletcher, Chairman of the Building Committee, to whom was referred the matter of procuring the furniture for the new Engineering Building, reported that they had awarded the contract to the Whitney Furniture Manufacturing Company of Detroit for the sum of $7,500. The action of the committee was approved by the unanimous vote of the Board. The President presented and read the following communication from Mr. Hamilton Carhartt of Detroit, and on motion the gift was accepted and the President was requested to transmit to Mr. Carhartt the thanks of the Board: DETROIT, MICH., March 9, I904. Thomas C. Trueblood, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. DEAR SIR: Agreeably to your very kind suggestion, it gives me great pleasure to say that I am quite willing to furnish the fund3 to establish what shall be known as the "Hamilton Carhartt Testimonial, for the honor debaters who represent the University of Michigan in the contest of the Central Debating League," the amount to be one hundred and fifty dollars per annum, to be furnished by the loth of March of each year.

Page  326 326 MARCH MEETING, 1904. Kindly convey to the President and the Regents my gratification at being allowed to show, in this small way, my interest in your splendid institution. I have the honor to be, Yours most respectfully, HAMILTON CARHARTT. The President stated that, through the courtesy of the Lufkin Rule Company of Saginaw, the Forestry Department of the University had received a full set of scale rules both for leg and board measure, valued at $I5. On motion the gift was accepted and the President was requested to transmit to the Lufkin Rule Company the thanks of the Board. The Executive Committee of the Board submitted the following report of their action during the interim of the Board, which was, on motion, approved: ANN ARBOR, February 25, I904. To the Board of Regents: The Executive Committee beg leave respectfully to report: Although it was supposed sufficient provision for the instruction of the Engineering students in German had been made, it proved when the semester opened that it was necessary to make one more section of students and provide teaching. Accordingly, on February 24, we appointed Mr. W. W. Dubee, who had given. full time to teaching during the first semester and to our satisfaction, to teach one section for this semester and to receive as compensation one hundred dollars. JAMES B. ANGELL, LEvI L. BARBOUR, HENRY S. DEAN. On motion of Regent Hill, an appropriation not exceeding $Too was made for the purpose of securing special lecturers on the Science and Art of Teaching, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Hill, Miss Lura Warner was appointed Assistant in Botany in place of Wesley Bradfield, resigned. Salary at the rate of $Ioo per year. On motion of Regent Hill, M\r. W. H. Lightstone was designated as the holder of the Parke, Davis & Company Fellowship in General Chemistry in place of Mr. O. W. Voedisch, resigned.

Page  327 MARCH MEETING, 1904. 327 Regent Barbour presented and read the report of Professors Adams, Taylor and Jones, on the work being done in Political Economy, with recommendations for the enlargement and improvement of the work.' The matter was referred to Regent Hill for consideration. Mr. Miggett, Superintendent of shops, asked, for an appropriation of $568.50 to enlarge and equip the wood shopin order to accommodate all the students who are obliged to take work during the next semester; also that another man be employed in the wood shop at $I.75 per day. On motion of Regent Dean, both requests were granted on a call vote. On motion of Regent Lawton, the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery was conferred upon Guy Harry Dillon, Arthur Finley Rawley and Frank Daniel Segur by the, full vote of the Board. The Dental Faculty requested the Board to purchase the library of the late Doctor Taft. On motion the matter was laid on the table to be taken up when the budget was considered. On the'recommendation of Dean Cooley of the Engineering Department, and on motion of Regent Dean, Mr. James A. Brown was appointed Assistant in Mechanical Engineering in place of L. C. Rogers, resigned. Salary $200 a year. And Miss Abbie Gates to succeed Miss Belser as steniographer and assistant to the Secretary, at a salary of $500 a year, both appointments to date from February 29. These appointments were made on a call vote. Dr. Reuben Peterson, Professor of Gynecology and Obstetrics, gave notice that Dr..T. S. Burr, Demonstrator, had severed his connection with the department. He asked the Board to advance Dr. Charles L. Patton to the position' of Demonstrator, salary $500oo, and Dr. A. P. Reed to be first assistant, salary $300, and to appoint Dr. Rolland L. Parnieter to be second assistant with salary of $200. On motion of Regent Lawton, the foregoing appointmients iwere made by the full vote of the Board. The Hon. Delos Fall, Superintendent of Public Instruction, alddressed the Board on the Centralization of the Rural Schools of the State.

Page  328 328 MARCH MEETING, 1904. On motion of Regent Dean, the IBuilding Committee were authorized to construct fire escapes from the sun rooms at UTniversity Hospital at a cost not exceeding. $Ioo, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher, it was voted to pay Charles Itoertz & Son the sum of $2,026.41 for extra work done on the new Engineering Building. The Board then took a recess until 2 o'clock P. Ai. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock p. M., Regent Carey being present. On motion of Regent Fletcher, it was voted to put metal treads on the stairs in the new Engineering Building. Regent Dean presented and read the military order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, giving a brief history of the life, death and services of the late Major and Surgeon Edmund Andrews, a graduate of this University in the class of I849. On motion of Regent Dean, the document was placed with the class history. On motion of Regent Fletcher, it was voted that Charles A. Sauer, contractor of the Psychopathic Ward, be paid the sum of $2,000 for extra work done on said building. Regent Barbour moved that the sum of $500 be added to the sum already voted for making a University exhibit at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition at St. Louis. 'It was so -ordered by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Hill, the President and Secretary were autthorized to enter into a contract with Mr. Alfred E. Jennings of Detroit, to accept gifts in the name of the Board for the erection of an Audlitorium or other btuilding on the Campus, such building to cost not'less than $250,000. On motion of Regent Knappen, the degree of Bachelor of Laws was conferred upon Thomas Addis Lowery and Benjamin Franklin Brown in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Department of Law. Regent Knappen submitted the following list of the

Page  329 MARCH MEETING, I904. 329 Faculty for the Summer Session of the Department of Law, and on his motion the list was approved by the full Board: Professors Thomas A. Bogle, Horace L. Wilgus, Harry M. Bates, Edwin C. Goddard, Junior Professor Joseph M. Drake, Assistant Professor Frank L. Sage, Mr". John W. Dwyer, John R. Rood, Edwin R. Sunderland. On motion of Regent Barbour, a sum not exceeding $40 was appropriated for the purpose of printing the Commencement program, and sending out 20,000 invitations to the Alunini to attend Commencement exercises. The President presented and read the following communication from the President of the University Musical Societv ANN ARBOR, March 10, I904. President James B. Angell, University of Michigan. DEAR MR. PRE;SIDENT: The rapid development of the University School of Music and the success of its work have led many of those interested in it to believe that a closer relation could be established between it and the University, to the advantage of both institutions. Will you therefore kindly ask the Board of Regents to appoint a committee to make a study of the whole matter and report at a subsequent meeting? Respectfully, FRANCIS W. KELSEY, President of the University Musical Society. On motion of Regent Barbour, the matter was referred to Regents Dean, Hill and Carey for consideration and report. COn motion of Regent Barbour, it was voted to pay Dr. J. Korselt for one month's services, $85, from the special appropriation of $300 made to the Chemical Laboratory for non-resident lecturers. On motion of Regent Knappen, the Finance Committee were authorized to contract with Mr. Holden, a builder in Detroit, for the erection of two houses on lots owned by the University in the city of Detroit, and known as the Crane lots, at a cost not exceeding $I,500 each. It was so ordered by the unanimous vote of the B iard. On motion of Regent Carey, die Finance Committee were authorized to plant fifty trees in front of property owned

Page  330 330 MARCH MEETING, 1904. by the University in the Fyfe, Barbour and Warren subdivision of the city of Detroit. -Regent Lawton, from the committee appointed to examine the Houghton Collection of Minerals in the city of Detroit, and report as to the desirability of securing the same for the University, reported. that the committee had examined the collection and had found so many duplicates that in their judgment it was unwise to make the purchase. On motion of Regent Knappen, the Board adjourned to Thursday, April 14, 1904, at Io o'clock A. M. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

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Page  331 APRIL MEETING. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, Ann Arbor, April 14, 1904. The Board assembled in the Regents' room at Io o'clock A. M. Full Board present except Regent Hill. The Secretary read the minutes of the previous meeting, which were, on motion of Regent White, approved and ordered printed. Communications which had reached the President were referred to the standing conmmittees of the Board for consideration. By permission,' Dr. Herdman addressed the Board on matters relating to the opening of the Psychopathic Ward. On motion of Regent Barbour, Regents Lawton and Carey and Professors Vaughan and Herdman were authorized to meet the joint Asylum Board and devise a practical plan for administering the Psychopathic Ward under the law, and report the same for the approval of the Board. Professor Demmon reported a gift of $Ioo from the Hon. W. C. McMillan of Detroit for the purpose of keeping up the McMillan Shakespeare Library. The gift was accepted and the President was requested to transmit to Mr. McMillan the thanks of the Board. Regent Barbour moved that the sum of $72.20 be appropriated for the purpose of printing and mailing circulars to the Alumni in relation to a Memorial Building to be erected on the Campus in memory of the students who died in the Civil War, and in the Spanish War. The motion was carried bv the full vote of the Board. The President presented and read the follwing communication from the Professor of Forestry:

Page  332 332 APRIL MEETING, I904. ANN ARBOR, March 25, I904. President James B. Angell, Ann Arbor, Mich. DE'AR SIR: I beg to report that the Marble Safety Axe Co., of Gladstone, Mich., has presented to the Forestry Department the following samples of their goods: I 24-oz. safety pocket axe. I I6-oz. wood-handled safety pocket axe. I belt axe. I 6-in. hunting knife with sheath. I 4-in. hunting knife with sheath. I safety compass. I water-tight match box. I pedometer. I set gun cleaners. I patent gaff..2 axe sheaths for belt. In view of the fact that this gift is of considerable importance in enlarging the equipment of our department, I thought that perhaps the President's office would like to take official. recognition and express its feelings in the matter to the company. Very respectfully, FILIBERT ROTH. On motion the President was requested to transmit the thanks of the Board to the Marble Safety Axe Company of Gladstone, Michigan, for their generous gift to the equip, ment of the Department of Forestry. The President read the following communication from Professor M. L. D'Ooge: ANN ARBOR, April I I, I904. President Angell and the Honorable, the Board of Regents: GENTrLEMEN: It affords me much pleasure to announce to you that Mrs. John S. Newberry, of Detroit, has promised to give the sum of three hundred dollars the ensuing year for the maintenance of a Fellowship in the Classics, to be awarded by a committee to be appointed by the President. While this Fellowship is only a temporary one and no promise is made for its continuance, I venture to express the hope that it may be renewed after a year under circumstances similar to those which prompted the generous donor to bestow this gift for the coming year. I have the honor to be, Yours very truly, MARTIN L. D'OOGi.

Page  333 APRIL MEETING, 1904. 333 On motion, this gift was accepted and the President was requested to convey to Mrs. Newberry the cordial thanks of the Board for her generous interest in the work of the University. Regent Lawton moved that the Chairman of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds be authorized to secure competent inspection of the old Medical Building and report as to its safety and what, in their judgment, should be done to make it habitable. The motion was carried by the Board. Regent W\;hite moved that Theodore W. Koch be appointed Assistant Librarian for one year with a salary of $2o000, and that Librarian Davis be requested to remain as Librarian, for the next college year, and thereafter he continue to deliver his course of lectures on Bibliography under the title of Em'eritus Librarian with a salary of $I,600. The motion was carried by the unanimous vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Barbour, Instructor D. M. Lichty was granted leave of absence for the college year of 1904 -1905 for the purpose of going abroad for study, salary to lapse during his absence. Regent Barbour presented a communication from a committee of the women students asking the Board to authorize the redecorating and refurnishing of the women's waiting room in the main building, and on his motion the matter was referred to the Auditing Board with power. On motion of Regent Dean, Regent Barbour was authorized to go to Omaha and look after University property there, and to dispose of such parts thereof as he shall think best. Oni motion of Regent Knappen, the Board took a recess until 2 o'clock p. M. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock p. M., Regent Knappen in the chair during the temporary absence of the President. On motion of Regent Lawton, $75 was appropriated for increasing the storage capacity of the Anatomical Department, bv the full vote of the Board.

Page  334 334 APRIL MEETING, I904. Regent Lawton moved that $600 be appropriated for the purchase of the Dental Library of the late Dr. Taft, and two microscopes and one spectroscope belonging to him. The motion was carried on a call vote. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Secretary was instructed to make a voucher of $92 in favor of the Ridgway Dynamo and Engine Company, in full settlement of their bill for repairs on the broken engine at our lighting plant. Regent Fletcher stated that the McCray Refrigeratqr Company of Kendallville, Indiana, had completed the cold storage room at University Hospital in accordance with their contract, and were now entitled to their pay for said work, and on his motion it was voted to pay them $I,820 as agreed. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Superintendent of buildings and grounds was authorized to purchase a carload of lumber for use on the Campus. Regent Fletcher moved that Pond & Pond, architects of Chicago, be paid $500 for making plans for the enlargement of the Physical Laboratory. It was so ordered on a call vote. On motion of Regent Barbour, the women students were authorized to take possession of.the tennis courts on the Campus, west of the Barbour Gymnasium. Messrs. Hannan and Tufts of Detroit then addressed the Board in opposition to the University building an apartment house in Detroit. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Secretary was directed to settle with the C. H. Scharf Company at contract rate for putting smoke burners on the heating plant at University Hospital. On motion of Regent Fletcher, it was voted that the Auditing Board have curtains placed on the windows of the new Engineering Building at a cost not exceeding $716. The President presented the following communication from Professor M. E. Cooley, Dean of the Engineering Department: ANN ARBOR, April 14, I904. President James B. Angell. D^AR SIR: I have the.honor to report that the Chicago Engi-,neering Alumni, at their annual banquet on Saturday evening, April 2, I904, presented to the University of Michigan for the Department

Page  335 APRIL MEETING, I904. 335 of Engineering, a portrait in oil of our late Dean, Professor Charles E. Greene, by Mr. Percy Ives, of Detroit. The presentation was accompanied by a number of speeches by alumni and professors, in which all paid high tribute to the memory of Professor Greene and his work in the University. Numerous personal reminiscences added much interest to the occasion and revealed the deep affection in which he was held. A committee was appointed to draft appropriate resolutions, which are to be engrossed and transmitted to the family. It is a matter of interest to record that the money for the portrait was raised among the Chicago Engineering Alumni alone, and that no subscription exceeded in amount two dollars. Mr. Dwight B. Cheever, who had charge of the collections, reported the portrait entirely paid for. Mr. Robert P. Lamont, assisted by Professor Charles S. Denison, looked after the painting; all working under the direction of the retiring president, Mr. George R. Brandon. Mr. John D. Hibbard, 52 Madison Park, was elected to succeed Mr. Brandon as president. I beg to suggest the formal acceptance by the Regents of this portrait of our late Dean, and the adoption of suitable resolutions in acknowledgment thereof. Very respectfully, M. E. COOLEY, Dean of Engineering Department. The gift was very gratefully received by the Board, and the President was requested to transmit to the Engineering Alumni of Chicago the cordial thanks of the Board for this evidence of their love for Dean Greene, as well as for their continued interest in all matters relating to this University. Regent Knappen moved that J. E. Bolles & Company of Detroit be paid the sum of $138.90 for putting additional fire escapes on the nurses' home at University Hospital. It was so ordered on a call vote. Regent Lawton presented and read the following communication relating to a Post Graduate course in Porcelain for Practitioners, given in the Dental Department this year. To the President and Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: WHEREAS, the Fuculty of the Dental Department have arranged for a post-graduate course in porcelain, whereby practitioners may avail themselves of its privileges; therefore, be it

Page  336 386 APRIL MEETING, I904. RESOLVED, by the members of the Post-Graduate Course: First. That we appreciate the efforts in extending such an opportunity to the practitioners in this advanced field of treatment. Second. That we hope that subsequent privileges may be offered in advanced lines in our professional work. (Signed by committee) FRED W. JOSLIN, ARTHUR C. RUNYAN. On motion of Regent Knappen, the Board adjourned to Wednesday evening, June II, I904, at 7:30 o'clock. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

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Page  337 MAY MEETING. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, Ann Arbor, May -II, 1904. The Board assembled in the Regents' room at 7:30 o'clock P. M. Present-Regents Hill, Lawton, Dean, Barbour, Fletcher, and White. Absent-Regents Carey and Knappen. The Secretary read the minutes of the last meeting, which were, on motion of Regent Lawton, approved and ordered printed. Communications which had reached the President were placed in the hands of the standing committees of the Board for consideration. Mr. Sim T. Price, Chairman of the St. Louis Alumni Association, stated to the Board that the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Company had set apart June 28 as University of Michigan day. He urged that every Alumnus of the University be invited to be present on that day. He also stated that if the Board would print 25,000 invitations over the signature of the President and send them to him, the Alumtli Association of St. Louis would mail them to every graduate whose address appears in the General Catalogue. Regent Barbour moved that 25,000 invitations to the Alumni be printed, as suggested by Mr. Price, at a cost not exceeding $40. The motion was carried by the unanimous vote of the Board. Professor Roth gave notice that the Forestry Department had received of Robert Douglas' Sons, Waukegan, I;1., a shipment of 500 specimens of plant material for the Arboretum of the Saginaw Forestry Farm, of the value of $200. On motion of Regent Barbour, the President was requested

Page  338 338 MAY MEETING, 1904. to convey to Robert Douglas' Sons the thanks of the Board for their valuable gift to the University. Professor J. B. Davis asked permission of the Board to deposit in the General Library a bound copy of the report and blue prints constituting a record of the St. Clair Flats Survey. On 'motion the permission asked for was granted. The President presented and read the resignation of Dr. Alice G. Snyder as Director of the Barbour Gymnasium, to take effect October I next. On motion the resignation was accepted. On motion of Regent Hill, the Board voted to appoint Dr. William T. Hale as Instructor in General Chemistry for one year, salary $9oo, and also authorized the appointment of,rn assistant, to be named, at a salary not exceeding $300. Thlese appointments were made to provide for the work of Instructor D. M. Lichtv, who is away on leave of absence for the year. On motion of Regent Fletcher, it was voted to pay the Buffalo Forge Company one-half the contract price for heating and ventilating the new Engineering Building. Regent Fletcher moved that the bill of the Fort Wayne Electric Works of $1,183.20 for electric light fixtures in the new Engineering Building be paid. It was so ordered by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the proposition to install an elevator in the Palmer Ward was laid on the table for the present. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Treasurer was directed to pay James S. Holden $I,500 to apply on his contract for the erection of two houses on lots belonging to the University in West Detroit. At the last meeting of the Board, the Chairman of the Committee on Buildings and 'Grounds was requested to have the old Medical Building inspected by competent persons and to report its present condition as to safety and also the possibilities for.alterations and further use. In compliance with this request he submitted the following report, which was accepted and placed on file:

Page  339 MAY MEETING, I904. 339 DETROIT, MICH., May 9, I904., Honorable Board of Regents, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. GENTLEMEN: In compliance with your request, we have made a careful inspection of the old Medical Building at the University in Ann Arbor, and beg to submit the following report as to its present condition and the possibilities for alterations and future use. For the purposes of this report we have considered 'the east and west buildings separately. The west building is in a decidedly bad condition, and although it may be used for a few years without any material changes, it would be impossible to attempt to reconstruct the interior and use the old walls, as we are of the opinion that such alterations in the interior would put the walls in an unsafe condition. In this west building we find that the floors have sagged quite seriously toward the center, indicating that either the foundations of interior columns have settled or that the connections at the top of columns have given way in some manner, and if the building is used in the present condition for any length of time, these matters should be looked into and the necessary repairs made. In our opinion it would not only be impracticable but very difficult to reconstruct this building so as to make it permanent and up to date, and we should advise its entire demolition at such time as it cannot further be used in its present condition. The outside walls form a mere shell, and if an attempt is made to remove the interior floors and replace them with new, the walls will be further damaged to such an extent that they could not be repaired and made a part of a permanent building. The north and south walls are cracked from the grade to the roof, indicating that the foundations have settled at points near where a tunnel has been put through. The arrangement of heating and ventilation is very bad, and the present conditions are unsanitary, the foul air being conducted direct from basement to lecture rooms. The basement is in bad condition and in need of a new floor. The roof is much in need of repair, and plastering under the roof should be entirely replaced. The arch over the opening in the wall between the east and west buildings is badly settled and the walls have cracked. We do not think any serious trouble will result from this, however. The truss in this wall, supporting the floor timbers of the upper lecture room, should be examined and properly repaired, as it is evident that some settlement has taken place at this point. In the east building the walls and foundations are in much better condition, in fact such inspection as we have been able to give indicates that they are in practically as good condition as when

Page  340 340 3l4MAY MEETING, I904. erected; the brick work having been thoroughly protected on the outside, there is no reason to believe that any disintegration has taken place, and all parts of the work where exposed are found to be in sound and perfect condition. The interior of this building may be entirely removed and reconstructed in a modern way and arranged to suit the future requirements without serious damage to the walls. The heights of stories in this building are somewhat less than they should be, and the lighting is bad, but we believe that it would be possible to rearrange the floor levels and alter the heights of windows, without seriously affecting the exterior design of the building. If desired, the interior construction may be left as at present, in which case some minor repairs would be necessary and a new roof should-be put on, together with new truss and roof timbers, the old timbers being badly decayed. A new front porch floor and steps should be provided, and other exterior repairs made as may be found necessary. Arrangements should be made outside of the building for keeping animals, and the basement cleared out and provided with a new floor, which would greatly improve the sanitary conditions. Some improved heating and ventilating system should be installed. The walls and general construction of the building are in fairly good condition, and perfectly safe. During the course of our investigation we talked over the entire situation with Professor Lombard and Supt. Reeve, and judging from their statements as to the future requirements, also bearing in mind the fact that there is a desire to retain the old east building for sentimental reasons, we would suggest the following: IAST BUILDING. The entire interior construction to be removed and replaced with modern fireproof construction, with stories increased in height as much as possible, the walls and partitions arranged to suit the present requirements, also windows altered to suit the new interior conditions, the roof construction, front steps and other external parts of the building properly repaired. in the most permanent manner and new heating and ventilation installed. The building would then be in practically as good condition as a new building which might be erected, and would last an equal number of years. WEST BUILDING. Old building to be entirely removed and new building erected of such arrangement and character as you may desire, possibly with

Page  341 MAY MEETING, 1904. 341 lecture rooms and laboratories, which would be connected with the east building, as may be found desirable. We would suggest that the original design of the east building be carried out in the exterior of the new west building, so that the result of the change would be to retain the old original design, to which there is a sentiment attached, and obtain a building which would be complete and up to date, with a design which would be uniform in character and pleasing and perfect as a whole. We trust that the foregoing report may cover the matter to your entire satisfaction, and remain, Yours very respectfully, FIELD, HINCHMAN & SMITH, Per F. L. SMITH (Signed) MARTIN SCHOLL, JR. (Signed) Regent Barbour moved that Mr. W. T. Graham (who is acting as the agent of the Board in the care of property belonging to the University in the city of Omaha, Nebraska,) be authorized to sell the west 46xIIO feet of the Taggert lot in said city, and also that he be requested to reshingie 'the two houses on the property known as the Manning property. The motion was carried by the full vote of the Board. The Building Committee asked for and obtained permission to demolish the old Winchell building on North University Avenue during the present summer. Regent Barbour stated that a tax of $60 for grading had been levied against the north 25 feet of lot 2, block 3, and the north 25 feet of lot I, in the Campbell addition to the city of Omaha, the property being a part of the Bates bequest to the University. He also stated that Crawford & Clark, attorneys, had written that in their opinion this tax was illegal and could be set aside in the courts, but they would undertake to clear this property of this tax for the sum of $30. It was voted that Mr. W. T. Graham be authorized to secure the release of the property from this tax, through Crawford & Clark, for a sum not exceeding $30. On motion of Regent Barbour, it was voted to pay Theodore W. Koch $35 for programs illustrating his lecture on Dante. The Board then took a recess until 9 o'clock A. M.

Page  342 342 MAY MEETING, I904. MORNING SESSION. The Board reassembled at 9 o'clock, Regent Carey being present. Professor Carhart gave notice that the Department of Electrical Engineering had received a gift from the Stromberg Carlson Telephone Company of Chicago of telephone apparatus to the value of $184, and that the Automatic Telephone Company of Chicago had loaned to the University a complete automatic system, with four telephones and apparatus for four stations, valued-at $I50. On motion, the President was requested to transmit the thanks of the Board to the parties named, for their generous gifts to the University. On motion of Regent Lawton, Mr. John H. Mustard was appointed dispensing clerk in the Laboratory of ElectroTherapeutics in place of L. A. Bawack, resigned. Salary at the rate of $ioo per year. Mr. Erwin Smith addressed the Board in relation to the retention of Professor V. M. Spalding as Professor of Botany. Regent Carey moved that Professor Spalding be made Emeritus Professor of Botany without pay. Regent Fletcher moved to amend by granting Professor Spalding another year's leave of absence without pay. The amendment was lost, and the original motion was then carried. Regent White moved that Assistant Librarian Koch be authorized to purchase of the Central Library Bureau of Washington six card catalogue cases for use in the General Library, at a cost not exceeding $6oo. The motion was carried on a call vote. Regent Lawton moved that the fee which students are required to pay for material in the Laboratory of Materia Medica be fixed at $io. A call vote being taken resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Hill, Carey, White, Barbour, and Lawton. Nays-Regents Fletcher and Dean. The Board then took a recess until 2 o'clock P. M

Page  343 MA Y MEETING, I904. 343 AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock P. M. On motion of Regent Hill, it was voted to pay Professor Trueblool $29.29, being the balance of his personal expenses while conducting oratorical contests at other Universities. On motion of Regent Hill, the salary of Professor J. 0. Reed as chairman of the Summer School Faculty was fixed at $200, by the full vote of the Board. Regent Fletcher moved that 24 air checks be placed on the doors of the new Engineering Building. It was so ordered by the Board. Regent Fletcher moved that Chas. A. Sauer, contractor of the Psychopathic Ward, be paid the amount due him under his contract, except $300, which is held to cover some unfinished work. The Finance Committee submitted the following report as the budget for the academic year of I904-I905, and by the unanimous vote of the Board the report was adopted: BUDGET FROM JULY I, 1904, TO JUNE 30, I905. ESTIMATED RECEIPTS. 4 m ill tax............................................ $394,500 oo Students' fees, net.................................... 194,752 oo Interest on endowment fund........................... 38,500 oo Homoeopathic act.................................... 6,0oo oo Summer Hospitals.......................... 3,000 oo Receipts from University Hospital..................... 40,000 00 Receipts from Homceopathic Hospital................. 8,000 00 Receipts from Dental Operating Room. 3,ooo oo Receipts from Summer School........................ 5,225 00 Receipts from diplomas................................ 8,000 oo Interest on deposits................................... 500 00 Earnings of shops......................... o 6 00 oo $7I2,o77 00 ESTIMATED DISBURSEMENTS. Department of Greek.................................. $25 oo Department of Latin.................................. 200 00 Greek and Roman portraits........................ I00 00 Department of German......................00 00 Increase of Instructor Eggert's salary.............. 30 00

Page  344 344 MAY MEETING, 1904. Department of French................................. 50 00 Increase of Instructor Frank's salary.............. 300 oo Department of Rhetoric............................... 50 oo Increase of Instructor Thomas' salary.............. 300 oo Department of English Philology...................... 50 oo Department of English............................... 50 00 Increase of Instructor Strauss' salary.............. 400 oo Duplicate books................................. 200 00 Department of Mathematics........................... I50 00oo Increase of Asst. Prof. Markley's salary............ 400 oo Apparatus for the work in Insurance not to exceed I,000 oo Department of Political Economy...................... 75 00 Increase of Prof. Taylor's salary................... 500 oo Increase of Prof. C. H. Cooley's salary............. 400 oo Increase of Prof. Jones' salary..................... 400 00 One instructor in Accounts........................ 9oo oo Special lecturers Department of Commerce......... 200 00 Department of Geology............................... I0o 00 Department of Botany................................ 800oo One assistant.................................... 450 oo Botanical Garden..................................... 300 00oo Department of Philosophy............................. 500 oo Increase of C. B. Vibbert's salary.................. 200 00 Increase of Prof. George Rebec's salary........... 400 oo Department of Forestry............................. I50 00oo Forestry Farm.................................. 350 oo Department of American History....................... 75 00 Department of General-History....................... 75 oo Increase of Instructor Cross' salary............... 400 oo Department of Zoology.............................. 800 oo f triple beam balance.............................. I5 oo I portable boat................................... 25 00 Department of Elocution and Oratory................. 50 oo Additional assistance........................... 400 oo Museum............................................ 550 oo Department of Semitics.............................. 00 oo Increase of Prof. Craig's salary.................... 200 00 Department of Music.................................. 50 00 Books........................................ 200 00 Appointment Committee.............................. 450 oo Clerical help.................................50 oo Observatory........................................ 340 00 Increase of Mr. March's salary................... 50 00oo

Page  345 MAY MEETING, I904. 845 General Library...................................... 821 00 Assistant Librarian Koch......................... 2,000 00 Increase of Mr. Severance's salary................. 300 oo Increase of Miss Lane's salary.................... I00 00 6 card catalogue cases............................. 600 oo Additional desk attendance..................... 200 oo Department of Law................................. I,200 00 Increase of Prof. Sage's salary.................... 1,400 00 Increase of Prof. Kirchner's salary............... 500 oo Increase of Instructor Sunderland's salary......... 400 oo Increase of Instructor Rood's salary............... 400 oo Expense of delegate.....................50 oo Department of Engineering: Secretary and Dean.............................. 1,232 00 Geodesy and surveying........................... 1,047 00 Civil Engineering................................ I00 00 Descriptive Geometry and Drawing................. 450 oo Engineering Laboratory......................... I, 00 Engineering shop allowance....................... 300 00 Marine Engineering................................... 1 29 00 Electrical Engineering................................ 200 00 Engineering Shops: W ood shop.................................. 576 oo Forge shop.................................. 318 00 Foundry..................................... 602 00 Machine shop................................ 254 00 Instrument room............................ 103 00 Drawing room........................... 28 00 Office room................................... 45 oo Contingent...................................46 oo Assistant to the Dean............................. 200 00 Increase of Instructor Goulding's salary............ 400 oo Increase of Instructor Wilson's salary............. 300 oo One Instructor Engineering Laboratory............ g00oo Two student-assistants Engineering Laboratory..... 400 oo Increase of Prof. Sadler's salary................... 500 oo Instructor in Engineering Shops.................. o 00 oo Extra summer pay for Purfield.................... 40 oo Increase of Instructor Wait's salary............... 400 oo Increase of Prof. Ziwet's salary.................... 500 oo Increase of Instructor White's salary..400 oo One Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 1,600 oo Increase of Supt. Miggett's "salary................. 400 oo Asst. Professor of Civil Engineering, not over.... 2,000 oo

Page  346 346 MAY MEETING, I904. Waterman Gymnasium............................ 300 oo Barbour Gymnasium.................................. 200 00 Mineralogy......................................... 50 oo Chemical Laboratory............ 2,000 00 Department of Physics............................. I,035 oo Apparatus..................... 425 oo Medical Physics.................................200 oo Dental College....................................... 4,000 oo One new assistant............................... 300 oo Departmefit of Medicine and Surgery.......o........... 00 oo Department of Hygiene............................... 2,500 00 Physiological Chemistry......................... 2,500 oo Pasteur Institute................................. 00 Microscopes and balances......................... 300 oo Anatomy-Anatomical material....................... 2,000 oo Laboratory supplies.............................. 340 oo Increase of McMurrich's salary.................... 200 00 Histology............................................ 700 oo Glassware.................................100 00 Apparatus........................................ 200 00 Increase of Mrs. DeWitt's salary................. 300 oo Ophthalmology..........................00 00 Materia Medica.................................... 600 oo Increase of Prof. Cushny's salary................. 300 oo Electrotherapeutics.............................. 600 oo Nervous Diseases..................................... 240 00 Theory and Practice.................................. 300 oo New apparatus................................... I00 00 X-Ray photography.............................. I50 00oo Pathology........................................ 750 00 Glassware.............................00 00 Increase of Mr. Baldwin's salary.................. 400 oo Surgical Laboratory and Clinic...................... 625 oo Increase of Mr. Loree's salary.................... 200 00 Dermatology...............................50 oo Physiology...........................................00 University Hospital................................. 33,500 oo Increase of Gilmore's salary...................... 400 00 Increase of Matron's salary........................ 60 oo Increase of Scully's salary......................... I00 0oo Increase of 4 orderlies $2 per-month............... 96 oo Homceopathic Hospital..........................8,000 00 Increase of Atchison's salary..................... 400 oo Increase of salary of Supt. of Nurses.............. i8 oo

Page  347 MAY MEETING, I904. 347 Increase of Head Nurse...........2........... I20 00 I additional Head Nurse.................. 360 oo 4 additional nurses..200 00 i instructor assistant to the Faculty............ 1,200 00 Homceopathic College.............................. 600 oo Secretary's office, increase of Willcox's salary...... 0 00 Laundry............................................. 7,000 00 Printing supplies........... 2,000 00 Printing proceedings Schoolmasters' Club...... 70 oo The Alumnus...................,400 00 Books for libraries................................ 15,000 00 Repairs...................5,000 00 Contingent expenses.................................. I0,000 00 Fuel........................................... 35,000 00 Gas for fuel in laboratories.......................... 3,500 oo Postage......................................... 2,000 00 Miscellaneous printing............................. 3,500 00 Summer School..........................0,000 00 Commencement expenses. I,000 00 Diplom as............................................,300 00 Carpenter shop supplies................ 2,000 00 School inspection....... 700 00 Care of teams......................................,500 00 Water supply.................................... 4,000 00 Electric supplies.................................. 2,000 00 Heating supplies.................... 2,500 00 Hinsdale's History.................................. 3,500 00 St. Louis Fair........................................ 3,000 00 General pay roll.......................... 433,069 oo $685,591 00 On motion of Regent White, the following distribution was made of the money set apart in the budget for the pur chase of books: General Library................................... $Ioooo 00 Law Library....................... 2,475 00 Medical Library............ 2,025 00 Homceopathic Library.............. 250 00 Dental Library....................................... 250 00 $I5,000 00

Page  348 348 MAY MEETING, I904. The Board then adjourned.to. tomorrow morning at 9 o'clock A. M. MORNING SESSION. The Board reassembled at 9 o'clock A. M. On motion of Regent Barbour, the title of Keene Fifzpatrick was changed from Director of the Waterman Gymnasium to Professor of Physical Culture and Director of the Waterman Gymnasium.. On motion of Regent Hill, the following appointments and reappointments were made: LITERARY AND ENGINEERING DEPARTMENTS. George Rebec, Ph.D., Junior Professor of Philosophy.....$2,000 oo Fred M. Taylor, Ph.D., Professor of Political Economy and Finance............................................ 2,500 oo Charles H. Cooley, Ph.D., Junior Professor of Sociology... 2,000 oo ASSISTANT PROFESSORS APPOINTED OR REAPPOINTED FOR THREE YEARS. Alviso B. Stevens, Ph.C., Pharmacy.................... $1,600 oo John R. Effinger, Ph.D., French..........................,600 oo Edward D. Jones, Ph.D., Commerce and Industry......... 1,600 00 S. Lawrence Bigelow, Ph.D., General Chemistry........... 1,600 00 Albert E. Greene, Ph.B., B.S., Civil Engineering.........,600 oo William H. Wait, Ph.D., Modern Languages, in charge of work in Engineering Department.................... 1,600 00 Louis A. Strauss, Ph.D., English....................... 1,600 00 Herbert J. doulding, B.S., Descriptive Geometry.......... 1,600 00 Alfred H. White, A.B., Chemical Technology........... 1,600 00 Arthur L. Cross, Ph.D.,History.................... 1,600 oo00 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR FOR ONE YEAR. Claude H. Van Tyne, Ph.D., American History...........$,600 oo SUPERINTENDENT OF ENGINEERING SHOPS. William L. Miggett, B.S., for three years.................$2,00oo oo INSTRUCTORS REAPPOINTED FOR THREE YEARS. Warren W. Florer, Ph.D., German.....................$,200 oo John —S.P. Tatlock, Ph.D., English....................... 1,200 00 James B. Pollock, Botany............................... 1,200 00

Page  349 MAY MEETING, 1904. 349 Ewald Boucke, Ph.D., German........................... 1,200 00 Hugo Paul Thieme, Ph.D. French.................... 1,200 00 J. A. C. Hildner, Ph.D., German........................ 1,200 00 Colman D. Frank, A.M., Romance Languages............ 1,200 00 Joseph M. Thomas, A.M., Rhetoric..................... 1,200 00 Carl Edgar Eggert, Ph.D., German..................... 1,200 00 Duane R. Stuart, Ph.D., Greek and Latin................. I,200 00 Frederick Charles Wilson, B.S., Descriptive Geometry and Drawing........................................... 1,200 00 Samuel J. Holmes, Ph.D., Zoology...................... 1,200 00 Frederic L. Dunlap, Sc.D., Analytical Chemistry........... 1,200 00 Raymond -Pearl, Ph.DI., Zoology......................... I,20 00 James E. Duerden, Ph.D., Zoology...................... 1,200 00 Archie B. Pierce, Ph.D., Mathemnatics.................... 1,200 00 Theodore R.' Running, Ph.D., Mathematics............... 1,200 00 Myra Beach Jordan, Woman's Dean..................... 1,200 00 George Augustus May, M.D., Physical Examiner in Waterman Gymnasium.................................... 1,200 00 APPOINTMENTS AND REAPPOINTMEN'TS IN LIT'IERARY AND ENGINEERING DEPART'MENTS OF INSTRUCTORS FOR ONE YEAR. John Dieterle, A.M., German........................... $90o oo Alice L. Hunt, Drawing............................ oo oo Edward B. Escott, M.S., Maathematics.................. oo William Marshall, M.S., Mathematics.................. goo oo C. F. A. Lange, Ph.D., German...900 oo Charles A. Davis, A.M., Forestry....................... 200 oo Harrison McA. Randall, Pli.D., Physics................. 900 oo00 Royal A. Abbott, A.M., Rhetoric...................... oo00 Clarence B. Morrill, A.M., Rhetoric..................... oo 00 John W. Scholl, A.M., German........................ 00 Lyman F. Morehouse, B.S., Physics.................... oo 00 George P. Burns, Ph.D., Botany...... oo' William G. Smeaton, A.B., Chem. Engineering....... 900 oo Fred G. Frink, M.S., Civil Engineering................... goo oo Charles C. Adams, M.S., Curator of Museum............ 90 oo 00 Roy R. Peck, A.B., French..900 oo Carl C. Tarbox, A.B., Rhetoric......................... 00 Geo. W. Bartlett, Descriptive Geometry and Drawing,...... 9oo 00 Harrison S. Smalley, Ph.D., Political Economy............ goo oo Howard B. Merrick, B.S., Surveying............... 900 0oo Peter Field, Ph.D., Mathematics.................. goo W. B. Ford, Ph.D., Mathematics........................ 00oo Edward M. Bragg, B.S., Marine Engineering.............. goo 00

Page  350 350 MAY MEETING, 1904. Henry W. Dubee, A.M.................................. 900 oo James S. Byrd, A.B., French............................900 oo Geo. L. Hamilton, Ph.D., French......................... 900 oo Verner L. Page, B.S., Descriptive Geometry and Drawing.. 900 oo Joseph A. Bursley, B.S., Mechanical Engineering.......... 900 oo Richard R. Kirk, A.B., Rhetoric......................... 900 oo R. D. T. Hollister, A.M., Elocution...................... 900 oo DEPARTMENT OF LAW. ASSISTANT PROFESSORS APPOINTED FOR THREE YEARS. John R. Rood, LL.B.....................................$I,600 oo Edson R. Sunderland, A.M., LL.B........................ 1,600 00 INSTRUCTORS FOR ONE YEAR. John W. Dwyer, LL.M...................................$,200 00 Gustav Stein, LL.B...................................... oo 00 DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY. INSTRUCTORS FOR ONE YEAR. Vernon J. Willey, A.M., Electro-Therapeutics............$I,ooo 00 Lydia Maria De Witt, B.S., M.D., Histology.............. 9oo oo Frederick A. Baldwin, Pathology........................ oo00 oo Roger S. Morris, A.B., M.D., Internal Medicine.......... go oo DENTAL DEPARTMENT. Cyrenus G. Darling, M.D., Acting Dean...................$I,ooo oo INSTRUCTORS FOR ONE YEAR. Robert B. Howell, D.D.S., Prosthetic Dentistry.......... 800 oo Marcus L. Ward, D.D.S., Operative Dentistry............ 8 00 oo Regent Lawton submitted the following resolution, which was adopted by the full vote of the Board, and the Secretary was requested to transmit a copy of the same to the Mayor: Resolved, That this Board is opposed to the city authorities granting the saloons an additional hour in which to keep their places of business open at- night. On motion of Regent Barbour, Dr. Carrow was requested to examine the Hoover boy at University Hospital, and to treat the case not later than Monday, if possible. On motion of Regent Carey, Regent Lawton was requested to inquire into the practice prevailing at the Hos

Page  351 MAY MEETING, I904. -351 pitals in the examination of patients as to their financial ability, and also in what way the patients in the Eye and Eat clinics are provided with glasses, and report to the Board. Regent Hill moved that the Scharf Company of Ypsilanti be paid $170 in full settlement of their contract for putting smoke burners on the boilers at University Hospital. It was so ordered by the full vote of the Board. Regent Lawton submitted the following resolution, which was adopted by the full Board: It is Resolved, by the Board of Regents, that whenever a patient or person coming for treatment to either of the hospitals belonging to the University of Michigan shall have been received into either of said hospitals by the Superintendent of the institution, whether received as so-called "in" patient or "out" patient, such person shall be considered and treated as a hospital patient, and shall be assigned to the proper clinic to which his, or her, case pertains, and if an emergency case, the patient shall receive immediate attention and treatment without delay; but if the patient be otherwise than an emergency case, then there shall be no greater delay in making the examination and extending the proper treatment than the necessities arising from conditions at the hospital and the work in the clinic to which the case is assigned demand. And in no case shall any patient or person coming to the hospitals for treatment be subjected, either directly or indirectly to any influence, pressure or inducement, brought to bear on such patient by the physicians in charge at the hospitals, or their assistants or by any employe of the hospitals to induce such patient to leave the hospital and go to the office, or private hospital of any of the hospital physicians, or elsewhere for treatment. Whenever a patient has been admitted into either of the hospitals for examination and treatment and has been so registered, no hospital physician or assistant physician shall be allowed to treat such person as his private patient for the relief of the ailment for which such patient has entered the hospital, until the patient shall have signified in writing to the Superintendent the desire for such change. The superintendents, the hospital physicians, the assistant physicians, the internes, nurses, and all employes in the hospitals are hereby required to give to patients proper attention and to subject them to as little delay and embarrassment as possible, to the end that all persons coming to the hospitals of the University of Michigan shall come with the fullest confidence and the assurance that they will speedily receive there the fairest treatment, and that all will be done for the relief of their infirmities that the circumstances and conditions will allow.

Page  352 352 2MAY MEETING, 1904. No hospital physician, or other person employed at the hospital, shall be allowed to furnish to any hospital patient any glasses, optical, surgical, or other' appliances which may be prescribed by the physician for the relief, correction and recovery of the patient from the ailment from which the patient is suffering. It shall be the duty of the Superintendent of the hospital, under the advice of the physician in charge of the case, to procure and furnish such glasses or appliances to the patient at a reasonable cost, it being understood that the University will supply all such necessary appliances. On motion of Regent Fletcher, it was ordered that the bill of the Toledo Chandelier Company for $515.80 for incandescent electric light fixtures for the Engineering Building be paid. The Secretary presented and read the following communication from the Frank B. Japes Company of Detroit. No action was taken on this communication by the Board: DETROIT, MICH., May 12, I904. To the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. GENTLEMEN: Take notice that the undersigned is furnishing certain material and labor to The Whitney Furniture Company, who are contractors with your Board to supply certain' material and furniture for the new Engineering Building. The amount of my contract is $6,500.oo, and there is now due a large part of the same. You will therefore in making payments to the original contractor, please withhold sufficient to take care of my claim. Respectfully, FRANK B. JAPES Co. Regent Barbour stated that the Citizens' Savings Bank of Detroit has given the University a bond of $50,000, issued by the Fidelity and Deposit Company of Maryland, covering the deposits of University money in said bank. The Fidelity and Deposit Company asks permission to cancel this bond, and issue one of even amount in the Title Guarantee and Trust Company of Scranton, Pennsylvania. On motion the exchange of bonds was authorized by the Board. The Bcard then adjourned:o Tuesday, June 21, at Io o'clock A. AM. TAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  353 JUNE MEETING. Ann Arbor, June 2I, I904. } UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, The Board assembled in the Regents' room at Io o'clock A. M.. the full Board-present. The Secretary read the minutes of the last meeting, which were, on motion of Regent Barbour, approved and ordered printed. Communications which had reached the President were placed in the hands of the standing committees of the Board for consideration. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Secretary was directed to have the bond of Contractor Sauer on the Psychopathic Ward cancelled. Communications were received from the several Faculties recommending candidates for degrees. On motion of the chairmen of the appropriate committees the recommendations were approved and the degrees were ordered to be conferred as indicated in the lists given below, by the full vote of the Board: CANDIDATES FOR DEGREES DEPARTMENT OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS BACHELOR OF ARTS Gertrude Mary Adams Cornelius K. Baarman, A.B., Earl Van Aldridge Hope College Esther Eveline Aldridge Franc May Bailey Esther Harriet Alexander, A.B., Lucile Bailey Hastings College Iena Amelia Barber, B.S., Matilda Eloda Amberson Adrian College - Edith Irene Atkin Florence Berenice Barnes Kittie Avery Albert Crum Baxter

Page  354 354 JUNE MEETING, 1904. George Wilson Beadle Angie Maria Beckwith Nellie Irene Beebe Frederick Beekel Grace Mitchell Bell Neil Isaac Bentley Minnie Ethel Pratt Berry Grace Darling Bissgll Divie Bethune Duffield Blain Richard Arthur Bolt Isabel Louise Bradley Charles Orin Briggs Eliza Broomhall Alma Brown Bertram Boyd Brown. Grace Enos Brown Mrabel Delia Brown Mattie Maude Brown Maude Ingersoll Brown James Lisle Bruce John R. Brumm Eugene Taylor Brunson Joseph Laurence Burd Mary Burr Fred Burton Ralph Starr Butler Lavilla Heacock Campbell Anna Crosby Cawley Leroy William Childs Mary Christine Christopher Arabel Wilson Clark B. Milburn Clark Geneive Worthington Clark Martha Canfield Clark Hugh Wallace Clarke Arthur Brooks Clawson Herbert Everett Coe John Leonard Conger Charles Wilford Cook Emma Faith Cooper Leigh Guillot Cooper Florence Mary Cotton Mary Belle Cox Ciyde Firman Craig William Dickinson Cramer Ieonore Crowell Cleora Cummings Leila Blanche Currie Agnes Eleanore Densmore Ida Almirall Dibble Ruth May Dietz Florence Gertrude Dillon Wesley Hugh DuBois Minnie Duensing Clara Belle Dunn Lionel Herman Duschak Grace Louise St. John Eaton Charles Wallis Edmunds, M.D. Merrick Knight Edwards Sarah Elizabeth Edwards Abigail Mabel Ely Blanche Earle Enyart Charles Fay Erwin Henry Parsons Erwin Sedona Lenora Fesenbeck Robert Roland Finster Ida Marie Fischer Jennie Deyarmon Fisher Ora Emelyn Follett Grace Mary Forster Lewis Lovatus Forsythe Squire Fouch Antonia Louise Freeman Earl Hazeltine Frothingham Emma Ellen Fuhrman Wilbur Newton Fuller Dora Inez Gage Blanche Gardner Charlotte Gerken Emma May Goodrich Marion Goss Janet Galbraith Goudie Myron Herbert Gray Jeanette May Gridley Olive May Gwynne Raynor Bessac Haeussler Florence Josephine Hagle Minnie Olivia Hall Ernest Milton Halliday Sarah Sager Hardy Charles Leroy Harpham Harriet L'eclair Harrington Helen Amalia Hathaway Wilfrid Henry Haughey, Jr. Julia Anna Haynes Nellie Fern Haynes Lilian Matilda Headsten Mary Elizabeth Hedden William Henry Hedges Gertrude Mary Heery John Helfman, Ph.C., B.S., (Phar.) Charles Almer HelselI Mary Bartron Henderson Louise Fasquelle Hennequin Grace Allena Hills Hermann Johann Hilmer Elizabeth Alice Hinchey Flora Annis Hodge Mary Cooley Horton

Page  355 TUNAE MEETING, 1904. 355 Harvey James Howard Marion Livingston Hubbard Walter Fred Hunt Ruth Agnes Hyde Caroline Louise Jenks Lee Royal Jenney Ralph Edward Jenney Laura Beatrice Jones Sara Grace Jones Grace Kaiser Wilhelmina Kaiser Sarah Lorilla Kanouse Nelson Austin Kellogg Edith Wilmer Kinnan Majorie Kinnan Allen Marshall Kline Don DeWitt Knapp Matthew Kollig Lewis Ellen Kollock James Joseph Krouser Louise Lamb Austin Lloyd Lathers Edith Alice Lewis Joseph Marvin Lewis Mabelle Lignian Ray Dudley Lillie Albert Edward Lucius Herbert Galen Lull James Duncan Knapp Lyman Angela Ida Maas Eleanor Grace Mabley Sarah Drake McAlvay Gerald McCoy Roderick Duncan MacDonald Kate Willard McGraw Fraley McMillan George Arthur Malcom Herman William March Catharine Ellen Maxwell Erle Gray Meeks Mark Neal Mennel Emma Mellin Ellis LeRoy Michael Lewis Scofield Miner William Daniel Moriatty Robert Porter Morsman Ward Davis Morton Joseph Eugene Murphy Louise Churchill Nichols Effie May Niles Zayda Ruth Noe Roscoe Charles Olmsted Gertrude Esther Palmer' Leigh G. Palmer Edward Foster Parker Albert H. Parks Mabel Edith Holmes Parsons Frank Cleveland Pennell William Jonathan Pennock, Jr. Rozilla Amelia Peters John Hibbard Pettis Anna Elizabeth Pinney Preston B. Plumb Genevieve Williams Purmort Hazel Grace Putnam Sophia Rosetta Refior Ethel Josephine Rice William Brownell Roberson Thomas Brockway Roberts Norman Meldrum Robertson Robert Millar Robinson Clara Roe Jessie Estelle Rood Mabel Maria Rood Gertrude Louise Roper Bertha Rosenthal Maurice Edgar Rosenwasser Margery Scheel Rosing James Emmet Russell Claire Mabel Sanders Amy Eleanor Savage Fay Catharine Schneider Walter Edward Schroeder Howard Lesher Schug Howard Jackson Seymour Wilfred Byron Shaw Angeline Sherwood Madge Genevieve Sibley Thomas Allan Sims Elisabeth Ethel Sinclair Charles Albert Sink Eva Lenore Smith Frank Robert Spencer, M.D. Helen Jane Spier Sara Belle Spore Claude Maurice Stafford Clara Emma Stanton H-elen McClure Stevens Mary Christina Stewart Lotta Lane Stiles Franc Stone Willis Gordon Stoner Henrietta Gibbon Stratton, A.B., Morrisville College Arthur Floyd Strome Ralph Howard Struble Myra Chase Sturgis Fverett Marlin Sweeley Geerge Philo Sreet Erle Reed Swift

Page  356 356, JUNE M.EETING, I904. David William Thomas Samuel Emory Thomason Elizabeth Lockwood Thompson Harriet Waterbury Thomson H-omer Smith Toms Frederick John Sherman Tooze Nelson Elbridge Tousley I,uella Townley Ora Travis Esther Moss Treudley Bessie Alfaretta Trollope Albert LeRoy Turner Bertha Adams Tuttle George Uihlein Louisa Amelia Van Dyke Nellie Louise Van Volkenburg Martin D'Ooge Verdier Charles Bruce Vibbert Zaidee Belle Vosper Bess May Vrooman Elsie Mae Wagner Guy Leslie Wait Dell Warner Ward Lura Allena Warner Orie Elmer Wasson John Edward Watkin John Wright Watling George Nathaniel Watson John Vincent Weadock Inis Harriet Weed ~V'altcr Samuel Weeks Faye Irene Whitman Mary Ross Whitman Georgia Griffith Whitmore Georgiana Wiggins Verna Eugenia Williams Gertrude Ethel Wilson Gwenllian Gwladys Wilson Emily Porter Wolcott William Henry Woodley Herbert Hollingsworth Woodrow James Anderson Work, Jr, Harry Ralph Wormley Rosabelle Veda Wykoff. Crace Evelyn Yerkes 276 MASTER OF SCIENCE (IN FORESTRY) Harry Day Everett, A.B., Cor- Clyde Leavitt, A.B. nell University 2 MASTER OF SCIENCE Amanda Jane Hamilton, Ph.B., Karl Wilhelmj Zimmerschied, Albion College A.B. 2 MASTER OF ARTS Robert Louis Benson, A.B. Helen Louise Bishop, A.B., Vassar College Mollie Drew Butts, A.B. Erle Elsworth Clippinger, A.B. Frank Lawrence Cooper, B.S. Carl Conrad Eckhardt, Ph.B., Ohio State University Ralph Henry Elsworth, A.B. Frances Williams English, A.B., Greenville College, A.M., ibid. Jessie Cook English, A.B., Greenville College, A.M., ibid. Nellie May Hamilton, A.B. William D. Henderson, A.B. Laura Emma Hoffman, A.B., Hiram College Richard Ray Kirk, A.B. Samuel Bovyer Laird, A.B., A.B. McKendree College, A.M., ibid. Frank Myers Longanecker, A.B., Hiram College Artios Dio Nye, A.B., Baldwin University Genevieve Delony O'Neill, A.B. Roy Romanzo Peck, A.B. Luis Marino Perez, A.B. Oliver Winfred Perrin, A.B. Candace Wilcox Reynolds, Ph.B., Olivet College Edward Hildreth Ryder, A.B. Philip Louis Schenk, A.B. Frederick William Schule, B.S., University of Wisconsin Manson Alexander Stewart, A.B.

Page  357 JUNE MEETING, I904. 357 Donald Clive Stuart, A.B. Zaida Elvira Udell, A.B. John G. Winter, A.B., Hope College. William Robins Wright, A.B. 29 DOCTOR OF SCIENCE Frederick Amos Baldwin, M.D., A.B. DOCTOR Of PHILOSOPHY I Harriet Williams Bigelow, A.B., Smith College Frank Arthur Bohn, Ph.B., Ohio State University Alphonso Morton Clover, B.S. Lewis Ralph Jones, Ph.B. Adoniram Judson Ladd, A.B., A.M. Ward J. McNeal, A.B. Edgar Nelson Transeau, A.B., Franklin and Marshall College 7-317 DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (IN MARINE ENGINEERING) Stuart Bowler Kingsbury William Edward Post Vernon Claude Wood 3 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING) William Henry Allen, Jr. EDavid Homer Clary Myron George Doll Lester Kirschbraum Harris Phelps Ralston, A.B. William Seymour Alfred Holmes White, A.B. 7 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING) George Wilsey Blackinton Eugene S. Brewer Henry Joseph Clemens Alfred Carrel Finney Robert Stephenson Fleshiem Earl Andrew Forkner Harry Alvin Harris Edward Lawrence. Hogan Clarence Lloyd Keller Oscar Franklin Mead, B.S., Michigan Agricultural Coll. Hubert Howard Montague John Harris Mustard George Garrett Thompson Oswald William Visscher, A.B., A.B., Hope College William Thomas Walker, Jr. Otto Christian Walther Edward August Weiland 17 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING) Egmont Benjamin Arnold Bert Wise Bachtel Walter Aldrich Barrett George Wilsey Blackinton James Frederic Bourquin Grant David Bradshaw Carl Talcott Cotter Allan Theodore Dusenbury Earl Alpheus Finkbeiner David Ross Fraser, Jr. Charles Arthur Fuller Thomas', Griswold Gale John Antony Garrett George Woodbury Gilkey Arthur Crandell Green Mark Harris Gregg

Page  358 358 JUNE MEETING, I904. Morris Albert Hall William Manville Hogle Arthur Holmes Walter Francis Kneip James Elliott McAfee William Coryell McBain Henry Eggleso McDonnell James Royal Mansfield Walter Babcock Perry Jesse Towsley Pratt Lewis Chubb Rogers Sydney Rumney Russel Morris Henry Stimson Charles Roscoe Swineford Robert Richardson Thomson John Sherrerd Tyler Ralph Aaron Vail William Thomas Walker, Jr. Edward Northam Walton Charles Albert Waring Edward August Weiland 37 BACHELOR Of SCIENCE (IN CIVIL ENGINEERING) Santiago Artiaga John Rogers Bartlett Carroll Biggs Valreen Colin Campbell John Knox Cochran William George Cook George Alkmaar Cunningham Gerrit Cornelius Dooge Benjamin Douglas, as of the Class of 1882 Harry Pine Drake Frank Collins Emerson John Edward Evans Herbert Spencer Graver Bertram V. R. Hall oolland Servis Hall Max Philip Heavenrich Harold Hooker Samuel Horner William 0. Houston Cortes Johnson Harlow Lewis Fred Mussey McLean William Joseph Matthews William Burgess May William Clyde Mundt Birtram Willard Ranson John William Seens Carl Hamlin Smith Walter Pearce Stine Juan Felix Roura Tecson Donald Cramer Waite John Arnon Whiting Jesse Clark Wright Arton Emory Yokam SCIENCE George Grant, Jr., B.S. MASTER OF Austin Perry Biggs, B.S. 34 2 ELECTRICAL ENGINEER Sergius Paul Grace, B.S. John Castelar Parker, B.S., A.M. Henry Lumsden Woolfenden, B.S., M.S. 3 MECHANICAL ENGINEER William Lincoln Miggett, B.S. CIVIL ENGINEER Clarence William Hubbell, B.S. Rollo Glenroy Manning, B.S. Alfred Latimer Newton, B.S. Frederick Charles Noble, B.S. 4-IO8

Page  359 JUNE MEETING, I904. 359 DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY DOCTOR OF MEDICINE Edward William Adamson Axcel Engelbert Anderson Edward M. Anderson, A.B., Williams College Kathleen Anderson Abel James Baker David Elijah Beardsley, A.B. Arthur King Bennett Charles Lenzo Bennett Adolphus Lyman Biggs Thomas Francis Birmingham Ernest Brennan Bradley, A.B., Kentucky University Stephen Dolphard Brazeau Dexter Alvin Buck William Henry Buskirk William Garretson Carhart, A.B. Arthur Julius Carlson Addison Bertram Clifford, A.B., Western Reserve University Otis Merriam Cope, A.B. Charles Vernon Crane William Henry Crede John Hunt Crosby, A.B. Irving John Cross, A.B., Oberlin College Jenny English Crozier Clara Marie Davis, A.B. John Joseph Donoghue Phebe Van Vlack Doughty, A.B., Vassar College Guy Melville Dunning Ward Ellis William Henry Enders Curtis Alban Evans, A.B. Earl Harland Foust Cyrus Bunting Gardner William Clement Gibson Edward Chace Greene, A.B., Yale University Willard Parker Greene Cyril Herbert Haas, A.B., Susquehanna University William Worth Hale Elizabeth Adams Hawley Samuel Reese Haythorn Herman Augustus Helming Charles Markham Hensley Lewis Starks Hodges Emile Cyrus Houle Maro Fredd Hunn Samuel Khacher Jamgotchian, A.B., Central Turkey Coll. Fred Andrew Johnson Roy Howard Johnson, A.B. Harrison William Jones Charles Floyd Jump David Maurice Kane Charles Edgar Keeler Guy Charles Keller Lee Earl Kelsey William Harrison Kennedy Mary Augusta Killeen Carl John Larson Clyde Archie Leonard Iva May Lickly Stellar Rudolph Light Jesse Durland Mars Albert Harvey Miller Owen Joseph Mink, A.B. James Frederick Munson, A.B. Norman Dwight Murphy Byron Deloss Niles, A.B., Olivet College Harry Montgomery Nuttall,ydia Marian O'Harrow Christopher Gregg Parnall, A.B. Alex. H. Pearson Elsie Seelye Pratt, B.L., Smith College Harcourt Hayden Ptolemy Roy Woodney Quick Elias Wilber Reed, B.S., Kansas Agricultural College George Girard Richards Bertolet Perry Rosenberry Mary Louise Rosenstiel Augustus Henry Halyard Roth, A.B. Guy. Victor Rukke Walter Abner Scott George Arthur Seybold Francis Marion Shook Harold Leon Simpson William Barton Skelton Frank William Smithies Charles Delos Stofer Albert Edward Stripp Charles Theophile Sturgeon Earle Reed Swift, B.S., Olivet 'College Charles Frederick Tenney, Jr.

Page  360 860 JUNE MEETING, I904. Bert Thomas, B.S., Whitman College Leland Herbert Tower William Philip Ultes, A.B., Wittenberg College Elmer Carl Unckrich Don C. Urie John Walter Vaughan, A.B. Charles Christian Walker Ernest Carl Weirick Carl Herbert Weisman Clarence Robert Wilcox William Wesley Wright Alford Elihu Wooster Yale o10 DEPARTMENT OF LAW BACHELOR Of LAWS Edgar Rich Ailes Harry Albert Allen Andrew Frederick Allyn Curtis DeWitt Alway William Alfred Anderson, B.L., Kentucky University Henry Wood Axford David Alexander Badenoch Arthur Bailey, Ph.B., Colorado College Fred Alva Baker Wirt Barnhart Ortha Orrie Barr Roscoe Jerome Barrett Charles Stacey Batt Carleton Wood Benton Nathaniel George Berridge John Chester Bills, Ph.B. Edgar Marcus Blessing Herbert Ray Bliss Clarence Newton Boord Charles Orland Borst Raymond Edward Bowkley Francis Jacob Bowsher Ezra Brainerd, Jr. Frank Michael Brennan, A.B., Detroit College John Wesley Breining Charles Henry Brittenham Isaac Louis Brock William Cummings Brown Frank Nathan Burns, B.S., Valparaiso College, A.B., ibid., LL.B.,- ibid. Warren Booth Burrows James Clinton Byers Joseph Michael Callahan, A.B., St. Viateur's College Maurice Raymond Carter, Ph.B., Upper Iowa University Warren Norris Chase William Henry Harrison Clayton, A.B. Theodore Miles Clowes Edson W. Coale James Milton Cobb Corie Cornelius Coburn Alexander Martin Cochrane Thomas Porter Miller Compere, A.B., Ouachita College Harry James Compton, B.S., National Normal University Daniel Arthur Cook Frederick Charles Cook Charles Robert Coulter, A.B., Miama University John Charles Davis Robert Burns Dawson, A.B. Edward Harris Decker James Herbert DeVine, B.S., Valparaiso College Margaret Noble Dickinson Irving James Dodge Edward Donnelly, A.B., Yale University Roy Ralph Durham Charles Edward Dvorak, A.B. William Albert Eldred David Booth Eppstein Lewis George Erb Lioyd Hugo Eriesson, A.B. Glenn Roy Clinton Faling Thomas LeBeau Fekete, Jr. Abram Henry Felker, A.B. Howard Malcolm Findley, A.B., Monmouth College Clarence Andrew Fisher David Beagle Fitch James Roy Fleming Frank Morrill Fogg, Jr. Harriet Freebey Willis Wells French Hugh Regnier Fullerton, A.B., University of Illinois Nathaniel Fulton, A.B., National Normal University

Page  361 JUNE MEETING, I904. 361 Harry Conrad Gahn Matthew Henry Gait, A.B., Maryland Agricultural Coll. Frank Short Gedney.Fred Peter Geib James Henry Gernert Arthur Clarke Goldtrap Louis James Goodman Richard Cecil Goodspeed Otto Fairchilds Freene Louis David Greenfield George W. Gregory Milton Wayman Guy Walter Ferdinand Haass, LL.B., Detroit College of Law Archie Hahn John Austin Hall, A.B., University of Kansas Charles Albert Hammond George Stewart Hanley Frank Bartlett Hannum Charles Melvin Harlan Robert Lee Harrod, B.S., Lima College Marcus Reuben Hart Frank Hartman, B.S., Wilmington College Lynn Wallace Hathaway Elim Jacobs Hawbaker Jared Waldo Hawkins Charles Howe Hayden Earl Heenan, A.B. Albert Heil James Buel Henry, B.S., Boston University Charles Hernett, A.B., Carleton College William Martin Heston Leonard C. Hirsch Cornelius Hofhus Paul Sprenger Honberger Austin Edward Hooker Edward Hugh Horton, B.S., Buchtel College Herman H. Hovda, B.S., Valparaiso College Thomas Burlison Hubbard Jcssiah Ross Huffman Frank Myron Hughson Charles Gammon Huse Roscoe Burhans Huston, A.B. Emory James Hyde Elbert Vittum Ingersoll William Hannibal Jackson Thomas Johnson Harrison Johnston, Jr. John Kiiskila, B.S., Northern Indiana Normal School Harry Mahlon Kimball Tunis Wyckoff Kimber Donald Franklin Kizer Fred Christian Klein, LL.B., Northern Ind. Law School Fred Garfield Kline Walter Michael Krimbill James Knox Lauher Eugene Wright Lawton Frederic Leckie Walter Clark Lee, A.B., Yale University William Baxter Lee, B.S., University of Tennessee Frederick August Lehman William Jacob Lehman, A.B. George Forrest Lewis Johann Christof Kloppenburg Lindhout George McCarty John Clarence McClure Hugh Wilson McGill Dan Erle McGugin, Ph.B., Drake University Delos Harold McIntyre Joseph Frederick Maguire Charles Salmon Matthews, A.B.. Guy Metcalf, A.B., Harvard University Frank Rudolph Meyer Charles Oliver Monroe Walter Ferguson Morrison, A.B., University of Washington Francis Thomas Nagorski Guy Percy Nevitt Louis Nockels James Rogers Offield Leon Edward Paige Charles Henry Pease Celsus Matthews Price Floyd Fosket Putman Frank Radigan Frank Lewis Rain, A.B., University of Nebraska louis Edward Rauch Hiram Brown Redford Mark Webster Reed Austin Lucius Richardson Ernest Richard Ringo, A.B., Fremont Normal College Edwin Shepherd Ripley, A.B. Roy William Risley

Page  362 362 JUNE MEETING, 1904. James D. Robinson, B.S., Upper Iowa University Morris John Robinson Clarence Sanford Roots Howard Bell Salot Charles Edward Sandall Wirt Ira Savery, A.B. Tillman Kulp Saylor Ralph Burton Scatterday Marvin John Schaberg Daniel Dwight Schurtz, A.B. Eli Fowler Seebirt, A.B., Mount Union College Millard Algernon Seitz Frank Sylvester Senn Jay Corwin Sexton Milo Barton Slick Edmund Mark Sloman Joseph Smith, LL.B., Central University Charles Sumner Sollars Edward Sonnenschein John Mickle Stager William Riley Stevens Ethol Wilkes Stone Bernard Erhart Stoutemyer Daniel Stratton, B.S., Westminster College Charles Dana Symonds Clay Tallman, B.S., Michigan Agricultural College James Ed Thomas Frank Abner Thompson Howard Miller Thompson James Herbert Thompson Oscar Benjamin Tibbs, A.B., Lincoln University Miles William Townsend Harland Adams Trax, Ph.B., Bucknell University Sanford Trippet, A.B., Indiana University John Truax George Tumpson James Turner, A.B. Elbert Boynton Vandervort, A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University Fianklin Allan Wagner Robert Kelsey Walton Glenn Elum Warner Frank Robert Watson William Monks Webb, Ph.B., Mount Union College Burton Singley Wellman Walter Steadman Wheeler Milo Armstrong White, A.B. Bernard Charles Wieck Herman Adolph Wieder Merlin Ludlow Wiley, A.B. Samuel Ritter Wilkeson William Kirkwood Williams, A.B. Charles Tobias Winegar Edward William Wolfstyn Frank Edison Wood George Wallace Zinky 221 MASTER OF LAWS George Wilbur Lindsay, LL.B., University of the South SCHOOL OF PHARMACY PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMIST I-222 Ambrosio Aguilar Herman Louis Becker, Ph.G., Detroit College Mabel Lucile Berger Linwood A. Brown, Phar. D., Louisville Coll. of Pharmacy Rollin Harvey Cogswell Arthur Earnest Crippen 'Ianuel Mario Guillermety Edward Henry Miller John Schell Wehrle Adolph Ziefle IO BACHELOR Of SCIENCE (IN PHARMACY) Charlotte Gerken John Alvin Inman Burton Samuel Knapp Rudolf Ernest Knapp James Seymour, Ph.C. Homer Charles Washburn, Ph.C. 6-I6

Page  363 JUNE MEETING, I904. 363 HOMTEOPATHIC MEDICAL COLLEGE DOCTOR 0E MEDICINE Oscar Cornelius Dixon William Eck Doran I,eon J. Gibson Corden Thorne Graham Awra Andrews Hoyt Clyde Allen Lown Harold Luce Lown Frederick Webster McAfee Ferdinand Claudius McCormick, M.D., Northwestern Univ. Arthur Holmes Norton, A.B. Ebenezer Payne, B.S., Rhode Island State College Luther Peck, B.S., University of Maine Samuel Schaefer, A.B. Howard Francis Schell James Wallace Sooy Charles Frederick Swift Virgil Lucius Weir George Pray Winchell Augusta Genevieve White, B.S., Bucknell University I9 COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY DOCTOR OF DENTAL SURGERY John Benedict Conlon Anna Dieterle Rudolph Linton Gilkey Claude Emory Markey John Austen Ogden Elmer Leroy Whitman William Henry Wismer 7 Total....................790 Dr. C. G. Darling addressed the Board on matters relating to the Dental Department. Professor Roth announced that the Department of Forestry had received from E. C. Atkins & Co. of Indianapolis, Indiana, a gift consisting of a complete set of saws and saw tools, such as are used in lumbering. On motion, the President was requested to transmit the thanks of the Board to E. C. Atkins & Co. for their valuable gift to the University. The President presented and read the following communication from the Society of Colonial Dames of Michigan, establishing a Scholarship in American History. On motion, the gift was accepted and the President was requested to transmit to, the society the grateful acknowledgments of the Board for this substantial evidence of their interest in this University: ANN ARBOR, June 14, I904. PRESIDENT JAMES B. ANGELL: My Dear Mr. President-The Society of Colonial Dames of Americ;' in Michigan have decided to offer a scholarship in American History, of one hundred and fifty dollars. This is to be called

Page  364 "364 JUNE MEETING, r904. The Elizabeth A. Rathbone Scholarship, and is offered to any young woman who is a student in the University, and the choice of the committee. Said committee is to consist of President James B. Angell, the Professor in charge of American History, and a committee of the Society, Mrs. H. B. Hutchins, Mrs. G. W. Patterson, Mrs. W. P. Lombard, and of course, Mrs. T. H. Newberry, as the President of the Society, ex-officio. This scholarship is only offered for one year, but it is hoped to continue it for at least five years and to increase the amcunt to at least $200.00. This year it may be necessary to pay it in two installments, each one of seventy-five dollars. You will see that I have the honor to be chairman of this committee, and of course it is a personal pleasure to me to announce it. The secretary of the Society will probably send you the official announcement, and we all feel very grateful to Mrs. Newberry, who has been very eager to arrange this. Very sincerely, MARY C. HUTCHINS, On motion of Regent Knappen, the following promotions and reappointments were made in the Law Department by the full vote of the Board: To the Honorable, the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: Gentlemen-I respectfully recommend the following: The appointment of Mr. Frank L. Sage as Professor in the Law Department, at a salary of $3,000.00. The appointment of Mr. John R. Rood as Assistant Professor for three years in the Department of Law, at a salary of $I,6oo.oo. The appointment of Mr. Edson R. Sunderland as Assistant Professor for three years in the Department of Law, at a salary of $i,600.oo. The foregoing promotions will be in accordance with the action of the Board of Regents in making up the last University budget.. I further respectfully recommend the following appointments. for one year: Mr. John W. Dwyer, Instructor in Law, at a salary of $1,200.00.. Mr. Gustav Stein, Instructor in Law, at a salary of $9oo.o0. Honorable Henry H. Swan, Non-resident Lecturer on Admir — alty, at a salary of $350.00. Dr. Victor C. Vaughan, Lecturer on Toxicology in its Legal' Relations, without salary. Mr. Melville M. Bigelow, Non-resident Lecturer on Insurance,. at a salary of $500.00.

Page  365 JUNE MEETING, 1904. Honorable John B. Clayberg, Non-resident Lecturer on Mining Law and on Irrigation Law; salary as Lecturer on Mining Law, $300; Irrigation, $200. Prof. Richard Hudson, Lecturer on Comparative Constitutional Law, without salary. Prof. Henry C. Adams, Lecturer on the Railroad Problem, without salary. Prof. Joseph H. Drake, Lecturer on Roman Law, salary as provided, $400. Mr. Frank F. Reed, Non-resident Lecturer on Copyright Law and the Law of Trademarks, salary, $Ioo. Mr. Albert H. Walker, Non-resident Lecturer on Patent Law, salary, $300. Mr. Dallas Boudeman, Non-resident Lecturer on Statute Law, salary, $500. Dr. William J. Herdman, Lecturer on Neurology, Electrology, and Railway Injuries, without salary. Mr. Harlow P. Davock, Lecturer on Practice in Bankruptcy, salary, $Ioo. Assistant Prof. James W. Glover, Lecturer on Mathematics of Annuities and Insurance, without salary. Miss Gertrude Elstner Woodard, Assistant Law Librarian, salary, $900. Miss Katherine Rosewarne, Clerk, salary, $200. The Assistant in the Law Library has not as yet been secured, and a recommendation for this place will be made later. Respectfully submitted, H. B. HUTCHINS, Deali. Mr. George S. Field, custodian of the Williams fund, submitted his annual report, which was, on motion of Regent Barbour, received and placed on file with the Treasurer, and the Treasurer was directed to pay Mr. Field the sum of $50 for services in caring for this fund. On motion of Regent Dean, the following course of study was adopted in the Engineering Department by the full vote of the Board: ANN ARBOR, June 20, 1904. HON. JAMES B. ANGELL, President University of Michigan: Sir-I have the honor to submit to the Regents for their approval the following resolutions of the Faculty of the Department of Engineering, adopted at a regular meeting of the Faculty, June 7, I904:

Page  366 366 JUNE MEETING, I904. i. Resolved, That the first two years of work in the Department of Engineering be uniform for all students candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science, and as follows: FIRST YEAR Ist Semester. Mathematics, Language, English ) Chemistry, Drawing or Wood op Forge 4 hours 4 hours 4 hours 2d Semester. Mathematics, Language, English ) Chemistry Drawing 4 hours 4 hours 4 hours 4 hours I6 hours } or Wood 4 hours Shop { Forge } I6 hours SECOND YEAR. 2d Semester. Ist Semester. Mathematics, Physics, Language, Desc. Geometry or Freehand and Physics 3b 5 hours 5 hours 4 hours 4 hours Mathematics, Physics, Language, Desc. Geometry or Freehand and Physics 3b 5 hours 5 hours 4 hours 4 hours 18 hours I8 hours 2. Resolved, That students entering the Department of Engineering after Commencement of this year be not required to prepare a thesis for graduation, but in lieu thereof that they be required to take one hundred and forty (140) hours of work during the four 'years, including one Summer Session. 3. Resolved, That students now members of the Department of Engineering be permitted a choice of preparing a thesis for graduation, or, of taking an amount of work elected from among the courses offered in the department, but not required, the equivalent of a thesis, as may be determined by the head of the department in which the student seeks his degree. 4. Resolved, That the Regents be requested to authorize the Faculty of the Department of Engineering to prescribe and announce the conditions under which students may become candidates for the

Page  367 JUNE MEETING, 1904. 367 advanced degree of Marine Engineer, of Naval Architect, and of Chemical Engineer, corresponding to the requirements now in force leading to the degree of Civil Engineer, of Mechanical Engineer, and of Electrical Engineer. In explanation of these resolutions I beg to add some of the reasons leading to their adoption: I. In making the first two years uniform for all students the work of classification is much simplified, and the time, both of students and instructors, is distributed to better advantage. 2. The increase of the requirements for graduation to 140 hours with the omission of a thesis is no material increase over the old requirement of I30 hours plus a thesis. The thesis is considered to represent on an average about eight hours of work. As engineering students are now required to take six hours of work during one Summer Session, the work required of them during the four years of nine months each is really less than under the old arrangement. A further reason is that the great increase in the number of graduates makes it impossible to take care of the thesis with our present equipment and force of instructors. 3. The reasons for permitting students now in college a choice of a thesis or of its equivalent in elective work are that they may not be barred from graduating under the rules in force when they entered college, and that we may obtain immediate relief, to some extent at least, from the very large number of theses due from next year's graduating clas-s. 4. A desire that all courses of study in the department be placed on the same footing throughout explains the resolution covering the degrees of Marine Engineer, Naval Architect and Chemical Engineer. Respectfully submitted, M. E. COOLEY, Dean. Regent Dean moved that the Board offer Professor Gardner S. Williams of Cornell University a Professorship in the Engineering Department of this University at a salary of $3,500 a year, subject to the conditions in the President's letter of June, 1904; also Professor Willlams's letter of acceptance of Aug. 8, 1904. A call vote being taken, resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Lawton, Dean, Barbour, Fletcher, Carey, Knappen, and White. Nays-None. Regent Hill not voting.

Page  368 368 JUNE MEETING, I904. On motion of Regent Dean, Mr. Benjamin F. Bailey was reappointed Instructor in Electrical Engineering at a salary of $900 by the full vote of the Board. Regent Dean presented and read the following communication from Dr. Flemming Carrow: HENRY S. DEAN, ESQ., ANN ARBOR, May 27, I904. Ann Arbor, Michigan. MJy Dear Sir-May I ask you as a member of the Board of Regents to devise some scheme, or in some way to let the Clinical Professors know, whom they may admit to the hospital as patients? We are often confronted with the following conditions: Patients applying for admission and requiring immediate attention when the wards are full-what are we to do? Patients in easy circumstances and patients very poor-when there is not room for both classes in the hospital, to which of the two shall we give preference in the order of admission? Can we advise the former class to go to our private offices when they are perfectly willing to do so? When patients apply for and require treatment on days not our clinic days-shall they be allowed to go to our private offices if they so desire? Patients applying to the office for admission to our free clinic, who do not know we have private offices, and who prefer to go to our private offices if they had such knowledge. If you will kindly give us answers to these questions, it will greatly facilitate our work, and not put us in the position of feeling that we may be reported for some unintentional evasion of our duty. These questions have never been answered for us, and some of us at least have been in the habit of interpreting them from the standpoint of justice to the physician concerned. In other words, the hospital being full and there being ample material to illustrate our lectures, some of us have felt that we could take patients who were abundantly able to pay to our private offices. If we have been doing wrong, I, for one, wish to know it so that I may change my methods of procedure in such cases. I am, sir, Yours very truly, (Signed) FLEMMING CARROW. To which the Board by a unanimous vote made the following reply: In response to the request of one of the Clinical Professors of the Medical Department of the University of Michigan, that the Board of Regents formulate rules for the government of the Uni

Page  369 JUNE MEETING, I904. 369 versity Hospitals, and his guidance in the admission and treatment of patients, the following statement of the objects for which the University Hospitals were established, and rules governing their conduct, and the admission and treatment of patients are promulgated by the Board of Regents: Ist. The primary object for which the University Hospitals were established, and are maintained by the people of the State, is to furnish the Medical Faculty facilities for giving instruction to medical, students; and all patients admitted to these hospitals for medical or surgical treatment are admitted upon the express condition that they shall receive 'such medical or surgical treatment in the presence of medical students for the purpose of giving medical or surgical instruction: Hence, if the patient is valuable for the purposes of medical instruction, the-question whether the patient is rich or poor is not one which the duty of any employe of the University of Michigan requires him to investigate, or to remark upon either to the patient or in the presence of the students. 2nd. In no case shall any patient coming to the University Hospitals for treatment be subjected either directly or indirectly to any influence, pressure or inducement on the part of physicians in charge at the hospitals, or their' assistants, or by any employe of the University, to induce such patient to leave the hospital, and go to the private 'office, or private hospital, of any of the Hospital Physicians, or elsewhere for treatment. 3rd. Whenever a patient has been admitted into either of the hospitals for examination and treatment, and has been so registered, no hospital physician, or assistant physician, shall be allowed to treat such patient as his private patient for the relief of the ailment for which such patient has been admitted to the hospital, unless such patient shall have signified in writing to the Superintendent of the hospital his or her desire for such change. 4th. The Superintendent, the Hospital Physicians, the assistant physicians, the internes, nurses and all employes are hereby required to give all patients proper and prompt attention, and subject them to as little delay as possible, to the end that all persons coming to, the hospitals of the University of Michigan for medical or surgical treatment may do so with the full assurance and perfect confidence that they will receive speedy and considerate attention. 5th. The University of Michigan and not the physician shall furnish to patients in its hospitals any glasses, optical, surgical or other appliances which may be prescribed for their relief by the physician in charge of the case. 6th. It shall be the duty of the Superintendent of the Hospital, under the direction of the physician in charge of the case, to procure

Page  370 370 JUNE MEETING, 1904. and furnish to the patient such glasses, optical, surgical, or other appliances so directed by the physician in charge, at a reasonable cost. Professor M. E. Cooley announced that the Engineering Department had received from President A. J. Cassett of the Pennsylvania Railroad, the contract-cdrawings, specifications, etc., for the work in connection with the company's New York terminals. These came through Alfred Noble, Chief Engineer of the East River Division, and Charles N. Jacobs, Chief Engineer of the North River Division. On motion, the President was requested to acknowledge the receipt of the material, and to transmit the thanks of the Board to the parties named. On motion of Regent Barbour, the sum of $40 was appropriated for the purpose of meeting the expenses of a reception to be given by the University to the students in the Summer School. On motion of Regent Hill, the Lecture Association was permitted to announce one concert in their course, provided it should not be the opening number. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds was directed to furnish such janitor service as may be necessary to care for the buildings used by the Summer School. On motion of Regent Knappen, the Board took a recess until 2 o'clock p. Mi. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock P. M. On motion of Regent Dean, William S. Hazelton, A.B., B.S. (M.E.), was appointed Assistant Professor of Meclanical Engineering for one year, salary $1,6oo, by the full vote of the Board. At the May meeting, the Board allowed the department of Electrical Engineering to expend, in advance of the budget, $1,5oo for new equipment. Professor Patterson asked the Board to allow this sum to stand as a special fund for his department, but the Board voted that it must be

Page  371 JUNE MEETING, 1904. 871 deducted from the $15,000 allowed in the budget for new equipment in the Engineering Department. In the budget of 1903-1904 for the department, of Mechanical Engineering, $Ioo were allowed to cover the expenses of two instructors on the annual tour of inspection. As this money was voted for a specific purpose, and not used, the Secretary declined to allow this money to be expended for current expenses. Professor Cooley asked the Board to allow the department to use the $oo00 to cover an overdraft in their budget for current expenses, but the Board voted that the money must be returned to the General Fund. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the contract for putting an elevator in the Palmer Ward was awarded to the Gardner Elevator Company of Detroit for the sum of $600. The University is to move the present elevator, make all water and sewer connections to and from the valves, and between operating valve and cylinder, do the filling in after the cylinder is set, and provide a suitable pit in the basement floor. On motion of Regent Dean, Instructor C. D. Frank was granted leave of absence for one year without pay to pursue a course of study at Columbia University leading to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Regent Lawton presented and read a communication from Dr. Warthin relating to matters in the department of Pathology. No action was taken by the Board. On motion of Regent Lawton, Junior Professor Moses Gomberg was made Professor of Organic Chemistry at a salary of $2,500, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Hill, Charles W. Edmunds, Assistant in Pharmacology, was made Instructor in Pharmacology at a salary of $900, $200 of said salary to be carried on the pay roll of the Chemical Laboratory. Regent Lawton presented and read the following communication from Doctor Flemming Carrow in relation to admitting patients to the wards of the Hospitals from the Institution for the Employment of the Blind at Saginaw,

Page  372 372 JUNE MEETING, 1904. and the Board voted to admit such patients on the same conditions as patients are admitted from the State School at Coldwater: ANN ARBOR, June I, 1904. The President and Board of Regents of the.University of Michigan: Gentlemen —In conformity with the advice and sanction of the Medical Faculty, I have secured the appointment of Consulting Ophthalmologist to the Institution for the Employment of the Blind now' in course of erection at Saginaw. As this institution will furnish valuable cases for clinical instruction, I desire to ask the Board of Regents to pass a motion admitting these patients to the wards of the hospital under the same conditions as pupils are admitted who come from the State School at Coldwater and the School for the Blind at Lansing, I am, Yours very truly, FLEMMING CARROW. On motion of Regent Lawton, the following routine appointments were made for one year in the Department of General Chemistry: Alexis C. Houghton, Assistant, salary, $300. Lionel H. Duschak, Assistant, salary, $200. Oscar H. Wurster, Assistant, salary, $I50o. William D. McNally, Assistant, salary, $Ioo. Frederick W. Willard, Assistant, without salary. Carl J. Pa-ter, Assistant, without salary. Regent Lawton presented and read the following communication from Parke, Davis & Company of Detroit: DETROIT, MICM., May 9, 1904. DR. S. LAWRENCE BIGELOW, Chemical Laboratory, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. Dear Sir-Apropos of our conversation last Friday, we have pleasure in informing you of the renewal of the Parke, Davis & Company fellowship for the year 1904-1905. At the same time we beg leave to reserve the privilege of choosing the subject to which the recipient of the Fellowship shall address himself. With kindest regards, we remain, Very respectfully yours, PARKE, DAVIS & CO., E. G. Swcift, Gen'l Manager.

Page  373 JUNE MEETING, 1904. 373 Regent Lawton moved that the President be requested to transmit the thanks of the Board to Parke, Davis & Company for the continuance of their Fellowship, and that Mr. MW. H. Livingstone, Jr., the present holder of the Fellowship, be reappointed to the position for the coming year. It was so ordered by the Board. On motion of Regent Hill, Dr. Helen E. Brooks of Boston was appointed Physical Director of the Barbour Gymnasium for one year, at a salary of $I,200, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Hill, J. A. C. Hildner, Ph.D., was made Assistant Professor of German for three years, salary $I,600, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Lawton, the following appointments and reappointments recommended by the Medical Faculty were made in the Department of Medicine and Surgery by the full vote of the Board: Resolved,That Jeanne Solis, M.D., Demonstrator of Nervous Diseases and Electrotherapeutics, be reappointed without change in salary, $500. That Theophil Klingmann, Ph.C., M.D., Assistant in Diseases of the Mind and Nervous, System, be reappointed without change in salary, $200. That Vernon J. Willey, A.M., Instructor in Electrotherapeutics, be reappointed without change in salary, $Ioo. That James Frederick Munson, A.B., M.D., be appointed as Assistant in Hygiene in place of Louis M. Gelston and at the same salary, $400. That John Foster Eastwood, Ph.D., be appointed Assistant in charge of Water Analyses in place of Gordon Berry, A.B., and at the same salary, $300. That Cyrenus G. Darling, M.D., lecturer on Genito-Urinary and Minor Surgery and Demonstrator of Surgery, be reappointed without change in salary, $500. That Ira D. Loree, M.D., First Assistant in Surgery, be reappoinied at a salary of $400, which amount was granted by your honorable body in considering the budget recently. That Conrad Georg, A.B., M.D., Second Assistant in Surgery,. be reappointed without change in salary, $Ioo.

Page  374 374 JUNE MEETING, 1904. That Frederick R. Waldron, Ph.B., M.D., Third Assistant in Surgery, be reappointed without salary. That Charles Frederick Tenney, M.D., be appointed Fourth Assistant in Surgery without salary. That Charles Edgar Keeler, M.D., be appointed Fifth Assistant in Surgery without salary. That Raymond D. Sleight, M.D., be appointed Demonstrator of Ophthalmic and Aural Surgery, Rhinology, and Laryngology, in place of Edward A. Willis, M.D., at the same salary, $500. That John Edwin Gleason, A.B., M.D., be appointed Assistant in Ophthalmic and Aural Surgery in place of Raymond D. Sleight and at the same salary, $200. That Roger S. Morris, A.B., M.D., be reappointed Instructor in Internal Medicine and Demonstrator of Clinical Medicine without change in salary, $900. That David M. Cowie, M.D., be reappointed First Assistant in Internal Medicine without change in salary, $300. That Warren P. Elmer, M.D., be reappointed Second 'Assistant in Internal Medicine without change in salary, $200. That Fred Mortimer Abbott be reappointed First Assistant in Physiology without change in salary, $300. That Carl John Wiggers be reappointed Second Assistant in Physiology without change in salary, $300. That Augustus Henry Roth, A.B., M.D., be appointed Instructor in Anatomy at a salary of $900. It is proposed that Dr. Roth fill the places formerly occupied by himself and by Mr. Bachelder, and that the salary of the two be combined and given to Dr. Roth. This is a return to the original plan, and provides for no increased expenditure. That David Lewis Dunlap, B.S., be appointed Assistant Demonstrator in Anatomy in place of Dr. Frank R. Spencer and at the same salary, $200. That Leroy William Childs be appointed Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy in place of George G. Richards at the same salary, $200. That John Hibbard Pettis be appointed Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy in place of Lucius A. Farnham and at the same salary, $200. That Norma Bertha Ellis be appointed Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy in place of Lily Theresa Roche and at the same salary, $200. That Charles L. Patton, M.D., be appointed Demonstrator of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women in place of Thomas S. Burr, A.B., M.D., and at the same salary, $500.

Page  375 JUNE MEETING, 1904. 375 That Arthur P. Reed, A.B., M.D., be appointed First Assistant in Obstetrics and Diseases of Women in place of Charles L. Patton, M.D., and at the same salary, $500. That Christopher Gregg Parnall, A.B., M.D., be appointed Second Assistant in Obstetrics and Diseases of Wbmen in place of Arthur P. Reed, and at the same salary, $300. That Samuel Reese Haythorn, M.D., be appointed Assistant in Obstetrics and Diseases of Women in charge of laboratory work in place of Ralph L. Morse, M.D., and at the same salary, $500. That Harry Norton Torrey, B.S., be reappointed Assistant in Bacteriology without change in salary, $300. That David J. Levy, A.B., be reappointed Assistant in Bacteriology without change in salary, $300. That Boyden Nims, Ph.C., be reappointed Assistant in Physiological Chemistry without change in salary, $600. That Lydia M. DeWitt, B.S., M.D., be appointed Instructor in Histology at a salary of $900, allowed in your last budget. That James F. Breakey, M.D., be reappointed Assistant in Dermatology without change in salary, $200. That Don C. Urie, M.D., be appointed interne in University Hospital in place of D. L. Alexander, M.D., and at the same salary, $125. That Bertolet Perry Rosenberry, M.D., be appointed interne in University Hospital in place of E. D. Kremers, M.D., and at the same salary, $125. That David Maurice Kane, M.D., be appointed interne in University Hospital in place of Samuel Osborn, M.D., and at the same salary, $I25. That Jesse Durland Mars, M.D., be appointed interne in University Hospital in place of J. C. Ruleson, M.D., and at the same salary, $125. That Albert Edward Stripp, M.D., be appointed interne in University Hospital in place of M. B. Floyd, M.D., and at the same salary, $125. That Clarence Robert Wilcox, M.D., be appointed interne in University Hospital in place of W. S. Shipp, M.D., and at the same salary, $125. That James P. Briggs, Ph.C., be reappointed Pharmacist in University Hospital without change in salary, $750. That Ida M. Tracy be reappointed Superintendent of Training School for Nurses without change in salary, $60 per month. That Walter B. Pillsbury, Ph.D., be reappointed Special Lecturer on Physiological Psychology, without salary.

Page  376 376 JUNE MEETING, 1904. That Cressey L. Wilbur, M.D., Superintendent of Vital Statistics, be reappointed Special Lecturer on Vital Statistics, his expenses while giving these lectures to be paid by the University as heretofore. That Henry B. Baker, A.M., M.D., Secretary of the Michigan State Board of Health, be reappointed Special Lecturer on the Administration of Health Laws, his expenses while giving these lectures to be paid by the University as heretofore. That William M. Edwards, M.D., Superintendent of the Michigan Asylum, be reappointed Special Lecturer on Insanity, his expenses to be paid while giving these lectures by the University as heretofore. That Thomas D. Munson, M.D., Superintendent of the Northern Michigan Asylum, be reappointed Special Lecturer on Insanity, his expenses while giving these lectures to be paid by the University as heretofore. That Edmund A. Christian, A.B., M.D., Superintendent of the Eastern Michigan Asylum, be reappointed Special Lecturer on Insanity, his expenses while giving these lectures to be paid by the University as heretofore. That George L. Chamberlain, M.D., Superintendent of the Newberry Asylum, be reappointed Special Lecturer on Insanity, his expenses while giving these lectures to be paid by the University as heretofore. That Elijah M. Houghton, Ph.C., M.D., be reappointed Special Lecturer on the Preparation of Medicines, his expenses while giving these lectures to be paid by the University as heretofore. All of which is respectfully submitted. V. C. VAUGHAN, Dean. On motion of Regent Hill, the following routine appointments were made in the Department of Zoology for one year: Frances Dunbar, A.B., Assistant in Zoology, salary, $200. Arthur B. Clawson, A.B., Assistant in Zoology, salary, $150. William J. Marshall, Assistant in Zoology, salary, $150. Bertram G. Smith, Assistant in Zoology, salary, $I50. Ada L. Weckel, Assistant in Zoology, salary, $I50. Regent Hill presented and read the following communication, asking the Board to determine the distinctive features of the cap and gown to be worn by persons holding

Page  377 JUNE MEETING, I9.04. 377 the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, and on his motion the matter was referred to the University Senate for consideration: ANN ARBOR, June, I904. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: Gentlemen-At a meeting of the candidates for the doctorate held recently to discuss the propriety of wearing the cap and gown at commencement, it was decided that it would be entirely out of place for them to appear in cap and gown inasmuch as your Honorable Body had never sanctioned the distinctive part of the cap and gown for the doctorate; viz., the hood. Consequently we beg to remind you that many of the contemporaries of the University of Michigan, University of Wisconsin, University of Chicago, Johns Hopkins University, University of Pennsylvania, and others, have adopted the custom, and further that all candidates for degrees at the University of Michigan, except those for the doctorate, have now adopted it. Hence, we, as candidates for this degree this year, ask you to consider the question and give it your sanction in order that candidates following us may do their share to make this classical custom uniformly adopted at the University of Michigan. A. J. LADD, FREDERICK A. BALDWIN, HARRIET W. BIGELOW, W. J. MAcNEAI, E. N. TRANSEAU, FRANK A. BOHN, Per A. J. L. On motion of Regent Hill, Mr. H. W. March was reappointed Assistant in Astronomy for one year at a salary of $450, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Hill, Mr. W. D. Moriarty was appointed Assistant in Rhetoric for one year in place of R. R. Kirk, resigned, salary $3oo, by the full vote of the Board. Regent Hill moved that Ora Travis be appointed Assistant in Latin for one year without salary. It was so ordered by the Board. Thle President gave notice that the Honorable Dexter M. Ferry had renewed for the ensuing year the Fellowship

Page  378 378 JUNE MEETING, 1904. in Botany bearing his name, the same yielding an annual income of $500. The Board requested the President to convey to Mr. Ferry their thanks for his continued interest in the TUniversity. On motion of Regent Hill, it was voted that the following routine appointments be made in the Department of Botanv for one year: Alfred Dachnowski, A.M., to be Assistant, salary, $i0o. Nelson F. Macduff, to be Assistant, salary, $Ioo. Leroy H. Harvey, B.S., to be Ferry Fellow in Botany, $500. Alfred Dachnowski, A.M., to be Whittier Fellow in Botany, income, $200. On motion of Regent Hill, the sum of $430 was appropriated for the purchase of cards for cataloguing the General Library, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Hill, it was voted that 2,000 copies of the President's Baccalaureate address be printed for distribution. Regent Fletcher raised the question whether persons receiving honorary degrees should not be required to be present at the time the degree is conferred. The matter was referred to the University Senate for consideration. Regent Lawton moved that Mr. L. E. Whitman be appointed Instructor in Prosthetic Technic in the Dental Department for one year at a salary of $500, R. W. Bunting Assistant in Prosthetic Dentistry at a salary of $300, and that $I,ooo be allowed the Department for conducting Post Graduate courses during the coming year. It was so voted bv the full Board. Regent Fletcher moved that the following additional help be employed in the Engineering Shops during the summer vacation, for the purpose of building part of the equipment needed for the new Engineering Building, and that the expense be charged against the budget fund for the equipment of said building: 2 Mechanics at $2.50 a day.............................. oo I Machinist Helper at $I a day......................... I oo i Carpenter at $2.25 a day................................ 2 25

Page  379 JUNE MEETING, 1904. 379 The motion was carried on a call vote. 'Regent Fletcher moved that a committee of two be appointed by the Board to consider the feasibility of appointing a treasurer for all student organizations having anything to do with finances. The motion was carried and Regents Hill and Knappen were named as such committee. Regent Fletcher moved that Professor Allen and the Secretary open and classify the bids for the University supply of coal for the ensuing year, and report their conclusions to the Building Committee, who are hereby authorized to award the contract. The motion was carried by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Knappen, the Board took a recess until tomorrow (Wednesday) at io o'clock A. M. WEDNESDAY MORNING SESSION. The Board reassembled at io o'clock A. M. On motion of Regent Hill, $200 were added to the salary of Assistant Professor Van Tyne on account of additional service required during the absence of Professor McLaughlin. The President stated that he had received a cablegram from the Governor of the Philippine Islands to, the effect that Professor P. C. Freer had decided to remain in the service of the government and would therefore not return to take up his work again in the University, and that his resignation had been forwarded by mail. On motion of Regent Hill, Charles W. Wagner, Ph.D., was appointed Instructor in Romance Languages for one year, salary $I,200, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Barbour, it was voted that the Alumni present during Commencement week be invited to attend the Alumni dinner without charge. Professor Roth gove notice that the Forestry Department had received a. gift from the Champion Tool and Handle Company, of Evart, Michigan, of an unusually complete set of logging tools of the value of $30. The President was requested to transmit the thanks of the Board to

Page  380 380 JUNE MEETING, 1904. the Champion Company for their contribution to the equipment of the department of Forestry. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Forestry department and the Athletic Board were requested to consider the question of ornamenting the Athletic field with trees and report. The petition of Sylvester S. Boulger, a former member of the Literary Class of I904, was presented, asking that a diploma of graduation be given him notwithstanding the action of the -Faculty of the Literary Department finding him guilty of improper conduct in.connection with the business of the Students' Lecture Association, and expelling him from the Universitv. It appearing to the Board that competent testimony was presented to said Faculty in support of the charges made against said Boulger; that the action so taken was justified by the facts so found by the Faculty: that said Boulger was informed by the Faculty of the nature of the charges made against him and opportunity given him to meet the same, his petition that he be awarded a diploma of graduation notwithstanding such action by said Faculty was denied. It was, however, voted that if said Boulger shall see fit to present to this Board testimony by affidavit in support of his claim that said Faculty, in reaching the conclusion of fact found by it, was imposed upon by false testimony, the same will be considered by this Board in connection with the testimony so presented to said Faculty for the purpose of determining whether a review of the action of said Faculty is warranted. It was further voted that the Dean of the Literary Department be requested to furnish to the Secretary of this Board, for delivery to said Boulger if he shall so, desire, a written statement of the charges so made against said Boulger and the nature of the testimony presented to said Faculty in support of said charges. The petition of Charles G. Bailey, a former member of the Law Class of I904, was presented, asking that a diploma of graduation be given him notwithstanding the action of the Faculty of the Law Department finding him guilty of improper conduct in connection with the business of the

Page  381 JUNE MEETING, 1904. 381 Students' Lecture Association, and requesting him to withdraw permanently from the Law Department. This case being almost identical with that of Mr. Boulger, the Board voted that the action-taken in the case of Mr. Boulger's request should also govern in the case of Mr. Bailey, and the Secretary was directed to furnish each of the parties with a copy of the action of the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher, it was voted that the bill of the Detroit Lead Pipe Works of $80 be paid. Regent Fletcher moved that the Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds be authorized to furnish a horse and covered wagon for handling the laundry of the University at a cost not exceeding $250. It was so ordered on a call vote. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Board voted to purchase 126 double lockers for use in the new Engineering Building. Regent Barbour moved that $250 be appropriated for the purpose of making certain changes in the stage in Sarah Caswell Angell Hall, to enable the Dramatic Club and other student organizations to give their entertainments in that building. The motion was carried upon the condition that Regent Barbour would direct the work. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the care of the Ferry Field and other athletic grounds was put under the care of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds of the Board of Regents. On motion of Regent Barbour, Edward L. Adams was appointed Instructor in Modern Languages in the Engineering Department for one year, salary $900, by a full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent White, it was voted to authorize the Finance Committee to loan the gift funds of the University on bond and mortgage at 5 and 6 per cent, not exceeding five year periods. On motion of Regent Lawton, the following routine appointments were made in the Chemical. Laboratory for the year ending June 30, I905: Edward Lucas reappointed Dispensing Accountant, salary, $I,000.

Page  382 382 JUNE MEETING, I904. Herbert H. Willard, A.B., reappointed Assistant in Analytical Chemistry, salary, $700. Silas F. Scott, B.S., Assistant in Organic Chemistry, salary, $200. Paul E. Demmler, Assistant in Qualitative Chemistry, salary, $150. Lenwood A. Brown, Assistant in Qualitative Analysis, salary, $200. Oscar A. Eberbach, Assistant in Analytical Chemistry, salary, $200. Frank W. Obetz, Assistant in Chemical Technology, and for the State Geological Survey, without salary. Frederick G. Wahl, Assistant in Analytical Chemistry, salary, $I00. Adolph Ziefle, Ph.C., Assistant in Pharmacy, salary, $200. Carlos P. Long, Assistant in the Organic Laboratory, salary, $200. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Secretary was directed to give the contractor of the new Engineering Building notice that unless he proceeded with the work of completing his contract within three days after such notice was served upon him, the University would then finish the building and charge the cost of the same to his account. Professor M. E. Cooley is to furnish a list of the work yet to be done. On motion of Regent Fietcher, it was voted to pay the Buffalo Forge Company the balance of their account for work done in the Psychopathic Ward, provided they give a bond of $2,500 that the work will test out acording to contract during the coming winter. Regent Knappen submitted the following resolution, which was adopted by the full Board: Resolved, That the committee to whom was referred the, question of erecting an apartment building in Detroit be relieved for the present from the further consideration of the subject. A recess was then taken until 8 o'clock p. M.

Page  383 JUNE MEETING, 1904. 383 EVENING SESSION. The Board reassembed at 8 o'clock P. M. On motion of Regent Dean, it was voted that hereafter bonfires on the Campus are prohibited. On motion of Regent Knappen, it was voted that a bookcase be provided for the Law Library, to cost not exceeding $50, and that' additional shelving be placed in the Faculty room. The Board voted to allow George Hayler, Master Mechanic, six weeks vacation on account of his long service in the University. On motion of Regent Barbour, the method of collecting the cost of analyzing water in the Hygienic Laboratory was referred to the Executive Committee for consideration. Professor Reighard announced that he was desirous of sending the taxidermist and five competent collectors to the Porcupine Mountains, and to Isle Royale in the Upper Peninsula, on a scientific expedition, provided the sum of $250 and transportation could be furnished to cover the expenses, of which sum Mr. Bryant Walker of Detroit had contributed $ioo. Regent White announced to the Board that he would be responsible for the remaining $150, as Mr. N. M. Kaufman of Marquette was willing to contribute $50 of the amount. Regents Barbour and White, who were requested by the Board to go to Omaha, Nebraska, and inspect the property belonging to the University in that city, and to sell such parts of the real estate as thley might think best, submitted their report in detail, which was accepted and placed on file, and a bill of $6o.io covering the expenses of the trip was ordered paid, on a call vote. On motion of Regent Knappen, the President and Secretary, and Regents Hill and Dean, were requested to consider the best method of caring for the work heretofore done by the late Professor Pettee, in auditing the accounts, and editing the publications of the University, and to report at the next meeting of the Board. On motion of Regent Knappen, the President, Regents Lawton and White were asked to consider the best method

Page  384 384 JUNE MEETING, 1904. of providing for the work in Mineralogy, and to report at the next meeting of the Board. On the recommendation of the Executive Committee, the President was authorized by the full vote of the Board to confer the following honorary degrees on the persons named: Master of Arts. James Decker Munson, M.D., 1873, Superintendent of the Northern Michigan Asylum. Charles Lang Freer, of Detroit. Jesse Fonda Millspaugh, A.B., 1879, M.D., Principal of the Normal School at Los Angeles, California. The Right Reverend Gershom Mott Williams, Protestant Episcopal Bishop of the Diocese of Marquette. Doctor of Laws. Frederic Henry Gerrish, A.M., M.D., Professor in Bowdoin Medical College, formerly Lecturer in the Department of Medicine and Surgery of this University. Lawrence Maxwell, Jr., B.S., 1874, A.M., 1893, LL.B., of Cincinnati, Ohio, formerly Solicitor General of the United States. Charles Mills Gayley, A.B., 1878, Litt..D., L.H.D., Professor in the University of California. Calvin Thomas, A.B., 1874, Professor of Germanic Languages and Literature in Columbia University. Professor J. O. Reed, chairman of the Faculty of the Summer School, presented the following as the pay roll of the summer session, which was approved by the Board: PAY ROLL FOR SUMMER SESSION, 1904. GreekInstructor Duane Reed Stuart, 3 Courses $202 50 LatinProfessor F. W. Kelsey, I Course, 125 00 Junior Professor J. H. Drake, 2 Courses, 240 00 Instructor C. L. Meader, 3 Courses, 202 50 FrenchAssistant Prof. Jno. R. Effinger, 3 Courses, 270 oo

Page  385 JUNE MEETING, I904. 385 Spanish and ItalianJunior Professor M. Levi, I Course in each, GermanAssistant Prof. Tobias Diekhoff, 3 Courses, Instructor J. A. C. Hildner, 2 Courses, Instructor W. W. Florer, 2 Courses, English LiteratureProfessor I. N. Demmon, 2 Courses, Instructor L. A. Strauss, 2 Courses, RhetoricInstructor J. H. Thomas, 2 Courses, Instructor C. B. Morrill, I Course, ElocutionInstructor R. D. T. Hollister, 2 Courses, PedagogyProfessor W. H. Payne, 2 Courses, Professor A. S. Whitney, 2 Courses, HistoryAssistant Prof. C. H. Van Tyne, 2 Courses, PhilosophyProfessor R. M. Wenley, 2 Courses, Assistant Professor Geo. Rebec, 3 Courses, Political EconomyJunior Professor F. M. Taylor, 2 Courses, MathematicsProfessor W. W. Beman, 2 Courses, Assistant Prof. J. L. Markley, 3 Courses, Assistant Prof. J. L. Glover, 3 Courses, Instructor Win. Marshall, 2 Courses, Physics — Junior Professor J. O. Reed, 2 Courses, Instructor H. M. Randall, 3 Courses, Instructor A. W. Smith, 3 Courses, Instructor L. F. Morehouse, 2 Courses, ChemistryJunior Professor M. Gomberg, I Course Assistant L. H. Cone, 45 hours' we Instructor F. L. Dunlap, 3 Courses, Instructor W. G. Smeaton, 3 Courses, Instructor Geo. A. Hulett, 3 Courses, Instructor Wm. J. Hale, 2 Courses, Assistant Lionel Duschak 240 oo 270 oo 135 oo I35 00 300 oo I35 oo 135 oo 67 50 I35 oo 300 oo 300 oo I80 oo0 300 oo 270 oo 240 00 300 oo 270 oo 270 oo I35 oo ork, A 240 00oo 202 50 202 50 I35 oo 120 00 100 00 202 50 202 50 bsence 202 50 135 oo 50 oo

Page  386 386 JUNE MEETING, I904. BotanyInstructor J. B. Pollock, Instructor Geo. P. Burns, ZoologyInstructor C. C. Adams, Physical TrainingInstructor C. T. Teetzel, 3 Courses, 3 Courses, 3 Courses, 3 Courses, 202 50 202 50 202 50 150 00 ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. DrawingAsst. Prof. C. G. Wrentmore, 3 Courses, Instructor H. J. Goulding, 3 Courses, Instructor G. M. Bartlett, 3 Courses, Electrical EngineeringJunior Prof. G. W. Patterson, 2 Courses, MetallurgyInstructor A. H. White, 3 Courses, 213 75 202 50 202 50 240 00 202 50 MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. MedicineDr. Roger S. Morris, SurgeryDr. C. B. Nancrede, 3 Courses, 202 50 2 Courses, 300 oo GynecologyDr. R. Peterson, 3 Courses, PathologyDr. A. S. Warthin, 2 Courses, Dr. W. G. Carhart, Assisting Dr. Warthin, Physiological ChemistryMr. Boyden Nims, 3 Courses, BacteriologyMr. H. N. Torrey, 3 Courses, Embryology, Dr. Lydia M. DeWitt, 3 Courses, LAW DEPARTMENT. Pay Roll................................. Administration. Chairman John 0. Reed................... Secretary J. R. Effinger.................... Secretary G. Carl Huber................... Secretary E. C. Goddard.................. Librarian.................................. Absence 240 oo 240 00 75 oo 202 50 202 50 202 50 1,475 00 $I,466 25 $200 00 I00 00 I00 00 I00 00 25 00 $525 00

Page  387 JUNE MEETING, I904. 887 Advertising. Announcements (printing), General......... $314 20 Announcements (printing), Law and Medical 57 75 Announcements (distribution of), Kephart, I 6 hrs., @ 12.5 cts. per hr............. 14 50 R. G. H unt........................... 3 75 Sprague Pub. Co...................... 15 oo West Pub. Co........................ I2 00 Postal Cards, Geo. H. Pond............. 64 oo R. W. Baley.......................... 3 75 January and February................ I 80 C. F. Meyers....................... 4 00 $490 75 $12,482 00 On motion, the Board adjourned to Wednesday, July 20, at 0o o'clock A. M. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  388

Page  389 JULY MEETING. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, | ANN ARBOR, July 20, 1904. j The Board assembled in the Regents' room at 10 o'clock A. M., full Board present. The Secretary read the minutes of the last meeting, which were, on motion of Regent Hill, approved and -ordered printed. Communications which had reached the President were placed in the hands of the standing committees of the Board for consideration. The Hon. Delos Fall, Superintendent of Public Instruction, addressed the Board in relation to the establishment of a chair of Economic Geology in the University. Judge V. H. Lane and Director Charles Baird addressed the. Board on matters relating to athletics. On motion of Regent White, the sum of $I25 was appropriated for the purpose of paying the transportation of the taxidermist and five competent collectors on a scientific expedition to the Upper Peninsula, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Dean, Frederick J. Menger was appointed Instructor in German in the Engineering Department for one year at a salary of $900, by the full vote of the Board. Professor E. D. Campbell gave notice that the Michigan State Gas Association had renewed its support of the fellowship in Gas Engineering which it has sustained during the past four years. And on motion of Regent Dean, Mr. David Homer Clary was appointed as the holder of the fellowship for the coming year, and the President was requested to transmit to the state Gas Association the thanks of the Board.

Page  390 390 JULY MEETING, 1904. Professor M. E. Cooley, Dean of the Engineering Department, asked the Board to authorize the appointment of an Instructor in Machine Design at a salary of $900, with the understanding that the salary should be increased $Ioo a year until the sum of $I,200 was reached. No action was taken by the Board on this request. On motion of Regent Dean, Mr. Mortimer C. Nichols was appointed Assistant to the Associate Dean of the Engineering Department, for one year. Salary $200. And Mark H. Gregg, M.E., was appointed Assistant in Mechanical Engineering for one year, salary $200, by the full vote of the Board. Regent Dean moved that the salary of Benjamin F. Bailey, A.M., Instru ctor in Electrical Engineering, be increased from $900 to $I,200, and that said increase ($300) be taken from the budget for the department of Electrical Engineering. The motion was carried on a call vote. Regent Barbour presented and read the following communication from Professor I. N. Demmon: ANN ARBOR, July 20, I904. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: I have much pleasure in announcing that Dr. Henry Smith Jewett (A.B. I868) of Dayton, Ohio, has presented to the University a complete set of the various issues of Fractional Currency put out by the United States Government during the Civil War and Reconstruction Periods. The collection contains seventy-eight 'specimens (no duplicates), nearly all of which are fresh, uncirculated copies, having been obtained from the banks at the date of issue from time to time. Accompanying this collection is also a stamp-book containing, among others, a nearly complete set of the "Documentary stamps" of all denominations issued by the government during the Civil War. The entire collection is valued at two hundred and fifty dollars and is presented in the hope that it may be properly mounted and preserved in the University, as an object lesson "to our children, of the necessities of our government when its life was in danger." Respectfully submitted, ISAAC N. DEMMON. On motion of Regent Barbour, the gift was accepted, and the President was requested to transmit the thanks of

Page  391 JULY MEETING, I904. 391 the Board to Dr. Jewett. The Board appropriated the sum of $25 to mount the collection. On motion of Regent Lawton, May Wheeler, Ph.D., was appointed Assistant in Hygiene for one year at a salary of $600, by the full vote of the Board. Regent Lawton moved that the salary of Assistant to the Chair of Nervous Diseases be made $500, an increase of $300 over the present salary, and that patients receiving electrical treatment be required to pay to the Superintendent of the Hospital $i for each treatment. The motion was carried by the unanimous vote of the Board. Col. James' Gay Butler of St. Louis, Mo., was a member of the class of I86I, from the time it entered the University in 1857 to the spring of I86I, when he left college (three months before graduation) to enter the army, Mr. Butler's record being perfect up to the time of his leaving college. Regent Barbour moved that the degree of Bachelor of Science be conferred upon- James Gay Butler as of the class of 186I. It was so ordered by the unanimous vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Treasurer was authorized to pay the Whitney Furniture Manufacturing Company of Detroit 50 per cent of their contract for placing furniture in the new Engineering Building. Regent Barbour moved that Superintendent Reeve be requested to inspect the two houses built by Mr. Holden on lots belonging to the University in West Detroit, and if found according to contract, that the Treasurer be authorized to pay Mr. Holden the balance due him on his contract, $1,500. It was so ordered on a call vote. Regent Lawton moved that the resignation of Professor P. C. Freer as Professor of General Chemistry and Director of the Laboratory of General Chemistry, be accepted, and that the Laboratory be merged with the Chemical Laboratory'under the direction of Dr. A. B. Prescott. The motion was carried on a call vote. The Board then tool a recess until 2 o'clock P. M.

Page  392 392 JULY MEETING, 1904. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock P. M. Regent Barbour moved that $50 be appropriated for the purpose of enabling the Students' Christian Association to get out a hand book of information for new students. The motion was carried on a call vote. Regent Hill presented and read the following communication from Professor V. M. Spalding, and on motion the resignation was accepted by the Board: WITCH CREEK, CALM., July 12, I904. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: Gentlemen-I present herewith my resignation of the chair of botany in the University of Michigan, to take effect October I, I904. In retiring from service in the University, permit me to thank your honorable body for the year's leave of absence, which has enabled me to satisfactorily conduct an investigation at the Desert Botanical Laboratory of the Carnegie Institution. The title of professor emertitus, conferred upon me at a recent meeting, I most respectfully decline. Very truly yours, V. M. SPALDING. On motion of Regent Hill, Miss Bertha Stewart was reappointed Assistant in the Barbour Gymnasium for one year.. Salary $550. On motion of Regent Hill, HIenry H. Armstrong, A.M., was appointed Assistant in Latin for the ensuing year without salary. On the recommendation of Professor Beman, and on motion of Regent Hill, John William Bradshaw, Ph.D., was appointed Instructor in Mathematics for one year in place of Instructor W. B. Ford, resigned. Salary $900. On motion of Regent Hill, J. Sharpless Fox was appointed Assistant in American History for one year, salary $600, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Dean, the Board authorized the appointment of one additional Instructor in Mathematics for the next college year at a salary of $900. Regent Hill moved that S. Lawrence Bigelow, Ph.D., be

Page  393 JULY MEETING, I904. 393 made Junior Professor of General Chemistry for three years, salary $2,000, and that Instructor George A. Hulett, Ph.D., 1e made Assistant Professor of Physical Chemistry for three years, salary $I,600. A call vote on this motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Hill, Lawton, Dean, Carey, Knappen and White. Nays-None. Regents Fletcher and Barbour not voting. Regent Hill moved that the Director of the Chemical Laboratory be allowed a clerk at a salary of $600. It was so ordered by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Lawton, Harry Stowe McGee, A.B., M.D., was appointed Assistant in Gynvecology for one year without salary. On motion of Regent Lawton, the title of Dr. Julius O. Schlotterbeck was made Junior Professor of Pharmacognosy and Botany, and his salary $2,000 from October i, I904, by the unanimous vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Secretary was authorized to enter into contract with the Ohio & Michigan Coal Co. to furnish the University's supply of coal for the ensuing year at $2.28 per ton for Cambridge, run of mine, F. O. B. Ann Arbor, provided they will furnish a satisfactory contract and bond. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Executive Committee were requested to look up an Instructor in Mineralogy at a salary of from $900 to $1,200, and report to the Board. The following communication was presented by Regent Lawton and adopted by the full Board: "It being found necessary to interpret the regulations adopted at the last meeting of the Board of Regents governing the matter of procuring appliances, etc., which may be prescribed by the physician in charge for the relief of patients in the hospitals of the University, it is hereby declared by the Regents that all appliances of every kind furnished by the University shall be procured by the Superintendents of the Hospitals in accordance with the prescription given by the physician, and each appliance when received shall be given to the physician in charge of the case for him to fit and adjust the appliance as the case may

Page  394 394 JULY MEETING, 1904. require. The responsibility and care of the patient treated rests with the physician in charge of the case, the only connection had by the Superintendents with such matters being that they shall order the appliances that may be prescribed by the physicians." On motion of Regent Hill, $Ioo was added to the annual salary of George Lutz, Master Painter, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Barbour, it was voted that the house on North University Avenue, known as the Perry house, be put in order and rented. Regent Lawton moved that inasmuch as the National Dental Association had voted to return to a three-year course for the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery, the Dental Faculty be required to arrange their course in conformity with the action of the National Association. It was so ordered by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Dean, it was voted to name the Dental Museum the Ford-Mitchell Museum, and to name the Dental Library the Dr. Ford Library. On motion of Regent Lawton, the Dental Faculty were allowed to use $1oo from their budget fund for the purpose of mounting material in the Dental Museum. On motion of Regent Hill, C. M. Jansky, A.B., was appointed as Assistant in Physics on full time at a salary of $600 for the academic year. Oh motion of Regent Knappen, the Secretary was authorized to pay the Alumni Association $56.53 to cover an error in the estimated cost of sending out 25,000 circular letters to the Alumni in relation to a memorial building upon the campus. The budget for the Chair of Diseases of Women and Children in the Department of Medicine and Surgery is derived from the income of the Bates bequest, and no action having been taken by the Board to provide a budget for this chair, the matter was, on motion, referred to the Finance Committee for consideration. On motion the Board adjourned to Thursday, September 22, I904, at TO o'clock A. M. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

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Page  395 SEPTEMBER MEETING UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, September 22, I904. The Board assembled in the Regents' room at 10 o'clock A. M. Full Board present. The Secretary read the minutes of the last meeting, which were, on motion of Regent Barbour, approved and ordered printed. Communications which had reached the President were placed in the hands of the standing committees of the Board for consideration. The President stated that the minutes of the May meeting should be corrected by changing the title of Edward D. Jones, Ph.D., from Assistant Professor to Junior Professor of Commerce and Industry, salary, $2,000. It was so ordered by the full Board. The President presented and read his annual report, after calling Regent Knappen to the chair. The report is as follows: THE PRESIDENT'S REPORT. To the Board of Regents: I offer to you my annual report for the year ending September 22, I904. In reviewing the year our attention is at once arrested by the great loss which the University has sustained in the death of three of its older Professors. In no previous year of its history has such a calamity befallen the Institution. Charles Ezra Greene, A.M., C.E., Professor of Civil Engineering and Dean of the Engineering Department, died suddenly on October 16, I903, aged 61 years. He had held the Professorship for thirty-one years, and the Deanship since I895, when the Department of Engineering became a

Page  396 396 SEPTEMBER MEETING, I904. separate organization. He graduated at Harvard University and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and had experience in his profession before coming to us. He was distinguished by simplicity and lucidity in his teaching. His writings won reputation for himself and for the University both in this country and in Europe. His high personal and professional character exerted a most elevating influence upon his pupils and commanded the respect of all who knew him. It is most gratifying that the Chicago Engineering Alumni have presented the University with an excellent oil portrait of him, and the undergraduate engineering students are to place a bronze tablet to his memory on the wall of the New Engineering Building. Jonathan Taft, M.D., D.D.S., Professor, and until within a month of his decease, Dean of the Department of Dental Surgery, died suddenly at the age of 83, on the same day as Professor Greene. When that Department was established in I875, he was entrusted with the important work of organizing it and he largely shaped its policy and administered its affairs down to the day of his death. Perhaps no member of his profession was more widely known or more generally respected both for his professional knowledge and his pure and attractive character. Even in his advanced years he set the highest standard of work in his profession. In fact he cherished so lofty ideals that it has proved impracticable to hold the profession generally up to them. But they and we owe him a debt of gratitude for the high aims which he cherished and for the inspiration he gave to so many of his brethren. William Henry Pettee, A.M., Professor of Mineralogy, Economic Geology and Mining Engineering, was first called to the chair of Mining Engineering in I875, when the Legislature made an appropriation' for two years for a Mining School. Unhappily the next Legislature did not renew the appropriation, but some years later established a separate mining school at Houghton. Professor Pettee was therefore asked to devote his time chiefly to Mineralogy, though he gave some instruction in Economic Geology. He had been thoroughly trained first at Harvard University, of which institution he was a graduate, afterwards at the re

Page  397 SEPTEMBER MEETING, 1904. 397 nowned mining school at Freiburg in Saxony, and in field work in California under Professor Whitney. He was a most conscientious and faithful teacher. For years he has been of the greatest service to the University in fields quite apart from his teaching, namely, as auditor of the accounts of the University and as editor of its official publications, the Calendar and Departmental Announcements. No other person was so familiar as he with the details of our finances. The lucid and exact financial statement, which for the last two years has been appended to the President's report, was from his pen. His minute acquaintance with our statutes, usages and traditions, and his proverbial accuracy as compiler and proof-reader, made our publications models of their kind. His lovable spirit endeared him to all his colleagues. He had been a sufferer for many months from the malady to which he finally yielded on May 26 last. He was 6I years of age. The year may be fairly described as one of earnest and successful work and of normal prosperity. The total attendance as reported in our Calendar was 3,957, or excluding the attendance in the Summer School in I903, 3,659. As compared with the previous years there was a.gain in the total attendance of I54, or excluding the Summer School, of 130. Nearly 56 per cent are from Michigan. But we are constantly surprised and gratified that so many excellent students continue to come to us from states which have strong colleges and universities, as for instance during the last year 321 from Illinois, 309 from Ohio, I89 from New York, 163 from Indiana, I22 from Pennsylvania, 52 from Missouri, 24 from California, 23 from Massachusetts, 15 from Connecticut and 17 from New Jersey. There were 63 from New England, every state being represented. We had representatives from every state except Delaware and South Carolina, from every territory except Alaska, from all our new possessions, Hawaii, Porto Rico, and the Philippines, and from the following states and provinces: Germany, Holland, Turkey, Arabia, Bulgaria, Japan, Mexico, Columbia, Cuba, England, Jamaica, Ontario, Quebec and Nova Scotia. What better proof can be given to our citizens who

Page  398 398 SEPTEMBER MEETING, I904..are maintaining the University that in the opinion of the world it is holding an honorable position, of which the state may well be proud, among the foremost universities of the country? The number of women in attendance was as follows (exclusive of the Summer School): Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts..... 663 Department of Medicine and Surgery.............. 32 Department of Law............................... 4 School of Pharmacy.............................. 4 Homceopathic Medical College..................... 11 College of Dental Surgery....................... 2 716 The preceding year the number was 714. The number of women exceeding by only two that of the previous year, and the increase in the number of men being 426, the ratio of women to men in the University is less by two per cent, eighteen per cent in I903-4 as against twenty per cent in I902-3. The attendance of women in the Professional Schools scarcely changes. In the Literary Department the ratio in 1903-4 is four and nine-tenths per cent; in I902-3 it was five and two-tenths per cent. The change in the ratio of the sexes in the University is due mainly to the rapid growth of the Engineering Department, in which no women are enrolled. Judging from the statistics of attendance for the last few years, the indications seem to be that the proportion of women to men in the Literary Department is not likely to increase, while in the entire University it is likely to diminish. While there is no striking change in the attendance in five of our seven departments, the change in the numbers in the two others is worthy of attention. In the Engineering Department the attendance rose from 609 in I902-3 (which was a gain of 120 over that of preceding year) to 823, an increase of I I4. And at this time there is a prospect that nearly,000o students will be registered in the Department for the year 1904-5. If this movement continues for three or, four years, the Engineering students will equal if not surpass in number those in the

Page  399 SEPTEMBER MEETING, 1904. 399 Literary Department. And a similar tendency is observable in all parts of the country. Young men are in great numbers seeking to train themselves in the application of the sciences to the practical arts and especially to those which we are accustomed now to group under the general name of engineering. The stronger technological schools and the technological departments in the universities are finding their resources taxed to the utmost to accommodate the rapidly increasing classes. All this is due, no doubt, to the calls which the recent extraordinary development of our manufacturing industries is making for young men competent to direct them and to the rapidity with which the competent graduates of these schools rise to well remunerated and responsible positions in their profession. To make adequate provision for the instruction of these eager and ambitious students is a serious task for us and for other institutions. For of all education, that in science and its applications is by far the most costly. We have been obliged to erect the largest and most expensive building on our grounds for the reception of these hundreds of engineering students, and the proper equipment of it calls for an immense outlay. To aid in providing for this outlay would be one of the most welcome and appropriate means, by which some of our great industrial companies, who are ultimately to reap benefits from this training of young men to assist them in their work, could supplement the gifts of the state. In the Dental Department the numbers have constantly and rapidly declined from the time that we established the four years' course. Four years ago there were 273 dental students, while last year there were only 94. With the high ideal of professional attainment which was always cherished by Dean Taft our school was one of the foremost in advocating a thorough four years' course for all the reputable schools in the country. The schools which comprise the National Dental Association at last promised to take this forward step. The Regents therefore established a rigorous four years' course as the condition of graduation in dentistry. But to our surprise few of the schools had the courage to live up to the standard which they had voted to adopt. Some of the largest adhered to the old three years'

Page  400 400 SEPTEMBER MEETING, I904. course. After long and repeated debates in the national society, that association has finally decided to approve the three years' course. It was plain that under this condition, the students would resort to the three-year schools. In the contest our numbers had declined nearly two-thirds. Re — luctantly we have found ourselves compelled to abandon for the present the reform for which we had labored and to content ourselves with holding firmly to our requirements for admission, which are higher than those of many schools, and with making some valuable special provisions for graduate work to be done by the more aspiring students. The experiment we tried last year in that direction by securing distinguished lecturers on special topics was attended with gratifying results which encourage us to repeat it under conditions still more promising. We hope to keep the school at the relatively high standing, which it has long maintained. The Department of Medicine and Surgery finds its new laboratory building and its enlarged hospital accommodations of the greatest service. It is generally conceded by our best educators that in no branch of instruction has so great improvement been made in the last twenty years as in med — ical teaching. With our energetic and competent Faculty, themselves trained in the best scientific methods of observation and induction and winning reputation for themselves and the University by valuable original researches in their various departments, with our ample laboratory accommodations, with clinical facilities which bring every student directly to the bedside of the patient, and with the enforcement of the most exacting demands on the time and energy of the classes, we have reason to believe that results are secured which deservedly give the school its enviable reputation throughout the country and even beyond the sea. The Law School, which from the signal ability of its first professors at its very foundation was largely attended, has continued year by year to attract students in increasing numbers from far and near, until now it has the largest attendance of any law school in the country. And in none, it is believed, is better instruction offered by the Faculty or more strenuous work done by the students. If there

Page  401 SEPTEMBER MEETING, 1904. 401 was ever any foundation for the tradition that the task of the law student was less serious than that of students in other departments of the University, that day is past. And here, as in medical teaching, old methods have in large degree been supplanted by new methods, which compel the student to familiarize himself with the same kind of investigation and preparation which he will have to resort to later in the practice of his profession. The Homceopathic Medical College pursues the even tenor of its way with about the same number of students from year to year. The hostility with which it was pursued for some time by members of the profession it was established to help appears to have abated in large degree. As the students take a considerable part of their work with the classes in the Department of Medicine and Surgery, much of what has been said of the training of the students in that department is applicable to these. The school justly has a high standing among the Homceopathic Medical Colleges of the country. The School of Pharmacy seems to have reached its normal development and carries about the same number of names on its roll from year to year. The high reputation of its Dean among the pharmacists of the country will secure for the school general respect so long as he guides its work. The establishment of courses in our mathematical department, intended to train men for the work of actuaries or other officers in insurance companies has attracted much attention and has received warm commendation from the journals which represent these companies. Prominent business men have spoken in terms of warm approbation of our work in Higher Commercial Education. There are many gratifying signs of a change in the opinions of leading merchants and bankers, who formerly doubted the value of a college education for men who are engaged in their pursuits. They now encourage us in our efforts to furnish some special training for those who look forward to responsible posts in business life. The attempt to furnish instruction in Forestry is attracting attention. The manufacturers of implements needed by

Page  402 402 SEPTEMBER MEETING, I904. foresters have been prompt to aid us in securing the proper outfit. Regent Arthur Hill has rendered us a most timely service by purchasing and presenting to us 80 acres of land three miles west of the University. At his request this tract is to be known as the Saginaw Forestry Farm. It is admirably suited to experimental purposes. There seems every prospect that through our cooperation with the State Forestry Commission we shall by the training of competent foresters render valuable service to the country and especially to this state, which more than most states needs the aid of such men to impart value to lands that have been rendered worthless by the reckless destruction of forests. The Library Building has been greatly improved by the construction of the new mosaic floor, the rearrangement of seats so as to accommodate a hundred more students in the reading room, and by better ventilation. But it will remain inadequate to our pressing needs until several seminary rooms are added. The Library now contains 182,680 volumes, 4,000 pamphlets and 2,250 maps. Librarian Raymond C. Davis, at his own request, has been permitted to lay down his office, while in appreciation of his long and faithful services you have asked him to remain as Librarian Emeritus, with the understanding that he will continue to give instruction in Bibliography. Mr. Davis has been connected with the Library as Assistant Librarian four years, and as Librarian twenty-seven years. He has seen the Library grow from 25,000 volumes to its present size. His fidelity and devotion to duty could not be surpassed, while his winsome personality and his willingness to assist every reader have endeared him to all who have ever had occasion to visit the Library. Mr. Theodore W. Koch, who has been connected with the Congressional Library, has been appointed Assistant Librarian. He is believed to be familiar with the best methods of library administration. Nothing is more essential to the greatest usefulness of the University than the efficient administration of the Library. In the basement of the Library we have for two years used a small printing plant in connection with our bindery. It has proved a great convenience in executing our minor

Page  403 SEPTEMBER MEETING, I904. 403 jobs of printing. The success with which it has been managed has suggested the inquiry whether we might not wisely install a larger printing plant. I suggest that careful estimates be obtained to ascertain whether it would not be economical, as it would certainly be convenient, to print ourselves our Calendar, Announcements, and other matter, now costing us a pretty large sum. At the Observatory Professor Hall has been engaged with the meridian circle in determining the places of a list of 5th and 6th magnitude stars. His observations of the zenith distances of Polaris which were made some years ago with the same instrument for the determination of the aberration constant, have been printed. Miss Harriet W. Bigelow has reduced and printed her observations of the declinations of certain circumpolar stars, the places of which were asked for by the German Astronomical Society. The Hospitals continue to commend themselves to the public by their beneficent services to the suffering. Established primarily to furnish illustrative material for the medical students, they are one of the most useful public charities in the state. For those in need of the best medical and surgical aid are here carefully treated at the most moderate cost. Not a few who had been a public charge on the counties are restored to health and thus enabled to earn their own living. The University Hospital received during the year 2,382 patients, the Homceopathic 1,727. These patients represent seventy-six counties of the state. The provision made last year for the treatment of persons bitten by dogs supposed to be mad proved to be most timely. About thirty cases presented themselves and all were treated successfully. After some hesitation we finally yielded to the urgent request of the Michigan State Commission on the Louisiana Purchase Exposition to make an exhibit at St. Louis. Our hesitation was due to the opinion of most of the universities which like us made costly exhibits at the Chicago Exposition that so far as could be seen little benefit accrued to the institutions from the large outlay there made. We fitted a booth, however, in a tasteful manner, and it has attracted

Page  404 404 SEPTEMBER MEETING, 1904. no little attention, and has been gladly visited by many of our alumni. Some of our very loyal and zealous graduates resident in St. Louis early conceived the idea of having a special day set apart with the approval of the Exposition authorities for a rally of the alumni of this University. June twentyeighth was selected as the time. The occasion was one of great gratification to the large number of our graduates who participated in the celebration. Admirable addresses were made by the President of the Exposition, Gov. Francis, the Secretary, Mr. Stevens, who is one of our Alumni, the Mayor of St. Louis, President Smith of the Michigan State Commission, the President and some of the professors of the University, and by alumni. A formal reception, largely attended, was held at the Michigan Building in the evening. Our thanks are due to the St. Louis alumni and to the State Commission, who spared no pains to make the event memorable. An important change was made this year in the organization of the Summer School of the Medical and Law Departments. They have heretofore been carried on by permission of the Regents through the personal enterprise of some members of the Faculties, as that of the Literary Department was for a time. The teachers who chose to do so offered instruction and received as compensation the fees which were paid. Since it was not at first certain what demand there would be for such instruction the opening of those schools was treated as experimental. But it having been demonstrated by trial that there is a permanent call for these professional schools, it has been deemed best to bring them like the Summer School of the Literary and Engineering Departments under the direct control of the Regents and thus impart to them a certain dignity and stability, which would add to their strength. Accordingly, in all branches of the Summer School alike, the teachers were appointed this year by the Regents on fixed salaries, and the fees received were paid into the University treasury. It is believed that this has proved advantageous. The number of students during the session of this last summer has been as follows:

Page  405 SEPTEMBER MEETING, I904. 405 Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts..... 398 Department of Engineering........................ 96 Department of Medicine and Surgery.............. 65 Department of Law.............................. 88 647 It was gratifying to observe that more students of an advanced grade were present than ever before, including principals and superintendents of schools and college professors. We have frequently had occasion to regret that we have not more permanent foundations for fellowships for graduate students. Most of the stronger universities have received sums for the endowment of a considerable number of such fellowships, which secure the attendance of brilliant and promising scholars. A good many of our most gifted graduates are thus every year called away to other institutions. But we desire to recognize with gratitude the generosity of some of our friends who continue each year to renew their support of fellowships for special study and research. These benefactors have been Hon. Dexter M. Ferry, who maintains a Fellowship in Botany; Parke, Davis & Co., a Fellowship in Chemistry; Frederick Stearns, a Fellowship in Music, and Theodore D. Buhl, a Fellowship in the Classics. One of the Rockefeller Research Fellowships, distributed among medical colleges, was assigned to us. It was a Fellowship in Pathology. Mrs. John S. Newberry now presents us with a Fellowship in the Classics for the coming year. We have also received from Mr. Joseph Bradford Whittier of Saginaw the gift of $400 for the permanent endowment of a Fellowship in Botany in memory of his mother, Angeline Bradford Whittier. The Michigan State Federation of Women's Clubs has presented us with $3,000 as a part of the fund they hope to raise for the Lucinda Hinsdale Stone Supplementary Loan Scholarship Fund. The avails of this fund are to be used for the benefit of women who are students in the University. The Fund is a memorial to a woman who was active throughout her life in securing to women the largest oppor

Page  406 406 SEPTEMBER MEETING, 1904. tunities for their education, and whose scholarship and public services were recognized by the University in the bestowal upon her of an honorary degree. We have also been gratified by receiving from the Society of Colonial Dames of America in Michigan a gift of $I50 for the maintenance of the Elizabeth A. Rathbone Scholarship in American History for the coming year, to be offered to some one of our women students. The society hope to continue this scholarship with larger support in the years to come. These associations of women can in no way contribute more effectively to the high ends they have in view than by thus assisting young women of signal promise to pursue their studies. Another very welcome gift is that of Mr. Hamilton Carhartt of Detroit, of $I50 a year to be given to the honor debaters who represent this University in the Central Debating League. It will be remembered that the debating teams of this institution have been signally successful in contests with other eastern and western universities, and have won high reputation for themselves and for the University. In these days when athletic contests between universities attract so much attention, and, as many think, undue attention, it is pleasant to have such a recognition as this of interest in purely intellectual contests. This testimonial will very properly bear Mr. Hamilton Carhartt's name. As we now come to the threshold of another academic year, and see the many and pressing demands which the University by its very prosperity makes upon us who are charged with the care of it, we cannot but feel keenly the weight of the trust which the people of the State have confided to us. We exert ourselves to the utmost to make sure that the people shall have no good reason to consider the support of the institution an unwelcome burden. But we cannot forget that in its halls we are to secure to their children the opportunity for as sound and useful and inspiring an education as is afforded in any other American university. It was with that high aim that the fathers founded the University of Michigan. And to the best of our ability with the means which the people place in our

Page  407 SEPTEMBER MEETING, I904. 407 hands we strive to meet the expectations of the fathers. And it is well for our fellow citizens to know that the University is administered at an expense of from one-half to two-thirds of that of the few great universities with which it is wont to be compared. We believe, therefore, that the State which has so faithfully supported us in our efforts to make the University of greater service with each succeeding year to this great Commonwealth will continue to sustain us in all wise and reasonable attempts to increase its power for good in the future. JAMES B. ANGELL. On motion the report-was adopted and the Secretary was directed to print the usual number of copies for distribution. On motion of Regent Lawton, Elmer P. Butterfield was appointed Instructor in Pathology in place of Dr. Baldwin, resigned, salary $900, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Board voted that the barns and mechanical shops should be removed from the Campus as soon as the Board can see their way clear to do so, and a committee of three, consisting of Regents Fletcher, Carey and Knappen, was raised to consider and report where these shops should be located when they are taken from the Campus. The President reported the following action of the Executive Committee during the intermission of the Board, which was approved by the full vote of the Board. ANN ARBOR, Sept. 20, I904. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: Gentlemen-The Executive Committee beg to report that to fill a vacancy they appointed in August Mr. Louis Karpinski, Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics for three years at the salary of $i,200. Also in September they appointed Edward H. Kraus, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mineralogy for the coming year at the salary of $i,6oo. JAMES B. ANGELL. LEVI. L. BARBOUR. HENRY S. DEAN. Regent Lawton presented and read the following communication from Dr. Fleming Carrow, and the resignation was accepted by the Board.

Page  408 408 SEPTEMBER MEETING, I904. ANN ARBOR, July 5, I904. To the President and the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: Gentlemen-I beg to tender my resignation as Professor of Ophthalmic and Aural Surgery, Laryngology, and Clinical Ophthalmology in the University of Michigan. In order that the work of this important department may not be interrupted, I shall be very glad to serve the University until you have satisfactorily secured a successor. I am, Gentlemen, Yours very respectfully, FLEMMING CARROW. On motion of Regent Lawton, the resignation of Dr. Raymond D. Sleight, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology in the Department of Medicine and Surgery, was accepted, and the President was requested to ask for the resignation of John E. Gleason, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology in the same department. Professor John O. Reed presented and read his report on the work of the Summer Session. And on motion the report was accepted, and ordered to be printed in full in the minutes. The report is as follows: ANN ARBOR, MICH., September 9, 1904. To the President and Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: Gentlemen-I have the honor to present herewith my report upon the work of the eleventh annual Summer Session of this University. Work was offered in the Departments of Literature, Science, and the Arts, of Engineering, of Medicine, and of Law. The Session opened June 27 in all Departments, and closed August 5 in all Departments except in the Department of Law, in which work continued until August I9. The enrollment by Departments was as follows: Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and of Engineering (paid enrollment)................................ 398 Depaitment of Medicine and Surgery (paid)................. 65 Department of Law (paid).................................. 88 Department of Engineering (free enrollment) (In Ann Arbor, 55; in Field, 41)......................................... 96 Total number doing work during summer............ 647

Page  409 SEPTEMBER MEETING, I904. 409 Of the 398 students enrolled in the Departments of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and of Engineering, the distribution by states was as follows: Michigan, 238; Ohio, 36; New York, 23; Illinois, 22; Pennsylvania, I6; Indiana, 15; 4 each from Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, and Wisconsin; 3 each from California and Mexico; 2 each from Oregon, Ontario, Holland, New Jersey, Kentucky, Porto Rico, and Kansas, while there were I each from Nebraska, Vermont, Texas, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Iowa, Alabama, Virginia, Washington, North Dakota, South Dakota, Colorado, Arkansas, Utah, and the District of Columbia. The enrollment comprised 247 men and I51 women in the Departments of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and Engineering, 55 men and 10 women in Medicine and Surgery, 88 men in Law, and 96 men in the required work in Engineering. Of the 398 students enrolled in the Departments of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and Engineering, 204, or more than half, were teachers, I37 were students previously enrolled in the University, the remainder being preparatory students and persons unclassified. The enrollment also shows an increase in the number of graduates of other institutions. Of the 398 names, 154, or 38.7%, were graduates of universities, colleges or normal schools. Of these, 5i are from the University of Michigan, 41 from the Michigan State Normal College, 8 from Albion, 5 from Hillsdale, 3 from Mt. Pleasant, 2 each from Hope College, Vassar, Earlham, and Bucknell College, with 4 from the Indiana, Pa., State Normal, 2 from Westchester, Pa., State Normal, and I each from 32 different universities, colleges and normal schools throughout the United States. In the Announcement of work for the Summer Session of 1904 there were offered I07 courses in 26 different branches, distributed as follows: Greek 5, Latin 7, French 3, Spanish I, Italian I, German 7, English Literature 4, English and Rhetoric 3, Elocution and Oratory 2, History 2, Philosophy 2, Psychology 2, Pedagogy 5, Political Economy 2, Mathematics 9, Physics 8, Chemistry 13, Zoology I, Botany 6, Physical Training 4, Drawing 5, Civil Engineering 2, Mechanical Engineering 4, Electrical Engineering I, Metallurgy I, Shop Practice 7. In the Department of Medicine and Surgery there were 29 twohour courses offered, and in the Department of Law I8. A study of the election blanks and the official class lists shows the following number of elections in each subject, rated in terms of two-hour courses. Thus a four-hour course is rated as two two-hour courses, and a six-hour course as three two-hour courses:

Page  410 410 SEPTEMBER MEETING, 1904. Greek 15, Latin 66, French 39, German 73, Italian 7, Spanish 6, English Literature 126, Rhetoric 62, Elocution 28, History 58, Philosophy 4I, Psychology 30, Pedagogy I07, Political Economy 25, Mathematics 99, Physics 98, Chemistry 135, Zoology 23, Botany 50, Physical Training 24, Drawing 60, Civil Engineering 47, Mechanical Engineering I6, Electrical Engineering 92, Metallurgy 36, Shop Practice 34. Of the character of the work done during the past summer, I have heard but one opinion from members of the Faculty: namely, that the class of students in attendance has rendered it possible to do work of an exceptionally high grade. In many cases advanced courses have been given with better results than have been obtained hitherto during the regular semesters. The students are unusually assiduous, earnest, and in general well prepared, especially so in the advanced work. So noticeable was the demand for advanced work that it was deemed best to provide in part for this work by the organization of special classes in Latin, Philosophy, and Physics to accommodate graduate students exclusively. Even then the demands for advanced work were not all met as fully as they should be next summer. As usual the series of open lectures by members of the Faculty was greatly enjoyed by all. The series this year comprised lectures by President Angell, and Doctors D'Ooge, Vaughan, Herdman, and Scott. The attendance was generous and the interest evinced by the student body showed that this feature of the Summer Session might well be extended in future. The students are largely strangers to the Institution and to the members of the Faculties, and such opportunity to hear and meet representative men of the University is of mutual benefit to the students and to the University. Another pleasing feature of the Session was a reception to the members of the student body, tendered through the courtesy of the Board of Regents. The management was entrusted to a committee of Faculty ladies, and the appointments left nothing to be desired. The student body responded almost unanimously, and owing to the precaution that only students and Faculties should be admitted, a most thoroughly representative gathering resulted, and the reception was greatly enjoyed by all. In accordance with the action of the Board of Regents at its meeting in February last, the Summer Session of the University for the year 1904 was made to include all work done in the University during the summer vacation. As a result the Session was free from many petty annoyances and incongruities noticeable in the past. Uniform time of opening, definite tuition fees, and unrestricted election of studies for the students were greatly appreciated. While on the part of the Faculties the increase.in salary, and the option be

Page  411 SEPTEMBER MEETING, I904. 411 tween salary or time allowance during regular semesters awakened considerable enthusiasm. Owing to the lateness of the definite announcement of the scheme, but few took advantage of the option during the past summer. It is to be hoped that the scheme will prove attractive to others in future. FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF SUMMER SESSION, UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, FOR YEAR 1904. PAY ROLL OP DEPARTMENTS. Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts. Greek: Instructor Duane Reed Stuart, 3 Courses Latin: Professor F. W. Kelsey, I Course Junior Professor J. H. Drake, 2 Courses Instructor C. L. Meader, 3 Courses Assistant H. H. Armstrong, I Course French: Assistant Professor J. R. Effinger, 3 Courses Spanish and Italian: Junior Professor M. Levi, I Course in each German: Assistant Professor T. Diekhoff, 3 Courses Instructor J. A. C. Hildner, 2 Courses Instructor W. W. Florer, 2 Courses English Literature: Professor I. N. Demmon, 2 Courses Instructor L. A. Strauss, 2 Courses Rhetoric: Instructor J. M. Thomas, 2 Courses Instructor C. B. Morrill, I Course Elocution: Instructor R. D. T. Hollister, 2 Courses Pedagogy: Professor W. H. Payne, 2 Courses Professor A. S. Whitney, 2 Courses History: Assistant Professor C. H. VanTyne, 2 Courses Philosophy: Professor R. M. Wenley, 2 Courses Assistant Professor Geo. Rebec, 3 Courses Political Economy: $202 50 125 00 240 00 202 50 25 00 270 00 240 oo 270 00 135 oo 135 00 300 00 135 00 135 00 67 50 135 oo 300 oo 300 oo I80 o0 300 00 270 00

Page  412 412 SEPTEMBER MEETING, 1904. Junior Professor F. M. Taylor, Mathematics: Professor W. W. Beman, Assistant Professor J. L. Markley, Assistant Professor J. W. Glover, Instructor Wm. Marshall, Physics: Junior Professor J. 0. Reed, Instructor H. M. Randall, Instructor A. W. Smith, Instructor L. F. Morehouse, Chemistry: Junior Professor M. Gomberg, Assistant L. H. Cone, Instructor F. L. Dunlap, Instructor W. G. Smeaton, Instructor Geo. 0. Higley, Instructor Geo. A. Hulett, Instructor Wm. J. Hale, Assistant Lionel Duschak, Botany: Instructor J. B. Pollock, Instructor Geo. P. Burns, Zoology: Instructor C. C. Adams, Physical Training: Instructor C. T. Teetzel, 2 Courses 2 Courses 3 Courses 3 Courses 2 Courses 2 Courses 3 Courses 3 Courses 2 Courses I Course 45 hours' work 3 Courses 3 Courses 3 Courses 3 Courses ($202.50) 2 Courses 3 Courses 3 Courses 3 Courses 3 Courses 3 Courses 240 00 300 00 270 00 270 00 I35 oo 240 00 202 50 202 50 135 00 120 00 I00 00 202 50 202 50 202 50 *Absence 135 00 50 00oo 202 50 202 50 202 50 150 00 Department of Engineering. Drawing: Assistant C. G. Wrentmore, 3 Courses Instructor H. J. Goulding, 3 Courses Instructor G. M. Bartlett, 3 Courses Electrical Engineering: Junior Professor G. W. Patterson, 2 Courses Metallurgy: Instructor A. H. White, 3 Courses 213 75 202 50 202 50 240 00 202 50 Department of Medicine and Surgery. Medicine: Dr. Roger S. Morris, Surgery: Dr. C. B. Nancrede, Gynecology: 3 Courses 2 Courses 202 50 300 00

Page  413 SEPTEMBER MEETING, I904. 413 Dr. Reuben Peterson, 3 Courses ($240.00) *Absence Pathology: Dr. A. S. Warthin, 2 Courses 240 0o Dr. W. G. Carhart, Assistant to Dr. Warthin 75 o00 Physiological Chemistry: Mr. Boyden Nims, 3 Courses 202 50 Bacteriology: Mr. H. N. Torrey, 3 Courses 202 50 Embryology: Dr. Lydia M. DeWitt, 3 Courses 202 50 Department of Law. Thomas A. Bogle.......................................... 250 oo Horace L. Wilgus......................................... 50 oo Henry M. Bates................................... 150 00oo Joseph H. Drake........................................ 75 oo Frank L. Sage............................................ 225 oo John W. Dwyer.................................. I75 oo John R. R ood............................................. 150 oo Edson R. Sunderland...................................... 150 oo Margaret N. Dickinson (Asst. in Library)................ 25 oo ADMINISTRATION. Chairman, John 0. Reed.................................. 200 00 Secretary, John R. Effinger................................ Io 0 0o Secretary, G. Carl Huber.................................. 10o 00 Secretary, E. C. Goddard.................................. Ioo 00 Librarian.................................................. 25 00 ADVERTISING, PRINTING, ETC. Announcements (Printing), general...................... $314 20 Announcements (Printing), Law and Medical............... 57 75 Announcements, Distribution of: W. M. Kephart, II6 hours at I2.5c per hour............. 14 50 R. W. Bailey, 30 hours at 12.5c per hour............... 3 75 R. G. Hunt, 30 hours at I2.5c per hour................ 3 75 Geo. N. Pond, 3,200 return postal cards.................. 64 oo Sprague Publishing Co................................... 15 00 West Publishing Co........................................ 12 0oo *Dr. Hulett and Dr. Peterson avail themselves of the permission given by the Regents to all teachers in the Summer School to be absent for a period on pay at some time, instead of drawing the salary here named.

Page  414 414 SEPTEMBER MEETING, I904. Sundries, January and February............................ C. F. Meyers, printing...................................... Katherine Rosewarne, $3.25 and $I.50....................... Sid W. Millard, printing................................... Morgan O'Brien.......................................... Curtis Publishing Co....................................... Moderator................................................ Outlook Publishing Co..................................... General Sundries, including Announcements, envelopes, printing, postage on Announcements, stationery, etc........... I 80 400 475 2 50 3 14 53 20 i8 oo 50 40 92 95 Total for Advertising, etc......................$ 7 69 SUMMARY O EgXPENSES. Pay roll for Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts............................................... $7,732 50 Pay roll for Department of Medicine and Surgery....... 1,425 00 Pay roll for Department of Law......................... 1,350 00 Pay roll for Department of Engineering................. I,06I 25 Total pay roll...................................$,568 75 Administration................................. 525 00 Advertising, etc................................. 715 69 Total expenses of Session................$12,809 44 INCOME Of SUMMER SESSION. Departments of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and Engineering................... $6,000 oo Department of Medicine and Surgery......... 1,075 oo Department of Law.......................... 2,I55 oo $9,230 oo 'Gross receipts from tuition................... $9,230 00 Tuiti-on refunded........................ 45 oo Net receipts from tuition..................... $9,185 00 Appropriation by Regents................... 4,000 oo Total income...................... $13,185 00 Total expenses..................... 12,809 44 Unexpended balance........................ $375 56

Page  415 SEPTEMBER MEETING, I904. 415 LABORATORY EES COLLCTED DURING SUMMER SESSION. Chemical Laboratory.................. $685 oo Hygienic Laboratory........................ I95 oo Keys..................................... 6 oo Pathological Laboratory..................... 300 oo Medicine.................................... 60 oo Practical Anatomy........................... 40 oo Histology................................... 56 oo Botanical Laboratory........................ 69 oo Mechanical Engineering..................... 2IO oo Zoology..................................... 50 oo Physics and Electrical Engineering............ 56 oo Gymnasium................................. 14 50 Total fees........................... $1,841 50 Respectfully submitted, JOHN 0. REED. On motion of Regent Barbour, it was voted to raise a new Standing Committee of the Board on the Summer Session, and-that such committee shall consist of the Chairmen of the Literary, Law, and Medical Committees. Regent Lawton moved that the Chair of Ophthalmology in the Department of Medicine and Surgery be divided, and that Dr. R. Bishop Canfield of New York City be appointed Clinical Professor of the Diseases of the Ear, Nose and Throat, for the coming year, salary $I,6oo, and that Dr. Walter R. Parker of Detroit be appointed Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Eye, salary $I,600, and that he be not required to remove to Ann Arbor during the next six months. It was so ordered by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Lawton, Mr. H. M. Torrey was appointed Rockefeller Fellow in Bacteriology for one year, without expense to the University. On motion of Regent Lawton, Dr. James Cummings was appointed Assistant in the Pasteur Institute for one year, salary $500. On motion of Regent Fletcher, Professor Roth was authorized to sell the fruit on the Saginaw Forest Farm for the sum of $i5.

Page  416 -416 SEPTEMBER MEETING, I904. On motion of Regent Fletcher, Professor Roth was authorized to rent to William April, Jr., lots I, 2, 3 and 4 of the Saginaw Forest Farm upon the conditions named in his proposal now on file in the office of the Secretary. Regent Fletcher moved that Albert Kahn, Architect, be paid the sum of $435 in full for professional services on the Psychopathic Ward. It was so ordered by the full vote of -the Board. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds was directed to make certain repairs in the dwelling house at the Observatory to provide for the -two students who take meteorological observations. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Secretary was ~directed to pay the Philip Carey Manufacturing Co. $2,000 *on their contract for.covering pipes in the New Engineering building. On motion of Regent Knappen, the Secretary was requested to notify the City Council that the University,expects to build a cement walk on the north and east sides of the Observatory grounds, but that it is too late to do so this year, and that the Board protests against the city's building these walks this fall or winter, or interfering in any way with the University property or the trees adjoining. On motion of Regent Hill, Mr. John L. Conger was selected as the holder of the Peter White Fellowship in American History for the coming year, and Miss Bess May Vrooman as the holder of the Colonial Dames Scholarship in American History for the academic year. The formal resignation of Professor Paul C. Freer was received and placed on file, the Board having acted on Professor Freer's cablegram to the same effect, at the last,meeting. On motion of Regent Hill, R. Percival Hebbard, A.B., was appointed the holder of the Ferry Fellowship in Botany for one year in place of Mr. Leroy H. Harvey, resigned. Regent Hill moved that the salary of Lyman F. Morehouse, B.S., Instructor in Physics, be increased to $1,200. It was so voted by the full Board. On motion of Regent Hill, the title of Junior Professor F. C. Newcomb was made "Junior Professor of Botany in charge of the Laboratory."

Page  417 SEPTEMBER MEETING, I904. 417 On motion of Regent White, the Finance Committee were authorized to loan to F. A. O'Breen of Detroit $8,000 from the Gift funds of the University; and also to accept good mortgages from the Citizens' Savings Bank of Detroit to the extent of $20,000; and the treasurer was also directed to receive said mortgages and to pay for the same out of the Gift funds. On motion of Regent White, the Executive Committee were authorized to protect certain musical instruments in the Museum with wire netting. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Secretary was authorized to purchase 150 chairs for the dining room in the Barbour Gymnasium. The Board then took a recess until 2 o'clock p. M. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock p. M. On motion of Regent Hill, Alfred C. Lane, Ph.D., State Geologist, was appointed Lecturer on Economic Geology for the second semester at a salary of $500, by the full vote of the Board. Regent Dean presented and read the following communication from Professor M. E. Cooley, and on his motion the gifts were accepted and the President was requested to transmit the thanks of the Board to the parties named. ANN ARBOR, Sept. 20, I904. Hon. James B. Angell, President University of Michigan: Sir-I have the honor to bring to the attention of the Regents two important donations to the Department of Engineering since the July meeting, with the recommendation that the donors receive the thanks of the Board at their next meeting. The Russell Wheel & Foundry Co. of Detroit, Michigan: Traveler for the Naval Tank. The Carnegie Steel Co. of Pittsburgh: Rails and track fastenings for the naval tank. The courtesy of these gentlemen has been exceedingly pleasant. The Carnegie Steel Co. not only presented the track materials, but paid the freight charges on the same to Ann Arbor. Respectfully, M. E. COOLEY.

Page  418 418 SEPTEMBER MEETING, I904. Regent Dean presented the following communication from Professor M. E. Cooley and the recommendations therein contained were approved by the full vote of the Board. HON JAMES B. ANGELL, President University of Michigan. Sir-I have the honor to request of the Regents certain changes in the force of instructors in the departments of Civil Engineering and of Descriptive Geometry and Drawing: I. Mr. Fred G. Frink, M.S., Instructor in Civil Engineering, tendered his resignation July 23, to accept an assistant professorship at the University of Illinois. I recommend the acceptance of Mr. Frink's resignation. 2. Mr. Clarence G. Wrentmore, C.E., Assistant Professor of Descriptive Geometry and Drawing, on learning of Mr. Frink's resignation, requested to be transferred to the department of Civil Engineering. A conference with the several heads of departments developed this to be a desirable change. I am pleased, therefore, to recommend that Mr. Wrentmore's title be changed to Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 3. Mr. Verner L. Page, Instructor in Descriptive Geometry and Drawing,.has also resigned. At Professor Denison's request I recommend the appointment of Mr. George G. Stroebe, as an instructor at $9oo to fill the vacancy caused by Mr. Page's resignation. Mr. Stroebe is one of our own graduates, and was an Assistant in Descriptive Geometry the second semester of I903-4. 4. To fill the vacancy caused by the transfer of Mr. Wrentmore to the department of Civil Engineering I am requested by Professor Denison to recommend the appointment as instructor at $900 of Mr. Howard B. Murphy, 6428 Vincennes Avenue, Chicago. Mr. Murphy is a graduate in Civil Engineering, class of I904, of the University of Illinois and presents favorable recommendations, including one from Professor Ira 0. Baker of the University of Illinois. These changes, it will be observed, do not increase the salary account of these departments. I also recommend that the title for Professor Gardner S. Williams be "Professor of Civil, Hydraulic and Sanitary Engineering." Respectfully, M. E. COOLEY.

Page  419 SEPTEMBER MEETING, I904. 419 On motion of Regent Dean, the daily pay of George G. Bull, Assistant Instructor in the Foundry, was made $2.25; and two additional laborers were authorized at $I.50 per day each, by the full vote of the Board. On the recommendation of Dean Cooley and on motion of Regent Dean, Mr. Allen Loomis was appointed Instructor in Mechanical Engineering, for one year, at a salary of $1,200, and Edward L. Hagan and Lyle A. Whitsit were appointed Assistants in Mechanical Engineering at a salary of $200 each. These appointments were made on a call vote. On motion of Regent Dean, Mr. Joel M. Barnes was appointed Assistant in Chemical Technology for one year, salary $200, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Dean, the salary of Peter Field, Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics, was increased from $900 to $1,200, on a call vote, appointment for three years. Regent White moved that Miss Mabel Perry be appointed a cataloguer in the General Library at a salary of $500; and that she be paid $I.20 per day from August I7th to September 30th. It was so ordered by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent White, $125 was appropriated for the purchase of an engraved copper plate for the General Library, and $50 for 5,000 impressions of the same. This motion was carried on a call vote. Regent White moved that $Ioo be appropriated for the purchase of labels and holders for the stacks in the bookroom of the General Library, and $25 for the purchase of a rubber-tired book truck. The motion was carried on a call vote. On motion of Regent White, it was voted to set apart $250 for the purchase of Library of Congress cards and of John Crerar cards for the public catalogue. On motion of Regent Barbour, it was voted to accept the proposition of Henry Bliton of $425 for remodeling the stage in the audience room in the Barbour Gymnasium, with $23 extra for plastering and mason work. On motion of Regent Barbour, it was voted that Regent White and the Librarian make such arrangement of pictures

Page  420 420 SEPTEMBER MEETING, 1904. and shelving in the Library as they shall think best at a cost not exceeding $Ioo. On motion of Regent White, it was voted to pay Assistant Librarian Koch $317.35 for services rendered up to October I, I904. The request of the U. of M. Daily that the Board purchase 300 copies of the paper to send to the high schools of the State, was, on motion of Regent Fletcher, laid on the table. On motion, Regent Barbour was authorized to draft and print a blank form of mortgage to be used in loaning the Gift funds of the University. On motion of Regent Barbour, a committee, consisting of the Librarian, Regents White, Dean, and Carey were asked to consider and report on the advisability of enlarging the University printing plant. The question of additional clerical help in the Treasurer's office was deferred until the next meeting of the Board. Mr. Ware, of Grand Rapids, representing the Independent Telephone Companies of the State, asked to put one of their telephones in the Secretary's office and in each of the hospitals without expense to the University. On motion of Regent Hill, the request was granted. On motion of Regent Dean, Mr. Don Byron Webster was reappointed Assistant to the Superintendent of Shops for year, salary $200, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Lawton, it was voted that the budget of the department of the Diseases of Women and Children, in the Department of Medicine and Surgery, be fixed at $4,000, to be paid from the income of the Bates. bequest. On motion of Regent Lawton, the salary of Miss Lyman, bookkeeper at the hospital, was fixed at $700, upon the condition that she does not board in the hospital. On motion of Regent Lawton, the title of Dr. C. B. Nancrede was amended to read as follows: "Professor of Surgery and Clinical Surgery, and Director of Surgical Clinics." On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Auditing Board were authorized to purchase the necessary furniture for the Old Engineering building.

Page  421 SEPTEMBER MEETING, 1904. 421 On motion of Regent Knappen, Thomas V. Williams and Reuben G. Hunt were appointed Assistants in the Law Library for the coming year at a salary of $I75 each, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Carey, the following appointments were made in the Homoeopathic Hospital, by the full vote of the Board: Leon J. Gibson, M.D., and Harold L. Lown, M.D., to be House Surgeons for the coming year at a salary of $125 each; and the following special lecturers were appointed without salary, except traveling expenses: 0. R. Long, M.D., Lecturer on Mental Diseases; W. A. Polglase, M.D., Lecturer on Nervous Diseases; R. H. Stevens, M.D., Lecturer on Dermatology; R. M. Richards, M.D., Lecturer on Renal Diseases. A. E. Ibershoff, M.D., was appointed Assistant to the Chair of Diseases of the Eye and Ear, without salary. And Mrs. Minnie K. Hosack was granted a certificate of graduation from the Training School for Nurses. Regent Carey moved that the Secretary be requested to transmit the following resolution of this Board to the Auditor General: Resolved, That this Board requests the Auditor General to transfer to the accumulation of savings account all unexpended monies of the State appropriations of I903 as shown by the Treasurer's report on the 3Ist day of December, I903, less the former year's bills. It was so ordered by the Board. On motion of Regent White, it was voted that the sum of $258 be appropriated for the purchase of 50,000 American Library Association cataloguing cards for the General Library. The Quadrangle Club asked for and obtained permission to use the south room in the Art Gallery for two weeks, for an exhibition of Japanese art. Charles Hoerz & Son,contractors for the New Engineering building being present, authorized the Board of Regents to take possession of said building upon the conditions named below: "We hereby authorize the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan to take possession of the New Engineering building, and consent that such taking posses

Page  422 422 SEPTEMBER MEETING, 1904. sion shall be without prejudice to any claim that the contract has not been completely and properly performed and without prejudice to any claim for damages on the part of said Board on account of such alleged failure to completely and properly perform said contract according to its terms." On motion of Regent Barbour, the Treasurer was authorized to pay James Holden of Detroit $381, being the balance of his bill for the erection of two houses on property belonging to the University in West Detroit. On motion of Regent Lawton, the Auditing Board were directed to purchase the necessary locks and lockers for the New Engineering building, and to provide that the students be charged a fee of fifty cents a semester for the use of a locker and fifty cents a semester for the use of a lock drawer and a drawing board. On motion of Regent Lawton, the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery was conferred upon Adolph Henry Breitenwischer, Glenn Elder Morningstar, Grace Pearl Rogers, Leon Audley Stebbins, and Haygazoon Hagop Tashjian; and the Dental Faculty were permitted to use $50 of their budget fund to pay the expenses of an attendant in the Dental Library. Regent Hill presented and read the following communication, which was approved by the full Board: To the Honorable, the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: Mr. Sylvester Boulger, who was denied his diploma in June of the present year, renews his request for the same, and submits certain letters and affidavits to relieve himself of the charges which were considered by the Faculty when it refused to recommend him for graduation. He claims he was not given a full opportunity to defend himself by the Faculty. Since he submits evidence not considered by the Faculty, and believing that further investigation will enlighten the Board as to the practices of the officers of the Students' Lecture Association, we recommend that the whole matter with proofs submitted be referred to the Literary Faculty for a new consideration and a report to this body. Especially we desire that Mr. John A. Warner shall be questioned as to who asked him for a bonus, with surrounding circumstances. ARTHUR HILL, LEVI L. BARBOUR, Committee.

Page  423 SEPTEMBER MEETING, 1904. 423 The Committee on the Law Department submitted the following recommendations, which were approved by the Board: In the Matter of Charles G. Bailey. To the President and Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: The Committee on the Law Department respectfully reports that Mr. Bailey has presented eleven affidavits in support of his petition for a diploma of graduation, and in support of his contention that he is innocent of the alleged misconduct on account of which his diploma was withheld. It is the claim of Mr. Bailey that he was not given full opportunity to present his defence before the Faculty. In view of the showing made by the affidavits submitted, the committee recommend that the affidavits be referred to the Faculty of the Law Department for reconsideration of the subject. LOYAL E. KNAPPEN, HENRY W. CAREY, Committee. The Michigan Bell Telephone Co. asked permission to place pay stations in the Library, Engineering building and University Hall. On motion the request was laid on the table. On motion of Regent Fletcher, $500 was appropriated for the purpose of constructing a Mesden floor in the Mechanical Laboratory, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Knappen, the Board adjourned to Thursday, Oct. 13, I904, at Io o'clock A. M. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

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Page  424

Page  425 OCTOBER MEETING. UNIVERSITY OF MICIIGAN, ) ANN ARBOR, October 13, 1904. The Board assembled in the Regents' room at Io o'clock A. M. Present-Regents Hill, Lawton, Dean, Barbour, and Carey. Absent-Regents Fletcher, Knappen, and White. The Secretary read the proceedings of the last meeting, which were, on motion of Regent Dean, approved and ordered printed. Communications which had reached the President were referred to the standing committees of the Board for consideration. Dean Hutchins made the following report of the action of the Law Faculty in the case of Charles G. Bailey: ANN ARBOR, Oct. 13, 1904. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: Gentlemen-At a meeting of the Faculty of the Department of Law of the University, held October 12, 1904, it was unanimously voted as follows: "It is the judgment of this Faculty, after a rehearing of Mr. Charles G. Bailey's case, that the action taken on the former hearing should be sustained." I am directed by the Law Faculty to state to the Board that upon the first hearing, the charges against Mr. Bailey were fully explained to him, and that at the five Faculty meetings that were exclusively devoted to the consideration of his case, extending through a period of a full week, ample opportunity was given him to answer the charges and to introduce evidence in support of his defense; that upon the rehearing of the case, the affidavits filed by Mr. Bailey therein were read to the Faculty and fully considered by them; that additional evidence bearing upon the questions raised by the affidavits was adduced, and that the entire case was carefully reexamined. Respectfully submitted, H. B. HUTCHINS, Dean.

Page  426 426 OCTOBER MEETING, 1904. On motion of Regent Carey, the action of the Law Faculty was approved. Regent Hill presented the following report from the Literary Faculty of their action in the case of S. S. Boulger: ANN ARBOR, Oct. 10, I904. In reply to the communication by the Regents, the Faculty, after considering the affidavits and documents referred to them, beg to inform the Board that they are still of the opinion that Mr. S. S. Boulger is guilty as charged. And on motion of Regent Hill the action of the Literary Faculty was approved. The President presented the following communication from Professor Kelsey to him: President James B. Angell: Dear Sir-I have much pleasure in reporting to you that Hon. Arthur Hill has generously advanced the sum of three hundred dollars to guarantee the publication of the first volume of University of Michigan Studies, Humanistic Series, Volume I. The advance has made possible the publication of the volume, the success of which seems already assured. Respectfully, FRANCIS W. KELSEY. On motion of Regent Barbour, the thanks of the Board were returned to Regent Hill. Regent Barbour moved that Professor J. O. Reed be appointed Treasurer-Auditor of the funds raised by the different student organizations of the University. This was made the special order for 2 p. M. Librarian Davis presented.and read his Annual Report: LIBRARIAN'S REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1903-I904. To the Honorable the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN:-I have the honor to submit to you my twenty-seventh annual report as librarian of the University. There were in all of the libraries June 30, 1904, 182,680 volumes, 4,000 pamphlets, and 2,250 maps.* *This is the number of volumes after a reduction has been made for duplicates disposed of, and for volumes worn out and retired. The number of maps given is the number accessioned and not the whole number possessed. The remaining ones will be accessioned shortly and will appear in next year's report.

Page  427 OCTOBER MEETING, 1904. 427 Of these, 144,584 volumes, 3,600 pamphlets and 2,250 maps were in the General Library; 21,480 volumes were in the Law Library; 13,139 volumes and 310 pamphlets were in the Medical Library; 1,475 volumes were in the Dental Library; and 2,002 volumes and go pamphlets were in the Library of the Homceopathic College. The total additions for the year were 8,095 volumes and 700 pamphlets. There were added to the:General Library...................... 5,637 vols. and 600 pamphlets Law Library................ 1,310vols. Medical Library..................... 68 vols. and So pamphlets Dental Library....................... 292 vols. Homceopathic Library................ 238 vols. and 20 pamphlets 8,095 700 The number of periodicals regularly received was I,IIo. These were distributed as follows: The General Library received................................. 8 o The Law Library received.................................... 20 The MedicaI Library received................................ 227 The Dental Library received................................. i6 The Homceopathic Library received.......................... 37 1,110 The appropriation made by you for the purchase of books for the year, including subscriptions to periodicals, cost of transportation, and the maintenance of the bindery, was $I5,ooo. This sum you divided among the several libraries as follows: General Library.......................................... $Io,ooo Law Library............................................ 2,475 Medical Library......................................... 2,025 Dental Library............................................ 250 H om cepathic Library.................................... 250 $15,ooo THE GENERAL LIBRARY. ADDITIONS.-Of the 5,637 volumes and 600 pamphlets added to this library 3,589 volumes were purchased, 1,263 volumes and 6o0 pamphlets were presented, and 785 volumes were the result of binding periodicals.

Page  428 428 OCTOBER MEETING, 1904. EXP;ENDITURES. The bills certified to by me, exclusive of those incurred for the bindery, and for transportation, and those drawn on the income of the endowment funds and the contingent fund, amounted to $8,498.59. Of this sum $6,764.42 was for books and periodical publications issued irregularly, and the balance, $1,734.17, was for annual subscriptions to periodicals for the year 1904. For miscellaneous expenses for the year you assigned to this library the sum of $520. The expenditures from this sum were as follows: For day attendants in the two cloak rooms................ $33 50 For evening attendants in the two cloak rooms............. III 17 For sundries, as catalogue cards, stationery, postage, readers' slips, etc.......................................... 96 49 $539 i6 The expenditures from the income of the endowment funds were as follows: Expended of the income of the Ford-Messer Fund........ $1,507 70 Expended of the income of the Coyl Fund............... 992 i6 As I have said in former reports the income of the small Goethe Fund is not expended, but is added to the principal, and will continue to be so added until the sum of $300 is reached. According to the Treasurer's books the condition of the three above funds July I, I904, was as follows: PFord-Messer Fund ($20,000) with unexpended interest added............................................. $22,550 02 Coyl Fund ($Io,ooo) with unexpended interest added... 12,525 97 Goethe Fund.......................................... 219 59 "There have been, and still are, in the hands of the Treasurer certain sums of money given by friends of the University for the purchase of books and other material for the library. I have not reported these sums as funds, inasmuch as they have been, or are to be, expended entirely. It has seemed better to report the purchases made with the money as gifts from those supplying it."-(From Report of I902-'03.) *This sum is used for the miscellaneous expenses of the Medical, Dental, and Homoeopathic libraries as well as for those of the General Library.

Page  429 OCTOBER I1IEETIVNG, 1904. 429 THE SHAKEiSPEIARE AN\D GOMET-Ii COLLECTIONS.-The additions to the Shakespeare Library were for the year, 178 volumes. A portion of Mir. AMcMillan's gift referred to in my last report has been applied to a subscription to the facsimile reprints of the four first folio editions of Shakespeare that have been undertaken by Messrs. Methuen & Co. of London. Up to thts time no reprints of the second, third and fourth folios have been made. The collection now numbers 5,441 volumes. The additions to the Goethe Library were I8 volumes. The cost of these was borne by the regular appropriation for German literature. There are I,o55 volumes in the collection at the present time. IMPORTANT ADDITIONS The additions that may be called important were not many during the year. Of the more valuable sets of books ordered, only about a half can be credited to the year's accessions. Of those that were received the following may be mentioned. Bought with income of the Ford-M\lesser Fund: r. Bibliotheque de FI'cole des Chartes, vols. I-63 (1839 -1902)....................................... $174 60 Bought with the income of the Coyl Fund: 1. Zeitschrift der Savig'ny Stiftung fiir Recltgeschichtle, 48 vols...123 75 2. Folk-Iore Society Publications (English), vols. 1-47.. T2r 75 3. Brown's History of the New York Stage, 3 vols......... 27 84 4. Transactions of thll Mlanchester Literary Club, 28 vols.. 20 00 Boug-ht on General Account: T. Works of Daniel Webster, New Edition. 18 vols....... $ oo 2. Kirkman's Science of Railway Economics, 12 vols....... 24 00 3. Preussischer Jahrbucher, 1882-1902 (completing our set)........................................... 50 oo GIFTS.-A larger proportion than usual of our gifts have been from societies, associations of various kinds, and( corporations. Their reports have been solicited for use in the courses in Commerce and Insurance. For some years certain cities have sent us their documents, which have been found useful for the work in Municipal Government. We

Page  430 430 OCTOBER MEETING, 1904. have found it desirable to add other cities to the list and so to increase the number of documents received. There is also a slow but steady increase in the number of documents received from the national government and the state governments. It seems to me that there is a difference between these gratuities to which I have made reference, and the gift of an individual from his own possessions, or something acquired by him for the purpose, and who is moved to perform the act by personal interest or affection. This distinction is not easily made, however. Following is an enumeration of a few of the more important gifts. From the Institution of Civil Engineers (London) we received volumes 152 and 153 of their Minutes of Proceedings. Mr. Horton C. Ryan presented 34 volumes and Io pamphlets of a miscellaneous character. A farther gift from the Duke of Loubat was: Codex Vaticauts, No. 3773. An old pictorial manuscript in the Vatican Library. Elucidated by Dr. Eduard Seler and published at the expense of the Duke of Loubat. From Professor A. C. McLaughlin were received 82 volumes, 68 pamphlets, 453 numbers of various periodicals, and 78 miscellaneous pieces. The following volumes came from the Minister of Public Instruction and Fine Arts of France: i. Correspondance des Directeurs de l'Academie de France a Rome, Tome 15, I764-1774. 2. Collection de Documents in6dits sur l'histoire de France. Recueil des actes du Comit6 de Salut avec la correspondance officielle. Tome I5. Mrs. John Crosby Brown of Orange, N. J., gave a copy of The Crosby Brown Collection of Musical Instruments of All Nations; Catalogue of Keyboard Instruments. This was published under the auspices of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Mr. W. K. Bixby of St. Louis gave a copy of Private Journals of Aaron Burr, 1808-1812, 2 vols. Before this edition by Mr. Bixby only a small portion of this journal

Page  431 OCTOBER MEETING, 1904. 431 had been printed. The edition is limited to 250 copies for presentation. The spelling and contractions of the MS. are copied. The printing is admirably done. Portraits of Burr and his daughter Theodosia are given. Rev. A. C. Grier of the class of '86 presented 4 volumes, two volumes of which were the Edinburg 1817 edition of Hazlitt's Round Table. Mr. William Viennot of the National Library of France has continued to send the catalogues of that great library as fast as published. Volumes 14, 15, and I6 were received during the year. Through the kindness of Hon. J. W. Foster we were early put in possession of a copy of the Alaska Boundary Tribunal, 3 volumes of text and 2 Atlases. From Professor Alexander Ziwet we received a copy of Geschichte des Spanischen Protestalltisnllus nld der Illqllisition in sechzehnltenl Jahrhundert. Von Ernst Schafer. 3 vols. From the National Sound Money League we received a copy of The Contest for Sound Money (History of Coinage and Currency in the U. S.) By A. Barton Hepburn. Vol. 17 of the Great Trigonometrical Survey of India was received from the Surveyor General of India. Mrs. M. C. Jordan of Andover, Mass., from wholm we have received a generous quantity of anti-vivisection literature in the past, contributed a copy of "The Immortality of Animals," by E. D. Buckner. Professor Gardner S. Williams,-'89, then of Cornell University, gave a set of the Congressional Debates, vols. I-14, 1824-25-1837. This set of books was already in the library, but a second set was needed and was very welcome. There were the usual gifts, numerous in many instances, from President Angell, Professors Demmon, Hempl,-Dr. Herdman and other members of the faculty. UsES oF THE; LIBRARY.-The statistics which follow were drawn from the report of Mr. Finney, the assistant in charge of circulation. Recorded circulation in Reading Room and Seminary Rooms......................................... 78,330 vols. Drawn for home use by Professors................... I,299 vols. Total....................................... I89,629 vols.

Page  432 432 OCTOBER MEETING, 1904. This is an increase of nearly 13 per cent. over last year's circulation. In this connection it is proper to state that this recorded use is only about one-half the whole use of the Library. The inter-library loans were 112 volumes and 126 photographs. We borrowed from other libraries 98 volumes. The daily average of readers in the reading room "during the busy part of the year," was I8o. Admissions to the stack were more numerous than ever before. During the year 330 students were admitted to the Seminary Rooms, as follows: 80 to the East Room, for the study of History, Political Economy, Pedagogy, Philosophy and Mathematics, and 250 to the West Room for the study of Language, Literature, and Art. THE CONDITION OF THE, LIBRARY. —I have called attention in former reports to the difficulty encountered by us in our efforts to preserve the classification of our books. Shelf room has for some time been exhausted. The use of temporary shelving has afforded some relief but the main difficulty will continue until there is an enlargement of the building. As regards the condition of the individual books the presence of a bindery in the basement enables us to keep them in a fairly good condition for use. Where so many have access to the book-stack misplacements on the shelves cannot be avoided. In the Christmas holidays, the April recess, and in June, there were examinations of the shelves for misplacements. That made in June was the most thorough and showed 1,878 books out of place. The number of books reported lost by Mr. Finney was 40. Of the 44 volumes reported lost last year o1 volumes have been found. Ten (io) volumes which were worn out by the constant use made of them, were retired. The number of mutilations of books discovered was 12. All of our efforts to detect the culprits were unsuccessful. It could not be otherwise than that where so many persons are concerned, and temptations are not wanting, there should be violations of the library rules. During the year three persons were temporarily suspended from the use of the library for taking away books, and one, for gross misconduct in the Reading Room was expelled from the University by action of the Engineering Faculty.

Page  433 OCTOBER MIEETING, 1904. 433 In referring last year to the condition of the outside, or departmental, libraries I had occasion to say that unless there was some improvement in the care of certain ones of these some action should be taken that would be more drastic than any that had been taken thus far. Mr. Severance, in making his annual examination this year, found the beginning of such an improvement, and there is reason to expect that this improvement will continue until something like adequate care of the books is taken. T'I-I ADMINISTRATION oF THE LIBRARY.-For two years past it has been apparent to me that the state of my health was such as to make it desirable, both in the interest of the library and on my own account, that I should resign the office of librarian. Information of my wish to do so at the end of the college year was communicated to you in the month of April. The result of this was the following action taken by you at your April meeting. "Regent White moved, that Theodore W. Koch be appointed Assistant Librarian for one year with a salary of $2,000, and that Librarian Davis be requested to remain as Librarian for the next college year, and thereafter he continue to. deliver his course of lectures on Bibliography under the title of Emeritus Librarian with a salary of $I,6oo." This motion carried by a unanimous vote of the Board. While it was my preference to relinquish the position at the end of the year I am glad to conform to your wishes and will serve you to the best of my ability the additional year. Mr. Koch comes to us from the Library of Congress where his work was upon the Catalogue. I look upon his accession to the force at this time as a most fortunate circumstance for the library. In the year 900o the Library of Congress decided to place copies of its printed card catalogues in various parts of the country for the use of scholars. No charge was to be made for the cards. The single condition attached to the gift was that the cards should be properly arranged in cases and made accessible to the public. On learning of this purpose of the Library of Congress I made immediate inquiry in regard to the matter and was informed that the number of copies to be thus placed was

Page  434 434 OCTOBER MEETING, I904. twenty-five, and that all of them had been already assigned. As none had been located anywhere in Michigan and none nearer than Chicago, it was impossible not to feel some disappointment. Mr. Koch, whose work in the Library of Congress made him intimately acquainted with the preparation and distribution of these cards, ascertained that a set of them still remained to be located, and through efforts on his part it was assigned to the University Library. The number of cards already in print was I35,000 and for the accommodation of these Mr. Koch recommended the purchase of six "sixty-tray" Library Bureau cases which he had ascertained could be secured for $600. The purchase of these was authorized by you at your May meeting. To understand the full value of this acquisiton by the Library it is necessary to consider in what manner both general literary work and scientific research are carried on at the present time. Acquaintance with any subject is made mainly through its literature. If this literature is fully represented in the library in which he is working-which is a condition not at all common-the scholar has no pressing need to concern himself with what is elsewhere. When this is not the case he needs access to the catalogues of other collections which do contain it. Having learned where this necessary literature is he may go to it, or, if the books can be loaned, borrow them, or, if transcripts from them will answer his purpose, have these made. If the want is a purely bibliographical one-the description of a book-the catalogue itself suffices for that. There are two libraries in the old world, one of which, the National Library of France, may be described as the largest library in existence, the other the Library of the British Museum, may be described as the most useful. We have, as far as published, the catalogue of authors of the first, and the catalogue of the second to 1882, and what is known as Fortesque's Index to subsequent additions. These catalogues have been found of very great use, despite the fact that catalogues of this kind, printed volumes, must lack recent publications. The catalogue of the Library of Con-. gress, which we have acquired, is not only the catalogue of a great library, the greatest on this continent, but it is a printed card cataloig-e and is kept up to date as an entity.

Page  435 OCTOBER MEETING, I904. 435 It has nothing to do with supplements. It cannot but prove of the greatest value in the work of the University. We have catalogues of other libraries than those named which are very helpful, but reference to them is not necessary. Those I have named fully illustrate my point. It had become necessary to make an extensive revision of our catalogue, and a matter that had remained undecided for several years was whether we should substitute for our manuscript and typewritten cards the printed cards of the Library of Congress, which that library offered to supply to other libraries at a very liberal rate. I corresponded with a number of libraries on the subject with the result that we were no nearer a decision than before. I found that there was satisfaction in some cases and dissatisfaction in others, where arrangements had been made to secure the cards. The superior legibility of the printed cards was everywhere admitted, but on this point we did not need evidence. Mr. Koch's experience in the preparation and distribution of the cards at the Library of Congress has convinced him that it will be greatly to our advantage to adopt them. You have shown your confidence in his judgment by an appropriation which enables him to begin the work. The farther progress that has been made in this direction falls into the report of the year I904-'05. THE LIBRARY FRc ORC OR I904-'o5.-The office force for the coming year will be Mir. T. W. Koch, Assistant Librarian; Mir. F. P. Jordan, Chief Cataloguer; Mr. B. A. Finney, Assistant in Charge of Circulation, and Mr. H. O. Severance, General Assistant. Other assistants are Miss Esther Braley, Miss Grace Lane, Miss Franc Pattison, Miss Mabel Perry, and Miss Amanda Belser. Mr. C. R. Cobb will have charge of the East Seminary Room and Mr. G. L. Wait of the West Room. Those serving as desk attendants will be as follows: At the Return Desk-H. E. Olson, J. H. McCandless, H. K. Stone and E. W. Waldron. At the Delivery Desk-L. M. Marshall, L. D. Welch, I. W. Long, L. E. Davidson, E. P. Martin, L. W. Elder, F. C. Van der Veen. THnS NEEDS OrF THE LIBRARY. The pressing needs of

Page  436 436 OCTOBER MEETING, 1904. the Library can be briefly told. They are, more money for books, and more room for the accommodation of books, and those who use them. In my last report I called attention to the many new courses of instruction that had been established within a short period. Those giving the instruction in these courses are clamorous for books. Some of these gentlemen whose subjects appealed to business interests, have sought help and found it outside of the University. Others have sought it and not found it, and are without their books. Your appropriation of I$5,ooo that was adequate ten years ago is adequate no longer. Of the need of more room for storing and using books you are hearing from others as well as myself. It is a grave need. )DUPlICAT1Es FOR CLi.ss USE;.-These were reported for the first time last year. Up to that time the books had been purchased with money contributed by the classes needing the books. Two years ago you appropriated for the first time a sum of money to be used in making additions to this collection. It now 'numbers 1,583 volumes, as follows: American History 406 volumes, Ancient and English History 8I volumes, European History (Continental) 783 volumes, Economics I95 volumes, Rhetoric Io8 volumes, Miscellaneous 10 volumes. These books are separately accessioned and catalogued and do.not appear in the total of volumes in the libraries. THE OTHER LIBRARIES. THI:IE \MIDICAL LIBRAIRY.-The additions to the Medical Library were 6i8 volumes and 80 pamphlets. Of these I12 volumes were purchased, 273 volumes and 80 pamphlets was presented or received through exchanges, and 233 volumes were the result of binding periodicals. The total of bills certified to by me for this library was $1,949.09. Of this sum $926.96 was for books and irregular periodical publications, and $I,022.13 was for subscriptions to periodicals for I904. Of the appropriation of $I,ooo made from the Bates Professorship Fund in June, 901o, for books and periodicals,

Page  437 OCTOBER MEETING, 1904. 437' there remained unexpended $29.10. Of this $22.63 fell due and was paid.* THE LAW LIBRARY.-The following information in regard to the Law Library is derived from the report of Professor V. H. Lane, Law Librarian. After stating that the number of volumes accessioned is 21,480, he continues: "In addition there are about a thousand volumes consisting of State and United States documents which are as yet unaccessioned. There has been added since the close of the year, before the opening of the present college term, however, shelving for about 2,500 volumes, sufficient to take care of the additions to the library for two years or thereabouts, after which time it would seem to be necessary to make some substantial additions for shelving books. The Board of Regents, before the beginning of the last school year, directed the collection from each student entering our department of a library fee of $2.00, to be used in purchasing books for the library aside from the additions of current books which are purchased to keep the library upto-date. The increase in the number of volumes purchased the past year over the number purchased in prior years was due to this new fund. For the same reason we shall be able to make some substantial additions to the library the coming year, negotiations for which are already under way. For the 'coming year there will be no change of the working force in the library save that Mr. Reuben Hunt and Mr. Thomas V. William, have been employed as assistants instead of Mr. Clarence W. Boord who took this work the last year. The employment of these is for the sanme number of hours as was given by Mr. Boord while in the service of the library. There has been presented by the class of I904 a portrait in oil of Professor Horace L. Wilgus which has been hung on the walls of the library." THE DENTAL LIBRARY.-The additions to this Library were 292 volumes, all of which were purchased, except 7 volumes which were presented. No dental periodicals were bound. Of the 292 volumes added 283 were from the *Of the $1,949.09 noted above as the regular expenditure of the Medical Library for books and periodicals, $8S.Io was contributed from the appropriations of the Dental Library.

Page  438 438 OCTOBER MEETING, I904. Dental Library of the late Dr. Taft, Dean of the Dental School. The most important transaction which I have to report in this connection is the purchase of this collection. Mr. Severance, who was deputed to take charge of it, reports upon it as follows: "The library consisted of 455 volumes, which was largely periodical literature devoted to the dental profession. We entered 283 volumes, some of which were duplicates of volumes already in the library, but desirable to preserve. There were 155 volumes of duplicates which were not accessioned but placed in the duplicate room in the Dental Building. Seventeen (17) volumes were of a general nature and were sent to the General Library." The purchase, which included some instruments also, was for $6oo, which was an especial appropriation made for the purpose. Some of the sets of journals are very rare and their acquisition by this library has given great satisfaction to the Dental faculty. The bills certified to by me for this library amounted to $I6I.OO. Of this sum $8I.IO was paid for medical literature as already stated. THEr HOM(EOPAT'HIC LIBRARY.-The additions to this library were 238 volumes and 20 pamphlets. Of these 221 volumes were bought, and 17 volumes and 20 pamphlets were presented. No periodicals were bound. The total of bills certified to by me was $225.46. Of this sum $223.46 were for books and $2.00 for the one periodical for which payment is made. The chief gift to this library was from Mrs. Dr. Hartley, who presented 7 volumes. THE BINDERY. The entire cost of operating the bindery for the year was $2,429.87. The expenditure for labor was.......................... $2,060 92 The expenditure for materials was....................... 368 95 $2,429 87 The following tables show the nature and extent of the work done, the cost of it at ruling prices for binding, and the distribution of it by departments:

Page  439 OCTOBER MEETING, 1904. Stalemeni of Binding-July, I9o3 to June, 190o. 439 NO. OF COST AT RUL- COST SUMMiARY PIECES ING PRICES PER VOL Bound and rebound, leather....... 1,306 $1,459 95 I I 23 Bound and rebound, cloth........ 2,202 I,133 34 55 Repaired, resewed, etc............ 760 124 45 Maps backed.................... 15 3 75 Labels and book plates......... 704 2 85 Special work for Printing Plant... I55 40 Special work, Chemical Laboratory I 25 2,880 99 Waste gold recovered............ 6 92 $T2,897 91 Distribution by Departments. PER SNAlRE OF COST TO PnR NO. OF ESTIMATED CENT ACTUAL CARE TO GENERAL LIBRARY PIECES EXPENSES OF EX- ACTUAL CHARGED TO PENSES COST DEPAR'M TS Bound, rebound —leather 957 $I,07I 55 Bound, rebound-cloth.. 2,046 I,030 64 Repairs................. 66I 89 45 M aps................. 15 3 75 Labels. 704 2 85 W aste gold............ I 6 92 Total......... 4,383 $2,215 i6 76.5 i$,859 22 i$,399 85 LAW LIBRARY Bound, rebound-leather 89 97 65 Bound, rebound-cloth.. 7 6 95 Repairs............... 96 34 00 Total............ 192 138 60 04.8 i6 25 87 84 MEDICAL LIBRARY Bound, rebound-leather 231 254 75 Bound, rebound-cloth.. 105 74 55 Repairs................ 3 00 Total.......... 339 330 30 5 279 00 43.~~~~~~3 3 o I.5.7 oc 2O4

Page  440 440 OCTOBER MEETING, I904. Distribution by Deiarnezents. - - Conzlinued. PER SHAPE OF COST TO BE - NO. OF ESTIMATED CENT GENERAL LIBRARY EAC UAL CHANGED TO PIECES EXPENSE O EXDEPARTMTS COST DEPARTM TS PENSES HOMCEOPATHIC LIBRARY Bound, rebound-leather 8 9 25 Bound, rebound-cloth.. I 3 50 Total.......... 19 12 75i 00.5 I2 00 9 15 DENTAL LIBRARY Bound, rebound-leather I I 20 Bound, rebound-cloth.. 2 00 Total............ 3 3 20 00. 2 4 I 83 SPECIAL Bound, rebound-leather 20 25 55 Bound, rebound-cloth.. 31 15 7o Printing plant........... 155 40 Chemical laboratory 1 25 Total............ 51 197 90 o6.6 16i oo 20 77 Grand Total..... 00. 2,429 87 I,829 87 I"""__ I '~l';^""i'""" It will be seen by reference to the first table that the cost of the work at ruling prices for binding was $2,897.9I. Comparing this sum with the cost of labor and materials for the year, which was $2,429.87, there appears a balance of $468.04 in favor of the bindery. Since the pay of Mr. Hollands, superintendent of the bindery and press ($1,200) is drawn from the General Expense Fund and no longer from the book fund of the libraries, one-half is charged to the bindery and one-half to the press in the accounting. In adjusting the amounts that the several libraries should pay, $6oo is deducted from the total cost of the bindery as not forming a part of the indebtedness to the book fund. In the second table is shown the percentage of expense to be borne by the several libraries, the actual indebtedness

Page  441 OCTOBER MEETING, 1904. 441 of each for work done, and in the last column the amounts chargeable to each library to reimburse the book fund. These amounts are: General Library........................................ $I,399 85 Medical Library........................................ 210 43 Law Library........................................... 87 84 Homceopathic Library.................................. 9 15 Dental Library......................................... I 83 Special............................................... 120 77 T otal.............................................. $,829 87 Following is a list of the persons employed in the bindery during the year, exclusive of Mr. Hollands, and the compensation received by each one. The pay of these, as already intimated, is charged to the book appropriation: George Dengler.....................................$700 per year George Roth...........To Jan., 1904, $20.00 per month; after, $24.00 Lydia Schleyer................................$28.00 per month These constituted the regular force. Others received temporary employment at prices varying according to the value of the service rendered. The one addition to the equipment was a cutting machine costing $182. There was a special appropriation of $200 made by you for this. THE PRINTING PLANT. Following is the report made by Mr. Hollands on the work of the Printing Press for the year: Mr. R. C. Davis, Librarian-The work done in the Printing Plant for the year ending June 30, I904, was as follows: Amount charged to the several budgets.................. $2,292 95 Amount of bills certified by you......................... 1,349 Io Balance........................................... $943 85 The items, in most cases, have been charged at 60 per cent of list, but in some cases of special work the time has been kept. During the year eight students have been employed an average of twelve (12) hours per week each, and the compensation has materially aided them in paying expenses.

Page  442 442 OCTOBER MEETING, 1904. Four of these were from the law department, three from the literary and one from the engineering. For the coming year the applications for positions include three law, three literary and two engineering students. In addition to this, one, and possibly two, students, might be employed during the summer months. It has been found necessary to run the press evenings as the work is steadily increasing. If the increase continues at the same rate another year more room will have to be provided. Respectfully, W. C. HOLLANDS. It has been impossible for me, without neglect of my duties in the library, to acquaint myself fully with the numerous details of the work of the Printing Press. It was understood in the beginning that all bills for materials and labor, except the salary of Mr. Hollands, who is on the pay roll, should pass through my hands. This, so far as my knowledge extends, has been the case, and it is to the account of expenditures kept by me that Mr. Hollands refers in his report. I cannot resist the impression that improvement in the conduct of the business of the Press is possible and desirable -I might say necessary. What we are doing is hardly more than experimentation. This experimentation shows, I think, I. That there should be a determination in regard to what is to be printed, and, also, a determination as to what fund, or funds, of the University should be drawn upon to meet the cost of materials and labor, or, more specifically the various jobs of printing. 2. A determination of what the style of the Press is to be. Something has been done in this direction in the selection of paper and type, but the matter has not yet passed beyond debate. 3. More recognition of the responsibilities and capabilities of Mr. Hollands and the difficulties that he encounters in his somewhat undefined status. Very respectfully submitted, RAYMOND C. DAVIS, October T3, 1904. Librarian.

Page  443 OCTOBER AMEETING, I904. 443 On the recommendation of a committee, consisting of President Angell, Dean Hudson and Professors D'Ooge and Kelsey, Miss Elizabeth Sinclair, A.B., was appointed the holder of the Fellowship established by Mrs. Helen H. Newberry, of Detroit, for the present year. The following communication was received: ANN ARBOR, Oct. I I, I904. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: Gentlemen —I have the honor to report that the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts recommend to you the following named persons for the degrees indicated: FOR BACHELOR OF, ARTS. Louis Bennett Austin, Helen Louise Finney, Albert Bauman, Lloyd Alonzo Gifford, Allan Charles Clapp, Earl Ralph Lamont Gregg, Lulu Coney, James Floyd Halliday, Belle Honey Croarkin, Stephen Codding Mason, Jr., George Herbert Curtis, Harold W. Ryland. William Andrew Ferguson, FOR MASTER OF ARTS. Beatrix Kate Mary, Howard D. Minchin. Respectfully, P. R. DE PONT. On the motion of Regent Hill, the degrees were conferred as recommended. On the request of Professor Carhart and on the motion of Regent Hill, F. J. Mellencamp, A.B., was on a call vote appointed Instructor in Physics for one year at the salary of $900, in the place of C. M. Jansky, A.B., resigned; and Professor Carhart was empowered to appoint an Assistant in Physics at the salary of $I50. On motion of Regent Barbour, the salary of Frank Burr Marsh, Assistant in European History, was on a call vote raised from $450 to $600; and James F. Halliday, A.B., and Allen M. Kline, A.B., were also appointed Assistants in the same branch for one year at the salary of $225 each.

Page  444 44 OCTOBER MEETING, 1904. On the motion of Regent Hill, E. H. Ryan, A.M., was on a call vote appointed Assistant in American History for one year at the salary of $200. On motion of Regent Dean, John F. Preston was on a call vote appointed Assistant in Botany at the salary of $200. On the recolmmendation of Professor Prescott and on the motion of Regent Lawton, the following appointments in the Chemical Laboratory were made: Lee H. Cone, B.S., continued as Assistant in Research without salary, being supported by a grant from the Carnegie Institute for work under Professor Gomberg. Burton S. Knapp, B.S., holder'of the Stearns Fellowship of Pharmaceutical Research and assistant without salary, Frederick Stearns & Co. having renewed their grant of $350 for this fellowship for this year. Frank K. Ovitz, Analyst for the State Geological Survey, without salary from the University, and under the regulations made for meeting the expense of laboratory material. On the motion of Regent Lawton, the recommendations in the following communication from Professor Prescott were on a call vote adopted: ANN ARBOR, Oct. II, I904. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: Geuntleiulcn-In the matter of filling the instructorship at $9oo during the absence of Instructor Lichty, I beg to report that I have not been able to find, soon enough, any one suitable to recommend for the rank of instructor (as authorized by the Executive Committee in August) and therefore have arranged to take an assistant for instructor's duty and fill places as follows: Alexis C. Houghton, already engaged at $300, to be Assistant in General Chemistry, at $700, an increase of four hundred dollars (Minutes, I904, June, p. 272). Oscar H. Wurster, already appointed at $150, to be Assistant in General Chemistry in place of Mr. Houghton, at $300, an increase of one hundred and fifty dollars (Minutes, I904, June, p. 272). Alexander L. Trout, to be Assistant in General Chemistry for the first semester only, at. $50. This provision for General Chemistry in 1904-1905 makes ex

Page  445 OCTOBER MEETING, 1904. 445 penditure of six hundred dollars instead of the nine hundred dollars proposed for the instructor first above mentioned. Very respectfully submitted, ALBEIRT B. PRErSCOTT. On motion of Regent Hill, Professor D'Ooge was granted leave of absence from April until the end of the University year to attend the International Archaological Congress at Athens, it being understood that he provides satisfactorily for the instruction of his classes during his absence. The Board then took a recess to 2 P. M. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 P. Wi. During the temporary absence of the President, Regent Carey occupied the chair. A communication from Professor John R. Allen to Secretary Wade was presented, stating that the furniture contract of the Whitney Furniture Company had been executed with the exception of the following items: One panel on a class room desk was split, and the combination locks had not been put on the fourth floor furniture. On motion of Regent Lawton, the sum of $31 being deducted for these exceptions, it was voted unanimously by a call vote to pay the company $3,719 in full of their claims. On motion of Regent Lawton, S. F. Edwards, M.S., was appointed Assistant in Bacteriology in place of H. N. Torrey, B.S., at the salary of $300. On motion of Regent Barbour, it was voted that the editors of the Daily and of the Inlauder be notified that the rooms they are occupying in University Hall must be kept clean, or the use of the offices will be forbidden to the editors. On motion of Regent Dean, the request of the students to be permitted to have a bonfire on the Observatory grounds was granted. On motion of Regent Lawton it was decided on a call vote that ten dollars received by the Treasurer for the analysis of water received from G. W. Bennett, Avondale, Mich., during the summer vacation, should be paid to Gordon Berry, Assistant in ~Water Analysis.

Page  446 446 OCTOBER MEETING, I904. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Auditing Board was unanimously by a call vote authorized to expend $I,ooo for furniture and electric lights in the New Engineering building. On the motion of Regent Lawton (the President in the Chair), the following non-resident Lecturers in the Dental Department were unanimously appointed. Dr. W. L. Reeves, compensation.......................... $400.00 Dr. M. T. Watson, compensation.......................... 500.00 Dr. E. B. Spalding, compensation......................... IOO.00 Also, the Dental Faculty were allowed to expend $50 from their budget to secure the services of an attendant in the dental library and reading room from 7:30 to Io o'clock each evening. Also, in accordance with the recommendation of the Dental Faculty the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery was conferred on the following persons, who entered on the four years' course, and have completed the work now required for graduation in the three years' course: Adolph Henry Breitenwischer Grace Pearl Rogers, Glenn Elder Morningstar, Haygazoon Hagop Tashjian. On motion of Regent Lawton, the resignation of J. E. Gleason, M.D., Assistant to the chair of Ophthalmology and Otology, was accepted. On motion of Regent Lawton, George E. Slocum, M.D., was appointed Demonstrator of Ophthalmology at the salary of $500, in place of Dr. Raymond D, Sleight, resigned. Regent Carey presented the following communication from Dean Hutchins, and on his motion the degree of Bachelor of Laws was conferred in accordance with the recommendation of the Law Faculty on the persons named. ANN ARBOR, Oct. 13, 1904. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: Gentlemen-The following are recommended for the degree of LL.B.: Lester C. Whitten, as of the class of I896. Eugene Edward Person, Donald Cornell Osborn.

Page  447 OCTOBER MEETING, I904. 447 Franklin Roy Dove, B.L., Ohio Wesleyan University, Leslie Ullrich, A.B., Howard Eastburn Spence, A.B., Monmouth College, Kennedy Loomis Potter, Nathaniel Haws Tanner, Edward James Marrinane. Respectfully submitted for the Law Faculty, H. B. HUTCHINS, Dean. On motion of Regent Barbour, it was unanimously voted on a call vote that the Treasurer, on report of the Secretary, be allowed to pay the contractor for the construction of the New Engineering building $Io,ooo on his furnishing to the Secretary release of all sub-contractors, material men and workmen, of any and all liens and claims against the building and to the Board, and making affidavit thereto. On motion of Regent Hill, Regent Barbour, chairman of the Finance Committee, was unanimously authorized by a call vote to sell the Campbell property in Omaha for $1,500, and the Evans property in the same city for $2,500. On motion of Regent Carey, the request of night watchman Armbruster for two weeks' vacation was refused and his request for an increase of pay was laid on the table until the next meeting. On motion of Regent Barbour, it was unanimously resolved by a call vote to contract with Mr. Holden to erect two houses on the Crane property in Detroit at a cost not to exceed $I,6oo each. On motion of Regent Barbour, it was voted to decline the offer of Mrs. DeWitt to sell her house on North University avenue for $5,000. On motion of Regent Hill, Regent Barbour was requested to endeavor by correspondence to collect the sum due the Bates estate by O. W. Morgan. On motion of Regent Barbour, it was unanimously voted on call vote to appropriate $5o for apparatus to heat the water for the swimming tank in the Barbour Gymnasium. On motion of Regent Barbour, it was voted to loan two of the cheaper vases from the Chinese collection in the Museum to the Library on the signing of a receipt for the same by the Librarian and the Assistant Librarian.

Page  448 448 OCTOBER MEETING, 1904. On motion of Regent Barbour, it was voted that the Financial Statement prepared by the Finance Committee be published as an Appendix to the President's Report. The Treasurer presented his Annual Report, which it was voted, on motion of Regent Barbour, to accept and file and print in the Regents' Proceedings. It is as follows: TREASURER'S REPORT. FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1904, To the Finance Committees, Board of Regents, University of Michigan: Gentlelzeln-Herewith I submit my annual report for the fiscal year ending June 30, I904. Respectfully, H. SOULE, Treasurer. Receipts. From From From From From From From balance in Treasury, July, 1903............ State Treasurer, acct. 1/4 mill tax for General Expenses.................................. $315,620 oo Expenses.$315,620 00 State Treasurer, acct. 1/4 mill tax for Special Expenses.................................. 123,905 oo State Treasurer, Special Appropriations....... 9,000 00oo State Treasurer, acct. University Interest..... 47,976 24 Earnings Miscellaneous Sources, General Acct. 290,676 89 Earnings Miscellaneous Sources, Special Acct. 124 54 $33,324 36 $787,302 67 $820,627 03 Disbursemsents. Paid on account of General Expenses............... Paid on account Accumulations, Special Expenses.. Paid on account of Special Appropriations......... Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1904........... $625,602 41 '33,359 95 6,335 25 $765,297 6I 55,329 42 $820,627 03 GENERAL FUND. RECEIPTS TO THE GENERAL FUND. Balance in Treasury, July i, 190o3................. From State Treasurer, acct. University Interest..... From State Treasurer, acct. 1/1 mill tax............ From Interest on Deposits........................ From University Hospital Earnings............... From Homoeopathic Hospital Earnings............. From Dental Operating Room Earnings............ From Engineering Shops' Earnings................ From General Library Earnings................... From Printing Plant Earnings.................... From Pasteur Laboratory Earnings................ FIrom Carpenter Shop Earnings.................... From Miscellaneous Sources' Earnings............. From the Laundry.............................. Firom Students' Fees: Literary Department........... $57,335 oo Literary Dept., Summer School.. 5,675 oo Engineering Department........ 36,765 oo Engineering Dept., Camp Fees... 400 oo Medical Department............ 17,305 oo Medical Dept., Summer School.. 630 oo Law Department.............. 40,800 oo Law Dept., Summer School...... 400 oo Dental Department............ 3,900 oo lomceopathic Medical Dept...... 2,855 oo Pharmacy Department.......... 3,I40 oo $25,656 o6 47,976 24 315,620 oo 967 94 45,733 37 20,045 02 2,860 69 250 65 I4 38 259 i8 300 00oo 21 25 5,155 Io 4 75

Page  449 OCTOBER MEETING, 1904. 449 Anatomical Laboratory......... 2,690 oo Chemical Laboratory.......... 9,366 23 Hygienic Laboratory........... 3,586 33 Zoological Laboratory.......... 648 oo Botanical Laboratory........... 557 oo Physiological Laboratory........ 66 oo Pathological Laboratory........ 1,180 0oo Pharmacological Laboratory..... 180 oo Histological Laboratory......... 1,OO0 00 Engineering Laboratory........ 5,650 oo Dental Laboratory............. 147 oo Medical Demonstrations........ 3,870 oo Electrotherapeutics............ 584 0 Waterman Gymnasium.......... 3,15 oo Barbour Gymnasium.......... 598 00 Key Deposits..........697 00 Drawing Board Deposits...... 414 0 Combined Courses.............. 380 oo Law Library Tickets............ 1,747 00oo Electric Engineering........... 1,113 00 Diplomas...................... 8,270 00oo Total Students' Fees....... $215,064 56 Fees Refunded............ 7,361 57 Students' Fees, Net......... $207,702 99 $215,064 56 $679,929 19 DISBURSEMENTS FROM THE GENERAL FUND. Literary Department Pay Roll....... Literary Dept., Summer School P'y Roll Literary Dept., Summer School Expen's Engineering Department, Pay Roll..... Engineering Laboratory, Expenses...... Engineering Department, Expenses..... Engineering Shops................... Engineering, Electrical............... Physics. Physics............................ Civil Engineering.................... Medical Department, Pay Roll......... Medical Dept., Sum'er School, Pay Roll Medical Department, General Expenses.. Medical Library...................... M ateria M edica...................... Hygiene........................... Anatomical, Material................. Anatomical Laboratory............... Physiology.......................... Pathology........................... Electrotherapeutics................... Nervous Diseases.................... Surgical Department................. Pasteur Institute Laboratory........... Theory and Practice................. Opthalmology........................ (Palmer) Hospital Ward............... Derm atology......................... Histology........................... Law Department, Pay Roll............ Law Dept., Summer School, Pay Roll.. Law Dept., Summer School, Expenses. Law Dept., Miscellaneous, Expenses.... Law Department, Library, Books...... -Iomceopathic Medical College, Pay Roll Homoeopathic Med. Coll., Library, Books Homceopathic Med. Coll., Misc. Expenses Dental College, Pay Roll............ Dental College, Supplies............... Dental College, Library.............. University Hospital, Pay Roll......... University Hospital, Misc. Expenses.... Homoeopathic Hospital, Pay Roll....... Homceopathic Hospital, Misc. Expenses. $198,168 24 7,570 00 $205,738 24 573 34 57,425 10 57,425 10 966 05 434 72 2,389 8o 83 12 1,143 7I 1,884 14 44,346 39 1,113 50 45,459 89 503 66 2,145 6i 595 69 4,600 87 2,129 45 1,677 26 521 98 1,633 I9 358 54 I66 9I 447 '7 746 83 221 05 58 23 35 75 23 45 1,367 39 45,910 oo 1,532 92 47,442 92 25 00 654 8i 3,605 35 7,752 50 7,752 50 225 90 48r 32 10,670 OQ., 10,670 00 3,374 42 83 93 14,129 65 I4,129 65 30,978 90 4,954 65 4,954 65 17,066 65

Page  450 450 OCTOBER MEETING, I904. Pharmacy and Chemical, Pay Roll.... 24,534 oo Pharmacy and Chemical, Misc. Expenses Amount of Salaries Paid from the General Fund....................... $418,106 95 Contingent Expenses................. Repairs Expenses.................... Fuel Expenses....................... Lights' Expenses.................... General Library, Books Expenses...... General Library, Misc. Expenses....... Postage............................. Advertising and Printing............ M useum............................. Botanical Laboratory................. Botanical Garden.................... Zoological Laboratory................ School Inspection.................... Observatory......................... Electrical Supplies................... Laundry.............. Waterman Gymnasium............... \Voman's Gymnasium................. Care of Teams...................... Carpenter Shop...................... Heating Supplies..................... Printing Plant...................... Appointment Committee............. Hospital Boiler House................ Forestry........................ I)iplom as............................ L atin................................ M usic............................... E nglish............................. Philosophy........................ F rench.............................. Naval Architecture................... Sem etics............................ American History.................... Barbour Gymnasium, Repairs.......... Water Supply...................... H istory............................. G eology............................. The Alumnus........................ Political Economy.................... G erm an............................. Greek............................... English Philology................ Pedagogy............................ M ineralogy.......................... St. Louis Exhibit..................... Commencement Expenses............. Students' Fees Refunded............. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1904 24,534 oo 9,462 05 7,o61 85 I7,IoI 60 34,384.03 2,102 40 IO,234 76 619 oI 1,784 34 2,368 69 221 19 687 0I 312 67 717 oo 493 45 536 21 1,37I 52 7,340 90 174 70 208 58 I,8II 72 1,500 00 963 29 1,694 I3 86 IO 5,366 80 i,oi6 74 1,7I7 I2 I57 I7 I99 6i 242 II 389 42 42 63 36 5 17 20 24 45 34 90 2,574 99 49 05 105 54 1,400 00 I99 9 35 30 9 02 12 50 40 27 25 25 1,o84 23 910 88 7,361 57 $625,602 41 54,326 78 $679,929 19 SPECIAL FUND ACCOUNTS. Homoeopathic Medical College. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, I903................. $ From State Treasurer........................... 6 Disbursements. Paid V ouchers................................... balance in Treasury, June 30, 1904................ 4 Electric Light Plant. Receipts. From Earnings...................................,600 00 1,ooo 00 $7,600 00 3,335 25.,264 75 7,600 oo 124 54 I24 54

Page  451 OCTOBER MEETING, I904. Disbursements. Overdrawn, July i, 1903.......................... I Summer Hospitals. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, 903.................. 3,0 From State Treasurer........................... 3,0 Disburse1ments. Paid V ouchers.................................. 3,0 Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1904................ 3,0 451 124 54 24 54 00 00 00 00 '00 00 00 00 6,000 oo 6,ooo 00 Psychopathic Ward. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, 1903.................. From State Treasurer............................ Balance Overdrawn, June 30, 1904................ Disbursements. Paid V ouchers.................................. 1,311 94 25,000 00 4,931 52 31,243 46 31,243 46 31,243 46 Accumulation of Savings, New Engineering Building. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, J9uly I, 1903................. From State Treasurer........................... Balance Overdrawn, June 30, 1904................ 5,I38 96 88,905 00 6,718 26 I00,762 22 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers.................................. 100,762 22 100,762 22 Accumulation of Savings, New Medical Building. Receipts. From State Treasurer........................... 10,000 00 10,000 00 Disbursements. Balance Overdrawn, July I, I903.................. Paid Vouchers................................. Balance in Treasury, June 30, I904................ 4,597 32 1,335 87 4,066 81 Io,ooo 00 Accumulation of Savings, Repairs to Woman's Gymnasium. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, I903................. Disbursements. Paid Vouchers................................... Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1904................ 1,339 26 1,339 26 i8 40 1,320 86 1,339 26 Special Funds. Summary of Balances, June 30, 1904. Homceopathic Medical College, Balance in Treasury.. Summer Hospitals, Balance in Treasury............ Repairs to Woman's Gymnasium, Balance in Treasury New Medical Building, Balance in Treasury........ 4,264 75 3,000 00 1,320 86 4,066 81 12,652 42 Overdrafts. Psychopathic W ard.............................. 4,931 52 New Engineering Building....................... 6,718 26 11,649 78 Net Balance in Treasury..................... $1,002 64

Page  452 452 OCTOBER MEETING, 1904. GIFTS AND TRUST IF'UNDS. Under this head are included gifts and other funds which tile Regents have received from time to time from benefactors for special pturposes. The new accounts opened during the year are the Saginaw Valley Alumnae Association, for aid of undergraduate women, the Lucinda Hinsdale Stone Supplementary Loan Scholarship Fund, and the Angelina Bradford \Vhittier Fellowship in Botany, the Humanistic Series Fund,-the Museum Expedition Fund, and tle Michigan Club Iouse Fund. Philo Parsons Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, I903.................. $i 1 I 74 From Interest................................... 11 52 $123 26 Disbursemcnts. Balance in Treasury, June 30, I904................ 123 26 123 26 Goethe Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, I903.................. 212 33 From Interest................................... 7 26 219 59 Disblurslemlen ts. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1904................ 219 59 219 59 Elisha Jones Classical Fellowship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, I903.................. 9 44 9 44 Disbtursemni ct s. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1904................. 9 44 9 44 Coyl Collection. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, 1903................. 12,875 63 Interest......................................... 612 89 13,488 52 L)isbllrseC eIl ts. Paid Vouchers................................. 962 55 Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1904................ 12,525 97 13,488 52 Buhl Law Library Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, 903.................. 498 30 Interest......................................... 10 79 509 09 Disblurselmenlts. Paid Vouchers.................................. 60 oo Balance in Treasury, June 30, I904................ 449 09 509 09 Seth Harrison Scholarship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, 190o3............... 29,426 82 Interest......................................... 1,378 85 30,805 67 Disbztr1se)m Iets. Paid Vouchers................................. 1,201 50 Balance in Treasury, June 30, I904................ 29,604 17 30,895 67 Class of Ninety-Four Scholarship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, I903.................. 1,581 49 Amount of Subscriptions Paid.................... 148 80 Interest......................................... 85 95 1,816 24

Page  453 OCTOBER M1EETING, 1904. 453 Disburscmlcntrs. IBalance in T'reasury, June 30, I904................ Ford-Messer Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, 1903................. Interest........................................ i,8i6 24 1,816 24 22,834 15 i,io6 71 Disbursem1lnc1ts. I'aid Vouchers.................................. I,400 84 Balance in ''reasury, June 30, 1904................ 22,550 02 The Phillips Scholarships Funds. 23,950 86 23,950 86 894 78 894 78 Receipts. -Balance in Treasury, July T, 1903.................. Interest... -Fro0m the Estate Rentals......................... D)isburscmentc s. P aid V ouche rs................................... Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1904................ Music Hall Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, 1903.................. In terest......................................... Disbuarsmc1euts. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1904............... 609 98 21 02 263 78 150 oo 744 78 1,363 53 61 59 1,425 I2 1,425 12 1,425 12 Class of Ninety-Seven Scholarship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, 1903.................. I1 nterest......................................... Disbulrase'mlcel ts. Balance in Treasury, June 30, I904................ i81 40 4 IS I85 58 185 58 185 58 Class of Ninety-Eight Scholarship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, 1903.................. Interest...................................... Fro0 m Subscriptions Paid........................ Disb uIrsem1cl ts. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1904................ American School at Rome. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, 1903................. Frolm Subscriptions............................... Disbulrse11Cmelts. Balance in TIreasury, June 30, 1904................ Parke, Davis & Co. Fund. Receipts. C ontribution..................................... Disb u'rsem ents. l'aid V\ouchers................................... Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1904................ 389 o6 12 17 15 oo 416 23 416 23 416 23 45 45 oo 45 I 45 II 45 II 500 oo 500 00 450 oo 50 00 500 oo

Page  454 454 OCTOBER MEETING, I904. Stearns Pharmacy Fellowship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, 1903.................. I 56 Contribution.................................... 490 491 56 Disburse ments. Paid Vouchers................................... 490 oo Balance in Treasury, June 30, I904................ I 56 491 56 Woman's Professorship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, 1903.................. 11,496 51 Interest........................................ 570 73 2,067 24 Disbursemeil ts. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1904................ 12,067 24 12,067 24 Library of Early Christian Literature. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, 1903................. 2 59 From Latin Fund Transfer....................... I 73 4 32 Disblursemenlts. Paid Vouchers.................................. 4 32 4 32 Special Latin Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, 1903.3................ 3 42 From Subscriptions (Trans., $I8.I5; Sub., $I3.98)... 32 13 35 55 Disbursemen ts. Paid Vouchers.............................. 32 22 Transfer to Early Christian Literature Fund....... I 73 Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1904................ I 6 35 55 Good Government Club. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, 1903................. 724 90 Interest......................................... 21 54 Contributions.................................... 70 0 816 54 Disbursemen ts. Paid Vouchers.................................. 6 0 oo Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1904............. 756 54 8i6 54 Peter White Fellowship. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, 1903................. 454 42 Interest...................................... 4 07 Contributions................................... 400 oo 868 49 Disbursementcs. Paid Vouchers.................................. 400 oo Balance in Treasury, June 30, I904................. 468 49 868 49 Ninety-Nine Law Class Fellowship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, I903................. 33 09 Interest......................................... 76 33 85 Disburse men ts. Balance in Treasury, June 30, I904................ 33 8 33 85 33 85

Page  455 OCTOBER MEETING, 1904. 455 Williams Professorship Fund. The care of the Williams' Professorship Fund has been partly in the hands of the Treasurer, and partly in the hands of Mr. George S. Field. A summary of the report of MAr. Field is in an appendix to the present report. (See Appendix). The report on the portion in the hands of the Treasurer is as follows: Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, I903.................. In terest..................................... DisbZursem1entis. Paid V ouchers................................... Balance in Treasury, June 30, I904................ Marine Biological Fund. Receipts. C ontributions.................................... Disb ursemenz ts. Paid Vouchers.................................. Morris Alumni Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, I903................. Interest......................................... Disb ursemiients. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 904............... $4,143 i6 206 60 50 00 4,299 76 $4,349 76 4,349 76 I00 00 100 00 I00 00 " 00 00 2,792 41 148 33 2,940 74 2,940 74 2,940 74 D. M. Ferry Botanical Fund. Receipts. Contribution.................................... Disb r semenl ts. Amount Overdrawn, July I, 1903................. Paid V ouchers................................... Bates Professorship Fund. 550 oo 550 oo 50 oo 500 oo 550 oo Receipts. Balance in Treasury July I, 1903, Cash and Loans.. Balance in Property July I, I903.................. In terest........................................ From rentals.................................... From Property Sold............................. Disbursenime ts. Care of Property Expenses and Taxes.............. Annuity to Legatee............................. Salaries to Professors and Assistants............... Apparatus and Laboratory Supplies................. Transfer from Property Account.................. Balance in Cash Account June 30, 1904............ Balance in Property............................. 102,606 io 28,226 46 4,161 46 4,8I5 95 1,396 79 4,292 93 1,200 00 3,390 00oo 425 22 1,396 79 103,672 15 26,829 67 151,206 76 151,206 76 Class of Ninety-Nine Memorial Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, I903................. 6 Disburse me ts. Balance in Treasury, June 30, I904................ 6 Newton Van der Veer Loan Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, 1903................ 318 Interest......................................... 9 35 6 35 35 6 35 48 63 328 II

Page  456 456 OCTOBER M/IEETING, 1904. Disb iurse1men1ts. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1904................ 328 11 328 11 Students' Lecture Association Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, 1903................. 1,031 00 Interest........................................ 27 25 From Treasurer of the Association............... 267 i8 1,325 43 Disb it rsm ets. PIaid \ouchers................................. 267 IS Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1904................ 1,058 25 I,325 43 Liquid Air Plant. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, 1903................. 2 49 I 2 49 Disb ursem cuts. Balance in T'reasury, June 30, 1904................ 2 49 i2 49 James W. Scott Classical Fellowship Fund. Reccipts. B1alance in Treasury, July I, 1903................... 17 2 Interest........................................ 94 i8 15 DisbtzrseIlc lts. Transferred to Special Latin Fund.................. 18 15 8 15 International Club Scholarships. Reccipts. Balance in Treasury, July I, 1903................. 2,781 25 Interest....................................... 40 00 2,821 25 Disb lrseilmeJts. lait Vouchers.................................. 1,580 oo Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1904.............. 1,241 25 2,821 25 Hannah E. Davis Allopathic Hospital Fund. Receipts. Ialance in Treasury, July i, 1903................. 2,213 32 Interest......................................... 66 85 2,280 17 Disb irsemellc ts. Paid Vouchers.................................. 19 71 Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1904................ 2,260 46 2,280 17 Warner Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, 1903.................. I 10 Interest......................................... 5 I 25 DisbhurselmetC s. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1904................ r 25 I 25 Gas Association Fellowship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, 1903.................. 42 6 \oucher Charged to this Account in Error......... 12 00 Contributions................................... 500 oo 554 60 Dis bltrsclCilts. Paid Vouchers.................................. 440 85 Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1904................ 113 75 554 60

Page  457 OCTOBER lMEETING, 1904. Palmer Memorial Ward. 457 Receipts. JBalance in Treasury, July i, 1903................. Disb r'seCim cns. P aid V ouclers.................................. Transfer to Correct Error to Gas Association Account Balance in Treasury, June 30, I904................ Walter Crane Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July 1, 90o3................. In terest................................... Disblurs;elC ts. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1904................ 895 56 895 56 i6i 82 12 00 721 74 895 56 57I 26 I5 79 587 05 587 05 587 05 Palmer-Memorial-Free Bed Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July, 1903................... In te re st........................................ Disb a rseC1 eiits. Paid V ouchers................................... Balance in Treasury, June 30, I904............... Chemical Apparatus Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, 1903................. Interest........................................ Disb lt rsemi cits. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1904................ Buhl Classical Fellowship. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, I903.................. In tere st......................................... C ontribution s.................................... Disblur seine its. Paid V ouchers.................................. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1904................ 15,000 00 450 IT 170 89 15,279 22 15,450 I I5,450 II 08 47 8I 109 28 109 28 109 28 5 36 07 500 00 475 00 30 43 505 43 505 43 Alice Freeman Palmer Memorial Fund. Receipts. Balancc in Treasury, July I, 1903................. In terest......................................... C ontributio ns.................................... Disb ursCeme1its. Balance in T'reasury, June 30, 1904................ McMillan Shakespeare Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, 1903................. Interest....................................... C ontributions................................... Disb iusecme1ts. Paid V ouchers.................................. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1904............... 1o 15 i8 5 oo 15 33 I5 33 I5 33 76 43 I 98 I00 00 33 13 145 28 I78 41 178 4I

Page  458 458 OCTOBER MEETING, 1904. Treadwell Free Bed Fund. Rcceipts. Balance in Treasury, July i, 1903................... 53 o Interest from State Treasurer........................... 39 86 92 96 Disb srsenimets. Balance in Treasury, June 30, I904.............. 92 96 92 96 Stearns Music Fellowship Fund. Receipts. Balance in Treasury, July, I903................... I 9 Contributions................................... 515 oo 516 go Disbulrscmenits. Paid Vouchers.................................. 511 90 Balance in Treasury, June 30, I904............... 5 0o 516 90 Saginaw Valley Alumnae Association Scholarship Fund. Receipts. From Contributions............................. 8o 80 oo Disbursemen1ts. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1904................ 80 o. 80 oo Lucinda Hinsdale Stone Supplementary Loan Fund. Receipts. From Contributions............................. 3,000 00 Interest......................................... 43 36 3,043 36 Disburselments. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1964.............. 3,043 36 3,043 36 Angelina Bradford Whittier Botany Fellowship. Receipts. From Contribution.............................. 4,000 00 Interest......................................... 90 68 4,09o 68 Disbur-seents. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1904............... 4,090 68 4,9go 68 Humanistic Series Fund. Receipts. From Contributions.............................. 32 50 Interest......................................... 21 32 71 Disbursemienlts. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1904................ 32 71 32 71 Museum Expedition Fund. Receipts. From Contributions.......................... 250 o. 250 00 Disbursiemenlts. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1904................ 250 00 250 00 1903 Class Memorial Fund. Receipts. From Contributions.............................. 137 65 Interest........................................ 3 60 141 25 Disburseuments. Balance in Treasury, June 30, I904.............. 141 25 141 25

Page  459 OCTOBER MEETING, I904. Michigan Club House-Junior Hop Committee Fund. 459 Receipts. From Contributions.............................. Disbursse;ln cts. Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1904................ I70 70 170 70 I70 70 I70 70 SUMMARY OF TRUST FUND BALANCES. Philo Parsons Fund............... Goethe Fund...................... Elisha Jones Fellowship Fund........ Coyl Library Fund................ Buhl Library Fund................ Seth Harrison Fund............... '94 Class Fund.................... Ford Messer Fund................ Phillips Scholarship Fund........... Music Hall Fund.................. '97 Scholarship Fund.............. '98 Scholarship Fund.............. American School, Rome, Fund...... Parke, Davis & Co. Fund........... Stearns Pharmacy Fund............ Woman's Professorship Fund........ Special Latin Fund................ Good Government Club Fund........ Peter White Fellowship Fund....... '99 Law Class Fund................ Williams Professorship Fund........ Williams Professorship Property Fund Morris Alumni Fund................ Bates Professorship Fund........... '99 Class Memorial Fund............ Newton Van der Vere Fund......... Students' Lecture Association Fund.. Liquid Air Plant Fund.............. International Club Fund............ Allopathic Hospital (Hannah E. Davis) Fund.................... W arner Fund...................... Gas Association Fund.............. Palmer Memorial Ward Fund........ Walter Crane Fund.................. Chemical Apparatus Fund.......... Buhl Classical Fellowship" Fund...... Alice Freeman Palmer Memorial..... McMillan Shakespeare Fund........ Treadwell Free Bed Fund........... Stearns Music Fellowship Fund..... Saginaw Valley Alumnae Fund...... Lucinda Hinsdale Stone Fund...... Angelina Bradford Whittier Fund... Humanistic Series Fund............ Museum Expedition Fund........... Michigan Club House Fund......... Palmer Memorial Free Bed Fund.... 1903 Class Memorial Fund.......... CASH. $123 26 219 59 9 44 2,525 97 449 09 4,604 17 316 24 2,550 02 744 78 425 12 i5 58 416 23 44 I1 50 00 I 56 1,067 24 I 60 756 64 468 49 51 299 76 790 74 29,272 15 6 35 328 II 126 59 12 49 1,241 25 2,260 46 I 25 113 75 721 74 587 05 I09 28 30 43 15 33 145 28 92 96 5 00 3,043 36 4,090 68 32 71 250 00 170 70 3,049 22 141 25 AND PROPERTY. TOTAL. $123 26 219 59 9 44 $IO 000 00 12,525 97 449 09 25,000 00 29,604 17 1,500 00 1,8i6 24 20,000 00 22,550 00 744 78 1,000 00 1,425 12 175 0oo 85 58 416 23 45 II 50 00oo I 56 1.o000 00 12,067 24 I 6o 756 54 468 49 33 34 33 85 4,00o 00 4,299 76 14,294 74 14,294 74 2,150 00 2,940 74 101,229 67 130,501 82 6 35 328 ii 931 66 I,o58 25 12 49 1,241 25 2,260 46 I 25 113 75 721 74 587 05 109 28 30 43 15 33 145 28 92 96 5 oo 80 oo 80 oo 3,043 36 4,090 68 32 71 250 00 170 70 12,230 00 15,279 22 141 25

Page  460 460 OCTOBER MIEETING, 1904. AlPPENDIX. Williams Professorship Fund. In July, 1898, by order of the Board of Regents, a portiQn of the property belonging to the \\illiams Professorship Fund was placed in the hands of IIon. Levi L. Barhour, of D)etroit, for management, and upon his assuming the duties of Regent, the management w\as turned over to Mr. George S. Field, of Detroit, by direction of the Board. The following statement, compiled and rearranged from the report of Mr. Field, shows the changes in the condition of the fund from June I5th, 1903, to June I 5tl, 1904. Receipts.:Amount of Cash on Hand from Last Account........ Amount Collected from P'rincilal on Interest on Loans Contra. Citizens Savings Bank to Apply on Loan............ Citizens Savings sank to Apply on Loan............ Paid Mortgage Principal and Interest................ Paid Mortgage Principal and Interest............... Paid Postage.................................... Paid Mlortgage Ioan Paid M ortgage Loan.............................. Estimated Value of SecuritiesR eal E state.................................. M ortgages on Real Istate..................... Land Contracts.............................. Last Year's Valuation......................... N et gain................................ $6i 56 2,721 34 $2,782 90 150 oo 178 95 851 95 700 oo 2 00 900 oo 2,782 90 1,129 08 12,245 66 920 0oo 4,294 74 13,442 26 $852 48

Page  461 OCTOBER MEETING, 1904. 461 On motion of Regent Dean, it was unanimously voted on call vote to purchase apparatus and supplies for immediate use in the Mineralogical Laboratory as requested by Assistant Professor Kraus, at a cost of $513. On motion of Regent Barbour, it was unanimously voted on call vote to place a telephone in the Barbour Gymnasium. On motion of Regent Carey, the following resolution was unanimously adopted: Resolved, That this Board requests the Auditor General to transfer to the accumulation of savings account the unexpended balance of the appropriation of 1903, being $39,452.50, and to set apart this sum to the credit of the New Engineering building. On the motion of Regent Hill, Professors Reed and Whitney were requested to formulate a plan for appointing some one to act as Auditor and Treasurer, in care of the funds raised by student organizations, and report to the Board. On motion of Regent Barbour, the President was unanimously authorized to use the sum of $300 to secure the editing of the Calendar and the Official Announcements of the Departments. On the motion of Regent Hill, the salary of Edward B. Escott, M.S., and that of William Marshall, M.S., as Instructors in Mathematics, were raised to $I,200 each from October I last, their appointments to be for three years. On the motion of Regent Lawton, the Finance Committee was requested to make recommendation concerning the needed help in the Treasurer's office. On the motion of Regent Hill, and on a unanimous call vote, the Treasurer was directed to pay Mrs. W. H. Pettee $300 for the services of Professor Pettee last year as editor of University publications. On motion of Regent Hill, it was unanimously voted that the Auditing Board employ such help for the Treasurer's office for the present as they shall think best, at the rate of $Ioo a month, and to secure Mr. Baker of Detroit, if practicable.

Page  462 462 OCTOBER MEETING, 1904. On motion of Regent Hill, it was unanimously voted to pay D. D. Starr, in charge of the University booth at St. Louis, $25 a month additional from Oct. I to the close of his services. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Board adjourned to November I I at 2 p. m. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  [unnumbered]

Page  [unnumbered]

Page  463 NOVEMBER MEETING. UNIVERSITY OF MIICHIGAN, Ann Arbor, Nov. II, I904. The Board met in the Regents' room at 2 p. M. Present-Regents Hill, Lawton, Dean, Barbour, Fletcher, Carey, and Knappen. Absent-Regent White. The proceedings of the last meeting were read and, on motior of Regent Hill, approved. Hon. C. B. Grant, representing the Alumni Committee on the Memorial Hall, briefly addressed the Board and submitted the following recommendation of the committee concerning the purposes of the proposed building: The Memorial Committee of the Alumni Association appointed at the last annual meeting to solicit funds for the erection of a Memorial Building on the Campus, in accordance with the resolution of said Association and approved by the Board of Regents, are willing and agree to recommend that the said building shall be devoted to the following purposes: (I) To have commemorated the names of students and members of the Faculty who have served or who may serve their country as soldiers or sailors in any of its wars; and also the names of students and members of the Faculty who have won or who may hereafter win distinction in any department of the world's work, or who have rendered signal service to the University. (2) To furnish rooms for the Alumni Association and its officers. (3) To furnish an assembly room for the annual and other meetings of the Alumni Association and for the use of the students and Faculty, and also quarters for the Michigan-Union under such regulations as the Board of Regents may prescribe. (4) To furnish rooms for social meetings and intercourse for the undergraduates and Faculty. (5) To furnish a large auditorium on the ground floor for the general use of the University, provided sufficient funds are obtained. On motion of Regent Lawton, it was voted that the plan submitted be approved.

Page  464 464 NOVEMBER MEETING, I904. On motion of Regent Fletcher, by a call vote, it was voted to pay to Charles Hoertz & Son certain bills, to the accuracy of which they made affidavit, amounting to $I5,OI3.35, and to deduct that sum from the sum of $I5,913.II, the balance upon the adjustment of the contract for the New Engineering Building, and after making such payment to pay said Hoertz & Son the remaining sum, $899.76. Professor Reed presented the following report prepared by him and Professor Whitney at the request of the Regents on the supervision and care of the finances of student organizations: ANN ARBOR, MICH., Nov. 10, I904. To the Honorable, the President and Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: Gentlemen-In obedience to your resolution of October 13, the committee appointed to consider the question of financial supervision of student organizations in this University beg leave to submit the following report: I. THE SITUATION. It may be of interest to glance briefly at the situation as it exists today. There are at present, in active operation in the University, some fifteen to twenty different organizations, which annually collect and disburse a large amount of money. A partial list of such organizations, with the approximate amounts handled annually by each, is as follows: (a) Non-athletic Organizations. The Michigan Daily................................$ 3,400 oo The Inlander........................................ 2,000 oo The M ichiganensian.................................. 4,000 oo The Technic....................................... 500 oo The Students' Lecture Association..................... 4,000 oo The University Comedy Club........................... I,ooo oo The Oratorical Association............................ 1,200 oo The University Glee and Banjo Club................... 2,500 00 The Junior Hop Committee........................... 2,000 oo The Senior Class (all departments, including caps and.gowns, invitations, tax, Senior promenade, etc.)..... 2,500 oo The Woman's Leagu-e................................ 400 oo Four Literary Societies................................ Io0 00 Total for non-athletic organizations........... $23,700 oo

Page  465 NOVEM/BER MlEETIG, I1904. 465 (b) Athletic Organizations. The Students' Athletic Association, $30,000.00 to $50,000.00, making in all, something between $50,000.00 and $70,000.00 annually disbursed by student organizations, with more or less supervision by the Faculty. Of the non-athletic organizations there had been, until last year, no supervision of the financial management at all. At present most of these organizations have some sort of supervisory control, imposed by the Committee on Non-athletic Organizations. In some cases this supervision leaves little to be desired, notably so in the case of the Michigan Daily, The Inlander, and The Students' Lecture Association; in others the machinery for auditing accounts has not yet been fully elaborated, and in the remainder no control or supervision has been attempted. In the case of the Michiganensian, and of the various committees of the Senior Class, it would seem impossible to secure satisfactory supervision until the present methods of doing business have been entirely overhauled and revised. In the Athletic Association we find a more elaborate and careful system of accounting than in any of the other organizations, as it should be, in view of the large amounts of money handled. The financial management of this association, while nominally in the hands of the student body, is yet under the supervision and control of the Board in Control of Athletics. The nominal management is lodged in a Board of Directors of the.Students' Athletic Association, composed of seven members, of which Mr. Baird, Director of Outdoor Athletics, is one, the other six members being students. The treasurer of this board handles no money, but draws checks for the payment of bills; these checks must be countersigned by Mr. Baird, and by Professor A. H. Pattengill, Chairman of the Board in Control of Athletics. The treasurer de facto is the Farmers and Mechanics Bank, of Ann Arbor, which keeps the account of the Athletic Association funds just as it does the account of a private individual. This bank receives all deposits, and pays out the same, only on presentation of checks drawn by the treasurer of the student Board of Directors and countersigned as above -mentioned. The functions of Business Manager of the Athletic Association are performed by Mr. Baird, by whom all contracts are made, all tickets are handled, and all liabilities are incurred. The Board of Directors of the Students' Athletic Association employs an expert bookkeeper to keep the accounts of the Association, and these accounts are audited in January, at the end of the financial year, by Mr. Belser, cashier of the Farmers and Mechanics

Page  466 466 NOVEMBER MEETING, 1904. Bank, of Ann Arbor. The functions of the Board in Control of Athletics are supervisory in the sense that all checks must be countersigned by the chairman of the board, and are advisory in the matter of disposition of the profits of the Association, in case such advice is needed. In the matter of athletic relations with other institutions, on questions of eligibility, and discipline of athletes, its powers are mandatory. Inquiry among the leading Universities of the United States concerning the practice of financial supervision of student organizations, has furnished some interesting and valuable information relative to the status of this question in other institutions. Of the twelve institutions addressed by your committee through a circular letter of inquiry, replies have been received from all but Harvard and Pennsylvania. Of these ten Universities furnishing replies, all have financial supervision of the funds of athletic organizations in some form or other. As to non-athletic organizations, the usage is extremely varied. Yale, Cornell, Illinois, Wisconsin, and Minnesota have no financial supervision of student activities, outside athletics, while Columbia, Ohio, Indiana, Missouri, and North western have financial supervision of some sort for all student organizations. In some cases this supervision is little more than advisory, as in Northwestern, where the financial managers of the various organizations must be approved by the administrative officers of the Universiy, or in Missouri, where the Faculty Committee on Student Activities apportions its members among the various organizations, one member to each. These gentlemen act rather as advisers than as supervisors. The Universities of Ohio and Indiana have systematic auditing of accounts of all student organizations, in Indiana by order of the Board of Trustees, and in Ohio by order of the Faculty. The most complete system of supervision of student organizations as well as the most unique is found in Columbia University, where there exists a committee consisting of three members of the Faculty, called the University Committee on Student Organizations. This committee has the power "to supervise and control all student organizations, athletic and other, which in any way represent the University before the public." The general supervision and control of the financial administration of all such student organizations is vested in a Comptroller of Student Organizations, appointed by the President of the University. Each University organization is required to submit to the Comptroller, annually, through its Board of Directors, an estimate for a budget for the year, which the Comptroller may modify at his dis

Page  467 NOVEMBER MEETING, 1904. 467 cretion. He may also designate the amount of money to be raised in advance, from membership fees or otherwise, which shall be required as a guarantee fund for the year, by any association, club or society under his control; and no such organization shall be allowed to incur any indebtedness or financial responsibility whatsoever, until such sum has been deposited to its credit by the Comptroller. All funds are to be deposited in a bank to be designated by the Comptroller, and no money shall be drawn therefrom except upon a voucher, countersigned by the Comptroller. The Comptroller has authority to prescribe the form in which the accounts of every organization shall be kept, and to see that they are kept as prescribed. The need of some sort of financial supervision in this University has been rendered only too apparent through the developments of the past year. Student politics has frequently exemplified practical politics in its worst form. Corrupt practices have run on from year to year until the tradition is urged as a defense. From their experience on the Committee in Charge of Non-athletic Organizations the members of your committee are led to believe that while the great mass of the student body is essentially sound, rightminded and honest, yet the lack of any form of financial supervision, the relatively large amounts of money handled by young men, usually of little or no business training, together with the irresponsible and slip-shod methods of business management traditional in the various student organizations have all contributed to foster the spirit of financial and political crookedness. Students who are honest enough in the beginning are entangled with those who are not, and through existing conditions may be forced into compromising attitudes before their fellows. An additional factor in the situation, is the agent of the lecture bureau, or of the printing establishment, or of the firm furnishing regalia, who not only connives at dishonest practices but voluntarily suggests ways whereby students may profit from their offices, and offers cash bribes for assistance in placing contracts. Specific cases of such demoralizing practices on the part of agents are only too common. In view of the situation it may be asked, what is to be done about it? After mature deliberation it seems to your committee that three things are reasonably clear. First, that some sort of official supervision of the financial administration of student organizations is imperatively demanded. Second, that whatever form of supervision be selected, it should, so far as possible, leave the management of student affairs in the

Page  468 468 4NOVEMBER MEETING, 1904. hands of students. That it should not encroach upon student initiative, nor seek to put the various student associations in leading strings. That the fundamental idea in University life is freedom, tempered with a knowledge of law, and respect for its requirements. That the student body as a whole can be trusted; and that the functions of a supervising official, whatever be his rank and title, should go no farther than to insure to the University, to the Regents, and to the people of the state an honest, orderly and selfrespecting administration of student affairs. Third, that a strict financial accounting should be required of every student organization representing the University before the public. That all non-athletic organizations be required to put themselves in touch with the committee in charge of such organizations, and so to modify or perfect their organizations as to admit of the frequent and easy auditing of their accounts. To this end a uniform system of bookkeeping should be required of all, and those that cannot or do not comply, should quit business at once. II. OFFICIAL MACHINERY. In accordance with the foregoing statement of facts and principles, your committee would respectfully recommend that some suitable person should be appointed to make monthly audit of the financial proceedings of all student organizations of whatever character. This officer should be empowered to prescribe a uniform system of bookkeeping for all such organizations, and no person should be allowed to serve as treasurer of any such organization who is either unable or unwilling to keep the accounts in the form prescribed. Any official incurring expense or paying bills which, in the judgment of the auditor should not be allowed, should be held personally responsible for the same. In the opinion of your committee, the person appointed to this office should be a man well versed in business, and in the keeping of accounts. He should be a man of recognized standing in the University, of tact, prudence and firmness, as well as of unquestioned fairness and honesty. He should be given discretion in the management of details, sufficient leisure and sufficient compensation to prevent the duties of the office from becoming either burdensome or distasteful. In addition your committee would recommend that a Senate committee be authorized to draw up and publish for general distribution each year among the student body, a codification of the rules for the guidance of students in the University, as they now exist upon the University records. In the opinion of your committee, the institution of some such

Page  469 NOVEMBER MEETING, 1904. 469 system of monthly auditing of accounts of student organizations as above indicated would remedy existing evils, and still preserve to student activities as large a measure of autonomy as is consistent with good order and good government. If, in the future, more insistent measures should be deemed necessary, the appointment of a common secretary and treasurer or of a comptroller of all student organization, might be considered. Respectfully submitted, JOHN 0. REED. A. S. WHITNEY. On motion of Regent Barbour, it was voted that the report be received and placed on file, and that the thanks of the Board be returned to the committee. The Executive Committee made the following report, which was, by call vote, adopted: ANN ARBOR, Nov. II, I904. To the Board of Regents. The Executive Committee beg leave to report that in August they appointed Maurice Garland Fulton, A.M., Instructor in Rhetoric (an appointment having been authorized by the Board) for one year from Oct. I, I904, at the salary of $oo0. Also, that on Nov. 3 they authorized the appointment of Professor Jameson of Chicago, Professor Turner of Madison, and Professor A. C. McLaughlin as non-resident lecturers in American History, the remuneration for the three to be $750, to be equitably distributed according to the amount of service, $I50 to Professor Jameson, $250 to Professor Turner and $300 to Professor McLaughlin. This appropriation, the committee believe, was by inadvertence omitted from the budget. The sum is $200 less than that appropriated last year to four lecturers. JAMES B. ANGELL. HENRY S. DEAN. LEVI L. BARBOUR. On motion of Regent Knappen it was voted: That the record of the May meeting be amended by the insertion of the following appointment: William D. Henderson, A.B., Instructor in Physics for one year, salary, $900. And the record of the June meeting by inserting: Calvin Henry Kauffman, A.B., Instructor in Botany (half time), salary, $450. Also, the record of the September meeting by inserting:

Page  470 470 ivNOVEMBER MEETING, 1904. Walter Francis Colby, A.B., Assistant in Physics for one semes ter, salary, $150. Russell William Hargrave, B.S., Instructor in Machine Design and Assistant to the Superintendent of Shops, one year, salary, $900, Norman Wood, Taxidermist for one year at $700. Mark Raymond Harrington, Assistant in Museum for one year at $I50. On motion of Regent Hill, by a call vote, it was voted that the following promotions and appointments be made: Alexander Ziwet, C.E., promoted from Junior Professor to Professor of Mathematics. Herbert Charles Sadler, Sc.D., from Junior Professor to Professor of Naval Architecture. Joseph Lybrand Markley, Ph.D., from Assistant Professor to Junior Professor of Mathematics, the promotions to date from Oct. I, 1904. That Theophil Klingman, Ph.C., Mi.D., be appointed Assistant to the Chair of Nervous Diseases, from Oct. I, salary of $500. That Otto C. McCreary be reappointed dispensing helper in the Chemical Laboratory for one year from Oct. I, I904, at the same salary as before, $25 a month for ten months. And J. A. Brown, Assistant to the Dean of the Engineering Department for one year, salary, $200. On motion of Regent Barbour, it was voted that a revised deed of the Evans property be executed to cover the entire property in lieu of one portion. On motion of Regent Hill, J. F. Shepard, B.S., was reappointed Assistant in Psychology for one year at the salary of $450. The following communication was received from the Literary Faculty: ANN ARBOR, MICH., Nov. 8, 1904. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: Gentle'men-I have the honor to report that the Faculty of Literature, Science, and the Arts ask you to change the requirements for admission so that among the I5 units required, Latin, German or French may be counted as 2 or 3 or 4 units instead of 2 or 4, as it is now. Respectfully submitted, P. R. DE PONT.

Page  471 NOVEMBER MEETING, I904. 471 On motion of Regent Hill, the change asked for was authorized. The following communication from the Literary Faculty was presented, and on motion of Regent Hill the degrees were conferred as recommended: ANN ARBOR, MICH., Nov. 8, I904. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: Gentlemen-I have the honor to inform you that the Faculty of Literature, Science, and the Arts recommend to you the following named persons for the degrees indicated': For Bachelor of Arts-Pearl Kathryn Archer, Robert Hause Beach, Glenn C. Beechler, Montgomery Webster. For Master of Arts-Calvin Olin Davis, Lyman Foote Morehouse. Respectfully submitted, P. R. DE1 PONT. Professor Kelsey submitted the following note: ANN ARBOR, MICH., Nov. I, I904. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: Gentlemen-I have pleasure in reporting that the University has received as a gift from Mr. Charles R. Morey (A.B. 1898, A.M. 1899) one hundred and ten mechanical reproductions of Latin inscriptions, made in Rome while he was holder of the Buhl Classical Fellowship, in I902-03. These reproductions, of the sort known as "Rubs," are unusually well made, and form a valuable addition to the material which the University already possesses for the study of inscriptions. Respectfully submitted, FRANCIS W. KELSEY. On motion of Regent Hill, the President was instructed to express the thanks of the Board to Mr. Morey for his gift. The following communication was also presented by Professor Kelsey: ANN ARBOR, MICH., Nov. I, I904. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: Gentlemen-I have pleasure in reporting that a friend of the University has contributed the sum of five hundred dollars for a Classical Fellowship the present year; and that Mr. Theodore D. Buhl has contributed a like amount for the renewal of the Buhl Classical Fellowship. The award of these Fellowships was a matter of no slight

Page  472 472 NOVEMBER MEE7ING, 1904. difficulty, on account of the unusual number of strong and worthy candidates. After mature deliberation, the Committee, composed of the members of the classical staff, by a unanimous vote awarded the Fellowships as follows: THE CLASSICAL FELLOWSHIP was divided between Henry H. Armstrong, of Ann Arbor, a graduate of the University of Michigan (A.B. 1901, A.M. I902), Fellow of the American School of Classical Studies in Rome in 1902-03, who last year received onehalf of the Buhl Classical Fellowship; and John G. Winter, of Holland, Michigan, a graduate of Hope College (A.B. I901), who last year received the degree of Master of Arts from the University of Michigan. THE BUHL CLASSICAL FELLOWSHIP was divided between Robert B. English, of Belfast, New York, a graduate of the University of Rochester (A.B. 1896, A.M. I898), who last year received one-half of the Buhl Classical Fellowship; and Laura B. Woodruff, of Peoria, Illinois, a graduate of the University of Michigan (A.B. I898, A.M. 1899). Respectfully, FRANCIS W. KELSEY. The thanks of the Board were by vote returned to Mr. Buhl and to the anonymous donor of a Fellowship for the year, and the four Fellows were appointed as recommended. On motion of Regent Barbour, M/iss Esther Smith was, by call vote, appointed Assistant in the General Library as a cataloguer at the rate of $500 a year salary. On motion of Regent Barbour, and on call vote, it was directed that Luick Brothers be employed to construct book shelves in the reading room of the General Library according to specifications, at an expense not exceeding $450. On motion of Regent Fletcher, and on call vote, L. C. Whitlark was appointed student Assistant to the Director of the Gymnasium for six months from Nov. I, for the compensation of $50. Regent Lawton presented several communications from physicians and medical societies objecting to the permission given to persons of means to avail themselves of our hospital facilities on the same terms as others, and moved that the writers be informed that the Board will give a hearing to any of them who choose to present themselves at the next meeting of the Board, Dec. 27. -The motion prevailed. On the motion of Regent Knappen, the degree of

Page  473 NOVLMBER MEETING, I904. 473 Bachelor of Laws was conferred in accordance with the following recommendation on the persons named: ANN ARBOR, Nov. IO, I904. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents of the University: Gentlemen-The following, having completed the required course of study, are recommended by the Faculty of the Department of Law for the degree of LL.B.. Alexander Alla, George Herman Gabel, Michael John Hobin, John James Keenan, Cecil Guy McCollum, Edwin White Sutton. Respectfully submitted for the Faculty by H. B. HUTCHINS, Dean. On motion of Regent Dean, and in accordance with the recommendation of the Engineering Faculty, the degree of B.S., C.E., was conferred on Carlos Arthur Williston. The following communication was received from Dean Cooley of the Engineering Department: NOVEMBER 9, I904. HON. JAMES B. ANGELL, President University of Michigan: Sir-I have the honor to report donations received by the Department of Engineering as follows, and to recommend that the same be suitably acknowledged by the Board of Regents: I. A I5/2 x I5 inch Armington and Sims steam engine of I60 H. P. and a stoker engine of 6 H. P., by the Edison Illuminating Company, of Detroit, through the kindness of the manager, Mr. Alexander Dow. This company has also given us two 6-inch separators and two 35 K. W. Edison generators. These latter items have not yet been received. The total value of the apparatus, if new, would approximate $2,800. The apparatus has been made available to us by the removal of the Edison Company's plant to Delray and the installation of steam turbines, throwing this older machinery out of use. 2. A four-cylinder Io H. P. air-cooled automobile engine, together with Appel ignitor, induction coils and transmission gear, presented by the H. H. Franklin Manufacturing Company, of Syracuse, New York, correspondence conducted with John Wilkinson, Engineer. This apparatus approximates in value $400.

Page  474 474 NOVEMBER MfEETING, 1904. 3. Copy of "Report of the Commission on Additional Water Supply for the City of New York," presented with the compliments of the Department of Water Supply, Gas and Electricity, by John T. Oakley, Commissioner. 4. A copy of beautifully bound volume entitled "Prominent Buildings Erected by the George A. Fuller Company of New York," presented with the compliments of the President, Paul Starrett, Fuller Building, New York City. Respectfully, M. E. CooLEY. On motion of Regent Dean, the President was instructed to return the thanks of the Board to the donors. On motion of Regent Dean, and on request of Dean Cooley, the following appropriations were, on call vote, made to supply the needs of the Classification Committee of the Engineering Faculty. Classification Board...................................$ 5 oo Filing equipment........................................ 5 oo Printing and stationery................................. oo Clerical assistance....................................... 00 oo On motion of Regent Dean, and on call vote, it was voted that two machinists and one carpenter, at $2.50 a day each, be added to the force of skilled workmen employed under Superintendent Miggett in the Engineering Shops. The following letter from Dean Cooley to President Angell was read to the Board. ANN ARBOR, MIICH., Nov. 9, I904. HON. JAMES B. ANGELL, President University of Michigan: Sir-I have the honor to transmit herewith a letter from Professor Campbell, relative to the installation of a small gas producing plant in the boiler room of the New Engineering Building. Certain members of the Michigan State Gas Association visited the University early in October, with a view to seeing what opportunity we could afford them to install this plant, and they determined that a part of the boiler room under the gallery would be entirely suitable for their purpose. The installation of this plant will involve the building of a mezzanine floor on the west side of the room at an expense of perhaps $I50 and will also involve a small amount of foundation work and suitable connections to our

Page  475 NOVEMBER MEETING, 1904. 475 chimney. I have no means of making a careful estimate of the total expense, but judge it would not exceed $200 or $250. As this piece of apparatus is likely to prove of great value to us in experimental research work in gas engineering, I have pleasure in recommending the acceptance of the proposition of the members of the Michigan State Gas Association and provision for the necessary expense. Respectfully, M. E. CooLEY. On call vote and on the motion of Regent Carey, it was voted to appropriate a sum not exceeding $250 for making the proper preparation in the boiler house for the installation of the gas producing plant to be presented to us. On motion of Regent Lawton, Razelmond D. Parker was, on call vote, appointed dispensing clerk in the Electrotherapeutic Laboratory, salary, $Ioo a year. On the motion of Regent Barbour, the request of Drs. Parker and Canfield for a supply of journals in their departments was laid on the table. On the motion of Regent Carey, and on call vote, a sum not exceeding $900 was voted to purchase a list of instruments for the use of Dr. Canfield in his department. On motion of Regent Dean, the request for an assistant in the x-ray work and that for the appointment of a Demonstrator in Diseases of the Ear, Nose and Throat were refused. The report of Dr. Dock on the Palmer fund and the Treadwell fund was presented and ordered to be received and placed on file. On motion of Regent Lawton, Dean Vaughan was requested to make a detailed report on water analyses. Regent Fletcher moved that the appropriation of $I,ooo already made for furniture and lighting appliances for the New Engineering Building be increased to $I,500. Ayes, all; nays, none. Regent Hill moved that $2,000 be appropriated for finishing the naval tank. Carried. Ayes, all; nays, none. On motion of Regent Fletcher, and by a call vote, the sum of $306 (of which $6 for a window) was appropriated to be paid to Mr. Sauer in final settlement for the construction of the Psychopathic Ward.

Page  476 476 vNOVEMBER MEETING, I904. On motion of Regent Hill and by a call vote, it was voted to appropriate a sum not exceeding $500, under the direction of the Auditing Committee, for work on the hydraulic canal in making connections with the naval tank. On motion of Regent Lawton, Superintendent Reeves was authorized to procure a carload of Alpena rock cement. Ayes, all; nays, none. On motion of Regent Lawton, it was voted that on and after Dec. I, ward patients from Michigan in both hospitals shall be charged $7 a week and that Michigan patients having private rooms shall be charged $I I a week; also that all patients entering either hospital and receiving treatment shall be charged for not less than one full week. Further, that patients from other states, whether in wards or in private rooms, shall be charged one dollar a week more than Michigan patients, viz., $8 a week in wards and $12 in private rooms. It is understood that these rules shall not apply to patients now in the hospitals. On motion of Regent Barbour, and by a call vote, the Finance Committee was authorized to make a loan of from $2,500 to $4,000 to Alice Wight of Detroit, if the security was found to be sufficient. On motion of Regent Barbour, and by a call vote, the Finance Committee was authorized to contract with Clara Borck for the sale of lot I I23 and the west 5 feet of lot I I24 on the Walter Crane farm for $6oo. On motion of Regent Knappen, Professor de Pont was appointed manager of the Comedy Club stage, under the supervision of the President, while the club is using the hall in Barbour Gymnasium. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Treasurer was directed to report to the Board at each meeting the amount of money in the Building Fund and in the Contingent Fund. The Board adjourned to Dec. 27, at Io o'clock A. M. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

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Page  477 DECEMBER MEETING. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, Ann Arbor, December 27, I904. The Board assembled in the Regents' room at Io o'clock A. M. Full Board present, except Regent Knappen. The President read the minutes of the last meeting, which were, on motion of Regent Barbour, approved and ordered printed. Communications which had reached the President were placed in the hands of the Standing Committees of the Board for consideration. The Board then received the representatives of the medical profession from several county organizations of the state for a conference relating to the free treatment of patients in the Hospitals of the University. After a full discussion of the subject, the regular business of the Board was again taken up. On motion of Regent Lawton, an appropriation of $500 was made on a call vote for the purchase of books for the chair of Diseases of the Nose, Ear and Throat in the Department of Medicine and Surgery. The Board then took a recess until 2 o'clock p. M. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock p. M. Regent Lawton presented and read the following communication from the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy, and the recommendation therein contained was approved by the Board. ANN ARBOR, Dec. 26, I904. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: Gentlemen-The Faculty of Pharmacy beg leave to recommend this addition to the requirements for graduation in the School of Pharmacy,that the graduate must be of such age (not above twenty

Page  478 478 DECEMBER MEETING, 1904. one years) as will comply with the rules of the Educational Department of the State of New York as a condition for registration of Colleges of Pharmacy. By direction of the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy. Very respectfully, ALBERT B. PRESCOTT, Dean. The President stated that the Michigan Life Underwriters Association, of Detroit, had presented the University Library with a full set of the Proceedings of the Actuarial Society of Great Britain at a cost of $250. Also that the Edison Illuminating Co., of Detroit, had presented the department of Electrical Engineering, through its manager, Mr. Alexander Dow, two 30 kilowatt (40 H. P.) Edison dynamos, of the value of $I,ooo. And that the Johnson Optical Co., of Detroit, had presented the University, for use in Dr. Parker's clinic, one perimeter valued at $65. The instrument is used for determining the field of vision and locating blind spots on the retina. These gifts were accepted by the Board and the President was requested to transmit the thanks of the Board to the parties named. On motion of Regent Carey, the degree of Doctor of Medicine was conferred upon William George Weidman in accordance with the recommendation of the Homceopathic Faculty. On motion of Regent Lawton, the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery was conferred upon Leon Audley Stebbins in accordance with the recommendation of the Dental Faculty. Op motion of Regent Barbour, the Treasurer was authorized to pay James Holden $I,500 on his contract for building a house on the Crane property in Detroit. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Treasurer was directed to place the Dorsch contract for the purchase of a house in West Detroit belonging to the University in the hands of Mr. George S. Field to collect the payments as they become due and report the same to the Treasurer. On motion of Regent Barbour, it was voted that the

Page  479 DECEMBER MEETING, 1904. 479 contract made with James Holden to build a house on the Crane property in Detroit, be paid for as a loan from the Bates fund. On motion of Regent Barbour, the consideration of the financial report was deferred until the next meeting. Dean Cooley reported the following gifts to the Department of Engineering since the last meeting of the Board: One 8-inch slide rule by the Keuffel & Esser Co., of Chicago. A working model of car couplers by the McConway & Torley Co., of Pittsburgh, Pa. A model of a schooner yacht by the Hon. William Savidge, of Spring Lake, Michigan. One Worthington Jet Condenser and Duplex Air Pump 71/" x 82" x Io" by the Fletcher Paper Co., of Alpena, Michigan, through the kindness of the Hon. Frank W. Fletcher. This machine will add materially to the equipment of the Steam Laboratory, and if new would cost at least $400. On motion these gifts were received and the President was requested to transmit the cordial thanks of the Board to the several parties named. On motion of Regent White, it was voted that the books on engineering, now housed in the General Library, be transferred to the Library room in the New Engineering Building as a Departmental Library, and that Miss Olive C. Lathrop be appointed assistant to the Librarian in charge of this collection, at a salary of $750 per year; also that $250 be appropriated for additional help during the year, and $250 for the purchase of a catalogue case, printed cards, and a suitable desk. On motion of Regent White, the Assistant Librarian was requested to confer with the Curator of the Art Collection, and to use such portraits as they shall agree upon for decoration in the reading room of the Library. Permission was granted to open the periodical room in the Library to the students. The other requests contained in the communication of the Assistant Librarian were not acted upon. On motion of Regent Barbour, the loan of $I,6oo to Nellie Bussey of Oakland county was continued for five years at 5 per cent.

Page  480 480 DECEMBER MEETINGG, 1904. On motion of Regent Barbour, the following committee was raised as an advisory committee of the Comedy Club, to determine the character of the entertainments to be given by the club in Sarah Caswell Angell Hall: Professors F. N. Scott, George Rebec, A. S. Whitney, Mrs. M. B. Jordan and the President of the Comedy Club. On motion of Regent Barbour, it was voted that the amount of the laundry bill for the Barbour Gymnasium be added to the budget of the department. On motion of Regent Barbour, it was voted to pay $5 for the purpose of keeping the sidewalks clear of snow in front of property owned by the University on Woodward avenue in the city of Detroit. There being a disagreement between Henry Bliton and the Board in regard to the terms of the contract for remodeling the stage in Sarah Caswell Angell Hall, the matter was, on motion of Regent Barbour, referred to the Auditing Board for adjustment. On motion of Regent Barbour, Professor George V. Patterson was made auditor and comptroller of the funds of all student organizations in the University. On motion of Regent Fletcher, and on a call vote, the following amounts were appropriated for equipment in the New Engineering Building: For iron tanks in Hydraulic Laboratory................ $2,331 oo For sluice gates in Hydraulic Laboratory............... 500 oo For two sluice valves in Hydraulic Laboratory.......... 510 00 For two 25-ton scales in Hydraulic Laboratory......... 490 oo For lining irons for tank..... 242 00 $4,073 oo Less $500 voted at last meeting......................... 500 po $3,573 oo On motion of Regent Fletcher, it was voted unanimously to purchase one Steam Air Compressor for the New Engineering Building at a cost of $750, and $300 were allowed for connecting the same with other buildings on the Campus. On motion of Regent Hill, Professor Pattengill was

Page  481 DECEMBER MEETING, 1904. 481 granted leave of absence from January io to April I, on condition that he provide for his University work during his absence. On motion of Regent Hill, it was voted that $25 be used in the purchase of duplicate books for the department of Oratory. On motion of Regent Hill, it was voted that the sum of $140 be used in making alterations in the basement of Tappan Hall for the better accommodation of the work in Mineralogy. On motion of Regent Lawton, the Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds was directed to put one additional window in Dr. Dock's Laboratory at University Hospital. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Secretary was directed to pay the Buffalo Forge Co. $2,000 on their contract for heating and ventilating the New Engineering building. On motion of Regent Fletcher, it was voted that the obstructions to the main entrance of the engineering shops be removed, and the sum of $Ioo was allowed for the purchase of lumber for floors and partitions in said building. On motion of Regent Dean, the Board voted to employ one additional Instructor in Civil Engineering, and one in Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, at salaries not exceeding $1,200 each, and that their work begin with the second semester. On motion of Regent Dean, the degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering was conferred upon Leon Alfred Paddock in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Department of Engineering. On motion of Regent Lawton, the salary of Dr. Cowie was increased from $300 to $500o from October I, I904, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Hill, the Finance Committee was authorized to loan $15,000 of the Gift Funds. On motion of Regent Dean, the sum of $75 was appropriated for the purpose of placing a large exhibition case and fifty trays in the Museum, for the accommodation of the work to be given by Dr. Lane. On motion of Regent Lawton, the Auditing Board were

Page  482 482 DECEMBER MEETING, 1904. authorized to expend $20 in the purchase of books for the Professor of Anatomy in the Department of Medicine and Surgery. On motion of Regent Hill, it was voted to employ a stenographer at $9 per week to keep the records of the surgical clinics at University Hospital, and also to care for the records and correspondence at the Dental College; that two-thirds of the salary be charged to the Hospital budget and one-third to the budget of the Dental Department. On motion the Board adjourned to Friday, January 20, I905. JAMES. H. WADE, Secretary.

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Page  483 JANUARY MEETING UNIVERSITY O I MIICHIGAN, Ann Arbor, January 20, I905. The Board assembled in the Regents' room at Io o'clock A. M. Full Board present. The Secretary read the minutes of the last meeting, which were, on motion of Regent Hill, approved and ordered printed. Communications which had reached the President were referred to the Standing Committees of the Board for consideration. Professor Kelsey addressed the Board in relation to the publication of Michigan Studies in the Humanistic Series. On motion of Regent Hill, Mr. John J Winter was appointed Assistant in Greek for the remainder of the year; his compensation to be provided for by Professors D'Ooge and Pattengill. Regent Hill presented and read the following conmunication from Professor Whitney, and the recommendations therein contained were approved by the full vote of the Board: ANN ARBOR, Jan. I9, I905. To the President and the Honorable Board of Regents: Gentlemen-Owing to the continued illness of Professor Payne, a. supplementary budget of $425.00 will be required to secure additional help to carry on the work in the Department of Pedagogy, said budget to be applied as follows: Professor Geo. Rebec, additional services..................$250.00 Mr. Chas. B. Vibbert, additional services.................. I50.00 Expenses of Superintendents or Principals-lectures........ 25.00 Respectfully submitted, A. S. WHITNEY, Dept. of Pedagogy, Regent Hill presented the resignation of Asaph Hall, Jr., Professor of Astronomy and Director of the Observatory,

Page  484 484 JANUARY MlIEE'ING, 1905. to take effect-October ist next. On motion the resignation was accepted by the Board. On motion of Regent Hill, William J. Hussey, B.S., C.E., was appointed Professor of Astronomy and Director of the Observatory at a salary of $2,500 and the rental of the house. His work is to begin October Ist next. This appointment was made on a call vote. On motion of Regent Hill, the President was authorized to invite Professor A. C. McLaughlin to return and take up his work again in the University, at a salary of $3,500, by the full vote of the Board. Professor Demmon gave notice that the Hon. WV. C. McMillan had sent him his check for $Ioo for the purpose of making additions to the Shakespeare Library. On motion of Regent Hill, the gift was accepted and the President was requested to transmit the thanks of the Board to Mr. McMillan for his generous gift. On motion of Regent Hill, the question of the appointment of an Assistant in Photography in University Hospital was referred to the MXedical Committee for consideration. Regent Lawton imoved that Mr. William Lyman be appointed assistant to the Chair of Diseases of the Nose, Ear and Throat for the remainder of the college year at a salary of $Ioo, with the understanding that next year he will be appointed Demonstrator at a salary of $500. It was so ordered on a call vote. Regent Lawton presented the following comlnunication from the Professor of Ophthalmology, and on his motion the sum of $773 was appropriated for the purchase of apparatus and instruments by the full vote of the Board: ANN ARBOR, MICH., Jan. 19, 1905. Hon. Charles D. Lawton, Regent, University of Michigan: Dear Sir-At your request, I have the honor to make the following report concerning the Ophthalmological Department. I find very few instruments and no provision whatever for teaching purposes in the way of models, charts, or lantern slides. There is no provision for laboratory work. I would respectfully request that the following amounts be allowed for the Ophthalmological Department:

Page  485 JANUARY MEETI-NG, 1905. 485 Giant Magnet (for removing steel from the eye).$105 oo Optometer (for testing muscles).................. 45 oo Instruments and case............................ 250 oo Lantern slide and charts......................... I50 00 Laboratory equipment............................ 200 00 Perimeter table.............................. 7 50 Handy adjustable bracket........................ 7 50 Ferris adjustable bracket with X-ray reflector..... 3 50 Two adjustable stools............................ 4 50 Total amount...................................$773 oo A patient came to the hospital last week with a piece of steel in his eye. It became necessary to send him away or order a giant magnet at once. At my request, the Victor Mfg. Co. of Chicago sent a magnet on approval. The steel was removed and I hope the eye thereby saved. Respectfully submitted, WALTER R. PARKER, Clinical Professor Ophthalmology. On motion of Regent Lawton, the chairman of the Building Committee, and the Medical Committee were requested to ascertain the best method of providing a detention ward at University Hospital, with power to act. On motion of Regent Hill, Mr. C. C. Parsons was appointed special Lecturer on Accounts and Business Organization, at a salary of $500, and the sum of $50 was allowed for procuring prints and plates to illustrate the work. The expense of this course of lectures is to be paid for from the budget of Political Economy. The President presented and read his resignation as President of the University, and after calling Regent Knappen to the chair withdrew from the room. ANN ARBOR, Jan. 20, 1905. To the Board of Regents: Gentlemen-I beg to tender you my resignation of the Presidency of the University, to take effect October Ist next. Although I have been graciously favored in the preservation of my health and strength, I am impressed with the belief that it will be advantageoua to the University if you call a younger man to take my place.

Page  486 486 JANUARY MEETING, 1905. I desire to express my sincere thanks to you and to your predecessors on the Board for the kind consideration with which I have been treated by you and by them during my long term of services. Should you so desire, I should be willing to continue to give instruction in International Law. Yours very respectfully, JAMES B. ANGELI,. To which the Board made the following reply: "Resolved, That the Board of Regents respectfully decline to consider Dr. Angell's resignation of the Presidency of this University. The members of the Board are unanimous in the conviction that no other person, young or old, can take President Angell's place either in value of service to the University and to the state, or in the love of the people. "If at any time in the judgment of President Angell, he should need assistance in his work, the Board of Regents will most cheerfully furnish such assistance in such form as he may wish. "ARTHUR HILL, CHARLES D. LAWTON, HENRY S. DEAN, LEVI L. BARBOUR, FRANK W. FLETCHER, HENRY W. CAREY, LOYAL E. KNAPPEN, PETER WHITE. JAMES H. WADE, Sec." The Board then took a recess until 2 o'clock P. M. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock P. M. On motion of Regent White, the sum of $98.I7 was appropriated for additional lighting in the reading room of the General Library, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Knappen, the sum of $42.50 was appropriated for printing a special report of the work in the Museum, by the full vote of the Board. Professor I. C. Russell gave notice that Mrs. C. E. Wright, of Washington, D. C., had presented a collection" of

Page  487 JANUARY MEETING, I905. 487 500 specimens of ores and minerals to the Museum of the University. Regent White moved that the gift be accepted and that the President be requested to transmit the cordial thanks of the Board to Mrs. Wright for her gift to the Museum. On motion of Regent Knappen, the degree of Bachelor of Laws was conferred upon Paul Jones, George Edward Ball, and Edwin Elroy Dibbs, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Department of Law. On motion of Regent Barbour, the question of additional heating in the basement of Tappan Hall was referred to the Auditing Board. On motion of Regent Dean, the degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering was conferred upon Oscar Edward Olson, in accordance with the recommendation of the Engineering Faculty. On motion of Regent Dean, the request of the Engineering Faculty for additional help in German, French and Spanish, for the second semester, was referred to the Executive Committee with power. On motion of Regent Dean, the bill against the Russell Wheel and Foundry Co. of $38.67 for testing a new type of water wheel was ordered cancelled, in view of the many courtesies the University has received from that company, particularly the donation of the traveler for the naval tank. On motion of Regent Dean, the following equipment in the New Engineering Building was allowed on a call vote: One I6-inch low pressure Pump.........................$ I,415 oo Piping and Valves..................................... I, 00 Freight, cartage and erection, not to exceed............. 585 oo $3,000 oo Regent Fletcher submitted the following resolution, which was approved by the full board:

Page  488 488 JA.NUARY MEETING, 1905. Resolved, That this Board disapproves of the action of Professors in removing locks from doors in buildings in which their work. lies and substituting special locks on their rooms and offices, and the Superintendent of Buildings is hereby directed to remove all such locks and replace them with uniform locks used in such buildings, to the end that the night watchman may have access to every room on the campus. On motion of Regent Fletcher, Superintendent Reeve was directed to construct a cement vault in the basement of the east ward of University Hospital for the preservation of the Hospital records. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Superintendent of Buildings was directed to move the Penny house from North University avenue to University Hospital and place it north of the west ward, with the door facing south, for a detention ward, at a cost not exceeding $400. On motion of Regent Fletcher, the Secretary was directed to settle with Mr. Knowlson, of Grand Rapids, as bondsman for the sub-contractor for the mason work of the New Engineering Building. Also to pay the Philip Carey Co. $400 in full of their contract for covering pipes in said building. On motion of Regent Dean, Charles J. Tilden, B.S., C.E., was appointed Instructor in Civil Engineering at a salary of $I,200, work to begin the second semester. This appointment was authorized at the December meeting of the Board, but the department was not able to recommend a suitable person for the place until now. Regent Lawton mioved that the weekly charges for patients in the Hospitals remain as now fixed, but patients who remain less time than a week shall be charged as follows: For residents of Michigan who are ward patients, $I.25 per day and in private rooms $I.75; non-resident patients in the wards, $1.40 per day, and in private rooms $2.00. The motion was carried unanimously. On motion of Regent Fletcher, and on a call vote, Superintendent Reeve was directed to construct a pit at the power house at a cost not exceeding $700, into which the boilers may be blown off.

Page  489 JANUARY MEETING, _905. 489 On motion of Regent Lawton, the salary of William \iedeman, porter at University Hospital, was made $45 per month, he to live outside the HIospital. On motion of Regent Carey, Dr. G. W. Roberts, of New York City, was appointed special lecturer on Clinical Surgery in the Homceopathic M\edical College, without salary. On motion of Regent White, the Treasurer was authorized to advance to the Comedy Club, to be repaid by them, $I50 for the purchase of curtains for their stage. Regent Hill moved that Walter Mulford, B.S., be appointed Assistant Professor of Forestry at a salary of $I,6oo, $i,ooo of which will be paid by the State Forestry Commission and $6oo by the University; services to begin October ist next. The motion was carried on a call vote. On motion of Regent \White, 'the following appropriations were made for the General Library, by the full vote of the Board: For a series of twenty-two college seals..................$ 44 00 For 69 feet Parthenon Frieze for decoration............... I68 50 For reference desk, chair and platform, construction of a dictionary and map case, and the construction of oak shelving behind desk................................ I40 00 For the purchase of rubber matting,........................ 150 00 For cards and label holders............................... O00 oo $602 50 Regent Hill read the following note: 1 hereby agree to contribute fifty dollars ($50.00) in addition to the three hundred dollars ($300) heretofore donated by me to the University for a similar purpose, to apply on the publication of a second volume of University of Michigan Studies, in the Humanistic Series, or any subsequent volumes in the same Series, the publication of which may be approved by the Committee of the University Senate on University Publications. ARTHUR HILL. Regent Hill then submitted the following resolution, which was adopted by the full Board:

Page  490 490 JANUARY MBEETING, 1905. "Resolved, That the University agrees to advance a sum not to exceed three hundred and fifty dollars ($350.00) for the publication of a second volume of University of Michigan Studies in the Humanistic Series, it being understood that any funds on hand derived from the sale of the first volume in this Series, over and above the cost of the same, and the fifty dollars specifically donated by Regent Hill to apply on the cost of the second volume, shall be treated as an advance by the University and deducted from the $350.00 agreed by this resolution to be advanced. Dr. Herdman then addressed the Board on matters relating to the Psychopathic Ward. Permission was given the Botanical Department to run a small electric wire from the New Engineering Building to the Green House opposite for power purposes. On motion of Regent Barbour, it was voted that this University accept the invitation of several National Engineering Societies to participate in the testing and reinforcement of cements and that provision will be made in the next budget for this work. On motion of Regent Lawton, Regent Knappen was added to the Committee on the Psychopathic Ward. On motion of Regent Barbour, the Board adjourned to Thursday, February I6, I905, at Io o'clock A. M. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  491 FEBRUARY MEETING Ann Arbor, February i6, 1905. UNIVERSITY 0O' MICHIGAN, The Board met in the Regents' Room at IO A. M. Present, the whole Board except Regent Hill. In the absence of Secretary Wade, President Angell read the proceedings of the last meeting, which were, on motion of Regent Dean, approved and ordered printed. Several communications in the hands of the President were referred to the Standing Committees of the Board for consideration. On motion of Regent Barbour, Professor John O. Reed was appointed Dean of the Summer Session at the same salary which he had previously received as Chairman of the Executive Committee. Regent Barbour presented a list of nominations of the Faculty of the Summer Session, and they were approved by a full vote of the Board as follows: SUMMER SESSION OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN. LIST OF APPOINTMENTS AND BUDGET FOR I905. Greek. Instructor Duane R. Stuart.......... Latin. Professor F. W. Kelsey.............. Junior Professor J. H. Drake......... Instructor C. L. Meader............. French. Assistant Professor J. R. Effinger.... Spanish and Italian. Junior Professor M. Levi............ German. Assistant Professor Tobias Diekhoff.. Assistant Professor J. A. C. Hildner.. Instructor W. W. Florer............. I904. I905. Incr. $202 50 $202 50 150 00 240 00 202 50 592 50 300 oo $150 00oo 240 00 202 50 742 50 150 oo 270 00 270 00 240 00 240 00 270 00 135 00 135 00 540 00 270 00 I80 oo 45 oo 135 00 585 oo 45 oo

Page  492 492 FEBRUARY MEETING, I905. English Literature. Professor I. N. Demmon............. Assistant Professor L. A. Strauss.... Rhetoric. Instructor J. H. Thomas............. Instructor C. B. Morrill.......... Elocution. Professor T. C. Trueblood........... History. Assistant Professor A. L. Cross...... Philosophy. Junior Professor A. H. Lloyd........ Junior Professbr Geo. Rebec......... Pedagogy. Professor A. S. Whitney............. Junior Professor L. B. Alger........ 300 00 135 00 435 oo 135 0o 67 50 202 50 135 oo 300 00 I80 oo 45 oo 480 oo 45 oo 135 00 135 oo 270 00 67 50 67 50 300 oo 165 oo So 80 o o 8 00o Deer. $60 oo 300 oo 240 oo 240 oo 240 oo 60 oo 540 oo 480 oo 60 oo 60 oo 300 oo 300 00 600 oo 300 oo 240 oo 540 oo Political Economy. Professor F. W. Taylor.............. 240 oo 300 00 60 00 Mathematics. Professor W. W. Beman........