Rizal Province directory, Volume I.
Salonga, Isayas R.

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Page  [unnumbered] RIZAL PROVINCE DIRECTORY by ISAYAS R. SALONGA B IB L IO0- F I LI PI NO P.O. BOX SM - 116 STA. MESA I MANILA, PHILIPPINES i ~~~TE'L. 61-12-18

Page  [unnumbered] DEDICA TION 0, -Ir. "-Vsr Kizal Reverently dedicated to the MEMORY of that great hero and patriot, DR. JOSE RIZAL, after whom the Province was named, and whose life and works will continue to influence the destiny of his country throughout the ages.

Page  1 I I I i I i I i I I i i i I I I I I I I I I I i i I I i I I I RIZAL PROVINCE DIRECTORY History, Government and General Information with the Full Text of the Philippine Independence Law Edited and Compiled by ISAYAS R. SALONGA Volume One 1934 GENERAL PRINTING PRESS Manila I I I i i i i i i i i i I i I i i i i I i i I i i i I i i I i I I I I I i I I i i i I If c I r r o, 4 i n a o ~ m f li n u i n Q I f l I"~ f l nt" i n I Q

Page  2 HIS EXCELLENCY, THE GOVERNOR GENERAL

Page  3 II OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR, GENERAL of the Philippine Islands Manila, February 7th, 1934. Mr. Jsayas R. Salonga, Rizal Province Directory, 7 David, Escolta, Manila,Philippine Islands. *Sir: Allow me to thank you for your thought fulmess in acquainting. me with your plans. I assume that, your pu~blication has for its objective the betterment of your Province, and that being the case, of course, deserves success. Sincerely yours, FRP N X IMLIIHY Governor-General. I - -- 3

Page  4 I i I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I QII~ - * - (i n;l)l)Clllc(~)(NI(IbOdl) OIIOQ(HPOQ+ (1Bb OOb BQ) (8+ QIOQC, (tB1O1P I I I i I I j I I I I i 1 i i i I I i i i i i i i I i i i I i i 4 i i i i i I i i kI THE AUTHOR AND PUBLISHER 4M~~~~~~~j)4MW04MW0 4MMW04I~~OI\~~OQ0D ~ o )~~ ~ OBI~b)4 1P)

Page  5 PREFACE This modest volume makes its appearance at a most momentous period in Philippine history. With the acceptance by the Philippine Legislature of the Tydings-McDuffie Act, a new life for the Filipino people has been ushered in. American influence will continue but it will cease to be dominant and in its place, the Filipinos will have to gather the broken threads of history of more than three centuries and begin anew the weaving of the fabric of national existence and culture peculiarly their own. The RIZAL PROVINCE DIRECTORY is not only a compilation of facts and the most reliable information about the Province of Rizal. Its aim is not only to present the community as it is today. In the following pages are faithfully recorded the chronicles from musty volumes of the different towns of the Province, since their early foundation up to the present time. In it also are shown the political and social progress of the people, the extent of their territory, the amount of their wealth and natural resources, their industries and trade. As history is mainly the achievements of great personalities, so there are written here the names and works of men who contributed their share in the foundation, development and growth of the community. It is the hope of the publisher that this work will serve in some humble way as a landmark to set off the years that have passed with the new era that is now dawning so that it might prove as a guide for the reorientation of the people's outlook. Because of its proximity to the national capital, the Province will continue to play an important part in the determination of the destiny of the country. If it must do so, there must be infused a renewed strength and vigor into the national consciousness of the inhabitants, to give vent to their practical ideas and freedom to their imagination. Industries must be developed, health and sanitation must be improved, vices must be minimized and public order must be maintained. For the solution of these problems, the publisher has attemped to furnish a proper perspective. I wish to acknowledge with gratitude the full cooperation given in the collection of important data by the insular, provincial and municipal officials. Personal encouragement for the continuation of the work was received from Hon. Francisco Sevilla, the provincial governor, and his Excellency, GovernorGeneral Frank Murphy. Indispensable help was given by my friend, Atty. W. Q. Vinzons, editor of "Inter-collegiate Press". and my brother Benjamin R. Salonga, for the revision of the manuscripts. I also thank those Manila and Rizal businessmen and citizens whose moral and financial support has made possible the successful publication of this Directory. THE PUBLISHER. 5

Page  6 TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER I GENERAL DISCUSSION Geographical Description........................... 7 Map of Rizal................................... Historical Sketch.................................. 9 Interesting Spots................................... 12 Agriculture........................................ 13 Com m erce......................................... 11 Industries................................. 15 Lum bering..................................... 15 Mineral Resources............................ 16 Fish and Game........................ 17 Transportation.................................. 18 Road Guide........................ 19 Administration............................ 23 Public Finance............................... 25 Income of Municipalities....................... 27 Education...................................... 28 Public Health............................... 29 Peace and Order................................... 3 Public W orks..................................... 32 Radio, Telegraph and Telephone...................... 34 Reading Facilities................................ 3 Recreational Facilities........................... 36 Religious Beliefs.............................. 37 Parties and Associations........................... 39 Statistics on Births, Marriages and Deaths......... 40 More Facts........................... 41 CHAPTER II SECTION OF MUNICIPALITIES Special discussions of Municipalities regarding their respective historical facts, interesting spots, essential data on location, population, territory, industry, etc. 43-155 CHAPTER III MISCELLANEOUS Dr. Austin Craig, the Adopted Son................... 156 Full Text of the Philippine Independence Law (The Tydings-McDuffie Bill)......................... 159 Directory of Persons (including the Provincial and Municipal Officials and employees; prominent citizens of each town; members of known Societies and Associations; and also the Officials-elect for 1934-1937) 171-224 6

Page  7 RIZAL PROVINCE GEOGRAPHICAL DESCRIPTION The province of Rizal is situated in the central part of Luzon island and lies about 14~ 40' north latitude and 121~ 10' east longitude. It is bounded on the north by Bulacan, on the east by Tayabas and Laguna, on the south by Laguna de Bay and Cavite and on the west by Manila Bay and the city of Manila. The extreme measurements from north to south are about 52 miles and from east to west about 43 miles. The total area is approximately 1,026 square miles. The surface is characterized by mixed topography. Except the western part which is low and flat, the entire region is broken by the spurs and ridges of the Sierra Madre Mountains which overlook a narrow coastal plain along the lake. The underlying materials are chiefly volcanic tuff, andesitic lava and agglomerates. Deposits of limestone, shale and sandstone are found in many places. Alluvium predominates about the shores of the Pasig River. The land is watered by many rivers. The Pasig River which has cut through the volcanic tuff drains Laguna lake which is shallow, the deepest soundings recorded leing 6.5 meters and covers an area of 930 square kilometers. The river is about 15 miles long with a width varying from 350 to 600 ft. and a depth from 7 to 12.5 feet. It is navigable throughout the year. The Marikina River which drains the fertile Marikina Valley rises in the mountains of Montalban and passes Montalban, San Mateo and Pasig. Near the boundary of Fort McKinley, the Marikina and. Pateros Rivers join the Pasig River which flows to Manila Bay. There is also the Malabon River which separates the town from Navotas, on the banks of which shipyards have been established. CQther minor rivers are the Cainta, Tanay, Morong, Puray and the San Francisco del Monte. Among the principal mountains of Rizal are Bantay in Montalban; Tayabasan, Lumutan, Pico-Susong Dalaga in Bosoboso; Imawang, Dupahig, in Tanay and Susong-Dalaga in Talim Island. Adjacent to the mainland are the Talim Island, famous for its stone quarry, and the islands of Malahi, Olahi-,pan and Donga which are scarcely inhabited. Between Talim Island and Point Tapas is the Navotas Strait. Thermal springs exist in San Jose, Antipolo and in Mainit, Cardona; ferroginous spring in Marikina and another spring of alkaline water in Pasig and in Tanay. 7

Page  8 MAP RIZAL PROVINCIE PnLv PPINC1#33LA" Rtiva '1033 a 1~I a 9 O 11 I The Map of RIZAL PROVINCE..J,....- S -----— l —. ---I- ~ --- —- - -J~ --- -~-~ I_~..__..__._ __0 _

Page  9 HISTORICAL SKETCH OF RIZAL PROVINCE The province of Rizal was created under the "provincial organization act" of February 6, 1901 by the enactment of the Philippine Commission on June 11, i901, to embrace all "that territory in the island of Luzon excepting the city of Manila known as the province of Manila and the politico-military district of Morong." The newly created province was named after Jose Rizal, the most beloved Filipino hero, through the suggestion of Trinidad H. Pardo de Tavera to the Civil Commission. It was composed of 19 towns of the Manila Province and 14 towns of the Morong district. Late as was the creation of this province, Pasig, Parafiaque, Taytay and Cainta were already thriving Tagalog settlements believed to be carrying on trade with the Chinese long before the Spanish conquest. In 1571 Juan de Salcedo, the first Spaniard to visit the region, travelled up the Pasig to bring the people of Taytay and Cainta under Spanish authority. These towns were thickly populated and trade was flourishing. After conquering them, Salcedo explored the neighboring regions, traversing Laguna and reached Faracale. The Chinese uprising in 1639 was the occasion of serious disturbances in various places of the region during which time considerable damage to property was done. The Chinese burned the churches of Pasig, San Mateo and Taytay. However, the uprising subsided and order was soon restored. In 1762, about a hundred years after the Chinese uprising, serious disturbances recurred. A British force arrived and occupied Manila. Governor Anda, in his attempt to starve the British and force them to retreat, detailed a Spanish force at Pasig to prevent the transportation of provisions from. Laguna to Manila, whereupon the British Commander Backhouse sent troops to dislodge them. A battle was fought at Maybunga in which the Spanish forces were defeated and forced to retire to Marikina. The British turned to Pasig and occupied it after meeting some resistance and remained there till their withdrawal from the islands ii 1764. An important event was the creation in 1853 of the politico-military district of Morong from portions of Manila and Laguna. It included the towns of Taytay, Cainta, Antipolo and Bosoboso of the province of Manila and the towns of Morong, Baras, Tanay, Pililla, Binangonan, Jalajala and Angono of the province of Laguna. The capital was established at Morong. Rizal province occupies an immortal page in the history of the Revolution. Balintawak was the scene of the first call to arms known historically as the "Cry of Balintawak", and blood was first shed in the towns of San Juan del Monte, Caloocan, and Pasig. When the Revolutionary Government was established, it brought under its control that part of the prov9

Page  10 ince of Manila which was ceded to Rizal, Ambrosio Flores acting as governor. Civil government was established in June, 1901 with Pasig as capital. On that day Commissioners Taft, Wright, Ide, Moses and Worcester met the 221 delegates representing Manila and Morong districts. President Taft of the Philippine Commission stated and explained the provisions of the Provincial Act and the Municipal Code and bill. He also stated that suggestion was made to the commission to unite Manila and Mcrong since the latter is not sufficiently extensive to justify a separate province. A vigorous opposition was launched by the delegates of Morong but after their points of objection were explained and doubts cleared the union was affected. Dr. Pardo de Tavera who accompanied the Commission to Pasig suggested that the union be named after Jose Rizal and not after either districts, which suggestion met the favor of all including the commission which delighted in doing honor to the illustrious hero. On June 11, 1901 the law was enacted extending the provision of the Provincial government Act to the Province of Rizal. In 1925 by virtue of an Order from the Department of Interior the province of Rizal was made a first class province. There are 27 municipalities classified now as follows: First Class: Caloocan, Malabon, Pasay, F'asig and San Juan del Monte. Second Class: Makati, Marikina, Navotas and Parafiaque. Third Class: Antipolo, Binangonan, Las Piias, Mandaluyong and Taytay. Fourth Class: Cainta, Cardona, Jalajala, Montalban, Morong, Muntinlupa, Pateros, Pililla, San Mateo, Tagig, Tanay and Teresa. Fifth Class: Baras. The First Provincial Butilding of the former Morong District Morong, Rizal. 10

Page  11 1. Montalban Gorge and water works; 2. Bonifacio Monument in Balintawak; 3. Salambao in Malabon River; 4. Pateros Duck Raising; 5. Guadalupe Ruins; 6. Pasig River; 7. Salt-beds in Paraniaque; S. Hinulugang Taktak; 9. Lake Drive; 10. Pasay Beach. 11

Page  12 INTERESTING SPOTS IN RIZAL 1. MONTALBAN GORGE AND WATER WORKS-The route leading to the place around the base of hills is very picturesque, the Gorge being one of the most remarkable natural features of Oriental Scenery. The Dan is built at the bottom of a cliff in a huge dike of limestone, which forms two natural abutments 1,000 feet high. Every day at dusk, countless thousands of bats emerge from the Cave and fly in long streams to the gathering darkness outside. 2. BALINTAWAK-The most sacred name among the Katipuneros, as the place where the first cry of the Philippine Revolution owas heard which caused the outbreak of the Spanish Filipino struggle for supremacy. A monument to the memory of the beloved patriot Andres Bonifacio stands here. 3. SALAMBAO IN MALABON-Found in Malabon River which is a native appliance for fishing industry. The Bangos culture in Malabon is also interesting as a native industry. (Read the "Bangos Industry" in the section of Malabon.) 4. PATEROS DUCK RAISING-A typical duck raising industry in the Islands. Patcros is the best region in the world where "balut" is prepared for its poYular delicacy. 5. GUADALUPE RUINS-The ruins of Guadalupe are situated on a small hill overlooking the beautiful Pasig River. This wonderful relic of old Spanish times was constructed about 1620, and it is a mute witness to the glory and power of the former master of the Philippines. 6. PASIG RIVER —The most navigable and romantic river in the Islands, immortalized by our patriot Dr. Jose Rizal in his "Noli". 7. PARANAQUE SALTBED-Depicting a typical scene of salt-making industry in the archipelago. 8. HINULUGANG TAKTAK-In the town. of Antipolo, where the Virgin of Peace and Good Voyage resides, the religions visitors could not help but pay a visit during May and June to this romantic Fall, the Hinulu gang Taktak. Antipolo is a quaint place, situated on a group of hills, some 900 feet above sea level, with streets and paths running up and down, at sharp angles. 9. LAKE DRIVE The road going to Pililla joining Mabitac, Laguna, which is encircling the lake, is one of the best drives outside Manila. It commands an excellent view of the scenic Laguna Bay. 10. PASAY BEACH-The favorite Miami of the social elite. The most romrantic beach in the Archipelago and setting of many stories and legends. 11. NOVALICHES DAM-One of the best water sources of Manila, reputed to be a safe drinking supply in Rizal. 12. McKINLEY-One of the largest Military reservations in the world, an ideal site on a small hill in Guadalupe, Makati. 13. NICHOLS FIELD-United States Army Air Corps Headquarters in the islands, situated in Paraiiaque. 14. BAMBOO ORGAN IN LAS PINAS-One of the wonders of the World. (Read the history of this famous organ in the section of Las Pinias.) 15. TERESA ZTGZAG-Ccmmwanding the most excellent view, of the beautiful Laguna Bay, is the Teresa Zigzag road located several kilometers from the town of Antipolo. 16. SAN JUAN DEL MONTE-The cradle of the Philippine Revolution. It was in the vicinity of the historical bridge of this town, that the first general engagement of the Filipino Insurrection against the Americans was precipitated in 1899. 17. TALIM ISLAND-The most beautiful isband-view in Laguna de Bay; a mountain range runs from North to South from which was obtained the stones most frequently used in the nearby towns atw Manila. 12

Page  13 AGRICULTURE The land topography, soil and climatic conditions and the nearness to Manila market of the province, make the growing of different fruit trees most profitable. Mango, pomelo, orange, papayas, and other hardy citrus varieties, coconut, cacao, coffee, chico, etc., find good places for planting in the territory. The chief products of Rizal are rice, sugar and corn. These products are raised in all towns, especially in the fertile valley of the Marikina River. The cultivated area of the province last 1933 was 186,110 hectares including those in Manila, although the land still available for agriculture is 145,368 ha. (with Manila). Last 1932, the value of agricultural production was P2,875,820. Among the leading crops raised with their respective values are: Palay-P2,096,140; Bananas-P345,120; Sugar cane-P176,710; Mangoes-P66,790; Forage grass-P50,770; Corn-P23,770; Pineapple-P20,340; Lumbang-P15,130; Tomatoes-P11,250; Sweet Potatoes-P10,000;. Pomelo-P6,300; Sugar appleP5,540; Eggplant-P4,510; Papayas-P4,410; Chicos-P4,170; Cacao-P3,940; Gabi-P3,740; Oranges-P3,720; RadishP3,690; and Ubi-P2,800. The raising of "zacate" for horses and draught animals in Manila is an important industry in the towns of Pasay and Makati. Several varieties of rice grow in the territory. The usual method of paddy culture is followed in the low-lands, while in the uplands a kind of dry land rice is cultivated. The province produces enough rice for local use. Tobacco grows in the Marikina valley and in the higher portions of the lowlands; the best corn lands are the alluvial valleys and the higher portion of the lowlands around the lake. Sugar cane is produced in considerable quantities in Caloocan, Marikina and Pasig. Most of the product is used locally in the manufacture of sweetmeat for native consumption. With the exception of some low lying land near Manila Bay in the municipalities of Malabon, Navotas and Caloocan, which is devoted to fish culture, nearly all the lands of Rizal are well adapted to cultivation and yield large crops of all farm-products. Rizal Provincial Nursery To foster better agricultural development, it was thought best to establish the Rizal Provincial Nursery as the center of plant propagation. The work started in 1926, but it was only in 1927, when officials became aware of its importance. Appropriation was made then but for failure to obtain the proper site, the nursery was not established. On December 24, 1928, the establishment was begun. An appropriation of P2,000.00 was made available during the year. 13

Page  14 COMMERCE The commerce of Rizal is almost wholly confined to internal trade. Though it carries on a rather extensive trade with the Provinces of Cavite, Laguna, Bulacan, Pampanga, and Batangas, yet most of its agricultural and manufacturing surplus finds a market in Manila. The principal exports are lumber, hats, mats, stones, salt, sugar, cigar and cigarrette, lime and cement. The chief imports are agricultural machinery, dry goods, wines and liquor, hardware, matches, petroleum, gasoline and furnitures and fixtures. There are five important market centers in the province, namely, Pasig, Pasay, Malabon, Tanay, and Marikina. Pasig the capital, is located on the Pasig River, which connects Laguna Lake and Manila Bay. Numerous steam launches and bancas ply between the city of Manila and the lake towns. Travellers and sightseers cannot expect big stores in the lake towns due to the nearness of Manila, where the inhabitants are naturally accustomed to buy their dry goods at low price. In some towns, nearly all the big and important tiendas are owned by the Chinese, but there are one or two towns where foreigners have never succeeded in winning the people's patronage. The shoe business in Marikina is now in the hands of the Chinese merchants, who provide the workers with raw materials and money. The shoes are sold in Manila and the provinces. The semi-civilized natives in the mountainous regions of Tanay and also of Montalban and San Mateo barter with the Christians rattan, wax and fibers for food stuffs and clothing. According to the latest statistical data issued by the Department of Agriculture and Commerce, there are 712 Chinese retail stores in Rizal; 28 stores owned by Japanese; 5 owned by other foreigners, while there are 2,473 retail stores owned by the Filipinos. A branch of the Philippine National Bank is located in the Provincial Capitol in Pasig, The following year, 1919, plant propagation commenced, but unfortunately the whole place was wiped out by the September1929 flood and typhoon, which destroyed practically all the 25.000 seedlings of different kinds of fruit trees propagated and almost ready for distribution. During the year 1930, reconstruction work was undertaken, and plant propagation continued, cf which thousands of seedlings were distributed already to Rizal farmers. Since then, the nursery proved, and will further prove to be an important factor in the economic development of Rizal along agricultural lines. LIVESTOCK IN RIZAL (1932 report) Carabaos-34,976 (value-P1,754,210); Cattle-8,494 (value-P236,589); Horses-4,947 (value-P131,845); Hogs-35,481 (value-P450,197); Goats-2,443 (value-P11,823); and Sheep-705 (value-P3,999). 14

Page  15 INDUSTRIES Rizal Province is the best industrial region of Southern Luzon. The proximity to Manila, the accessibility of the most navigable river of the Islands, and the favorable location of the province around Laguna Lake and Manila Bay help the industrial development of the territory. The different industrial establishments in Rizal employ several thousands of people and save the province from the pangs of the crisis now keenly felt everywhere especially among the sugar and coconut regions of the archipelago. The Rizal Cement Factory owned by Madrigal & Co., is situated in Binangonan, while the famous Malabon Sugar Factory is in Navotas. Another factory, the Lime Factory in Montalban operated by Parsons Hardware & Co., is among the best in the Islands. Marikina, Paraiaque and Pateros supply shoes, slippers and embroidery, but the latter is more famous as it stands out a class by itself as the first place in the'world where "balut" is prepared as a popular delicacy. It is now a real thriving industry of the town-people. We have the cigar and cigarette factories in Malabon, Pasay, Cainta and Caloocan; clothes and other dainty fiber clothes in Malabon and Navotas; dairy products in San Juan and Cardona; furniture making in Caloocan, Taytay and Malabon; tinajas and ceramics in Makati; lime manufacturing in Binangonan; hat weaving in Tanay and Pililla; pottery making in Pasig; brick manufacture in Mandaluyong; and salt-making in Paraiaque and Las Pifias. Each town has one or more bakeries usually owned by Chinese and Tagalog. Carromatas and carts are manufactured in Malabon and Navotas: Bamboo furniture and baskets, soap, and pillow-lace are produced in the neighboring towns near Manila. There are 3,540 slipper makers in the province; 127 tailor shops; 10 auto repair shops; 3 ice plants; 27 cinematographs; 65 bakeries; and 3 electric plants. LUMBERING Lumbering is another source of income in the province. The ready market afforded by the city of Manila and the numerous nearby towns has stimulated this industry to a certain extent. There are now sawmills in the province. The old nativo method of sawing the trees into planks by hand is followed. Ties for railroads and telephone and telegraph poles are cut in large numbers from the forest of eastern Rizal. Plants giving valuable fibers for hat and mat making grow in many parts of the territory. The making of bancas is an industry of some note in the wooden section. 15

Page  16 MINERAL RESOURCES LIMESTONES Pure hard crystalline limestone deposits occur in Binangonan and Montalban. In 1914 Binangonan deposit was utilized for Portland cement manufacture by the Rizal Cement Company, Limited, under the supervision of Ynchausti and Company, and at present by the Madrigal and Company. The Montalban deposit has been quarried and sold as lime. As early as 1903 limestone claims were stuck in Antipolo and Morong but none was developed. Beds of oyster and marine shells are distributed along the coast towns of Manila Bay. They are exploited only for mortar purposes by the towns of Malabon, Navotas, and Paraiaque for they are of inferior quality. GOLD Gold speculation has been active since the early years of American occupation. Lodes were claimed to occur in Montalban, Tanay, San Mateo and Antipolo and places in the Marikina river, but no active operations were attempted. During the gold rush of 1933 several hundred claims were registered with the Division of Mineral Resources. The towns of Tanay, Montalban and Antipolo became the centers of fever heat speculation. Each claim covers an area of 9 hectares. IRON AND PLATINUM Iron deposits that occurred in the district of Morong (Rizal) were first exploited by the Spaniards before they worked on the ores of Angat and San Miguel de Mayumo of Bulacan. Iron-ore deposits were known to occur in Pililla, Tanay, Antipolo and Montalban, but no attention was given them. In the alluvial deposits of Rizal, native platinum was reported to have been found in minute flattened grains. SAND, GRAVEL AND ADOBE STONES Large quantities of sand and gravel deposits consisting chiefly of andesitic and basaltic origin are exploited from the Marikina, Pasig and San Juan rivers. They are dredged or hand quarried, loaded into bancas and exported to Manila, where they are used for concrete construction. The quarrying in Talim Island which supplies the city with crushed stone is done by dynamite blasting and machinery crushing. Adobe stone is quarried from San Pedro Miakati, Pineda (Pasig), McKinley and Mandaluyong. GUANO AND KAOLIN Guano deposits were reported to exist in Montalban, Tanay, San Mateo, Binangonan, Antipolo and Pasay. No commercial exploitation was done of this fertilizer. In 1912 kaolin was reported to occur in Montalban. 16

Page  17 CLAYS Alluvial clays suitable for the manufacture of pottery, earthen jars and bricks are abundant in Rizal. Mixed with sand to counteract shrinkage and beaten with wooden paddles to increase the density and reduce cracking, the clays are made into cooking pots in Pasig, water container in San Pedro Makati and Caloocan, and bricks in Pasig and San Pedro Makati. SALT The inexhaustible supply of sea water and the wide area of tide lands suitable sites for crystalizing make Paraniaque, Las Piias, and Malabon the salt-producing towns of Rizal. FISH AND GAME IN RIZAL Rizal province is not only bordering two big bodies of water but also is well supplied with fresh water streams where different varieties of fish abound. Among the kinds of fresh water fish caught from the lake and rivers are the Bia, Candule (cat fish), Dalag (mud fish, murrell), Hito (cat fish), Banak (mullett), Apahap (Sates calcarifer), Ayungin, Tulingan (thunnus thynnus) and Shrimps. Mussels and clams are also obtained from the bottom of the Pasig River. However, only the Candule, Bia and Dalag are marketed in great numbers. They are caught with the use of native appliances chiefly the "Pukot", "Baklad" and nets. In shallow streams and rivers, the hook and line, baklad, nets and traps are commonly used. The catch is generally small and in most cases is but enough for family consumption. The Bangos and salt industries apparently keep the bordering towns of Manila Bay from sea fishing. At present sea fishing is controlled by Japanese fishermen, who are successfully operating in the nearby waters of the bay with their motor-boats and sail-boats and improved equipment. These fishermen are out fishing all the year round while the natives, excepting those engaged in "bangos culture", are mostly seasonal fishermen. A commercial exploitation of this promising industry will necessitate investments to promote improved means of catching, curing, preserving and marketing sea products.. Big and small game have attracted both Manilans and the natives. The mountains of Bosoboso, San Mateo, Montalban, Tanay, Jalajala and Morong abound with wild pigs, deer and wild carabaos. Napindan, Tagig and many swampy areas bordering Laguna lake are good hunting grounds for snipes and wild ducks which migrate from colder regions of the north. These games are abundant during the months of August, September and October. 17

Page  18 TRANSPORTATION The Province of Rizal has excellent means of transportation. A railroad from Manila to Montalban, joins the towns of Mandaluyong, Fort Wm. McKinley, Pasig, San Mateo and Montalban. A branch line runs to Antipolo connecting this town and Taytay with Manila. Caloocan is on the main line of the Manila and Dagupan railroad, while Muntinlupa is on the main line of the Manila and Southern Luzon railroad. Pasig, Caloocan, Pasay, San Pedro Makati and Malabon are also connected with Manila by electric car service. With the exception of Jalajala, all towns of the province are connected with the capital by provincial roads. The Province of Rizal, being at the threshold of the northern and southern provinces, its roads, especially around the City of Manila, which serve as avenues for heavy traffic, rank among the best in the Islands. Small steamers ply from Manila up to Pasig, reaching the towns of the lake and those along the Pasig River. Morong, Tanay, Pililla and Jalajala have tri-weekly connection with Manila and Pasig. The lake towns have very good dirt roads which are available for cart and careton service during the dry season, but become impassable during the period of the rains. Formerly, these towns depend upon water transportation, but at present, due to the cheap means of land transportation, they are more dependent on land facilities. For the public information about the roads, the following is quoted: Manila-North Road-From Km. 6.70 to Km. 13.83-7.1 Kms. Junction-Malabon-Navotas-From Km. 11.40 to Km. 12.03-2.3 Kms. Calle Real-Navotas-From Km. 12.03 to Km. 12.65-6 Kms. Calle Real-Navotas-From Km. 12.03 to Km. 14.48-2.8 Kms. Tinajeros-Manila-From Km. 12.88 to Km. 13.20-.3 Km. Sangandaan-Balintawak-From Km. 9.20 to Km. 12.32-3.1 Kms. Avenida Rizal Extension-From Km. 6.54 to Km. 10.41-3.8 Kms. Manila-Novaliches-San Jose Road-From Km. 5.32 to Km. 22.79 -17.5 Kms. Banlat-Pasongtamo-Marikina-From Km,. 12.488 to Km. 17.00 -4.5 Kms. Manila-Marikina-From Km. 6.50 to Km. 15.40-8.9 Kms. San Juan-San Felipe Neri-Jolo Road-From Kms. 6.92 to Km. 9.62-2.7 Kms. San Juan-Santolan-From Km. 7.56 to Km. 8.08-.6 Km. San Felipe Neri-Welfareville (new Asylum)-From Km. 0.00 to Km. 300-3.3 Kms. Manila-East Road-From Km. 3.78 to Km. 62.70-58.9 Kms. Pasig-Pateros-From Km. 10.30 to Km. 11.90-1.6 Kms. Pasig-Tagig-From Km. 11.47 to Km. 16.04-4.6 Kms. Pariancello Bridge-Rotonda, Pasig-From Km. 11.48 to Km. 11.92 -.4 Km. 18

Page  19 Calle Real-Pateros-From Km. 13.56 to Km. 13.85-.3 Kms. Junction-Montalban-From Km. 15.25 to Km. 35.16-19.9 Kms. Taytay-Antipolo-From Km. 21.05 to Km. 27.01-6.0 Kms. Antipolo-Teresa-From Km. 27.01 to Km. 35.60-8.6 Kms. Antipolo-Railroad Station-From Km. 26.90 to Km. 27.56 —27.7 Kms. Manila-South Road-From Km. 3.37 to Km. 31.06-27.7 Kms. Pasay-Junction-From Km. 6.47 to Km. 728-.8 Km. Junction-Camp Nichols-From Km. 774 to Km. 77.8-.1 Km. Junction-Zapote-From Km. 14.68 to Km. 14.93-.3 Ti-. Pasay-Ft. Wm. McKinley-From Km. 4.6 to Km. 10.49-5.9 Kms. Taft Avenue Extension-From Km. 2.89 to Km. 7.23-3.3 Kms. TOTAL....................... 201.7 Kms. SOME TRANSPORTATION COMPANIES 1. Raymundo Transportation Co., Inc.-Manila to Quisao passing thru all the intervening towns and also Maniia-SLa. Cruz (Laguna) via Antipolo, Binangonan, Rizal and Mabitak, Laguna. 2. Manila Electric Co.-Trainway to Pasig, Malabc. and Pasay. 3. Pasay Transportation Co.-Automobile trucks-lines of operation: Manila-Montalban via Mariquina; Manila-Parafiaque via Pasay; Manila-Tagig-Montalban via Pateros. 4. Gergaray Transit-Operating from Manila to Binangonan. 5. Manila Railroad Co.-Passenger and freight-extension to Taytay via Pasig; Manila-Montalban via Pasig and San Mateo. 6. Antipolo Bus-Automobile truck-line of operation: Manila. --- Antipolo via Pasig. 7. Maingat Trans. Co.-Automobile truck-line: Manila-Binangonan via Pasig. 8. Halili Transit-Automobile truck-line: Caloocan-Manila; ManilaBulacan, via Baesa. 9. Try-Tran-Automobile truck-line: Manila-Tanay via Pasig; and Manila-Antopolo via San Pedro Makati and Pasig. 10. Ampil Transportation Co.-Automobile truck lx;;c of OperationManila-Taytay via Pasig. 11. L. T. B.-Automobile truck-line-Manila-Tereov via Pasig. All the automobile trucks corporation charge P0.10 per km. from passenger and P0.05 per 100 kilos of freight. 12. Montalban Bus-Automobile truck-line-Manila-Montalban via San Juan. ROAD GUIDE TO LAKE TOWNS Leave Manila either by Calle Herran, thence via San Pedro Makati and Guadalupe, or by the Taft Ave. and Pasay route, thence thru Ft. McKinley toPASIG-Capital of the Province (Long Distance Phone). Just after passing Ft. McKinley is a steel bridge over the Pasig River, where a left road branch off to Pateros, seat of a duck raising industry and marketing of the popular "balut". RAILROAD CROSSING, and gate 19

Page  20 JUNCTION-Montalban road to left, Montalban is the site of Manila's first water works system, and as late as 1910 was the only point outside of Manila that could be reached by motor cars. TAYTAY-Watch for sign board marking left turn for Antipolo, 28.0 Kms. from Manila. Keep straight ahead for lake towns. The road to lake towns east of Baras via Antipolo and Teresa is shorter by 4.8 Kms. with more beautiful scenery of the Laguna country than the Binangonan route. 21.6-Left turn, then right, 200 meters beyond stone culvert. 27.5-ANGONO. Bear left over concrete bridge. 35.5-BINANGONAN. 200 meters beyond bridge turn left, crossing bridge. Up grade from here to — 38.2-SUMMIT OF DIVIDE-Fine view of Laguna Lake and basin. Artesian water here, 100 meters before highest point. 41.2 —CARDONA. SLOW. Follow main road with several turns thru town, then along edge of lake. 45.4-MORONG-Birthplace of Tomas Claudio, first Filipino killed in the service of the U. S. during the World War. Church and the Old Capitol here are worth a visit. 57.0-PILILLA. 59.8-Left fork here for Mabitac and Pagsanjan. Road under construction but passable. Drive carefully. Scenic route. This new link allows a complete circuit of Lake Laguna, the most attractive tour in the Manila district. 63.3-QUISAO-Road ends at beach. Artesian well here. ANTIPOLO-TERESA-MORONG Turn left at sign board in Taytay (21.00 kms.). 21.2-Rig'ht turn. Caution. Gradual grade to Antipolo (650 ft. above sea level) begins here. 28.0-ANTIPOLO-Old church is straight ahead, 100 meters. Turn right to Teresa; then left at market. 35.2 —TERESA-One of the smallest towns in the province. Road is under construction but open to traffic (Dec., 1933). Drive carefully. Road and bridge approaches narrow. 3 meters of metalling only. 41. 9-SAGBAT-Junction. For Morong and other lake towns 1.0 km. Hair pin turn left to Baras. MANILA TO LAS PITAS O-Luneta. Proceed south along Dewey Boulevard, Calle M. H. del Pilar or Calle A. Mabini. 2.4-Pass Fort San Antonio Abad on ri'ght. 3.3-Manila city limits. 4.9-Pass left turn for Fort McKinley, 6 kms. 5.0-POLO CLUB, Pasay. 7.0-Nichols field, U.S.A.A. Air Corps. 9.8-Parafiaque bridge. Bear right across bridge, passing plaza and church. Bear left 100 meters then right thru main street. 20

Page  21 12.8-Las Pifias. Church and Bamboo organ worth a visit. 13.4-Caution: Use horn. Bear left. Road passes thru a district devoted to salt production by means of evaporation of sea water, This unrefined salt is in general used by the poor classes. 13.6-Concrete bridge before sharp right. 15.0 —Junction. Straight ahead on highway. Pass left fork, continuation of the highway. 14.9-Rizal-Cavite Boundary. Zapote concrete bridge. MARIKINA AND MONTALBAN GORGE The beautiful Montalban Gorge is reached by either of two routes: The Antipolo-Teresa route, or via Santa Mesa and San Juan del Monte, across the Marikina river bridge where a junction is made with the other route at Marikina, at Km. 19.1. Turn left. This route offers a very pleasant afternoon circuit. 15.25-Sign post at road junction. Left fork. 19.1-Marikina. Slow thru town. Many sharp turns. 25.3-Slow. Left then right over concrete bridge. 26.8-Caution. Bear left over narrow bridge. 28.1-San Mateo. Turn right in front of church and after passing Km. Post 29, bear right, then left. 30.0-Slow. Bear right, then left. 32.3-Slow over wooden bridge. 33.5-Montalban. Presidencia on right and public school on left. 35.16-Slow. First class road ends. Pass second-class road to San Rafael, branching off the right, and take narrow uphill road straight ahead. 35.7-Caution. Zigzag descent, then winding along river bank to end of road. 39.0-Gorge of Marikina River and residence of Water Works employees. This is the source of the Manila water supply system. Entrance to Gorge and dam is only by pass obtainable at office of Metropolitan Water District. MANILA TO NOVALICHES, CALOOCAN 0.0-Rizal Monument on the Luneta. 5.0-Cross railroad tracks at Calle Blumentritt. 6.7 —Manila-Rizal boundary. 8.9-Junction circle. Turn right on Samson street. 10. 9-Balintawak. Turn lef on road to Novaliches. Right turn for Manila via Cementerio del Norte. 12.5-Barrio Baesa. Road on right for Barrio Pasong Tamo, 3.5 kms. 14.5-Barrio Bagbag. 17.7-Novaliches. Turn right; road straight ahead is third class. 21

Page  22 :i I

Page  23 ADMINISTRATION Since its establishment by an act of the Philippine Commission in 1901, the Province of Rizal has enjoyed unprecedented and consistent progress under the wise and able administration of government officials. With only a few exceptions, the leaders of the people have always been upright and capable men who have rendered their services for the best interests of the province. The provincial executives of the province of Rizal from the year 1901 to the present time are: Ambrosio Flores, Arturo Dancel, Jose Tupas, Lope K. Santos, Mariano Melendres, Eulogio Rodriguez, Andres Gabriel, Arcadio Santos (acting), Eulogio Rodriguez, Ruperto Martinez (acting), Andres Pascual, Eligio Naval, and Francisco Sevilla. During the administration of Gov. Lope K. Santos, all kinds of gambling in the province were wiped out totally. When Governor Naval assumed the office in 1928, controversies between the provincial administration and the municipalities occurred, resulting in many suspensions. However in his term, the progress attained by the province was shown by the holding of a Provincial Carnival and Exposition directed by Servando de los Angeles and by the construction of a new capitol. A few years after its creation, Rizal was classified as a third class province. It was in 1907 during the administration of Gov. Tupas that the first Capitol was constructed. Since then Rizal has progressed continuously. In 1925, during the term of Gov. Rodriguez, Rizal was made a first class Province, only out ranked by Pangasinan, Cebu and Iloilo. But in 1931, due to the very large number of provinces which applied for the rank of first class, a new classification was made by the Department of the Interior, and Rizal remained a first class province under class B. The Present Capitol, considered the Pride of the Administration, stands out today as one of the largest of its kind in the Islands, impressive both in architectural design and execution of work, and one of the most modern and beautiful structures in the Archipelago. It is of Italian Renaissance. The main edifice is flanked on two sides by pylons decorated at the base with 23

Page  24 fountains and at the top with lines of the entablature and the parapet of the buildings. The two wings are of Spanish styl. The area occupied by the Capitol is as follows: Right wing-744 sq. m.; left wing-744 sq. m.; and edifice-809 sq. m. The province of Rizal is divided into two representative districts. A few years ago, there was a plan to add one more district or to make Rizal into three districts so that it would have three representatives in the Lower House of the Philippine Legislature. Rizal belongs to the fourth senatorial district. The two representatives of Rizal sent to the first Philippine Assembly were Cayetano Lukban and Bartolome Revilla. When an Upper Chamber of the Assembly was created under the Jones Law, Rizal's first senators were Pedro Guevara and Rafael Palma. Palma got the majority of votes and served for the term of six years. The administration for the period 1931-34 is composed of Governor Francisco Sevilla, Ludovico Labao and Juan Sanchez as board members. In the lower house of the Philippine Legislature, Rizal is represented by Reps. Pedro Magsalin of the first district, and Eulogio Rodriguez of the second district; and in the upper house by Senators Jose Generoso and Juan Nolasco. The 1931-1934 officials of our Provincial Government are: Governor-Francisco Sevilla Board Member-Ludovico Labao Board Member-Juan R. Sanchez Secretary-Norberto Ferrera Provincial Treasurer-Balbino Kabigting Provincial Fiscal-Jose Bautista Div. Supt. of Schools-Celedonio Salvador Provincial Auditor-Angelo Angeles District Engineer-Fernando E. V. Sison Sanitary District Officer-Dr. Man. Ma. Aycardo Register of Deeds-Teodoro Gonzales District Commander-Capt. Rafael Jalandoni Sheriff-Gregorio Velasquez The 1934-1937 Provincial Officials-Elect are: Francisco Sevilla-Governor Ludovico Labao-Member Nicanor Garcia-Member Insular Officials of Rizal for 1934-1937: SENATORS Juan Nolasco-Senior Juan Sumulong-Junior REPRESENTATIVES Pedro Magsalin-First District Eulogio Rodriguez-Second District 24

Page  25 PUBLIC FINANCE THE PROVINCE OF RIZAL is a "First Class B" province. It has an income of P462,587.97 in 1933, excluding insular allotment of P177,992.00 for public works purposes. The total real property tax collection in 1933 amounted to P566,674.71 as against P615,728.19 in 1932, thereby showing a decrease of P49,053.48. This decrease is attributed to the economic crisis now prevailing almost everywhere. The outstanding land tax delinquency at the end of the year 1933 was P330,835.32 compared with P237,463.43 as of December 31, 1932, or an increase in delinquency in the amount of P93,371.89. Of this increase in delinquency, P49,053.48 was due to decrease in collection and P44,318.41 to increase in assessment of real properties in 1933. With this disfavorable showing, the finances of the province of Rizal should have suffered a great handicap and the different activities would have been paralyzed. But, in spite of this, the financial standing of the province still remains firm and stable financially speaking. Unlike other provinces of the same category, the officials and employees of this province are fortunate enough, not to suffer until this time from any cut in their pay. This facts indicates that the finances of the province are in highly sound condition. Our provincial general fund budget for the current year has been balanced without difficulty. All the statutory obligations and administrative expenses of imperative nature, election expenses not excluded, have all been duly provided for in the said budget. The necessary transfer to school and health funds was also included. And no overdraft is expected at the end of the current year. The balance sheet as of December 31, 1933, is as follows: BALANCE SHEET OF THE PROVINCE OF RIZAL as of December 31, 1933 ASSETS Cash in the Prov. Treasury............................. p7,684.28 Current Accts., Gov't. Depositories...................... 71,469.86 Time Deposits, Gov't. Depositories....................... 275,000.00 Advances to Disb. Officers.............................. 285.41 Supplies and materials................................. 6,431.57 Accounts Received....................................... 21,514.79 Deferred Charges (prepayment)......................... (35.36) Loans to municipalities.................................. 44,040.00 Real Properties excluding accrued depreciation............ 3,731,820.68 Equipments excluding accrued deprecation................ 164,126.98 TOTALS.......................... P4,322,338.21 25

Page  26 LIABILITIES AND SURPLUS Accts. Payable.......................................... P68,687.45 Deferred credits........................................ 2,767.49 Public and Private Trust Funds........................ 257,580.35 Installment ObligationsLoans with Insular Government...................... 160,999.84 Principal Accounts...................................... 3,778,987.82 SurplusGeneral Fund.................................. 10,689.50 Prov. School Fund Road and Bridge Fund.............................. 41,776.03 Health Fund....................................... 44.00 Non-Christian Inhabitants Fund..................... 605.73 Special Locust Fd................................... 200.00 Exposition; Fund........................ TOTALS.......................... P4,322.338.21 After making a careful and thorough analysis of the above balance sheet, the following facts were disclosed: 1. Current assets are more than sufficient to liquidate current liabilities. 2. There was no fictitious asset, therefore no fictitious balance or surplus in any fund. 3. No overdraft in any fund. 4. All liabilities were taken up, hence no understatement of liabilities. 5. No outstanding obligations left unaccounted for. 6. Loans with the insular government-Taking as a basis the last year's income, the provision for the yearly installment on loan and its interest may be easily covered up. Provincial Share Municipal Share Road & General Bridge General School Sources of Income Fund Fund Fund Fund Cedulas............ 1/4 1/2 1/4 Weights & measures..... 1/2 1/2 Int. Rev. Allotment (prov.).. 1/2 1/2 Int. Rev. Allotment (mun.). - - 1/2 1/2 Real property taxes..... 2/7 1/7 2/7 2/7 Franchise taxes (prov.)... 100% Franchise tax (mun.)... - 100 -- Municipal license taxes... - 100%/ Market & slaughterhouse fees. - 100% Cattle registration fee... -- -100% -- Building permit fee..... 1 00% Marriage license fee..... 100% 26

Page  27 INCOME OF MUNICIPALITIES Market Market Market Municipalities Class 1933 1932 1931 1933 1932 1931 Antipolo.3rd 20,998.18 22,879.11 23,939.19 2,665.91 3,286.43 3,278.42 Baras **-* *** 55th 2,595.07 4,126.24 4,000.69 250.12 283.80 276.81 *Binangonan.*** * 3rd 16,437.92 20,111.07 18,813.34 2,283.26 2,364.82 2,440.31 BCnangonan.............. Cainta...*.* 4th 8,671.15 9,578.74 9,944.57 591.56 672.93 677.93 Caloocan.'"1st 94,340.64 109,888.65 110,222.38 17,882.40 17,310.5o 14,540.50 Cardona 4th 5,911.37 7,047.24 7,039.28 309.15 281.80 353.30 Jalajala..... 4th 2,964.85 6,026.72 4,352.50 10.33 28.64 28.85 Las Piaas...3rd 13,432.30 16,381.89 16,772.57 1,229.85 1,247.33 1,262.14 Makati........2nd 40,893.38 42,774.60 42,847.69 3,017.95 2,930.45 2,928.10 Malabon.1.............. 1st 86,503.0z 94,492.14 88,947.27 34,909.27 37,515.51 38,028.06 Mandaluyong............ 3rd 44,199.91 44,340.76 31,452.71 7,628.95 7,945.85 6,687.60 Marikina2.................. '..2nd 43.359.39 13,099.85 40,844.19 15,964.73 16,254.15 15,417.92 Montalban.................. 4th 11,415.53 12,544.47 13,185.61 772.79 884.91 842.27 Morong.................. 4th 9,347.84 12,275.50 13,343.83 1,169.97 2,093.20 2,323.27 Muntinlupa................ 4th 8,886.99 10,240.25 10,089.71 436.98 729.30 728.31 Navotas.................. 2nd 31,518.63 33,995.07 34,129.74 5,156.55 5,208.80 4,920.55 Parafiaque................ 2nd 44,373.75 46,443.01 44,654.88 11,038.96 11,828.33 8,986.95 Pasay..........1.......... st 189,080.98 188,697.93 159,011.22 64,907.69 56,192.50 34,795.86 Pasig.................... 1st 75,469.05 86,103.18 83,489.23 40,849.17 2,763.80 40,521.13 Pateros.................. 4th 9,647.94 10,681.87 11.657.79 2,221.00 45,246.30 2,776.43 Pililla.................... th 5,549.14 6,139.75 6,026.15 402.11 292.71 352.83 San Juan del Monte.......... 1st 94,952.82 298,305.70 93,163.75 24,653.90 24,543.03 20,969.27 San Mateo................ 4th 10,811.11 11,839.30 12,482.78 1,217.79 1,244.87 1,172.84 Tagig................ 4th 13,203.21 15,270.84 12,052.49 826.80; 813.86 806.55 Tanay.................... 4th 12,341.73 12;894.08 12,939.36 3,957.51 3,802.89 3,673.21 Taytay.................. 3rd 16,472.96 16,098.64 17,062.80 4,538.65 4,921.90 5,420.50 Teresa.................. 4th 3,958.33 4,585.09 5,351.89 402.90 287.18 287.37

Page  28 EDUCATION IN RIZAL RIZAL is one of the progressive school divisions in the Philippines. From the time the American flag was hoisted in the territory and a system of primary education was introduced, the natives became more conscious of their part in the intellectual upliftment of the race. Marked progress especially in securing better qualified teachers both for primary and secondary education has contributed much in fostering an efficient instruction in the province. During the year 1932-1933, there were 29,726 students enrolled in the public schools and the total school population as estimated Was 78,700 while in 1930-1931 the public school enrollment was 28,044 and the total school population was 88,793. Also during the school year 1933-1934, there were 43i teachers in the primary department, 231 in the intermediate and 36 in the high school. Due to the shortage of the school fund, some of the members of the teaching force in Rizal in 1931-1932 were cut from the service. At present, there are 131 schools, well-housed as compared with other provinces of the Archipelago. Practically, all classes are accomodated in either permanent or semi-permanent buildings. To give more emphasis to the health education in the province, the health program has been developed so as to include progressive health teaching, more adequate health supervision by teachers and nurses, improved sanitary equipment of the school plant and intentive application of physical education methods for promoting bodily growth. Health officers and nurses visit the school at least thrice a year to vaccinate and inspect the pupils. The American Red Cross dentists treat the pupils yearly. The private institutions in the Province have given their best cooperation to minimize the number of illiterates and to maintain a higher standard of learning among the inhabitants. Among the private high schools of good standing are the Malabon Normal School, Malabon; Jose Rizal Academy, Pasay; Malabon Central Institute, Malabon; Eastern Rizal Academy, Morong; and Malabon Standard High School. During school opening, the most serious and pressing problem among the local officials is how to accommodate the ever increasing population of our educational institutions, especially in our public schools. 28

Page  29 PUBLIC HEALTH SANITARY ORGANIZATION One of the important offices in the Provincial Government of Rizal is that of the District Health Officer. Under its administration the province is divided into 12 sanitary divisions, each of which is comprising from 1 to 4 municipalities although the average is 3. Every division is taken charge of by one President of the Sanitary Division who is a registered physician. In turn, each municipality in a division has sanitary inspectors ranging from 1 to 3 according to the size of the municipality and its importance. Besides the mentioned personnel there are nine district nurses who are assigned where their service is most needed. HEALTH FINANCES The so-called Provincial Health Fund supports the public health organization of the Province. This fund is a combination of the municipal and provincial funds. It requires to maintain the local health department, an average of P58,847.00 The health fund is used only for the purpose of paying the salaries and traveling expenses of the health personnel, for the purchase of surgical and medical supplies and disinfectants to be distributed to the municipalities. HEALTH CONDITIONS The health condition of the province may be judged by the following average for the last 5 years: Crude death rate..... 25.08 + or - 0.063 per 1,000 population Infant mortality.... 223.7 + or - 3.34 per 1,000 births Communicable diseases endangering the health of the community is practically nil in the province. If any, it never appeared in the epidemic form. Dreadful diseases as cholera and smallpox are no longer known. More than any single disease, tuberculosis of the lungs shares by 18% of the total deaths. Bronchopulmonary diseases excepting tuberculosis, by 21 % average for 5 years period. These are common among infants as are diarrhoea and infantile beriberi. SOME IMPORTANT ACTIVITIES CARRIED OUT IN 1933 Fo rthe purpose of public relief, the health office through its 27 dispensaries in the province, gave 31,000 treatments to indigent patients. 29

Page  30 Infant welfare work was rendered likewise. In fact, 16,700 children were given attendance in the public dispensaries and in their own homes. For the purpose of protection, 59,900 persons were inoculated against cholera; 33,800 persons against dysentery; 11,082 against typhoid fever and 44,800 vaccinations against smallpox, mostly among children. A total of 2,397 homes were provided with sanitary latrines besides 18,900 houses with toilets in existence at the beginning of the year. There are 24 barrios in which every home is making use of sanitary toilet and with satisfactory environmental conditions. In the public schools alone, the health office was able to conduct physical examination to 18,600 pupils of whom 2,300 were given treatments. To protect the health of over 100,000 pilgrims coming to Antipolo a special preventive health work was conducted. All emergency cases were treated in the Bureau hospital located in the center of the town. During pilgrimage, health personnel was detailed. GENERAL INFORMATIONS Of the 27 municipalities, 11 are making use of water for drinking purposes supplied by the Metropolitan Water System. Other municipalities are using water from 335 artesian wells. In terms of percentage 78%, of the population uses drinking water of safe source. A total of 47 public markets are available in the province. Most of them are modern types. There are 65 cemeteries of different denomination. The great majority are owned by the government and the Roman catholic church. A rural health Demonstration Unit is established in the town of Binangonan under the auspices of the University of the Philippines and the Insular Bureau of Health. The purpose of this Unit is: (1) to give practical field training for health officers and public health nurses (2) To serve as a means for determining the most efficient procedures for combating the ravages of preventable diseases in a Philippine Rural Community and (3) To serve as demonstration center for carrying out various functions of a modern public health organization. Health Demonstration Units also are established in the municipalities of Navotas, Malabon, Caloocan and Pasay under the auspices of the Rockefeller Foundation and the Bureau of Health where a modern system of public health organization and administration is carried out. 30

Page  31 PEACE AND ORDER The combined efforts of the Philippine Constabulary, the members of the police force and the municipal presidents under the able direction and leadership of the Provincial Governor reduced the criminal cases filed in the Court of First Instance of Rizal by 541, during the last three years. The comparative statement of criminal cases filed in the Court of First Instance during the year 1928 to 1933 follows: t928-506; 1929-5.16; 1930-518 (total-1,570) 1931-409; 1932-288; 1933-332 (total-1,029) Any suspicious association or secret organization has been put under surveillance of the authorities and the watchful eyes of the Philippine Constabulary. The year 1933 was marked by no serious violation of law. Ri7al has at present a big police force in her 27 municipalities. Pasay alone has 28 policemen, and is considered the most etticient municipal police torce, aue to the fact that it is a Metropolis. The said municipality has also a fire department of nine men for the safety and security of properties and lives of the residents during conflagrations. Although there are many dancing halls, roadhouses and bars in the municipalities surrounding Manila, yet no serious crimes are often committed as compared with other municipalities in some important provinces in the islands. The degree of criminality in the province of Rizal is quite low. In 1933, there was a total of 169 convictions in criminal cases and 55 acquittals. The most common crimes are those relating to property. Ranking next are crimes against morals and those against sex. Robbery leads with 28 cases, while ordinary theft numbers 26 cases, 9 of qualified theft, 8 of domestic theft and 10 of theft of large cattle. Embezzlement ranks next with 18 cases, and then gambling and defamation, each with 14 cases. There was 12 cases of abuse against chastity and the same number of cases of less serious physical injuries. There were 4 cases of consumated homicide, 5 frustrated, 2 attempted and 9 through reckless negligence; 2 cases of consumated murder, 4 attempted and 4 frustrated; 6 cases of consumated rape, 4 attempted and 1 frustrated. Other crimes include abduction, alteration of boundaries, assaults, arson, arbitrary detention, adultery, bigamy, bribery, coercion, concubinage, falsification of public document, malicious mischief, infidelity in the custody of prisoners, perjury, seduction, resistance against agents of authority, trespass to dwelling, and theft. In the year 1933, there were filed 271 ordinary civil cases, 103 probate cases, 74 Land Registration Cases, and 12 other cases of civil nature. OWf these, 205 ordinary civil cases, 110 Probate cases, 66 Land Registration cases, and 8 other caseswere decided. With those pending at the beginning of the year, 83 ordinary civil cases were dismissed, 6 Land Registration cases and 9 other cases.

Page  32 PUBLIC WORKS Since last year, 1933, Rizal has had a much more impressive list of public works than the other provinces in the Archipelago. Just for the maintenance of the first class roads, the government.has spent P156,177.90 last year and for the second and third class roads, about P440.90 per kilometer to keep them in good condition. Attention was concentrated into the improvement of first class roads, such as asphalting, widening of metalling and subgrades. The total amount of P616,300.66 received during the year 1933 as public works appropriation from provincial and municipal funds and also from allotments from Acts 3248, 3045, 3912 and 3500 and insular loans to Municipalities were systematically spent for roads, bridges and Luildings, as apportioned by proper authorities. In a report prepared by the District Engineer of Rizal, the major results of 1933's work are as follows: Increase of First Class Roads... Total Lengths of subgrade constructed... Length of new subgrade surfaced one course Length of roads resurfaced........ Length of roads asphalted......... Length of roads widened to 8 & 10 meters roadway asphalted............ Number of culverts widened to 8 m. roadway Number of bridges constructed: (a) Permanent............ (b) Temporary...... Number of pipe lines constructed..... Lineal meters of concrete curbs and gutters. School buildings completed........ These consist of 13 standard rooms (Seven rooms concrete structures) School buildings repaires......... Markets Constructed (total bays)..... Market tiendas constructed consisting of 20 units......... 1932 1933 1.3 6.4 3.3 10.43 16.48 12.42 22.96 2.83 38 7.03 2.90 23 2 2 ( 149 l.m.) 5 6 ( 94 l.m.) 54 22 (1040 l.m.) 8 7 4 1 2 1 2 3 Among the most important projects constructed last year are the Marikina Steel Bridge, San Jose Creek Bridge and also the Rizal, Laguna inter-provincial road. Teresa-Morong Road, Pililla-Jalajala Road, Pasong-Tamo-Marikina Road, Tondo-Navotas Road; improvement of Manila South Road, Espaia Extension, Tagig-Muntinlupa Road, Pasay-McKinley Road, MalabonObando Road; asphalting San Juan-Marikina Road, MalabonObando Road, Marikina-Montalban Road; widening and improving Calle Libertad, Pasay, the Rotonda of Taft Avenue Extension, etc. Some of the construction projects began but not finished at the end of 1933 are: Pasay Presidencia with the total ap 32 i

Page  33 propriation of P27,400 which is purely local; Provincial Capitol ground; Pasay School Building with the total appropriation of P15,000; and Caloocan Market with the contract price of P5,640. All these projects are to be completed this year. ROADS The District Engineer has recommended for further appropriations several roads some of which are under construction this year. Among the roads recommended are: (1) Pililla-Mabitac Road to finish the second course metalling, (2) Taguig-Muntinlupa for surfacing and further improvements, (3) Teresa-Morong for second course metalling, and (4) for asphalting of Espaia Extension. These roads are now opened for traffic, but should be improved into first class classification to make them safer and more comfortable to traffic and to lessen danger in motoring. The Antipolo-Teresa Road has long been declared first class. Due to the opening of the Morong-Teresa road, this road will carry a heavy traffic this year (1934) so a reasonable appropriation is needed. Among the roads not yet started but recommended for construction are: Tondo-Navotas Road, Pililla-Jalajala Road, Malabon Diversion, Marikina-Montalban Diversion and Improvement, San Francisco del Monte-San Juan Road, CaintaMapandan-Bulao Road, San Pedro Makati-Culi-culi Road, Proposed road from Tanay to Sampaloc. Roads recommended to be widened and asphalted are: Manila South Road, Manila East Road from Taytay to Angono, Asphalting of Calle Samson to connect with the asphalted road of Manila-Novaliches Road and Asphalting of Junction-Marikina Road. BRIDGES Among those recommended last year are: Ampid River Bridge, which is now under construction; Pateros River Bridge, Pasig-Pateros Road; Ermitaio Bridge, San Juan-Marikina Road; Taguig River Bridge, Taguig-Muntinlupa Road, and Muson Bridge Km. 26, Manila East Road; and also the widening of the old Pasig Steel Bridge, Paraiaque Bridge, the Malabon Bridge and the Navotas Bridge. RIVER CONTROL The starting of the river control of the Marikina River for the protection of the Provincial Capitol is recommended by the district Engineer for immediate action of the proper authorities. BUILDINGS The improvement and beautification of the parks and ground of the Provincial Capitol and the construction of up-todate Presidencias of Navotas, Malabon, Makati and Caloocan are also highly recommended to the Provincial Board of Rizal for favorable action. 33

Page  34 RADIO, TELEiGRAPH AND TELEPHONE Rizal has the radio, telegraph and telephone services. The Radio Station is in Pasay, inaugurated on May 1, 1927. The Robert Dollar Co. Radio Stations in San Juan and Mandaluyon are operated as a private enterprise. The oldest telegraph station in Rizal was established in Pasig prior to 1906. There are six telegraph stations in the Province with Fort"'s McKinley. All municipalities are connected with the telephone to the Provincial Government. The system was inaugurated in 1905. The following diagram will show the alphabetical list of Postal, Telegraph and Telegram services in the Province: PL"ACES Municipalities Antipolo Baras Binangonan Cainta Caloocan Cardona Jalajala Las Pifias, Makati Malabon Mandaluyong Marikina Montalban Morong Muntinlupa Navotas Paraflaque Pasay PASIG Pateros, Pililla San Juan San Mateo Tagig Tanay Taytay Teresa Postal Service TfTelegraph Service P0 PO P0 P0 P0 P0 PO P0 PO P0 P0 P0 P0 P0 PO PG P0 PO P0 P0 P0 PG P0 P0 $ B-i B-2 $ B-i B-2 $ B-i B-2 B-2 B-2 B-2 $ B-i B-2 $ B-i B-2 $ B-i B-2 B-2 $ B-i $ B-i $ B-i B-2 B-2 $ B-i $ B-i $ B-i B-2 B-2 B-2 T T T T R T Telegram Station by Mail Manila Manila Manila Manila Manila Manila Manila Manila Manila Pasig Manila Bifian Malabon Manila Pasig Manila Manila Pasig Pasig Manila Manila Manila Morong Pasig Binangonan Morong Paraftaque Manila Manila San Mateo Bifian Malabon Pasig Morong Morong Pasig Antiploj Money Order Office Symbols used: P0-for Post Office; $-for Postal Money Oorder and C.0.D.; B-for Postal Savings Bank; and T-for Telegraph Station. 34

Page  35 READING FACILITIES Indicative of the intellectual activity and literary bent of the people of Rizal, is the fact that they have several newspapers and magazines. However, most of these are not widely circulated due to the proximity of Manila to Rizal, which is easily reached by the metropolitan papers. According to the information received from Manila publications like the TVT, DMHM, Bulletin, Hiw:aga-LiwaJyway-Graphic-Bisaya and Free Press, Rizal is considered as one of the most important reading regions in the whole archipelago. This may be considered true, because of the highly cultivated class living in our metropolitan towns like Pasay and San Juan, and also in our big towns as Malabon, Caloocan, Pasig and Paraiaque. Some of the present publications in the Province are: 1. RIZALIAN (Official organ of Rizal High School) Published at Pasig. Publisher: Rizalian Editorial Staff. (Monthly newspaper). 2. M. C. I. PEN (Official Organ of Malabon Central Institute). Published in Malabon. (Monthly newspaper). 3. TAGUMPAY (Weekly Paper) Edited by Tomas Rodriguez. Circulated in the Province. 4. RIZAL (Formerly "ANG PATNUBAY NG PASIG," a Yearly Magazine). Publisher and Editor: Isayas R. Salonga-Published at Pasig. 5. MARTIR (Yearly Magazine) Edited by Miguel Cristobal-Published at Malabon. Some of the best contributors and writers to our dailies and weeklies in the city are the following: Manuel Bernabe, poet laureate in Spanish; Lope K. Santos, premier editor and poet in Tagalog; Aguedo Bernabe, in Spanish; Leonardo Dianzon, in Tagalog; Servando de los Angeles, known dramatist in Tagalog; Emilio de la Paz, formerly citiy editor of El Debaete; Dr. F. Galauran, short story writer in Tagalog; Godofredo Herrera, ex-member of Mabuhay Staff; Adolfo Santos of Tahiha; Gregorio Coching of Liwayway; Carmen Herrera of the Sampagita weekly, Judge Juan Sumulong in Spanish, Ligaya Victorio Reyes in English and D. San Agustin, Ildefonso Santos, F. Sta. Ana and V. Aznar in Tagalog. Most of the libraries in the province are managed by private and public schools, where students find materials for references and for intellectual upliftment. 35

Page  36 RECREATIONAL FACILITIES WACK WACK GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB-The most popular place for the City of Manila's prominent men of society, business and government, is the Wack Wack Golf and Country Club. There the elite of the metropolis meets for rest and recreation. The Club was first organized on January 29, 1930, in a meeting of the board of directors of the old Wack Wack Golf Club. The project was fully discussed, and it was decided to organize a club with a membership of 400. The following committees were created: Finance, Organization, and Membership. O'n March 31, 1930, the club was in a position to take up an option on its present property and to pay for the same in cash. The officers elected for the first year were: William J. Shaw, President; Marcos L. Roces, Vice-President; Francisco Segado, Secretary; N. E. Marchadesch, Treasurer; Juan Altavas, Gabriel La 0, and Gregorio Olegario, members of the board. The club property comprises an area of 839,062 square meters and is situated in Mandaluyong. An 18-hole golf course was finished in 1930. It is 6,350 yards in length and the par is 72. There is also a 9-hole course, 2,570 yards long and the par is 35. A club house with a bar, tennis courts and a swimming pole have also been constructed. POLO CLUB-Situated in Pasay is the beautiful Polo Field and Club house, founded with private funds by former Governor-General W. Cameron Forbes. Although for club members only, visitors may view the grounds and club house, the great lawn at the waters edge where nightly dinner parties are in order, the polo field and the swimming pool. SANTA ANA CABARET-Generally considered to be the largest dance hall in the world. It is attractively decorated and illuminated. At one end is a bar for those who prefer the brass rail. The other end is semi-partitioned off by a grille with the orchestra midway in the division. This space is reserved for private parties who come to dance or partake of the excellent spaghetti dinner. According the the Division of Statistics. Department of Agriculture and Commerce last year, the province has the following recreational facilities: Number Number Cinematographs....... 27 Cockpits.......... 28 Bowling halls........ 23 Dance halls......... 21 Pool rooms and Billiard halls. 67 Bars............ 42 36

Page  37 RELIGIOUS BELIEFS IN RIZAL, as well as in other parts of the archipelago, with the exception of a few scattered pagan communities, the dominant belief is Christianity. Although one cannot tell precisely what was the ancient religion of the Filipinos, yet from the little information that has tickled down through the centuries, it appears that the old inhabitants of these islands believed in deities and spirits. As at present observed, the principal Christian sects in the Philippines are the Roman Catholic Apostolic Church, the Aglipayan Church and the various Protestant denominations. The following contains brief descriptions of the organization, activities and extent of each for the archipelago: ROMAN CATHOLIC CIURCH-Archbishop 1; bishops including Guam 15; secular priests over 1000; religious priests 650 (Augustinians, Belgian Fathers, Benedictines of Monserrat, Benedictine Missionaries, Capuchins, Columbian Fathers, Fathers of the Society of the Divine Word, Dominicans, Franciscans, Jesuit Fathers, Olbetos de San Jose, Maryknoll Fathers, Australian Province, Redemptorist Fathers, Irish Province, Sacred Heart Missionaries, and Christian Brothers); religious sisters devoted to teaching, nursing, etc., 1500 (Agustinas Terciarias de Filipinas, Agustinas Terciarias Recoletas, Benedictine Sisters of St. Otilla, Congregacion de las Hijas de la Caridad o de S. Vicente, Companiia de Beatas de la Virgen Maria, Dominican Mothers; Assumption Sisters, Belgian sisters, Missionary Sisters, Servants of the Holy Ghost, Maryknoll Sisters, Franciscan Sisters, Good Shepherd Sisters, Missionary Sisters of the Immaculate Conception, Oblates Franciscan Missionaries of Mary, Sisters of St. Paul de Charters, Madres Clarisas, Carmelite Sisters, Sisters of the Holy Ghost, Benedictines of the Eucharistic King); religious lay brothers 100; churches not less than 1400; chapels about 4,500; Santo Tomas University about 3,000 students; colleges and higher schools 103; primary and intermediate schools 600; pupils attending Catholic schools (recognized and unrecognized by the Government) over 100,000; hospitals and orphanages 26; seminaries 15; students attending seminaries 950. IGLESIA CATOLICA APOSTOLICA FILIPINA (Aglipayanos)Bishops 9; priests 200; parishes 200; primary schools 200 (with about 6,000 pupils); seminaries 3; number of members estimated at about 2,000,000. METHODIST EPISCOPAL MISSION-Membership 79,000; church buildings 293; parsonages 116; value of church buildings P962,000; pastors 89, probationers 23, local preachers 119; deaconesses 101; Bible women 50; women missionaries (Woman's Foreign Missionary Society) 14; missionary families (Board of Foreign Missions) 5. UNITED EVANGELICAL CHURCH-( Presbyterians, Congregationalists, United Brethren) -Membership 41,000; churches 302; other groups 268; Filipino pastors 101; other evangelistic workers 130; Sunday schools 37

Page  38 531 (enrollment 23,400); hospitals 4; dormitories 6; student centers 6; schools (Union High School, Ellinwood Girls School, Silliman Bible School, Silliman Institute) 4; seminaries (Union Theological Seminary) 1, EPISCOPAL MISSION-Baptized persons approximatey 20,000; bishop 1; priests 18; property valued at $627,522, of which $212,325 is used for educational work and $246,450 for medical work; contributions $8,905; educational fees $34,933; medical fees $75,916; work is carried on among non-Christians in the Mountain Province and in Cotabato anl among Chinese and Mohammedans as well as among the American-BritishEuropean groups. Comparative data on the other churches in the Philippines could not be obtained in the time available, but the following table of local receipts of and United States grants to various denominations was obtained from the National Christian Council of the Philippine Islands: Deom)inration Local Receipts U. S. Grants Disciples of Christ.......................... P129,880.00 P 40,000.00 Presbyterian................................ 225,000.00 153,990.00 Methodist Episcopal......................... 165,325.00 154,350.00 Congregational.............................. 24,135.00 32,355.00 Independent Baptists........................ 60,000.00 Christian and Missionary Alliance............ 3,500.00 2,185.00 Baptists.................................... 241,520.00 50,000.00 United Brethren in Christ................... 42,540.00 21,100.00 Independent Filipino Churches.............. 100,000.00 TOTAL........................ P931,900.00 P513,980.00 * Estimated: Local receipts include not only contributions to the support of the churches (salaries for pastors, deaconesses, Bible women; contributions for the erection and repair of church buildings and parsonages; gifts to domestic missions and other benevolences) but also fees collected in dormitories. hospitals, and schools. The grants from the United States are not only for the churches, but also for schools and other institutions. The above figures do not include the amount sent from the United States for missionary salaries; medical vacation, children, travel and other allowances; and house rent. It is approximately as follows: 75 missionary families at P7,600........... P 570,000 72 single missionaries at P3,000............ 216,000 Total missionary budget................... P 786,000 Total grants............................... 513,980 Total from U. S.......................... P1,299.980 Total raised locally....................... 931,900 Grand Total............... P2,231.880 * From one of the issues of the Phil. Magazine. 38

Page  39 PARTIES AND ASSOCIATION The organizations found in Rizal province represent the different phases of popular interest. The proximity to Manila does not only afford the city a unique outlet for its political, social, civic and athletic activities, but also avails the town organizations with the desired influences thru frequent contacts with those prominent in their chosen lines. Leading in popularity and sphere of activity and influence are the political parties. Obviously at present the major parties are the Democrata-Nacionalista Anti Coalition and the NacionalistarDemocrata Fro Independence. Senator Sergio Osmefia and ex-Speaker Manuel Roxas are the supreme heads of the latter and Senate President Manuel L. Quezon of the former. The minor ones are the "Sakdalista", led by Mr. Benigno Ramos and the "Filipino Fascist" founded by Mr. Miguel Cornejo. Several fraternities have big membership. Chief among them are the Palihan ng Bayan, Legionarios del Trabajo, Rizal Masonic Lodges, Caballeros de Sta. Cruz, Caballeros de Colon, National Volunteers, Labi ng Katipunan, Veteranos de la Revolucion, and the Council of Kadosh of McKinley. Sport clubs like the Manila Polo, Wack Wack and Country, Cosmopolitan Gun Club of Makati, Pasig Tennis and others provide healthful exercise and wholesome fellowship among the members. Civic clubs, like the Pasay Civic Club, the Women's Clubs and Puericultztre Centers of most towns contribute much to the general welfare. Educational associations like the Zalnir of Malabon and the Minerva Day of Pasig, yearly honor new college graduates and receive them into their ranks. Rizal Day Associations and Parent-Teachers Associations in most towns contribute also to the educational and moral upliftment of the populace. Vernacular societies like the "Panitik Pasig," "Panitik Malabon," "Kawal ng Panulat" of Caloocan and branches of "Diwang Ginto" and of "Ilaw at Panitik" in some municipalities, seek to develop and promote the official use of tagalog dialect. The Rizal Medical Association and the Rizal Bar Association are the known professional associations. The "Abiertas House of Friendship" in Mandaluyong is the only charitable organization in the territory. Some of the Religious societies, like the Catholic Women's League of the Roman Catholic Church, and the Epworth League and Christian Endeavor Societies of various Protestants dominations, supplement the work of their respective churches. 39

Page  40 STATISTICS ON DEATHS, BIRTHS AND MARRIAGES -1933 Rate Rate Rate Rate Numbcr per Number per Number per Number per of 1000 of 1000 of 1000 under 1000 MUNICIPALITIES Deaths population Births population marriages population orwe year Births Antipolo....... 116 18.25 217 31.15 50 15.74 40 181 Baras.....40 20.49 88 45.08 18 5.66 17 193 Binangonan..... 385 21.98 696 39.78 147 16.78 131 188 Cainta........ 88 33.13 135 55.44 19 15.60 32 244 Caloocan....... 867 24.80 740 26.89 260 14.87 302 1161 Cardona. 84 23.16 128 35.30 35 19.30 30 857 Jalajala....... 33 17.08 56 28.98 13 13.45 13 232 Las Pinias....... 126 40.72 251 81.13 42 27.14 68 271 Makati........ 390 18.15 707 32.44 248 23.08 119 168 Malabon..... 713 26.39 1216 45.02 281 20.08 247 205 Marikina.... 295 28.33 761 73.08 146 28.01 108 142 Mandaluyor.g..... 339 44.92 339 1 44.92 181 47.97 82 242 Montalban..... 161 32.49 166 33.51 42 16.95 64 385 Morong........ 159 19.31 268 32.68 80 19.43 46 172 Muntinlupa...... 155 25.37 267 43.71 47 15.38 80 298 Navotas....... 604 32.16 912 48.88 95 10.01 219 240 Parafiaque..... 375 21.91 553 32.30 138 16.12 155 280 Pasay........ 615 19.11 1442 44.80 315 19.57 193 134 PASIG........ 442 20.76 703 45.36 181 17.00 157 223 Pateros........ 159 23.48 253 37.47 67 19.79 46 181 Pililla........ 122 28.52 153 35.78 45 21.04 38 248 San Juan. 298 20.88 483 33.84 104 14.57 99 205 San Mateo...... 14 28.58 271 57.79 52 22.18 55 203 Tagig......... 287 29.24 367 37.38 65 13.24 117 318 Tanay...176 26.35 273 40.81 46 13.77 58 212 Taytay....220 25.44 480 55.51 107 24.70 71 148 Teresa........ 47 22.84 103 50.55 30 19.62 15 145 TOTAL..... 7430 24.42 12228 40.18 28543 18.76 2602 212

Page  41 SOME MORE FACTS ABOUT THE PROVINCE 1933 Statistics Approximate area (hectares)............................ Agricultural area (hectares)............................ Still available for agriculture (hectares)................. Population (estimated), 1932............................ Unemployed (number................................... W age (average daily).................................. Hospitals (number), 1931............................... Patients attended to (number), 1931................ Dispensaries (number), 1931........................ Treatment (number), 1931.......................... Puericulture center..................................... Mothers attended to (number), 1.931................. Children attended to (number), 1931................. Value of agricultural production (1932)................. Assessed Value of real estate (1932)...................... Real estate assessment (per capita), 1932............... Roads and bridges (km.), 1932......................... Automobiles registered (number), 1932................... Gross sales (1932)..................................... Internal revenue collections (1932)...................... Retail stores (number)................................. Retail stores (less than P200 capital, number).......... Retail Stores (P200 capital or over, number)............. Hotels (number)....................................... Restaurants (number).................................. Refreshments (number)................................ Bakeries (num ber)..................................... Rice warehouse (number).............................. Rice m ills (num ber).................................... Kiskisans (num ber).................................... Sugar centrals (number)............................... Funeral parlors (number).............................. Brass bands (number)................................. Orchestras (number.................................... Drug stores (number)................................... Professionals in active practice (number)............... Lawyers...................................... 91 Pharm acists................................... 147 Dentists....................................... 93 Physicians.................................... 116 Engineers..................................... 18 Opticians...................................... 7 (a) Includes Manila. (b) Includes Welfareville Hospital. 41 195,800 (a) 186.110 (a) 145,368 305,091 16,995 P.83 (b) 2 (b) 1,453 (b) 31 (b) 61,464 1 6,396 8,161 P2,875,820 P91,888,770 P312.63 260.4 1,880 P5,441,597 P480,146 3,218 2,106 1,112 3 75 f5 119 41 50 29 41 23 121 427

Page  42 The Provincial and Municipal Executives of the Province. The sixth man standing on the front row, from left to right, is the Provincial Governor, Hon. Francisco Sevilla. II ZOSIMA G. DE GARCIA Importers of DIAMONDS, PEARLS and solid gold chains, by the meters; also watche3 of different styles and makes. Big discounts. for e.rchants in the Province. See Us For Your Jewelry Needs 829-831 Rizal Avenue, Manila Tel. 2-39-42 I ZOSIMA G. DE GARCIA PAWNSHOP We accept pledges at very liberal terms and reasonable rates cf interest. 827 Rizal Ave. Manila 42

Page  43 Antipolo -::..:/. -.: -;.i~:1A t.,.:I/ The 11unicipal Building ANTIPOLO Location: 7 miles ESE. of Pasig, the capital. This town is on high ground and the climate is conducive to health. Geographically, 14~ 35' lat., 121~ 10' longitude. Population: 6,353; during 1887-4,355; in 1903-2,788. HISTORY: Antipolo was founded in 1578 by the Franciscan Fathers, although Cavada claimed 1650 as the true date. It is named after "Tipolo" tree. The Franciscans did not stay long due to the scarcity of food supply. Jesuits took possession of the town and Fray Pedro Chirico became the parish priest. It was on March 25, 1624 when Don Juan Nifio de Tabora, newly appointed General Captain of the Islands that the Virgin, later called "Nuestra Sefiora de Antipolo" was brought from Acapulco, Mexico. Thousands of people from different parts of the Islands flock to Antipolo during May and June for religious festivities. There are many beautiful spots in this town; some of them are "Hinulugang Taktak," "Balon ng Birhen" and the "Balon ng Marunong." Territory: Area-24,776 Ha.; Barrios: Poblacion, Bosoboo, Cupang, Manbugan, Pantay and Tagbag. Industry: Farming, fruit growing and herding..L~~,L l~lr,,I...... -.. 43

Page  44 ANIPLOBU The Courteous Line-The Safe Line Regular schedulc and service f rom Antipolo to Manila and vice-versa via Pasig, with cornpetent conductors and courteous drivers. Special service during Antipolo Pilgrimage. A. MAGSANGKAY Operator Home Office: City Office: Antipolo, Rizal 303 Azcarraga, Manila Electrical__Supplies Electrical Fixtures Electric Motos &'~Dynamos ICE PLANTS, SODA'WATER MACHINES, DIESEL ENGPMES, WOOD WORK1NG MACHINES OILS VLtNO GREASES ENGINEERING & CONTRACTING Electrical & Machinery Co. 627 Rizal Avenue Manila, P. J. P. 0. Box 625 44

Page  45 Comiplimernts of JUAN SUMULONG Senator-Elect of the 4th Senatorial District Antipolo Rizal LUVRENZO SUMUIJONG Abogado-Nota~rio Publico Office: 201 Regina Residence: Bldg., Manila Antipolo, Tel. 2413-10 MARCELINIO M. SANTOS Graduate of P.S. A.T. Member of 1st Olympic Games, P.1I. Ex-Municipal Teacher Ex-Municipal President Notary Public Antipolo Rizal DR.' SERAPio R. ROLLUQUI Medi~co-Cirujano Antipolo Rizal AMBR-OSTO! CARBUNGCO' 163 Maria Clara, Manila Tel. No. 2-67-21 Ex-Chef of the Casino-Espafiol with eight years Experience.. CARBUNGCo RESTAURANT Antipolo, Rizal We receive City and Provincial Orders for Banquets, Picnics, Wedding, Etc. Prompt and Efficient Service DR. PRIMO CALINGO PHYSICIAN-SURGEON Antipolo Rizal DRY GOODS STORE Virgin Souvenirs Gent's and Ladies Furnishing, Toys, etc. Photo Service (Best Results) Films, all sizes Developing and Printing Lends Kodaks Free Antipolo, Rizal 45

Page  46 I.. I I I 1 Not Merely Travel When you plan a trip, either on business or for pleasure, consider the means of transportation as carefully as you consider your journey. Look for comfort and Safety in a Dependable means of Transportation. These are important features found in Manila Railroad coaches which are provided with all travel conveniences. For parties preferring to travel by train a RECREATION CAR appropriate for Dancing and Music during the trip is furnished without additional charge. W.,:i,,,:, '...'....,.' ' +t.;d:-::"E: '.i:' ',' 0. ':,';,.::E..'.... Our Bus Service for excursion and sightseeing trips is scond to none. Our equipment is of the latest type. It pays to investigate what I the Manila Railroad has to offer in the way of travel comfort, safety and service either by train or motorbus. REMEMBER ALSO our RADIO and TELEGRAPPH SERVICE is offered to you when other means of communications are not available in your hours of need. Very convenient for persons desiring to communicate with passengers on board a train or a Company's ship. Commercial telegrams from persons other tanila train passengers and railroad shippers are accepted for transmission only when Government telegraph office are closed on Sundays and holidays and outside of business hours. For further information, inquire from the local station agents or call up Telephone 4-98-61, Central Office, 943 Azcarraga, Manila. Manila Railroad Co. I I I 46 -

Page  47 Baras ^ _ — F -....-.-.- _ _ - _ _. ~ -..,i, -l~^.- X&I '..~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~~~~: '^:s i K^',f-a ^t N 1: ^^^ & The Municipal Building BARAS Location: At the N. point of the middle portion of Laguna de Bay, 13 miles ESE. of Pasig. Geographically, 14~ 13' lat., 121~ 16' longitude. Population: 1,952; during 1918- 1,604; in 1903-1,200. HISTORY: Founded around 1595-1596. Formerly a chapel site of Morong. Due to the conflagration in 1635, it was separated from Morong and ceded to Ibayo district. Baras is a curruption of the word "Bara" or "Barahan", the place where boats and cascos are forced to stop. A few years after 1901, Baras was ceded to the town of Tanay but in the year 1921 she regained her independence, with Mariano Ballesteros as the first municipal president. Baras is a well-known hunting ground for shore birds. The muddy and swampy beaches of Laguna Lake furnish home for lake birds of different types. The historical spot is the old bridge constructed in 1782 by Felipe de la Parrilla. Territory: Area-3,515 Ha.; Barrios: Poblacion. Industry: Fishing, farming and weaving. 47

Page  48 "Leaders of Rizal" - Olr Is Our Next - Official Publication PhotographerSAN JUAN STUDIO /^^~ ~ J. G. SAN JUAN, Mgr. Pasig Rizal Specified Invariably by leading Architects and Engineers and extensively used in most concrete construction works in this country. That is the record of the RIZAL Portland _-. CEMENT MADRIGA 8 Muelle del Ban Plant: Binangonan Rizal L & CO. co Nacional Tel. 21-9-62 4..

Page  49 Binangonan I I i The Municipal Building BINANGONAN Location: On the shores of Laguna de Bay, on the road between Morong and Manila, 9 miles SE. of Pasig. Geographically, 14~ 28' lat., 121~ 11' long. Population: 18,024; during 1918-14,379; in 1903-11,327. HISTORY: The town was established in 1737 and conquered by the Spaniards in 1763. Various data as to the origin of Binangonan are found conflicting. But the prevalent belief is that the name means the first established town around the Lake. The first inhabitants were found to be very fanatical and warlike. The town includes a great portion of the western part of the beautiful island of Talim. Some of the scenic spots are: Calvary Mountain, Puente del Diablo, Mt. Susong Dalaga, Rizal Cement Factory and the "Calinawan Stone Quary". i I ] Territory: Area-25,315 Ha.; Barrios: Poblacion Norte, Poblacion Sur, Amihanan de B. Subay, Angono, Balatik, Banaba, Bangad, Bayan Subay, Bilibiran, Binitagan, Bongabong, Calumpang, G. Sanay, Gumising Ka Bayan, Gupiing, Ithan, Janosa, Kalawaan, Kalinawan, Kasili, Kaytume, Kinaboogan, Kinagatan, Limbonlimbon, Mahabang Parang, Makamot, Malakaban, Matikiw, Nagsulo, Pautok, Pilapila, Sampad, San Guillermo, Sapang, Talim, Tatala and Tayuman. Industries: Fishing, Agriculture, cement and lime production, poultry raising, fuel and charcoal making, vegetable growing. 49

Page  50 DR. CRISPIN G. LARA PHYSICIAN Angono, Binangonan, Morong Rizal DR. M. FINEZA Y FLORES DENTIST Binangonan Rizal DR. P. TRINIDAD, PHYSICIAN Physician: Rizal Cement Mill Binangonan Rizal DR. T. RICO0HERM-OSO PHYSICIAN Angono, Binangonan Rizal I FINEZA's DRUG STORE Binangonan, Rizal MAURA FTNEZA PHARMACIST FARMACIA ANGONO JACINTO SAMSON, Prop. Angono, Binangonan Rizal TINDAHANG I3AYAN (Silayan Store) Binangonan, Rizal We are selling Electrical Supplies and other common products and liquors. JACINTO SILAYAN, Prop. 50

Page  51 Cainta I The Municipal Building CAINTA Location: 2 miles NE. of PASIG. Geographically, 15~ 55' lat., 121~ 07' longitude. Population: 3,260; during 1918-2,087; in 1903-1,761. HISTORY: Supposed to be the oldest settlement in the Province, founded in 1760 according to Cavada, while Fr. Juan de Medina in his "Biblioteca Filipina" claimed 1689 as the true date. The legend centers around a rich old woman called "Ca Inta". Inter marriage between the natives and the Hindus who remained here after the British occupation in 1762, caused the inhabitants to possess a darker color with a better profile than the rest of the Filipinos. Territory: Area-940 Ha.; Barrios-Poblacion, Rural, San Andres, San Antonio, San Isidro, San Jose, San Juan and Santo Domingo. Industry: Farming, poultry raising, fruit and "inuyat" peddling. 51

Page  52 Compliments of ATTY. VICENTE AMPIL Cainta Rizal DR. JESUS AMPIL and DRA. ANGELA P. AMPIL DENTISTS Cainta Rizal I~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ DR. C. N. FERNANDEZ MEDICO-CIRUJANO Taytay, Rizal MEDICINA GENERAL NINos Y PARTOS Residencia: Cainta, Rizal ANG MANGGAGAWA 483 JUAN LUNA Binondo, Manila G. PAGKATIPUNAN, Prop. Native and Foreign Hats of all kinds. Bleaching and Blocking our specialty. Can You Save P11.96 a Month If you can save this amount you can buy a beautiful lot of 276 sq. m. at RIZAL AVENUE HILLS by paying only a monthly payment of P11.96. This subdivision is beautiful- This lovely spot situated by ly situated on undulating the side of Rizal Avenue Exground, bearing an abundance of fruit and shadow trees, and tenson forms on of ost constantly fanned by cool, important arteries connecting health giving breezes. Manila with the nrovinces of Plenty of modern convenien- Northern Luzon ces are already existing, for instance, ELECTRICITY, TEL- Efficient Auto-Bus Service EPHONE, WATER SUPPLY IN EVERY HOUSE, FIRST at Short Intervals! CLASS STREETS ALREADY Gre r CONSTRUCTED AND PROP- The Gret Opportunity is ERLY GRADED. here for you today! Don't hesitate to call up Telephone 2-14-57, and we will gladly send you one of our representatives to show you the beautiful lots of RIZAL AVENUE HILLS. PHILIPPINE LAND IMPROVEMENT CO. 3rd Floor, Insular Life Bldg. Tel. 2-14-57 PLAZA CERVANTES Manila 52

Page  53 Caloocan The Municipal Building CALOOCAN Location: 2 miles inland from the Bay of Manila and 10 miles NW. of Pasig on the main road. Geographically, 14~ 39, lat., 120~ 58' longitude. Population: 39,458; during 1918-19,551; in 1903-9,291. HIISTORY: The town's name originated from the tagalog word "look", bahia in Spanish. Caloocan in 1814 was a part of Tondo district, but after a year, it was organized as a town with San Roque as the Patron Saint. Caloocan is the most thickly populated town of the Province. Balintawak, a part of Caloocan, is famous for being the place where in 1896, the Katipunan Organization headed by Andres Bonifacio, rose to arms against Spain and started the successful revolution. Other important spots are Pasong Tamo where Tandang Sora fled and supplied the Katipuneros with food, and Grace Park, the airport near Manila. A new national monument in honor of the Great Plebeian was erected last year in the territory. Novaliches, formerly a town by itself in 1856, became a part of the municipality of Caloocan in 1904. Territory: Area-12,000 Ha.; Barrios-P'oblacion, Baesa, Bagbag, Bagbaguin, Bagong Barrio, Bagubantay, Bagumbong, Bahaytoro, Balintawak, Kalaanan, Kamarin, Dulo, Gulod Kaybiga, Kay Kastila, Kay Kapos, Llano, Loma, Malanting, Masambong, Mercedes, Novaliches, Pasong Putik, Pasongtamo, Pinagpatayang-Buaya, Sampalucan, San Bartolome, Santol, Sauyo and Talipapa. Industry: Furniture making, farming, manufacturing, embroidery and fishing. 53

Page  54 FARMACIA CRUZ MARCELO DE LA PAZ Prop.Maypajo, Caloocaui, RizalI FARMACIA JACINTO La Loma, Caloocan, Rizal A. Bonifacio St. Bowling Hall La Loma, Caloocan, Rizal DONATO C. JACINTO PANADERIAT'L SOL' Sangandaan, Caloocan, Ri~zal Malabon Market & San Agustin' Subdivision TIMOTEO POLICARPIO Proprietor RoSARio L. BORRER0 DRESSMAKER and ACADEMICAL CUTTER Receive orders for Filipina and European Dress at reasonable prices. 13 Dimas-alang Caloocan, Rizal I CALOOCAN IDELICIOUS ICE DROP I. MENDOZA, Pr&p. 186 A. Mabini Caloocan Rizal VACIADOR FILIPINO ESTEBAN DIAMSE 225 A. Mabini Caloocan Rizal __________________________________________________ FARMACIA IDEAL IPILAR S. SANCHEZ, Prop. Caloocan Rizal MIRANDA STUDIO 379 Mabini, Caloocan. Rizal Taking pictures Dail~y Inside and Outside of Gallery DAY AND NIGHT L. MIRANDA Photographer and Proprietor 54

Page  55 Attention! F o r Your Comfort and Good Health Buy RIZAL BED from "THE RIZAL BED FACTORY," the only factory in the Philippines which offers the best wurrkmansh i p and scientific design at the B lowest factory quotation. All our beds are manufactured from the best materials and labor. For your inform a t i o n write or see our store and displayroom. THE RIZAL BED FACTORY SY TO CHIN CO., LTD., Partnership Manufacturer of Steel Beds and Mattresses Office Factory & Displayroom 733 Rizal Avenue 738-746 Echague St. Tel. 2-68-46 Tel. 2-60-98 LAVADIA & CO., INC. 306-310 Carriedo P. O. Box 1594 Phones: 2-38-26-2-38-88 Manila, P. I. Exclusive Distributor of: BERLOY Steel Filing Equipment DIEBOLD Fire-proof Safes and Bank Vault Doors WOODSTOCK Typewriters BRUNSVIGA Calculating Machines GRIEF RAPID Duplicators and Stencil Paper KOLSTER International "Rejectostatic" Radios SPARTON AC-DC Long and Short Wave Radios KEN-WELL Sporting Goods Also maintain: EXPERT RADIO SERVICE For any make of Radio Sets

Page  56 DR. HoRmcio J. PALisoc PHYSICIAN-SURGEON No. 2 J. R. Rizal Maypajo, Caloocan Rizal DRA. RosARLo L. MARclos DENTISTA Caloocan Rizal DR. JESUS BASA DENTIST 167 A. Mabini St. Caloocan Rizal Jose G. Sanchez Ricardo C. Robles ROBLES & SANCHEZ ABOGADOS NOTARIOS PUBLICOS Bufete:' Lacng Nasa Bldg., Manila Tel. 4-88-13 Residencia: Caloocan, Rizail DR. MARIO BATACLAN DENTAL SURGEON 145 A. Mabini St. Caloocan Rizal,Complimen ts of ZIORAYDA S. VELARDE Ph. C. and Prop. Caloocan R ia izal DR. AUGUSTO LUC AS DENTIST MANILA RAILROAD CO. Office: Sangandaan Caloocan II IRizal DR. VICTORIANO CALLANTA DENTAL SURGEON Private Dentist of M. R. R. Co. Main Office:Laong Nasa Bldg., Antonio Rivera, Manila Branch Office: G~en."Luna No. 4 Caloocan, Rizal 560

Page  57 The MOST IMPORTANT investment you'll ever make! So you want it to be perfect. You CHOICE want it to be of utmost beauty and LOTS now available charm. You want MAXIMUM LIVING-but at MINIMUM COST! You may acquire them on very favorable termsAnd that's where we come in. - hi..,,.t_ ir Let's help YOU give tangible form to your fondest dream. the present rental the present rental you now pay for something tha'll never be yours. Manila Office: 9 Plaza Moraga Tel. 2-32-28 Manila BALINTAWAK SUBDIVISION GUI BEE KIM CHUAN SOY FACTORY FABRICA DE VIJON Cuando usar de nuestro Toyo es muy sanitario y fuerza cuerpo. 434 Sangiandaan 1403-1405 La Loma, Caloocan Caloocan, Rizal Te. 5-6-7 Tel. 2-77-96 RIZAL BAR Drink of all kinds to Your heart's content Don't forget your placeRIZAL BAR Rizal Extension Grace Park, Caloocan 5,.7

Page  58 FRIENDLY WATCH MAKER REGINO GUTIERREZ, Prop. No. 51 Sa-ngandaan Caloocan Rizal EL MOLAVE SEGUNDO ASISTIG, Prop. Tienda y Fdtbrica de Muebles 117-119 A,. Mabini Caloocan Rizal MOLINA'S Fashion and Dry Cleaning 52 Sangandaan Calooca'n Rizal MATIAGA RESTAURANT.r CARINDERIA Y PANCITERIA EUGENIO FLORENTINO, Mgr. No. 9, Rizal, Maypajo, Rizal F AR EASTERN DR Y CLEANING & LAUNDRY ENCARNACION S. GLORIA Prop. No. 147 A. Mabini Caloocan Rizal SOMBRERERIA de FORTUNATO APOLONIO Prop. & Mgr. Maker of Fine Hats, Good Service and Up-to-Date Style 433 A. Mabini Calooca-n Sangandaan Rizal IPLATERIA y RELOJERIA de SIMEON EVANGELISTA RECIBEN DORADO, PLATEADO Y GRAVADO 89 A. Mabini Caloocan, Rizal GUINTO SHOE SHOP FAUSTINO, F. GUINTO (Shoewmaker & Pi-op.) Caloocan Rizal 58

Page  59 ciq a, ~C2 ~ r- 3' P, 0I R C aq ~ c crq 0' C P H P' 0 -4 t"4 1-4 X -4 z;Z 0 c) l c" >~ W h 59

Page  60 Be Independent! Help reduce the tremendous amount of money going out for Eggs. Start your own business and be Independent. The Novaliches Poultry Products will show you the way. Write for particulars NOVALICHES POULTRY PRODUCTS 704 Evangelista, Manila Tel. 27449 D. R. GOCHANGCO, Mgr. POPULAR FURNITURE FACTORY Well known furniture Dealer 69 A. Mabini, Maypajo, Caloocan, Rizal RAYMUNDO DY, Mgr. Quality Furniture at moderate Price. Special attention to all orders. Tel. Cal. 1-56 Compliments of Dr. FAUSTO GALAURAN Medical Surgeon Caloocan Rizal WATCH!... for the next Publication "BUILDERS of RIZAL" THE AUTHOR....i MARCELO'S FASHION C. MARCELO, Master Cutter 306 A. Mabini Caloocan Rizal Hand-Painting Greeting Cards RAMON R. REYES ARTIST Caloocan Rizal DEAR RIZALENOS: Meet your Politicos and friend in theAmerican Doughnut Shop Best of Foods and drinks MISS FELISA DE SANTOS, Prop. 510 Ave. Rizal, Manila Tel. 2-67-42 60

Page  61 Cardona i. ii......... z......_ 'IThe Miunicipal Building CARDONA Location: On the west shore of the central portion of Laguna de Bay, on the main road, 11 miles SE. of Pasig. Geographically, 14~ 29' lat., 121~ 14' longitude. Population: 4,453; during 1918-3,278; in 1903-2,580. HISTORY: Anciently called SAPAO, corrupted into SABAO which in Spanish meant "caldo" (soup), from which was derived the word CALDO-NA. Another authority says Cardona was named after Cardo, a rich owner of the region. The town was founded in 1855. This town formerly was a mere barrio under the municipality of Morong, but thru negotiations it became an independent municipality. Cardona guards the roads from the southern most towns of Rizal, and commands the best fishing region of the lake. The present municipal building is located near the bank of the Lake, and is often reached by the roaring sea. Territory: Area-14,835 Ha.; Barrios-Poblacion, Dalig, Del Remedios, Iglesia, Lambac, Looc, San Francisco, San Ro. que and Tuna. Industry: Farming and Fishing. 61

Page  62 FARMACIA CONCEPCION CARDONA DRUG STORE Cardona, Rizal Cardona, Rizal E. F. CONCEPCION, Ph. Ch. Manager & Proprietor MARIA C. CONCEPCION NORBERTO C. FERRERA Farnaceutica y Prop. Attorney TINDANG-BAYAN Mrs. Dorotea Kopiko Nurse & Midwife Umaasa sa tangkilik ng mga kababayan I. Molino de Arroz ROSARIO PILI, May-ari P Kaaderia D. KOPIKO, Mgr. Cardona Rizal Cardona Rizal With the Guarantee you KnoW" ^ "' C. V ^.M., Manila^.. 'Ft^bk l 8'h, r.... e Roseario, Manila. Dear Sirs: Attention "Indian Head" Cloth Dept. WiHed" cloth or Gu.h io year s nowv and ne fjoud wearig, dut Lrep llnqal it y e U'gh't emd i school d ress purpose s in my tropical count, the Philippine Islands. I have ao had occasion to ue thi s clot in fagf ever ~ rose, I "di atteWad" th aid do cm nd it to e21 schoo. aHnd -eolle girls'and houe wirtes throva mu t tl~ "/i*'*,i'***"eev up *Prinou c~i is>n ilu l.. s I 1Edi /& oge h ipr hr1 n reoo o 0~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ha ~~yhg ond o h r~~ fyu L Genuine iNDi)IAN HIEAD ~L~T~t H 36 Inches Wide In 39 different shades Colors Guaranteed Fast W hite -in different widths.. 62

Page  63 Jala-Jala Th e Municipal Building JALA-JALA Location: In the extreme SE. part 22 m. SE. of Pasig, near the E. shore of Laguna de Bay. Geographically, 14~ 21' lat., 121~ 19' longitude. Population: 1,098; during 1918-1,584; in 1903-1,217. HISTORY: Jala-jala is a long peninsula, extending from north to south, in the middle of Laguna Bay. Before 1786, Jala-jala was a part of Pililla and under the Franciscan order. In 1820, Paul de la Gironiere, a young French surgeon who came to the islands in 1819, married a 19-year Spanish widow, the Marques de las Salinas. After resigning as surgeon-major of the 1st Light Regiment of the Spanish militia, he bought the Jala-jala estate consisting of 5,000 hectares. He drew around him a large population, built a village, a church and a beautiful residence, and transformed an unproductive soil into a fertile and magnificent hacienda. He was awarded the prize of P12,000 by the Spanish government for having been the first to raise 6,000 coffee plants in the islands. He was honored as Chevalier of the French legion of honor. When his wife died, he left the islands after a stay of 20 years. According to Cavada, the town was established in 1823. Due to the topography of the land, it is the only town not traversed by the provincial road and has a very poor means of communication. The town is considered one of the best hunting grounds in the province. Territory: Area-18,074 Ha.; Barrios-Poblacion, Bagombong and Punta. Industry: Herding, fishing, farming and lumbering. 63

Page  64 enjoying nation wide acceptance! CIGARETTES I CIGARS I I 'ma KAT Tels. 4 Ninfa Filipina La Dalaga Maria Clara Coronas Especiales Excelentes Good President Youngmen nufactured by JBUSAN 501 Clavel 1-95-75 & 4-95-24 MANILA Save on Shoes High Quality Shoes at Lowest Cost For MEN, WOMEN and CHILDREN Go to your dealer now ask for People's Shoes They areSTRONG, ECONOMICAL AND STYLISH If your dealer cannot supply you, order direct from us. MOSHOE Manila Factory: 98-118 Soler-Tel. 4-97-86 Stores: 123 Escolta Tel. 2-63-38 64

Page  65 Las Pinas The Municipal Building LAS PJlAS Location'. O. the main road along the Manila shores, 10 m.les SSW. Geographically, 14~ 29' lat., 120 59' longitude. ~~~Pop~~zdatwion'.i 38,09^4l; during 1918 — l~2,872; in 1903 ~ — l.2,762.li HISTORY' The town of Las Piias was formerly called "Las Pilas" due to its separation in 1762 from Paraflaque after tribal conflicts between two known barangays. The name was corrupted and changed as it is now. Some authorities claimed that the town's name originated from the immense "pitias" or pineapples found in that territory by the first Spanish settlers. Felix Timbang was the first gobernadorcillo (1762). Mariano Ortiz was the first muniI~j~::: iz|: b E OR. A. cipal president. The Zapote Bride is historically important, as the place where th e Americans and the natives met in a battlehe famous.lBamboo Organ in the Church is claimed to be the only instrument of its kind and size in existence and also reputed as one of the wonders Territory Area-4,500 Ha.;Barrios-Poblacion and Pamplona. Industry Fishing, salt-making, bettle leaf raising, farming and embroidery. | h aoeBig s itrclyiprana h lc hr | the Americans and the natives met in a battle. The famous Bam-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~l~i | boo Organ in the Church is claimed to be the only instrument of~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~i1 | and embroidery.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~::~::I:::::j::p~:;~:~~ I 65

Page  66 BAMBOO ORGAN Widely publicized in touring pamphlets and books, this Batmboo Pipe Organ at Las Piiias is about the best knou, n organ in existence th roughout the world. About 1790, Fray Diego Sera came to the islands and built a bamboo organ with 715 pipes, the largest eight feet by five inches, of the best materials. It has five octave Keyboard with 22 stops in vertical rows, 122 horizontal reeds made of soft metal, four sets of bellows, moved by eccentrics from a common crank turned by hand, supplied the air that passes into the accumulator and then to the pipes. Twice the organ was seriously damaged, once by eathquake in 1862 and again by rains, when a storm destroyed the church's roof in 1882. It was reconstructed in 191.7, at which the Begian missionary Faniel with the assistance of the town people, undertook to bring back its sweet tone and music. Under the management of Father Paul Hubaux, who came to the islands eight years ago, he was able to maintain the organ. The successful installation was completed during April, 1932, after several failures to operate it by power. A 1-horse power Wagner motor now drives a pressure blower supplying the original old accumulator, and the organ again gives its full volume, retaining all the softness and beauty of tone t1hat distinguished its design and quality. SAN JUAN STUDIO The SAN JUAN STUDIO in Pasig, Rizal, is the only Studio owtned and managed by the well-known photographer J. G. San Juan. 66

Page  67 Malabon The Mutnicipal Building MALABON Location: 2 miles inland from the shore of Manila Bay and 11 miles NW. of Pasig. The boundary of Bulacan and Rizal passes between it and the Bay shore. Geographically, 14~ 40' lat., 120~ 57' longitude. Population: 27,010; during 1918-21,695; in 1903-20,136. HISTORY: The ancient nucleus of the territory was MAYSILO. Later, religious orders formed a barrio under the district of Tondo, Province of Manila. In 1570, the town was established and named TAMBOBONG, including within its jurisdiction NAVOTAS. The center of population was transferred to its present site in 1873. TAMBOBONG is from "tambo" (Spanish, bambu or Omeson, "casa de hospedage de los viajeros"). Later, the name was changed to Malabon Tambobong, to distinguish itself from "Malabon Grande" of Cavite Province. Malabon came from the word "Malabo". It was in the barrio of Concepcion that the "Bangos" Industry in the Philippines originated, which has been the source of wealth of the residents of Malabon. The popular "Pancit Malabon" is also another pride of this town. Territory: Area-1,300 Ha.; Barrios-Baritan, Bayanbayan, Katmon, Concepcion, Dampalit, Ibaba, Julong-Duhat, Julong Flores, Longos, Ma-asim, Maysilo, Mozon, Niugan, Panghulo, Potreto, Rizal, San Agustin, Santulan, Tafiong, Tinajeros, Tonsuya and Tugatog. Industry: Fishing, farming, cigar and cigarette making, manufacturing, embroidery and weaving. 67

Page  68 BANGOS INDUSTRY * The Bangos culture, to which the towns of Malabon and Navotas owe much of their prosperity and which has been a source of considerable income to the government was originated by Sr. Domingo Coronel. About 1863 this pioneer constructed the first bangos pond in Concepcion, Malabon. After some years the industry spread to the neighboring towns bordering Manila Bay. The reasons for its confinement along the coastal towns are not difficult to seek. The mangrove and nipa swamps along the coasts are very favorable to moss growth (spyrogyra) on which the fish feed. Besides there is mud suitable for dike construction and water for the ponds from the rivers that empty into the bay is available throughout the year. The sea water raises the salinity of the pond sufficiently to discourage the growth of the "dalag" fish which preys on the growing fry. A typical fish pond covers an area of several acres. High and strong dikes surround it to retain water, withstand inundation, and avoid overflowing of the ponds during rainy season. The pond is divided into several compartments by dikes and are provided with small sluice gates for water communications. At the mouth of the river or estero there is a main sluice gate with which the caretaker regulates the in and out flow of water. The square or rectangular compartment immediate to this gate is the "Kulungan". Smaller sluice gates constructed along its dikes connect it with the other compartments ralled the "IKuluangan" which are the ponds proper where the bangos are raised to marketable size. One compartment is called the "impitan" where the fry are detained until the "Kaluangans" have grown sufficient "Lumot." The "Impitan" may serve as "Bansutan" where the fry are returned due to the shortage of "lumot" in the "Kaluangan." A canal runs from each sluice gate diagonally or in the longest distance possible to every compartment. The floor of the compartments are so sloped gradually down the canal as tc insure complete drainage whenever necessary, to provide a cooler depth of water for fish to retreat during hot hours of the day, and to serve as collector during catching time. The fry are imported from the coasts of Bataan, Batangas, Mindoro, Tayabas, Zambales and the Ilocos. From March to the latter part of May, the' spawners or female bangos discharge their eggs along the shores and are fertilized by the milters or male. Shore conditions are very favorable to propagation. The fry are called "KIawagkawag" and are caught by means of sagap, seive like devise of coarse sinamay or by saplad a V shaped bamboo device to which the fry are forced to retreat. The fry are sorted, counted and sold in earthen jars. The transplanting and the rearing of the "Kawagkawag" until they become "hatirin" or fingerlings of two to three months old and require the most careful attention. The fry are so weakened materially during the transportation that an abrupt change of conditions may prove fatal to them. When the fry nursery has grown sufficient "lablab" already and the weather promises to be fair, the fry are carefully poured into the pond while a free circulation of water takes place through the pipes es* Excerpts talen from the Phil. Journal of Science. 68

Page  69 pecially constructed in the nursery. One must see to it that the temperature of the containing jar and the ponds are nearly the same else the abrupt change may chil the fry and kill them. As soon as they have reached the "hatirin" stage they are sold to pond owners for big bangos culture. The hatirin feed on lumut jusi (spyrogyra). When the Kaluangan exhibits a luxuriant growth of it the hatirins can be transfered to them till harvest. The big space of the pond and the abundance of food and water supply enhance their growth. The growth is slow during the hot season but as soon as the rainy season comes it is accelerated. The bangos are caught at night. The ponds are drained gradually so that about the time the tide rises and rushes inwards the water in the Kulungan is about a meter deep. The bangos upon sensing the incoming current of the tide rush to the sluice gate and enter the Kulungan which is soon closed and the fish are caught by means of net. Then they are put in bancas and transported to the market. Shrimps and the "banak" fish are often attracted into the ponds and they share as source of income to the owner of the pond. MALABON STANDARD HIGH SCHOOL (The Oldest Private High School Recognized by the Government in Malabon) Founded iin 1923 Complete High School, Complete Intermediate and Complete Primary STRONG FACULTY-STANDARD INSTRUCTION Lower Tuition Fee-No Library Fee-No Examination Fee No Laboratory Fee- No Athletic Fee-No Diploma Fee For particulars, address THE DIRECTOR JOIN THE NEW YOUTH MOVEMENT Youth is in revoltagainst the old tyranny of thought in POLITICS, RELIGION, i LITERATURE, PHILOSOPHY Read the ORGAN of YOUTHPhilippine INTERCOLLEGIATE PRESS 1.00 a year-P. 0. Box 135, Manila 69

Page  70 DR. MAURO G. BORJA PHYSICIAN-SURGEON Malabon Rizal DR. TEOFILo G. MARTINEZ,PHYSICIAN-SURGEON Malabon Rizal DR. P'ACIANo BAUTISTA PHYSICIAN Eye, Ear, Nose, Throat Clinic 804 Ilaya Corner of Azcarraga Consultation: 9-:00-1:00 A. M. 4:00-6:00 P. M. '9:00-12:00 A. M. Sunday Residence: Malabon, Rizal Tel. 4-74-17 DR. MIGUEL MARCELO Medico y Farm~ace,(tico FARMACIA MARCELO Malabon, Rizal Tel. 160 DR. B ENITO CRUZ MEDICO C. Arellano No. 194 Malabon Rizal DR. VICTORIANO T. RIVERA MEDICO-CIRUJANO Malabon, Rizal Consultorio: Farmacia, Quijano Tangos, Navotas, Rizal -4:00-6:00 P. N Residencia: Tangos, Navotas. Rizal DR. JOSE C. PAULINO MEDICO-CIRUJANO Hospital San Lazaro, Manila Tel. 2-17-27 c/o Botica Quijano Tangos, Navotas, Rizal Residencia: Malabon, Rizal DR. EDUARIDo D. CANICOSA MEDICO 184 C. Arellano, Malabon, Rizal Tel. 129 Calamba Laguna 70

Page  71 I - I THE MALABON NORMAL AND HIGH SCHOOL Malabon, Rizal The first Catholic Normal School in the Philippine Islands for the training of young ladies in the profession of teaching was founded at Malabon, Rizal in 1926 by His Grace, Most Reverend Michael J. O'Doherty, D.D., Archbishop of Manila. The Foreign Mission Sisters of Saint Dominic of Maryknoll, New York, were placed in charge of the school and thus today The Malabon Normal and High School (a boarding and day school for girls) exists under the Archbishop's distinguished patronage. The school is recognized by the Government and offers every advantage to parents desirous of giving their children an up-to-date, refined, complete education. Boys are accepted in the Primary and Intermediate Departments. All classes are conducted in English by American Sisters. CURRICULUM IN THE SECONDARY AND NORMAL DEPARTMENTS The curriculum consists of four years high school at the end of which time diplomas are awarded to those who satisfactorily complete the course. Then follows a two-year Normal College course with approved courses in academic and professional subjects, and in Methods and Principles of Teaching. The Normal School students find adequate opportunity for practice teaching in the Practice School. Applicants for admission to the first year Normal must have successfully completed the four-year General High School course. Classes in Religion are held daily through out the school. All pupils, regardless of creed, are required to take the course in Religion, A special course in Latin is offered to boys. I I 71

Page  72 II I THE MOST DELICIOUS CANDIES Made Under the utmost sanitary Conditions MALABON SUGAR Co., Inc. SMITH BELL & Co. Ltd. General Managers Phone 2-30=96 - 72

Page  73 R~OSA'S BEAUTY PARLOR Nagkukulot Araw, at Ga~bi Nagkukulot ng flat wave, round wave, finger wave at ringlets. A~agbibili ng -sari-garing kagami — tan sa pagkukulot na ka.gaya ng Frederick's liquid, hair trane at Brilliantine. Malabon Rizal. PANADERIA "~BAGONG SIKAT" 196 C. Arellano Malabon,. Rizal J. F. ARGUELLES Prop. LA ENCANTADORA Taller de Vestidas Biding y rCadenetas C. Arellano No. 194 ANITA U. CRUZ Prop. MALABON LUMBER,& BAMBOO DEALER, Back Julong Duhat Market Malabon, Rizal ISIDRO S. SANTOS Prop. DR. HIPOLITO SEVILLA Y ACUR4A PHY'SICIAN-SURGEON Home Address: Tinajeros, Malabon, Rizal Office:. Botica Jose de los. Santos Sangandaan, Caloocan', Rizal DR. ESTEBAN TABLANTE MEDICO-CIRUJANO Malabon Rizal DR. DELFPIN R). PAREJAS SURGEON-DENTIST Ex-Externo Surgeon Dentist of the Philippin~e Gen. Hospital Malabon ) I Rizal 73

Page  74 "ANG MAGJNOO" CHINELERIA Y ZAPATERIA Gen. Luna No. 250 DR. E. S. IGNACIO DENTIST Gabinete Dental: Gen. Luna, Concepcion, Malabon Residence: Cayetano Arellano No. 140 Malabon Rizal Malabon Rizal I DRA. GiENERAcioN GRACIAS9O DENTIST CARROCERIA "BAGONG PANAHON"P ni J. VICENCIO 127 Gen. Luna Malabon RizCwI 87 Concepcion, Malabon,Rza Rizal ARSENJO SANTOS ABOGADO "MAGSJMPAN" SINELASAN ii D. SANTOS Calle Leoiio, Tafiong Malabon Rizal Malabon Tel. Rizal No. Cal. 5-77 At Your Service at Any Time SANTIAGO PRESS 269 Gen. Luna, Malabon, Rizal We print all printing matters If you are in need of servants male of female just drop down to ourSANTIA4GO'S EMPLOYMENT. AGENCY 269 Gen. Luna, Malabon, Rizal and We will supply you at any Day and at any time with satisf actory service. THE LOPEZ TAILORING The first and the last in Style, economy and comfort. T. S. LOPEZ, Prop. 76 Escolta, Manila Tel. 2-64-66 74

Page  75 Compliments of GENARO TAN TORRES ATTOIRNEY-AT-LA'W Residence: Law Office: Malabon Rizal JUAN ORTEGA ATTORNEY-AT'-LAW Law Office: Residence: Tonsuya, 407 Masonic Malabon Temple, Escollta Rizal Manila-Tel. 2-42-02 JOSE Y. CERVANTES Fashion, Academical (Master-Cutter) No. 107 Ave. Rizal Malabon Rizal MALABON DRUG STORE ALIS-SUGAT of DR. E. TABLANTE Shell & Service Station Mrs. ALEJANDRA R. TABLANTE (Mgr.) j. ANDREA S. ROXAS MODISTA Concepcion Malabon Rizal Dr. NEMEsio BUENAVFENTURA MEDICO-CIRUJANO Malabon Rizal DR. RICARDO, REYES DENTIST Pyorrhea Surgery Gen. Luna 291 Malabon Rizal 75 DR. IIALTAZAR C. ESPIRITU DENTISTA Especialist-a en la prirnera Dentici6n y en los trabajos de ecaucho Ido, Malabon Rizal

Page  76 DR.~ DOROTEOL GARCIA DENTIST 3 ral. Luna Malabon, Rizal [ DR. JOSE D. JOSON DENTIST 189 C. Arellano Malabon Rizal DR. J. M. RODRIGUEZ DENTAL SURGEON Malabon Rizal.DR. SEVERING0 AvENDA140 MEDICO-CIRUJANO Malabon IRizal *1 FARMACIA MODERNA Naval St.,, Malabon, Rizal NATIVIDAD M. DE SANTIAGO Pharmacist and Prop. DIONISIO C. GIRON Contractor and Dealer of Hard Stone, Gravel, Sand -and Road Material.Resid~ence: Malabon, Rizal Tel. 170 A. Bonifacio St. Malabon, Rizal MODERN SANITARY ICE -DROP Calle Naval, Malabon, Rizaj RAFAEL, SINGSON, Prop. 76

Page  77 i WE TALTHis for HAT -DON'T TAKE THE RISKConsult our DIRECTORY of best products for immedia~Le recovery and satisfaction: Vermosal "BES" Castoria "BES" Sikmural "BES" Tilki TIki "DES" Glico-Sedol "BES" Celia Cream "BES" Neuro-Vitagen "BES" Catah~plastime "BES" AmnpoUle-S Strychlno-Tiki "BES"9 A~mpoules Cacodylates Compound "BES" In cas3s- your Drug Store fails you, Order from usFARMA CIA CON?1CEPCIONV (Sole Manufa~cturer and~ Distributor) Malabon, Rizal 77

Page  78 sa, Subdibisiong CONSUELO, sa San Pedro M~akati, mataais at magrandang lupa na nababagay pagtayuan nig bahay at "tpoultry" ay mayroong kaming inga loteng ipinagbibili harigga.ng sa kasingbaba ng, P6.87 buwan-buwan, walang antisipo. Mayroon ding kami sa Malols ubdvisiorn Sa Sta. Ania, na mga loteng tig 276 m. c. sa P8.39 isang buwan, walang antisipo. Mayroong~ kamningo kiase ng lote 01.10 ~~~~para, sa bawa't pan-angailangan rig lahat-at lupang abut naman rig kaya ninyo para sa inyong binabalak na pagtatayo ng sariling BDVSIONS Parito, kayo sa amin ngayon din. Tutulungan naming kayo, sa inyong mga kinakailangan. Ukol sa iba pang ibig mabatid ay rnakipagalamn sa lkatlong Palapag Filipinas, Building Tel. 2=31-=96 I I

Page  79 f Makati............. The Municipal Building MAKATI Location: On the left bank of Pasig River, about midway between Laguna de Bay and Manila Bay, 4 miles E. of Manila and 4 miles of Pasig. Population: 21,486; during 1918-12,612; in 1902-3,921. HISTORY: San Pedro Makati. as it is popularly called, is partly named in honor of its patron Saint, Saint Peter the Apostle. The word "Makati" is truly local, meaning "low tide". This is due to the fall of the tide after the flood during rainy days near the Pasig River bank of that municipality. There is nothing certain as to the date of the establishment of the town, but an inscription at the church door bears the date, 1739, and on a fountain in front of the church the year, 1610. The ruins of Guadalupe are situated on a high hill and are very historical. Fort William McKinley, one of the largest army reservations in the word, is located within the territory. Territory: Area-1,650 Ha.; Barrios-Poblacion, Culiculi, Guadalupe, Fort McKinley, Malapadnabato, Masilang, Olimpia, Sampalukan, Kasilawan, Palanan, Pinagkaisajan, Rural, Comandante Carmona, and Tejeros. Industry: Farming, grazing, pottery making, japanese bottle factory, fishing, embroidery and shoe making. I I 79

Page  80 I I I Porcelain Dinner Sets When you see what we have, you cannot but exclaim: "THESE ARE WHAT I AM LOCKING FOR; THEY ARE PRESENTABLE." We have dinner sets with precious designs and rich colors which may elevate your position socially. Set of 100 pieces, from........... P25.00 Set of 136 pieces, from.......... P35.00 We accept C.O.D. orders with P1.00 deposit. A copy of our Catalog No. 6 sent free on request. Iictorina G. de Laperal Wholesale importer of Diamronds, Pearls, Brilliants and other Precious Stones. 851 Rizal Ave.-Tel. 2-42-60-P. O. Box 1710 MANILA,._____ Where ever you go Remember Take always with you... YOUR RIZAL PROVINCE DIRECTORY for service and information Help to propagate the progress of your Province anywhere and at anytime. 80

Page  81 IJOSE VILLENA ATTORNEY-AT-LAW NOTARY PUBLIC San Pedro Makati Riz'al ABUNDIO G. SUCK ATTORNEY-AT-LAW Residencia: No. 3 HI. Santos, Tejeros, Makati, Rizal Bufete: 358 Raon-312 Bustos, Manila oUAN S. TOLENTINO Filing Contractor. of Road8, Lowlands and Premises We Sell Guadalupe stone, land fillings, earth for garden, crushed rocks, cement, lime, gravel and sand also Genuine Auto Spare Parts FRANCISCO N. VICENTE Rep. and Agent Makati, Rizal Tel. 5-56-75 F. R. JACINTO SASTRE 69 P. Burgos, Makati, Rizal We do receive all works for men I*1 BECK'S HOLSTON BEER ASAHI S. MIGUEL M. ANGELES, Prop. Guadalupe Makati, Rizal EL ELGIN NICAsLo MANAIT, Prop. Guadalupe, Makati, Rizal Expert in Watch Repairing and Gold Smithing FERNANDEZ BICYCLE REPAIRING SHOP General Repairing, Paiisting and Nickel Plating of Bicycles also dealer of Bicycle Spare Parts, Shoes, Zapatillas Iand Chinelas. 466 Guadalupe Station Makati, Rizal FILEMION 0. FERNANDEZ, Prop. RICARDO ANASTACIO BAZAR, GROCERY and.FURNITURE STORE Comercio St. No. 456 Guadalupe, Makati, Rizal 81

Page  82 DRS': NARCiso & GENEROSO V. LEA&D~ MEDICO-DIENTAL CLINIC PHYSICIAN-D)EN'TAL SURGEON MVakati. Rizal' N. QUILON ATTORNEY-AT-LAW -and -, INOTARY PUBLIC Tel. 4 —92-63 Residence: Makati, Rizal FABRICA, DE LADRILLOS OLIMPIAde MELENCTO BERNARDO, Prop. (10 yjears experienRce in Brick Industry) Makati, Rizal Ladrillos, cements, Tosks Ladrillos Espiga,. Cemenits, Es'piga, pula LEON DE GuzMAN IMakati, Rizal Brick Manufacturer and Contractor. 1.7 years experience in brick making. Especialized on the following: 1. Pressed brick for boiler setting. 2. Clay tile f or floor roof (floor dock). 3. Standard pressed brick for building purposes. FABRICA DE LADRILLOS Olimpia, San Pedro Makati Rizal N~agbibili ng iba't ibang kiase ng ladrillos sla mababang halaga. PABLO PONCE, May'-ani Makati Rizall -M E TROUNIVERSAL FASHION (Men's Clothes) FRANCISCO SAGE, Prop. (Escolta, Tailor and Academical Cutter) Near the Municipal Bldg. Makati Rizal Tel. 5-56-75 VELASCO' s TAILORING Odympia Makati, Rizal, P. 1. PASCUAL DE LA CRUZ Master Cutter FERNANDO VELASCO Proprietor 82

Page  83 Mandaluyong The Municipal Building MANDALUYONG Location: On the bank of Pasig River, 71/2 miles NW. of Pasig. Geographically, 14~ 35' lat., 121~ 02' longitude. Population: 8,500; during 1918-5,806; in 1903-4,349. HISTORY: Anciently known as MANDALUYONG, but the name was changed to SAN FELIPE NERI in honor of King Philip IV of Spain. The name Mandaluyong was officially reconsidered last year (1933) by the Legislature. It originated from the Tagalog word "madaluyong", meaning the waves always surged in that particular place. Mandaluyong had played a very important role in the Revolution of 1896-1898, when San Juan del Monte took up arms onI August 29., 1896. General Calentong, with his army financed by Laureano Gonzales, started their uprising in Hagdang Bato. The monument of General Calentong with Gonzales and Andres Bonifacio is situated in the said municipality in honor of the known and unknown martyrs. The government Psychophatic hospital and the Welfareville and also the new camp for the Constabulary in Santolan known as "Camp Murphy",, are located in the territory. Territory: Area-1,600 Ha.; Barrios-Poblacion, Barranca, Hagdang Bato, Jolo, Lamayan and Suniga. Industry: Clay products, zacate, fruit raising, embroidery, milk industry and laundering. 83

Page  84 DR. FRANCISCO C. BAYLON DENTAL SURGEON San Felipe Neri Rizal R I ZAL Chocolate, Coffee and Candy-Factory PABLO RESURRECCION AND SONS Pi-op. Mandaluyon Rizal BA T IB T I C FABRICA DE SILLAS DE HIERRO Mandaluyong Rizal "LA PATRIA" MAMERTO PAGLINAWAN,. PANADERIA Prop. FABRICA DE OFICINA CENTRAL: DULCERIA 631-633 Legarda, Sampaloc CHOCOLATE Tel. 2-67-94 REPOSTERIA Direccio'n Telegrifica "PATRIA" Y CAFE P.O. Box 2283 Manila, I. F. FABRICA DE ---- ALMACEN DE SiJOURSALES: BIZCOCHOS 635-637 Legarda, 723 Tabora, COMESTIBLES 143 'Villalobos y 73 Bustillos Katubusan Cigars and G iga rettes 84

Page  85 Marikina The Municipal Building MARIKINA Location: On the main road 8 miles NE. of Pasig. Geographically, 14~ 39' lat., 121~ 06' longitude. Population: 10,412; during 1887-10,303; in 1903-8,187 HISTORY: Founded in 1630 according to Cavada. The first settlers were Chinese who married the native Malays. In the first days of the Jesuit missionary in 1630, it was known as Jesus de la Pefia, but the name was changed in 1687. Civil government was established in 1787. The name Marikina is a corruption of the word "marikit-na". In 1882, the population was nearly wiped out by the cholera epidemic. In 1904, fire ravaged the unfortunate place and was reduced to ashes. Again in 1907, cholera broke out which almost wiped off the entire population. Marikina is the trade center of a producing region adapted to raising rice, sugar cane and vegetables and also a known center for the manufacture of native shoes and leather work of various kinds. At present there are about 300 shoe shops, with a total output of 5,000 pairs of shoes a week. The inundations of the Marikina River maintain the fertility of the valley and its bed supplies Manila and the surrounding towns with sand and gravel for construction purposes. Territory: Area-4,850 Ha.; Barrios-Poblacion, Bayanbayanan, Kalumpang, Jesus de la F'efa, Malanday, Santa Elena, San Roque, Santo Nifio and Taniong. Industry: Farming, shoe-making, fishing, manufacturing. I 85

Page  86 THE SHOE-MAKING INDUSTRY Marikina is oftentimes referred to as the center of the shoe-making industry in the islands. Most of the low-priced locally made shoes that are for sale in Gandara and Nueva Streets in Manila are the products of the excellent workmanship of Marikina shoe-makers. Almost a century ago, shoe-making was only done by the Chinese in the Philippines. A, Filipino in Marikina, Rizal, who was a tanner and a sandal-maker, started his own shoe-making business and other Filipinos engaged in the lucrative occupation and trade. Soon, after the establishment of the American regime, retired soldiers from the invading army established shoe repair shops, and as the use of shoes became more widespread, the industry flourished. The Marikina shoemakers increased their output, and the progress was almost phenomenal. Because they had no machinery to work with and locally tanned leather was used, they catered to the poor and laboring class in the country. Soon, however, they imported better-class materials from abroad. Of the 250 shoe shops in the Philippines, a great number are found in the town of Marikina. Many of them are small, and the work is done by hand, but they are able to compete with five modern shoe factories using modern machinery situated in Manila. The Filipinos control-about 50 per cent of the industry which is estimated to amount to eight million pesos. In spite of the conflagration which nearly gutted down the work shops in Marikina, this Rizal town- will still continue to dominate the industryl. The importation of foreign-made shoes is decreasing steadily every year, and before long, locally made shoes will be used exclusively by the natives. FARMACIA MARIQUINA Room 3 in this Building The house of Dr. Juan Chanyungco, M.D. Mariquina, Rizal 86

Page  87 Marikina, Rizal Naglilintgkod,-ca la hat fly Oras Mga' niyaring gamotLAGNACOL,ASTRIN TABLETS UL-SAN S'ANIPOWDER Ipinagbibili sa mga Botika. Nasa Daang Dr. Rizal For the Economic, Social and Political Progress of Rizal Province.. COMPLIMENTS Of Luzon Surety Co. Inc. EULOGIO RODRIGUEZ M~anagyer 215 Regina Building This. 2-16-30 Escolta, Manila 2-34-30 DRA. TOMASA F. HALILI MATRIZ, PARTOS Y NIROS Horas de Consulta: Res.: 1430 Washington Ave. 9-12 a. m. y 4-6 p. Mn. Tel. 2-68-63 Oficina:~ 679 Ave. tRizal Tel. 2-56-02 ~87

Page  88 Funeraria "EL ARTE" Marikina, Rizal Ang Funeraria "EL. ARTE" ay laang maglingkod sa madla sa isaing paraang maayos, malinis. mura at katangi-tangi. Ang aming layon-Magkaroon ng kasi-ahang loob ang lahat. ESTANISLAO LOPEZ May-ari POPULAR DRUG STORE Marikina, Rizal MARIA DE LA PAZ (Fa~rm~aceutica) FUNERARIA MARIKINA MATILDE EUSTAQUIG Prop. Umaasa sa Tangkilik ng rnga Kctbabayan Marikina Rizal FARMACIA DE MARIA DE LA PAZ Marikina Rizal MICOL V. DiMANLIG Farmace~itica DR. DAVID SIASOCO DENTIST Marikina -Rizal DR. FELINO A. REYES DENTIST Marikina Rizal DRA. S. J. HERNANDEZ 'LADY DENTIST Marikina Rizal DR. RUFIN-O MENDOZA DENTIST Marikina Rizal 502 Ave. Rizal, Manila Tel. 2-65 72 DR. ALFRED~o T. MALLARI Veterinarian and Surgeon Marikina, Cubao, Sanvuan 'Rizal -88

Page  89 GARCIA's TAILORING BERNARDO GARCIA Master Cutter and Proprietor Marikina Rizal PANADERIA PERLA DEL ORIENTE GENARO S. PAZ e HIJOS.Prop. Sto.~ Nifi, Marikina Rizal 1. MANOLA PAZ MODISTA, Marikina Rizal j ICE DROfP GARDEN We sell delicious and nutritious ICE DROPS JOSE P. SANTOS, Prop. 1037 Dr. Rizal Marikina, Rizal G. G. CAGUIA TAILORING and MABUHAY DRY CLEANING and.LAUNDRY Marikina Rizal ISAAC EUSTAQUIO Marikina, Rizal Manufacturer of concrete water traps, slabs, Balusters, Flower pots and other ornamental concrete products. MO(LINO ]DE AkRRO(Z de T. NEPOMUCENO Kami ay tumatanggap ng palay' upang ilugad ng taunan. Tumatanggap din naman kami ng palay upang bigasin ar aw-araw. Handa at laang maglingkod sa lahat ng oras sa iinyong pangsngailangan. D. J. NEPOMUCENO Manager I Marikina;IRizalI 89

Page  90 DR. MARIANO V. MALLARI MEDICO N~i'os y Mccticinct General 38Concepcion, Ermita Tel, 2-77 02 Consultas: Desde 4:00 P. M. Marikina, Rizal Sabado y Domingo Buro de Ciencia,- Manila: Tel. 5-69-86 8: 00 A. M.-4: 00 P. M. DR. GONZALO DE LA PAZ,PHYSICJAN-SU RGEON Marikina Rizal DR. CIRILO.~C. CRUZ Medico-Cirujano EMILIO DE LA PAZ ATTORNEY-AT-LAW Residence: Marikina, Rizal Law' Office: Regina Blg., Manila Marikina Rizal IGNACLO SANTOS D, ATTORNEY-AT-LAW Marikina, Bin'angonan, Rizal DR. JOSE P. CRUZ DENTIST Clinic: 105 Bustillos Sampaloc, IManila Residence: Marikina Rizal SANTOS HAT STORE AND DRY CLEANING AND LAUNDRY T. SANTOS, Prop..Marikina Rizal LEONOR A. MARCELO REGISTERED MIDWIFE Sto. Niiio Marikina, Rizal' 90

Page  91 Montalban The Municipal Building MONTALBAN Location: On the main road, 13 miles North of Pasig, at the crossing of Puray River and 3 miles South of the boundary of Bulacan. Geographically, 14~ 44., lat., 121~ 09' longitude. Population: 6,108; in 1918 4,259; in 1903 3,440. HISTORY: Founded in June, 1871. The name "Montalban" was a derivation from the Spanish word "Monte" meaning. Mountain. This town was formerly known as BALITE, a barrio of San Mateo, but thru the efforts of Eulogio Rodriguez, later appointed first Municipal President and Governor Ambrosio Flores, they were able to create it as a town. Montalban is one of the sources of Manila water supply. A pure mountain stream that flows down the Puray and San Mateo rivers join at Montalban. The water is only clear during dry season. Territory: Area-27,200 Ha.; Barrios-Poblacion, Burgos, San Isidro, San Jose and San Rafael. -: Industry: Farming, fishing, fruit raising and herding. deriatio frm. he ~ Spnishword"Mote" eanigsMounain. III*I~LYIY ~pIIIIMC — YMII.-Y~B~~d~IPc~~1~~~1~~e,~0~14 1 r, C1 —ul —.ll4lm

Page  92 FARMACIA MONTALBAN Mrs. RAFAELA R. BAUTISTA (Oumer & Pharmacist) Montalban Rizal DR. PONCIANO M. BAUTISTA SURGEON DENTIST of theManila Railroad Company Mouth Diseases Minor Oral Surgery and Operations, Specially Pyorrhea, etc. Clinic: 986 Azcarraga, Tondo, Manila Tel. 4-90-36 Opposite Tutuban station Home address: Montalban, Rizal HAVE A CHOICE FROM US: New Shipments of American, Belgian & German Arms and Ammunition SHOTGUNS Browning Ithaca Remington Remo-Popular Winchester RIZAL BONIFACIO, etc. REVOLVERS' Browning Colts Luger Mauser Smith & Wisson and RIFLES FRESH AND COMPLETE LINE OF SPORTING GOODS such as Equipment for BASEBALL, BASKET BALL, FOOTBALL, INDOOR BASEBALL, TENNIS, VOLLEYBALL, BOXING and other HEALTH BUILDERS. We have also stock of FUN-FULL PLAYGROUND APPARATUS and MAGNAN RACKETS for which we are the exclusive representative in the Philippines. Special Prices And Reasonable Discounts PHILIPPINE TRADING CO. 508 Rizal Avenue, Manila, P. I. Tel. 2-77-23 REQUEST FOR FREE CATALOG Box 1948 92

Page  93 .I I I I I I I i Morong The Municipal Building MORONG Location: One of the lake towns on Laguna de Bay, ESE. of Pasig. Geographically, 14~ 31' lat., 121~ 14' longitude. Population: 8,232; during 1903-5,276; in 1918-6,840. HISTORY: Morong was founded in 1586 about eight years after the first missionaries Juan de Placencia and Diego de Oropesa had started converting the natives to Christianity. On Feb. 23, 1853, Morong became the capital of the established military district which included parts of the provinces of Manila and Laguna, like Taytay, Cainta, Bosoboso, Baras, Morong, Tanay, Pililla, Binangonan and Jalajala. When Rizal Province was created in 1901, Morong ceased to be the capital and became only a town of Rizal. Tomas Claudio, first Filipino killed in the service of America during the last world war, hailed from this town, where now stands a memorial school in his honor. The old capitol and the town church are landmarks of her glorious past. The U-ugong Falls is her scenic pride. while the Raymundo Transportation Company keeps on advertising the home town. Territory: Barrlios-Maybangkal, San Guillermo, San Jose, San Juan, San Pedro, Lagundi and Kaniogan. Industry: Fishing, farming and hunting. I 93

Page  94 THE RiAYMIUNDO TRANSPORTATION The RAYMUNDO TRANSPORTATION CO., INC. was organized in 1919 by Messrs. Jose Raymundo, president; Eligio Raymundo, vice president; Santos Mateo, Secretary-Treasurer; and Maximo Mateo, Hospicio Salvador and Geronimo de la Virgen, members, and started business with one truck acquired from the Bachrach Motor Co. on the installment plan. Encouraged by the profitable results of its first months operation, the founders decided to purchase three additional trucks, and registered the company in the Bureau of Commerce on May 31, 1921, with a paid-up capital stock of P13,800.00. However, during the latter part of 1921, the company suffered financial reverses and the mortgage on its trucks was nearly foreclosed because of its failure to comply with the terms of its contract with the Bachrach Motor Co. During the middle of 1922, Mr. L. B. Raymundo was prevailed upon to join the company. He was elected Secretary-Treasurer, and on January 1, 1923, he was chosen to fill the position of President and General Manager. He assumed this position at a time when the company was in precarious financial condition which was made worse by the advent of several competitors. Through efficient and honest management, however, Mr. L. B. Raymundo, with the help of Mr. A. M. Zarate as the company's attorney, was able to pull the company out of its difficulties and forced the competitors to sell out or go out of business one by one. Mr. L. B. Raymundo still holds the position of General Manager with Mr. A. M. Zarate as President and Attorney. From a very small beginning and under financial difficulties and stiff competition, the company forged ahead to its present standing, without increasing its original capital. The company now owns 44 trucks and autos. It plays its modest part in lessening the country's unemployment problem by supplying the livelihood to about 200 families. The management feels confident that this company is bound to play even greater roles in the country's economic development in the future and especially to the provinces of Rizal and Laguna where it renders its services day in and day out during the year. The company, therefore, capitalized as it is with 100% Filipino capital furnished by scores of small Filipino investors, naturally expects in days to come the safe favorable patronage which it has deserved from the public during the past. The company has approximately a half-hour service from Manila to Santa Cruz, Laguna, via Binangonan and via Antipolo and all the intermediate towns of Rizal and Laguna provinces bordering the Laguna Lake, thru the newly opened inter-provincial road between Pililla and Santa Maria. The following are the present officials of the company: President.......................................... Mr. A. M. Zarate Vice-President............................... Mr. Eligio Raymundo MEMBERS: Mr. Pedro San Luis Mr. Leoncio Raymundo Mr. Serapio Cruz Manager & Treasurer........................ Mr. Leoncio Raymundo 1st Assistant Manager........................... Mr. Ernesto S. Felix 2nd Assistant Manager............................ Mr. Serapio Cruz 94

Page  95 _ I_ Efficient, Courteous, Safe and Dependable Transportation (Financed by small local capital combined together) The "RAYTRANCO" (HASIKASO) maintains regular bus services between Manila and Pililla-Quisao, and Manila and Sta. Cruz, Laguna, via Antipolo-Teresa and via Binangonan, Rizal, passing over the new PilillaMabitac road. 1! - I "HASIKASO" RAYMUNDO TRANSPORTATION CO., INC. Morong, Rizal, P. I. Manila Branch Office 634 Norzagaray, Quiapo Tel. 22974 Laguna Branch Office Sta. Cruz, Laguna 95

Page  96 MAXIMINO M. SAN PEDRO Abog~cado-Notario (Patent-Attorney) RUPERTO MARTINEZ,Abog~ado-Notario.Morong Rizal Home Address: Morong, Rizal. Office: 314 Kneedler Bldg., Manila IA. M. ZARATE Abogado 65 Juan Luna. Manila Tel. 2-56-55 Home address: Morong, RizaJ DR. BENJAMIN CIFRA MWdico Mo~rong Rizal DR. CRISPIN G. ILARA PHYSICIAN Morong Angono Rizal Rizal DR. ISIDRO SANTOS Physician Morong Rizal Residence: Tanay, Rizal IFARMACIA RIZALINA Morong, Rizal Mr. & Mrs. RAYMUNDO, Prop. JOSW'A YLAGAN RAYMUN.Do (Pharmacist) EMILIA'S PHARMACY Morong, Rizal MR. & MRS. MATEO, Prop. EMILIA SALAW MATED (Pharmacist) 96

Page  97 Muntinlupa The Municipal Building MUNTINLUPA Location: In the extreme SW. of that portion of the province formerly included in the province of Manila, on the main road along the SW. coast of Laguna de Bay to Santa Cruz, 12 miles S. of Pasig and about 11/2 miles N. of Cavite boundary. Geographically, 14~ 23' lat., 121~ 03' longitude. Population: 6,108; during 1903-3,128; in 1918-4,712. HISTORY: Muntinlupa is ever true to its name since the Spaniards called it so because it was a small settlement in a corner of Manila province. Once a barrio of Tagig before it became a town itself. The founding of Muntinlupa is debatable for others say it was in 1851, some in 1856 and others in 1869. According to the historian Zufiiga, long ago Muntinlupa was famous for its robbers. The Serum Laboratory of the Bureau of Science is located in Alabang. The former name of the place was Terrazaville and later Numasancillo, then Muntinlupa when it became a town. Territory: Area-9,630 Ha.; Barrios-Alabang, Bayanan, Kupang, Pututan, Sukat, Tunasancillo and Poblacion. Industry: Farming, fishing, duck raising, and sale of fruits. 97

Page  98 F~ARMACIA R. ZARRAGA Muntinlupa, Rizal GASPAR R. ZARRAGA Fa~rmacerutico y prop. FOR YOUR HEALTH Drink Royal Sterilized Milk T. M. MOLINA (Mamuger) 16 Valenzuela Tel. 6-70-71 Sta. Mesa, Manila ~&VA1 '!I DeU ~ IfAMPOTEJ OFII6IC ~6R4Nn1Ur & MdRHZLE5 Especialidad en Capillas, Mausuleos, Estatuas, Utpidas, Altares (6 Imagenes. 876 Ave. Rizal, Manila -(Frente Opera House) TEL. 2-93-45

Page  99 Navotas The Municipal Building NAVCOTAS Location: On an island a few hundred yards W. of Malabon and 12 miles NW. of Pasig. Geographically, 14~ 40' lat., 120~ 57' longitude. Population: 18,777; in 1918-13,454; in 1902-11,688. HISTORY: The former name of the town was San Jose de Navotas, a barrio of Malabon. After June 11, 1859, Navotas was separated and was organized as a regular town under Fray Matias Naboa. ~Navotas, which means "breached", in 1860 was not entirely surrounded by water. The layer of the land between the former district of Tondo, some alleged, was probably of weak kind, and the turbulent waves of the bay during rainy seasons gradually eroded that portion of the land, until a breach was made so as to allow the sea water to flow thru it-now the Bitac River. Owing to this geographical change, it was called "Nabutas" and in latter years called Navotas. During 1904-1905 Navotas was again ceded to Malabon, but acquired independence before the expiration of the term of Bernardo Dagala. Mariano Estrella was the first gobernadorcillo of the naturales and Mariano Israel of the Mestizos. In economic advancement, Navotas has a modern refinery, the Malabon Sugar Co., situated in the barrio of Tanza. There are also a tannery and Yangco's dock yards. Territory: Area-300 Ha.; Barrios-Poblacion, Almacen, B. Bayan Banculasi, Daanghari, San Jose, San Roque, Sipak, Tangos and Tanza. Industry: Fishing, farming, manufacturing and weaving., 99, 9 9.. A} I,,~~~~~~~~~'i(ti~ *x~~r~3 Sj: ~~~:ji~~~~~~~~~~~~8 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~ ilii~~~~~~~~~~

Page  100 Co'mpliments of ANDRE$ PASCUAL ABOGADO NOTA1RJO PUBLICO Tangos, Navotas Rizal DR. VICTORINO T. RIVERA MEDICO-CIRUJANO Malabon, Rizal Consultorio: Farmacia, Quijano, Tangos, Navotas 4:OO —6:OO P. M. Residencia: Tangos, Navotas, Rizal.,N APANAGINIP Patis Navotas ni JULITO GINOGINO Primera kiase. Tunay na katas ng Isda. Malinis at Mura. San Roque Navotas. Rizal Ganda, aIna at Malinamnam PATIS NAVOTAS Prirnera k'ase. Luto sa araw ESCOLASTICA NAVAL May-ari San Roque, Navotas, Rizal ILUMINADA DAR SANTOS MODISTA Grctduada en la Academia de Artes del Hogar y Artes Decorcttivos, Pintura y Corte. Actual maestra de Corte en la mismez. Navotas, Rizal ANG DILAG NG DALAGA CONSTANCIA'S BEAUTY PARLOR Nagkukulot sea ara-w at gabi Navotas Rizal SAN RjoQUE DRUG STORE Navotas, Rizal ALEJANDRO LEONGSON Prop. MO11DESTA R. POLICARP1o DRESS MAKER-MODISTA Tunmatanggap ng Biding at yumayari ng sunod sa lahat ng bagong moda. Navotas Rizal ROSARIG BASA Farmaceutica 100

Page  101 THE TANNING INDUSTRY Closely connected with the shoe industry of Marikina is the tanning industry. Malabon can count with the most modern tannery in the Philippines-the Philippine Tannery Company. While Navotas has also one the Philippine Chinese Tannery Ass. The tanning industry, although it could be the source of a large profit, has been neglected in the past. In 1903 there were 30 tanneries in the islands with a total investment of P160,373.00. In 1918, there were 59 tanneries with an investment of P357,946.00. The seven tanneries in Manila are owned by Chinamen and operated under crude methods. Tanneries are also found in Pangasinan, Camarines Sur, Batangas, Cebu and Bulacan. Hitherto, shoe-makers have been using imported leather for their industry. The quality of locally produced leather was poor and the nauseating odor could not be eliminated. At present, sole leather can be obtained from the local tanneries, but upper leather for shoes is almost entirely imported. The improved quality of sole leather locally produced has resulted in the decline of the amount of imported sole leather. In 1926, we imported 489,962 kilos valued at P648,956; in 1927, 315,294 kilos, valued at P437,649; and in 1928, 326,720 kilos valued at P689,996. Our total import of unmanufactured leather in 1926 is P2,141,540, and during 1927, P1,929,527. Our annual imports of hides and skins amounts to about 5,000 kilos valued at P3,000. 101

Page  102 TALLER DE MAQUINARIAS Y VARADERO, San Roque, Navotas, Rizal Se reciben toda clase d-e trabajos concernientes al ramo de maquinarias, montajes de ma'quina, molinos, etc., Soldadura por el Procedimiento Ele'ctrico Oxy-Acetileno. C. I. CASTILLO, Prop. TIMOITEO, MAUHAY Gerente [DR. FLORENCIO SANTOS DR. PRIMITivo GONZALES DENTAL SURGEONDETS Offfice: Dongalo, I 1209 Azcarraga Parafiaque, 5 alrnPrfau Sta. Cruz Rizal 5 alrnPriau Manila Rizal Compliments of 90 Cavi'te Road, Parafiaque COMPLIMENTS OF Tanay Eectric CO.' YALENTIN CRUZ, Prop. Tanay Rizal 102

Page  103 Parafiaque The Municipal Building I PARARAQUE Location: On the Manila and Cavite road, 7 miles S. of Manila and 8 miles NW. of Pasig. Geographically, 14~ 30' lat., 120~ 57' longitude. Population: 17,118; in 1918-22,121; in 1903-6,407. HISTORY: Parafiaque is also called Palanyag, corruption of the Tagalog word, PALAYAG (embarcaci6n 6 punto de navegar). According to legend, there was a tree on its seashore which at a distance appeared like the hoisted sails of a boat, hence its name. The church was constructed in 1760. It is the most famous town for salt making in Rizal and considered as one of the oldest towns of the Province. It had been the center of trade long before the Spanish invasion in 1571. According to Fray Agustin de la Cavada, the town was founded in 1572. Territory: Area-1,950 Ha.; Barrios-Baclaran, Dongalo, Ibayo, La Huerta, San Dionisio and Tambo. Industry: Salt-making, embroidery, farming, shoe-making, weaving and slipper-making. 103

Page  104 SALT MANUFACTURE * The use of solar heat for evaporating sea water and crystalizing salt from the concentrated brine has been exploited and developed by the coast dwellers of Manila Bay. Wide areas of Parafiaque, the leading salt producing town of Rizal, and Malabon are appropriated for this industry. The production begins from December to May. There are two methods used: the Filipino and the Chinese, and both have undergone modifications. The native method, better known as Iras Tagalog, was probably the first to be employed in these towns. The plant consists essentially of evaporating ponds, leaching vats, crystalizing ponds and warehouses. Wide areas of sandy land along the coast, and reached by the high tide are cleared and cleaned. The soil on the surface is loosened (abuhan) and water from canals (angkaw) through which sea water is led in, is sprinkled over the surface where it evaporates. This process is repeated four or five times a day for three days until a heavy accumulation of salt on the surface is obtained. On the fourth day the salt-impregnated earth is scraped into heaps and transferred to the leaching vats where it is leached with sea water conveyed through bamboo pipes from the estero until most of the salt is extracted. To test the concentration of the brine, twigs of a plant called "culase" whose specific gravity is approximately equivalent to 11.5% salt are plucked, thrown to the brine and should they float the brine is sufficiently concentrated to be transferred to the crystalizing ponds (banigan), otherwise it is weak and needs strengthening by dipping back into a leach several times until it attains the required concentration. The leaching vat is a circular dike about one half meter high and four meters in diameter and built on the ground. The bottom is covered with a layer of rice husks and nipa leaves which filter the mud from the brine. The filtered brine is drawn off by means of bamboo pipes through the dike into a shallow cement or earthernware well. While the leaching is in progress another layer of loose soil is being impregnated in the evaporating ponds. The leached mud after slight hardening is marked into square blocks and as soon as the next salt-impregnated earth is scraped into heaps, these blocks are thrown back to the field to be used again. The floor of the crystalizing ponds are laid with smooth broken pottery set in lime mortar or cement to prevent seepage and admixture of sand with salt. The ponds are surrounded and protected from dust and heavy wind with bamboo fences and nipa or cogon grass. Stronger brine is added from time to time, first passing through filter baskets to free it from rice husks. Everyday at sundown, the salt crystals are raked into heaps, collected into baskets to drain and finally deposited in the warehouses. The Chinese method consists of shallow evaporating reservoirs of different sizes and crystalizing ponds. The lower areas usually flooded * Excerpts taken from The Phil. Journal of Science. 104

Page  105 by ordinary tide from 30 to 50 centimeters deep are utilized. The partitions are diked with levees at least a meter high. The reservoir where the first evaporation takes place is usually a fish pond, and includes several rows of shallow concentrating reservoirs. The brine is drawn from one reservoir to another as concentration progresses and volume decreases while in turn new water is admitted. The stronger brine is usually dipped up by hand and transferred to the upper crystalizing ponds sometimes letting it pass through straw filter. When land above tide level is used, water is elevated by means of bamboo sweep. The whole process is by gravity. Compliments of Philippine Lime Factory and Tile Works FABRICA DE CAL Y BALDOZA Campo Claudio, Paraiaque, Rizal A. PASCUAL Office & ( T - (~Pro~p. ) ~ FcrTel 5-19-62 (Prop.) Factory ( RELOJERIA, PLATERIA y DORADISTA GAUDENCIO F. ATIENZA Real No. 65 Residencia::':: Baclaran, 156 Libertad Parafiaque Pasay TIE Rizal GAUDENCIO F. ATIENZA 105

Page  106 RIZAL ICE PLANT First Class Ar- d; Mataas na uri ng tesian Water tesian Water tubig sa Poso. SiApproved by the Burea of / nang-ayunan ng Bureau of.~ Science - Buro de Ciencia. Jose RIZAL Baclaran, Paraiaque, Rizal Tel. 5-16-64 F. G. LAPID Manager and Prop. Born February 27, 1888, at Guagua, Pampanga. Son of Fran- cisco and Jacinta Gabiola. Marriet nd to Sofronia Paras, with whom he has nine children.shed " L IE hEducation: He took his elementary grades at the Guagua, Pampanga, Elementary School. He studied the secondary clas-a ses at the Buencamino Privates k School. Later, he enrolled at theer Ice Plant iteneo de Manila, but he discon-tin tinued because his inclination was more for business. He began his bakery business in 1907. He met with hardluck. But as a man who knows no defeat, he FORTUNATO G. LAPID started the "El Fruto de Cacao." Proprietor and Manager Again he failed. He reestablished "RIZAL ICE PLANT" his bakery in 1921. With his little savings, he bought a fish pond in 1924. In 1927, he sold the fish pond and invested the proceeds in an ice plant, in 1929, situated at Baclaran, Parafiaque, Rizal Province. The business is known as "RIZAL ICE PLANT" which has-been financially a success. Another Ice Plant built in Cavite did not meet with the same luck and was discontinued. 106

Page  107 Dr. TEODORICO SANVTOS MEDICO-CIRUJANO Paraflaque, Rizal F. SANTOS DRUG STORE P'arafiaque, Rizal APO LIME COMPANY GARCIA & TOLENTINO,(Formerly Apo Lime Factory) LAW FIRM Lime Manufacturer's and Tel. 2-27-55 General Merchant. Tel. 5-11-11 FRANCISCO C. SANTOS We Sell: Attorncy & Cou ncillor-at-Latw Lime, adobe stones, gravel Office: sand, tiles, bricks, garden earth, 318 Calle Laguna, Manila and shell for tennis courts. Residence: Parafiaque Rizal ~~~Parafiaque, Rizal f Main Store: Branch Store: IBaclaran, Parafiaque, CR Z U O Cor. Rizal Avenue & Rizal Blumentritt,- Manila Tel. 5-17-98 SU P YTel. 2-52-70 Motorists' Headquarters F. B. CRUZ, Prop. & Mgr. Central Office: 4th Floor, Leyva Bldg., 227 David St., Manila Tel. 2-80-38,ARAGON' Dressmaking all kinds of Fe miine modes Graduated Phil. Women's University ~~ Nov. 4, 1933 PURIFICACION Baclaran, Parafiaque, MALAYA, DRY CLEANING and LAUNDRY65 Real, Baclaran, P~arafiaque, Rizal CATALINO DE LEON Prop. Carpintero y Galapatero,. Rizal 107 -

Page  108 DR. GuiLLERmo C. TORRES NURSE AND DENTIST Baclaran Parafiaque Rizal Dra. LEDoNCIA LoPEZ DE LEON DENTISTA FARM. NTRA. SRA. DE BUENSUCESO M. S. LOPEZ DE LEON Farmnaceu tica Parafiaque, Rizal DRA. SEVERA B. GUTIERREZ DEN:TIST Baclaran Parafiaque Rizal FARMACIA "ANG LUNAS" San Dionisio, Parafiaque, Rizal ALICIA LAQUINDANUM Fa~rmaceutica FARMACIA BERNABE Parafiaque, Rizal Ldo. AGUEDO BERNABE Propietario-Gerente BOTICA REYES Parafiaque, Rizal PERFECTO REYES DE LEON Farmaceutico ANG INAM SINELASAN ni MANUEL RODRIGUEZ Calle Real Parafiaque Rizal MISS SEGUNDINA, VIZCARRA EMBROIDERY CONTRACTOR and DESIGNER Real No. 16.Parafiaque Baclaran Rizal 108

Page  109 Pasay The Municipal Building.PASAY Location: On the coast road 6 miles SW. of Pasig. Geographically, 14~ 33' lat., 121~ 00' longitude. Population: 33,310; during 1918-18,697; in 1902-9,825. HISTORY: Pasay is one of the most populated towns in the province and the residential place of many prominent men of Manila. It was formerly a barrio of Malate and was founded by a Tagalog princess of that name, daughter of King Lukban or Lakandakan, King of South Tondo, resident of Suaboy (now Sta. Ana). She was one of the first converts to Christianity and was baptized as Dominga Custodio. Austin Craig remarked that Pasay, the Provincial metropolis, began as the Javan Pasar, a corruption of the Arabic "bazar" and so appropriate for a town which was always a market place. According to Cavada, it was founded in 1727 and separated from Malate in 1815. In 1863 the residents petitioned the central government to change the name of the town to Pineda in honor of Don Cornelio Pineda, a Spanish horticulturist in Singalong who was their benefactor, a friend and a proprietor. The name Pasay was reconsidered in Aug. 4, 1901 by the municipal council. Pasay Beach is a retreat where the sea breezes spell health. The well known Manila Polo Club is situated in Pasay. The Nautical School, School of the Deaf and Blind, and Camp Nichols are situated also in this municipality. Territory: Area-1,950 Ha.; Barrios-Malibay, San Isidro, San Jose, San Rafael, San Roque, Santa Clara, and San Juan. Industry: Soap-making, shoe-making, cigar-making, flower raising, fire crackers factory, farming and fishing. 109

Page  110 DR. ENGRACIA GATDULA LADY-DENTIST 348 Libertad, Pasay, Rizal ARCADJO, HILARIO Academic Cutter 549 Burgos, Pasay, Rizal DR. ALBERTO ESCALA DENTIST Pyorrhea Operation and Oral Diseases 282 Libertad, Pasay, Rizal Just in front of Pasay Market. P. TOLENTINO, GENT'S TAILOR C. TO0LENTINO, S. TOLENTINO, Maniager. Proprietor. 375 Libertad. Pasay. Rizal ANG HJYAS PLATERIA, DORADISTA Y CHINELERIA Nagbibili at Bumibili ng Hiyas PILAR S. INOCENCIO, Proprietor. 330 Libertad, *Pasay, Rizal CORTEZ. DRY CLEANING AND LAUNDRY 3635 Taft Ave. Ext., Pasay, Rizal Branch: Cortez Dry Cleaning & Laundry Libertad, Pasay, Rizal We accept C. 0. D. orders ERA'S PHOTO "KABJNATAAN" Developing and Printing Shoe & Slipper Manufacturer _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _F. C. E R A Prop. FLORENTINO C. ERA 24 F. B. Harrison, Pasay, Rizal Master Cutter ERA'S FASHION TAILORING 26 F. B. Harrison Pasay, Rizal 110

Page  111 (MANUEL LOPA,, Mgr. a-n4 Pr-op.) MAIN STORE: Corner Azearraga and Juan Luna-Tel. 49-6-47 BRANCH: 500 502 Azcarraga, Manila-Tel. 48-6-87 EVERY THING FOR YOUR CAR TIRE AND TUBES AUTO ACCESSCRtII TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT GASOLINE AND C FORD AND CHEVROLET PARTS BATTERIES AND ELECTRICAL SERVICE ES' ' 1IL THE PHIL. NET & BRAID MFG. CO., INC. 343 Juan, Luna, Manila MGA MANGJNGISDA: Bilhin ninyo ang aming mga lambat at sinulid na marea "PEZ" at "CHINCHORRO" na siyang pinakamabuti sa lahat.I Drink for LIfe Remember Your Best Place - ORIENTA~44L CSAF MARIANo TRINIDAD, Prop. 9 pelo Cruz, Pasay 111

Page  112 BOTICA NTRA. SRA. DE LOS ANGELES 176-178 F. B. Harrison Pasay, Rizal RICARDO CASAS Pharmacist Tel. 5-12-93 NATIONAL WATCH REPAIRING AQUILINO C. DEL MUNDO (Watch-maker & Prop.) 834 F. B. Harrison Tel. 5-16-63 Formerly with "EL PORVENIR" 160 Escolta Manila "LAS DALAGAS" Goldsmith Engraver B. FELICIANA, Prop. 338 F. B. Harrison Pasay Rizal Tailor makes man:If you want to know this truth, drop now in our tailoring. ALHAMBRA'S TAILORING PEDRO ALHAMBRA Master Cutter 157 Libertad, Pasay, Rizal BALITE DRY CLEANING LAUNDRY ELENA ALVARAN. Prop. 80 Domingo, Pasay, Rizal TIMOTEO MANALO and SONS TAILORING 339 F. B. Harrison, Pasay, Rizal (Ex-Master Cutter and Tailor of Roberts Inc., Manila) Try usWe are always up-to-date with the latest fashion of Manila. We cut all kinds of suitings for men, women and children. SASTR3RIA LIGAYA Ma. REMEDIOS SANTOS DE MALONES Maestra Cortadora 21 David, Pasay, Rizal BULAKERA RESTAURANT AND PANCITERIA (The place where People Meet to Eat) We sell undress chicken, fresh butter, imported fish, fruits and drinks. Never forget not to come in this place after you have been in the Beach and try our Panclt and Sandwiches. 825 F. B. Haarrison Near Pasay Beach Call up Tel. 5-15-63 for your order. 112

Page  113 i N, Aurora ice Drop A5urora I ce Drop PILAR RAMOS,.Prop. 328 Libertad, Pasay, Rizal 113

Page  114 M"-\-ercy Hospital 810 F. B. Harrison, Pasay, Rizal Exciusivamente para Casos Qtiirurgicos y Partos Exclusively for Surgical and Maternity cases DR. VICENTE S. GRANADOS23 MEDICO-CIRUJANO 1282 Libertad Pasay, Rizal I ~~Tel. 5-14-85 DR. JUAN SALCEDO, JR. MEDICO-CIRUJANO Rlesidencia: 158 Libertad, Pasay, Rizal, Tel. 5-15-77 Horas de Consulta: 11:00-12:00 A. M. 5:00- 7:00 P. M. DR. GREGORIO G. DELGADO0 MEDICO-CIRUJANO Res.' 428 F. B. Harrison, Pasay, Rizal Tel. 5-21-73 "ANG SULIHIA" Taller de Muebles y Reparacion de Cil'ugias 399 F. B. Harrison FARMACIA AURORA (Laboratorio Tolentino) 430 F. B. Harrison Pasay, Rizal DR. REMIGio A. BAUTISTA SPECIALIST IN VISUAL DEFECTS 225 Libertad, Pasay, Rizal Tel. 5-15-78 114

Page  115 DR. MATIAS A. FELIX DENTIST-SURGEON Mouth's diseases-Teeth Gums and Pyorrhea Dental Clinic: 833 F. B. Harrison Corner Libertad, Pasay, Rizal Office Hours: 8:00-12:00 A. M. 3:00- 7:00 P. M. DR. ALBERTO ESCALA DENTIST 282 Libertad, Pasay, Rizal Just infront of Pasay Market FARMACIA SAN JOSE 282 Libertad, Pasay EUGENIA PESTARAS (Prop.) DR. P. A. IGNACIO Dentist Prophylactic treatment and Surgery of Pyorrhea DR. FORTUNATO GASCON DENTAL CLINIC At the terminal of the Manila Electric Car and Auto Bus Line beside the Pasay Transportation Company station. 768 F. B. Harrison Pasay Rizal ~ WHOOPEE CABARET The Best Place in Rizal to Enjoy and Dance... Where Excellent Music-Selected Partners — Festive Atmosphere are always guaranteed every night. -Owned and Patronized by Filipinos WHOOPEE CABARET Pasay: Rizal ISIDORO M. REYES Gen. Mgr. PBABLO RIVERA Proprietor 115

Page  116 ANG PASAY ZAPATERIA Y CHINELERIA,de P. S. PILAR,340 F. B. Harrison Pasay Rizal Tels. 5-66-93 5-12-14 GUILLERMO B. GUEVARA ABOGADO Office:- Residence: 727 Florida Cuneta, Pasay, Rizaj FARMACIA NEPOMUCENO 1161 Libertad, Pasay Tel. 5-15-92 TEa~ixro NBPomUCENO, JR. Prop. and Pharnvacist UNION DRUG STORE 590 F. B. Harrison Pasay, Rizal MR. CRISANTO DAVID Manufactutring Chemist LIMBO BR)OTHERS ITAILORING I "Maker of fine suits Iextra made 24 hours. M. J. LIMBO Ma~ster Cuttter Residence: 540 Burgos, Pasay, Rizal MODERN PRESS COMMERCIAL PRINTERS AND BOOKBINDERS 347 F. B. Harrison Pasay, Rizal L. T. CRUZ, Mgr. Tel. 5-16-93 513 Leveriza Tel. 5-12-75 Pasay, Rizal Ncttionrtl Soft Drinks Ang inuming nagbibigay ng kasiyahan sa lalo mang pihikang panlasa. M. G. JIMENEZ, Prop. PASAY CENTRAL BOWLING & HALL JOSE PABLO, Mgr. 205-207 Libertad, Pasay Tel. 5-22-87 '116

Page  117 ILA VENTURINA I I PLATE RIA I y IRELOJERIA ITIBURCIO LAZARO, Prop. 486 F. B. Harrison, Pasay, Rizal Venta de Brillantes, Perlas, y Piedras Faises "ROCOR"- DRY CLEANING & LAUNDRY Oatr Service Means Satisfactio-a MRS. FELICIANA RODRIGUEZ Prop. 386 F. B. Harrison, Pasay, Rizal SAMAHANG FUNERARIA MALAYA VICTORJO VITO CRUZ, PE.DRO SANCHEZ, ADRIANO CUENCA Props. Libertad No. 139-141 Pasay Tel. 5-14-34 Se Reciben Gbras Por Contrata TABLERTA de AGATONA C. SANTOS 411 y 415 F. B. Harrison Pasay, Rizal VIDAL'S DRESSMAKER Bleading and Vainica, 145 Libertad Pasay, Rizal ROMAN CRuz TAILORING ROMAN CRUZ, Prop. 36 F. B. Harrison, Pasay, Rizal LEOFEL'S SHOP DRESSMAKER The Right Style and Price Perfect Satisfaction Guaranteed Provincial Orders Accepted 34 F. B. Harrison, Pasay, Rizal PACITA's BEAUTY PARLOR and DRESSMAKER PAZ MENDOZA, Prop. 401'F. B. Harrison, Pasay, Rizal 117

Page  118 RIZAL GROCERY and COLD STORES 600 F.B. I IMPORTERS larrison, Pasay Tels. 5-17-77 & 5-18-72 QUALITY FOOD PRODUCTS FANCY GOCERIES WINES & LIQUORS CIGAR & CIGARETTES We always keep a complete assortment of fresh stocks Weekly shipments of fresh fruits & vegetables from the States and Baguio PRIME IMPORTED MEATS FISHI, POULTRY & GAME DAIRY PRODUCTS FRESH FRUIT & VEGETABLES Open all days of the week Schedule of Delivery: "Every hour on the hour" Prompt and Courteous Service "Quality plus Service" Subscribe Now... To our next publication — "LEADERS OF RIZAL".,.........., 118

Page  119 I I i v i I Pasig!! ~ ~. *. *.: Air view~ of the town Plaza in Pasig, called Plaza 'Rizal. The building pointed by the ar'-ow is the "Presidencw.a. PASIG Locution: The capital of the Province and well-known road center. A place of an important traffic about 1 mile East of Pasig River. Geographically, 14~ 33' lat., 121~ 05' longitude. Population: 21,291; during 1918-16,787; in 1902-12,000. HISTORY: Pasig, one of the oldest towns in the Province, has its origin from the word "Pasigan" meaning a low muddy place near the river. Another legend more popular about its origin relates to the rather romantic tale about the town lovers who were Virgilio and Paz. Recently, Dr. Craig stated in the press that Pasig, like the short but important river of the same name, came originally from the Malayan name Pasir, anciently from Borneo and meaning "Sand". Pasig was founded in 1572 and its first inhabitants came from Cainta. The Chinese uprising in 1639 was the occasion of more or less serious disturbances in various places and the burning of the church of Pasig. At the battle of Maybunga between the Spaniards and the British in 1762, the Spaniards were defeated and forced to retire in Marikina. Anda, in his attempt-to starve the British and force their withdrawal, detailed a Spanish force in Pasig to pevent the transportation of provisions from Laguna to Manila, whlre I i I -. 9 -.. (-119~ I

Page  120 upon the British Commander, Backhouse, sent troops to dislodge them. Pasig was also one of the places where the first bloodshed occurred in the revolution. In 1898-1900, the town of Pasig was destroyed and the archives of the tribunal and the church were burned. The most bloody battle was fought by the Katipuneros and the Americans on Christmas eve, near the present Victoria Theatre. Territory: Area-1,840 Ha.; Barrios-Poblacion, San, Jose, Bagong Ilog, Bambang, Buting, Caniogan, Capasigan, Malinao, Maybunga, Ugong, Palatiw, Pinagbuhatan, Pineda. Rosario, Sagad, San Joaquin, San Miguel, San Nicolas, Bagong Katipunan, Santolan, Santo Tomas, and Sumilang. Industry: Pottery-making, fishing, farming, embroidery, dry goods industry and quarrying stones. BIGASANG MAIRGAT Rosario, Pasig, Rizal Tumatanggap ng Lagak na PROF. ROSARIO GARCIA palay at pinananagutan ayon sa School of Dressmaking kapalakaran ng "Bureau of City Office: Commerce."ty Oce: r ---~. -1618 Dominga, Malate, Manila MAINGAT TRANSPORTATION Tel. 5-60-38 Binangonan-Manila Branch Office: at Antipolo Special EVARISTO B. GUTIERREZ, Prop. Infront of the Provincial Capitol Kinatawan ng Pasig, Rizal SOCONY VACUUM MONTANO SANTOS AGHANAPIN Land & Water Transportation ZAPATERIA Y CHINELERIA MbNTANO SANTOS ZAPATERIA Y CHINELERIA MIIONTANO SANTOS FILLING CONTRACTOR PEDRO GERONIMO, Selling Gravel, Sand, Cement, (Prop.) Tiles, etc. Tels. 2-22-12 565 Echague Rotonda, Pasig, Rizal 2-87-79 Quiapo, Manila Your Best Photographer... SAN JUAN STUDIO Pasig, Rizal 120

Page  121 OUR HIGH INSTITUTION OF LEARNING i I i I The Rizal High School, situated in the Capital of the Province "Youth will never live to age imnless they keep themselves in health with exercise and in heart with joyfulness." -QUOTED.... In heart with joyfulnessYes, with a perfected likeness of you, artfully done for life - YOUR PHOTOGRAPH - is the most precious gift to yourself and to your dear ones. WHEN You want your picture well taken, you will do well to see us at any time SAN JUAN STUDIO (Open Day and Night) J. G. SAN JUAN, Prop. Pasig, Rizal. WTe are the official photographer of this DIRECTORY this year. 121

Page  122 Dr. ESTEBAN M. SANTOS DENTIST Pasig Rizal Dr. TRINIDAD GUANO DENTAL SURGEON P. Burgos St. Pasig, Rizal Dr. HERMINJO SANTOS DENTIST-SURGEON Pasig i.Rizal Dr. MARIANO F. JAVIER DENTAL SURGEON Pyorrhea Treatments Dental Clinic: Farmacia Rizal Pasig, Rizal Branch: Taytay, Rizal DR. MAXIMO FLORES DENTIST 62 J. Luna Pasig, Rizal DR. C'ELESTINO GOMEZ DENTAL SURGEON Pyorr-hect Treatment David, No. 7. Escolta, Manila Tel. 2-72-54 DR. FRANCISCO P. LAZARD SURGEON-DENTIST Clinic: 552 Rizal Ave. R-214, Padilla Bldg. Residence: 48 J. Luna St. Pasig, Rizal DR.- FIDEL P. CRUZ I DENTISTA Pasig Rizal 122

Page  123 DR. CESAR UMALY Midico-Physician 57 A. Luna Pasig, Rizal DRt. Luis DAMIAN MWdlco-Cirujano I -.1436 'I erran, Paco ~Manila DR. BENJAMIN CIFRA. MEDICO DR. SEBASTIAN REYES m~clico-Cirujaflo.Plaza Rizal Pasig, Rizal Pasig Rizal DR. B. M. VILLAPANDO Specialists Eye, Ear, Nose & Throat Tonsil, operation in 2 minutes CONSULT: 8-12 a. ~m. —1-4 p. m. Of fice: Residence: Alberto Bldg. 6th Street Quiapo, Manila Pasig, Rizal Tel. 2-50-87 DR. JOSE DIMANLIG MEDICO Pasig Rizal Tel. 2-50-87 DR. MOISES M. SANTOS Medico-Cirujanlo 62 J. Luna Pasig, Rizal Drz. 'ISAAc EUSTAQ~UIO Phys ician-Sutrgeon SpecialistI in Children Diseases 9:00-12:00 A. M. A., Mabini Pasig, Rizal 123

Page  124 YANGCO'S TRY=TRAN An efficient and economic land transportation service is maintained in the Province of Rizal by the Try-Tran land and water transportation, owned and operated by Teodoro R. Yangco. This firm, owned by the foremost Filipino philantropist and shipping magnate, owns a number of steamers plying in many parts of the islands. The Try-Tran has a very efficient land as well as water transportation service. About four years ago it acquired, the Zamibales line, and true to its policy of expansion, the Try-Tran also acquired, recently, the Pililla-Tanay line in Rizal and the Santa Maria (Laguna) line via Santa Cruz and Pagsanjan, besides operating a Taxicab and Garage Service in Manila and suburbs. The firm owns and operates, at present 120 passenger buses and 14 freight buses or all its lines. These transportation vehicles arc supplemented by an automobile and truck shop situated near the main office and drydock in Navotas, Rizal. The shop rivals the best, in equipment and reliability, in the Islands. It has a first class upholstery department and the apparatus necessary for any repairing, raging from the fixing of a plug to the construction of a bus' whole body. The drydock altho actually closed for outside bids, remains ever ready to cure any ailment which the firm's ship may suffer. At the central office, 421 M. de la Industria. is Ramon L. Corpus, general manager and right hand man of Mr. Yangco, who commandeers the numerous employees of the firm. It is estimated that over 500 persons are employed in the different departments of the firm at present. Undoubtedly interest in the welfare of his employees, Mr. Yangco has a doctor, with clinic in the main office, from whom the employees and their families received medical assistance and medicine free of charge. Other officials of the Try-Tran are Ventura Loreto, assistant general manager; Amado Pineda, superintendent of the taxi and garage department; Ramon Magsaysay, superintendent of shops; Arturo S. Corpus, chief inspector of the shipping department; Nicolas Guerrero, chief clerk of the shipping department; and Esteban Salcedo, cashier. "Small Profit and Good Service" is the slogan of the firm, to which it owes its popularity and success. Mr. Yangco, a Christian gentleman, constantly reminds his co-workers and associated in busines of the following line from Frank Irving Fletcher, posted at the main office: DISCOURTESY is a species of DISHONESTY COURTESY is not a concession It is an obligation. FOR ECONOMY AND STYLE DON'T FAIL TO SEE US... J. V. RODRIGUEZ FASHION Gents Tailoring 4 Plaza Rizal Pasig, Rizal EL MICAEL Relojeria, Plateria y Joyeria de JOSE B. MICAEL J. Lune St., Pasig, Rizai 124 A

Page  125 (TEODO RO R. YANGCO) Land &L Wvater Transportation Main &f fice: 421 Muelle de la Industria P. 0. Box 829-Manila Mianila Service: TAXI-CABS GARAGE CARS AUTO-CALESAS Shipping Lines: Autobus, Lines: CAVITE IGUAGUA BATAAN ZAMBALES RIZALe-LAGUNA ILOCOS Sure-Courteous and Comfortable Service MAIN OFFICE Phone 2-19-56 AZCARRAGA STATION Phone 4-97-38 QUINTA STATION Phone 2-16-17 I 125

Page  126 FACUNIDO SAN AGUSTIN Abogado y Notario Pgtblico Pasig Rizal MARIANO MELENDRES Abogado —Notario Thiblico Oficina:101 Nueva y Escolta Tel. 2-54-29 Residencia: Pasig, Rizal BENEDICTO JAVIER Abogado-Notario Pz~tblico Oficina: Residencia: 444 Ave. Rizal Pasig, Rizal Tel. 2-13-87 Lucio JAVILLONAR ATTORNEY-AT-LAW NOTARY PUBLIC 134 Arzobispo, Intramuros Manila Tel. 2-71-69 DEMETRilo G. POZON A ttorney-at-Law Notary Public Law Office: Fernandez Bldg. 124 T. Pinpin, Manila Tel. 2-39-90 Residence: 2 Vision, Rizal Park Provincial Residence: Pasig, Rizal Comnplimnefts of NICANOR A. ROXAS Atto~rney-at-Lau' Pasig Rizal MANUEL GA. GAvIERES ATTORNEY-AT-LAW NOTARY PUBLIC Pa~sig Rizal LEANDRO JABSON ABOGADO NOTARIO PUBLICO Pasig Rizal 126

Page  127 "As unto the bow the chord is, So is man unto womtan Useless each withovt the other." -Longfellow So is Furniture to your Home!... We have all kinds of Furniture Ready made or made to order. 0 Easy And Painless Use-As-You-Pay Plan, Liberal Discounts For CASH Pasig Furniture 28 Juan Luna Street, Pasig, Rizal PIO S. RAYMUNDO Prop. & Gen. Manager Mail Order Service-Free Delivery 127

Page  128 ROTONDA ELECTRIC SUPPLY Rotouida, Pasig, Rizal Near the Street car We sell electrical fixtures. including quality bulbs "MALTWANAG" We stall electric wirings at low rates. VEDASTO BERNARDO, Ma~r. MEDARDO N. GOMEZ Certified Pubiic Accountant Office: 65 Juan Luna, Manila Tel. 2-38-84 SIXTO VILLANUEVA Naglalaba at nagkukulay ng lahat rig uri ng darnit rig lalaki at babae at iba pa. BASTIDURAN 39 A. Mabini, Pasig, Rizal Nagpapa~arkila ng bisekl eta sa lahat "SUMILANG" Fabrica de Aguas Gascosas DOMINGA ALVAREZ (Prop.) Sumilang, Pasig Rizal EL MONTE DE ORO Jewelry and Gold Silver Smith Engraving, Goldplating and nickel work. 3 A.' Luna St. Pasig, Rizal MAXIMIANO ESTEBAN Owner and Manager ALBAYANA TAILORING DRY CLEANING MR. ANGEL GONZALES Cutter MRS. TECLA GONZALES Designer Malinao Pasig, Rizal ESTEBAN SUNGA ITAILORING Fit and Elegance Characterize our Work Rotonda, Pasig, Rizal SAN LORENZO'S TAILO~RING Clothing Perf ection; all Latest Styles from Europe and America. Work Guaranteed. ALFONSO LORENZO, Prop. 51 A. Mabini IPasig, Rizalj 128

Page  129 Pateros The Municipal Building PATEROS Location: On the bank of the Pasig River, 2 miles from the outlet of Laguna de Bay and 11/, miles SW. of Pasig. Geographically, 14~ 33' lat., 121~ 04' longitude. Population: 6,618; during 1918-4,113; in 1903-4,105. HISTORY: Pateros is the leading "Balut" producing region in the Philippines and the pioneer of this note-worthy industry not found elsewhere in the world. "Pato" is the origin of the word "Pateros" The town was founded in 1901, according to Cavada. Pateros was formerly known as "Agoho", a barrio of Pasig. In 1819, a cholera epidemic occured during the administration of Captain Antonio de Luna. Some of the gallant sons of Pateros during the revolution were Sinforoso Tuazon and Leonardo Ison who were wounded in the battle at Zapote and Pasong Tamo. Territory: Area-900 Ha.; Barrios —Poblacion, Agoho, Santa Ana and Santo Rosario. Industry: "Balut-making", farming, fishing, slipper and shoemaking, bettle-nut growing and embroidery. 1 129

Page  130 HISTORIA BREVE DE LA FABRICA DE BALDOZAS Y FOGOiNES "MAYON" D1&C., TUASON E, HIJOS Inducidos, por el gran deseo de independizarse y Filipinizar nuestras industrias y comercio Don Ciriaco Tuason despuds de haberse separado del servicio del gobierno, de los. EE. UU. de Amikica en Filipinas fund6 la F~ibrica de Baldozas y Fogones. MAYON bajo el nombre dci C. Tuasoii e Hijos en la calle Agno Niuins. 1174-1188 del distrito. de Malate de la ciudad de Manila el afio 1921. En los primeros cinco afios, tropez6' con muchos inconvenientes porque los equipos de la ffdbrica eran unas maquinarias, de sencilla construcci6n de la propia invencion de Don Ciriaco, y desde luego la producci6n Ilegaba solamente a P200,000.00 al afio. Despue's de cinco alios de continua lucha salv6' los enormes escollos que salian a su. paso habiendo conseguido modernizar los equipos. de su Pibrica equipaindola con niodernos aparatos y maquinarias con que. producir baldosas, nmosaicos, tubos, de ceniento, ladrillos, canales, bloques, tejas, balaustres, floreras, escaleras marmolizadas y otros articulos de cemento. La producci6n actual oscila de P500,000.00 a P800,000.00 al aiio. Adema's de los ya nombrados artliculos, Don Ciriaco, guiado por su vivo deseo de minintizar Los articulos de importacio'n, invent6 los ahora farosos. fogones MAYON sin humo, patentado en Washington, D. C. Am~rica con el Ntim. 1706943 y registrado en la Oficina del Bur6 de Comercio de Filipinas bajo el Niim. 9536. La conce~si6n del patente es testinionio de la excelencia, alta calidad y m~rito del fog6n MAYON sin mencionar ya las. varias medallas de oro y diplomas ganadas en varias exposiciones, del pais que podrian constituir otra prueba de la eficiencia del fog6n MAYON, y que con esto su use va generalizaindose en todos los. rincones del Archiphilago. Actualmente tenemos instalados, muchos de estos fogones en varios hospitales provinciales y asilos, en las escuelas. y colegios do ciencias dom~sticas, en Los conventos, en Los cuarteles de La'policia insular, y en otras varias organizaciones. En los, comienzos de la fabricaci6n, la producci6n Ilegaba 'solamente a 500 fogones, al afio porque el mercado estaba -inundado de cocinas importadas, del extranjero; pero a los doce afio~s de lucha la demand-a de los fogones MAYON lleg6 a aumentarse con~siderablemente que Los obreros de la faibrica tuvieron que trabajar aia y noche para que la producci6n anual sea de 1,500 a 2,000 fogones. Don Ciriaco es natural de Pateros, Rizal. ABELARDO P. GONZALES SURGEON DENTIST Clinics: Pateros Pasig II Taguig Pateros Rizal PATEROS DRUG STORE Pateros, Rizal DELFINA TANGCO PHARMACIST 130

Page  131 I. I I FOR,ARTISTIC~ FOUNT.AINS I II' I 11 I.ConsultTUA SONT -te Manuf acturer 114 ~of Tiles and MAYON STOVES r~~~~~~~~~ Arti Brie BRI Cern Cemn Cern Deec Drir Gar( Directory of Tuason Products stic Fountains Granolithic Stair RICHUELA, beanI ks of Cement Cases Rice Laundry Stare] LLO Floor Wax- Granolithie Tiles RIMAIZ, corn floui,ent Balusters MAYON Stoves RIMONGO, mo'ngo ~ent Pipes Mosaic Tiles RNGImlg ~ent Statues Ornamental Cement RNGImlg )rative Urns Mouldings flour iking Fountains Pedestals RINAROZ, rice flo len Benches Tiles ~Iour Flour kit ur C. TASON v HIJOS 1178 Agno, Malate Manila.'512 Azcarraga 131

Page  132 THE DUCK INDUSTRY ALWAYS associated with the towns of Pateros and Tagig is the duck industry, which was said to have been begun by Chinese traders even before the Spanish conquest of the islands. From Rizal, duck raising spread to Laguna, Bulacan and Pampanga. The region about Pateros and Tagig is well adopted for duck raising by reason of its natural drainage facilities and the abundance of streams from where "susu" (Vivipara an'/ularis, Miller and Melania sp.), a certain species of mollusks which serves as duck food, could be obtained. In 1918, there were estimated to be 15,320 ducks in Pateros, 10,158 in Tagig, 4,260 in Binangonan, and 4,149 in Jalajala. The ducks are raised chiefly for their eggs. The "balut" is an egg that has been incubated for from 16 to 19 days letting the chick to develop. It is boiled hard and sold in railroad stations and Manila. The egg costs 5 centavos each on the average. The "penoy" is an infertile egg that has been under incubation for about 13 days and boiled. It sells at 3 centavos each. The fresh duck's eggs are sold in Manila and used in restaurants, bakeries and in homes. Duck raising is a growing and profitable industry. In the towns of Pateros and Tagig, the ducks are cared for in groups averaging 100 birds with a ratio of one male and nine females. They are penned in long yards about 10 x 4 meters and have access to running water where they swim and eat the suso given them or the regular ration of unhusked rice. At night, they are kept in a low-built house, usually of nipa and bamboo, with a raised clay floor covered with rice hulls or straw. The yards are fenced with bamboo at a height of 30 to 40 centimeters. The care of the duck and the incubation of eggs both need daily undivided attention. BANDA NATIN.Pateros, Rizal DRA. TRINIDAD R. ANGELES Isang Bandang binubuo ng apat napu at dalawang katao, sa DENTIST ilalim ng pamamahala ni G. Santiago Alejo ng Banda ng Constabularia. Tumatanggap ng asistencia sa lalong mababang halaga. P Pateros, Rizal DR. L. ROSALES May-ari. GREGORIO CASTILLO ', ' ' ATTORNEY-AT-LAW Pateros Rizal 132

Page  133 DR. JOSE A. MENDIOLA PHYSICIAN-SURGEON GENERAL MEDICINE Pateros Rizal DR. FERNAND~o D. MANALO0 PHYSICIAN-SURGEON Practice Limited to Surgery Phil. General Hospital Floor 15 7:30-10:30 A. M. P. Y. Herrera, Pateros 4-6 P. M. Residence: 345 F. B. Harrison,, Pasay, Rizal Tel. 5-16-93 DR. CRISANTO DE BORJA PHYSICIAN-SURGEON Treatmnent of Children's diseases and Hcinnoroids without operation. Consultation: 8:00-1:00 P. M. Pateros, Rizal DR. EUSEBJO, A. SAEZ DENTAL SURGEON IClinic: Cu Unjieng Bldg.-Room 213 Residence: Pateros, Rizal 0. i FARMACIA FLORES Pateros, Rizal INOCENCIO FLORES Pharm~acist DR. TOMAS G. ALMEDA DENTIST Pateros Rizal DR~. ANACLETO SANCHEZ DENTAL SURGEON Pateros Rizal 133

Page  134 MAPALAD BAKERY T. TUAZI'O14, Prop. Pateros~, Rizal Mayroon, ding pinakamalaking Pagawaan rig itlog n4 ~Balot ria kilala sa-tawag na "BALUT FACTORY AND DUCK RAISING" May Estacion rig Gasolina na handang maglingkod sa lahat ng oras. THE MODERN ART Dntfogt GOLD SMITH SAN JUAN STUDIO WATCH REPAIRING J. G. SAN JUAN, (Prop.) G. G. RAYMUNDO, Pi-op. Almeda, Pateros, RizalPagRia FOR THE FUTUR~E PROGRESS OF RIZAL PROVINCE'omnplimentts EMILIANO ALMEDA (Mu-nicipa~l President, 1931-.34) Pateros, Rizal 134'

Page  135 Pililla. The Municipal Building PILILLA Location: On the NW. Coast of the central portion of Laguna de Bay, 17 miles SE. of Pasig. Geographically, 14~ 29' lat., 121~ 18' longitude. Population: 4,227; during 1918 —3,580; in 1903-2,859 (with Quisao). HISTORY: Pililla came from the word "Pila" due to the fact that residents from Pila, Laguna, in olden days traded with the natives of this place and some stayed permanently to engage in the fishing industry. Founded in 1583 according to Cavada. The first "visita" was called "Pilang-Morong" in honor of "Santa Maria Magdalena". The forest and mountains of Pililla are very rich in natural resources. Not only lumber but also rattan and bamboo are found abundantly on the hilly sides. The "Kaingin System", which is an old method of agriculture is still practised in high places by the mountaineers. The famous Pililla hats are made of sabutan. Hat weaving is the best household industry especially among the youth. Territory: Area-9,400 Ha.; Barrios-Poblacion, Dolores, Ibayo, Quisao, San Francisco, San Juan, San Lorenzo, San Pedro, San Roque and Santa Marta. Industry: Farming, fishing, hat-making and lumbering. 135

Page  136 Compliments of th e DAVID',S PHARMACY JOSE J. DAVID, Ph.C., Pi-op. DR. MARCELO C. ANGANGCO, M.D. DR. REGINA FLORA, D.D.S. Rizal St. Pililla, Rizal Compli'ments of FILOMENA C. ANGANGCO, B. S. E. (U. P.) Philippine Normal School Manila Pililla Rizal Compliments of ISIDRO C. ANCANGCO, LI. B. Bureau of Customs Manila Pililla Rizal SAN?., cJUAN,.* CABARET "Sure-fit." Environment for Discriminating Joy-Seekers PRIMO SAN PEDRO SAN JUAN, RIZAL, (Operator and Manager) Tel. 6-88-42 136

Page  137 San Juan The Municipal Building SAN JUAN Location: On the left bank of the tributary of the Pasig River, 71/2 miles NW. of Pasig. Geographically, 14~ 36' lat., 121~ 02' longitude. Population: 14,272; during 1918-6,172; in 1903-1,455. HISTORY: San Juan del Monte, formerly a barrio of Santa Ana, is now considered a metropolis next to Pasay. It was organized as a municipality in 1783. The name is derived from the Patron Saint San Juan and del Monte often annexed to it was named after the hilly structure of the land. The church was burned by the Chinese pirates in 1639 but it was re-established in 1896. San Juan was the cradle of the Philippine Revolution although Caloocan and Pasig were the first towns to witness bloodshed. The increasing population of the town is due to the attractive prices of the land offered by the new rapidly growing residential subdivisions of San Juan Heights, Manila Heights, San Francisco del Monte Heights, Addition Hills, New Manila, Rosario Heights, etc. Among the well-known establishments are: Robert Dollar Radio Transmitting Station, Wack Wack Golf and Country Club and Malayan Pictures Corporation. Territory: Area-2,700 Ha.; Barrios-Poblacion, Andres Bonifacio, Ermitano, N. Domingo, Rincon, San Francisco del Monte, Sapang Camias, Sulapan and Tibagan. Industry: Farming, stone quarrying, shoe-making, manufacturing and dairy industry. I 137

Page  138 SAN JUAN HEIGHTS The San Juan Heights Company began its subdivision in August 1920 subdividing the old Dominican Estate which comprised all the residence lots then constituting the town of San Juan del Monte. There was a great demand for lots due to the fact that many people could only rent from the larger estates surrounding Manila and to the delightful location for homes in San Juan. The Company went about its development in a very complete and thorough manner, immediately constructing roads and installing water mains and electric lights. Their policy was well received and several thousand people established their homes in San Juan, many of them being the very best type of citizens including the very highest officials of the Insular government. San Juan gained in population from a fourth class to a first class municipality in only a few years. The Company later began building homes for sale to people who wished a complete home payable on the installment basis. This policy was also popular and about a hundred and fifty homes were built and sold. The- Comipany has always tried to deal fairly with its purchasers valueing good will and confidence very highly. This policy has also brought good results. Even during the depression altho many adjustments of contracts were necessary very few of our buyers have failed to retain their interest and ultimately pay for their lots. The Company takes pride in its successful subdivision and will proceed with others in the vicinity as fast as the growing population of Manila will warrant. LA PACITA BAKERY Fabrica de Bizcochos y Dulces Biscuit Especiales. 25 Progreso, San Juan, Rizal Tel. 6-86 33 LUIS MARTINEZ, Prop. PACITA ICE DROP MASARAP, MALINIS AT DALISAY No. 4 N. Domingo, San Juan, Rizal MARCOS DE LA CRUZ, Prop. Our Specialty- Blocking, Bleach;ng of all kinds of work on hat business. Promptrnss, Elegance and Economy EUiRONIO A. JACINTO San Juan-Marikina-Rizal 138

Page  139 I- -- -— c SAN JUAN PHONE 2-15-01 HEIGHTS COMPANY, INC. 680 AVE. RIZAL P. 0. BOX 961 San Juan Heights used to be a health and pleasure resort for the very rich only. That was when fast horses and carriages were the only rapid transportation. It was a rare privilege then to live there.; Now even the poor may have the privilege of a home in San Juan Heights. SAN JUAN HEIGHTS CO. INC. 680 Ave Rizal Manila P. 0. Box 961 Phone 2-15-01 13.9

Page  140 THE SAN FRANCISCO DEL MONTE SUBDIVISION San Francisco del Monte, Inc. took over from John Gordon in 1924, a tract of land of approximately 230 hectares, later increased to nearly 260 hectares by a purchase from the San Franciscan Orden. This tract of land is now known as the Del Monte Subdivision. In Spanish times and even prior to the Spanish occupation, the barrio of San Francisco del Monte was important as being the head of banca transportation on the San Juan River. The church and convent was constructed nearly three centuries ago and were utilized as a place of retreat and vacation by the members of the Order. In and about the barrio are many interesting relics of the Spanish and Pre-Spanish civilization. During the Philippine Revolution the barrio was burned and in fact from the time of the American occupation until the launching of the Subdivision, the barrio was inhabited by only a few families living on the products of the soil. The first sales were made in the Subdivision during the month of December, 1925, and within a year nearly one million square meters were dispatched. On account of its luxuriant vegetation and picturesque surrounding, the place aroused favorable comment from the beginning and in only a few months a small colony of new-comers had been established. The barrio now boasts of a population of nearly 5,000 and is a candidate for admission as a separate municipality. Del Monte has justly been called, "The Subdivision set down in a natural park." LA SAMPAGUITA THE CHIC PANADERIA DRESS MAKING SHOP Y DULCERIA GREGORIO ALCANTARA (Prop.) 46 N. Domingo San Juan 46 N. Domingo San Juan, Rizal Tel. 6-83-12 Rizal r LEONILA'S FASHION and HAT SHOPPE Modista-Dressmaker We sell all kinds of hat for men. We receive blocking and cleaning. LEONILA PATAWARAN, Prop. 37 N. Domingo San Juan Rizal ANDYS MALAYAN FASHION BERNABE Y. CALAQUIAN (Prop. & Cutter) 56 N. Domingo San Juan 140

Page  141 II SAN FRANCISCO DEL MONTE SUB=DIVISION 7 0 C (A CIe Or w Ce LL 0 0 U I One of its beautiful homes Located in the hills fifteen minutes from Plaza Goiti over first class road. The purest water in the Philippine Islands, all from artesian wells. Area of lots to suit the buyer. Prices within the reach of all. We share the profits ewith you. Del Monte Subdivision SAN FRANCISCO DEL MONTE, INC. I Office: 227 Calle David Phone: 2-16-36 141.

Page  142 .Dr. WENCESLAO SALVADOR Medico-Cirujano y Farmaceutico IIHoras de Consulta: 8:00-10:00 A.M. 3:00-5:00 P. M. 70 N. Domingo San Juan Tel. 6-84-32 DR. JOSE F.i SANTOS 1 MEDICO-CIRUJANO Consultas: 8 a 10 a.m. 3 a 5 p.m. 46 N. Domingo, San Juan Residencia: 25 Manuel St. Marikina, Rizal SIAOC'SDRUG STORE 96 N. Domingo, San Juan, Rizal Dr. SEVERO SIASOCO Medico Consulta: 10-11 a.m. 1755 Azcarraga, altos Farmacia Arriola-Tel. 2-30-66 Residencia: 96 N. Domingo, San Juan-Tel. 6-88-30 DR. TEOFILo G,. VERDOTE ~, DENTAL SURGEON Clinic: 'San Juan, Rizal Gasan Marinduque FARMACIA SALVADOR W. SALVADOR, Prop. San Juan del Monte Rizal DR. OCTAVIO G. CARLOS DENTAL SURGEON Residencia: IClinic: Marikina, Rizal Mandaluyong & San Juan del Monte Rizal SADIANG LAAN Chitneleria~ y Zapateria FERMIN ALBERTO, Prop. 23 Blumentritt 770 Legarda San 'Juan, Rizal Manila DR. ALBERTo L. MENDOZA CIRUJANO-DENTISTA Residencia San Roque Marikina. Clnica: 44 N. Domingo San Juan, Rizal 142

Page  143 RICARDO ADRIANO QUIMICO FARMACEUTICO Oficina: Residenciae: ADRIANO'S DRUG STORE 47 M. Salvador & CHEMICAL LABORATORY San Juan del Monte 61 N. Domingo Rizal San Juan del Monte, Rizal Tel. S. J. 6-84-51 RIVERA'S DRY CLEANING LAUNDRY — TAILO RIN"' Free Collection and Delivery. TAI OPI 55 N. Domingo, San Juan, Rizal ALFREDO HALUBER, Prop. 30 N. Domingo, San Juan, Rizal w ~. _....'- ',...... In view of the constant scarcity of young men and, young women with vocational training, the COMMONWEALTH INSTITUTE offers to students in general some of the most practical vocational courses imaginable, such as: ACCOUNTING BANKING FINANCE BOOKKEEPING STENOGRAPHY TYPEWRITING JOURNALISM COMMERCIAL ENGLISH COMMERCE. SALESMANSHIP SPANISH SHORT-STORY WRITING DRESS CUTTING HAND EMBROIDERY DESIGNING SEWING MACHINE OPERATION HOME ECONOMICS MACHINE EMBROIDERY DRESS MAKING CULINARY ART-"COOKING" MESTIZA DRESSMAKING, FILIPINO DRESSMAKING, INTERIOR HOME DECORATION and many others which will be opened or started if there is a sufficient number of students to enroll and form a class. Theory and Practice in every case is the Keynote of our Instruction REGISTRATION and Classes are now open. Please, enroll early so as to avoid the rush and crowding at the last minute. Be sure to bring your friends and relatives so you can form a large, substantial class. For further particulars apply to: COMMONWEALTH INSTITUTE No. 1556 Azcarraga, Sta. Cruz, Manila, P. I. 143

Page  144 Always Keep These Products Of Farinacia Manuel Zamora In Your Home. JIKI-TIKI Manuel Zamora Warning: Beware of other, Tiki-Tiki's with low quality and sells at a low cost. Insist upon TIKI-TIKI MANUEL ZAMORA the original and the best. The original and genuine Tiki-Tiki effective remedy for infantile Beri-Beri. ZA NEURD-VITOL M. Za~mora, Effective in cases of neurasthenia, insomnia, MANurELZY headache, and general debility. ia 96 FORMULA: Glicerofosfato de sosa 40.00 Gin.; Glicerofosf ato de cal 30.00 Gm.; Glicerofosfato, de hierro 30.00 Gm.; -Glicerofosfato de estrienina 0.15 Gm.; Pepsina, pancreatina Iy I TI diastasa aa. 7.00 Gm.; Extracto de tiki-tik'KI-TIKI granulado c.s. 1000.00 Gm. MANUEL ZAMQRA, FOSFATADO ZAMORA JARABE YODD-TDNICD The most effective cure for weakening of the body, rheumatism, anemia and tuberculosis. CASTORIA CON TIKI-TIKI Manuel Zamnorca An effective cure for constipation among children. FORMULA: Pepo seminis Jaf. 55%; Frutus anisi Jnf. 1.%1; Mentha Folium Inf. 0.5;% Senna Fld. Extr. 10%; Bicarbonas sodicus 0.2%/, Sal ex Seignette 3.%/; Tiki-Tiki Fld. Extr. 10%,; Alcohol 2.%,; Syrupus Simplex c.s. Farm-acia de Manuel Zanora 928 R. H idalgo, Quiapo, Manila Tel. 2-65-215 IMPRENTA DE MANUEL ZAMORA PRINTERS-TYPESETTERS-BOOKBINDERS 928 R. Hidalgo, Quiapo, "Manila Tel. 2-65 25 144 -

Page  145 San Mateo The Municipal Building SAN MATEO Location: On the main road north of Montalban, 10 miles north of Pasig. Geographically, 14~ 42' lat., 121~ 07' longitude. Population: 4,689; during 1902-6,700; in 1918-4,841. HISTORY: The town was named after Saint Matthew, the Apostle. it was established about 1596 with 6,463 souls composed of native Malayans, Creoles and Chinese "mestizos". During the time of the Jesuit mission in 1696, a revolt broke out among the inhabitants Who fled to the mountains after the uprising. They returned in 1746 and formed a new town. San Mateo is historically important during the Spanish and American regimes. The battle of Nangka where Gen. Glicerio Geronimo and his Filipino troops valiantly but futilely fought against the Spaniards, was an important event. It was in this town where Major-General Henry W. Lawton was killed by the Filipinos. The gallant soldier Mamerto Natividad was also honored by his admirers for his services with a monument on the town plaza. The town is on the Marikina valley and due to the fertility of the soil vegetation is luxuriant. Various crops are raised throughout the year. Territory: Area-8,850 Ha.; Barrios-Ampid, Bagongbayan, Dulong-bayan, Guinayan, Guinanghayan, Kamandag, Mady, Nangka, Patis, Payatas, Santa Ana and Talanay. Industry: Farming,shoe-making, and animal industry. 145

Page  146 FOREST The eastern part of Rizal includes heavy virgin forests abounding with valuable products. Different varieties of timber, like narra, acle, banaba, baticulin, dongon, calamansanay, ipil, molave, camagon, tindalo, palo-sapis, tangile and lauan are cut, sawed by hand and exported. Rattan, resin and other forest products are used for furniture making. Large quantities of bamboo are floated from the lake towns down the Pasig River to Manila to be used for building construction. The Kaingin System has claimed considerable area of timberland and pushed the region up the inaccessible heights. Table showing the Approximate Area in Hectares of Rizal Province with its actual Soil cover and the necessary Balance: Soil Cover Corn. Forest.. Hon. Cor. Forest Cultivated.. Open Land... Fresh Marsh.. Salt Marsh... Unexplored... Total.. Necessary Balance Alien Dis. A. in Ha. % Actual Soil T; Land Cover A. in Ha. % A. in Ha.. 5.20. 2.98 15.97 54.23.18.36. 78.92 12,130 6,934 37,190 126,304 413 834 183,805 17.20 1 40,060.311 730 3.57 8,320 -21.08 I49,110 21.08 I 49,110 22.40 3.29 15.90 57.80.18.36 100 52,190 7,66.1 37,190 134,624 413 834 232,915 FELICIDAD BEAUTY PARLOR Poblacion, San Mateo, Rizal DR. ALFREDO N. CANGCO Dental Surgeon Residencia: San Mateo, Rizal Office: Pasig, Rizal BIGASAN SAN MATEO, RIZAL Bumibili ng Palay J nagbibili ng bigas. Umaasa sa tangkilik ng mga kababayan at kalalawigan. ESTEBAN C. FLORENCIO, Prop. 146

Page  147 Tagig:............., I I The Municipal Building TAGIG Location: On the right bank of Pasig River at the outlet of Laguna de Bay, 2 miles south of Pasig. Geographically, 14~ 32' lat., 121~ 04' longitude. Population: 9,815; during 1918-4,841; in 1903-6,829. HISTORY: Tagig was formerly v. part of Tondo but in 1587, it was made a town. Next to Pateros, the town is noted for duck raising in the territory. In 1870 a typhoon occurred and devastated the whole territory; in 1898, cholera epidemic visited the town and claimed several hundreds of lives; and in 1919 a flood caused devastation to lives and properties. Tipas, the largest barrio of Tagig is the seat of her civilization. It has a population of 3,478. Territory: bang, ngon, Industry: ing. Area-11,580 Ha.; Barrios-Bagumbayan, BamBicutan, Calzada, agonoy, Ibayo, Napindan, P1ali Santa Ana, Tipas, Tuktukan, Ususan and Wawa. Fishing, farming, weaving sawali and duck rais 147

Page  148 I i DR. EUSEBJO CRUZ PHYSICIAN-MEDICO Residence: Tagig, Rizal Office: Alberto Bldg. Facing Quiapo Church Manila FLORES DRUG -STORE I ~- I., Tagig, _Rijzal IFERMINA S. FLORES Farmaccezethicc Compliments of HON. LUDOVICO LABAO Member, Provincial Board of Rizal Residence: Tagig, Rizal IMPRENTA ILAGAN, If it is -printing matte'rs consult us for economy, neatness and promptness. ISABELO SANGA Prop. & Mgr. Plaza Binondo 351 Juan Luna T el. 4-87 41 Manila BIGASANG MAGSIKAP INC. Tumatanggap ng lagak na palay at bumibigas sa mababang halaga. May dalawang bigasan at malaking pintungan ng palay. JOSE MATEO, Prop. Prop. CARROCERIA Tumatanggap;ng mga gawain sa karitela sa lalong mababangC halaga. MODESTO SANVICTORES May-ari Taytay Rizal Santo Rosa de Lina Rice Mill & Co., Inc. SIMON GARROVILLA~S, Prop. Teresa Rizal MOLINO DE ARROZ,Tumatanggap ng Pabigas sa lalong mababang halaga. ROBERTO DE JESUS, -Prop. Teresa Rizal 148

Page  149 Tanay The Municipal Building TANAY Location: On the NE. shore of the central portion of Laguna de Bay,on the Morong Road, 15 miles ESE. of Pasig. Geographically, 14~ 30' lat., 121~ 17' longitude. Population: 6,680; during 1918-6,704; in 1902-4,529. HISTORY: The word Tanay is claimed to be corrupted from "Tana sa Balangay," (let us go to the settlement), words used by the ancient inhabitants when they invited their friends to go with them. Semicivilized peoples are living in the nearby mountains, who barter food and clothes with the natives. During the Spanish regime, Tanay in 1583 was incorporated as a "visita" of Pililla in the Province of Laguna with Bai later, Pagsanjan as the Capital. Before this period, Tanay in 1571, although not yet conquered by the Spaniards, was nominally placed under the "Encomienda de Morong". A church was constructed in 1639 by Fr. Francisco Aranilla, a Jesuit. The ancient settlement was at DARAITAN, consisting of eight barangays. In 1659, due to the raids of the Negritos, they transferred to INALSAN where they came in conflict with Chinese i settlers. In 1898, it was made a part of Rizal Province. Territory: Area-18,415 Ha.; Barrios-Poblacion and others. 'Industry: Fishing, farming, weaving, mat industry mining, and hunting. 149 " I

Page  150 Felizardo 'S Laboratory heartily announces the following Products with the trade mairfl (Flafel's Products) and each corresponding general uses: -. 1. 0 3. 4. 5.6. 7. 8. 9. II 10. 11. 1.2. 13. 14. 115. Pulmochromine-for cataplasm Mentho-por-for cold and skin infections Syrup -Bronchosi.ne-for cough Purgatol-Purgative and vermifuge Polvos Asma, Compuesto-for asthma Tablets of Iron, Quinine and Strychnine Arsenite-blood tonic. Tablets of Appendicolitis-for appendicitis Aruykati-for skin diseases LUroline-for kidney. liver and bladder Nerviosan-Hypnotic, nervine, and ephilepsy Mixtura Ubolina-Lung congestion Reumatone-for rheumatism, Gout and fever Syrup Jodotannin Phosph. Comp.-alterative and t-onic Pildoras Azul Quinina-for malaria Tonico Cal. Fosfato-reconstituent and tonic I ( XR DE R DIRECTLY FROM YOUR DRUGGIST ALL PRODUCTS ARE PURELY~ IGUARAN.. TEED Sole Distributor Fa~rmacia Felizardo Taytay, Rizal I I I 150

Page  151 I Taytay The Municipal Building TAYTAY Location: 4 miles ESE. of Pasig. Geographically, 14~ 34' lat., 121~ 08' longitude. Population: 8,647; during 1918-7,429; in 1902-6,800. HISTORY.: The origin of the town of Taytay is debatable. There were many legends as to the source of the name of the town and some of them are: "Tayutay", "Hintay-hintay" and "Taytay". Taytay was first visited by Don Juan de Salcedo in 1571. It was founded in 1675 and considered as one of the oldest towns in the Province. It was in 1760 when this town together with Cainta gained recognition as a municipality. The first inhabitants of the place were believed to be the remotest ancestors of the few remaining tribes of Negritos inhabiting the minor part of Zambales mountains. These aborigines were later driven away or assimilated by the incoming hordes of seadaring wanderers of the Sri-Visayan and Majapahit Empire. At the time of the discovery of the Islands by Magellan the natives of "Batasin" possessed a culture similar to those of the subjects of King Humabon, which was even better than that of the Indians of the New World at the time of its discovery by Columbus. The first known head was Captain Francisco Pasdan Amagsila in the year 1651. Industry: Slipper and wooden shoe-making; "salacot-making" and carpentry, shoe-industry, fishing, farming, poultry and hog raising. Territory: Area -4,444 Ra.; Barrios-Dolores, Santa Ana, San Isidro and San Juan. 151

Page  152 I - - A Luzon Brokerage Company Derham Building P. 0. Box 591 Port Area T.l3. 2-24-21 Manila, Philippines Licensed Customs Brokers Foreign Freight Forzarders Bonded Warehousemen I.152 --- 152

Page  153 REGULAR TRIPS ESUS AMPIL SPECIAL TRIPS We offer daily re- TRANSPORTATION We offer Special gular service for pas- Busses for all occassengers and freights r PEOPLE 'S BUS I sions; picnics, excurbetween Taytay, i sions, parties, etc. anyCainta and Manila. Taytay, Rizal where at reasonable Half hourly service I BRANCH OFFICE price. during morning and afternoon and hourly 104 Regidor, Quiapo Specal trps to Antipolo during the service during noon. Tel. 25077 season. We offer good service to the public; clean, comfortable and stable Busses with cusion seats. Best and nice body type available, equipped with first class Motor Dodge Truck. Expert drivers and courteous employees at your service, without the least possible delay. Try us and be convinced. For information and particulars apply to: Dr. JESUS AMPIL Prop. & Manager TEL. 2-50-77 PAGAWAANG "LA FILIPINA" PAGAWAANG "LA SUERTE" Tuematanggap ug mga bintanang GATAPIA and DE LA PAZ CO. Prop. capiz, cristal, Perciana at Pinto DE LA PAZ y FRANCISCO CO. Tumatanggap ng gawaing Bintana. Perciana, Cristal at mga Pinto s-a Mababang Halaga. Madali, Malinis at Matibay Calle Azcarraga 910 Tondo Manila Blg. 908 Azcarraga Manila Tel. 4-91-42 General Sail-Maker TRINIDAD GREGORIO, Prop. 1151 Antonio Rivera, Tondo, Manila 153

Page  154 DR. MELECIO C. ISON DENTAL SURGEON Taytay Rizal DR. DEMETRio ALEJANDRO DENTAL SURGEON Taytay, Rizal ALEJANDRO PHARMACY FRANCISCA ALEJANDROVDA. DE FRANCISCO, Prop. PJAINADERIA DE LA PAZ Taytay, Rizal DALMACIO DE LA. PAZ, Prop. Tumatanggap ng pagawang sari-saring matamis at nagbibili ng sari-saring tinapay. LIWAYWAY STUDIO CANDIDO FRANCISCO Prop. Taytay Rizal Nagbibili ng rnga sari-saring D~arit na yari at Hindi Yari sa Mababang Halaga. LORENZA H. GONZAGA Taytay Rizal LADIES FASHIOiN (Modista) CELEDONIA ESP'IRITU, Prop. Taytay, Rizal MABUHAY SASH FACTORY PAGAWAKN NG PINTO, BIN TANANG CAPIZ, SALAMIN, PERCIANA AT IBA PA. SANTOS HERMANOS, Prop. Main Office:Taytay, Rizal: I I;. I I I I; I I o i I I I!. i I I! -! i I B'rawch Office: 912 Azcarraga, Tondo Manila. 154

Page  155 i Teresa The Municipal Building TERESA Location: On the road between Morong and Antipolo, 7 miles SSE. of that point and 9 miles E. of Pasig. Geographically, 14~ 33' lat., 121~ 12' longitude. Population: 2,057; during 1903-1,683. HISTORY: Teresa was formerly a barrio of Morong, called Oroquieta. As a sign of gratitude to the unselfish services rendered by the attorney who defended her cause, the town people change the name in honor of his mother. Dfia. Teresa. The patron Saint was Rosa du Lima. The Provincial Road to this place is under construction but is already opened to traffic. Teresa commands an excellent view of the beautiful Laguna de Bay. Hunting is the favorite game in the territory. Territory: Area-11,078 Ha.; Barrios-Poblacion and some small ones. Industry: Farming. ADVERTISE... In our first edition of "LEADERS OF RIZAL" to be off the press on December, 1934.........m,a..,,....,,.., -~......... I 155

Page  156 AUSTIN CRAIG ADOPTED BY PROVINCE FOR INTEREST IN RIZAL RESEARCH No other writer or historian, per- haps, in the Philippines has been re- i sponsible in the popularizing of Dr.. of the great Calamban. He has published most of his works in books and in newspapers. He ha ae Rizal the in a l of Ah best embodiment of Filipino patriotism Philippine history. He has given lifeg. to the more remote past of his te race and ing researved to give impetrces to the inew a l historical philosophy in the Philippines _ of the great Calamban. He has pub-afte In recognition of his work, the provincial board of Rizal passed a rd resolution reads thus: "WHEREAS, we have, as the finest example of American scholarship, Dr. Austin Craig's "Rizal's Life and Minor Writings" in the line of sustained biography; Besides his writings about Rizal, Dr. "WHEREAS, Professor Austin Craig has given most of his valuable time and resources without stint to the making of a national hero for the Filipinos and his to bring to light events little known in Philippine history which reflect credit on the Filipino race; "WHEREAS, to recognize and appreciate the historic services of this foremost author of the life of our national hero, Dr. Jose Rizal after whom this province is named, and to show to the peoples that, in our march of progress, we have not forgotten the role played by Professor Craig;ned biography; "NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT "RESOLVEDs withat the province of Rizal adopt, as it hereby adopt, through thi s Provincial Boar, a events this province the Rizalist, Austin Craig, whose researches into the life and lineage of our national hero began in the towns of Biinan and San Pedro Tunasan, Laguna, and whose 156 156

Page  157 latest book, "Rizal's Political Writings," together with its companion volume of Rizalians of 1933, "The Filipinos' Fight for Freedom," and "An Oriental History Particularly for the Philippines" have all been printed in the municipality of San Juan del Monte of this province; "RESOLVED FURTHER, that copies of this resolution be, as they are hereby furnished to the Director of the National Library, and Dr. Austin Craig, 1430 Felix Huertas, Manila, and for their information." Carried. In acknowledgment of this resolution, Dr. Craig wrote the following reply: "The important province that bears the honored name of the hero whom I have been studying with constantly increasing respect and admiration ever since his tragic death over 37 years ago, has adopted me qs a son. I deeply appreciate this gracious action. "No part of our great island of Luzon, where civilization is then thousand years old, has 'a more interesting history. The provincial capital, Pasig, like the short but important river of the same name, had originally the Malay name Pasir, anciently from Borneo and meaning "sand". The provincial metropolis, Pasay, began as the Javan Pasar, a corruption of the Arabic 'bazar', and so appropriate for a town always a market place. "When the Visayan conqueror, the Emperor-Sultan's son of Borneo, the Malays' hero Nakoda Ragam, captured Manila on his second attempt and killed the reingning rajah Datu Gambang, he chose a princess from the older royalty of Pasig to become his Luzon queen and continue the dynasty. "In the veins of Jose Rizal ran the blood of Nakoda Ragam and his Pasig queen, as it did in the veins of Andres Bonifacio and many other patriotic and intrepid leaders of the Filipinos in their long fight for freedom. This was through Maria Guinto, the ancestress on Rizal's father's side who in the early 1700's, after two and a half centuries of Spanish rule, signed her name to a friar estate land lease in the old Filipino characters, a signature that may still be seen in the Dominican Fathers' archives. "The town of San Pedro Makati recalls Rizal's mother's family. There are the ruins of his maternal grandfather's home, unroofed in the great typhoon of 1832. There a lawyer great-uncle was accused of gathering friends in 1823 to plot for the restoration of the Constitution of Cadiz in the Philippines. There the youthful Rizal visited and obtained from a cousin's brick yard the clay that he used in modelling while an Ateneo student and from a joke on this cousin, Dimas by name, came the Tagalog name Dimas-Alang given to the great novel Noli Me Tangere. "To Antipolo, to the shrine of Our Lady of Peace and Safe Travel, whose image was one of the early imports from America, Rizal made his first trip from home, the pilgrimmage that his pious mother had vowed if her baby son lived and became strong. 157

Page  158 "In a clumsy casco by the Pasig River young Rizal made his first voyage to Manila and later in the old steamer Talabi he often repeated the trip. The river and the trip are both featured in Noli Me Tangere's sequel, El Filibusterismo. On the banks of the Pasig the youthful dramatist Rizal located the playlet which his Jesuit teachers thought was in honor of the Virgin of Antipolo but he who reads now must recognize was a courageous attempt to recall to the Filipinos the spirit of their preSpanish past. "And when in his trip across the United States, Rizal traveled beside the Hudson River from Albany to New York City, it was to the Pasig, and in the Philippine river's favor, a shorter but a busier stream that he likened the American river. "On Rizal's leaving Kalamba in May of 1882, he traveled by carromata, or rather two carromatas, for he changed once in the long journey, through what is now Rizal province. "When Rizal returned to the Islands in the Fall of 1887, with the walking habit he had learned in Germany, he hiked over the same road. At Muntinlupa he stopped to entertain the school children with sleight of hand tricks till he found them looking on the marvels as supernatural. Then he explained how the tricks were done and warned the pupils against superstition. "The teacher was that Doroteo Cortez who in American time was released from Bilibid prison because no reason for her incarceration could be found. To know Doctor Rizal in Spanish times was dangerous. "When I came to write about Rizal, I felt consistency required that books about him should be printed in the Philippines. He who knew that the Philippines had a printing press half a century earlier than had the country now called the United States of America would think it strange that a free Philippines should get its school books from ten thousand miles away. The Legislature is beginning to feel that way and in time the Philippine Government may come to adopt that policy which is only that the Urited States does for itself. "During the past years, I have printed three good-sized books about Rizal not only in the Philippines, like the half-hundred publications of mine that have preceded them, but in the province of Rizal in San Juan del Monte. "One volume is a Rizal-like history of the Philippines' past. Another book is an oriental history particularly for the Philippines which disproves the Wood-Forbes Mission libel on the Malay's political capacity to which I objected a dozen years ago with the result that I lost my Rizal researchprofessorship in the state university. The third volume, of Rizal's Political Writings, makes apparent how farseeing a statesman Rizal really was, with principles proper for every point of preparation for a free Philippines. "From the foregoing account, it readily may be seen that I have a long and extensive acquaintance with the province of Rizal and great respect to be its loyal adopted son." 158

Page  159 Full Text of the Philippine Independence Bill (THE TYDINGS-MCDUFFIE ACT) SEVENTY-THIRD CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; AT THE SECOND SESSION, Begun and held at the City of Washington on Wedrnesday, the third day of January, One Thousand Nine Hundred and Thirty-Four. TO PROVIDE FOR THE COMPLETE INDEPENDENCE OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS, TO PROVIDE FOR THE ADOPTION OF k CONSTITUTION AND A FORM OF GOVERNMENT FOR THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES. Be it enacted by the Senate and house of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, CONVENTION TO FRAME CONSTITUTION FOR PHILIPPINE ISLANDS. Section 1. The Philippine Legislature is hereby authorized to provide for the election of delegates to a constitutional convention, which shall meet in the hall of the House of Representatives in the capital of the Philippine Islands, at such time as the Philippine Legislature may fix, BUT NOT LATER THAN OCTOBER 1, 1934, to formulate and draft a constitution for the government of the Commonwealth of the Philippine Islands, subject to the conditions and qualifications prescribed in this act, which shall exercise jurisdiction over all the territory ceded to the United States by the treaty of peace concluded between the United States and Spain on the 10th day of December 1898, the boundaries of which are set forth in Article III of said treaty, together with those Islands embraced in the treaty between Spain and the United States concluded at Washington on the 7th day of November 1900. The Philippine Legislature shall provide for the necessary expenses of such convention. CHARACTER OF CONSTITUTION-MANDATORY PROVISIONS Sec. 2 (A) The constitution formulated and drafted shall be Republican in form, shall contain a Bill of Rights, and shall, either as a part thereof or in an ordinance appended thereto, contain provisions to the effect that, pending the final and complete withdrawal of the sovereignty of the United States over the Philippine Islands(1) All citizens of the Philippine Islands shall owe allegiance to the United States. (2) Every officer of the government of the Commonwealth of the Philippine Islands shall, before entering upon the discharge of his duties, take and subscribe an oath of office, declaring, among other things, that 159

Page  160 he recognizes and accepts the supreme authority of and will maintain the faith and allegiance to the United States. (3) Absolute toleration of religious sentiments shall be secured and no inhabitant or religious organization shall be molested in person or property on account of religious belief or mode of worship. (4) Property owned by the United States, cemeteries, churches, and parsonages or convents appurtenant thereto, and all lands, buildings and improvements used exclusively for religious, charitable, or educational purposes shall be exept from taxation. (5) Trade relations between the Philippine Islands and the United States shall be upon the basis prescribed in Section 6. (6) The public debt of the Philippine Islands and its subordinate branches shall not exceed limits now or hereafter fixed by the Congress of the United States; and no loans shall be contracted in foreign countries without the approval of the President of the United States. (7) The debts, liabilities, and obligations of the present Philippine government, its provinces, municipalities, and instrumentalities, valid and subsisting at the time of the adoption of the constitution shall be assumed and paid by the new government. (8) Provision shall be made for the establishment and maintenance of an adequate system, of public schools, primarily conducted in the English language. (9) Acts affecting currency, coinage, imports, exports, and immigration shall not become law until approved by the President of the United States. (10) Foreign affairs shall be under the direct supervision and control of the United States. (11) All acts passed by the legislature of the Commonwealth of the Philippine Islands shall be reported to the Congress of the United States. (12) The Philippine Islands recognizes the right of the United States to expropriate the property for public uses, to maintain military and other reservations and armed forces in the Philippines, and, upon order of the President, to call into the service of such armed forces all military forces organized by the Philippine government. (13) The decisions of the courts of the Commonwealth of the Philippine Islands shall be subject to review by the supreme court of the United States as provided in paragraph (6) of Section 7. (14) The United States may, by Presidential proclamation, exercise the right to intervene for the preservation of the government of the Commonwealth of the Philippine Islands and for the maintenance of the government as provided in the constitution thereof, and for the protection of life, property, and individual liberty and for the discharge of government obligations under and in accordance with the provisions of the constitution. (15) The authority of the United States high commissioner to the Government of the Commonwealth of the Philippine Islands, as provided in this act, shall be recognized. 160

Page  161 (16) Citizens and corporations of the United States shall enjoy in the Commonwealth of the Philippine Islands all the civil rights ol the citizens and corporations, respectively, thereof. (b) THE CONSTITUTION SHALL ALSO CONTAIN THE FOLLOWING PROVISIONS, EFFECTIVE AS OF THE DATE OF THE PROCLAMATION OF THE PRESIDENT RECOGNIZING THE INDEPENDENCE OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS, AS HEREINAFTER PROVIDED: (1) THAT THE PROPERTY RIGHTS OF THE UNITED STATES AND THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS SHALL BE PROMPTLY ADJUSTED AND SETTLED, AND THAT ALL EXISTING PROPERTY RIGHTS OF CITIZENS OR CORPORATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES SHALL BE ACKNOWLEDGED, RESPECTED AND SAFEGUARDED TO THE SAME EXTENT AS PROPERTY RIGHTS OF CITIZENS OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS. (2) THAT THE OFFICIALS ELECTED AND SERVING UNDER THE CONSTITUTION ADOPTED PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF THIS ACT SHALL BE CONSTITUTIONAL OFFICERS OF THE FREE AND INDEPENDENT GOVERNMENT OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS AND QUALIFIED TO FUNCTION IN ALL RESPECTS AS IF ELECTED DIRECTLY UNDER SUCH GOVERNMENT, AND SHALL SERVE THEIR FULL TERMS OF OFFICE AS PRESCRIBED IN THE CONSTITUTION. (3) THAT THE DEBTS AND LIABILITIES OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS, ITS PROVINCES, CITIES, MUNICIPALITIES, AND INSTRUMENTALITIES, WHICH SHALL BE VALID AND SUBSISTING A/T THE TIME OF THE FINAL AND COMPLETE WITHDRAWAL OF THE SOVEREIGNTY OF THE UNITED STATES, SHALL BE ASSUMED BY THE FREE AND INDEPELNDENT GOVERNMENT OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS; AND THAT WERE BONDS HAVE BEEN ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF AN ACT OF CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES BY THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS, OR ANY PROVINCE, CITY, OR MUNICIPALITY THEREIN, THE PHILIPPINE GOVERNMENT WILL MAKE ADEQUATE PROVISION FOR THE NECESSARY FUNDS FOR THE PAYMENT OF INTEREST AND PRINCIPAL, AND SUCH OBLIGATIONS SHALL BE A FIRST LIEN ON THE TAXES, COLLECTED IN THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS. (4) THAT THE GOVERNMENT OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS, ON BECOMING INDEPENDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, WILL ASSUME ALL CONTINUING OBLIGATIONS ASSUMED BY THE UNITED STATES UNDER THE TREATY OF PEACE WITH SPAIN CEDING SAID PHILIPPINE ISLANDS TO THE UNITED STATES. (5) THAT BY WAY OF FURTHER ASSURANCE THE GOYERNMENT OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS WILL EMBODY THE FOREGOING PROVISIONS (EXCEPT PARAGRAPH 2) IN A TREATY WITH THE UNITED STATES. 161

Page  162 SUBMISSION OF CONSTITUTION TO THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES Sec. 3. Upon the drafting and approval of the constitution by the constitutional convention in the Philippine Islands, the constitution shall be submitted within two years after the enactment of this act to the President of the United States, who shall determine whether or not it conforms with the provisions of this act. If the President finds that the proposed constitution conforms substantially with the provisions of this act he shall so certify the governor general of the Philippine Islands, who shall advise the constitutional convention. If the President finds that the constitution does not conform with the provisions of this act he shall so advise the governor general of the Philippine Islands, stating Wherein his judgment the constitution does not so conform and submitand ordinances approved thereto. Such election shall be held in such manner as may be prescribed by the Philippine legislature, to which the return of the election shall be made. The Philippine legislature shall by law provide for the canvassing of the return and shall certify the result ting provisions which will in his judgment make the constitution so conform. The goverfor general shall in turn submit such message to the constitutional convention for further action by them pursuant to the same procedure hereinbefore defined, until the President and the constitutional convention are in agreement. SUBMISSION OF CONSTITUTION TO FILIPINO PEOPLE Sec. 4. After the President of the United States has certified that the constitution conforms with the provisions of his act, it shall be sub mitted to the people of the Philippine Islands for their ratification or rejection at the election to be held within four months after the date of such certification, on a date to be fixed by the Philippine legislature, at which election the qualified voters of the Philippine Islands shall have an opportunity to vote directly for or against the proposed constitution to the governor general of the Philippine Islands, together with a statement of the votes cast, and a copy of said constitution and ordinances. If a majority of the votes cast shall-be for the constitution, such vote shall be deemed an expression of the will of the people of the Philippine Islands in favor of Philippine independence, and the governor general shall, within thirty days after receipt of the certification from the Philippine legislature, issue a proclamation for the election of officers of the government of the commonwealth of the Philippine Islands prvided for in the constitution. The election shall take place not earlier than three months nor later than six months after the proclamation by the governor general ordering such election, when the election of the officers provided for under the constitution has been held and the results determined, the governor general of the Philippine Islands shall certify the results of the election to the President of the United States, who shall thereupon issue a proclamation announcing the results of the election, and upon the issuance of such proclamation by the President the existing Philippine government shall terminate and the new government shall enter upon its rights, privileges, powers, and duties, as provided under the consti162

Page  163 tution. The present government of the Philippine Islands shall provide for the orderly transfer of the functions of government. If a majority of the votes cast are against the constitution, the existing government of the Philippine Islands shall continue without regard to the provisions of this act. TRANSFER OF PROPERTY AND RIGHTS TO PHILIPPINE COMMONWEALTH Sec. 5. All the property and rights which may have been acquired in the Philippine Islands by the United States under the treaties mentioned in the first section of this act, except such land or other property as has heretofore been designated by the President of the United States for military and other reservations of the government of the United States, and except such land or other property or rights or interests therein as may have been sold or otherwise disposed of in accordance with law, are hereby granted to the government of the commonwealth of the Philippine Islands when constituted. RELATIONS WITH THE UNITED STATES PENDING COMPLETE INDEPENDENCE Sec. 6. After the date of the inauguration of the government of the commonwealth of the Philippine Islands trade relations between the United States and the Philippine Islands shall be as now provided by law, subject to the following exceptions: (a) There shall be levied, collected, and paid on all refined sugars in excess of fifty thousand long tons and on unrefined sugas in excess of eight hundred thousand long tens, coming into the United States from the Philippine Islands in any calendar year, the same rates of duty which are required by the laws of the United States to be levied, and paid upon like articles imported from foreign countries. (b) There shall be levied, collected, and paid on all coconut oil coming into the United States from the Philippine Islands in any calendar year in excess of two hundred thousand long tons, the same rates of duty which are required by the laws of the United States to be levied, collected, and paid upon like articles imported from foreign countries. (c) There shall be levied, collected, and paid on all yarn, twine, cord, cordage, rope and cable, tarred or untarred, wholly or in chief value of Manila (abaca) or other fibers, coming into the United States from the Philippine Islands in any calendar year in excess of a collective total of three million pounds of all such articles hereinbefore enumerated, the same rates of duty which are required by the laws of the United States to be levied, collected, and paid upon like articles imported from foreign countries. (d) In the event that in any year the limit in the case of any article which may be exported to the United States free of duty shall be reached by the Philippine Islands, the amount or quantity of such articles produced or manufactured in the Philippine Islands thereafter that may be so exported to the United States free of duty shall be allocated, under export permits issued by the government of the Com163

Page  164 monwealth of the Philippine Islands, to the producers or manufacturers of such articles proportionately on the basis of their.exportation to the United States in the preceding year; except that in the case of unrefined sugar the amount thereof to be exported annually to the United States free of duty shall be allocated to the sugar-producting mills of the islands proportionately on the basis of their average annual production for the calendar years 1931, 1932, and 1933, and the amount of sugar from each mill which may be exported shall be allocated in each year between the mill and the planters on the basis of the proportion of sugar to which the mill and the planters are respectively entitled. The government of the Philippine Islands is authorized to adopt 'the necessary laws and regulations for putting into effect the allocation hereinbefore provided. (e) The government of the Commonwealth of the Philippine Islands shall impose and collect an export tax on all articles that may be exported to the United States from the Philippine Islands free of duty under the provisions of existing law as modified by the foregoing provisions of this section, including the articles enumerated in subdivisions (a), (b), and (c), within the limitations therein specified, as follows: (1) During the sixth year after the inauguration of the new government the export tax shall be 5 per centum of the rates of duty which are required by the laws of the United States to be levied, collected, and paid on like articles imported from foreign countries; (2) During the seventh year after the inauguration of the new government the export tax shall be 10 per centum of the rates of duty which are required by the laws of the United States to be levied, and paid on like articles imported from foreign countries; (3) During the eigth year after the inauguration of the new government the export tax shall be 15 per centum of the rates of the duty which are required by the laws of the United States to be levied, collected, and paid on like articles imported from foreign countries; (4) During the ninth year after the inauguration of the' new government the export tax shall be 20 per centum of the rates of duty which are required by the laws of the United States to be levied, collected, and paid on like articles imported fromi foreign countries; (5) After the expiration of the ninth year after the inauguration of the new government the export tax shall be 25 per centum of the rates of duty which are required by the laws of the United States to be levied, collected, and paid on like articles imported from foreign countries. The government of the Commonwealth of the Philippine Islands shall place all funds received from such export taxes in a sinking fund and such funds shall, in addition to other moneys available for that purpose, be applied solely to the poyment of the principal and interest on the bonded indebtedness of the Philippine Islands, its provinces municipalities, and instrumentalities, until such indebtedness has been fully discharged. When used in this section in a geographical sense, the term "United States" includes all territories and possessions of the United States, except 164

Page  165 the Philippine Islands, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and the Island of Guam. Sec. 7. Until the final and complete withdrawal of American sovereignty over the Philippine Islands(1) Every duly ad3pted amendment to the constitution of the government of the Ccmmonwealth of the Philippine Islands shall be submitted to the President of the United States for approval. If the President approves the amendment or if the President fails to disapprove such amendment within six months from, the time of its submission, the amendment shall take effect as a part of such constitution. (2) The President of the United States shall have authority to suspend the taking effect of the operation of any law, contract, or executive order of the government of the Commonwealth of the Philippine Islands, which in his judgment will result in a failure of the government of the Commonwealth of the Philippine Islands to fulfill its contracts, or to meet its bonded indebtedness and interest thereon or to provide for its sinking funds, or which seems likely to impair the reserves for the protection of the currency of the Philippine Islands, or which in his judgment will violate international obligations of the United States. (3) The chief executive of the Commonwealth of the Philippine Islands shall make an annual report to the President and Congress of the United States of the proceedings and operations of the government of the Commonwealth of the Philippine Islands and shall make such other reports as the President or Congress may request. (4) The President shall appoint, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, a United States high commissioner to the governmente of the Commonwealth of the Philippine Islands who shall hold office at the pleasure of the President and until his successor is appointed and qualified. He shall be known as the United States high commissioner to the Philippine Islands. He shall be representative of the President of the United States in the Philippine Islands and shall be recognized as such by the government of the Commonwealth of the Philippine Islands, by the commanding officers of the military forces of the United States, and by all civil officials of the United States in the Philippine Islands. He shall have access to all records of the government or any subdivision thereof, and shall be furnished by the chief executive of the Commonwealth of the Philippine Islands with such information as he shall request. If the government of the commonwealth of the Philippine Islands fails to pay any of its bonded or other indebtedness or the interest thereon when due or to fulfill any of its contracts, the United States high commissioner shall immediately report the facts to the President, who may thereupon direct the high commissioner to take over the customs offices and administration of the same, administer the same, and apply such part of the revenue received therefrom as may be necessary for the payment of such over-due indebtedness or for the fulfill165

Page  166 ment of such contracts. The United States high commissioner shall annually, and at such other times as the President may require, render an official report to the President and Congress of the United States. He shall perform such additional duties and functions as may be delegated to him from time to time by the President under the provisions of this act. The United States high commissioner shall receive the same compensation as it now received by the Governor General of the Philippine Islands, and shall have such staff and assistants as the President may deem advisable and as may be appropriated for by Congress, including a financial expert, who shall receive for submission to the high commissioner a duplicate copy of the reports of the insular auditor. Appeals from decisions of the insular auditor may be taken to the President of the United States. The salaries and expenses of the high commissioner and his staff and assistants shall be paid by the United States. The first United States high commissioner appointed under this act shall take office upon the inauguration of the new government of the commonwealth of the Philippine Islands. (5) The government of the commonwealth of the Philippine Islands shall provide for the selection of a resident commissioner to the United States, and shall fix his term of office. He shall be the representative of the government of the commonwealth of the Philippine Islands and shall be entitled to official recognition as such by all departments upon presentation to the President of credentials signed by the chief executive of said government. He shall have a seat in the House of Representatives of the United States, with the right of debate, but without the right of voting. His salary and expenses shall bz fixed and paid by the government of the Philippine Islands, until a resident commissioner is selected and qualified under this section, existing law governing the appointment of resident commissioners from the Philippine Islands shall continue in effect. (6) Review by the supreme court of the United tSates of cases from the Philippine Islands shall be as now provided by law; and such review shall also extend to all cases involving the constitution of the commonwealth of the Philippine Islands. Sec. 8 (a) Effective upon the acceptance of this act by concurrent resolution of the Philippine legislature or by a convention called for that purpose, as provided in section 17 -(1) For the purposes of the immigration act of 1917, the immigration act of 1924 (except section 13 [c]), this section, and all other laws of the United States relating to the immigration, exclusion, or expulsion of alliens, citizens of the Philippine Islands who are not citizens of the United States shall be considered as if they were aliens. For such purposes the Philippine Islands shall be considered as a separate country and shall have for each fiscal year a quota of fifty. This paragraph shall not apply to person coming or seeking to come to the territory of Hawaii who does not apply for and secure an immi166

Page  167 gration or passport visa, but such immigration shall be determined by the department of the interior on the basis of the needs of industries in the territory of Hawaii. (2) Citizens of the Philippine Islands who are not citizens of the United States shall not be admitted to the continental United States from the territory of Hawaii (whether entering such territory before or after the effective date of the section) unless they belong to a class declared to be non-immigrants by section 3 of the immigration act of 1934 or to a class declared to be no-quota immigrants under the provisions of section 4 of such act other than subdivision (c) thereof, or unless they were admitted to such territory under an immigration visa. The secretary of labor shall by regulations provide a method for such exclusion and for the admission of such excepted classes. (3) Any foreign service officer may be assigned to duty in the Philippine Islands, under a commission as a consular officer, for such period as may be necessary and under such regulations as the secretary of State may prescribe, during which assignment such officer shall be considered as stationed in a foreign country; but his powers and duties shall be confined to the performance of such of the official acts and notarial and other services, which such officer might properly perform in respect of the administration of the immigration laws if assigned to a foreign country as a consular officer, as may be authorized by the secretary of State. (4) For the purposes of sections 18 and 20 of the immigration act of 1917, as amended, the Philippine Islands shall be considered to be a foreign country. (b) The provisions of this section are in addition to the provisions of the immigration laws now in force, and shall be enforced as a part of such laws, and all the penal or other provisions of such laws not inapplicable, shall apply to and be enforced in connection with the provisions of this section. An alien, although admissible under the provisions of this section, shall not be admitted to the United States if he is excluded by any provision of the immigration laws other than this section, and an alien, although admissible under the provisions of the immigration laws other than this section, shall not be admitted to the United States if he is excluded by any provision of this section. (c) Terms defined in the immigration act of 1924 shall, when used in this section, by the meaning assigned to such terms in that act. Sec. 9. There shall be no obligation on the part of the United States to meet the interest or principal of bonds and other obligations of the government of the Philippine Islands or of the provincial and municipal governments thereof, hereafter issued during the continuance of United States sovereignty in the Philippine Islands: Provided, that such bonds and obligations hereafter issued shall not be exempt frorn taxation in the United States or by authority of the United States. 167

Page  168 articles imported from other foreign countries: Provided, that at least one year prior to the date fixed in this act for the independence of the Philippine Islands, there shall be held a conference of representatives of the government of the United States and the government of the commonwealth of the Philippine Islands, such representatives to be appointed by the President of the United States and the chief executive of the commonwealth of the Philippine Islands, respectively, for the purpose of formulating recommendations as to future trade relations between the government of the United States and the independent. government of the Philippine Islands, the time, place, and manner of holding such conference to be determined by the President of the United States; but nothing in this proviso shall be construed to modify or affect in any way any provision of this act relating to the procedure leading up to Philippine Independence or the date upon which the Philippine Islands shall become independent. IMMIGRATION AFTER INDEPENDENCE Sec. 14. Upon the final and complete withdrawal of American sovereignty over the Philippine Islands the immigration laws of the United States (including all the provisions thereof relating to persons ineligible to citizenship) shall apply to persons who were born in the Philippine Islands to the same extent as in the case of other foreign countries. CERTAIN STATUTES CONTINUED IN FORCE Sec. 15. Except as in this act otherwise provided, the laws now or hereafter in force in the Philippine Islands shall continue in force in the commonwealth of the Philippine Islands until altered, amended. or repealed by the legislature of the commonwealth of the Philippine Islands or by the Congress of the United States, and all references in such laws to THE GOVERNMENT OR OFFICIALS OF THE PHILIPPINES OR PHILIPPINE ISLANDS SHALL BE CONSTRUED, INSOFAR AS APPLICABLE, TO REFER TO THE GOVERNMENT AND CORRESPONDING OFFICIALS RESPECTIVELY of the commonwealth of the Philippine Islands. The government of the Commonwealth of the Philippine Islands shall be deemed successor to the present government of the Philippine Islands and of all the rights and obligations thereof. Except as otherwise provided in this act, all laws or parts of laws relating to the present government of the Philippine Islands and its administration are hereby repealed as of the date of the inauguration of the government of the Commonwealth of the Philippine Islands. Sec. 16. If any provision of this act is declared unconstitutional or the applicability thereof to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the validity of the remainder of the act and the applicability of such provisions to other persons and circumstances shall not be affected thereby. 168

Page  169 RECOGNITION OF PHILIPPINE INDEPENDENCE AND WITHDRAWAL OF AMERICAN SOVEREIGNTY Sec. 10. (A) On the 4th day of July immediately following the expiration of a period of ten years from the date of the inauguration of the new government under the constitution provided for in this act the President of the United States shall by proclamation withdraw and surrender all right of possession, supervision, jurisdiction, control, or sovereignty then existing and exercised by the United States in and over the territory and people of the Philippine Islands, including all military and other reservations of the government of the United States in the Philippines (EXCEPT SUCH NAVAL RESERVATIONS AND FUELING STATION AS ARE RESERVED UNDER SECTION 5), and on behalf of the United States, shall recognize the independence of the Philippine Islands as separate and self-governing nation and acknowledge the authority and control over the same of the government instituted by the people thereof, under the constitution then in force. (B) THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES IS HEREBY AUTHORIZED AND EMPOWERED TO ENTER INTO NEGOTIATIONS WITH THE GOVERNMENT OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS, NOT LATER THAN TWO YEARS AFTER HIS PROCLAMATION RECOGNIZING THE INDEPENDENCE OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS, FOR THE ADJUSTMENT AND SETTLEMENT OF ALL QUESTIONS RELATING TO NAVAL RESERVATIONS AND FUELING STATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES IN THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS, AND PENDING SUCH ADJUSTMENT AND SETTLEMENT THE MATTER OF NAVAL RESERVATIONS AND FUELING STATIONS SHALL REMAIN IN ITS PRESENT STATUS. NEUTRALIZATION OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS Sec. 11. The President is requested, at the earliest practicable date to enter into negotiation with foreign powers with a view to the conclusion of a treaty for the perpetual neutralization of the Philippine Islands, if any when Philippine Independence shall have been achieved. NOTIFICATION TO FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS Sec. 12. Upon the proclamation and recognition of the independence of the Philippine Islands, the President shall notify the governments with which the United States is in diplomatic correspondence thereof and invite said governments to recognize the independence of the Philippine Islands. TARIFF DUTIES AFTER INDEPENDENCE Sec. 13. After the Philippine Islands have become a free and independent nation there shall be levied, collected, and paid upon all articles coming into the United States from the Philippine Islands the rates of duty which are required to be levied, collected, and paid upon like 169

Page  170 EFFECTIVE DATE Sec. 17. The foregoing provisions of this act shall not take effect until accepted by concurrent resolution of the Philippine Legislature or by a convention called for the purpose of passing upon that question as may be provided by the Philippine Legislature. (Sgd.): HENRY T. RAINEY Speaker of the House of Representatives ROY PITTMAN President Pro Tempore of the Senate APPROVED, MARCH 24th, 1934. (Sgd.) FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT. EXPLANATORY NOTE: The changes from the original are-Hawes-Cutting Law are set in capitals, and are herewith summarized, as follows: 1. Section 1.-Date of expiration changed to October 1, 1934. 2. Section 2.-In the HHC Act this section contained lettered subparagraphs from (a) to (p) inclusive. In the present act it contains two subsections, (a) and (b), the first containing 16 numbered paragraphs, and the latter five numbered paragraphs, these having been transferred to it from what was Section 10 in the HHC Act. 3. Section 10.-In the HHC Act this contained the main section and five (5) subparagraphs, the latter dealing with amendments to the constitution of the Philippine Commonwealth required before the grant of independence could be consummated. In the presetn act this section has two subsections, (a) and (b). In the first, the words "except such land or property reserved under section 5 as may be redesignated by the President of the United States not later tha ntwo years after the date of such proclamation" ar eliminated, and the words "except such naval reservations and fueling stations as are reserved under section 5" are inserted instead. The second sub-section (b) is added, and provides for future adjustment of questions relating to naval and fueling bases. The five numbered sub-paragraphs in the section in the HHC Act are eliminated from the section in the present case, and are now Sub-section (b), Paragraphs 1 to 5, inclusive, of Section 2. 4. Section 15.-The provision that laws in effect or to be in effect shall apply to the Philippines or the Philippine Islands, is amended to read "to the government or officials of the Philippines or Philippine Islands shall be construed insofar as applicable to the government and the corresponding officials, respectively," of the commonwealth of the Philippine Islands. All other sections are identical with the HHC Act. 170

Page  171 i _ GENERAL DIRECTORY OF PERSONS Including the Municipal Officials-Elect for 1934-37 and Delegates to the Constitutional Convention 171

Page  172 ANTJPOLO MUNICIPAL OFFICIALS Pascual Oliveros...........President Juan Coronado............Vice-.President Hospicio Alarcon...........Councilor Eugenio Gregorio........... Gil 0. Testa............. 9. Pedro Serranillo........... S Antonio Mendoza.......... Victoriano Beltran.......... Ely T. Leyva.........I....Secretary Agapito C. Tuazon..........Chief of Police Sebastian S. Oliveros.........Justice of thel Peace Ceferino Fuentes...........Treasurer Dr. Bonifacio Zamora.........PAes., San.. Div. OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT Emiliano A. Zapanta,.........Clerk OFFICE 'OF THE TREASURER Teofilo Caluma........... Marciano Bagtas,.......... Paz Dimianlig............ Ponciano Anclote.......... Urbano Caluna........... Sixto Pedracio............ Alberto Martinez........... Chief Clerk Land Tax Clerk Int. Rev. Clerk Clerk Letter Carrier Market Collector Janitor-Messenger OFFICE OF THE POLICE FORCE Fidel S. Francisco..........Sergeant Rufino, Pedracio...........Guard Felix Lindo.............. Sixto Caluta............. Y Emilio P. Simeon........... Ireneo P. Pedracio.......... 9 OFFICE OF THE SAN. Div. Orocio Coronado...........Prov. San. Inspector SOME PROMINENT RESIDENTS Judge Juan Sumulong Onofre Carigmia Alejandro Oliveros Antonio Masaquel Alberto Araullo, Jaime 0' Hara, (Atty.) Cleto Sumnulong Lorenzo Sumulong (Atty.) Maximo Garcia Dr. Serapio Rolluqui (Medicine) Marcelino Santos Dr. Antonio Santos (Dentist) Dr. Juan Masangkay (Dentist) Dr. Primo Calingo Dr. Lauriano Lawis (Dentist) 17-2

Page  173 BARAS MUNICIPAL OFFICIALS... Leopoldo B. Digma................. President Beato Cabandong................... Vice-President Maximo Llagas..................... Concilor Hilario Constantino................. " Hugo C. Fullante.................. " Timoteo Rio........................ E. M. Catmunan................... Secretary E. C. Sexon....................... Treasurer F. Majarreis........................ J. of Peace Eladio Velasco................ Asst. Sanitary Inspector Lorenzo Abayari.................... Chief of Police OFFICE OF THE TREASURER Segundo Estanislao............ Clerk OFFICE OF THE POLICE FORCE Liborio G. Ocampo.................. Guard Alejandro Matignas........ " Pablo de la Cruz..................... I I SOME PROMINENT RESIDENTS Atty. Norberto A. Ferrera Justo San Jose Roman Teston Macaria Tesoro Victoriano Gimenes Adriano Ferrera BINANGONAN MUNICIPAL OFFICIALS Julio Antiporda..................... President Alvaro Vital........................ Vice-President Marciano Cerda.................... Councilor Julio S. Reyes.................. Apolinario Median.................. " Melencio Picones.................... " Honorio Unida.................... " Bonifacio Cafre..................... " Hilarion T. Finesa.................. Secretary Gabriel C. Garcia................... Ignacio P. Santos................... J. of Peace Dr. Lorenzo Fernandez.............. Pres., Sanitary Div. No. Estanislao Cefiedoza................ Chief of Police OFFICE OF THE SAN. DIV. Gerardo Arabit..................... Sanitary Inspector Apolinio Dimulacion................. " 173 9

Page  174 SOME PROMINENT RESIDENTS Dr. M~aximo, Firneza 02.ntist)' Dr. Primitivo, Trinidad Dr. Pablo del Rosario, (physician) Dr. Primitivo Natividad (physician) Dr. Julian Tolentino, (physician) Antonina Luansin (pharmacist') Maura. Fineza (pharmacist) Jacinto Silayan Quintino, Goto Victor Bolado, Valentin' Antazo, Silvino Goto Clemente Antiporda Buenvenida Nazario Mauro Cabildo, Concordia Ison Felix Katipunan Gervacio, Ochoa Salvador Diestro, Matias Galano, Joaquin Gido, Mariano Mixto Glicerio, Labao, Antonio San Pedro CAINTA MUNICIPAL OFFICIALS Jul1ian Buenviaje...........President Juan Dimanlig............Vice-President Cirilo, Tolentino,............Councilor Francisco Varquez.......... Cirilo, Raymundo,.......... Domingo Lacanienta........... Alberto Gonzaga............ Leon Fernandez.. Francisco Felix............Secretary Miguel Rodriguez............Treasurer Jose Chivi..............Pres., San. Div. Milagros Lianera............ Chief of Police J. of Peace OFFICE OF THE TREASURER Crisanto San Juan..........Princip l Clerk Antero Marcelo............Clerk Tomas Santos............. Mess. and Mkt. Collector OFFICE OF- THE SAN. Div. Cayetano Matienzo,..........Asst. San. Inspector OFFICE OF THE POLICE FORCE Emiliano Vasquez...........Guard Segundo P. Salazar.......... Eugenio S. Morales.......... SOME PROMINENT RESIDENTS Dr. Jose San Juan Claudio Cruz Dr.. Cat,~aliioo Pagkatipunan Exequiel Reyes Dr. Crispulo, Fernandez Maximo Francisco Vicente Ampil Exequiel Ampil Dr. Jesus Ampil_.Brigida P. Javier Eligio Raymundo Albina Gonzales, 4174

Page  175 iOFFICE OF, THE, TREASURER Julian Ison.. PinialClr Rufo Vital..I.............Clerk Simeon Ison...........e... Julian Cerda............ Eulogio Ison............. OFFICE OF THE POLICE FORCE I Aproniano B. Maravilla........1st Sergeant Julian Enrique....I... I.....Guard Prim~o Ferrera.............. Tomas Santos............ Leonor Reyes............ Bernardo Dizon........... Tiburcio, Vital............ (2 vacant) CALO.OCAN MUNICIPAL OFFICIALS Pablo Pablo, Mun. President Brias Bernardino, Vice-President Patricio, Galauran, Councilor Lucas Bustamante "t Jose B. Sanchez P Jose Francisco y Exequiel Pascual Flaviano de' Jesus Segundo Asistio, P Benito Lizardo OFFICE OF THE TREASURER Melchor Batongbacal, Mun. Treasil Feliciano Bernardo, Principal Clerk Matias MV1. Reyes, Clerk Dorninador Sanchez, Clerk Marcial Gatchalian, Clerk Leon B. Santos, Clerk A~ntero, A. Roxas, Clerk Crispin Martinez, Clerk Eleuterio Velarde, Clerk Ricardo Pablo, Clerk OFFICE OF THE PBESIDENT Demetrio Baction, Clerk Mariano Prudencio, Clerk OFFICE OF THE MUNICIPAL SECRETARY B. H. Aquino, Mun. Secretary Cenon Muiioz, Clerk Severino Sison, Clerk Gorgonio Sanchez, Clerk OFFICE OF THE JUSTICE 'OF PEACE Sofronio Abrera, Justice of Peace Francisco Cordero, Clerk OFFICE OF THE SANITARY DIVISION Dr. Jose Concepcion Pastor Temporas, -Clerk Josefa Bustaniante, NurseI Mrs. Magaser 175

Page  176 OFF ICE OF THE.CHIEF OF POLICE MraoD. Aquino', Sinmeon Sanchez, Seri ISegundo Mallari, Ser Guard Manuel Castro Sabas Bustamante Sikat Dagcasin Fidel Sanchez Fidel Tolentino, Mariano Juat Francisco Trinidad Luis Trinidad Francisco Victorio Gerosimo Mallari Agripino Espiritu Mariano Domingo Gregorio Orbeta Prudencio, Bagus, Ch( Rufino, Salonga, Chaz Benjamin Cleofas, FK 'Federico Gregorio, F,, 7'hief of Police Mariano Gloria 7eant Loreto Simon,geant Sebastian Acantilado Vicente Sanchez Teodorio Baldemos Jovito Gutierrez Pantaleon, Lagdan Leopoldo Carpio Luciano Ba~quing Cipriano Ablaza Paulino Parrocha Crisanto Gonzales Ignacio Cachola Felipe Leoncio Clemente Parra Agustin Galvez Francisco Bagaman FIRE; DEPARTMENT, zuffeur Francisco Salonga, Fireman Jffeur Cayeta no Pascual, Fireman ireman Maximo Mandanas, Fireman iremian IIOFFICE OF THE POSTMASTER Francisco Reyes, 'Postmnaster Alejandro Santos, Clerk.Cayetano -Luchan Dr. Cuerpo Cruz Dominador Aquino Emilio Sanchez ISOME PROMINENT RESIDEN4TS, Cecilio Apostol Regino Asistio Dr. Fausto Galauran Jose B. Sanchez Godofredo Herrera CARDONA MUNICIPAL OFFICIALS M. C. San Juan.............President 'Juan Ocampo.................Vice-President Roman F. Dionisio.............Councilor Marcelo Panguito............. Eleuterio S. Dionisio........... Meliton Zapanta............... Melchor Arriola.............. Roberto de Luna. Constancio F. Concepcion..........Secretary Guillermo Aquino...........Tremurer Engracio Santiago.............J. of Peace 176

Page  177 Dr. Lorenzo Fernandez.....I...... Pres., Sanitary Div. Francisco S. Antonio............Chief of Police OFFICE OF THE TREASURER Marciano S. Felix.............Principal Clerk Jose Tiburcio...............Clerk OFFICE OF THE POLICE, FORCE Be-nedicto San Juan.............Private Ramon P. Alfonso............. Florentino F. Luna........... OFFICE OF THE SAN. Div. Gerardo Arabit..............Asst. San. Apolinio Dicimulacio'n........... SOME PROMINENT RESIDENTS Atty. Trineo V. Bernardo, Mariano Kopiko Mateo Flores Eusebio Dionisio Santiago Ocampo, Vicente M. Flores Inspector MUNICIPAL OFFICIALS Domingo Masikip......IActg. Mun. Pres. Tomas Pillas................Councilor Pio Villaran............... Laureano Cadawas............ Irineo Matienzo......... Pedro Pillas.................Secretary, Celestino C. Santiago............ Act. Mun. Treas. Felix Sta. Ana...............J. of Peace Dr. Leon Melen-dres.............Pres., Sanitary Div. Sulpicio Pefiuico.............-Chief of Police OFFICE OF THE TREASURER Past. M. Nimeno.......I.......Principal Clerk Antonio R. Vidallo.............Field Clerk Narciso Andallo..............Letter Carrier Zosimo Mariano........... Mail-Messenger OFFICE OF THE POLICE FORCE Leoncio D. Perez..............Private Carlos de, la Vega............. OFFICE. OF THE SAN. Div. Adriano C. Masikip..............Assistant San. Inspector SOME PROMINENT RESIDENTS Juan B. Angeles A1lej andr'o Perez Bricsio N. Matienzo Eugenio Castafieda Gregorio J. Borja Miguel de la Vega Bernardo Gellido Victoriano Pillas 177

Page  178 LAS PIRAS MUNICIPAL OFFICIALS Elias Aldana..................President Simon Tolentino.......... Vice-President Crispin Santos.................... Cowncillor Fruto Santos................... " Pablo T. de Leon............ Francisco Mateo............ " Valeriano Miranda.............. " Jesus Velasquez.................. " Samuel Hans................Secretary Juan del Rosario...................Treasurer Amado Valeriano................Justice of Peace Alejandro Santos............President, Sanitary Division Elias Santiago.................Chief of Police OFFICE OF THE TREASURER Mr. Manzano..................Chief Clerk Victorino Elemna.........Clerk Benedicto Alvarez.........Clerk Angel Chan C.............Clerk OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT Emiliano de Leon...............Janitor OFFICE OF THE POLICE FORCE Donato Velasquez... Esteban de la Cruz.. Apolinar Cuenca Marcelo Rone$s Tranquilino Antonio Isaac Julio Dnoato Ambrocio Tomas de Leon.........Sergeant............... Sergeant Guard Andres Vescara Isidoro Pallera Elino Cristobal Manuel Arevalo Juan Tiongquao Clemente Dalandan SOME PROMINENT RESIDENTS Dr. Lorenzo Fernandez Roque Castillo Atty. Bernardo Aldana Dr Silvino Chan Pablo Arevalo Eugni Tri d 3Dr. Sixto Arevalo Eugenio Trinidad Dr. Cipriano Lara Inocencio Santos Rufino de Leon Ignacio OIivaa MALABON MUNICIPAL OFFICIALS Basilio Bautista,................. President Miguel Garcia..................... Vice-President Romulo Santos........................ Councilor 178

Page  179 Francisco Barican......... Victor Gaza.............. Nemesio Illacad.............. Menuel Vellarva.............. David Guevarra I............... Andres Siochi............... Ramon Avaluhas............. Marcelo M. Espiritu............ Secretary Arsenio T. Bonif ado.......Treasurer Gregorio C. Concepcion.J. of Peace' Amado Castro..............Chief of Police Amadeo H. Cruz...............Pres., San. Div. OFFICE OF TPiE PRESIDENT Angel C. Lazaro.......Chief Timoteo Cruz................Clerk OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY Gabriel M. Aceron.............Clerk Clerk OFFICE OF THE POLICE FORCE Felix Policarpio..............Sergeant Severino Policarpio............ Godof redo Alejo........I..... Alejandro Domingo' Silverio Legaspi Quintin Bustamante Francisco Santos Exequiel Santos Feliciano Lorenzo Benedicto Santos Delfin Rivera Felipe Lim Alej andro Contreras Julio Santos Francisco Hilarh' Crispin J. Cruz 'Benjamin Aguilar Julian Tangkeko Amando Enrique7 Emilio Custodio OFFICE Antonio Correa Elias Villarosa' Carlos Molina Generoso' Gutierrez Eleuterio Reyes Dominador Matias, Pablo Aquino Rafael Evangelista Leon Santos Juan Santos Dominador Bautista Felix, Buenviaje Alf redo Concepcion Jose Domingo OF THE TREASURER G. C. Penia.....Principal Cle") Braulio QuImson Pedro G. Tuazon Alejandro Suaco Bartolom~ 'V. Santiago Agapito M. Raymundo 'Mariano L. Mateo Teofilo Leongson 179

Page  180 OFFICE OF THE JUSTICE OF THE PEACE Santos Norofia...............Clerk OFFICE OF THE SAN. Div. Rizalino Hilario...............Teodoro, Soriano Inspector SOME PROMINENT RESIDENTS Simeon Bias Leonardo Dianzon Benedicto Luna Jose Geukeko Jose Luna Basilijo Bautista Senon Villongco, Cornelio Martinez Jose, Paez Genaro, Tan Torres Dr. Conrado Paez Teofilo, Santos Dr. Severino Avendafio, Sinforoso Pascual Arsenio Paez Rafael Singson Pedro B. Cruz Calixto, Villarota Elisea E. Cayco, Clemente Felix Florentino Cayco, Celedonio Bernardo Ildefonso Santos MANDALUYONG MUNICIPAL OFFICIALS Clemente Fernando.............President Ricardo Tatco...............Vice-Presideni L Benito Francisco.............. Ponciano Enriquez............. Ponciano Martinez....... Marcelo Castaiieda............ Jose Torres............. Cipriano Angeles.............. Marcelo Lerma........... Vicente Diego............... Urbano Navarro............. Dr. Antonino Lontok........... Florentino R. Tnocentes........... Councilor Secretary Treasurer Justice of the Peace Pres., San. Div. Chief of.Police IOFFICE OF THE TREASURER Amado A,. Oliveros.............Principal Clerk Ignacio V. Oprecio.:........I..I Clerk Guillermio 0. 'Santos............ Godoferdo G. Sanchez........... Janitor-Messenger Hilario Bilang...............Market Collector Carmelo Olivos...............Market Cleaner Rosalio Neri................Cetmcterey Guard OFFICE OF THE POLICE FORCE Akgapito Avila................Sergeant 180

Page  181 Leandro Medina.Guard Salustiano Vicencio............ Maximo de Guznman.............. Francisco de Leon... Pablo Victorino............ Maximo Martinez............. SOME PROMINENT'RESIDENTS Hon. Jorge B. Vargas- Nicanor Mendiola-7M.D., Tomas Conf esor Manuel Leyva,-M.D'~ Emilio Ledesma, MAKATI MUNICIPAL; OFFICIALS Pablo C. Cortez.. Vice-Pre~iden Dionicio Af able. Councilor Jorge Cruz.......... Potenciano Villanueva. Ama~do Diaz......... Marcos Concepcion...... Gregorio Santos..... Francisco Santiago.. Secretary Alejandro V. Bellin.. Treasurer Facundo San Agustin... J. of Peace Deogracias D. Santos C. of Police Dr. Eugenio Santos... Pres., San. L OFFICE. OF THE SECRETARY t )iv. Antonio Salazar..............Clerk Maximo Paulino. OFFICE OF. THE TREASURER Leoncio Castillo.................Pri c ipal1 Manuel Blas...............Clerk, Crispin Tuazon............... Marciano Rosario.... Ruperto Blanco............... Pedro Aguirre.............. OFFICE: OF THE SANITARY DIVISION 'Clerk Isidro San Pedro..... Inespector Gaudencio Manosca.......... Jose Severino.......Messenger, OFFICE OF THE POLICE FORCE Isidro V. Santos.......I...........Sergeant Antonino Bautista............. Aurelio Silverio............... 1-81

Page  182 Constancio Ortiz..............Guard Vicente Ojales.....I.......... Jose Ojales. Anastacio Valenzuela.......... Maximiano Valenzuela.......... Silverio Dumandan.. Pablo Amor........................ Felix Flores............... Efipanio Pangilinan............ Lorenzo de la Cruz..... Matias Arellano............. Alberto Benares.......o...... Domingo Orbeta.............. Felipe Belleza............... Nicolas de los Santos.......... OFFICE OF THE JUSTICE OF THE PEACE -- Julita Alcantara..............Clerk SOME PROMINENT RESIDENTS I I Juan J. de Tellechea Justino Jinwnes, Juan Tolenino Elpidio Medel Generoso Santos Carlos Leafio. Sd. Alejandro Domingo Antonio Domingo Pedro San Mateo Mu] Roman Reyes. Matias Reyes........ V. T. Mariano........ Santiago Inquimboy. Doroteo Cruz...... OFFICE Blas C. Adriano...... Demetrio Angeles...... Dr. Timoteo Navarro Dr. Zacarias Dizon Dr. Juan Tuazon Dr. Ceferino Ayalde,Dr. Sim~plicio Legaspi Dr. Narciso V. Leaiio, Atty. Jose D., Villena Atty. Adolfo Brillantes, Dr. Eleuterio Jimenez 'ONTALBAN NICIPAL OFFICIALS President *.Secretary Treasicrer Juistice of the Peace Chief of Police OF THE TREASURER Principal Clerk Clerk OFFICE O1F THE: SANITARY DivisioN Pedro Salvador......... Asst. Sanitary Inspector IOFFICE OF THE PO0LICE FORCE Guard Dionicio V. Santo Dionicio Hernand( Eulogio Rodrigue, Capt. S. Cruz (P Dr. Jaacinto Baul IS Calixto Evangelista IMaximo Sta. Isabel I SOME PROMINENT CITIZENS 9 ~~~~Gregorio Bautista.C.) Rosendo Cruz;ista, Dr. Ponciano Bautista 182

Page  183 MARIKINA MUNICIPAL OFFICIALS Wenceslao' C. de la Paz..... Marcelo Marcelo.. Gil Fernando........... Bartolome Santa Ana...... Mariano G. Cruz........ Narciso G. Isidro. Geogracias de Guzman. A~nacleto Marcos.. Tereso Ignacio........ Irineo Cruz... Gregorio M. Josef......... Jose S. Velasquez........ Graciano T. Banaag...... Roman S. Paz.......... OFFICE OF President Vice-President Councilor I Secretary Treasurer JIastice of Peace, Chief of Police THE PRESIDENT Juan M. Rosario........Messenger-Janitor OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY Julio B. Cruz....... Clerk ~OFFICE OIF THE TREASURER Justo Cruz............Principal Clerk R-emigio Guevara........Land Tax Clerk Miguel Tanyag....... Internal Revenue Francisca Guzman,. Bookkecper Encarnacion Bautista *.. Record Clerk Isidro Villareal... larket Collector Hilario Gamboa... arket Collector Sixto Isidro... essenger-Janitor Clerk OFFICE OF THE POLICE FORCE Primo Rosario.........ISergeant Police Guard Prudencio Bagares Julian Santos Isaac Eligio 'Rafael Feliciano Vicente Gomez Hilario A. Roxas Tgnacio S. Diaz Leodegario Victorino i Dr. Juan Chanyungco i Servando Angeles Dr. Severo Siasoco, Catalino Cruz Tomi~s Bernardo Teofilo Ignacio Francisco Fulgencio Nicolas D. Santos, Arcadio Gabriel Justo de Mesa SOME PROMINENT CITIZENS Emilio de la Paz Nicanor A. Roxas Demetrio Andres Domingo Zamora, Mamerto Tingjungco Dr. M. Mallari Felisa Florencio Dr. Cecilio Lopez Mariano Cruz 183 0

Page  184 MORONG OFFICERS R. de Ungria........... Roman Tantiongco.. Felix San Juan........ Pascual Calma........ Hilario Marcelino...... Mateo Inguito....... Ildefonso Geronimo....... Eusebio Pascual......... Adriano San Antonio...... Pedro San Juan....... Antonio Mateo....... Patricio H. Soriano.............Municipal President....Municipal Vice President.. Councilor.. Councilor.. Councilor.. Councilor... Councilor.. Councilor.... Municipal Secretary...Municipal Treasurer.. Ju.tice of the Peace....Chief of Police OFFICE OF THE TREASURER Teotimo Robles..............P.rin. Clerk, Treas. Emilio San Luis............... Clerk Felipe San Juan........... Clerk Ricardo Ignacio............... Cemetery Keeper Amando C. Cruz................Market Collector SOME PROMINENT CITIZEN Ruperto T. Martinez Feliciano Nora Ricardo Olivas Juanita C. Soriano (Mrs.) Maximino San Diego Emilia S. Mateo (Mrs.) Emiterio Santiago Josefa Raymundo (Mrs.) Agripino Alfonso Apolinaria San Juan Ligaya Santiago Jose Raymudo Carmen Santiago V Victor Geronimo Perfecta Francisco P et F c Ruperta Garrovillas Matea S. Pascual (,Mrs.) Julia de Garrovillas Asuncion Tantiongco Esperanza San Miguel Isabel San Jose Crispin G. Lara Aurelio Gonzales Benjamin Cifra Igmidio Garrovillas Claudio Olivas Francisca Galarosa I Florencio Pascual.. Eleuterio de Vera MUNTINLUPA MUNICIPAL OFFICIALS Tomas M. Molina..........President Marciano E. Arciaga....... Vice-President Jose Claudel........ Councilor Alberto Arciaga..... " Francisco Gatchalian...... Teodoro Moldez......... " Leon Mendiola....... Bernardino Arandia...... " E. M.Arevalo........ Secretary T. A. Rosario.......... Treasurer M. E. Joaquin........ Chief of Police 184 r ~~.

Page  185 OFFICE OF THE TREASURER Dominador Mag-iba......Principal Clerk Pedro Nicolas..........Clerk OFFICE OF THE PO0LICE FORCE Gil Roque............Guard Gregorio de la Cruz...... Victoriano Pili......... Nicolas Hilapo......... SOME PROMI1NENT RESIDENTS Genaro Espeleta Gaspar Zarraga Simeon Arciaga Gil Joaquin Justino Carlos ASSOCIATION Parents Teacher Association NAVOTAS MUNICIPAL OFFICIALS Alejandro Leongson.......Preside-nt, Bibiano Tengson........Vice-Presid( Felix Monroy..........Councilor Tomas Gomez..... Dr. Gaudencio de los Reyes Marcos Valle.......... Apolonio A. Santos....... Simeon Bonzon... Flaviano Gutierrez....... Juan Pascual......... Hermogenes Monroy.......Secretary Rosendo Sevilla.........Treasurer Gregorio C. Concepcion.....Justice of Dr. Amadeo H. Cruz......Pres. Inst. Moises de Vera.........Chief of P4 I?flt 4 - ~,he Peace San.. Divisidit?. s3lice OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT Antonio Estrada........Clerk to the President Antonio Ochoa.........Fish Trap Inspector.' OFFICE OF THE TREASURER Elias Prudencio.Principal Clerk Urbano Cruz..........Clerk David Alonzo.......... Adriano Macatulad.... Gonzalo G. Oliveros....... Elias Pefia...........Market Collector~ Hilario Jimenez.. OFFICE., OF THE POLICE FoI~cE Exequiel R. Roldan... Private Gimenez Vicente........ Emailio Reyes..........

Page  186 Andres Espiritu........ Fernando Domingo....... Modesto E. Javier...... Eduardo Gozon......... OFFICE OF THI Esteban Soriano.... Rosalina S. Santos....... Remigia Peregrino........ SOME PROM Hon. Arsenio Roldan...... Andres Pascual......... Benjamin C. Alonzo...... Roman Leorente........ Nicanor Jocson......... Dr. Fernando A. Tengson... Dr. Wenceslao Pascual..... Dr. Iluminado S. Cruz..... Dr. Ricardo Sanchez...... Eligio Naval.......... Roman Santos.......... Potenciano Gabriel....... Florentino del Rosario..... Angel Santiago.......... SANITARY DIVISION San. Inspector District Nurse INENT RESIDENTS Lawyer, Judge of the Mun. Court, City of Manila Lawyer, Ex-representative and Ex-Prov. Gov. of Rizal. Lawyer M.D. M. D. M.D. M. D. Prop. and Ex-Prov. Gov. of Rizal Proprietor Ex-President PARARAQUE MUNICIPAL OFFICIALS Sabas de Guzman........ Jose M. Loya......... Nicolas Santos......... Laureano Capistrano....... Ricardo Bernardo........ Pedro Martin.......... Sixto Gatchalian........ Simeon Reyes.......... Dionisio Leonardo........ Jose de Castro......... E. Monsod........... Nestor Mayuga......... Felix Zamora.......... Dr. Alejandro Santos..... Ricardo Bernardo........ President Vice-President Councilor,.,,,t,t Treasurer Secretary Justice of the Peace Pres. San. Division Chief of Police OFFICE OF THE TREASURER Anacleto P. Sanchez...... Prin. Clerk Teodoro Felipe......... Clerk 186

Page  187 Leocadio Santos....... Rufin~o Macahuag........ Nicanor Ison.......... Floro Llamas.......... Mariano Gooco.........Mess. and Letter Carrier, Ildef onso Gabriel........Mess. and Letter Carrier' Pioquinto Jose..........Market Collector Vitaliano Salcedo.........Market Collector Julian Atienza........ Cleaner Agapito Aquindo. SOME PROMINENT RESIDENTS Judge Jose Bernabe Dr. Casiano de Leon Timoteo Bernabe Dr. Nicanor Cruz Maximo C. Hernandez Dr. Emilio L. Nory Fortunato, Lapid Dr. Petronio Monsod Estanislao Mayuga Dr. Conrado Lorenzo Apolonio Pascual Dr. Paz Lorenzo Emilio Veloso Guillermo C. Torres Pedro Lombos Florencio Santos Tomas Borja Flore'ntino de Leon Nicanor Lopez Jose Bautista Dr. Arcadio Santos Leoncia L. de Leon' Dr. Marcelino Hallare Mercedes Rodriguez Dr. Abelardo Rodriguez Maria L. de Leon Dr. Juan Gabriel Noeme Santos Dr. Servillano Zalasar, Fidela Santos Dr. Iluminado Vallejo Perfecto R. de Leon Dr. Teodorico Santos Aguedo Bernabe Dr. Angel Mayuga Geronimo Reyes PASAY MUNICIPAL OFFICIALS Moises San Juan. Jose Milan..... Adolfo Santos.. Tdefonso K. Romey Roque Inocencio Miguel Gutierrez Jacinto Manuel Perfecto Manahan Macario Vasquez Patricio Mariano Ramon Camagon Francisco Pablo President Victe-Presideut Councilor Serear Tereasrer. 1 1 f I I I I 187

Page  188 Magio A. Ferrer... Dr. Pablo del Rosario Rosendo D. Tuazon.....Justice of the Pea~ce....President, Sanitairy Division,....Chief of Police OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT R. Santiago M. Miranda V. Morales C. Reyes A. Mariano 0F] A. Mendoza M. T. Gomez L. S. Ramos V. M. Prudencio C. de Jesus S. Fernando E. C. Reyes F. Fulgueras P. Santos S. Regala M. Cuenvas, G. Barroso N. Castillo B. Morales M. Cristobal A. Gutierrez F'ICE OF THE TREASURER I M.' P. Marfil. Ii! I I D. Rayos del Sol H. S. Malong A. del Rosario T. Cornejo P. Trinidad A. Gatchalian C. Beronibla M. Apolinario T. Gatus OFFICE 'OF THE, SANITARY DIVISION P. Edralin E. Jardiniano M. Punungbayan, S. de Leon N. Fernando R. Fernandez B. San Juan P. Villanueva J. Taylo J. Rosales R. Cedilla J. Dayuta OFFICE: OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT I I, I,H. Panganiban - ~~~J. Manuel.1N. Calixto S. Sotto OFFICE OF THE POLICE FORCE D. A. Brown E. Marcelino C. Velasco G. Valenzuela G. Cementina C. Claudio N. Fernando 0. Amandy R. Intendez R. Narshal F. Evangelista A. Ignacio V. Gutierrez N. Legaspi I. Gutierrez C. Rodriguez M. Cortez T. Isidro P. Cervantes C. Sinibulan E. Balmadrid R. Santos F. Hilario C. Villegas. J. Valentin M. Santos 188 I I

Page  189 M. Cabagtong P. Sioco G. Afionuevo C. Castro F. Malinao C. Palacio J. Cruz J. Reyes J. Porciuncula F. Santos S. Oca J. Mirante SOME PROMINENT RESIDENTS Hon. Manuel L. Quezon Hon. Vicente L. Legarda Dean Jorge Bocobo Tomas Mapua Justice Carlos Imperial Chief Justice R. Avancefia Senator Alejo Mabanag Martin de Veyra Judge Pedro Sison Guilermo B. Guevara Fiscal Sotero Rodas Fiscal Jose Paredes Dr. Regino Padua Dr. D. Tambuatco Dr. Mariano Lazatin Dr. Gervacio Erafia Celestino Chavez Jose Galvez Pedro Aunario Juan Salcedo Mariano Molo Artemio Reyes Pascual Villanueva Antonio Caniizares Miguel Cornejo Ireneo Facundo PASIG MUNICIPAL OFFICIALS Dr. Sixto Antonio..... Dr. Sebastian Reyes....... Candido Lacuna....... Leopoldo L. Echevarria.... Mariano Perez........ Guillermo de Leon....... Francisco Legaspi...... Francisco Espinosa...... Pedro Hizon...... Leonardo Pascual........ Teofilo San Agustin....... Jose C. Villena........ Dr. Jose Chivi......... Simeon Garcia........ Jose Benavides....... President Vice-President Councilor ),,t Secretary Treasurer President of the Division Justice of the Peace Chief of Police OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT E;nrique Espiritu... Luis D. Escasa.... Zacarias Lazaro.... Principal Clerk.. Clerk.. Messenger 189

Page  190 Zosimio G. Piones. Ceferino C. Sta. Ana Carlos M. Uson... Florentino Jose... Ernesto Angeles.. Nicanor Gatchalian Jovito Juiflo... OFFIICE OF THE TREASURER Principal Clerk Bookkeeper Int. Revenue Clerk Recorder...... Local Civil Registry Clerk Market Inspector Ceduta and Mu.Licemse Clerk Feliciano Esguerra. Land Tax Clerk Felipe Gatchalian....Building Inspector Crisanto Perez.Clerk Messenger Constancio Tekiko,.......Market Collector Igrnacio Bonif acio........ Quirino de la Cruz. OFFICE OF THE SANITARY DIVISION Aifredo Jose...........Sanitary Inspector Geronimno Timuat....... Sanitary Inspector OFFICE OF 'THE JUSTICE OF THE PEACE Eustaquio Montef alcon. Clerk Messenger OFFICE 'OF THE POLICE FORCE Cipriano Jose.. st. Sergeant Tomas Atienzo.2n.....ld. Sergeant Marcelino Lanupa. Ist class Guard Epifanio Villanueva...... Gregorio, Ronmblon....... Agapito Sasutana...... Pascual Alejandro...... 2nd. class Guctrd Escolastico Panas,....... Benigno Bonoan....... Genaro V. Ruiz.........3rd. — lass Guard Jose Sanchez........ Juan R. Claros......... Pedro Peco........... Jose Sta. A'na...... Maximo Tuazon..... Paterno Vega Francisco Lopez......... 1, k, I I I I SOME PROMINENTr RESIDENTS Mariano Melendres Ramon 'Peralta, Sr. Fortunato Concepcion' Eugenio Santos Leandro Jabson Jose Tupas. Ramuon Victorio Vicente Marifosqui 19t0

Page  191 Facundo San Agustin Felisa Af able Nicanor Roxas Sebastian Reyes Candido Bartolome Dr. Cesar Umialy Dr. Fernando Santiago Eligio Marcelo Cipriano A. Raymundo Emiliano Almeda Inocencio Flores Policarpo Almeda Domingo Guaiio Jose M. Perez Jose Damian Juanita Jabson Filomeno Sta. Ana, Nemesio Dimianlig Joaquin Tuazon Dr. Luis Damian, P ATVP. ( MUNICIPAL OFFICIALS *I.. President *..I Vice President *.. Secretary COUINCILORS 1. Domingo S. Asuncion '. Dr. Eusebio Saez 5. Atty. Gregorio Simon 12. Benedicto Casi 4. Dr. -Crisanto 6. Jose Tangco;illoII Borja OFFICE OF THE TREASUREEZ Casimiro F. Capistrano.... Pedro A. Cagalingan.... Servando Franco....... Eleuterio Flores.. ' Treasurer Principal Clerk Treasury Clcrks OFFICEK OF THE SANITARY DIVISION Dr. Eugenio Santos......President Teodorico Ceragones......Inspector Claro Sandoval........ I I POLICE: DEPARTMEHT Maria-no R.. Manalo.......Chief of Police POLICEMEN Carlos Santiago Jose Cotas Julio Valencia Jose Capco SOME PROMINENT RESIDENTS Luoio Rosales Fernando Manalo Gregorio Simon C. de Leon Gregorio Concepcion Clemente Rodriguez Mariano Borja Delfin ~Salonga I Victor Barrientos Gregorio Gonzales Angeles Mendiola ~.. Simplicio Manalo Lorenza Boria 191

Page  192 PILILLA MUNICIPAL OFFICIALS Guillermo Dikit...... President Benigno Anievas.. Vice-President Juan Tibay. Councilor Wenceslao Olitan. Vicente C. Flora.. Faustino Pascasio....... Feliciano Vidanes....... Dr. Honorio A. Matoto.. Julian A. Nierva....... Treasutrer Ildefonso N. Alcantara.....Secretary Atty. Felix Sta. Ana......Justice of the Peace Cornelio P. Orbeta.. Chief of Police Cirilo Vidanes.. Eugenio S. Villarojas Vivencio Atienza... Deogracias Amores. Anastacio Olea... OiPPric OF THE TREASURER.... Principal Clerk Clerk I.... Market Collector....Letter-Carrier...Poundkeeper OFFICE OF THE POLIWE FORCE Tomas Aguinaldo.......Guard Maximo Tejada........ Pio Masarap......... OFFICE OF THE SANITARY DIVISION Pedro Paragas,......... Sanitary Inspector SOME PROMIINENT RESIDENTS Daniel C. Flora Vicente C. Lozano Gregorio Paz Genaro Paz Felipe Martinez W. H. Cooper C. H. Foss Fred. W. McCaw Angel E. Paz Alfonso Santiago I Pedro Melendres Silvino Lindo Tecla C. Angangco, Atty. Felix Sta. Ana Atty. Isidro Angangco Atty. Urbano Buan Atty. Isaac Gellidon Dr. Regino C. Flora Dr. Honorio A. Matoto Dr. Concepcion Martinez Isidoro Yojingco Fortunato Patefia Jesus Paz SAN JUAN MUNICIPAL OFFICIALS Valentin P. Ibafiez. President Luis Artiaga.Vice-President Juan Montoya.Counwilor Gregorio Felipe........ Mariano Domingo........ 192 I

Page  193 Bibiano Mejino....... " Francisco Zamora...... Aquilino de Guzman...... " Andres de Leon........ " Jose Rubio.......... Jesus P. Angeles...... Secretary Pelagio Domingo..... Treasurer Atty. Clemente E. Felix... Justice of the Peace Dr. Antonino Lontoc..... Pres., 12th San. Div. Tiburcio L. Cruz...... Chief of Police OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY Juan Parada.......... Clerk OFFICE OF THE TREASURER Marcelo de los Santos.... Principal Clerk Juan Gonzaga.... Clerk Felix Moreta...... Godofredo Angeles...... " Julia Victoriano...... " Juan Parada.......... Janitor-Messenger OFFICE OF THY SANITARY DIVISION Alfonso Mendoza........ Prov. San. Insp. Angel Angeles........ Nieves de Guzman....... Nurse OFFICE OF THE JUSTICE OF THE PEACE Pilar San Juan........ Clerk SOME PROMINENT RESIDENTS Hon. Jose Veloso, Senator Hon. Ramon J. Fernandez, E<'Senator Hon. Lope K. Santos, Ex-Prov. Gov. and Senator Hon. Teodoro Sandiko, Ex-Senato: Hon. Senator Jose Vera Juan Arellano Hon. Melecio Arranz Salvador Araneta Maximo A. Reyes, Ex-Pres. Daniel Santiago Dr. Hilario Perez Dra. Marcela Artiaga de Perez Dr. Wenceslao Salvador Dr. Severo Siasoco Sec. Faustino Aguilar Atty. Jose P. Osorio Dr. John Reitz Miss Consuelo Basa Prudencio Esquivel Quirino Quioco Hammon H. Buck Atty. Pedro Suaverdez Dr. Augusto Ongsiaco Atty. Gervacio Garcia A. W. Ralstor-Merchant Placido Artiaga Cayetano Francisco Balbino Kabigting Atty. Pedro Mendoza Atty. Guillermo Planas 193

Page  194 Atty. Angeles Anzaldo Dr. Jose A. Enriquez Dr. Jose Santos Hon. Anonas AJejo Basco Felix Valencia Vicente Chan Quep SAI~ MUNIC Vicente B. Santos....... Melchor Amado........ Jose Desiderio........ Hipolito Domingo..... Gregorio Valerio. Santiago Arriola........ Victoriano Hilario....... Felipe Salvador........ Antonio Basa Jr. Victorio D. Antonio. Jose S. Valencia........ Juan Domingo........ Dr. Pedro C. Narcizo, Tomas Cordero Pedro Cruz Jorge Saramo Dr. Jose Radavan Senator Claro M. Recto T MATEO IPAL OFFICIALS President Vice-President Councilor Secretary Treasurer Justice of the Peace Chief of Police OFFICE OF THE TREASURER V F. Mateo..........Clerk Gregorio Torres...... OFFICE OF THlE SANITARY DIVISION Mariano Sta. Maria......Sanitary Insp. OFFICE OF THE POLICE FORCE Rufino B. Antonio.......Guard Marcos Cruz....... Ireneo Victoria........ Ponciano Dominguez...... SOME PROMINENT RESIDENTS Servando de los Angeles Dr. Jose M. Hilario Dr. Sixto de los. Angeles Cesar M. Santos Ismael Amado Vicente del Rosario Miguel Cristi Lorenzo Alberto Ceferino, Lorenzo Eulalio C. Paz Lt. Mariano Sulit (U.S.) Lt. Melecio Santos (U.S.) Lt. Basilio Fernando (P.C.) Angel M. Lorenzo-Lawyer Gregorio Natividad-Lawyer Mariano Manahan Jr.-Lawyer Juan Baltazar-Dentist Felix Salvador "9 Alf redo Cangco Victoriano Basa 194 -

Page  195 TANAY MUNICIPAL OFFICIALS Lorenzo A. Ramos....... Mariano Floreza....... Manuel Fulgueras....... Geronimo Reyes........ Pio Fulgueras......... Gregorio Cuitiong....... Antonino Yposada....... Pascual Reyes........ Teodulo Q.Bernados. Pedro Carlos......... Dr. Leon Melendres. Edilberto Cautivo....... Atty. Manuel Lugo. President Vice-President Couricilor Secretary Treasurer Pres., 10th Pr-es., San. Div. Chief of Police Jutstice of the Peace OFFICE OIF THE SECRETARY Pantaleo-n Jesuitas....... Clerk OFFICE OF THE TREASURER Jose Hilao..........Principal Clerk Julio Catapusan........Cler k Ulpiano Reyes......... Santos Ramos.........Market Collector Agapito Ulic-ulic........Mail-carrier OFFICE OF THJE SANITARY DIVISION Pedro Paragas........Asst. San. Ins p. OFFICE OF THE POLICE FORCE Guard Basilio Vidallo Marciano Puerta Agustin Bautista Isidro Ramos Vicente Toleros SOME PROMINENT RESIDENTS. Simeon Bendafia Pio Melendres Protacio Amonoy Pastor Masilang Patricio Jarin Pedro Santos Floro Santos Julian Tentado Pio Porciuncula. Miguel Martinez Bonif acio Matienzo Daniel Ramos Leon Melendres, M.D. Isidro' Santos, M.D. Anastacio Jesuitas Marcos Medinaceli Luis Dikitanan Inocencio Sta. Ana Cenon Bautista Manuel Resurreccion Lucio Jarin Tomas Catambay Manuel H. Roxas Pedro Catuira Jose Cayetano Magin Fulgado Emilio S. Jugo, Dentist Leoncia de Fidelino, Dentist 195

Page  196 TAGIG MUNICIPAL OFFICIALS Cleto C. Mastrili........ Exequiel Labao........ Teotimo Cuevas.... Eustaquio Ordofies... Antonio Cruz......... Apolonio Ramos....... Elino Cruz.......... Cesario Magsalin....... Gerardo M. Manalo. Silvino de Jesus. Dr. Eugenio Santos. Vitaliano F. Pasco. President Vice-President Councilor Secretary Treasurer San Division Chief of Police OFFICE OF THE TREASURER Ambrosio L. Santana......Principal Clerk Alejandro C. Franco......Clerk Mariano G. Carlos....... Cipriano Sumulong....... Aniceto Ramos........ OFFICE OF THE POLICE FORCE Jose G. Reyes, Sgt. Teodoro R. Estacio Vicente L. Cruz Nicolas V. Mendiola Alejandro E. Dionisio OFFICE OF THE SANITARY DIVISION Marciliano Reyes....... Asst. San. Insp. Silvino Estacio........ 9 t SOME PROMINENT RESIDENTS Pedro Magsalin Isidoro Fermin Ludovico Labao Jacinto Yamson Castor Cruz Cipriano Mateo Segundo Mastrili Felix Sta. Ana Deogracias Bunyi Artemio Natividad Marcelo Ramos Eusebio Cruz Jose Valencia Juan Capistrano Victoriano Dimaguila Vivencio Dimaguila Cleto C. Mastrili Fortunato Rayos del Sol Gregorio *Natividad Juan Fresnido Daniel Victoria Eleuterio Natividad Jose Pagtakjan Eusebio Santos Dra. M. Victoria Maj. A. Natividad Adela Balagtas Lt. Marcos Estacio Rosario Capistrano Lt. M. Capistrano TIPAS SCHOOL PARENT-TEACHER Ass. Ben. G. San Pedro...... 196 President

Page  197 TAYTAY I~MUNICIPAL OFFICIALS Aquilino Velasquez......President Guillermo Marcelo.......Vice-President Guillermo de Lumen.. Coutncilor ElIadio Alcantara,........ i Joaquin Loyola. Esteban Valle......... Teodulo Naval.... Gregorio Ramos. Severino Sincuengco.. Secretary Macario Rubin..Treasurer Macario V. Aguilar.......Justice of the Bonif acio Zamora.......Pres., Sant. D Vicente de Leon........Chief of Polic I;. I Peace ivision T i OFFICE OF THE, SECRETARY` Pe-dro Tolentino........ Cle)vk OFFICE OF THE TREASURER Daniel E. Paz.....Prilncipal Clerk Eduardo Francisco....... CIerk Filomnena de Leon....- Eugenio Flores........ Messenger OFFICE OF THE SANITARY DIVISION Rufino Mendiola........Assistant San. Inspector OFFICE OF THE POLICE FORCE Feliciano S. Francisco. Sergeant Guard Victor Garcia Felipe Victor Pacifico Aguao Federico Aquino Meliton Gatapia, Buenaventura Gervacio Enrique Gonzaga, Felix Sanvictores, Jose Mateo Enrique Reyes German Esguerra SOME PROMINENT RESIDENTS Elpidio Ocampo, Macario Crisostomo, Felipe Galvez Matias Bolrja 197.

Page  198 TERESA MUNICIPAL OFFICIALS Roberto de Jesus... Jacinto H. Santos... Bartolome Carigma Gelacio T. Cruz. Mariano 0. Francisco Pedro San Andres... [. S. Carigma,...... Fidel C. Pascual.... Sebastian S. Oliveros, Dr. Bonifacio Zamora................ President V7ice-President Councilor Secretary Actg. Mun. Treasurer Justice of the Peace Pres., San. Div. Chief of Police Teofilo Estrada........ OFFICE OF' THE TREASURER Ruperto Salomon........Clerk OFFICE 'OF THE SANITARY DIVISION Victor Geronimo.......San. Inspector OFFICE OF THE POLICE FORCE Epitacio, Francisco.......Gufard Tiburcio G. Salomon...... SOME PROMINENT RESIDENTS Serapio Cruz Juan Sampinto Simon Garrovillas, Quiterio San Jose Julio Garrovillas, Felicisimo M. Cruz 198

Page  199 PR""IOVINCIAL OFFICIALS AND EMPLOYEES PROVINCIAL GOiVERNOR'S OFFICE Norberto A. Ferrera... Amado C. Gervacio... Cipriano A. Raymundo. Francisco Pascual... *.. Dep. to Gov.,,,, it D~emetrio Y. Argosino Manuel Ga. Gavieres Florentino A. Tenorio Benedicto Espiritu. Evaristo A. Mangubat Simeona Gomez... Albino. Tanjanque. OFFICE FORCE..... Chief Clerk.... Law Clerk..... Steno-Clerk.... Record Clerk.. I. Stefto-Clerk.... index Clerk.... Jan.-Mess. OFFICE OF THE L. C. Velasquez...... Sofronio Concepcion.... Benigno G. San Pedro... Isidoro Sumulong..... Juan P. Vidallo...... B. Litengeo y Esguerra. DISTRICT HEALTH OFFICE Asst. D. H. 0. *. Chief Clerk Stat. Clerk *. Prop. Clerk Corr. Clerk 0 Prov. Lab. Tech. Presidents, Sanitary Division Dr. Amadeo H. Cruz IPJose Concepcion Eduardo Canicosa. Jose Chivi Alejandro T. Santos "Pablo del Rosario S. Mangaser Orpilla Rosalina, S. Santos Angeles Edu Marcela Punongbayan Perpetua Balaore A Cayetano Saquitan Orosio Coronado Isidro G. San Pedro Fausto Espiritu Lope Francisco Nemesio Bernardo Pastor Temporas M~atias Bugtong Mariano Sta. Maria Gaudencio. M~afiosca Esteban Soriano Isidoro Soriano Dr. Bonifacio Zamora "y Lorenzo Fernandez "Y Leon Melendrez, Y)Eugenio Santos ~pAntonino Lontoc District Nurses Romana. Gutierrez C. Tiangco Reyes Isidora Abaya, Remigia Peregrino.sst. Sanitary Inspectors Gerardo Arabit Angel Angelez Eladio Velasco, Adriano C. Masikip Pedro Ramil Leoncio Sison Apolonio Disimulacion Gerardo Olabre Eliseo A. Isla Claro Sandoval Simon de Leon Victor Geronimo,

Page  200 Lorenzo Jose Anastacio Ancheta Pedro Salvador Loreto Josef Antonino Aguilar Marceliano Reyes Rizalino Hilario Teodorico Aragones Ambrocio Concepcion Cayetano Matienzo Raymundo Fernandez Silvino Estacio Pedro U. Paragas Eustaquio Calderas Rufino P. Mendiola Antonio Jaojoco Alfonso B. Mendoza Tomas P. Recalde Paterno Salvador OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT ENGINEER Fernando E. V. Sison....... Arturo M. Gonzales.. Carlos Y. Salcedo....... Jose Garcia. Graciano Pascual.... Candido Miguel.. Rafael del Rosario... Angel Bautista........ Donato Cruz....... Amado Natividad.... Eloy Guarin........ Marcial Esguerra. Vicente Patag......... Amadeo Alban....... Juan Gayawat...... Eduardo Villafuerte... Jose Garcia.. Amando Tanlapco.... Victoriano Gutierrez...... Clemente Jabson....... PROVINCIAL Jose S. Bautista..... David Fernandez Lavadia.. Manuel A. Torres, Jr..... Rafael de los Safitos.. Graciana Geronimo..... Antonia Buenaventura.. Basilio Unsay........ OFFICE OF Balbino Cabigting, Prov. Tr:as. Meliton Francisco Ciriaco D. Escasa Primitivo Ceiidoza Pedro C. Jabson Hipolito Salvador Juan Fuentes Laureano Lizardo Encarnacion Paz Victoria Y. Pablo District Engineer Asst. Eng., 1st. Sub District " " 2nd." Bldg. Foreman Highway Insp. Foreman Surveyor.,,. Bldg. Inspector,,? Chief Clerk Corr. Clerk Ledger Clerk Property Clerk Voucher Clerk Mess. FISCAL'S OFFICE Actg. Provincial Fiscal Dep. Prov. Fiscal Chief Clerk Clerk-Stenographer,,.. Messenger [HE TREASURER Pusidio E. Ocampo Zoilo S. Roldan Sebastian E. Santos Miguel C. Cruz Teodulfo R. Teylan Vicente Manalo Segundo Mendiola Domingo Austria Vicente M. Lopez Gregorio T. Bonifacio;200

Page  201 Pablo Baltazar Lo F. Slantos Olimpia J. Mercado Pastor L. Antazo Marcelo Cenieso Jorge Castro Jose M. Pascual Rufino Sta. Ana' Santiago Cruz Francisco Talanay Francisco,-Villanueva Ricardo Talanay Felipe Valiente Roque Beltran Macario Flores Miguel A. Jabson Marcelino L. Estacio Severo Calingo Eufrasio B. Lozada Gregorio, Ar'aullo Quiri-no Salvador Lucio L. Santos Eugenio Pedro Catalino, Bautista Jo-se Pagtakhan Angel Jabson Arsenio Dolores Silvestre Floi'es COURT OF FIRST INSTANCE lion. Pedro Tuazon, Jiudge S. de Leon, Jan.-Mess. Hon. F. Zandueta, Jadge T. Britanico, Bailiff S. Abellera, Clerk of Conrt L. McDough, Bailiff B. Macrohom. Dep. -Cl~er)k F. Alban, Bailiff Luis Martinez, Clashier F. Lupena, Interpreter Pedro Aldea, Clerk F. Oliveros, Interpreter J. Sumabat, Clerk P. Poblete,- Interpreter D. Umali, Clerk E. Torres, Stenographer Virginia Evangelista, Clerk R. Alvarez, Stenographer Dr. Gonzales, Clerk H. Clastromeno, 'Stenographer OFFICE OF THE REGISTER,OF. DEEDS Pio, L. Pestafio, Chief Clerk Silvino S. Silahis. Arcadio Esguer-ra Antonio Diaz Eulogio S., EusebioG Ignacio Eusebio Ireneo Monillas Nicasio Cruz Alberto Serafica Maximino Coronado Quiterio San Jose Francisco Calayag Atanacio Valiente OFFICE OF THE PROV. AUDITOR Nicasio Marin, Chief Clerk S. Villavieja, F. A. Clerk Placido Corpuz, Clerk Felix Ordofiez, F. A. Clerk Leopoldo A. Ortega, Clerk Jose A. Orell'ana, Ceirk 7 F. B. Herrera, Clertk Numeriano L. Califigo,' Clerk M. C. Tanyag, F. A~. Clerk D.*e Leon, Steno. Clerk A. Guillermo. F. A. Clerk DIVISION Mariano Abaya. Pa-ntaleon Danas....... Alejandro Esguerra. Crisostomo Trinidad. Exequiel Feliciano. DIVISION Gonzalo Guzmfan. Severo Cardenas. Miss Angeta Pn~,Riia~f1~o-rida. Alejandro H. Perez, Jan.-Mess.OFFICE FORCIJ *Chief Clerk Property Clerk Stenographer Correspondence Clerk Janitor-Messenger SUPER VISORS Divi~sioun Academic Supervisor Sup. of Inst rial Instruction Sup. of Hokmne Fx-E-oakmics ~201

Page  202 RIZAL HIGH SCHOOL Mr. Ricardo Castro, Principal Andres, Zoilo, D. T. San Basaca, Dominador Bautista, Miss Susana Castro, Mr. Jacinto Constantino, Mr. Agripino Creighton, Mrs. Esther S. Creighton, Mr. John V. Cruz, Mr. Segundo Fajardo, Mr. Bernardo Fernandez, Mr. Dominad'or Florendo, Miss Natividad Flores, Mrs. Dolores N. Galauran, Mr. Arsenio Jose, Mrs. Paz S. Jose, iVr. Gregorio San Lardizabal, Mr. Pedro 0. Madrifian, Mr. Ceferino Mag-iba, Mr. Pedro R. Mesa, Mr. Angel B. de Nicolas, Miss Pilar Posadas, Mr. Amado D. Prudencio, Miss Carmen Quetulio, Mrs. 'Libertad D. Raymundo, Mr. Luciano Saguil, Mr. Osmundo N. Sanchez, Mr. Arsenio B. Santiago, Mr. Domingo Santiago, Miss Felisa C. Santiago, Mrs. Teresa R. Santos, Mr. Alejandro Santos, Miss Luz A. Santos, Miss Teofila D. Tan Torres, Mrs. Filoniena Torres, Mr. Rufino Unalivia, Miss Natividad Valdez, Mr. Pablo ANTIPOLO DISTRICT Mr. Manuel Alberto......Supervising Teacher A-ivtipolo Elementary School: Torres, Mrs. Juliana F. Aranda, Honorato Dalisay, Miss Remigia Duque, Miss Dionisia Maricaban, Miss Paciencia Reillo, Briccio Rivera, Clemente Santos, Serapio H. Simeon, Miss Eugenia Maya'mot Barrio School: Alcala, Miss Eli., Argente, Miss D, Simon, Miss Concc Chupungco, Esta:, Magsalin, Miss F Bautista, Francis Cruz, Miss Abur Cruz, Francisco Cruz, Miss Marcc Lara, Miss Salu Leon, Amado, de Leongson, Ernest, m Zapanta, Damaso Caintct Et~ententkrry School`: orotea Paz, Miss Esperanza de la ~rdia, Principal Salvador, Andres nislao Santos, Miss Leona Irancisca Zapanta, Miss Isidora Taytay Elementary School: co Luna, Miss Arcangel idia San Pedro, Miss Cresencia J. Santos, Miss Vicenta )sa Santos, Florencio d Tablan, Miss Andrea Tiangco, Miss Elena o Umali, Getulio, Teresa Elewtentary School: Francisco, Severino, Principal' Natividad, Ampaya, Miss Lydia Ompang'co Bulatao,,Miss Rosario Quiogue,I Leovigildo,Lorenzo Miss Teofista..202

Page  203 BINANGONAN DISTRICT Bi-nanuonan Central School: Mr. Santiago Fernandez, Supervising Teacher Abiola, Fabio, Principal Antiporda, Miss Emerenciana Antiporda, Miss Remedios Cabildo, Miss Asuncion Custodio, Miss Asuncion King, David L. Leon, Miss Pilar de Madarang, Domingo Malawig, Miss Miguela Reyes, Antonio Roy, Miss Adelaida San Esteban,, Lamberto Vistro, Gaudencio, Angono Barrio Scho~oL: Jandoc, Gaudencio MO Mayor, Miss Emilia Ban gad Barrio School Safiga, Alf redo. Leon Ithan Barrio School Leyva, Miss Purificacion rada, Miss Patrocinio, Miss Veronica de Jan~osa Barrio School Climaco, Miss Felicisima, Angeles, Jose Pilapila Barrio School: Castafieda, Lorenzo Castafieda, Mrs. Ismaela M. Talinm Barrio School Ceijidoza, Leodegario Cardona Central School: Ortega, Simplicio Bonifacio, Miss Caridad Estacio, Antonio Labrador, Miss Tteodora Luchico, Miss Josefina Pili, Leon Rodriguez,' Miss Gregoria. Bayan Subay Barrio School: Rivera, Nurmeriano, San, Miss Segunda Boor Bar-rio School:. Distor, Miss Isidra Lanibac Barrio School: Ocamnpo, Eusebio Estacio, Ponciano!i~ooc Barrio School: Pagtakhan, Miss Juliana Tuna Bcaorrio School: Solomon, Rufino R. San Felipe, Miss Paciencia CALOOCAN DISTRICT Calaana~n Intermediate School: Mr Generosa del Rosario, Super. Borja, Pedro Teacher.. Bunag, Agustin Maximino, Arciaga, Esguerra, Miss Eugenia Aregente, Miss Antonia Estacio, Miss Maria P. Argente, Miss Lydia Manapat, Monico Asistio, Mrs. Beatriz Obedencio, Casiniiro Bautista, Luciano Viray, Ruperto 203

Page  204 '7aioocan' Elementary 'School: Asistio, Juan, B. Baello, Miss Avelina Bustamente, Miss Victori.9 Cabrej as, Miss Felicidad Cordero, Miss. Pacifica Estrada, Miss Consuelo Fajardo,' Mis's Beatriz Galian, Miss N~atividad Gatmaitan, Miss Rosario Guzmnan, Guillermo de Caloocan Castillo, Beatriz del Alviedo, Mtiss Feliza Cruz, Miss Cornelia P. Faustino, Miss Bricine Hernandez, Miss Maria Jesus, Mrs. Beatriz M. de Leon, Miss Natalia B. de Ocampo, Nenmesio Rafael, Miss Consorcia Santiago, Miss Eduarda Santos, Miss Gaudiosa Santos, Miss Rosairio Sityar, Mrs. Teodora 0. Elemn,. School Annex. Merced, Mrs. Asuncio de la R. Molina, Juan R. Pascual, Catalino Raymu-ndo, Escolastico: Jesus, Miss Josefina de Bonfacio Memnorial School: Quilantia, Prude-ncio Sanchez, Miss Victoria Cortes, Miss Lucia Tameta, Eleuterio Fiogobantay 'Barrio Sc'hool: Moreno, Buenaventura Bagombong Barrio School: Jesus, Miss; Dolores de Caybiga Barrio School: Decena, Bonifacio Novaliches Barrio School: Bernardo, Pacifico Tunque,' Pablo' Serrano, Miss Ursula Pasongtamto Barrio School: Alcantara, Miss Catalina Pendon, Ifigo ~ Talip~apa 'Barrio, School: Cruz, Maximo Juco, Miss Natalia Laborero, l3 d1iss Rosa Navotas Elementary School: Salamat, Francisco Acosta, Damaso.A. Bonifacio, Tomas Gabriel, Miss Florentina Hizon, Ang'elo Mariano, David Mariano, Miss, Leonora Mercado, Miss Felicidad Miranda, Miss Marciaina' Miranda, Miss Valentina Morelos, Bern ar'dino, Nolasco, German Soyangco, Miss Clara Vivas, Miss Maria, 04

Page  205 Taiigos Barrio School: Calayag, Melanio Cruz, Miss Emilia Francisco, Miss Concordia Gomez, Miss Isidra Mesa, Miss Rosalina de Reyes, Benito Santos, Hospicio Sianghio, Miss Serafina lBagumbayan Barrio School: Atanacio, Melchor Cruz, Miss Francisca I. Fronda, Miss Lucia Macanas, Miss Aquilina Tanza Barrio School: Medina, Miss Cosmeding Santos, Miss Encarnacion Mandalu yong Elementary School: Constancio Gabriel-Super. Pri-"t. Anonas, Ceferino Balajadia, Catalino Cailao, Rita Clemente, Sixto Cruz, Exequiel Espiritu, Teopisto Francisco, Leodonila Gatpayat, Paz Guico, Fausta Jaojoco, Jose Jolo Barrio Si Arellano, Filemon S. Cruz, Miguel Leon, Trinidad de Leyva, Rosario Manalo, Valentina Mapili, Juanita Morales, Alejandro Obispo, Dalmacia P. Roque, Baldomero Santos, Guadalupe Soriano, Leonor Tanyag, Felipa Vales, Eugenia P. 1-hool Gatchalian, Ana S. Leonardo, Generosa MAKATI DISTRICT Mr. Vitaliano Bernardino.... Super. Principal Mlaktati Central School: Cruz, David Garcia, Mrs. -Apolonia F. Guia, Guillermo de Marcelo, Marta Mendiola, Concepcion Neria, Marcela Quiogue, Emiliano Santiago, Purificacion Santos, Socorro Gunadalupe Barrio School: Franco, Mrs. Celerina F. Juinio, Matilde Loyola, Regina Manalastas, Marciano Villarosa, Perpetua Ctiliculi Barrio Schools Arago, Inocentes Cuesta, Amada de la Reolosa, Ignacia Tejeros Barrio Schooli: Torres, Salome de los Villaroman, Epifania 205

Page  206 Ft. Win. McKinley Elern. School: Villalon, Monico Adevoso, Asuncion Asuncion, Mrs. Isabel C. Avecilla, Leovigilda Bidaure, Salvacion Castafieda, B[uena V. Cervantes, Primitfiva. Concepcion, Constancio Concepcion, Constancio Estacio, Mrs. Sergia D. Guzman, Mrs. Adela C. Macaventa, Remedios Magsalin, Liberata Mateo, Severino Mesa, Rosalina de Pill, Dorotea Posadas, Mrs. Juana C. Roldan, Jose Vasquez, Nidulfo \Tictorino, Maria Yaso-n, Buenaventura Rivera, Juan T. IMALABON DISTRICT Ildefonso Santos........Sifper. Teacher Matabom Elenbentary School: Cayco, Mrs. Elisa E. Aguilar, Miss Eufemia Agustin, Bienvenido San Aluquin. Miss Susana B. Arevalo, Mrs. Felisa. Atibagos, Dante C. Camungol, Brigido Castro, Miss Sofia d e Celestino, Mrs. Lorenza C. Clemente, Miss Felicidad Concepcion, Lucino Cruz, Miss Esperanza Garcia, Ismaelito Guzman, Emiliano R. de Juat, Francisco Layaoen, Celestino Leon, Alejandro de Limpoco, Francisco Madrid, Pastor Magbanue, Mrs. Potenciana C. Martin, Regino Matias, Miss Socorro Mendoza, Alejandro G. Pangilinan, Jose P. Paulino, Miss Virginia Paz, Jose Rivera, Miss Leonarda Santiago, Miss Mercedes Santos, Alejandro E. Sarmiento, Benjamin Sogueco, Miss Natividad Tamayo, Miss Brigida Villegas, Miss Margarita Villegas, Miss Salud Concepc ion Barrio School: Aquino, Venancio Dios, Miss Trinidad de Santos, Miss Filomena Umerez, Miss Antonio Ibaba Barrio School: Aguirre, Ramon Cortez, Joaquin Francisco, Miss Eufrosina Gino, Miss Aniparo Naval, Miss Rosalina Reyes, Miss, Maxima Taiiong Barrio School: Bas~ilio, Arcadio R. Buenaventura, Miss Feliza Cristobal, Miss Encarnacion Cruz, Miss Manuela 206

Page  207 Tonsutya Barrio School: Borromeo, Miss Antonina Miranda, Miss Emilia Pastolero, Miss Teodora Vicente, Juanito M. Tinajeros Barrio School: Arellano, Mrs. Severina C. Marifias, Mauricio Torres, Fernando Yanga, Miss Adela Pan ghulo Barrio School: Borromeo, Mrs. Bibiana 0. Ibo, Mrs. Juana E. MARIKINA DISTRICT Mcirikina Elementary School: Miss Felisa Florencio, Super. Teacher Santos, Tomas L. Alberto, Fidel Alcaraz, Miss Leonor Bartolorne, Mrs. Asuncion G. Bautista, Francisco 0. Bautista, Mrs. Adelaida C. Bernardo, Miss Ana Brillante, Vicente A. Estacio, Crisanto Fabro, Miss Marcelina Florencio, Miss Simeona Guzman, Mrs. Sancha A. de Jabson, Miss Marta Legaspi, Mrs. Sofia Y. Lim, Miss Carlota Mallari, Miss Felisa M~endoza, Maximo Mendoza, Miss Vicenta Paz. Miss Anita Paz, Miss Aurelia. de la Paz, Miss Guillerma Paz, Miss Teodora Quilinao, Miss Cecilia Quilinao, Miss Nieves Reyes, Miss Olimpia Santa Barbara, Arsenio Santos, Ricardo Victorino, Miss Josefa Bayanbayanari Barrio School: Abary, Miss Trinidad Cangco, Miss Pilar Lanzanas, Santos Salvador, Miss Rosa Calumpang Barrio School: Evangelista, Miss Florentina Tanyag, Miss Amanda Jesits de la Peita Barrio School: Garduque, Catalino D. Gutierrez, Miss Ciriaca Santos, Miss Emiliana Morong Elememtary School: Mr. Monico Mateo, Sup. Teach. Adawag, Wenceslao Angeles, Miss Pelagia Aquino, Eugenio Buenaventura, Miss Pilar Buenaventura, Teodoro Cantillep,Ambrosio Fineza, Mrs. Segunda P. Golla, Miss Angela Martinez, Miss Pastora Pascual, Gregorio San Miguel, Miss Rosario Romibongan Barrio School: Reyes, Miss Fermina San Giullermo, Barrio School: Capampangan, Silvestre Talanay, Miss Carlota Tinga, Miss Corazon 207

Page  208 Maybangcal Barrio School: Costes, Rom-an B. Francisco, Miss Fausta Lagundi Barrio School: Fontanilla, Anastacio Natividad, Miss Teopista PARA&AQUE DISTRICT Paraiiaque Elementary School: Mr. Roque Fernando, Sup. Teach. Fernando, Mrs. Regina M. Crucilo, Ricardo Cruz, Fortunato Guillermo, Leopoldo Jose, Miss Antonia Ladia, Miss Francisca, Dongalo Barrio: Bcnito, Miss Josefina Favila, Miss Aurora Laquindanum,, Eusebio, Ortile, Alipio Lopez, Miss Victorina Macabagdal, Mrs. Elisea M. Macabagdal, Pedro Mariano, Miss Isabel Quetulio, Mrs. Aquilina R. Santos, Deogracias Tanjuakio, Gregorio Santos, Miss Aurelia Tunla, Ponciano Vallejo, Mrs. Consuelo Baclaran Barrio: Dimacali, Miss Fe Floresca, Mrs. Demetnia, E. Lopez, Juan lbayo Barrio: Rodriguez, Francisco Soriente, Miss Felisa Medel, Miss Pacita Quilatan, Miss Elisa Reyes, Felicisimo Las Pijias Elementary: [,as Pijias Elmentary School: Carlay, Patricio Bautista, Miss Trinidad Buan, Miss Mercedes Cruz, Miss Fortunata Javier, Mrs. Perf ecta S. Lopez, Pedro Yasay, Emilio Miguel, Moises San raplona Barrio School: tbang Elemoentary: Joaquin. Jose Albuero, Miss Generosa R. Bulay, Andres Fabian, Mrs. Pilar R. Tlluntinlupa, Central: Ampaya, Miss Felisa Juan, Felix San Sueat Barrio: Molera, Miss Catalina 208 Hernandez, Miss Carmen Monteyro, Miss Angela Olivo, Mrs. Maria T. Musfigi, Eladio Reyes, Miss Dolores Y.

Page  209 PASAY DISTRICT Mr. Lazaro Cruz, Sup. Teacher Pasay Elementary: Rosario, Mrs. Corazon C. del Arevalo, Miss Esperanza Bernardino, Mrs. Segunda B. Blancaflor, Miss Jahel Carpena, Miss Encarnacion Castillo, Melchor Cruz, Marciano C. Feliciano, Nicanor Gabriel, Mrs. Rosario C. Gali. Mr. Ismael Hernandez, Mrs. Paz V. Macabagdal, Lorenrzo Magbanue, Miss Magdalena Matera, Miss Felipa Mendiola, Miss Virginia Mendoza, Mrs. Priscila H. Niguidula, Miss Romelia Pifiga, Marciano Rey-s, Nazario Rivera, Diego D. Rivera, Miss Isabel A. Rodenas, Miss Caridad Rosario, Miss Paz V. del Rosel, Mrs. Socorro H. Santos, Mr. Angeles C. Sudano, Miss Flora Tengco, Mrs. Juana Tensuan, Mr. Alfredo Tensuan, Mrs. Elnperatriz S. Malibay Barrio: Velasquez, Miss Purita Pasay Old Central: Domingo, Exequiel Alberto, Miss Asuncion Alcantara; Miss Guillerma Angeles, Miss Trinidad Araneta, Mrs. Socorro P. Padilla, Jose Pagkalinawan, Severino Panes, Mr. Salvador Romero, Miss Lourdes Sanchez, Miss Regina PASIG DISTRICT Mrs. Raymunda G. Guzman, Sup. Teacher Pasig Central School: Santos, Teodoro Asuncion, Miss Primitiva Atienza, Miss Maria Calsa, Miss Elena Cruz, Dominador Cruz, Miss Virginia Danao, Mrs. Victoria G. Enriquez, Valeriano Galang, Alberto S. Hernandez, Miss Dolores Ison, Miss Maria Jabson, Miss Aniana Leon, Miss Josefina de Licsi, Miss Cristeta Linsangan, Nicanor Llige, Miss Soledad Lucas, Mrs. Pilar T. Martinez, Bruno Monzuela, Mrs. Beatriz Monzuela, Bienvenido O'Hara, Miss Mary Pineda, Miss Juana Ponce, Miss Amanda Reyes, Miss Dominga Rosales, Ignacio Ruelos, Miss Anacleta Salvador, Emigdio Santiago, Paterno Santos, Enriqueta Santos, Pilar Santos, Miss Vicenta Santolan Barrio: Lazaro, Miss Cecilia Menguito, Maximino 209

Page  210 Rosario Barrio: Quitiongco, Miss Marina Reyes, Francisco Ugorq Barrio: Molina, Mrs. Victoria C. Can*ogan Barrio: Guevarra, Miss Pascuala Bagong Hlog Barrio: Araullo, Miss Dominado-ra Pin~agbuha~t an Barrio: Flores, Miss Nieves Palatiw Barrio: Gomez, Miss Emilia Sta. Ana, Felixberto Buting Barrio: Geronimo, Miss Asuncion Samson, Nemesio Pineda. Barrio: Bugnot, Miss Lorenza Isaac, Miss FlorendaTuazon, Leon Gatchalian, Jose PATEROS DIS.TRICT Mr. Isidro B. Figuracion. Sup. Teacher Pateros Elemnemtary School: Capistrano, Miss Nieves Cordoviz, Bernardo Ferrer, Miss Catalina Flores, Miss Felipa Guzman, Florencio de Juinio, Mrs. Lourdes G. Leocadio, Luis Magsalin, Miss Felipa Manalo, Dalmacio D. Mejica, Felipe Pagkalinawan, Miss Eusebia Tajigia, Miss Benedicta Verzosa, Miss Juana Wenceslao, Ars-enio SAN JUAN DISTRICT Mr. David S. Santos Svp. Teacher San Juan Elem.. School: Miranda, Victoriano Alcantara, Mrs. Alfredo C. Alegre, Emilio Atanacio, Arcadio Bernardo, Miss Lutgarda Cantos, Miss Julita Castello, Melchor Cabibes, Miss Rosario Casim, Roman Ceciliano, Mrs. Juanita Cruz, Miss Victoria Cutaran, Miss Maria Dayrit, Miss Vicentica Elinon, Miss Dolores Escanilla, Miss Lydia Eusebio, Miss Glo-ria Fernando, Miss Patrocinio Guzman, Crispino Guzman, Eustaquio Lainez, Lorenzo 210 Lapuz, Dominador S. Leon, Miss Maria de Longa, Mrs. Cristeta Lopez, Miss Cecilia Lopez, Miss Maria Macario, Remigio Manankil, Mrs. Felipa G. Medina, Mrs. Ignacia Navarro, Purificacion Paala, Miss Lorenza Panial, Ernesto Pascual, Miss Leonor Raval, Miss Francisca Regala, Miss Pilar Rivera, Miss Trinidad Santos, Aguedo Santos, Miss Beatriz Santos, Mrs. Oliva Sumera, Miss Maria Tadena, Miss Maria Umali, Gil Urbino, Miss Marina

Page  211 Beliso, Miss Soledad 0. Ceguerra, Bernardo Concepcion, Miss Filomnena Cruz, Miss Juana R. Mariano, Mr. Alejandro Mendoza, Mrs. Eugenia R. San Pedro, Ciriaco Santos, Miss Oliva Severino, Mrs. Trinidad C. Tanjuatco, Teofilo Zarris, Emidlio M. San Rafael Barrio: Cu, Francisco Alonso, Miss Julia Eusebio', Miss Natividad T1. Gutierrez, Mrs. Juana R. Ilernandez, Mr. David T. Ignacio,. Miss Clem-encia Lucas, Miss Paula Malawig, Miss Gregoria Morales, Miss Teopista ISan Juan, Mrs. Teodosia N. SAN MATEO DISTRICT Mr. Eugenio Valentino... Sup. Teacher San Mateo Central: Gabriel, Jose P. Bustamante, Miss Rosalina Cabada, Mrs. Consolacion, M. Desiderio, Miss Justa Fernando, Miss Carmen Gomez, Miss Luz A. Gomez, Miss Natividad Manalo, Miss Pilar Roque, Ruperto San Pascual, Mrs. Roqueza Sta. Maria, Miss Modesta Sta. Maria, Vicente Torres, Ceferino Valerio, Vicente TDlongbayan Barrio: Sta. Maria, Miss Regina Valdez, Miss Gregoria Mialy Barrio: Carpio, Miss Lucia Javier, Miss Consuelo M1ontalban Central: Santos, Rufino Cruz, Miss Belen Cruz, Miss Encarnacion Cruz, Miss Vicenta, Esguerra, Leandro Laqui, Miss Florentina Lumibao, Dionisio Pascual, Eugenio Santiago, Mariano B. Ulang, Miss Camila Burgos Barrio: Javier, Miss Elvira San Isidro Barrio: Maliglig, Mrs. Valentina S. San Jose Barrio: Concepcion, Miss Benaidez Linco, Miss Jacoba San Rafael Barrio: Cueto, Mrs. Macaria C. TAGIG DISTRICT Mr. Florencio Ilagan. Acting Sup. Principal Tagig Elementary: Cabada, Teodoro Amorosa, Leon Camacho, Jose S. Carag, Miss Rosario T. Lontoc, Nemesio Pastoral, Miss Avelina Paz, Miss Caridad de la Pedro, Miss Consuelo C. Bagurnbaymn Barrio: Castillo, Miss Fe flagonoy Barrio: Franco, Miss Rafaela Herrera, Miss Eriberta Tipas Barri~o: Bunyi, Miss Ana Gatchalian, Mrs. Gregoria V. Mariano Olunmpio Ocol, Miss Julia Safiga, Mrs. Feliza L. 211

Page  212 Ramos, Miss Felisa V. Santos, Mrs. Agustina S. Santos, Rodrigo Tenorio. Feliciano Vera, Bartolome de Safiga, Pablo Uszusan Barrio: Carlos, Miss. Etpidia Dinguinbayan, Miss Pilar TANAY DISTRICT Filem~on de Guzman...... Sup. Teacher Baroan Central: Alcantara, Emiliano Aragon, Miss Consolacion Layacan, Felix Mediavelle, Miss Pilar Tan~ay Elembentary: Peralta, Cresencio Alfonso, Miss Anacleta Arellano, Miss Justina Calderon, Cornelio Casuga, Elviro Cautiverio, Santos Decena, Olympia Pagkalinawan, Miss Leonora Roldan, Miss Felisa D. Rosario, Jose del Umali, Paz H. Villanueva, Purificacion Yujuico, Miss Teodula Pililla, Central: Biteranta, Cristino Carbonell, Ubaldo Cosine, Miss Maria Francisco, Miss Simeona Sevilla, Juan Sta. Ana, Magdalena SCHOOLS, ASSOCIATIONS, SOCIETIES, ETC. W'ack M~ack and Country Club, Inc. Mandaluyong, Rizal Box 129, Manila, Tel. 6 87-30 Off icers: Win. J. Shaw, President Jose Fabella, Vice-Prcs. Francisco Delgado, Sec. W. Doughlas, TreaF. Castor P. Cruz, Ass. Sec.-Treas. Abiertas House of Friendship Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. San Juan, Rizal Asuncion A. Perez Paz Cuerpocruz, Secret-ary Verne E. Miller, Treas..Josefina Oca. Matron Hospital Espciiol de Santiago Makati Damian Urmaneta, P res. Santiago Freixas, Vice Pres. F. Oleaga, Secretary M. Pujalte, Treasurer Executive Comm,??ittee F. V. Kauffman, President Mrs. Carmen de Elizalde, membe: G. Garcia, Member M. Pujalte, Member F. Oleaga, Secretary Doctors Juan Tuazon Ceferino Ayalde Santol Tuberculosis Sanatorium (Phil. Islands Tuberculosis Society) Santol, Caloocan, Rizal Dr. Andreas Trepp, Med. Director Alejandro Posadas, Supt. Dr. J. A. Sollosa, Sen. Res. Physician Dr. Jose J. Arevalo. Junior Res. Physician Memtbcrs Hon. Teodoro R. Yangco Mrs. Josefa J. Martinez Justice Jose Abad Santos Mrs. Maria Valdez Ventura Dean Jorge Bocobo Dra. M. Huiling Lee Mrs. Fayee Thorn Cooper Mrs. Leslie Wolf 212

Page  213 Dr. Soledad Florendo-Arcega, Jr. Res. Physician Dr. Gregorio Farrales. E.E.N. and T. Specialist Miss Clemencia V. Reyes, Pharmacist Rosa Balunsat, Chief Nurse Mrs. J. Alvarez Yniguez, Dietitian Sister Anais, Kitchen-in-Charg-e Rufino N. Niles, Mechanic and Electrician Antonio Cabailo, Sanitary Insp. Mrs. S. N. Alcazar, Supervisor, Occ-.ipational Therapy Dept. Miss Virginia Eusebio, Matron Bernardo Beltran, Stec. RIZAL MEMORIAL ACADEMY, PASAY Board of Trustees: Agatona C. Santos, Chairman Isrnael Zapata, Sec.-Treas. Perfecto Ahordo, Mem,,ber Artemio Reyes, Member PHILIPPINE UNION COLLEGE (Form-erly Phil. Junior College) B3acsa, Caloocan, Rizal R. R. Figurh. Pres. of Board L. M. Stump, President 0. A. Blake, Treasurer MALABON STANDARD HIGH SCHOOL Malabon, Rizal Mrs. Alejandra Reyes, Di1r. Jesus I. Martinez, Prin. Manuel Camus. Pres. Board of Trustees: Manuel Camus, Chairman Adolfo Fabella, Secretary Andres Pascual, Member Werceslao Pascual, Member Clotildp Torres, Member MALABON NORMAL SCHOOL Malabon, Rizal Professors: Sister Mary Charitas. 0. P. and Directress Sister Mary Philip, O.P. Sister Mary de Chantal, O.P. Sister Sister Sister Sister Sister Sister Sister Sister Sister Sister Mary Francisca, O.P. Mary Eucharisca, O.P. Mary Marcella, O.P. Mary Assump-ta, O.P. Mary Damien, O.P. Mary Clotilde, O.P. Mary Colman, O.P. Mary Siena, O.P. Rose Marie. O.P. David Mlarie, O.P. Colegio de Nuestra Seiiora del Been Con~sejo (Agustinian Sisters) Pasig, Rizal Rev. Mother Josefina del Patroc,.nio, Superioress RIZAL MASONIC LODGES Silaviganan No. 1.9-Pasig W.. M., Elpidio L. Cruz S. WV., David L. Santos J. W., Ramo-n Peralta Treas., Pedro C. Jabson P. M. Sec.. Jose M. Santos La bong No. 59 WV. M., Vicente Quijano, Malabon S. WV., Gcneroso Jiongco J. WV., Filomeno Santiago Treas., Amado Jacinto P. M. Treas., Julian Sugueco Mieog No. 89-Para~iiaque XV. M.. Agripino Pascual S. W., Carl G. Hei~mann Treas., Eusebio Laquindanum Sec., Mauricio B. Jaberina 1. IXV., Eusebio B. Beltran P. M. Baclaran, Parai'iaque McKINLEY COUNCIL OF KADOSH McKinley Joaquin Antero Alix, Coin. John Floyd Harstine, 1st. Lieut. Comn. Jose V. Buenaventura, 2nd. Lieut. Comn. Uy Peng Yong, Chancellor Mariano Rodriguez, Orator Marcial Borromeo, Almoner Isabelo V. Bi namira, Recorder Joaquin Antero Alix, Treas. 213

Page  214 Lim Yok Su, Master of Ceremonies Placido Manlunas, Turcopilier Segundo Cinco, Draper Go Chan, First Deacon Victoriano Reynes, 2nd Deacon Go Siong Mitt, Bearer of Beauseant Timoteo Yu Tiong, Bearer of W. S. Alfonso P. Villa, Bearer of B. S. Alejandro Flores, Lieut. of Guard Saturnino Ramirez, Sentinel Reg. Meeting: First Friday of March, June, Sept. & Dec. MANILA POLO CLUB Pasay, Rizal Ewald Selph, President F. L. Lawrence, Vice-Pres C. Parsons, Hon. Sec.-Treas. M. A. Hayes, Manager Directors: Edward Selph J. M. Elizalde F. N. Berry F. L. Lawrence Kenneth B. Day J. R. Lloyd Major W. D. Crittenberger HARRISON HOSPITAL 525 F. B. Harrison, Pasay Dr. D. T. Tambuatco, Res. Surgeon Dr. Dionisio Bravo Dr. Jose Lachica Dr. Angel de Ramo Dr. P. A. Young "RIZAL DAY ASSOCIATION-1934" (Pasig) Dr. Cesar Umaly. Pres. Zosimo Piones, Treas. Gorgonio Concepcion, Sec. I. R. Salonga, Chairman on Prog. V. Enriquez, Chairman on Parade M. Alfonso. Chairman on Stage METHODIST EPISCOPAL MINISTERS Bias, Rev. Simeon............ Capule, Rev. Donato P......... Gamboa, Rev. Jose........... Gatdula, Rev. Balbino......... Manlapig, Rev. Daniel.......... Pano, Rev. Natanael C. de...... Pascual, Rev. Agaton.......... Reyes, Rev. Simon D......... Santos, Rev. Catalino T........ Santos, Rev. Catalino T........ Santos, Rev. Querico.......... Tuason, Rev. Prudencio......... CRUZ, REV. ESTEBAN T.. Sn. Francisco del Monte, S. Juan, Rizal Parafiaque, Rizal Taytay, Rizal Malabon South, Rizal Novaliches, Caloocan, Rizal Malabon North, Rizal Tafigos, Navotas. Rizal Bagumbayan, Navotas. Rizal Makati, Rizal Mandaluyong, Rizal Caloocan, Rizal San Juan Rizal District Superintendent, Pasay, Rizal PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH MINISTERS Rev. Catalino Paulino.......... Pasay, Rizal Rev. Esteban Salonga.......... Binangonan, Rizal Rev. Rafael Resus............. Pasig, Rizal Rey. Pedro Imenzo............. Muntinlupa, Rizal 214

Page  215 TAYTAY EPWORTH LEAGUE Felipe Sta. Ana, President Benjamin Salangsang, Sec. Leonor Gonzaga, 1st. Vice Pres. Pagasa Naval, Treas. Deo. A. Espiritu, 2nd. Vice Pres. Virgilio Tamayo, Reporter Deodulo Cruz, 3rd. Vice Pres. Pedro Rosario, Reporter Belen Gonzaga, 4th. Vice Pres. RIZAL MEDICAL ASSOCIATION President...........Dr. Fausto Galauran Vice-President..........Dr. Manuel Aycardo Sec.-Ti-easurer.........Dr. Crisanto de Borja COUNCJLORS: Dr. Wence-slao Pascual Dr. T. Ricohermoso Dr. Anatolio B. Cruz Dr. Teodorico Santos Mlembers Doctors 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 1-0. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 25. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. Jose Chivi......... Jose Concepcion....... Efren V. Baltazar. Eugenio Santos...... Bonif acio Zamora..... Pablo del Rosario. Leon Melendres....... Jose D. Bautista..... Silvino Chan....... Hipolito Sevilla...... Severino, Avendafio. Gregorio G. Delgado. Lorenzo Fernandez. Higino Gregorio...... Teodorico Santos...... Crispin G. Lara...... Isidro Santos....... Crispulo Musfigi...... Abelardo Rodriguez. Fausto Galauran...... Fernando Santiago. Alejandro T. Santos. Fernando D. Manalo. Lucio Rosales....... Jose D. Mendiola...... Artemio Natividad..... Wenceslao Pascual..... Juan Salcedo Jr...... Antonio Lontok...... Trajano Bernar do...... Paz E. Lorenzo....... Conrado Lorenzo...... B. M. Villapando...... Amadeo Cruz....... Cesar Umualy........ Addr-ess Pasig, Rizal Caloocan. Rizal Malabon, Rizal Makati, Rizal Antipolo, Rizal Marikina, Rizal Tanay, Rizal Montalban, Rizal Las Pifias, Rizal Malabon, Rizal Malabon, Rizal 401 F. B. Harrison, Pasay Las Pifias, Rizal Marikina, Rizal Parafiaque, Rizal Morong, Rizal Tanay, Rizal Pasay, Rizal Paraiiaque. Rizal Caloocan. Rizal Pasig, Rizal Paraliaque, Rizal Pateros, Rizal Pateros, Rizal Pateros, Rizal Tagig, Rizal Malabon, Rizal Pasay, Rizal San Juan, Rizal Malabon, Rizal Parafiaque, Rizal Paraliaque, Rizal Pasig, Rizal Caloocan, Rizal Pasig, Rizal 215

Page  216 MALABON CENTRAL IN3TITUTE 1933-'34 Membe-:s of the Faculty Angekcs S. Santos Alf redo G. Pacheco Teofilo C. Gallardo Miss Carmen C. Paez Adoracion J. Dianzon ly Juana F. de la Paz ly Mercedes C. Javier "t Patricia Miranda Mrs. Hermogenes. C. Bernales Mr. Maximo S. Cruz Moises Saysay Miss Nieves M. Ochoa it Dolores A. Lopez' Incorporator8 Dr. Calixto Chikiamco, Pres. Diia. Rufina Romero, Treas.. Mr. Rafael Singson, Member Dr. Conrado Paez, Secretary Mrs. Hermogena C. Bernales. Member MINERVA. ASSOCIATION (Pa-sig). Antonio San Pedro, Pres. Martin Hugo, Vice-Pres. (Miss) Leonor Danijan, Treas. Alf redo Concepcion, Sec. PASIG VARSITY CLUB Pedro Revilla, Pres. Tomas Pagaduan, Vice-Pres. Paz Reynoso, Treas. Mamerto Lorenzo, Sec. Jose P. Santos, Auditor Mariano Alfonso, Eng. Reporter Jorge R~evilla, Spanish Rep. Nenita Jabson, Adviser PANITIK-PASIG Zosimo Piones. Pres. Isayas R. Salonga, Vice-Pres. Gonzalo Jose, Treas. Victorino Victoria, Member Felisa Gat-Ulayaw Eduardo Buensuceso, Vicente San Juan, Ricardo Cruz, Eugcnia Villarin, Muse Fidela Guevara, y Leonarda -Af able l Aurora Cruz, y KNIGHTS OF HOLY CROSS ChaPtcr 14, Pasig, Rizctl OFFICERS Atty. Manuel Gavieres............I Victorino G. Victoria.............. Quintin Santos................. Carlos M. Uson................. Candido Miguel................. Deogracias Limpaco,.............. President Secretary Grand Master.Councilor..Treasurer Guardian MALABON NOR11TH EPWORTH LEAGUES President.Belen C. Vicencio 1s-t Vice-President.Arturo Pascual 2d Vice-President.Rosario Rodriguez 3rd Vice-President.Juana Mendoza 4th Vice President isosceles Pascual Secretary.Mlarcial Cruz Treasurer.Eduvigis R. Pascual 216

Page  217 CIVIC CLUB OF PASAY (Organized, July 9, 1933) President...................JOSE S. GALVEZ S~ecretary-Treastrer..............DR. REGINO G. PADUA Meiob~rs.................. PEDRO, AUNARIO MARTIN P. DE VEYRA MOISES SAN JUAN MEMBERS ADMITTED IN 1933 1. Agtarap, Mr.1 Joaquin 23. Mencarini, Mr. J. I 2. Aguilar, Maj. Miguel 24. Morillo, MVr. Saturr 3. Arias, Mr. Vicente25OriaM.S.B 4. Aunario, Mr. Pedro 26. Pablo, Mr. Francisc 5. Barbaza. Mr. Jos6 Jr. 27. Padua, Dr. Regino 6. Cabrera, Mr. Carlos 28. Paredes, Mr. Jose 7. Chavez, Mr. Apolonio R. 29. Prado, Mr. Jose M. 8. Concepcion, Dr. Islabelo 30. Quisum~bing, Mr. Ec' 9. Erahia, Dr. Gervasio 31. Quisunmbing, Mr. F. 10. Eugenio, Mr. Marcelo 32. Rodas, Mr. Sotero, ii. Fernandez, Dr. Domingo 33. Salcedo, Mr. Juan 12. Fernandez, Mr. Mariano R. 34. Salud, Mr. Ambrosi 13. Flores, Mr. E. 0. 35. Salud, Dr. Eusebio 14. Fortitch, Mr. G. 36. San Agustin, Mr. I 15. Fragante, Mr. Vicente 37. San Juan, Mr. Moi., 16. Galvez, Mr. Jos6 5. 38. Santos, Mr. Jesus 17. Guzman, Mr. Irineo de 39. Santos, Mr. Ramon 1.8. Guzman, Mr. I. 0. 40. Sison, Mr. Fernan( 19. Legaspi, Mr. Mariano Molo 41. Vera. Mr. Tomas d 20. Limjap, Mr. German 42. Veyra, Mr. M. P. 21. Lopa, Mr. Manuel 43. Zabala, Mr. Exequi( 22. Lovina, Mr. Primitivo, MEMBERS ADMITTED IN 19134 44. Barrenengoa, Mr. Hipolito 48. Reves, Mr. Artemio 45. Bautista, Capt. Juan 49. Rivera, Mr. Marciai 46. Katigbak. Mr. Guillermo M. 50. Roa, Dr. Emeterio 47. Mapua, Mr. Tomas W1ACK WACK GOLF,& COUNTR Y CLUB BOARD OF DIRECTORS Lino L. '0 G. Ma. del luardo, A. 0 B. )ionisio ges, J. lo E. V. [e le 4 G. 10 Mr. Win. J. Shaw.President Dr. Jose Fabella.Vice-President Mr. WV. Douglas.Treasur~r Mr. F. Segado.Secretary Mr. Henry J. Belden.Director Capt. Enrique Razon.Director Mr. Albino Sycip.Directo.' ZALMIR CLUB M1alcbon-Navotas, Rizal OFFICERS Mr. Epifanio Tuason.......... Miss Rosalina Siochi............. Miss Consuelo Santos............ Miss Clarita Luna............. Mr. Restituto Aquirio........... 217. President Vice-President Secretary/ Treasurer Publicity Manager

Page  218 M~unicipal Offcials 1 934e ---,1937 MUNICIPALITY OF ANTIPOLO, Pascual Oliveros..........President Juan Coronado...........Vice-President Councilors Monico Gutierrez Hospicio, Alarcon Patricio, Encusar Juan Catangay Antonio Masaquiel Felicisimo Serrato, MUNICIPALITY OF BARAS, Andres de Torres..........P-resident Andres Bigasin...........Vice-President Councilors Norberto Robles Hugo Fullante.Angeles Pilapil lBenedicto Gimnenez MUNICIPALITY OF BINANGONAN Julio A. Antiporda,.........President Mauro Cabildo,...........Vice-President Councilors Bonifacio Cafre Francisco de la Cruz Jacinto Paralejas Cirilo Barreto Apolinario, Medina Melencio Picones Jesus Ampil Jorge Bassig MUNICIPALITY OF CAINTA President Vice-President Manuel Mendoza Leon Fernandez Pedro Candelaria Councilors Gervacio dle la Paz Claro, Santos Fortunato Villanueva MUNICIPALITY OF CALOOCAN Pablo Pablo............President Segundo Asistio,..........Vice-President Councilors Jose Francisco Oscar Baello Alejo Candido Rufino, Carrion Zosimo Galauran Blas Bernardino L~ucas Pascual Eustaquio Rivera 218

Page  219 MUNICIPALITY OF CARDONA Mariano San Juan.........President Simplicio San Juan.........Vice-President Councilors Bonifacio Bautista Prudencio Sta. Maria Roberto de Luna Eduardo Patag Roman Dionisio Meliton. Zapanta MUNICIPALITY OF JALA-JALA Domingo Masikip..........President Alejandro Perez..........Vice-President Councilors Gerardo Miranda Bernardino Salvador Eugenio Castafieda Basilio Bernabe Agapito de Guzman Eulogio Oli'verio MUNICIPALITY OF LAS PIfRAS Eugenio Trinidad.......... President Pablo T. de Leon.........Vice-President Councilors Crispin Santos Tnoccncio Santos Mariano Santos Francisco Mateo Jacinto Villanueva Martin Pangilin MUNICIPALITY OF MALABON Teofilo C. Santos..........President Jose G. Camus...........Vice-President Couneilors Romulo Santos Fabian Palmario Timoteo Cruz Jose Oreta Herminio Luna Pedro Pascual Francisco Barican David Guevara MUNICIPALITY OF MAKATI Jose D. Villena...........President Deogracias Luciano.........Vice-President Amado Diaz Tomas B. Estacio Eliseo D. Viray Abundio G. Suck Councilors Gregorio Santos Luis Anastacio Felipe Juan Dionisio Af able MUNICIPALITY OF MANDALUYONG Isaac Lopez............President Ponciano Enriquez.........Vice-President 219

Page  220 Marcelo Castaiieda Federico Torres Hermenegildo Coronado Councilo rs Mariano Martinez Rodrigo Vicencio Ruperto Santiago MUNICIPALITY OF MARIKINA Wenceslao C. de la Paz.......President Marcelo Marcelo..........Vice-President Narciso G. Isidro Bartolome Sta. Ana Gelacio Cruz Jose Cruz Con cilors Anacleto Marcos Anatolio B. Cruz IrnoCruz -Joaquin Sta. Arta MUNICIPALITY OF MONTALBAN. Jacinto Bautista......... President Rosendo Cruz............Vice-Prcsident Maeario Bautista Angel Salvador Deogracias Councilors Jose Cueto Procopio Bautis.2, Pablo Cabal MUNICIPALITY QF M,,UNTINLUPA Marciano E. Arciaga........President Leon S. Mendiola..........Vice-Prcsidcnt Co?"nCilo rs Jose Claudel Aniceto Tagle Melencio Santos Felipe Aquino Manuel Arciaga Esteban Navarre Ricardo de Ungria Roman Tantungco MUNICIPALITY OF MORONG............. President............. Vice-President Felix San Juan Maximo Javier Pascual Calma Councilors Ponciano Quiogue Dionisio Francisco Dionisio Soriano MUNICIPALITY OF NAVOTAS Benjamin Alonzo..........President Lorenzo de Jesus.............Vice-President Ricardo Cortez Gaudencio Reyes Marcos Valle Juan Pascual Councilors Luis A. Santos Roman Leorente 'Jose Dimla Josafat de Dios.-220

Page  221 MUNICIPALITY OF PARAiSAQUE Dr. Francisco Gabriel........President Nicanor F. Cruz..........Vice-President Councilors Emiliano Cruz Pedro J. Banta Cesar Reyes Macario Garcia Manuel G. Cruz Hermenegildo Santiago Buenaventura D. Cruz Quirino Burgos MUNICIPALITY OF PASAY Moises San Juan..........President Josia Milan.............Vice-President, Councilors Adolfo C. Santos Roque Inocencio Cecilio Cabrera Macario Vasquez Marcos Protacio Dr. Matias Apelan Felix Perfecto B. Manahan Juan Romero MUNICIPALITY OF PASIG Dr. Sixto Antonio.........President Leandro Jabson..........Vice-President Councilo rs Mariano Melendres Dr. Fernando Santiago Eligio Marcelo Montano Santos Filomeno Sta. Ana Ernesto Angeles Mariano Perez Pedro Hizon MUNICIPALITY OF PATEROS Moises Flores...........President Francisco Luna...........Vice-President Councilors Meichor Menguito Domingo Asuncion Joaquin Alviar Isidoro Sta. Anna Vicente Luna Esteban Flores MUNICIPALITY OF PILILLA Indefonso Alcantara........President Wenceslao Olitan..........Vice-President Councilors ]Pedro Vidanes Laureano Ilocso Juan Tibay Constantino Melendres Fermin Bias I Tomas Aguinaldo, 221

Page  222 MUNICIPALITY OF SAN JUAN Engracio Santos..........President Florencio Atanacio.........Vice-Priesident Juan Montoya Jose Rublo Aquilino de Guzman Mariano Domingo Councilors Francisco Zamora Gregorio V. Felipe Ricardo Santos Hilario Francisco MUNICIPALITY OF SAN MATEO Cesar M. Santos..........President Eduardo Manahan.........Vice-President Councilors Jose Desiderio Nicanor Papa Angel Rivera S3alvador Alfonso Claro Natividad Sin-on Negrito MUNICIPALITY OF TAGIG Dr. Artemio E. Natividad......President Teotimo Cuevas..........Vice-President Councilors Jorge Ramos Sancho Monzod Felipe A. Bernabe Mateo Gregorio Francisco de la Rosa Jose Geronimo MUNICIPALITY OF TANAY Pastor Masilang..........President Paterno Solano...........Vicc-Prcsident Manuel Resurreccion Esteban P. Garcia Alfonso Bardan Councilors Pastor Peiiaranda Teodoro Barrera Mamerto Amhin MUNICIPALITY OF TAYTAY Dr. Eladio Alkantara.........President A. Araullo............ Vce-President toCouncilors M. Borj a E. Valle D. de la Paz J. Loyola A. Cortez D. Santos MUNICIPALITY OF TERESA Francisco T. Gonzales........President Vicente Garrovillas.........Vice-President Councilors Gelacio T. Cruz Maximiano Francisco Feliciano San Felipe Pedro Sspiritu Santo Brigido, Pascual Mariano Francisco 222

Page  223 Rzal Delegates to the 1st District CASTOR CRUZ JUAN ORTEGA 2nd District MARIANO MiELENDRES DOMINGO DIKIT /il Dstrict Eectric Ligt & ce Pant JOSE DE BORJA, Prop. Morong Rizal 2"'23

Page  224 JO0Y ERJIA de MAXIMA LAPERAL DE GUZMAN Despacho de brillantes, perlas y piedras preciosas sueltos. Aihajas de todas clases de estilo moderno. 850-852 Ave. Rizal, Manila Tel. 2-19-07 MABUHAY CABARET San Juan del Monte, Rizal ANTONIO SANTOS Manacger BAGONG SIKAT FABRICA DE MUEBLES CECILIo Luz CARPio, Prop. 127 A. Mabini, St. Caloocan, Rizal DR. JRENEO P. SJA MEDICO0-CIRUJANO Cirujia, Partos, Nifios, Matriz, Tuberculosis. PHIL. GEN. HOSPITAL Floors 7 & 17 Tel. 5-69-91 Residencia: 765 F. B. Harrison Pasay, Rizal Tel. 5-14-24 DR. BENEDICTO CASTILLO DENTIST Pateros Rizal HYGIENIC DRY CLEANING AND LAUNDRY Sterilizes, Cleans, Keeps Clothes like New JULIAN L. ToRRE, Prop 218 Gral. Luna St. Concepcion, Malabon, Rizal DR. ALFONSO R. ROSALES PHYSICIAN-SURGEON Pateros Rizal DR. EMILIO0 JUGO DENTILST Tanay Rizal 224

Page  225 BUSINESS GUIDE INDEX TO ADVERTISERS ACCOUNTANTS: Page Medrado N. Gomez.................................. 128 AERATED WATER FACTORIES: "Sum ilang"........................................... 128 National Soft Drink................................. 116 ARTISTS: Ramon Reyes......................................... 60 ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW: Am pil, Vicente........................................ 52 Castillo, Gregorio...................................... 132 Gavieres, Manuel...................................... 126 Guevara, Guillermo M.................................. 116 Jabson, Leandro..................................... 126 Javier, Benedicto...................................... 126 Javillonar, Lucio....................................... 126 Labao, Ludovico....................................... 148 Melendres, Mariano.................................. 126 Martinez, Ruperto..................................... 96 Ortega, Juan.......................................... 75 Pascual, Andres....................................... 100 Paz, Emilio de la...................................... 90 Pozon, Demetrio...................................... 126 Q uilon, N............................................. 82 Romero, Guillermo.................................... 73 Roxas, Nicanor....................................... 126 San Agustin, Facundo................................ 12G' Santos, Arsenio....................................... 74 Santos, Francisco C............................... 107 Santos, Ignacio Diaz.................................. 90 San Pedro, Maximino M............................. 96 Sumulong, Lorenzo......................... 45 Sumulong, Juan......................... 45 Suck, Abundio........................................ 81 Torres, Genaro Tan............................. 74 Villena, Jos......................................... 81 Zarate, A. M........................................ 96 BAKERIES: Panaderia "EL SOL".................................. 54 225

Page  226 INDEX TO ADVERTISERS Page Panaderia "BAGONG SIKAT"......................... 73 Panaderia "LA PATRIA" (Manila).................... 84 Panaderia "PERLA DEL ORIENTE"................... 89 MAPALAD BAKERY................................. 134 La Pacita Bakery..................................... 138 La Sampagita...................................... 140 Panaderia de la Paz.................................. 154 BEAUTY SHOPS: Rosa's Beauty Parlor.................................. 73 "Ang Dilag ng Dalaga"................................ 100 Pacita's Beauty Parlor................................ 117 Felicidad Beauty Parlor............................... 146 BED FACTORIES: Rizal Bed Factory..................................... 55 BICYCLE REPAIRING SHOP: Sixta Villanueva...................................... 128 Fernandez Bicycle Rep. Shop........................... 81 CHOCOLATE & COFFEE BUSINESS: "Rizal" Chocolate & Coffee Factory..................... 84 CIGAR FACTORIES: Katubusan........................................ 64, 84 DANCE HALLS: San Juan Cabaret.................................... 136 Whoopee Cabaret..................................... 115 Mabuhay Cabaret............................. 224 DRY CLEANING & LAUNDIES: Molina's Dry Cleaning................................ 58 Far Eastern Dry Cleaning............................ 58 Mabuhay Dry Cleaning & Laundry...................... 89 Santos Dry Cleaning.................................. 90 Malaya Dry Cleaning.................................. 107 Cortez Dry Cleaning & Laundry........................ 110 Balite Dry Cleaning............................. 112 "RACOR" Dry Cleaning & Laundry................... 117 Sixta Villanueva...................................... 128 Rivera's Dry Cleaning................................ 143 Hygienic Dry Cleaning & Laundry..................... 224 DENTISTS: Alejandro, Demetria.................................. 151 Almeda, Tomas C..................................... 133 Ampil, Jesus & Angela................................ 52 Angeles, Trinidad R................................... 132 Basa, Jesus........................................... 56 226

Page  227 INDEX TO ADVERTISERS Page Baylon, Francisco..................................... 84 Bautista, Ponciano.................................... 92 Bataclan. Mario................................... 56 Callanta, Victoriano................................... 56 Carlos, Octavio...................................... 142 Castillo, Benedicto.................................... 224 Cangco, Alfredo N..................................... 146 Cruz, Jose P.......................................... 90 Cruz, Fidel........................................... 122 Espiritu, Baltazar..................................... 75 Escala, Alberto.................................... 110,115 Felix A. M atias...................................... 115 Fineza, M........................................ 50 Flores, Maximo...................................... 122 Gascon, Fortunato.....................................115 Garcia, Doroteo....................................... 76 Gonzales, Abelardo..................................... 130 Gatdula, Engracia.................................... 110 Gomez, Celestino...................................... 122 Gonzales. Primitivo........................ 102 Guafio, Trinidad...................................... 122 Gutierrez, Severa B.................................... 108 Javier, Mariano....................................... 122 Jugo, Emilio.......................................... 224 Lazaro. Francisco..................................... 122 Leaiio, Generoso...................................... 82 Leon, Leoncia Lopez de................................. 108 Lucas, Augusto....................................... 56 Marcos, Rosario L...................................... 56 Mendoza, Alberto L.................................... 142 Mendoza, Rufino....................................... 88 Parejas, Delfin....................................... 73 Reyes, Felino A...................................... 88 Reyes, Ricardo........................................ 75 Rodriguez, J........................................ 76 Saez, Eusebio...................................... 133 Sanchez, Anacleto................................... 133 Santos, Esteban M..................................... 122 Santos, Florencio.............................. 102 Siasoco, David.................................... 88 Sta. Ana. Joaquin..................................... 235 Torres, Guillermo...................................... 108 Verdote, Teofilo...................................... 142 Villamayor, Domingo................................... 50 AUTO SUPPLIES: Cruz' Auto Supply.................................... 107 Manila Auto Supply................................ 111 Francisco N. Vicente.................................. 81 227

Page  228 INDEX TO ADVERTISERS DRESSMAKING SHOPS: Pagc Andrea S. Roxas...................................... 75 Aragon's Dressmaking................................. 107 Iluminada Dar Santos............................... 100 Ladies Fashion........................................ 154 La Encantadora...................................... 73 Leofel's Shop.................................117 Leonila's Fashion & Hat Shoppe...................... 140 Manola Paz................................... 89 Modesta R. Policarpio.................................. 100 Pacita's Dressmaker.................................. 117 Rosario L. Barrero..................................... 54 Rosario Garcia........................................ 120 Segundina Viscarra................................... 108 The Chic.............................................. 140 Vidal's Dressmaker....................................117 DRUGGISTS: Farmacia Angono...................................... 50 Fineza Drug Store..................................... 50 Farmacia Cruz...................................... 54 Farmacia Jacinto.................................. 54 Farmacia Ideal....................................... 54 Cardona Drug Store.................................. 62 Farmacia Concepcion (Cardona)...................... 62 Malabon Drug Store.................................. 75 Farmacia Moderna (Malabon).......................... 7( FARMACIA CONCEPCION (Malabon)................ 77 FARMACIA MARIQUINA............................ 86 FARMACIA MODERNA (Marikina)................... 87 Popular Drug Store.................................... 88 Farmacia de Maria de la Paz........................ 88 Farmacia Montalban................................ 92 Farmacia Rizalina.................................... 96 Emilia's Pharmacy.................................... 96 Farmacia Zarraga.................................... 98 San Roque Drug Store................................ 100 Farmacia "Ang Lunas"............................... 108 Botica Reyes..................................... 108 Botica Ntra. Sra. de Buensuceso........................ 108 Farmacia Bernabe................................... 108 Botica Ntra. Sra. de los Angeles....................... 12 Farmaciao Aurora.................................. 114 Farmacia San Jose.................................. 115 Farmacia Nepomuceno................................ 116 Union Drug Store................................ 116 Pateros Drug Store......................... 130 Farmacia Flores.............................. 133 David's Pharmacy..................................... 136 Farmacia Galvez...................................... 235 228

Page  229 INDEX TO ADVERTISERS Page Farmacia Salvador.................................. 142 Siasoco's Drug Store.................................. 142 Adriano's Drug Store.................................. 143 Farmacia Manuel Zamora (Manila)..................... 144 Flores Drug Store.................................... 148 FARMACIA FELIZARDO............................. 150 CEMENT FACTORY: Rizal Portland Cement................................ 48 CINEMATOGRAPHS: Cine Mabini..7........................................ 76 DRY GOODS BUSINESS: Jesus M. Lanuza Store................................ 45 Lorenza H. Gonzaga................................... 154 ELECTRIC SUPPLIES: ELMAC INC. (Manila)................................ 44 Rotonda Electric Supply............................... 128 ELECTRIC COMPANIES: Tanay Electric........................................ 102 EMPLOYMENT AGENCIES: Santiago's Employment Agency......................... 74 FURNITURE BUSINESS: Ricardo Anastacio Furniture Store..................... 81 PASIG FURNITURE................................. 127 "El Molave".......................................... 58 Popular Furniture Factory............................ 60 "Bagong Sikat"....................................... 221 FABRICS: Indian H ead........................................... 62 FILLING CONTRACTORS: Dionisio C. Giron..................................... 76 Montano Santos....................................... 120 Juan Tolentino........................................ 81 GROCERIES: RIZAL GROCERY & COLD STORE................... 118 Ricardo Anastacio..................................... 81 HATTERS: "Ang Manggagawa".................................... 2 Sombrereria de F. Apolonio............................ 58 Santos Hat Store..................................... 90 Eufronio A. Jacinto................................... 138 229

Page  230 INDEX TO ADVERTISERS HOSPITALS: Page MERCY HOSPITAL.................................. 114 ICE PLANTS: RIZAL ICE PLANT................................... 106 District Ice Plant & Electric Co........................ 223 ICE DROP FACTORIES: Caloocan Ice Drop..................................... 54 Modern Sanitary Ice Drop............................. 76 Ice Drop Garden....................................... 89 AURORA ICE DROP................................. 113 Pacita Ice Drop...................................... 138 JEWELRY STORES: Joyeria de M. Laperal de Guzman...................... 224 Zosima de Garcia..................................... 42 Victorina G. de Laperal............................... 80 LIME BUSINESS: Phil. Lime Factory.................................... 105 Apo Lime Company................................... 107 LUMBER & BAMBOO DEALERS: Malabon Lumber & Bamboo Dealers.................... 73 Tableria Agatona C. Santos........................... 117 MAGAZINES: THE PHILIPPINE INTER-COLLEGIATE PRESS..... 69 MARBLE WORKS: Villanueva Marble W orks............................... 98 MID-WIVES: Mrs. Dorotea Kopiko.................................. 62 Leonor A. M arcelo.................................... 90 MUSIC BANDS: "BANDA NATIN".................................... 132 NET & BRAIDS MFG. CO.: Phil. Net & Braid Mfg. Co......................... 111, 235 NOTARIES: M. Marcelino......................................... 45 Delfin Salonga........................................ 133 OPTOMETRISTS: Dr. Remigio A. Bautista............................ 114 PAWNSHOPS: Zosima de Garcia..................................... 42 PHOTOGRAPHERS: San Juan Studio........................ 48, 66, 120, 121, 134 M iranda Studio....................................... 54 230

Page  231 INDEX TO ADVERTISERS Page Era's Photo.......................................... 110 Liwayway Studio......................... 154 PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS: Avendafio, Severino................................ 76 Bautista, Ponciano..................................... 92 Bautista, Paciano.................................... 70 Borja, Crisanto de......................... 133 Borja, Mauro........................... 70 Buenaventura, Nemesio................................ 75 Calingo, Primo......................... 45 Canicosa, Eduardo D................................... 70 Chanyungco, Juan......................... 86 Cifra, Benjamin.................................... 96, 123 Cruz, Benito........................................... 70 Cruz, Cirilo........................................ 90 Cruz, Eusebio........................................ 148 Damian, Luis...................................... 123 Dimanlig, Jose............................. 123 Delgado, Gregorio G................................... 114 Eustaquio, Isaac....................................... 123 Galauran, Fausto...................................... O Galvez,M anuel S....................................... 235 Gimenez, Teofilo...................................... 70 Granados, Vicente..................................... 114 H alili, Tom asa........................................ 87 Fernandez, C. N........................................ 52 Lara, Crispin....................................... 0, 96 Leano, Narciso........................................ 82 Kosca, Jose M....................................... 235 Mallari, Mariano.................................. 90 Manalo, Fernando D.................................. 133 M artinez, Teofilo...................................... 70 Mendiola, Jose A.................................. 133 Palisoc, Narciso J.................................... 56 Paulino, Jos.......................................... 70 Paz, Gonzalo de la......................... 90 Reyes, Sebastian.................................. 123 Ricohermoso, T..................................... 50 Rivera, Victoriano T................................. 70, 100 Rolluqui, Serapio...................................... 45 Rosales. Alfonso......................................... 224 Salcedo, Juan Jr....................................... 114 Salvador, Wenceslao............................... 142 Santos C. Francisco.................................. 107 Santos, Jose F........................................ 142 Santos, Isidro......................................... 96 Santos, Teodorico...................................... 107 Santos, M oises M..................................... 123 Sevilla, Hipolito....................................... 73 Sia, Ireneo............................................ 224 231

Page  232 INDEX TO ADVERTISERS Page Siasoco, Severo.................................. 142 Tablante, Esteban................................... 73 Trinidad, P............................... 50 Villapando, B. M..................................... 123 Umaly, Cesar........................................ 123 PRINTING PRESS: Santiago Press....................................... 74 Modern Press......................................... 116 Imprenta Ilagan...................................... 148 RADIO REPAIRING SHOPS: Lavadia & Co. Inc............................ 55 RESTAURANTS: Carbungco Restaurant......................4.......... 45 Matiaga Restaurant................................... 58 Bulakefia Restaurant.................................. 112 American Doughnut Shop.............................. 60 RICE MILLS: Molina de Arroz de T. Nepomuceno..................... 89 Bigasang M aingat..................................... 120 Molina de Arroz de R. de Jesus........................ 148 Bigasang MASIKAP Inc............................... 148 "Bigasan" of S. Garrovilias........................... 148 SAIL MAKERS: General Sail Maker.................................... 153 SLIPPER MAKERS: "ANG MAGINOO".................................... 74 "M agsimpan"....................................... 74 "Ang Inam"........................................ 108 "K abinataan"......................................... 110 "A ng Pasay"....................................... 116 "Paghanapin"......................................... 120 "Sadiang Laan"....................................... 142 Chineleria Carifiosa................................... 235 SALOONS (Bars & Cafe): Purity Bar......................................... 102 Oriental Cafe......................................... 111 Beck's Holsten Beer.................................. 81 R izal B ar............................................ 57 SCHOOLS: MALABON NORMAL & HIGH SCHOOL............. 71 COMMONWEALTH INSTITUTE...................... 153 Malabon Standard High School........................ 69 SHOE BUSINESS: The People's Shoe..................................... 64 Guinto Shoe Shop..................................... 58 232

Page  233 INDEX TO ADVERTISERS SUB-DIVISIONS: Page AYALA Y CIA....................................... 78 PHIL. LAND IMPROVEMENT....................... 52 SAN JUAN HEIGHTS............................... 139 SAN FRANCISCO SUB-DIVISION................ 141 BALINTAWAK SUB-DIVISION....................... 57 SUGAR COMPANIES: M alabon Sugar Co..................................... 72 SURETIES: Luzon Surety Co...................................... 87 TAILORING: M olina's Fashion...................................... 58 M arcelo's Fashion...................................... 60 The Lopez Tailoring.................................. 74 Jose Y. Cervantes..................................... 75 F. R. Jacinto......................................... 81 Velasco's Tailoring..................................... 82 Metro Universal Fashion............................... 82 G. G. Caguia Tailoring............................... 89 Garcia's Tailoring.................................... 89 Era's Fashion........................................110 P. Tolentino.......................................... 110 Arcadio Hilario........................................110 Timoteo Manalo & Sons Tailoring..................... 112 Alhambra's Tailoring................................... 112 Sastreria LIGAYA................................... 112 Limbo Brothers Tailoring.............................. 116 Roman Cruz Tailoring................................117 J. V. Rodriguez Fashion............................... 124 Esteban Sunga Tailoring.............................. 128 San Lorenzo's Tailoring............................... 128 Albayana Tailoring................................. 128 F. Haluber's Tailoring................................. 143 Andys Malayan Fashion............................... 140 TILE WORKS & BALUSTERS: TUAZON E HIJOS................................... 131 Fabrica de Ladrillos Olimpia.......................... 82 Isaac Eustaquio....................................... 89 Fabrica de Ladrillos de P. Ponce.............. S2 Leon de Guzman...................................... 82 Phil. Lime Factory & Tile Works....................... 105 TRANSPORTATION COMPANIES: Raymundo Transportation Co.......................... 95 Try Tran.................................. 125 Jesus Ampil Transportation........................... 153 Halili Transit....................................... 59 Pasay Transportation................................. 236 233

Page  234 INDEX TO ADVERTISERS Page Antipolo Bus......................................... 14 Manila Railroad Co.................................... 46 UNDERTAKERS: SAMAHANG FUNERARIA MALAYA................ 117 Funeraria Marikina.................................. 88 Funeraria "EL ARTE"............................... 88 WAREHOUSES: Luzon Brokerage Co................................... 152 SARI-SARI STORES: "Tindang-Bayan" of J. Silayan........................ 5 "Tindang-Bayan" of Rosario Pili...................... 62 WATCH MAKERS & GOLDSMITH: National Watch Repairing............................ 112 La Venturina......................................... 117 Jose B. M icael........................................ 124 El M onte de Oro...................................... 128 Friendly Watch Makers............................... 58 Relojeria, Plateria de Atienza.......................... 105 "ANG HIYAS"....................................... 110 Plateria y Relojeria de S. Evangelista................. 58 "E L E LG IN "......................................... 81 The M odern Art...................................... 134 Las Dalagas..................................... 112 VETERINARIANS: M allari, Alfredo...................................... 88 "PATIS NAVOTAS": "Ang LINAMNAM"..................... 98, 101 "Patis Navotas" of E. Naval................... 100 "NAPANAGINIP".................................. 100 MISCELLANEOUS: Carroceria "BAGONG PANAHON".................... 74 CARROCERIA de Modesto Sanvictores............ 148 Vaciador Filipino..................................... 54 Royal Sterilized Milk................................. 98 Taller de Maquinarias y Varadero.................... 102 Compliments of E. Almeda............................ 134 Compliments of Isidoro C. Angangco................. 136 Compliments of Zarayda S. Velarde.................... 56 Compliments of F. Angangco.......................... 136 Siempre Vivo Garden............................ 138 Philippine Trading Co................................. 92 BATIBOT INC. Fabrica de Sillas Hierro............... 84 Qui Bee (Fabrica de Vijon)........................... 57 Kim Chuan Soy Factory............................... 57 Novaliches Poultry Products........................... 60 Siempre Vivo Garden.................................. 138 234

Page  235 CHINELERIA CARIF4OSA de GREGORIO ANICETO. Prop. Caloocan Rizal DR. JOAQUIN ST-A. ANA DENTIST Marikina Rizal THE PHIL. NET & BRAID MFG. CO. INC. 343 Juan Luna, Manila MGA MANGJNGISDA: Biihin ninyo ang aming mga lambat at sinulid na marea "PEZ" at "CHINCHORRO". na, siyanga pinakamabuti sa, lahat. DR. JOSE M. KOSCA MEDIC, - CIRUJANO0 93 Lucban, Pasay Tel. 5-12-97 Niftos y Partos DR. MANUEL S. GA1LVEZ PHYSICIAN-SURGE~ON 254-2456 Libertad, Pasay Fiebres, Niflos, Enfermedades del Pecho y Estomago FARMACIA GALVEZ 254-256 Libertad Pasay Clinic: Farmacia Galvez Consulta: 8:00-12:00 A. M. 4:00- 6:00 P. M. 235

Page  236 Efficient, Economical and Dependable PASAY TRANSPORTATION CO. INC. PARA~AQUE, RIZAL Tels. 5-18-64 2-41-07 REGULAR SCHEDULES IN ALL LINES At anytime 3 = = Anywhere.... The Pasay Transportation Company owes its existence to Don Antonio Garrido who bought a franchise from one Perfecta 0. de Borioni, then operating an insignificant line between Pasay and Las Pitias. After a few months he exte nded t he line to Cavite. Don Antonio incorporated the company on Decemnber 10, 1928. The needed capital for the expansion of the business was not hard to raise for Lhe public knew his exceptional business ability and genius. The Company subsequently acquired several certificates authorizcause of the tactful management of Don Antonio the service of the company has been raised to the highest standard. The company is now operating in many sections of the buted, more than anybody else, to the protion Company which is also providing livelihood to numerous employees and their faniANTONIO GARRIDO, Manager ilies. 236

Page  237 '"RAM ON LEE"I P A N CITE R I A is the beet place for you when you want THE BEST IN CHINESE DISHES Moderate Prices Excellent Service Opposite Cine Palace 1,22 Ronquillo, Sta. Cruz, Manila MAAAGR & Phone 2-18 65 PO~F;O ISAAC EUSTAQUJO Marikina, Rizal Manufacturer of concrete water traps, slabs, Balusters, Flower pots and other ornamental concrete products. Fabrica de Cal y Baldosa Campo Claudio, Parafiaque, RizalI A. PASCUAL OFFICE & PROP. FAC TORY I EL. 5-19-62

Page  238 TEL. 2-54-97 SALVADOR S. SEVILLA..ATTORNEY-AT-LAW MAXIMINO SAN DIEGO ABOGADO-NOTARIO (Patent Attorney) Home Address: Morong, Rizal Office: 314 Kneedler Bldg., Manila 40 Argellies Bldg. 456 DasmariinasManila' Residence: 88 Juan Luna Street, Malabon, Rizal 1i7DRA. GENERACION QUIJANO I ~~DENTISTA 1 121 Gen. Luna.Malabon, Rizal DR. J. SIXTO AREVALO PHYSICIAN-SURGE!ON Residence: 559 Leveriza, Pasay Consultation: 3-6 p. m. Tel. 5-12-12 EL FLOREAL DRESSMAKER' Beading already-made dresses Trajes de Boda, Ternos y Ropas.hecha's. GREGORIO SIMON ATTORNEY-AT-LAW Pateros Rizal 123 F. Rosario Pasay, Rizal THE MODERN SHOP Dressmaking & Permanent Hair waving Genuine Frederics Products used at very reasonable prices. J. SAN Luis, Prop. 721 Leveriza, Pasay.Tel. 51550 CLAUDIA IGNACIO NURSE & MIDWIFE Malabon, Rizal

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Page  [unnumbered] 1. I N.0 1. — r!. -*.... a S.yne S;r~~~~~~o ana ADRIANO'S MENTHOL COUGH DROPS NEGROL ADRIANO REUMACOI ADRIANO TONSICOL ADRIANO GONORREICOL ADRIANO METRONAL ADRIANO 'ALLICIDOL ADRIANO COCO-TONAL ADRIANO SHAMPOO.MEN-THO-COL ADRIANO MATA-DOLOR ADRIANO GONORREICO[ ADRIANO COMBINADO ELIXIR DENTRIFICO ADRIANO BULATOL ADRIANO TAB. NGIKIKOL ADRIANO TAB. URICOL ADRIANO VINO-KINA-KOLA ADRIANO ADRIANO'S HER SET BOR-O-XOL ADRIANO LOTION HIKAKOL ADRIANO HEMATOL ADRIANO LINIMENTO ADRIANO para CABALLO:61 N. Domingo, San Juan, Rizal t - Tel. 6-84-51 -- ~ -- -* — ~~I.I C -rl ~:: cr-rrrrrrrrrrr~~ ~, ~~~~~~~~- Am~~~~~~~~~~~~j"~~~~~~~ t-~__- _;~: J~:.-,~\