Illustrated history and biographical record of Lenawee County, Mich. ...
Knapp, John I., 1825-, Bonner, R. I. joint author. (Richard Illenden), b. 1838., De La Vergne, Earl W.

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Page  2 P: I Log Cabins built on the County Fair Grounds, Adrian, in 1898. The logs were supplied by farmers from nearly every town in the County. The day set for the "hauling" was a memorable one in Adrian. The procession of log teams was more than one-and-a-half miles long. The buildings were erected in honor and memory of the pioneers of Lenawee County.

Page  3 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND Biographical Record OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICH, Containing an Accurate Epitomized History from the First Settlement in 1824 to the Present Time, ILLUSTRATED WITH PORTRAITS OF MANY OF THE FIRST SETTLERS AND THOSE THAT CAME AFTER, TOGETHER WITH MANY OLD LANDMARKS, PUBLIC BUILDINGS, FARM SCENES AND HOMES OF PROMINENT RESIDENTS. VALUABLE STATISTICS AND CAREFULLY WRITTEN BIOGRAPHIES. By JOHN I. KNAPP and R. I, BONNER. ADRIAN, MICH.: THE TIMES PRINTING COMPANY. 1903.

Page  4 Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1903, BY JOHN I. KNAPP AND R. I. BONNER, In the office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington, D. C.

Page  5 TO THE CHILDREN AND GRANDCHILDREN OF THE PIONEERS OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN, THIS VOLUME IS MOST RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED.

Page  6 LENAWEE COUNTY COURT HOUSE.

Page  7 THE MISSION OF THIS VOLUME, The authors and compilers of this volume have no excuses to offer or apologies to make for its appearance. Some twenty-four years ago the writer spent two years in producing the first history and biographical record of Lenawee county. At that time most books of this character contained dry facts, without embellishment or relief. In the interval, great progress has been made in the arts, and recent discoveries make it possible to embellish and illustrate in the highest degree. The new methods of engraving make it possible to illuminate a volume at moderate cost. Taking advantage of this fact we decided to undertake the publication of this book. One of the most entertaining methods of making history is by illustrating important events, prominent men and women, their first homes, buildings, etc. Believing this and assuming that patriotic citizens would be interested, and in many cases fascinated with a volume containing the portraits, or views of the homes of the pioneers of Lenawee county, together with old landmarks, public buildings and landscapes, modern homes and architecture, we commenced the work. We had the confidence to believe that a volume of this kind would put our readers truthfully and familiarly in touch with the scenes of the past, giving object lessons to the present and future generations. Therefore we have made the illustrations the distinctive feature of our work. The photographer has done his work well, and there is not an imaginary picture in the book, each view illustrating some real face, object or place. Thus we preserve the personality of many of the pioneer heroes, and striking features of their habitat. In writing history or biography one finds himself constantly hunting for. the blazed trees along the trail, the most potent factor being the recognition of every evidence of truth and reliability. There is no value in inaccuracy, and to avoid it one is ever on the alert. It has been our endeavor in the prosecution of this work to correctly give all facts and figures. Many of our illustrations will show the faces and the habitations of the first settlers in the wilderness of Lenawee county. We hope that the presentation of those resolute old faces will stimulate a feeling of veneration and regard. Many of our present readers can readily imagine, and some can vividly remember their parents, living in a log hut, surrounded by an illimitable wilderness, striving to make a home, and only being able to secure the scantiest food. Is it possible for the occupants of the hundreds of pleasant and beautiful farm homes and fine estates in Lenawee county to realize that their parents saw nothing

Page  8 8 THE MISSION OF THIS VOLUME. but wildness, roamed at large by bears and panthers and packs of wolves, and screeching catamounts, affording hiding places for thousands of timid deer, where now you see beautiful landscapes, with herds of cattle and flocks of sheep upon the gentle slopes, and fine homes and orchards upon the hill tops. Are you, as the children of those pioneers, who now enjoy all the peace and comfort of this favored land, and occupy those homes, sufficiently impressed with the sacrifices your parents made; with their heroism and their fortitude, their hope and trust? Do you realize what kind of fathers and mothers they were, what they did for you and humanity? The children of the pioneers of Lenawee county should rejoice and be happy, not that their parents have passed away. but that they had such ancestors to remember. The endurance and unconscious bravery of your fathers was heroism, but the hope and fortitude, the watchful and loving care, the uplifting influence of your mothers was triumph. In making the canvass for this publication we have visited the different townships in the county, and have occasionally found an original settler still alive; one of the seed sowers who has lived to enjoy the harvest. There are still a few veterans left living on the land they purchased of the government. In Rome we found one, David Smith, and in Fairfield two, Asaph K. Porter and Mrs. James Green, all over ninety years old. We have found many people between eighty and ninety years of age, enjoying life to the fullest extent, which fact gives evidence of the salubrity of our climate and the obvious advantages of a residence here. Lenawee county is the home of the oldest woman in Michigan, Mrs. Maria H. Hixon, of Clinton, who came to Tecumseh in 1826. She was born June 26th, 1800, making her 103 years of age, and able to help herself to a remarkable degree. One of the last reports from the State Agricultural Department shows that Lenawee county leads all the rest of the State in two important items: the amount invested in farm buildings and the value of its live stock. The people of the county are to be congratulated on their abundant blessings, and the good judgment of the first settlers is proclaimed.

Page  9 MICHIGAN, The territory that now includes Michigan was probably first visited by a white man in 1641. Thatyear. in July, the French Jesuit Fathers, Charles Rymbalt and Isaac Jogues, encamped at the Sault Ste. Marie. In 1665 Father Claude Allonez founded a mission at La Point, Lake Superior. In 1668 Father Marquette founded a mission at Sault Ste. Marie, and in 1671 established another mission near Mackinaw. In 1671 the King of France took formal possession of all the country lying between Montreal and the Gulf of Mexico, and west as far as the great lakes and the Mississippi river. The tribes of Indians then occupying this territory were Ottawas and Chippewas, with some Sacs and Foxes on the south shore of Lake Superior. and some smaller tribes of Pottawatomies and Miamas in the south, on the portion now known as Southern Michigan. Detroit was founded in 1701 by De La Motte Cadillac. He landed on the site of the present city on the 24th day of July, and immediately commenced the erection of Fort Pontchartrain. In 1761 France ceded her dominion over Michigan to England. In 1774 Michigan became a part of the Province of Quebec. In 1796 Michigan was surrendered to the United States, and General St. Clair was appointed Governor. Wayne County was organized August 11th that year, and included all of Michigan, the northern part of Ohio and Indiana, and a portion of Illinois and Wisconsin. Wayne County elected delegates to the first Territorial Legislature. which met at Cincinnati September 16th, 1799. January 11th, 1805, Michigan was organized as a Territory by Act of Congress, and Gen. William Hull was appointed Governor. On the 11th day of June, 1805, Detroit, then a village, estimated to have a population of at least 2,500 people, was entirely destroyed by fire, not a building being left. The first Legislature was called to meet there July 2d following. Michigan Territory was surrendered to the British by General Hull on the 17th day of August, 1812. On the 29th day of September, 1813, the British evacuated the Territory, and on the 13th day of October following, Col. Lewis Cass was appointed Governor.

Page  10 10 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL TECUMSEH, THE FIRST SETTLEMENT IN LENAWEE COUNTY. [The most comprehensive and accurate history ever written of the first events in Lenawee county was the work of the Hon. John J. Adam; and can be found in Whitney and Bonner's History and Biographical Record of Lenawee County, vol. 1, page 6.] September 10th, 1822, Lewis Cass, then Governor of the Territory of Michigan, thought it expedient to lay out a new county, to be known as the County of Lenawee. He accordingly issued a proclamation to that effect, and included all the territory "Beginning at the principal meridian, where the line between the townships numbered four and five, south of the base line, intersects the same; thence south to the boundary line between the Territory of Michigan and the State of Ohio," etc. The territory then included in Lenawee County extended as far west as Lake Michigan, and consisted of the present counties of Hillsdale, Branch, St. Joseph, Cass and Berrien. At that time Lenawee County was attached to Monroe, where all taxes were paid and courts of justice held. It was not until the 31st of December, 1836, that Lenawee County became fully organized by act of the Legislative Council. The seat of justice was then established "On the northwest quarter of section numbered thirty-four, in township five south, range four east, in said County of Lenawee, on lands owned by Messrs. Wing, Evans and Brown, agreeably to the plan of a town or village (Tecumseh), situated on the said northwest quarter section, and recorded in the Register's office in the county of Monroe the twenty-sixth day of June, 1824." By this act the inhabitants of Lenawee County "were entitled to all the rights and privileges to which, by law, the inhabitants of the other counties of the Territory are entitled." Gen. Joseph W. Brown was the first judge of the county, and the original plat of the village (now city) of Niles was recorded in the first volume of the registry of deeds of Lenawee County. One of the principal reasons, and perhaps the most potent, for the constant and rapid arrival of immigrants and settlers to the new county was the fact that the Indians were quiet and peaceable. There is no mention of any massacre or horrible depredation upon the new arrivals on record. It was a common thing for settlers to locate regardless of neighbors or protection, and there is no account of a stockade ever being constructed in Lenawee county. The first Indian scare did not come until 1832. In some mysterious way a rumor was started that large numbers of Indians were gathering, and that the

Page  11 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 11 whites were to be massacred or driven from the country. There was intense excitement among the settlers for a time, but nothing ever occurred to warrant the " scare." This was the "Black Hawk War." The original area of Lenawee county was twenty townships, six miles square, containing thirty-six sections of land, besides a strip along the south side containing at least twenty sections more. It is believed by good judges that the fractional sections along the west side of the county will make up for the land covered by the water of the lakes in the western portion. This being true, there are 2,860 quarter sections of arable land. Since the organization of the county two townships have been, for local reasons, divided. Tecumseh township was bisected and the township of Clinton established. The township of Blissfield was likewise divided and the township of Deerfield organized. Snell Hotel, Tecumseh. Erected 1833-34. The first settlement in Lenawee County was made May 21st, 1824, on the present site of the village of Tecumseh. These primitive pioneers nearly all came from Jefferson County, New York, and consisted of fifteen men, four women and eleven children, as follows: Musgrove Evans, wife and six children; Gen. Joseph W. Brown, wife and five children; Ezra F. Blood, Peter Benson and wife, Simon Sloate, Nathan Rathburn, Peter Lowe, James Young, George Spofford, Curtis Page, Levi Baxter, John Borland, Capt. Peter Ingals, John Fulsom. Turner Stetson and wife, who had come from Boston, joined the party at Detroit.

Page  12 12 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL It is fair to say that Musgrove Evans was the pathfinder of this bold adventure, for during the previous year, 1823, he visited the locality during a preliminary exploration, and after covering a large portion of the region, decided that this spot was the most desirable and beautiful of all he had seen. It was he who interested Gen. J. W. Brown in the enterprise, and through him enlisted the other members of the party. But while it is true that Mr. Evans projected and succeeded in settling his colony in the beautiful wilderness, he was never regarded as the leader and mainstay by the settlers. It was General Brown whom each relied upon. He had experienced a pioneer life, was practical, resourceful and capable of combating with nature in her most primitive state. He could lead a forlorn hope and conquer all ordinary obstacles. He was a practical farmer and miller, was endowed with moral and physical courage, and his forceful nature inspired hope and confidence. He was a typical pioneer, and under his leadership the colony prospered and grew in numbers and importance. Tecumseh soon came to be a place of importance, and retained the county seat until 1838, when, by act of the first State Legislature, it was removed to Adrian. By the state census of 1837 Tecumseh had a population of 2,462, while Logan township (afterwards changed to Adrian), including the village, could only muster 1,962. The first frame house in Tecumseh, or Lenawee County, was built by General Brown in 1825. It was known as the Green Tavern and was for some time the only public house in the territory west of Monroe. In the fall of 1824 the first sawmill was erected by Wing, Evans & Brown, and in 1825 Turner Stetson erected a gristmill for them, the stones being worked out of a huge granite boulder found nearby. Many pioneers came a distance of sixty miles with their "grists" to this mill. The first school opened in the county was taught by Mrs. Mary Spofford in the winter of 1824-5. The first wedding in the county occurred in May, 1827, when Miss Cynthia Spofford was married to Theodore Bissell. They went to Texas in 1835, where Mr. Bissell died. The first physician to abide in the county was Dr. Caleb N. Ormsby, first locating in Tecumseh, but permanently settling in Adrian in 1827. Dr. M. A. Patterson was the first to permanently settle in Tecumseh. In the spring of 1830 a stage route was established west from Tecumseh to White Pigeon by Horace Walcott, Sumner F. Spofford driving the first coach through. The first election in the county took place in Tecumseh, in 1825, when only fourteen votes were cast for the Hon. Austin E. Wing, for delegate to congress. He was twice elected to congress, and served from 1825 to 1829. Although Mr. Wing was closely connected

Page  13 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 13 with the first settlement of Lenawee county, he never became a resident, his home being in Monroe. He had filled the office of private secretary to Governor Cass with ability, and possessed rare qualities for organization and public service. Hle took a lively interest in the early growth and development of Lenawee County. He personally entered the land for the firm of Wing, Evans & Brown, upon which the village of Tecumseh now stands. He lived many years and saw the county completely settled and become dotted with beautiful cities and villages, and prosperous and happy farm homes. He died at Cleveland, Ohio,, in August, 1869. Musgrove Evans platted Tecumseh in 1824, and christened the village. He was the first mail contractor and postmaster. In 1826 he was appointed by the United States government to survey a military road from Detroit, Mich., to Chicago, Ill., now known as the old Chicago turnpike. He took the first census in 1830. His district included all the territory west of Monroe county, south to the Ohio and Indiana state lines, and west to Lake Michigan, which territory then contained a population of 1,491. Mr. Evans was a native of Bucks county, Pennsylvania, being born there in 1793, and died in Cypress Creek, Texas, June 7, 1855. The first regular store in the county was opened in Tecumseh by Daniel Pitman, in 1825. It was greatly appreciated by the white settlers, as well as the Indians. The court house at Tecumseh, that was vacated by the removal of the county seat to Adrian, was afterwards occupied by the State University for some time. The church history of Tecumseh is quite interesting. The first minister of any denomination to create a regular appointment in the county was the Rev. John A. Baughman, who organized a Methodist Episcopal church in Tecumseh in 1826. The first Methodist church was built in 1842. The first minister to visit Tecumseh and hold service was Rev. Noah M. Wells, a Presbyterian divine, in the fall of 1825. In April, 1826, the Rev. Alanson Darwin established a Presbyterian church, with ten members. The organization was effected under the name of "The First Presbyterian Society of Tecumseh." In 1839-40 the first church edifice was built, and March 31st, 1869, the present fine church was dedicated. The Baptist church was organized in 1839, with a membership of twenty-eight, the Rev. L. H. Moore being the first pastor. He has been followed by the Revs. J. I. Fulton, Samuel Cornelius, P. B. Haughout, E. Royce, James McLeod, B. McLouth, J. Fletcher, J. I. Fulton, J. L. McCloud, T. S. Hill, J. Moxsom, P. Olney, M. E. Hayne, C. E. Conley, F. A. Adkins, F. E. Arnold and H. A. Smith. St. Peter's Episcopal church dates back to September, 1831, when Rev. Dr. P. Galatin conducted the first services in a school house. In 1832 the parish was organized, Rev. Mr. Freeman being present. In May, 1833, Rev. W. Lyster became the first rector,

Page  14 14 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL under whose efforts the church was built, the opening day being August 2, 1835. A Universalist church was instituted April 9th, 1853. In March, 1854, Rev. W. E. Manley was installed as the first regular minister. The Friends church was organized in 1851. It is an orthodox society and belongs to Adrian quarterly meeting. The Tecumseh Union school district was organized in 1854. There are four commodious and adequate school buildings in the village. Chicago Street, Tecumseh. The village of Tecumseh is one of the handsomest and most desirable places of residence of its class in Michigan. As a business center it is an influential factor in Lenawee county. Many important manufacturing industries are located there. The business places, many of which are filled with most desirable and varied assortments, are mostly located in substantial brick buildings of good style and architecture. The streets are wide and shaded by deciduous trees, bordered by beautiful lawns and fine residences. There is an efficient system of water works, and water of the best quality is supplied. The village also has a good electric light plant, and the public places are all nicely lighted, while most of the stores and many residences enjoy this most brilliant and cleanly illuminator. We are indebted for many facts to the late Hon. Francis A. Dewey, who left many valuable statistics relating to first events in the county. His memoirs are of the greatest value at this time. We

Page  15 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 15 copy as follows: "In the year 1824 the first government land was bought in this county, by Austin E. Wing, and on June 2d Musgrove Evans moved his family, with a few others, to this county. On the east side uf the river, at Tecumseh, he. erected his log house, with elm bark for a roof, twenty miles from any laid-out road or white inhabitant. * * * * A more admired scenery than the wild domain presented never perhaps greeted the eye of the enterprising home seeker. * * * * Rev. Noah M. Wells preached the first sermon, and Rev. Mr. Walker, Methodist preacher, also called here in his circuit of 1,200 miles, and gave a discourse. In 1828 Leslie Osborne set out the first orchard. In 1829 Darius Comstock, at the Valley, built the Friends meeting house, and by subscription the court house was built at Tecumseh, also a logjail, in 1830. * * * * A short half-mile from the corner of the road, near Brownville, where it turns east on the old Saline road, were the remains of earth-works. Here was a square enclosure with an embankment of earth four feet high and three rods square, with two openings. Here in this enclosure tradition of the older Indians points with majestic pride, and says there is where the celebrated or imperial chiefs held council. Also near by, on this level and beautiful plat of ground, was a circular embankment or enclosure, four feet high and about two rods in diameter, with a cavity scooped out in the center. Where tradition of olden time illustrates the historical emblems, the sacred plants or herbs were placed in the center of the circle and set on fire; from the fumes of this smoke the pipe of peace or war was dictated by the chiefs to the Indian nations. It is with pleasure that I now say within the year 1829 and '30, full fifty-eight years ago, it was a cheerful treat for me on several different times to visit this beautiful plateau of ground, with its ancient works of solid embankments, with leisure and admiration studied to learn who were the managers of this olden time monumental relic. Since the year 1832 the plow and cultivator have leveled the historic work of the ancient mound builders. * * * * In my brief outline I do not wish to omit a few words as a passing notice of the renowned chief, Tecumseh. He was born, and over forty years of his life were spent, in the forests of Michigan; his wigwam was on the banks of the River Raisin. Historians say he possessed a noble figure, and his countenance was strikingly expressive of magnanimity; also was distinguished for moral traits far above his race; a warrior in the broadest Indian sense of the word. He disdained the personal adornments of silver brooches, which the tribes so much delighted to wear. In the war of 1812 he joined in the British service, and had in his command over a thousand Indians belonging in Michigan. In Gen. Proctor's division of the Canada soldiers, Tecumseh held the rank of brigadier general in the British service. He still adhered to his Indian dress, a deerskin coat with leggins of the same material being his constant garb. In this he was found dead at the battle of the Thames, October 5th, 1813."

Page  16 16 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL BLISSFIELD-The Second Settlement, The second settlement made in the county was by Hervey Bliss and family. June 19th, 1824, Hervey Bliss entered land on sections 29 and 30, the present site of the village of Blissfield, and moved his family on the land in December, that year. Mr. Bliss was thus the first settler and founder of Blissfield. The township and village were named for him. The second entry of land in the township was made by Gideon West, June 28th, 1824, on section 29. Mr. West moved there with his family in 1825. These were the only entries made in the township that year, but in 1825, George Giles, Almond Harrison and Samuel Buck entered land. George Giles brought his family in the spring of 1826. Samuel Buck, being a young man, was the principal in the first wedding in the township, marrying Miss Margaret Frary, stepdaughter of Gideon West, November 23d, 1826, it being necessary to send to Monroe. for a justice of the peace to perform the ceremony. George Stout took advantage of the occasion, and was married to Miss Delight Bliss at the same time. May 28th, 1827, the first election was held at the home of Hervey Bliss, for the election of township officers. There were twenty-five offices and only thirteen electors to fill them. Some of the men were elected to two, and in one case, three offices. The first minister in the township was the Rev. J. A. Baughman, of the M. E. church, who came in the fall of 1827. The first birth in the township was George Lane, who was born March 27th, 1827. The second was Lucinda Buck (now Mrs. Fred CanThenon), born O ctober 3d, 1827. Both still reside in Blissfield. First log house built in the Township of The first school house was built Blissfield. of logs, in the summer of 1827, and the first school master was Chester Stuart, who came from Monroe. The first Presbyterian church was organized in Blissfield, February 22d, 1829, the Rev. Alanson Darwin, of Tecumseh, officiating. At the election held July 11th. 1831, twenty-nine votes were cast. The township was organized in May, 1827, and then included all of the present township of Deerfield.

Page  17 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 17 The village of Blissfield is one of the important business points in the county. It is the principal trading point for the southeastern portion of the county, and three townships of the most productive farming land of Michigan are tributary to it. It is probably the largest shipping point for fat live stock, on the line of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern railroad, between Chicago and Toledo. During the year 1902 fully 2,550 fine cattle and over 10,000 fat hogs were sent to the eastern markets from that station. The Business Center of Blissfield. The cattle shown in the above picture were fatted by Stephen H. Leonard, who resides on Sec. 12 in Ogden. Mr. Leonard is the largest cattle feeder in Lenawee County. In 1901-2 he fed 72 head of cattle, and in June, 1902, shipped them, together with 119 hogs, from Blissfield station, receiving in payment a check for $8,587.14. In 1902-3 he fed 66 head of cattle and 80 hogs. 2

Page  18 18 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL ADRIAN-The Third Settlement, Early in the fall of 1825, Addison J. Comstock, accompanied by his father, Darius Comstock, started from their home, in Lockport, New York, for the Territory of Michigan. Upon arriving in Detroit they found Walter Whipple, who was pn his way back east. Mr. Whipple had been on an exploring tour and had taken up land. They were old acquaintances in the State of New York, and Mr. Whipple informed his friends of the fine lands and opportunities south of Tecumseh, where he had purchased. The Comstocks took the "Tecumseh trail," and September 7th, 1825, Addison J. Comstock purchased from the government 480 acres of land, on which the greater portion of the city of Adrian now stands. Mr. Comstock was then a "single" man. Immediately returning east, he was married the following February, and that spring, 1826, started for his future home in Michigan. Thus the third settlement of pione'ers in Lenawee county was begun. East Maumee Street, Adrian, in 1863. John Gifford came in Mr. Comstock's employ. Mr. Comstock forthwith gave his attention to building two houses, one for himself, located on the lot now occupied by the street railway company, as a depot, at the east end of Maumee street bridge. Mr. Gifford succeeded in making his house habitable first, and Mrs. Gifford boasted of being the first white woman to settle in Adrian. Mrs. Comstock, however, was domiciled in her house a few days later. John Gifford was the second man to locate land within the present limits of Adrian. Elias Dennis was the third, his purchase dating from December

Page  19 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 19 26th, 1826, and comprised a large portion of the southern part of the present city. On the last day of March, 1828, Addison J. Comstock laid out, platted and recorded the original plan of the village of Adrian. This contained forty-nine lots, commencing at the river bank and running east nearly to what is now Broad street. Settlers came in rapidly. The village was first called "Logan," but it was decided to change that appellation, and Mrs. Comstock christened it "Adrian," after the noted Roman. The first public roads were laid out, fourteen in number, by Noah Norton and Warren Aylesworth, Road Commissioners, from November 26th, 1827, to December 11th, 1828. Monument Square, Showing Soldiers' Monument. The first election held for village officers took place in May, 1827. The second election in the township took place on the first Monday of the following November, for choosing members to the legislative council, when 71 votes were cast. In the summer of 1828, the father of Mrs. Addison J. Comstock, Mr. Isaac Dean, came to Adrian, and soon after commenced the erection of the first hotel, the "Exchange." The building stood on the corner of Maumee and Winter streets. It was a commodious structure for those days, became very popular as a public resort, was the "stage house" for many years, and was removed in 1859 to make

Page  20 20 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL room for the large brick hotel now occupying the site. A part of the old building, now known as the "Gibson House," was located a little further down the street. The second hotel was built by Isaac French, on the northwest corner of Main and Maumee streets, in 1830, and was known as the "Franklin House." It was destroyed by fire in 1846, and a brick hotel was soon after erected on the site. In 1829 A. J. Comstock and Isaac Dean built a mill, for many years afterwards known as the " Red Mill." At that time the nearest mill was at Tecumseh. The first postoffice in Adrian was established in 1829, with A. J. Comstock as postmaster. The first quarter's receipts were nineteen cents. First Soldiers to leave Adrian in the Spring of 1861, under President Lincoln's call for 75,000 men. The first school was opened in the village in the winter of 1828-9, by Miss Dorcas Dean. In 1829, a frame school house was built on the west side of South Main street, at the junction of Winter street. The first dry goods store was opened by E. C. Winter in 1829, on the southwest corner of Maumee and Winter streets. For many years Mr. Winter was a successful Indian trader and dealer in white men's supplies. The first church edifice to be built in Adrian was in 1832, when

Page  21 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 21 the Presbyterian society located their house of worship on Church street, adjoining the lot where the principal apparatus of the fire department is now stationed. The first newspaper in the county was established in Adrian by R. W. Ingals, October 22, 1834. The paper was first christened The Adrian Gazette and Lenawee County Republican. This was subsequently changed to The Watch Tower. Mr. Ingals continued to publish the paper until 1863, when he disposed of it to Larwill, Applegate & Champion. September 11th, 1865, Gen. William Humphrey purchased the plant, when the name was changed to the Adrian Daily and Weeckly 7Times, which still lives. Main Street, Looking North. The first meetings of the Baptist church of Adrian were held in 1832 in the upper room of the house now occupied by Dr. Jewett Williams, jr., on the north side of East Maumee street, next west of the postoffice. The first drug store was opened by Abel Whitney and Asahel Finch, jr., in 1835. During the summer of 1834 the village was visited by a plague of sickness that carried off many of the most respected and prominent citizens. Scarcely a family escaped. The greatest event in the history of Adrian occurred November 2d, 1836, being the completion of the Erie & Kalamazoo railroad

Page  22 22 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL from Toledo to Adrian. This was the first railroad built west of Schenectady, New York, and was an enterprise of the greatest importance. It was through the enterprise and untiring efforts of Addison J. Comstock, his father, Darius Comstock, George Crane, Joseph Gibbons and Dr. C. N. Ormsby, of Adrian, and some gentlemen in Toledo, that the work was done. The first court house and jail was erected in Adrian in 1836-7. The court house was destroyed by fire on the morning of March 14th, 1852. Many valuable records were lost. Maumee Street, Looking West. The first bank in the county was the "Erie and Kalamazoo Railroad Bank of Adrian." established by Philo C. Fuller, of Geneseo, N. Y. The bank afterwards went into the possession of John B. and F. W. Macey, of New York. With the Maceys came Carlisle Norwood, who was the first chief engineer of the Adrian fire department. The Hon. Daniel Webster, of Massachusetts, visited Lenawee County in 1838, remaining over night in Adrian. The "big gristmill" was erected at Palmyra, six miles east of Adrian, in 1836-7, and for many years was a prominent landmark. In those days it was confidently predicted that Palmyra would outstrip, in size and importance, both Adrian and Tecumseh.

Page  23 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 23 The first Methodist church built in Adrian was on Toledo street, and is now owned and occupied by the Church of Christ. Adrian was incorporated as a village in March, 1828, and as a city in January, 1853. Adrian Lodge No. 8, I. O. O. F., was instituted March 6th, 1835, by R. W. P. G., B. F. Hall. and R. W. P. G., J. H. Mullett, of Michigan Lodge No. 1, when the following officers were installed; Daniel D. Sinclair, N. G.; Sebra Howard, V. G.; Charles Smith, S.; R. W. Ingals, T. Mrs. Josephine (Southworth) Wilcox, wife of the late Hon. William S. Wilcox, on her death in 1897, left the sum of $5,000, to construct an entrance to Oakwood Cemetery, Adrian, in memory of her husband. The above picture shows the character of the Memorial as it now stands completed. The first brass band in this place was organized in 1838, by an Englishman named William Tutten, from Utica, New York, and was called the "Adrian Brass Band." This band went to Fort Meigs in 1840, with the Lenawee County delegation, to attend the great Harrison mass meeting. At this time it was led by William C. Hunt, father of W. O. Hunt, of this city. General Joseph W. Brown was in command of the Michigan delegation at this great meeting, and held an umbrella over General Harrison while he was speaking. Alert Fire Company No. 1 was officially organized June 19th, 1841. Following are the names of the original members: D. K.

Page  24 24 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Underwood, Joseph H. Wood, Milo Weins, S. V. R. Smart, M. Merrick, W. S. Wilcox, S. W. Van Vosburg, J. J. Newell, Isaac Paulding, R. Smart, A. Barnard, Thomas S. Baker, Samuel Smith, C. R. Watson, Phi. Tabor, T. D. Ramsdell, Charles Ingrsoll, R. W. Ingals, James Mills, J. H. Woodbury, E. H. Rice, W. M. Comstock, John Harkness, Charles W. Hunt. The machine was purchased from Lewis Selve, of Rochester, New York, at a cost of $813. City Hall, Adrian. A Hook and Ladder Company was officially organized June 19th, 1841. Following are the names of the original members: A. W. Budlong, A. S. Berry, L. G. Berry, J. H. Chittenden, Joel Carpenter, Washington Harwood, Henrv Hart, Horace Mason, N. L. P. Pierce, Charles Philbrook, Clement Smith, Randall W. Smith. March 11th, 1842, the Village Council appropriated the sum of S90 for the purchase of a truck for the use of the company. We also notice on the records

Page  25 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 25 that Henry Hart, who was then a trustee, offered a resolution to purchase three axes for the company. The truck was built by William C. Hunt. The Adrian Guards, the first military company regularly equipped by the state, in Lenawee County, was organized May 10th, 1842, by Daniel Hicks, who was elected captain, which office he held until the year 1847, when he went to Mexico in command of a company. F. J. King was first lieutenant, Edwin Comstock, second lieutenant, William Aldrich, orderly sergeant. In 1843, George W. Hicks was elected orderly, he being the best drill-master in the company. Charles M. Croswell was elected captain after Captain Hicks, and held the office until the next annual election, when the late Frederick Hart was made captain, which position he held up to April, 1861, with the exception of one year, 1855, when Justus H. Bodwell was made captain. Protection Fire Company No. 2 was organized in October, 1845. Perry B. Truax, now of Toledo, was the first foreman, W. Huntington Smith, assistant foreman, and F. C. Beaman, secretary. The engine arrived in December, the same year, and cost $990. The first Masonic lodge organized in the village was "Adrian Lodge No. 19," on July 28th, 1847, by E. Smith Lee, Grand Master of Michigan at that time. The original officers were: John Barber, W. Master; William Moore, S. W.; Warner Comstock, Jun. W.; Jonathan Berry. Treasurer; David Horton, Secretary; David Bixb-, Sen. Deacon; William Talford, Jun. Deacon; Samuel Anderson, Tyler. % The Adrian and Bean Creek Plank Road Company was organized on the 4th of May, 1848, with a capital stock of $75,000, divided into 3,000 shares. The original charter was from Adrian to Bean Creek, but an extension was granted, and it was built as far as Gambleville, in Hillsdale county, where it intersected with the- Chicago turnpike. During the year the survey was made, the right of way purchased and the contracts let for lumber and construction. The first plank of the road was laid in Adrian in the spring of 1849. Commencing on Front street, opposite where the Court House now stands, planks were laid up Main street to Maumee, and on Maumee street west to the village of Addison, etc. A. J. Comstock was the first president, Henry Jones, secretary, and E. L. Clark, treasurer. The Adrian Gas Light Company was chartered by city ordinance, June 18th, 1855. The company consisted of Benijah Baker, H. P. Platt, George H. Wyman, L. C. Thayer. The Common Council that year was as follows: F. J. Buck, mayor; Aldermen L. B. Bowen, R. J. Bradley, E. P. Linnell, J. H. Cleveland, A. J. Dean, W. E. Kimball, F. R. Stebbins, W. S. Wilcox. The steam fire department was organized on Friday, October 11, 1867, consisting of two steamers, with attendant hose carts and one hook and ladder company. R. J. Bradley was appointed chief engineer and James Redmond assistant.

Page  26 26 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL The state fair was held in Adrian in 1865, commencing September 19th and continuing four days. It was also held here the following year. The corner stone of the Masonic Temple was laid June 24th, 1865, and the building was occupied the following year. The first Lenawee County fair was held in this city in September, 1849. HUDSON-The Second City, The first settlement where the city of Hudson now stands was made by Hiram Kidder, October 29th, 1833. Mr. Kidder came from Yates county, New York. He located his land on section 8 and built a house upon it previous to moving his family, which consisted of his wife and five children, in October. The house had neither windows nor doors, and the nearest neighbor was twelve miles away. The whole of the country then known as fhe Bean Creek Valley, was an unbroken wilderness. Several other entries of land were made in the township that year, and on the evening of the first day of November, two days after their settlement, there was a most important arrival, consisting of the family of Charles Ames, comprising his wife and four children, Elizabeth, Henry, William and Ezra, Miss Ball, sister of Mrs. Ames, and Alpheus Pratt. This was the foundation of the present prosperous city of Hudson. In 1834, Hiram Kidder platted the village of Lenawee, which was acknowledged and recorded in the Register's office of Lenawee County, June 13th. That year Mr. Kidder built a mill, and Dudley Worden opened a store. In May, 1834, Beriah H. Lane and his brother, Erastus, moved in and determined to found a village in opposition to Mr. Kidder. The settlement prospered, the first election being held April 4th, 1836, when B. H. Lane was elected justice of the peace. In May following a postoffice was established and named Lanesville, with Mr. Lane as postmaster, and the entire settlement was formally consolidated as Lanesville. By common consent the name of the village was afterwards changed to Hudson, at the suggestion of Hiram Kidder. The first newspaper published in Hudson appeared July 9th, 1853. The paper was called the Hudson Sentinel, and T. D. Montgomery was editor and proprietor. The city contains eight churches, many of them fine edifices, all well attended and in flourishing condition. It has a fine public school system, with adequate buildings and equipments. Its business interests are large and varied, with ample banking capital, and several factories and important enterprises have been developed and fostered within its borders.

Page  27 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 27 MORENCIL The first settlement made on Section 6, Town 9, range 1 east, where the village of Morenci now stands, was in 1833. It is situated on the bank of the Tiffin river (Bean Creek), near the Ohio line, in the southwest corner of the township of Seneca. Martin Hoag and Mr. Sherman entered the first land. Dennis Wakefield, Simon D. and James Wilson, and Elias Baldwin settled there in 1834. View of Business Center of Village of Morenci. Jephtha Whitman built the first log house, in which he lived and kept a store and postoffice. The first hotel was a double log house built and run by William Sutton. The first school was taught by Miss Louisa Dellman, in a log house erected for that purpose. The first church organization was the Methodist, in 1836, with seven members. Rev. Mr. Staples was the first minister. The first Methodist church edifice was dedicated in May, 1852, R. R. Richards presiding elder. The trustees were Hiram Wakefield, Josiah Osgood, Daniel Reed, S. D. Wilson and Samuel Warner. A Baptist church was organized in 1852, with fifteen members. The Congregational church was organized in 1858, with the Rev. George Barnum as pastor. The first frame building was erected by David M. Haight,

Page  28 28 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL and was occupied as a store. The first gristmill was erected in 1852 by Franklin Cawley and Dennis Wakefield. The first plat of the village was made in 1852 by Franklin Cawley, who platted an addition in 1858. The first name given the village was "Brighton," but owing to the fact of there being another village in the state of the same name, it was changed to Morenci by Mr. Whitman and S. D. Wilson. At that time there were four stores in the village, the original one having ceased to exist. From this time, 1852, until the present the village has steadily grown in importance and wealth. It was incorporated in 1871, and is now one of the most thriving business points and growing centers of population in the county, outside of Adrian and Hudson. There is a splendid public school system, adequate churches, and a sound and progressive social sentiment, while the village today is one of the handsomest and most desirable places of residence in the county. The business interests of Morenci are large and varied. There are two banks with an abundant capital, with surplus and deposits amounting to more than $500,000. Twa brick and tile yards have recently been opened with good material and very large capacity. The Chappell Heating Furnace Company is an important industry. E. W. Scofield, dealer in furniture and undertakers' supplies, manufactures a casket fastener that finds a ready market. The Michigan Brick and Tile Machine Works is a prosperous concern. The Morenci Roller Mills Company, merchant millers, is also another flourishing concern. The Ohio Dairy Company commenced the manufacture of condensed milk in 1902, and consumes daily more than 13,000 pounds of milk, the product being about 4,800 pounds. In 1902 the Morenci cheese factory made more than 148,000 pounds of cheese. There are many more important enterprises that go to make up a prosperous and happy community. The village is the center of an excellent farming region and enjoys a large patronage from the nearby Ohio farmers. The village has recently expended over $14,000 in laying brick pavement upon the principal streets, and the business places are lighted with electricity. For railroad facilities the main line of the Wabash railroad, the Fayette branch of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, and the Toledo and Western electric line furnish adequate and complete* service. Other public improvements are contemplated. CLINTON, Clinton Village is situated on the northern border of the county, in the Township of Clinton, on the Jackson branch of the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railroad. The Clinton Woolen Mill

Page  29 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 29 is one of the important manufactories of the county, and its fine product of cloth finds ready market. The village is surrounded by a fine farming country, was incorporated in 1869, has a bank, good hotels, and is an important shipping point. DEERFIELD, The Township of Deerfield was set off from Blissfield in 1867, and the village of Deerfield was incorporated in 1872. It is a thriving borough of about 1,000 inhabitants, and some considerable trade is done there in merchandise, live stock and farm produce. It has a bank, hotels and some manufacturing interests. It is situated on the Detroit branch of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad. CLAYTON, The village of Clayton is situated on the town line between Dover and Hudson, on the main line of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad, eleven miles west of Adrian. It was first settled in 1836, and was incorporated in 1870. It is a business centre of considerable importance, and has a population of about 600. UNINCORPORATED VILLAGES, The unincorporated villages in the county are: ADDISON, in the southwest corner of the Township of Woodstock. It has a good flouring mill and several reliable merchants. It is surrounded by a fine farming country. BRITTON is a village in Ridgeway Township, on the Wabash Railroad, a good business point and farming centre. CADMUS is a village in the Township of Dover, on the main line of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad, seven miles west of Adrian. ONSTED village is situated in Cambridge, on a branch of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad. Itis beautifullylocated and is the center of a fine farming region. HOLLOWAY Village, on the line of the Wabash Railroad, in the eastern portion of Raisin Township, is an important shipping point for stock and farm produce.

Page  30 30 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL JASPER, Weston and Fairfield Villages are all situated in Fairfield Township, and are important trading and shipping points in a most prosperous farming region. Palmyra village, in Palmyra Township, six miles east of Adrian, on the L. S. & M. S. railroad, is a trading and shipping point for farmers. Riga village, in Riga Township, on the L. S. & M. S. railroad, is also a convenient shipping and trading station. Ogden Center is a small village situated in the center of Ogden Township, with stores and postoffice, but no railroad connection. Macon village, in Macon Township, and Rome Center, in Rome Township, are hamlets appreciated by farmers in their vicinity. Along the Wabash Railroad, west of Adrian, are the villages of Sand Creek, in Madison Township, Ennis, in Seneca Township, and Munson, in Medina Township. These are all shipping and trading points of importance and convenience to a large farming community. THE LAST HUNT. Nearly half a century ago there existed in Adrian a Hunting Club with the following members: Frank W. Clay, Asa Crane, William Crane, Edward Crane, John Harvey, M. Lawson, Philo Robinson, Stimson Harvey, Wm. Lewis and John Osborn as members. The above picture shows the result of the Club's last hunt, in 1863, with sixteen deer to its credit. The picture shows the then vacant lot on the corner of Broad and Maumee streets, the site of the Government building and Postoffice. Six members of the Club are still living.

Page  31 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 31 Old County Offices, built immediately after the burning of the old Court House in 1852. It stood on the site of the present Court House.

Page  32 32 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL CHURCH ORGANIZATIONS, The First M, E, Church, As early as 1827, soon after Mr. Comstock had platted the village of Logan, now city of Adrian, the Rev. John Jones, a Methodist circuit rider, came to the log cabin of Noah Norton and preached the first sermon in the new settlement. Nothing important of a religious nature occurred again in the village until 1830. That year the Rev. Jacob Hill, also a Methodist, in charge of the Monroe Circuit, came occasionally. Asa result of his coming the first church of any sect was organized that year, with five members. Mr. and Mrs. William Barrus, Mr. and Mrs. John Walworth, and Americus Smith. Mr. Smith was a local preacher, and keeping up the interest that summer, seven additional members were added. They were Milton and Louis Foote, Pharez and Hannah Sutton,'Samuel and Ada Gregory, and Altha Sphink. In September, 1830, Adrian was put down on the plan of the Monroe Circuit as a week-night appointment. James W. Finley was put in charge, and he came once a month to preach in some private house. The first "Sunday preaching" commenced in 1832. James F. Davidson and Thomas Wiley, of the Tecumseh Circuit, arranged to preach at Adrian school house every alternate Sunday. In 1833 there was a great revival. In 1838 the construction of a church edifice was commenced, and in 1840 the old brick church now standing on Toledo street, and recently purchased by the Church of Christ Society, was dedicated. The present M. E. church, on the corner of Broad and Maumee streets, was dedicated in 1863, Rev. F. A. Blades being the pastor. Early in the history of the church a Sunday school was organized, and this branch of the service has been a source of great good. The present enrolled membership is about 550, with an average attendance of about 300. The officers are: W. M. Blanchard, superintendent; Arthur Baldwin, 1st assistant; Mrs. Clarence Frost, 2d assistant; George Breen, 3d assistant; Dr. C. L. Norton, secretary; Mrs. Harriet Norton, treasurer; George Trimm, librarian. There are thirty-one teachers. First Baptist Church, On the evening of November 5th, 1831, a number of Baptist friends met at the school house in the village of Adrian, for the purpose of conferring on the subject of covenant union. The gathering

Page  33 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 33 was composed of eleven men and thirteen women, as follows: Joseph Rickey, Reuben Tooker, Benjamin F. Gouldsbury, John H. Carpenter, John Whitney, John S. Older, John W. Myers, Allen S. Hutchens, John T. Carpenter, Gersham Noyes, David Wiley, Maria Hutchens, Lydia Whitney, Delia Older, Eliza Gouldsbury, Lydia Thursting, Eunice Rickey, Nancy Rickey, Lucy French, Elizabeth Parker, Cynthia Upton, Elizabeth Carpenter, Amy Fitch, Lois Stone. John Whitney was the moderator of this meeting, and William Foster (afterwards received by baptism), was clerk. After an interesting session it was "Resolved to meet again at this place for further conference on the 19th inst." First Baptist Church, Adrian. At the meeting on the 19th of November, 1831, John Whitney, Reuben Tooker, Joseph Rickey, John H. Carpentor, Dan Treat (received by letter), and William Foster were appointed a committee to prepare Articles of Faith and Covenant. At a subsequent meeting on the 23d of the same month, the Articles were presented, approved and accepted, when it was "Resolved to call on the following churches for a council to witness our union and to constitute us into Church State, if such council should think it to be expedient, viz.: Church in Dexter, Church in Ypsilanti, Church in Saline, and 3

Page  34 34 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL also to give Elder Tripp, of Sand Lake, an invitation; council to meet in the village of Adrian on the last Saturday of December, 1831." The council met at the stated time. Elder T. Bodley, of Saline, preached the first sermon and extended the hand of fellowship. On the next day, Sunday, January 1st, 1832, Elder Bodley preached at the house of Isaac Dean, from these words: "Who is this that cometh up from the wilderness, leaning upon her Beloved? " On Sunday, January 29th, 1832, after church service, the congregation repaired to the River Raisin, when Elder Bodley baptized eight candidates for membership. In February, 1832, Elder T. Bodley became the first installed minister of the church; John H. Carpenter and John Whitney were the first deacons, and John Whitney the first treasurer. Elder Bodley remained with the church during the year 1833, at a salary of $150.00. The records show that in March, 1834, a call was extended Rev. Mr. Goodman, but we find that in June, 1834, the Rev. Bradbury S. Clay (father of our present well known banker, Frank W. Clay), was installed. It appears the question of the minister's salary occasioned the members some anxiety. There had been considerable delay in raising the last year's expenses of the church, and it was decided to empower William Foster, Lauren Hotchkiss and Benjamin Palmer to make a levy, and William Foster to make an assessment on the taxable property of the members of the church, that the amount of the Rev. Mr. Clay's salary might be assured. It was voted to raise $200 to pay Mr. Clay for his ministration during the year 1835. In 1837 a brick church was completed and dedicated on the site of the present edifice on Broad street. Rev. Gideon D. Simmons was the pastor during the construction of the first church. A large and fine toned bell was soon after hung in the tower. It was first swung between two stumps in front of the church, where the village gamin insisted on trying its tones. About the year 1855 the first chapel was built. The present chapel was dedicated January 1st, 1900, and cost $7,372.28. The annex and audience room was constructed in its present form in 1884-5, during the pastorate of Rev. J. S. Holmes, at a cost of about $12,000. The present pastor, Rev. Franklin Wait Sweet, was installed October 3d, 1902. The present Board of Trustees consists of the following gentlemen: E. L. Baker, president; John E. Carr, secretary; George W. Ayres, C. B. Bennett, Frank Cantrick, C. C. Fisher, D. B. Morgan. The Sunday school was organized soon after the church was founded, and in 1834 Lauren Hotchkiss was its superintendent. The Hon. William S. Wilcox became superintendent in the fall of 1839, and served continually in that capacity until the spring of 1891, a period of over fifty-one years. Since the resignation of Mr. Wilcox, D. B. Morgan and George L. Bennett have served as superintendents, the latter still being in that position. Mr. Bennett is

Page  35 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 35 assisted by the following associate superintendents: D. B. Morgan, B. P. Hathaway and Mrs. E. L. Baker. E. L. Baker, jr., is the secretary and treasurer. The membership is about 625, with thirty teachers. There is a Sunday school board of twelve members, to whom all questions are referred. On the basis of average attendance, which for the first six months in 1903 was 425, this is one of the largest Sunday schools in Michigan. Below will be found extracts from a letter written by Allen S. Hutchens, a constituent member, on the occasion of the semi-centennial of the church in 1881. Many facts and incidents of the early settlement will be found in this interesting paper: BEAVER DAM, WIS., Nov. 18, 1881. To THE BAPTIST CHURCH IN ADRIAN, MICH.: Dear Brethren- * * * * * My father with his family reached Adrian Sept. 22, 1831. A few weeks later, Deacon John Whitney, who had come from a church near Trumansburg, N. Y., and had settled about five miles northwest of Adrian, called at our house and introduced himself as a Baptist, and said that he had started out to see how many of the like faith and order he could find in the vicinity of our little village. His strong and cheerful words were a note of joy to my mother's heart and to my own. In perhaps two weeks 'he came again, rejoicing that he had found so many anxious as himself for a church home. Rev. Thos. Bodley, at Saline, was sent for, because he was the nearest Baptist minister. Elders. Booth, Goodman and Merrill were a good deal farther away. Isaac French was building a hotel on the northwest corner of Main and Maumee streets. It was enclosed and the floor laid in a small room that was soon the barroom. There we met, as joyful a company of Christians as ever came together. The figures in the little room stand out in bold relief-forms still dear to my heart. They were Christ's men and women. Deacon Whitney in the center of the room, so happy that he couldn't keep his face straight, and the smile read, " I didn't bear my old rheumatic limbs on my canes around through the woods for A. S. Hutchens, the last constituent nothing." The sisters sat on the north member of the Church. Died at side; Elder Bodley, Joseph Rickey and Madison, Wis., July 10th, 1903. others on the west side; I, a little boy, in the southeast corner under the window. Deacon Foster, near Deacon Whitney's right hand, arose and read a series of Articles of Faith and Practice, which, I presume, he had taken from the records of the church in Shelby, Orleans County,

Page  36 36 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL N. Y. The Articles were accepted, and we solemnly pledged one another to walk together as a church in the fear and love of our common Lord. Elder Bodley's heart was full, and oh, how earnestly he counselled and prayed. After the organization was effected we tarried long and were loth to part. Mr. Dean, whose hotel stood on the northeast corner of Maumee and Winter streets, was not a professor of religion, but a kind, good-hearted neighbor, and he allowed us to go into his ball-room the next day for Sunday services, for the Methodists were occupying the schoolhouse that stood by the old cemetery. The room was so well seated that it seemed to us that the old gentleman must have borrowed chairs from nearly every house in the village. Elder Bodley preached from these words: "Who is this that cometh up from the wilderness leaning upon her Beloved? " The celebration of the Lord's Supper followed the sermon. A strong spirit of brotherly love possessed us, and our hearts were full of the joy and hope of the new church life. We had come from warm living churches, torn ourselves away from loving Christian hearts, hoping that bye-and-bye, before many years, there would be some little church somewhere in those woods that we could unite with, and now to start off so soon, so strongly and so unitedly was away beyond what we had dreamed of. During the following winter our covenant meetings were held in the school house, and our prayer meetings at the homes of the brethren, here and there in the forest. I am not certain that Elder Bodley visited us in the winter, though I think he did; at any rate he came to see us in March, and we invited him to become our pastor, and in April he moved his family into a little house on the edge of the swamp on the southwest corner of Maumee and Broad streets. My father's log house. a little southeast of the village, then became our place of meeting on Sunday mornings and on Sunday evenings, and often on week day evenings Elder Bodley preached in the different neighborhoods where the brethren lived. In the autumn of 1832 we began to meet in the upper room of a dwelling house that stood on the northwest corner of Maumee and Broad streets, and met there until we went into the brick house in 1836. We began to go to the river almost immediately after out' pastor began his work. A spot just below the mill dam is in the memory still as a sacred place. The church commenced its work in the best of harmony of feelings and views; so much so that a stranger might well have thought that we had migrated from some one church in the East. Except one from New Hampshire and two from Vermont, I think we were all at first from Central and Western New York. * * * * * * We had to work for what we got. I have seen in my father's log house, sitting on boards laid on logs between the two beds at one end of the room, and the large fire-place at the other dnd, sisters of the church and young women, who had come on foot five miles, and brethren who had come from the south settlement eight miles, with ox teams, to enjoy the Sabbath services, and to see the faces of brethren that were loved. After the sermon, unless we had to go to the river, the greeting was about as long as the meeting. We lived in the midst of new things-new houses, new clearings, new comers from the East-much constantly to awaken interest; but to us the church and the meetings of the church were the main things on earth. And this brotherly love and devotion to His cause the Lord blessed, for within two years from the organization, brethren who

Page  37 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL 37 were acquainted with the churches thought the church in Adrian not only larger in numbers, but stronger in spiritual gifts than any other Baptist church in the territory. Brethren, let me correct a mistake. At the semi-centennial of the Baptist church in Medina, Orleans County, New York, two years last May, it was stated that your church was founded by members from that church. I believe my mother and I were the only ones from that church. There were more members at first from the church at Shelby, in the same county, than from any other church. The pastor of that church claimed that you owed them a debt of gratitude. Pay it, for two years later it made to you the best gift it could make, for it sent to you in August, 1833, Lauren Hotchkiss, a man full of zeal for work in the Master's cause. He was remarkably fitted to two kinds of service, to lead a prayer meeting and to conduct a Sunday school, for he never allowed the one to be dull, nor interest in the other to flag. He put a strong arm under our little struggling Sunday school and made it right off one of the important interests of the church work. The last work he did for the church was to be the soul and inspiration of the building of the meeting-house. Yours in the bonds of Christian love, A. S. HUTCHENS. The First Presbyterian Church, 77 "7 Q. - %$IPKT49RI-gg, '. - ", 11, p "'.1 "'!W.. 1-...,I I The First Presbyterian Church of Adrian was organized at the house of N. D. Skeels on the fifteenth day of September, 1832, pursuant to a public call. The Rev. I. M. Wead, of Ypsilanti, was

Page  38 38 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL present and chosen moderator, and N. D. Skeels, clerk. The moderator presented the Articles of Faith and Covenant adopted by the Detroit Presbytery, Sept. 1st, 1831, which were adopted by resolution. The clerk was then ordered to enroll the following names, after giving evidence of their regular membership in other churches: Josiah Sabin, Patrick Hamilton, Isaac Ormsby, Amelia Ormsby, Elijah Johnson, Elihu Frary, Asahel Finch, Jr., Mary D. Finch, N. D. Skeels, Elizabeth Skeels, Clarissa Fessenden, Mary A. Chapin, Elizabeth Beals, Huldah Brown. There seems to have been a strong temperance sentiment existing at that time, for we find in the minutes of the first meeting the following: "Resolved, That no person shall be admitted to this church unless they can conscientiously abstain from the use or vending of ardent or distilled spirits, except for medical purposes." Three elders were then elected, as follows: Elijah Johnson, A. Finch, Jr., Josiah Sabin. The first baptism was the little daughter of Asahel and Mary D. Finch, Elizabeth Mary. In November, 1832, the Rev. George Howell came to Adrian. The minutes show the next minister to visit the village was the Rev. A. S. Wells, in 1834, who was followed the same year by Rev. E. Gregory, who remained during the winter of 1834-5. In the fall of 1835, the Rev. William Wolcott came, and served as supply during 1835-6. The church has had eight installed pastors, as follows: 1837-42, Rev. J. L. Tomlinson; 1844-61, Rev. George C. Curtis; 1861-65, Rev. George Duffield, Jr.; 1865-74, Rev. Wm. H. Webb; 1876-80, Rev. John C. Hill; 1881-85, Joseph B. Little; 1886-98, Rev. Willard K. Spencer; 1898, and still in charge, Rev. Edward M. McMillin. The first church building was erected by the Society on Church street, in November, 1832, being the first church edifice built in the village. In 1842 a new structure was built on the present site, on East Maumee street, at an expense of $12,000. This was enlarged in 1854 at an expense of $5,000, and again in 1869-70 was largely rebuilt and beautified, at a cost of $25,000. The church bell, weighing 1,601 pounds, and costing $478, was hung Dec. 31st, 1846. The chapel was built in 1884, at a cost of $5,000. The fine parsonage, No. 35 Dennis street, was built by the Samuel E. Hart estate, in 1895, and was first occupied by the Rev. W. K. Spencer. The Sunday school is in a flourishing condition, and since 1850 has been a power for good and active church work. The officers are: Superintendent, S. S. Withington; First Assistant, H. M. Judge; Second Assistant, Miss Della Corbus; Third Assistant, Miss Ida Park; Secretary, Miss Florence Clement; Assistant Secretary, Norman Angell; Treasurer, Miss Helen Jewell; Superintendent of

Page  39 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 39 Primary Department, Miss Alice Angell; Assistant, Miss Carrie Culver. The enrollment is about 350 scholars, with an average attendance of about 225. Christ Episcopal Church, One of the handsomest and most substantial church edifices in Adrian is Christ Episcopal Church. This church was organized in 1838 by the Rev. David J. Burger, who remained here for one year. Christ Episcopal Church, Adrian. In 1839 Rev. Wm. N. Lyster, of Sand Lake, took temporary charge, and often visited the parish, until 1840. In 1841 Bishop McCoskry administered the Apostolic Rite of Confirmation in the Methodist Church, on Toledo street, the congregation kindly tendering their house of worship for that purpose. About this time the old Presbyterian structure on Church street was secured, the Presbyterian Society having erected a new edifice on Maumee street, and the Rev. Sabin Hough was appointed rector. No records can be found (it is believed they were burned in the old court house in 1852), but it is known that services were held during the first ten years, and that the Revs. David J. Burger, Wm. N. Lyster, Donald Frazer, Charles V. Kelley and Richard S. Adams were in charge. The first church edifice was erected in 1851. The building committee was James J. Newell and Henry Hart, and the contractors were Daniel A. Loomis and Robert J. Bradley, builders, the architect being F. J. Scott. The cost of the building was $4,282. This was

Page  40 40 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL done under the rectorship of the Rev. Rufus Murray, and the church was consecrated by Bishop McCoskry, Oct. 31st, 1852. Since that time, 46 years, the church was at various times improved and enlarged, and was used until Sunday, August 9th, 1897, when a special service was conducted by the rector, Rev. C. H. I. Channer, whose sermon contained many interesting historical references. The old building was then removed and the corner stone of the present handsome sanctuary was laid September 28th, 1897. The first service was held in the new church on Easter Sunday, 1898. Following were the church officers at that time: Rector, Rev. C. H. I. Channer; Wardens, Richard A. Bury and H. V. C. Hart; Vestrymen, A. W. Carey, E. E. Marble, W. F. Ayers, H. L. Larwill, C. D. Hardy, C. Short, R. Alfred Bury. The building committee consisted of R. A. Bury, H. V. C. Hart, A. W. Carey, H. L. Larwill, E. E. Marble. The architects were Spier & Rohn, of Detroit, and the contractor was Samuel Pickles, of Jackson, Mich. The cost, with all its furnishings, was $25,000. The handsome rectory on the corner of Church and Locust streets was built with money donated by Mrs. Mary L. Drew, relict of the well known pioneer resident, Delos Drew. The house was built in 1899, at a cost of something over $4,000. Mrs. Drew died before its.completion. Methodist Protestant Church, The College Church, afterwards known as the First Methodist Protestant Church of Adrian, was first organized April 14th, 1867, with 46 members. The first trustees appointed were: Dr. J. Kost, J. H. Bailey, D. G. Edmiston. Stewards: J. S. Wilcox, J. H. Davis, J. R. Gilkey. Leaders: A. H. Marsh, G. B. McElroy. Following are the names of the first ministers: J. M. Mayall, Asa Mahan, G. B. McElroy, John Kost, J. S. Thrapp, W. M. Goodner. The licentiates were: C. B. Goodrich, A. R. Seamon, A. H. Marsh, John Ellis and D. G. Edmiston. In August, 1879, the Society leased the old Plymouth church building, and in May, 1880, purchased the property and has worshiped there since that time. The present pastor, Rev. C. W. Stephenson, was installed in September, 1901, and has been engaged for his third year. Board of Trustees at present are: Dr. G. B. McElroy, I. W. Swift, J. N. Sampson, Rev. John Gregory, Charles Clark, Dr. M. R. Morden, V. A. Michener. Board of Stewards: A. E. Metler, Alfred Dobbins, Mrs. Charles Thierman, Mrs. Karnes, Arthur Randall. Secretary, Arthur Randall; Treasurer, Alfred Dobbins; Superintendent of Bible School, H. K. Fox; Superintendent of Primary Sunday School, A. E. Metler.

Page  41 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. ~ 41 St, Mary's Catholic Church, About the year 1840 a Catholic mission was opened in the village of Adrian by Father Smoulder, who came from Monroe. He came here monthly, and Mass was read in the homes of Patrick Kelley, Chas. Conlisk and Patrick Stanton. Father Kindekens established a church in 1845, and the first edifice was built on the corner of Center and Erie streets. Father Ehrenstrasser came in July, 1865, and remained until September, 1867. Father Van Dyke came in September, 1867, built the present St. Mary's Church edifice in 1869, and remained until December, 1871. In December, 1871, Father Duhig came and remained until September, 1873. Then came Father Wallace, in October, 1873, who remained until January, 1894. Dr. Charles O'Reilly, D. D., came in February, 1894, and remained until March, 1901. Father Henry D. Sullivan, the present pastor, came in March, 1901. St. Mary's has a membership of about one thousand, and has a Sunday school of one hundred and fifty scholars. St, Joseph's Catholic Church, The Catholic congregation in Adrian was separated in 1862, when the German Catholics decided to build a place of worship of their own nationality, as they were all German speaking and wished to have a pastor who spoke their own language. From 1862 until 1865 the congregation's spiritual welfare was administered to by the Redemptorist Fathers, who visited here regularly from Detroit, but as they were rapidly growing in numbers it became necessary for a resident pastor, so in 1865, Rev. Father Ehrenstrasser took charge of the rapidly growing congregation and remained here until 1870, but was then relieved and called to a different field of labor. He in turn was succeeded by Father Tewis, who remained here only two years, and in 1872 was succeeded by Rev. Father Kullmann, who did much in behalf of the church and congregation. Under his pastorage the first cemetery was opened, besides several improvements on the church property, but at that time it was very evident that the church was not large enough for the greatly increased congregation, and the building of a larger edifice was agitated; but nothing definite was done until the following year, when Rev. Casimir Rohwoski took charge of the congregation, and to him is due the credit of the present beautiful edifice, the school and residence; but his undertaking was great, and he had not fully carried out his plans when he was removed, with a portion of his noble work undone, that is, the completion of the parish residence. But his successor,

Page  42 42 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Rev. Theisen, finished the work of the residence, and did much in liquidating the debts on the property; he was in charge of the congregation only two years and in turn was succeeded by the Rev. A. P. Ternes, who remained here until 1896, making various improvements on the parish property. Rev. Henry C. Koenig took charge in 1896, and the present pastor, F. W. Schaeper, came in March, 1903. There is a large congregation and Sunday school. First M, E, Church, Following are the names of the pastor and principal officers of the M. E. Church of Adrian, in 1903: Pastor, Rev. J. I. Nickerson; President pro tem. and Collector, Rev. A. J. Bigelow; Secretary and Recording Steward, Fred E. Ash; Treasurer, E. N. Smith; District Steward, Mrs. A. J. Bigelow. Erected in 1863. TRUSTEES-G. P. Fuller, President; C. L. Norton, Secretary; E. N. Smith, Treasurer; Wallace Westerman, H. W. Bovee, A. J. Bigelow, P. J. Willson, J. W. Page, Joseph Wesley. STEWARDS-G. 0. Green, Oliver Schneerer, A. D. Quick, H. H. Todd, Fred E. Ash, J. J. Stephenson, W. O. Albig, W. J. LaFraugh, Mrs. H. Camburn, Mrs. A. J. Bigelow, Mrs. E. S. Ferguson, Mrs. G. D. Austin.

Page  43 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 43 ADRIAN PUBLIC SCHOOLS, The history of the Public Schools of Adrian is not without interest to every one. With the exception of those burned in the old Central School building in 1866, the record is quite complete from the very first school that was opened by Miss Dorcas Dean in 1828, when there were only seven families in the village. This school was kept in one room of the first frame house, built by Dr. C. N. Ormsby that year. The first school committee was formed in 1828, and a combined school and meeting house was constructed and used during the winter of 1828-9. This building was located at the junction of South Main and Winter streets. The first teacher in this building was David Buck. The old English Reader, Cobb's spelling-book, and Morse's Geography were the books used. Mr. Buck did not remain long, but First Union School in Adrian. Erected in 1,S51-2. Burned in 1866.

Page  44 44 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL went farther West, where he was drowned in 1830. Anson Jackson was the second teacher and served the village as schoolmaster for many years, being competent and popular. The records do not give detailed facts regarding all the school history that might have been preserved, but the names of some of the teachers are at hand. We find among them Messrs. Powers, Brewster, Inglis, Dixon, Ramsdell and Hance, as the most prominent and successful among the men, while Miss Emma L. Keeney, afterwards Mrs. A. F. Bixby, and Miss Casey, who became Mrs. Norman Geddes, were among the most accomplished and successful of the early teachers. Michigan was one of the states which first adopted the union or graded school system. By provisions of the law which at that time regulated this system, the several district schools of a village or city might unite under one organization whose aggregate resources would permit that classification of pupils and supervision of work which constitute a graded school. Previous to 1849 there were four school districts in the village of Adrian. In the early part of that year the school inspectors of the townships of Adrian and Madison, in which these districts were located, by virtue of the law which empowered them to act in such cases, united these four districts under a single organization, known as "Adrian Union School District Number One." In accordance with this arrangement, Alonzo F. Bixby, clerk of the Board of School Inspectors of Adrian, issued a call, dated March 27th, 1849, to the taxable inhabitants of the new district, to meet on the 12th day of April "'for the election of officers and the transaction of such other business as may be necessary." At this meeting Dr. P. J. Spaulding was elected chairman, and Samuel Jordan secretary. The meeting then proceeded to elect the first Board of Trustees of what we know as the Public Schools of Adrian. Following are the names of the Board: Richard H. Whitney, Moderator; Warner M. Comstock, Director; Abel Whitney, Assessor. At this meeting it was also "Resolved, That a committee consisting of eight persons, two from each former district, be chosen to examine and report at an adjourned meeting the different locations within this school district for the site of a school house, also the price and terms of each location. Following is the committee appointed: John Barber, J. V. Watson, George Kennedy, Stephen Whitehorne, E. Vandegrift, James Field, Wm. L. Greenly, James J. Newell, Titus H. Treat. At the opening of the new Central building, in 1868, the Hon. Charles M. Croswell made an address which covered all the information obtainable, and from which we copy: "At the adjourned meeting the committee of nine reported that several propositions had been placed in their hands, but that they were unable to agree on a site 'which would be for the best interests of said school district.' "It was a fact that some influential citizens, through motives which they believed to be right, vehemently opposed the organiza

Page  45 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 45 tion of the new system from the very start; and it was with extreme difficulty and after considerable delay that the organization was finally put on a working basis." The man to whose efforts the reconstruction of the four district schools upon the union plan is really due was Dr. John Cadman. He had learned the practical workings of this system from his observations in New York, and devoted himself to the inauguration of the improved graded school in Adrian. At this meeting, immediately after the report of the failure of the committee to report a site for a building, Dr. Cadman offered a resolution "That a school house be erected, 66 feet by 70, three stories high." Central Building and Four Branches, Adrian. This motion was adopted, and a committee of twelve appointed to report a plan for the building. The committee consisted of Dr. John Cadman, L. Dodge, E. H. Winans, F. C. Beaman, Wm. L. Greenly, R. H. Whitney. John Barber, Daniel A. Loomis, A. Barnard, Marshall Huntington, Wm. L. Sheldon, Thos. P. Thompson. At a special meeting of the district, held June 4th, 1849, after a stormy debate, the following points were gained: The plan for the new building, the site as reported by the committee of nine, and a resolution offered by Dr. Cadman authorizing the raising of $2,000 as the first installment of the amount necessary to be raised by tax. At the annual school meeting, held September 24th, 1849, the

Page  46 46 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL following officers were elected to constitute the new Board of Trustees: Elihu L. Clark, Moderator; Henry Hart, Director; Ira Ingals, Assessor; James Kingsland, R. H. Whitney, M. N. Halsey, A. G. Eastman, Trustees. The minutes of this meeting relate that "It was on motion resolved that the vote passed at the last special meeting to raise $2,000 the coming year for building a school house be reconsidered. The mover withdrew the motion, and the vote was not taken." The state of feeling which existed at this time, on the part of those who opposed the new organization, may be seen from a call for a special meeting within two months after the annual meeting, "for the purpose of taking into consideration the propriety of dissolving said union school district, and also for the purpose of directing the two thousand dollars in money raised and collected * * * * to be paid back to the taxpayers from whom the same had been collected. " This special meeting was held February 9th, 1850, and the following resolution was offered: "Resolved, as the sense of this meeting, That in view of the differences of opinion known to exist in the minds of the citizens composing this district as to the practicability of maintaining the present organization upon an equitable basis, that we respectfully request the inspectors of common schools of the towns of Adrian and Madison to dissolve the district as at present organized." The minutes inform us that after some discussion on the resolution, Joseph H. Cleveland and A. S. Berry were appointed tellers, and a vote resulted as follows: For the resolution, 51, and against it, 139. This was the final effort of the opposition, and was no material obstruction in the way of the Board, which at the next annual meeting, in September, 1850, was instructed, by resolution offered by F. C. Beaman, "to proceed with all convenient dispatch to the erection of a building. The Board for the year 1850-51 was as follows: E. L. Clark, Moderator; Henry Hart, Director; Daniel Larzelere, Assessor; F. C. Beaman, R. H. Whitney, A. G. Eastman, Wm. L. Greenly, Trustees. At the annual meeting September 30th, 1851, a tax of $2,000 was ordered as the third installment of the building fund, and the Board was authorized "to contract for the erection of a suitable cupola upon the school building, and to obtain a bell for the same, provided the cost of the same shall not exceed $500. The Board for this year was: E. L. Clark, Moderator: Henry Hart, Director; Daniel Larzelere, Assessor; F. C. Beaman, R. H. Whitney, W. L. Greenly, John Barber, Trustees. The new building was completed and occupied September 13th, 1852. It was situated between Church and Maumee streets, the site extending from one street to the other, and nearly opposite the present Central building.

Page  47 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 47 It is thus described by Prof. Hubbarjl in a report to the Superintendent of Public Instruction: "The Central building, or, according to the present plan, the Academy, is 60 by 80, three stories high, with a well finished basement under the entire building. The exterior is plain, but the interior is very commodious and pleasant. The building often contains 500 scholars or more. It will accommodate 312 scholars and give a large public lecture hall, a class lecture room, and a library room. The original cost of the building, with grounds, was $11,375.13." This building was burned August 10th, 1866. Between the years 1857 and 1861 it was found necessary to provide increased accommodations for the school population, and new houses were built as follows: In 1857 the East Branch, costing $5,000; in 1859 the South Branch, costing $3,500; 1860 the West Branch (enlarged in 1867), costing $13,000; 1861 the North Branch, costing $13,000. At the annual meeting held September 26th, 1859, it was "Resolved, That the district establish a free school, the expenses to be paid by taxation on the property of the district." On the very day of the burning of the Central building, in August, 1866, leading citizens requested the School Board to call a special school meeting "for the purpose of taking measures to immediately rebuild the Central schoolhouse." The meeting took place on the following 22d day of August. The Board was instructed to procure plans for a school building to cost at least $50,000. At this time F. R. Stebbins was President of the Board, and Chas. M. Croswell was Secretary. The plan of the new building was made by Architect A. Barrows. The size of the building, over all, is 117 by 95 feet-about 60 feet to the cornice and 110 feet to top of tower. The building contained twenty school rooms, made to accommodate about 1,000 scholars. The cost, including heating and fixtures, outhouses, grounds and fences, was $68,000. Since the foundation of the schools in 1849 the following gentlemen have served as Superintendents: 1849-50-M. W. Southworth. 1850-51-Nathan Britton. 1852-54-M. S. Hawley. 1855-65-Franklin Hubbard.* 1866-67-Wm. W. Washburn. 1867-69-Newton W. Winchell. 1869-79-William H. Payne. 1879-85-William J. Cocker. 1885-96-George W. Walker. 1896-1901-A. E. Curtis. 1901- -P. J. Willson. *The above records show that Mr. Hubbard only served ten years, when the truth is he served from January, 1855, to December, 1865, making eleven years.

Page  48 48 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Adrian High School 63 Years Ago, As a relic of the early days in Adrian, and as a matter of interest to the present and future generations, we give place to the following now unique school catalogue. Among all the names contained in the list of students, but three are known to be alive-James W. Helme, Sr., and J. C. Linnell, of Adrian, and Stephen Eaton, of Hudson. In reading the list many well known and prominent names will be found. Among the girl students, Miss Mary E. Horton became the wife of the Hon. Thomas M. Cooley; Miss Harriet Stone, sister of Mrs. Major Cole, married Edward Shephard, a merchant of Detroit, where she died; Miss Emily Wadsworth became the wife of the Hon. John R. Clark: CATALOGUE OF THE STUDENTS OF THE ADRIAN HIGH SCHOOL. WINTER QUARTER. NAMES. RESIDENCE. ~ NAMES. RESIDENCE. Mr. Wiley Aldrich —. ----... ----.Adrian Mr. William Morris —. --- —----— Adrian "Harla Aldrich. --------------- " Robert Morse. -----------—.. " " Charles H. Allen ----. --- —-----. David Morton --- —-----—. —.. I Anson Backus ----------------- " " Harlow Mulliken ---------—. —Madison " Edwin Ball --------- ----- " James Pennock --- ----------— Adrian Thomas Barber --—. --- —-— Madison " George Raymond -----—...-.. Norman Bartlett ------------— Adrian " Solomon G. Rice —. ---------- " Charles Bigelow.-... ---. --- —. " " Horatio W. Shaw -----------— Dover " George L. Buck. ---------------- Alonzo D. Sheldon ----------— Madison Marvin A. Buck... --- —--- " Joseph Strimbeck -------—.Adrian James Bump ------------------ Wm. Henry Stone --- —--------- John R. Clark -------------- Seymour Treadwell --------— Madison Horace Comstock ------—.-.. " Heman Treadwell ------------- "De Witt Cooper ---------—..-. " Charles Winans. ----. ---. ---. Adrian Wm. Henry Crane..... " George Woodbury -—....-. ---Deloss Crittenden --- —----—. - " Samuel A. Woodbury -------— Columbus,O. "Oscar Crittenden.-. --- —--—. - "James Wooster -----------— Adrian Alonzo Dickinson --—. --- ——. " Charles Linnell ---. ---------- Albert Edmunds --—. —. ----. -Madison "Stephen Eaton ---— Pittsford, Hillsdale Co. "John Fay. ------------------— Adrian Miss Ann Maria Allen -----------— Madison " Franklin S. Freeman --------- " Jane Eliza Allen --- —------- "' William H. Freeman -... --- — " Lovinia Allen --- ----------- " i' Alexander M. Foster --------- " " Lydia Barber -. --- ——. --- — " Albert A. Graham.-. --- —---- Madison " Maria Combs --------------- " Peter Haughwout ---. --- —---- Adrian " Lucy E. French ------—. --- — James W. Helme -----—. ----.- " Caroline Hawkins ----------— Rockport, 0. "John C. Horton. --- —-------- ' " Charlotte O, Hopkins -----— Adrian " Philo Hunt.. --- —. —. " Mary E. Horton ------------- Joseph Jones... ------—... " " Martha A. Linnell ----------- Alonzo Jocelyn.-..-..... " " Rebecca M. Salisbury ------- Fairfield "Isaac Keeler -------------—.. " " Harriet Stone --------------— Adrian "Uriah L. Linnell -----—.. --- " " Ruth Thompson -----------— Madison "James C. Linnell.. --- —------ " " Ann E. Wright. —.. ---.. Byron Merrick -... -----—.. —Madison " Emily Wadsworth ---------— Adrian The fourth term of this institution will commence on the 18th March. TERMS OF TUITION.-For common English branches, per quarter, $3.50. For other English branches, $6.00. For painting, drawing, etc.. $6.00. For chemistry illustrated by apparatus, per quarter, $8.00. For Latin, Greek and French, $8.00. For music upon the piano, $10.00. For use of piano, $2.00. As far as practicable the colloquial and explanatory system of instruction which prevails so extensively and successfully in many of the high schools at the East will be adopted, and the sciences simplified and illustrated as much as possible by the use of the blackboard and other appropriate means. It is particularly desired that those who intend to become members of the institution the coming quarter should enter as near the commencement of the term as possible. Adrian, March 12, 1840. GEORGE BREWSTER, Principal.

Page  49 z v 1o z 0 z 0 u w Tq M Tg v 0 0 u t4.-1 - ADRIAN COLLEGE.

Page  50 50 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL ADRIAN COLLEGE, Adrian College was organized March 22d, 1859, in accordance with the provisions of an act passed by the Legislature of the State of Michigan, entitled "An Act to Provide for the Incorporation of Institutions of Learning." This institution comprises several schools, each having its distinct course of study leading tb its appropriate degree. At present four schools are included under the management: The College of Literature and Arts, the School of Music, the School of Theology, and the Preparatory School. The associated schools are under the control of a board of thirty trustees, twenty-four of whom are elected by the general conference of the Methodist Protestant Church, and six by the Alumni Association of the College. The College Campus embraces twenty acres of land, handsomely laid out, with grove and athletic field in the background. There are five large buildings for college purposes, and the departments of instruction are open to both sexes. There is a library of 7,000 volumes, with an adequate laboratory and fine museum. The Faculty consists of twelve persons of the highest character and qualifications, and students may enter without intending to graduate. The business officers are: T. H. Lewis, D. D., President; Miss Miriam Lewis, Registrar; Matron, Miss M. O. Smith. The officers of the Board of Directors are: David Metcalf, President; G. B. McElroy, Secretary; F. E. Priddy, Treasurer. BROWN'S BUSINESS COLLEGE, One of the prominent and very important institutions of Adrian is Brown's Business College. It was established by the present principal, Mr. L. S. Brown, in 1884, and has been a growing success from that time. It is very gratifying to all who are interested in the education of the young to note this fact, and all heartily congratulate Mr. Brown, not only as a teacher and instructor of the youth of the county, but upon his financial success, in being able to erect and equip such a fine and adequate building. His efforts must surely be appreciated when he is thus enabled to add to the importance of Adrian such an institution of learning and improvement. The new building, which is located upon the corner of College avenue and McKenzie streets, as will be seen by the accompanying engraving, is large and imposing, and will accommodate over four hundred

Page  51 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 51 students, with all the comforts and conveniences desirable in such an institution. Instruction in this school is most thorough and complete, and graduates have found no trouble in securing good positions. We advise all young men and women who desire to equip themselves for an active, independent life, to look up the facts and investigate the methods, cost and results of a full course at this institution. The work of the school is divided into two courses, the Business course and the Shorthand course. The Blusiness course includes Double and Single Entry Bookkeeping, Business Arithmetic, Rapid Business Writing, Spelling and Business Correspondence, English Grammar, Commercial Law, Banking, Commission, Corporation and Manufacturing Bookkeeping. The branches embraced in the Shorthand course are Graham Shorthand, Typewriting (by Touch Method), Rapid Dictation and Legal Reporting, Manifolding, Spelling and Business Correspondence, Business Writing and English Grammar. The price of scholarships and the cost of living is always of importance to those contemplating a business course. Write to Brown's Business College, 43-45 College avenue, Adrian, Mich., for all desired information. Brown's Business College, Adrian.

Page  52 Bird's-eye View of State Industrial Home for Girls, at Adrian.

Page  53 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 53 STATE INDUSTRIAL HOME FOR GIRLS, One of the best and most important of all the public institutions of Michigan is the Industrial Home for Girls, located at Adrian. It was mainly founded by the efforts of that grand old Quakeress, "Aunt" Laura Haviland, whose home was for so many years in Raisin township, this county, and who for nearly thirty years was so potent a factor in the great anti-slavery controversy that ended in the war of the rebellion of 1861-5. After the blight of chattel slavery had been driven out of the nation forever, she took up the battle for the mothers of the land, and became an active worker for the founding of an educational and industrial home for the unfortunate and incorrigible girls of Michigan. Aunt Laura was a "tower of strength," and her work lives after her. She was the embodiment of true womanhood, and as a moral teacher was broad and noble in her thought and deeds. She saw the weak places in our civilization and believed in higher education, moral suasion and example, rather than in prisons, corporal punishment and brute force for the wayward of her sex. She realized that if we are to have a perfect civilization, and high standards. ve must have good mothers -mothers who can fully realize the difference between semi-savagery and a high type of manhood and womanhood. She believed that a girl brought up in an environment of neglect, and crime, and corruption, was not a fit being to become a mother, and should not perpetuate and increase the race of low-born and brutalized humanity. She believed that to send a child or young person to prison only intensified human savagery and stultified human instincts. If, as a people and a nation, we are to grow in grace, intelligence and usefulness, we must first make pure and wholesome and morally strong our mothers, the most potent element in the human family. Hence, she said, to improve the race we must not send the unfortunate and wayward girl to the common prison house, but we must set apart a home for her, where she can be restrained, taught and shown the beauties and happiness of an exemplary life; where pure example and high standards rule, and where industry, education and accomplishments bring a noble reward. This was her thought and belief, and to her it meant work and ultimate success. She labored to that end, the sentiment grew, the idea prevailed, and to-day we have a grand institution in working order, and as immaculate as our civilization and ideals can make it. The State Industrial Home was created by act of the Legislature of 1879, under the administration of our own Governor, Charles M. Croswell. The first Board of Control, under the act, to choose location and provide buildings, appoint officers, etc., was as follows: Chas. T.

Page  54 54 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Gorham, of Marshall; Wm. H. Waldby, of Adrian; Mrs. S. L. Fuller, of Grand Rapids; Mrs. C. B. Stebbins, of Lansing; Miss Emma Hall, of Ypsilanti; with Gov. Croswell as ex-officio member. The beautiful site was donated by the citizens of Adrian, and conSisted of forty acres of land, with the buildings thereon, together with $3,000, but since that time adjacent ground has been purchased until there is now one hundred and thirteen acres of the most productive soil, with two farmhouses and adequate barns. The first building constructed was Clark cottage, which, although not entirely finished, was occupied August 3d, 1881. Miss Viola Wood, now Mrs. John I. Knapp, of Adrian, was the first cottage manager appointed, with Miss Seaver, of Adrian, as teacher, and Miss Myrick as housekeeper. The first girl received came from Lansing, and the second, a few hours later, from Saginaw. They arrived August 3d. The Home was founded on the cottage, or family system. There are now twelve buildings, the cottages being named and known as follows: The Administration Bulding, Clark Cottage, Croswell Cottage, Gillespie Cottage, Haviland Cottage, Central Cottage, Palmer Cottage, Alger Cottage, and Bliss Cottage. There is a school building with a corps of eight teachers, and a graded school; a fine chapel, with a Sunday school each Sabbath morning and services in the afternoon, supplied by pastors of the city. Catholic services are held twice each month, a priest coming for mass and confession, and the Sisters each month for catechism. A fine hospital has been erected, with all modern appointments, and supplied with an appointed lady physician. There is also a complete and thorough cooking school, where a class of thirty-two in number is daily under actual instruction by a competent teacher. Each girl takes a course of four months, and when she graduates is presented with an excellent and practical cook book. Some capable and competent cooks are turned out at the end of every term. Each girl is detailed for a certain period to look after all the domestic duties in the cottages, all becoming proficient in this important branch of household lore. Washing, ironing, mending, cleaning and decoration are all looked after, and good housekeepers are the rule. A sewing school is also in operation, and every girl is taught to sew, put garments together and make calico dresses. During this tuition, where any girl shows an aptitude for sewing, cutting and fitting, she is advanced to the dressmaking department where custom work is done, and many of them become expert dressmakers, capable of constructing the finest gowns. It is not the policy of the Home to try to make a natural dressmaker into a cook, or vice versa. There is a horticultural department, and all learn the cultivation and propagation of plants, shrubs and flowers. Music is taught in many branches, and all the ordinary accom

Page  55 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 55 plishments so acceptable and necessary in a happy home, are sought to be developed as much as possible. There is a fine orchestra of eighteen members. Mrs. Sickels expects to establish a monthly publication, the work of editing and printing to be done at the Home. The idea is to cultivate a literary taste, develop thought and keep in touch with as many as possible of those who have been saved by the institution, and now occupy homes and responsible positions. When the Board and the Superintendent are satisfied that girls are qualified, morally and otherwise, and it is to their welfare to leave the home, places are found for them in the families of the farmers of the state. Great care is exercised in regard to these allotments, and girls can be called in at any time. Each girl receives a salary of from $1.50 to $2.50 per week, and a stipulated portion is returned quarterly to the Home and given the proper credit. Several girls upon receiving their final discharge have found a bank account of from $75 to $175. Since the opening of the Home, August 3d, 1881, to May 1st, 1902, one thousand seven hundred and forty-one girls have been received, and there are at this date four hundred and thirty-one on the rolls. During this time only fourteen have died while under the control of the Home. Since the foundation there have been but three Superintendents. Miss Emma Hall was the first, taking charge June 27th, 1881. She did excellent work in organizing, originating and formulating plans and rules for governing a new and untried institution. After three years of hard service, she was succeeded by Miss Margaret Scott, who remained in charge until 1891, when in August of that year, the present Superintendent, Mrs. Lucy M. Sickels, was installed. Since Mrs. Sickels has been in charge, 1,166 girls have been received, and many of the buildings have been erected. The Home is now in fine condition, and people who thoroughly understand its workings appreciate the wisdom of its founding, and the resultant good to the people of the state. The records show that seventy-five per cent. of the girls discharged have proven to be good women and useful members of the communities in which they reside. The Board of Control consists of three members, one of whom must be a resident of Adrian. The present Board comprises the following persons: Hon. Gilbert Hart, Detroit, President; Mrs. May Stocking-Knaggs, of Bay City, Secretary; Fred C. Bowerfind, of Adrian, Treasurer. The resident members of the Board since the foundation were as follows: Wm. H. Waldby, C. R. Miller, John G. Mason, Mrs. Edwin Crane, Willard Stearns, Wm. Corbin, David Metcalf.

Page  56 56 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL RAILROAD HISTORY, The Erie & Kalamazoo was the first railroad built in the United States, west of Schenectady, N. Y., and was incorporated by the Territorial Legislature of Michigan, in April, 1833, to construct a railroad from Lake Erie (Port Lawrence, now Toledo), to the head waters of the Kalamazoo river, hence the name "Erie & Kalamazoo." At that time the entire road was supposed to be in Michigan, but on final adjustment of the boundary question, after the celebrated "Toledo war," about one-third of the road-eleven miles-was found to be in the State of Ohio. This road was laid with a thin iron ribbon, on oak stringers, and was opened in 1836. Until August the motive power consisted of horses. The notice of the arrival of locomotive No. 1, the first one in the tier of states bordered by the great lakes, and the advertisement of The First Locomotive and "Pleasure Car" on the E. & K. R. R. the road, in 1837, is here given, copied from the Toledo Weekly Blade: [From the Toledo Blade. January 20. 1837.] It affords us pleasure to announce the arrival of the long-expected locomotive for the Erie & Kalamazoo railroad. The business of our place has been embarrassed for want of it; goods have accumulated at our wharves faster than we could transport them into the interior on cars drawn by horses, and as a natural consequence several of our warehouses are now crowded to their utmost capacity. It is expected that the engine will be in operation in a few days, and then, we

Page  57 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 57 trust, goods and merchandise will be forwarded as fast as they arrive. A little allowance, however, must be made for the time necessary to disencumber our warehouses of the large stock already on hand. [Advertisement.] TO EMIGRANTS AND TRAVELERS. The Erie & Kalamazoo railroad is now in full operation between TOLEDO AND ADRIAN. During the ensuing season trains of cars will run daily to Adrian, there connecting with a line of stages for the west. Michigan City, Chicago and Wisconsin Territory. Emigrants and others destined for Indiana, Illinois, and the western part of Michigan WILL SAVE TWO DAYS And the corresponding expense, by taking this route in preference to the more lengthened, tedious and expensive route heretofore traveled. All baggage at the risk of the owners. EDWARD BISSELL, W. P. DANIELS, Commissioners E. & K. R. R. Co. GEORGE CRANE, A. HUGHES, Superintendent Western Stage Company. It will be observed no time is given for the departure of trains. The Board of Directors adopted the following tariff in 1836: Resolved, That the fare in the "Pleasure Car" (a two-story, top-heavy affair, always jumping the track), shall be as follows: Passengers, Toledo to Adrian, twelve shillings, fifty pounds of baggage free. Freight, Toledo to Adrian, four shillings per hundred pounds; salt, $1 per barrel. For ten years this road had a stormy and troublous existence, its affairs being managed sometimes by a Commissioner, acting for the Board of Directors, sometimes by Trustees, appointed by order of the court, and part of the time by a Receiver at the Toledo end, and a Commissioner at the Adrian end, recalling the familiar anecdote of the retort of the mate of a vessel to the captain, "My end of this craft has come to anchor." In 1848 the road was sold out under accumulated judgments; Hon. Washington Hunt, of Lockport, N. Y., and George Bliss, of Massachusetts, were the purchasers. They leased the road August 1, 1849, in perpetuity, to its rival, the Michigan Southern, then in operation from Monroe to Hillsdale, and, although it forms a part of the main line of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern from Toledo westward, the Erie & Kalamazoo company still exists, drawing and dividing its rental of $30,000 per year. MICHIGAN SOUTHERN. In 1837 the new State of Michigan launched out in a grand scheme of internal improvements, providing for a loan of $5,000,000 (an enormous sum at that time), for the improvement of rivers, construction of canals, and for three railroads-a Southern, a Central and a Northern railroad.

Page  58 58 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL The Southern road was to start at Monroe, on Lake Erie, traverse the southern tier of counties, and terminate at New Buffalo, on Lake Michigan. Chicago was a mere Indian trading post, with a'fort (Dearborn), in an apparently irreclaimable quagmire. The track was laid with the flat or "strap" rail, 22 inches wide, Y inch thick. The road was opened as follows: Monroe to Petersburg, eighteen miles, in 1839; Adrian, thirtythree miles, in 1840; Hudson, fifty miles, in 1843; Hillsdale, sixtysix miles, in 1843. This comprised all the Southern road built by the state. The Palmyra & Jacksonburg railroad (now the Jackson branch) was started by the owners of the Erie & Kalamazoo railroad, and opened to Tecumseh, its terminus for nearly twenty years, with a celebration August 9, 1838. This road became involved and was sold to the State of Michigan in 1844 for the amount of the state's loan and interest, $22,000. The state united it with the Southern road, as the "Tecumseh branch," stipulating in the sale of the Southern road, in 1846, that this branch should be extended to Jackson, which, after a delay of ten years, was done. In 1846 the state sold the road to a company, with Edwin C. Litchfield at its head, for $500,000, in ten equal annual installments. The new company did but little the next four years, adding but four miles to the west end to reach Jonesville. During the years 1851-2 the road was constructed very rapidly, reaching Chicago, 243 miles from Toledo, in March, 1852. The lease of the Erie & Kalamazoo, already noticed, August 1, 1849, settled the struggle for supremacy between Monroe and Toledo, in favor of the latter. Following is a copy of a time table printed in the Watchtoweroffice, Adrian, May 6th, 1844, sixty years ago: MICHIGAN SOUTHERN RAILROAD. SPRING ARRANGEMENTS FOR 1844. (Road owned and operated by the State of Michigan.) FROM MONROE TO ADRIAN, HUDSON AND HILLSDALE. This Road is now in operation from Monroe to Hillsdale, a distance of 66 miles, and being well provided with Locomotives, Freight and Passenger Cars, is prepared to transport FREIGHT AND PASSENGERS Expeditiously and at low rates. This Road is the cheapest and most direct for Passengers going to Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa, South and Western parts of Michigan. Stages leave Hillsdale for Jonesville, Coldwater, Marshall, Kalamazoo, White Pigeon, Constantine, Niles, Mishawaukie, South Bend, Mouth of St. Joseph River, and all the important Western Villages and Cities. Passengers will find it for their interest to leave the Lake at Monroe, to avoid

Page  59 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 59 delay, as the Cars on this Road pass Adrian for the West before they can reach Adrian from Toledo; and also to avoid the expense and trouble of transhipment. THE TRAIN FOR PASSENGERS LEAVES MONROE DAILY, SUNDAYS EXCEPTED, AT SIX O'CLOCK A. M., And Adrian at Nine o'clock A. M., and arrives at Hillsdale at HALF PAST ELEVEN O'CLOCK A. M. Leaves Hillsdale at half past 12 o'clock P. M., and Adrian at 3 o'clock P. M., and arrives at Monroe at 6 o'clock P. M. FARE THROUGH, $2. To intermediate places in proportion. TABLE OF DISTANCE. Monroe to Adrian -------------—.. --- —- 34 miles Sturges to White Pigeon ----------—. —12 miles Adrian to Hudson -------------------—.-17 " Mottville to Edwardsburgh --------— 221 " Hudson to Hillsdale — ---------------— 17 " Edwardsburgh to Niles ---------—..-.-1l " Hillsdale to Jonesville -------- ------- 5 " Niles to Michigan City ------—. --- —-. 36 Jonesville to Coldwater -----------—. —18 Michigan City to Chicago (steamboat) 60 Coldwater to Bronson Prairie --- —----— 13 " Boat runs through daily. Bronson to Sturges' Prairie --------—.-14 Niles to mouth St. Joseph River —.. ----25 Boat leaves St. Joseph daily for Chicago. May 6, 1844. J. H. CLEVELAND, Sup't. The Wabash Railroad, One of the most important events in the history of Adrian was the construction of the Detroit, Butler & St. Louis railroad, from Detroit to Butler, Indiana. In 1880 the movement to construct such a road was completed and was headed by the Hon. James F. Joy and other prominent men in Detroit. It was unquestionably the intent of the prime movers, at its inception, to make this road part of the Wabash system, although its construction was accomplished by an independent company. The importance of the great undertaking has been demonstrated in the highest degree since its completion, as it has become the "main line" of this great thoroughfare between the East and West. There is now no greater or more efficient railroad line betweenChicago, St. Louis and New York, than the Wabash, and Adrian and Lenawee County are benefited proportionately. The Detroit, Butler & St. Louis railroad was built during the years 1880-1, and the first passenger coach came into Adrian from Detroit, a distance of about 57 miles, May 12th, 1881. June 10th, 1881, Jay Gould passed over the entire line from Butler to Detroit. The great financier stopped in Adrian for some two or three hours, and a grand reception was given him. He was driven about the city by the Hon. W. S. Wilcox, the carriage being occupied by Mr. Gould and Ald. W. T. Lawrence, with Mr. Wilcox at the reins. A splendidly served lunch was given at the Lawrence House, when Mr. Gould proposed as a toast, "Prosperity to Adrian," which was heartily responded to by the large number of citizens present.

Page  60 60 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL The actual bonus given by the citizens of Adrian to secure this important railroad connection was $36,199. The largest subscription of any Adrian citizen was that of Hon. E. L. Clark, amounting to $10,000. July 6th, 1881, an excursion party of ten carloads, containing Mayor Thompson and prominent and enterprising citizens of Detroit, came to Adrian to rejoice over the completion of the road. This was during the administration of Thos. J. Navin. As mayor he made a short speech of welcome, and Mayor Thompson, of Detroit, responded. It was looked upon as a great occasion by both cities. The day was intolerably hot, but all participants were unanimous in their sanguine faith of future results. July 15th, following, the subscribers to the bonus raised by Adrian, were invited to Detroit, as the guests of that city, in honor of the completion of the road. The number of citizens who took advantage of the occasion was 725, and a grand ovation was enjoyed. Col. W. F. Bradley was appointed agent for the company in this city, June 15th, 1881, and still fills that important position. Detroit Southern Railroads The first train to arrive in Adrian, over what was then known as the Lima Northern railroad, was on Sunday, July 27th, 1896. At that time the track was completed from Lima, Ohio, to the Wabash track in South Adrian, and a temporary traffic arrangement was made with the Wabash company. The work of tracklaying was soon afterwards pushed on through Adrian, north to Detroit, and in 1898 trains commenced running between Lima and Detroit. In 1902 the name of the road was changed to the "Detroit Southern," and it is now a very important line. It connects with all the trunk lines running through Ohio, and at its present terminal, Ironton, Ohio, with the Chesapeake & Ohio and Norfolk & Western roads, making it a very important freight and passenger road. Toledo and Western Electric Line. The first car to run from Toledo to Adrian on this line arrived in Adrian on Saturday, December 7th, 1901. Cars commenced running on the following day on schedule time. The subway, under the Wabash railroad tracks at Adrian, was completed in August, 1903, and the first through car went into Adrian on August 11th.

Page  61 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 61 THE SHERIFFS OF LENAWEE COUNTY, Following is a complete list of the Sheriffs of Lenawee County, who have filled that important office since Michigan became a state: Joseph H. Cleveland, Dem., elected 1836-8. Darius Jackson, Dem., elected 1840-2. Olmsted Hough, Dem., elected 1844 —6. Sumner Spofford, Dem., elected 1848. Joseph R. Bennett, Whig, elected 1850-2. George Ketcham, Know Nothing, elected 1854. Joseph R. Bennett, Rep., elected 1856-8. Flavius J. Hough, Rep., elected 1860-2. Sylvester B. Smith, Rep., elected 1864-6. William R. Tayer, Rep., elected 1868-70. John G. Mason, Rep., elected 1872. Nathaniel B. Eldredge, Dem., elected 1874-6. James R. Cairns, Rep., elected 1876-8. Charles Bidwell, Rep., elected 1880-2. A. K. Whitmore, Dem., elected 1884-6. Edward C. Baldwin, Rep., elected 1888-90. Edward G. Wilson, Rep., elected 1892-4. Edwin S. Ferguson, Rep., elected 1896. John C. Iffland, Dem., elected 1898. William F. Shepherd, Rep., elected 1900-2. James Patchen, of Tecumseh, was sheriff previous to the removal of the county seat to Adrian. Allen Washburn was appointed the territorial sheriff after the removal to Adrian, and served until Joseph H. Cleveland was sworn in under the state organization. NEWSPAPERS OF LENAWEE COUNTY, Below will be found the names and places of publication of the different newspapers in Lenawee County at this time: ADRIAN-Times and Expositor, daily and tri-weekly. Times Printing Co.; Thomas A. Dailey, editor and manager. The Telegram, daily. D. W. Grandon, editor and proprietor. Adrian Press, weekly. Willard Stearns, editor and proprietor. College World, semi-monthly. Adrian College. ADDISON-Courier, weekly. A. J. Kempton, editor and proprietor.

Page  62 62 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL BLISSFIELD —Advance, weekly. John C. Howell, editor and proprietor. CLINTON —Local, weekly. J. R. Blanchard, editor and proprietor. DHERFIELD —Times-Journal, weekly. Wm. McNamara, editor and proprietor. HUDSON-Gazette, weekly. News Publishing Co., proprietors. Post, weekly. Charles Steuerwald, editor and proprietor. JASPER —Journal, weekly. Miss Minnie Forman, editor and proprietor. MoRENCI-Observer, weekly. Allen Bros., editors and proprietors. ONSTED-News, weekly. B. E. Thayer, editor and proprietor. TEcuMsEH —Herald, weekly. George Stacy, editor and proprietor. News, weekly. 0. E. Hawkins, editor and proprietor. WESTON-Kodak, semi-monthly. Mrs. D. J. Strang, editor and proprietor. This is the only log house left in the Township of Rome. It was built by John York, in 1837, and is a good sample of the pioneer home. It is now owned by Charles H. Severance, of Adrian, and was occupied as a residence until 1903.

Page  63 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 63 MAYORS OF ADRIAN FOR FIFTY YEARS, Following is a complete list of the names of the men who served as Mayor of Adrian from 1853 to 1903, and the date of their official service. In the spring of 1852 James Sword was elected President of the Village Board. In January, 1853, Adrian became a city by act of the Legislature, and Mr. Sword was acting Mayor until the regular election in April, 1853. Here are the names and dates: 1853-Addison J. Comstock. 1879-Frank O. Bray. 1854-Dr. Parley J. Spaulding. 1880-James A. Stacy. 1855-Francis J. Buck. 1881-Thomas J. Navin. 1856-Fernando C. Beaman. 1882-William Corbin. 1857-Richard H. Whitney. 1883-William Corbin. 1858-William L. Greenly. 1884-Richard A. Bury. 1859-Henry Hart. 1885-Dr. Nelson H. Kimball. 1860-William W. Cook. 1886 —Dr. Daniel Todd. 1861-Daniel A. Loomis. 1887 —Adolph J. Kaiser. 1862-Charles M. Croswell. 1888 —Adolph J. Kaiser. 1863-John D. Campbell. 1889 —Abram Wing. 1864-Benjamin Folsom. 1890 ---Seth Bean. 1865-William S. Wilcox. 1891 —Leonard W. Hoch. 1866-William S. Sammons. 1892 —Alanson B. Treat. 1867-John Townsend. 1893-Wm. Foster Bradley. 1868-William S. Sammons. 1894 —Charles S. Cain. 1869-Norman Geddes. 1895 —Dr. Clifford Kirkpatrick. 1870-Nathaniel B. Eldredge. 1896-William O. Hunt. 1871-Richard B. Robbins. 1897-J. Will Kirk. 1872-Henry A. Angell. 1898-J. Will Kirk. 1873-William H. Waldby. 1899-Willard Stearns. 1874-Dr. Nelson H. Kimball. 1900-Willard Stearns. 1875-Dr. Nelson H. Kimball. 1901-Dr. James H. Reynolds. 1876-William W. Luck. 1902-Dr. George B. M. Seager. 1877-Charles H. Comstock. 1903-Jacob N. Sampson. 1878-George H. Bruce. EMINENT MEN OF LENAWEE, Lenawee County has been the home of several noted men, but it is our purpose here to call attention to those only who have attained the greatest eminence. It being about eighty years since the first white settler located here, the record is very creditable. The county has furnished the state with two Governors, three members of Congress, and one of the most eminent jurists in the

Page  64 64 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL nation. Several men have reached the distinction of a candidacy for Congress and high state offices, many of whom were successful. In 1845 Hon. William L. Greenly, of Adrian, was elected Lieutenant Governor, and succeeded to the governorship in 1847 by the election of Governor Felch to the United States Senate. The Hon. Charles M. Croswell, of Adrian, was elected Governor in November, 1876, and was re-elected in 1878. The first member of Congress to be elected from Lenawee County was Hon. Fernando C. Beaman, of Adrian, who was first chosen in 1860, filling that responsible position for five terms, a period of ten years. In 1884 Hon. Nathaniel B. Eldredge, of Adrian, was elected, and re-elected in 1886. In November, 1898, Hon. Henry C. Smith was elected, and reelected in 1900. It will be observed-that out of its eighty years of existence Lenawee County has furnished a Governor for five years and a member of Congress for eighteen years. Not a bad record, when it is understood the much older counties of Monroe and Wayne have always comprised a part of the congressional district. Hon. Thomas M. Cooley was the most eminent man that ever made his home in Lenawee County. Born on a farm about one mile east from Attica, Genesee County, N. Y., January 6th, 1824, the tenth of a family of fifteen children, he was the only one to attain any position above mediocrity. He attended a district school until he was fifteen years old, and then became a student at the Attica Academy three years. His ambition was to attend college, but the family was too poor, and he never got beyond the academy. In 1842 he began to read law in the office of Theron K. Strong, of Palmyra, N. Y., but in 1843 he removed to Adrian, where he continued his studies in the law office of Alexander R. Tiffany and Fernando C. Beaman. A portion of his time was given as Deputy Village Clerk of Adrian. In December, 1843, he was married to Miss Mary E. Horton, of Adrian. In 1848 he became a member of the law firm of Beaman, Beecher & Cooley. In 1850 he was elected Circuit Court Commissioner and Recorder of the village of Adrian. At this time he also assisted in running a farm in association with his father-in-law. He served as Secretary of the Lenawee County Agricultural Society, and edited a local paper. In 1855 he formed a law partnership with Charles M. Croswell. He was first a Democrat, but joined the Free Soil party in 1848, and followed that into the Republican party. In 1857 he was chosen by the Legislature to compile the laws, state and territorial, up to that time, and accomplished the great task in nine months. In 1858 he was appointed Reporter of the Supreme Court. That year he was

Page  65 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 65 chosen by the Board of Regents of the State University, one of the three first professors of the law department, with Judge James V. Campbell and C. I. Walker, and he removed to Ann Arbor. In 1864 he was elected to the bench of the Supreme Court of Michigan, and of course discontinued his work as Reporter, after having issued eight volumes of reports. In 1868 he published his great work on "Constitutional Limitations." In 1870 his edition of Blackstone appeared, and next, in 1874, his Story's Commentaries; in 1876, his work on Taxation; in 1879, on Torts, and in 1880 a Manual on Constitutional Law. In 1882, with the Hons. Allen G. Thurman and E. B. Washburn, he was appointed as a tribunal to settle differences between the great terminal lines. In 1885 he left the bench. In 1886 he was appointed Receiver of the Wabash railroad, and became general manager. In 1887 President Cleveland appointed him one of the first five members of the Interstate Commerce Commission, and he became its chairman and controlling spirit. In 1891 he resigned on account of ill-health. In 1894 he became physically used up, and died Sept. 12th, 1898. His law books and commentaries are the standards among lawyers throughout the nation. Judge Alexander R. Tiffany was a lawyer of eminence and influence in Lenawee County. He was a student with the Hon. John C. Spencer, of Canandaigua, N. Y., who became Chief Justice of the State of New York. Mr. Tiffany came to Michigan in 1832 and settled in Palmyra, this county. In 1836 he was elected Judge of Probate of Lenawee County, was a member of the constitutional convention in 1850, and member of the Legislature and. chairman of the judiciary committee in 1855. He was the author of Tiffany's Justice Guide and Tiffany's Criminal Law, both being regarded as standard legal works. They are in general use in Michigan. The first edition of the Justice Guide was printed at the Watchtower office, in Adrian, in 1850. Mr. Tiffany printed two subsequent editions, and in 1866 the fourth edition was published by Charles Humphrey, of Adrian. The fifth edition was revised by Judge Andrew Howell, of Adrian. Mr. Humphrey published in all five editions. We believe that the tenth edition is now in general use. The work on Criminal Law was issued soon after the Justice Guide. It was later revised by Judge Andrew Howell, and many editions have been issued. The copyright of these valuable compilations is still in the hands of Judge Tiffany's children, control being vested in his son, George S. Tiffany, of Tecumseh. 5

Page  66 66 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL JUDGES OF PROBATE. One of the most important of all the county offices is that of Judge of Probate, and below will be found a correct list of the names of the men who have served the people in this capacity from the first organization of the county. The records of the court show that the first business was done in 1828, when only one case was settled during the year. In territorial days the office was an appointive one. The records do not show the dates of the appointments made by Governor Cass, but we find two names previous to 1836: 1828 —Musgrove Evans. 1860 —Robert R. Beecher. 1834 —S. Hale. 1872 —Fernando C. Beaman. 1836 —Alexander R. Tiffany. 1880 —Norman Geddes. 1844 —Consider A. Stacy. 1888 —Richard B. Robbins. 1856-Fernando C. Beaman. 1900 —Harry L. Larwill. GENERAL JOSEPH W. BROWN, General Joseph W. Brown, whose portrait we are pleased to present, was among the very first settlers, and was altogether the most prominent pioneer of Lenawee County. He was one of a party of fourteen men who came to Michigan in May, 1824, and settled on land where the village of Tecumseh now stands. Austin E. Wing was a resident of Monroe, and had been Secretary to Governor B Lewis Cass. Musgrove Evans -— Ywas a relative of Mr. Wing. Both Wing and Evans were ambitious politicians. Wing wanted to go to Congress, and Evans wanted something "equally as good." In 1823 Mr. Evans visited Mr. Wing at Monroe and unfolded his proposition. A plan was formulated by which they believed both could make their point. Joseph W. Brown was then a miller and farmer at Brownville, Jefferson County, N. Y., and a relative by marriage to both Wing and Evans. Gen. Jacob Brown, a brother of Joseph W., was in Washington, in command of the U. S. Army. Here was "influence." Wing and.n.ral.. $Tnoh W Rmown. Evans at once started from Mon su v, H1 V vvv^ * -,,i

Page  67 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 67 roe to locate land, and after a short campaign decided to take up a large tract on the Raisin river, at the confluence of a stream they named Evans creek, the present site of Tecumseh. After this was done, Mr. Evans went to visit Joseph W. Brown, at his home in Brownville, N. Y., bearing a letter from Mr. Wing Mr. Evans succeeded in interesting Mr. Brown in the enterprise, the land was at once duly entered, and the firm of Wing, Evans & Brown organized. In May, 1824, Mr. Brown became the resident member, a village was platted, a county seat established, etc., etc. In the spring of 1825 an election took place. Wing was chosen to Congress by the aid of the Tecumseh colony, and Evans was made United States Surveyor, while Mr. Brown was pioneer, miller and farmer. One of the first things Mr. Brown did, after putting up a log house for his wife and family of five children, was to build a mill for grinding grain and sawing lumber. He was a typical pioneer, able and resolute, with capability, courage and endurance enough to lead the great pioneer enterprise whose destiny he was then directing. The rapid growth of the settlement gave evidence of his fitness to lead. He built the first grist and sawmill in this county; he did the first plowing, and ground the first wheat. He carried the first mail from Monroe to Tecumseh, built the first frame house, and established the first stage mail route between Detroit and Chicago. Mr. Brown was born of Quaker parentage, but inherited military instincts. In 1817 he was appointed adjutant of a regiment of cavalry; in 1818, captain of a rifle company, and in 1819, lieutenant-colonel of the One Hundred and Eighth Infantry, by Governor Dewitt Clinton, of New York. In 1826 he was made chief justice of Lenawee County, Michigan, and in 1829, colonel of the Eighth Michigan Regiment, by Governor Lewis Cass. In 1831 he was appointed brigadier general of the Third Brigade, and in 1836, Register of the land office at Ionia, Mich., by President Andrew Jackson. In 1839 he was appointed brigadier general of Michigan troops, and also Regent of Michigan University, by Governor Stevens T. Mason. During the "Black Hawk War," of 1833, Gen. Brown was in command of the Michigan forces, and was commended by the territorial and national authorities. In 1835, the year of the "Toledo War," that might have resulted in blood and carnage, had the Ohio forces come upon the disputed territory, Gen. Brown, in command of 1,500 Michigan troops, marched to Toledo and thus put an end to the disgraceful proceeding of Governor Lucas, who, with 500 or more Ohio militia, was then encamped at Maumee. Governor Lucas was bringing this army to Toledo to protect a court that was to sit there to declare the disputed line "legal," and to extend civil jurisdiction over the stolen territory. But General Brown and his army arrived first, and the court never acted. Congress finally passed an act ceding to Ohio the disputed territory, and in return attached to Michigan our present upper peninsula, a tract of country then supposed to be worthless and almost uninhabitable. But it has proven a good trade for

Page  68 68 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Michigan. After this campaign General Brown was again commended. There never was a better or more useful pioneer than General Joseph W. Brown, of Tecumseh. He was practical and thorough, generous and hospitable, shirked no duty, feared no responsibility, and commanded the respect and confidence of all citizens. He lived to a good old age at his home in Tecumseh, honored by all. He was born in Falls Township, Bucks County, Pa., November 26th, 1793, and died in Toledo, Ohio, December 9th, 1880. His remains lie buried in the beautiful cemetery at Tecumseh. HON, ADDISON J, COMSTOCK, Hon. Addison J. Comstock, whose portrait is here shown, was the founder of Adrian. He came to Michigan with his father, Darius Comstock, from Lockport, N. Y., in the fall of 1825, and took up from the government six hundred and forty acres of land, upon which the city now stands. At the same time his father entered a large tract in Raisin Township, which is now occupied by Raisin Valley Seminary. Both immediately returned to Lockport, where they settled up their affairs, and the next year, 1826, came to Michigan and settled in the wilderness. Addison J. Comstock, with his young wife, married in February, arrived at his home in the woods in July. His first work of importance, after putting up a log house, was to build a sawmill, which he comHon. Addison J. Comstock. menced to operate in

Page  69 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 69 November. This sawmill was an important factor in establishing a settlement. So many settlers came in that in March, 1828, Mr. Comstock laid out and platted the village of Adrian, which was recorded in the County Register's office at Tecumseh, April 1st following. This plat contained forty-nine lots, which Mr. Comstock then believed to be sufficient for all time, but in 1837 he added largely to the original plat. On the 4th of July, 1828, a celebration was held, the day being patriotically observed by Mr. Comstock reading the Declaration of Independence. The whole number of people, young and old, in the settlement, numbered about forty. In 1829 a postoffice was established, with Mr. Comstock as postmaster, the first quarter's receipts being nineteen cents. This same year he, with his father-in-law, Isaac Dean, built a gristmill, which was the second in the county. In 1832 he and his father projected the Erie & Kalamazoo railroad from Toledo to Adrian, a distance of thirtythree miles. This was a great undertaking, but with the assistance of enterprising men, both at Adrian and Toledo, the road was completed in 1836. It was operated with horses until August, 1837, when the first locomotive was procured. This was among the earliest railroads in the nation, and was the first in the entire country west of Schenectady, N. Y. In 1836 the Erie & Kalamazoo Railroad Bank was established by some eastern capitalists, and Mr. Comstock was one of the principal stockholders. In 1837 Mr. Comstock was elected a member of the Legislature. In 1848 he was chosen president of the Adrian and Bean Creek Plank Road Company, and a good plank road was constructed from Adrian to Gambleville, Hillsdale County, the junction of the Chicago turnpike. The road was completed in 1849. In 1850 he was elected a member of the constitutional convention of that year. In 1853 he was made mayor of Adrian, being the first mayor elected by the people. On Sunday, January 20th, 1867, he died suddenly, at his home, in the afternoon, after attending church in the morning. Mr. Comstock was a most honorable and exemplary man, and was held in the highest esteem by every person who knew him. He proved in every way equal to the great task imposed upon himself in going into the wilderness and building up a happy community of worthy and prosperous people. He was first in every undertaking that inured to the benefit, comfort or prosperity of the county. In organizing churches and schools, and in building roads, bridges, mills, etc., he was always first with his labor and means. He gave liberally of his land for public purposes, and encouraged every laudable enterprise. He was a man of good business education, and a public speaker of much force and influence. His pioneer life was a grand success, and his happiness was in the enjoyment of his good work. A complete history of Mr. Comstock's life and family relations may be found in the "History and Biographical Record of Lenawee County," vol. 1.

Page  70 70 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL MRS, LAURA S. HAVILAND, Mrs. Laura S. Haviland was born at Kitley, Leeds County, Ontario, Canada, December 20th, 1808. She was the daughter of Daniel and Sene (Blancher) Smith. Mr. Smith was a native of the State of New York, an approved minister in the Society of Friends (Quakers), and was a man of strong convictions, clear reasoning powers, and earnest and successful in his spiritual work. Soon after his marriage with Sene Blancher he removed to Canada and resided there until 1815, when he returned to his native state, with his family, and settled in Cambria, Niagara County. Here their daughter, Laura S., lived until she was married to Charles Haviland, jr., November 3d, 1825, at Lockport. She became the mother of seven children, five of whom survived her. In September, 1829, Charles and Laura Haviland, with their two infant sons, came to Michigan and settled on a wilderness farm, in what is now Raisin Township, Lenawee County, within three miles of where her R Aunt Laura te. Heavlan h parents had settled four years previously. She proved a true pioneer, being among the first in every movement to better the conditions and alleviate the sufferings of settlers. She was a kind, devoted mother, a faithful, pure and loving wife. About the year 1837. she, with her husband, opened a manual labor school on their premises, afterwards known as the Raisin Institute. Her brother, Harvey Smith, sold his farm of one hundred and sixty acres, and put the proceeds into buildings. This was the first school in Michigan to open its doors to students of good moral character, regardless of sex or color. The first students were nine children taken from the Lenawee County Poorhouse, and wholly maintained by the Institute for more than one year. Her husband died March 13th, 1845. Out of this enterprise has - grown the two splendid State Industrial Schools, the one for girls at Adrian and the other for boys at Coldwater. These schools are authorized by acts of the State Legislature, and maintained by the state. Aunt Laura, as she was familiarly called, spent much time at Lansing,

Page  71 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 71 during the sessions of the Legislature when these acts were passed, in laboring with members in their behalf. She was one of the organizers of the first Abolition Society, back in the 30's; established the first "underground railroad" depot in the state, and was ever after an earnest and enthusiastic helper of the slaves in their efforts to gain their freedom. So active was she in this work that a reward of $3,000 was offered for her, dead or alive, by the slave interests of the South. But this fact did not intimidate her in the least, and she continued her zealous efforts until the advent of universal emancipation in 1863. She was a woman of great attainments and wonderful moral and physical courage, a forceful and convincing speaker, possessing rare gifts, with a religious fervor such as few are inspired with. She loved to do a kindly act, to relieve suffering, and comfort the weary and forlorn. In 1864 she went to New Orleans as agent of the Freedman's Relief Association of Michigan, and, in distributing supplies and dispensing relief, learned there were three thousand Union soldiers imprisoned on Ship Island and the Dry Tortugas, in the Gulf of Mexico. These men had been sent there by an ex-rebel captain named Attocha, who, after first swearing allegiance, had been rewarded by General Banks, who made him judge advocate at New Orleans. The Government was then drafting men to fill up depleted regiments, while this traitor was decimating the ranks by sentencing men to Ship Island on the most trivial charges, for long terms at hard labor, with ball and chain attachment. Aunt Laura was at once aroused at this outrageous proceeding, and used all her craft and diplomacy in trying to unwind the red tape that made it possible these innocent men should suffer such wrong. Following desperate and fruitless efforts in their behalf, she went to Ship Island, and after a week's investigation was further shocked and horrified at learning the truth. She got at the records, copied from the books the charges that condemned these men, and returned to New Orleans. The facts and records were laid before the officers in command there, but no relief could be had-the tape could not be unwound, and three thousand innocent men were allowed to remain on the white sand, under a tropical sun, because nobody had the courage to act. She came home to Adrian. After a few days' rest, she presented the case to the Hon. Fernando C. Beaman, our member of Congress, and Benj. F. Wade, of Ohio. Within a week, she got word that Judge Attocha had been removed, and that the soldiers would be released as soon as due investigation could be made. This was one of the greatest achievements of her life. She stated the facts and presented the proofs so clear and strong that quick work was done at Washington. No woman was better or more favorably known among the loyal people in this whole country than Aunt Laura. Her fifty-three years of widowhood were devoted to the righting of wrongs, relieving of suffering, and comforting hopeless humanity. Hers was a life of

Page  72 72 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL religious devotion, for it is only those who are impelled with such a mind, such courage, such resources and exalted piety, that can accomplish such grand results. She was broad, noble and kindly, sweet in her disposition, reverently grand in her instincts, and was graced with modest dignity and pure womanly excellence. Her life and history should be an inspiration to every Christian woman. She made more history, and set a greater example, than any woman who ever resided in Michigan, if not in the nation. A town in Kiowa County, Kansas, and a Friends Academy, established in 1886, were named "Haviland" in honor of her life and work. At the same place a Friends quarterly meeting was also established and named after her. The picture of her kindly face adorns the walls of the academy at Haviland, Kansas, and also the schools at Adrian and Coldwater. She crossed the ocean and passed five pleasant months in England, after she was eighty years old, and was there entertained by the best people of the realm. Lenawee County is justly proud of this meek but practical woman. She sleeps beside her kindred in Raisin Valley cemetery. She died at the home of her brother, Rev. Samuel B. Smith, D. D., of Grand Rapids, Mich., April 20th, 1898, having attained the ninetieth year of her age. She wrote a book entitled "A Woman's Life Work," in which she details her eventful career, and records many historical events to be found in no other volume. A modest monument at present marks her final resting place, but a strong movement has recently been instituted to secure a fund by popular subscription, and erect above her treasured dust a tribute to her memory that shall endure for coming ages. *

Page  73 BIOGRAPHICAL RECORDS, The following Biographical and Family Records have been obtained by personal interviews with the subjects, or their children, and all the dates and figures are taken from family records. The greatest care has been taken in writing and compiling, every sketch being approved and pronounced correct by the parties of whom it has been obtained. They will be found as reliable as it is possible to make them. HON. FERNANDO C. BEAMAN was born in Chester, Windsor County, Vermont, June 28th, 1814. His father, Joshua Beaman, was born in Lancaster, Massachusetts, and was baptized March 12th, 1769. Joshua Beaman was the descendant of Gamaliel Beaman, who settled in Dorchester, Massachusetts, with his parents, when twelve years of age, in 1635, but removed to Lancaster, the same state, in 1659. He had eight children, four sons and four daughters. Elijah Beaman was the son of John Beaman, who represented the third generation from Gamaliel Beaman, and was born October 10th, 1736, at Lancaster, Massachusetts. He married Miss Thankful Nichols, of the same place, in 1759. Joshua Beaman was the son of Elijah and Thankful Beaman, who were Fernando Beaman's grandparents. Joshua Beaman lived in Lancaster, Massachusetts, until 1787, when he was called out by the Government, to assist in quelling Shay's rebellion, soon after which he removed to Chester, Hon. Fernanido C. Beaman.

Page  74 74 ' ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Vermont. He resided in Chester until about 1819, when he removed to Chateaugay, Franklin County, New York, and purchased a farm, where he died, April 26th, 1829. About the year 1791 Joshua Beaman married Miss Hannah Olcott, daughter of Timothy Olcott and Hannah Chandler, by whom he had fourteen children, Fernando C. being the sixth son and twelfth child. Mrs. Hannah Beaman was born in Windsor County, Vermont, in 1773, and died in Chateaugay, New York, March 19th, 1829. Fernando C. Beaman lived at home until the death of his parents, which occurred in his fifteenth year. At that time he had received a good common school education, afterwards working himself through Franklin Academy, of Malone, New York, teaching school seven winters and three summers. He went to Rochester in 1836, and in the following year entered the law office of Haight & Elwood, subsequently reading also with Wm. S. Bishop, a prominent member of the bar of that city. In 1838 he came to Michigan, and early in 1839 was admitted to the bar in Lenawee County, and first settled in Manchester, now in Washtenaw County, where he entered upon the practice of his profession. Later in the same year he moved to Tecumseh, and formed a partnership with Hon. Consider A. Stacy. In 1843 Mr. Beaman was appointed prosecuting attorney of Lenawee County, by Gov. Barry, and removed to Adrian, the county seat, where he resided until his death. He was twice re-appointed to this position, holding it for six years. During this time he formed a law partnership with the Hon. A. R. Tiffany, and later he became a member of the law firm of Beaman, Beecher & Cooley, composed of himself, the late Hon. Robert R. Beecher, and the Hon. Thomas M. Cooley, afterwards a justice of the Supreme Court. Subsequently Judge Cooley dropped out of the firm, the remaining members continuing until after Mr. Beaman's election, in 1856, as judge of probate for Lenawee County, which office he held for one term. In 1871, soon after retiring for the first time to private life, he was appointed judgeof probate again, to fill a vacancy caused by the death of Judge Beecher, and in 1872 and 1876 was re-elected to the same office. In early life Mr. Beaman was a Democrat of the liberal sort, and afterwards, in 1848, became a Free Soiler, and made a vigorous canvass of Lenawee County in favor of Van Buren and Adams, the presidential candidates of the party. In 1854 he attended the Jackson convention, which organized the Republican party, in Michigan, and was one of the vice presidents of that assembly. He was also a delegate to the National convention at Pittsburg, which met for consultation, and paved the way for the organization of the Republicans as a National party. The same year he served as one of the presidential electors for this state, casting his vote for Fremont and Dayton. In 1856 he was also a delegate to the Philadelphia convention, which nominated Fremont and Dayton. In 1860 Judge Beaman was elected to Congress, in the Second district, comprising Monroe, Lenawee, Cass, Hillsdale, Branch and St. Joseph Counties;

Page  75 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 75 receiving 19,173 votes against 12,699 cast for the Hon. S. C. Coffinberry, of St. Joseph. For four succeeding and consecutive terms he was re-elected. In 1862 the district was changed, Branch, St. Joseph and Cass being detached from it, and Wayne added. This was the year when the "Union" movement came so near sweeping the Republicans from their footings, and Judge Beaman only won by one hundred and ninety-two majority over Hon. E. J. Penniman, of Plymouth. In 1864 he defeated the Hon. David A. Noble, of Monroe, in the same district, by 2,314 majority; in 1866 he was elected over the Hon. J. Logan Chipman by 3,876 majority, and in 1868 was chosen over the Hon. M. I. Mills by 1,602 majority. In none of these years had Judge Beaman sought the nomination. Of the nominating convention which convened at Monroe to nominate Mr. Beaman's successor, in 1871, J. Fred Meyers, editor of the Dennison (Iowa) Review, who attended the convention, says: "The Wayne delegation didn't want any change, and urged the Lenawee County delegation to unite with them (they having a majority over Hillsdale and Monroe Counties) to secure Mr. Beaman's nomination, but Mr. B. stood by his previous declaration. When meeting him subsequently, we reported that if he had only given the word he would have been certainly and eagerly nominated. To this he replied that all public men wear out, sooner or later, and that it is the part of wisdom to retire while the public yet desired their services, and not to wait until their welcome was worn out. He felt that ten years of Congressional life was enough for him, and that he ought to retire voluntarily, and not wait defeat either before a convention or before the people." In May, 1872, he was elected president of the First National Bank of Adrian, and held the position until the bank went into voluntary liquidation. November 13th, 1879, Mr. Beaman was appointed by Governor Croswell to the exalted office of United States Senator, to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Hon. Zachariah Chandler, but owing to ill-health did not accept the position, although it was one of the highest encomiums to his ability, fidelity and personal worth that could be tendered him, coming, as it did, unsought and unexpected. This is not the first time he declined to accept high official stations. Gov. Kinsley S. Biigham tendered him the appointment of Justice of the Supreme Court, to fill a vacancy on the bench, which Mr. Beaman declined. When Senator Chandler was Secretary of the Interior, he tendered Judge Beaman the position of Commissioner of Indian Affairs, which was also declined. May 10th, 1841, Mr. Beaman married Miss Mary Goodrich, daughter of Ira and Fear Goodrich, of Brockport, New York, by whom he had three children, as follows: Mary A., born in Clinton, this county, March 4th, 1842, now the wife of Rienzi H. Baker;* Elwood C., born in Adrian March 12th, 1845, died July 5th, 1846; Roscoe W., born in Adrian July 18th, 1847, died in Chicago August 31st, 1877. Mrs. Mary Beaman was born in Granville, Washington County, New York, March 16th, 1818. Her father was a native of Owego, New

Page  76 76 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL York, and died in Rochester, New York, in 1825. Her mother was a native of Vermont, and died at Brockport, New York, in 1851. Mr. Beaman died in Adrian, September 27th, 1882. Mrs. Beaman died September 15th, 1894. *Rienzi H. Baker and Mary Antoinette Beaman were married in Adrian, November 13th, 1867. Two children have been born to them, as follows: Leslie Beaman, born February 22d, 1871, resides at home; Mary Louise, born in Adrian, October 22d, 1874, and resides at home. R. H. Baker was born in Dexter, Washtenaw County, Mich., November 3d, 1840. His parents, Hiram and Jerusha (Sawtelle) Baker, were pioneers of Washtenaw County, and settled at Dexter in 1833. Hiram Baker was a farmer, and located government land. After clearing up his farm and putting up comfortable buildings, he engaged in the mercantile business in Dexter with Judge A. D. Crane. He was born near Gorham. Ontario County, N. Y., July 20, 1806. After a short but successful career in Michigan, he died in Dexter, March 10th, 1842, leaving a wife and three children. Rienzi, the youngest, is the only survivor of the family. Mrs. Jerusha Baker was born near Gorham, Ontario County, N. Y., March 27th, 1807, and was the daughter of Levi and Sarah (Monroe) Sawtelle. Levi Sawtelle was born near Boston, Mass., and was a pioneer in Ontario County, N. Y., where he met and married Miss Sarah Monroe, who was born in the Wyoming Valley, Pa., and was a survivor of the memorable massacre. Mrs. Jerusha Baker died February 18th, 1867. R. H. Baker served his country in the Union army, during the great rebellion, for about three and one-half years. He first enlisted as a private in Detroit, April 16th, 1861, in the three months' service, and was discharged at the expiration of that time, but re-enlisted July 26th, 1862, as a private in the Eighteenth Michigan Infantry, and was mustered out in August, 1865. He was promoted to sergeant and afterwards to second lieutenant. He was detailed as aid to General R. S. Granger, and was commended on several occasions for gallant and meritorious conduct. FLAVIUS J. HOUGH was born in East Schuyler, Herkimer County, N. Y., March 18th, 1823, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1831. His father, Olmsted Hough, was born in Columbia County, N. Y., in 1797. In 1801 his parents removed to Schuyler. Zepheniah Hough, father of Olmsted Hough, was of French and English ancestry. He was a soldier in the Continental army during the Revolutionary War, and died in Schuyler in 1836. He could trace his ancestry back to Normandy, France, from which his fore

Page  77 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 77 Olmsted Hough. Flavius J. Hough. fathers went to England in the days of William the Conqueror. Two brothers, William and Benjamin Hough, came to America and settled at Norwich, Conn., in 1680, and from these two men all families in the United States who spell their names H-o-u-g-h have descended. Olmsted Hough lived with his parents until he was fourteen years old, when he was bound out to a brother-in-law to learn the trade of carpenter and millwright. When he was eighteen he bought his time. He followed the business until 1830, when he was elected to the New York Legislature, on the "Masonic ticket," and served one term. In June, 1831, he emigrated to Michigan with his family, and settled on a farm on what was then known as "the trail road," running from Tecumseh to Saline. He was always an active, enthusiastic Democrat in politics, being present and assisting in the organization of the party in this county. At the first state constitutional convention he was elected sergeant-at-arms. He was elected the first State Senator of his district after Michigan was admitted to the Union. In 1838 he was appointed by President Martin Van Buren, Register of the State Land Office, then located at Detroit, but resigned when the Whigs came into power, in 1840. In 1844 he was elected Sheriff of Lenawee County, and was re-elected in 1846. He was elected by the Township of Tecumseh to the Board of Supervisors for several terms, and was also made chairman of that body. He was a man of sterling qualities. His life was a strenuous and honorable one, being respected and highly regarded by all. He died in the village of Tecumseh, December 25th, 1865. He was twice married, first in 1820 to Miss Julia Ann Boughton, who died April

Page  78 78 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL 4th, 1829. He next married Miss Mary Boughton, a sister of his former wife, who died in Tecumseh, April 25th, 1890, aged 85 years. Flavius J. Hough, the subject of this sketch, came to Michigan when he was eight years old. He lived with his parents until he was seventeen years old, and was educated in the country district schools, and three years in what was then known as the Tecumseh Branch of the State University. During the winters of 1841-2 he taught school in Raisin Township. For about ten years his principal employment was teaching school. In the spring of 1842 Mr. Hough started for St. Louis, Mo., on foot. He was armed and equipped with a rugged constitution, a good education, and a resolute purpose to enlighten and civilize the western youth. He walked from Tecumseh to Chicago, and from Chicago to the Mississippi river. It was at Ottawa, Illinois, that he boarded a boat for St. Louis. He found that city supplied with young men of his class, all clamoring for fame and employment. He made the acquaintance of a gentleman from what is now known as West Virginia, and striking a friendly chord, he accompanied him home, going by river to Sistersville, near Wheeling. From here he crossed the* mountains to Staunton, atld then on as far south as Greensboro, S. C. Here he turned about and headed for home. He discovered that northern school teachers were not appreciated in the south, and, somewhat disheartened, he tramped back. On this trip he walked over 1,300 miles, not including his steamboat excursions. That fall he started out again, by the same conveyance, for New Orleans, but found a school to teach in Butler County, Ohio. Here he remained until 1850, when he returned to Michigan. He at once purchased a farm in Macon, was elected Supervisor in 1851, and served six terms. In 1860 he was elected Sheriff, moved to Adrian, and was re-elected in 1862. In 1863 he was appointed deputy collector of internal revenue for Lenawee County, but resigned in 1864 to accept the appointment of general agent and adjuster of the Michigan State Insurance Company, being a director and stockholder, which position he held until 1879, when the company retired from business. He is now actively engaged in a general insurance business with his son, Frank L. Hough, and is the oldest insurance man in Adrian at this time. September 25th, 1845, Flavius J. Hough married Miss Jane M. Wheeler, daughter of James and Sarah Wheeler, of Macon. Four children were born to them, as follows: James, born Sept. 2d, 1846, drowned in the river at Adrian, June 3d, 1861; Clara J., born August 3d, 1850, died in Macon in October, 1855; Emma R., born January 7th, 1852, married T. R. Travers April 1st, 1879, who resides in Adrian; Frank L., born July 6th, 1858. He married Miss Zoe McLain, daughter of Wilmot and Ellen McLain, and they had two children, Roy B., born at Ft. Wayne, Ind., Sept. 23d, 1886; Rudolph F., born at Ft. Wayne, Ind., December 20th, 1891. Mrs. Zoe Hough was born in Minnesota, January 26, 1863, and died in

Page  79 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 79 Ft. Wayne, Ind., January 1st, 1892. Her parents were pioneers of Minnesota. January 11th, 1893, he married Miss Eugenia A. Heinlen, of Ft. Wayne. They have one son, Harold H., born July 8th, 1902. Mrs. Eugenia A. Hough was born in Ft. Wayne, December 8th, 1865. Her parents were Germans, and early settlers in Ft. Wayne. NORMAN GEDDES, son of Samuel, 1775-1848, and Elizabeth, 1779-1865, was born at Livonia, N. Y., April 14, 1823, and died at his home in Adrian, May 11th, 1899. He first became a resident of Michigan September 5th, 1835, settling with his parents upon a farm in Cambridge, Lenawee County. He began teaching at seventeen, was for some time a student in the branch, then located at Tecumseh, of the University of Michigan, and in 1843 entered the law office of Hon. Richard Butler, at Mt. Clemens, and pursued his legal studies under the direction of Mr. Butler and of the late Giles Hubbard, supporting himself meanwhile by teaching. In 1846 he entered the law office of the late A. C. Harris, at Adrian, and was admitted to the bar the following year. After admission he taught for two terms in Professor Hance's Academy, an educational institution at Adrian of considerable note at that time. Thereafter he continued in the active practice of his profession, until shortly before his death, except for about six years, during which he was in charge of the collection department of a large commercial house at Buffalo, and for nine years in which he served as Judge of Probate. He was. in 1849, elected Recorder of the then village of Adrian, and was twice re-elected; in 1851 was elected Justice of the Peace; in 1864 was elected Circuit Court Commissioner, and was re-elected in 1866, holding the office four years. In 1880 he was by Governor Croswell appointed Judge of Probate, to fill the vacancy caused by resignation of Hon. Fernando C. Beaman, and at the general election following was elected to the same office, and was re-elected in 1884, holding the office nine years. For twelve years he was a member of the Board of Trustees of the Eastern Michigan Asylum for the Insane; for fifteen years was Trustee and Treasurer of the Plymouth Congregational Church of Adrian, and for twenty-seven years was President of the Board of Trustees of Adrian College, resigning as President at the June session of the board in 1898. At the close of the War of the Rebellion he was prominent in the organization of the County and City Soldiers' Monument Associations, was Secretary of both bodies, and at the dedication of the monument, July 4, 1871, was orator of the day. He was a director of the Commercial Savings Bank in Adrian from its organization, and from July 25th, 1898, president of the Pioneer and Historical Society of Lenawee County, in the work of which he took great interest and to which he

Page  80 80 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Judge Norman Geddes. devoted much time, holding both offices until his death. He was three times married: October 19, 1848, to Laura E. (March 23, 1821-August 21, 1851), daughter of Lyman Casey, of York, Livingston County, N. Y.; November 29, 1853, to Harriet D. (October 29, 1822-April 30, 1857), daughter of Hon. John Barber, of Adrian; and September 15, 1859, to Jane M. (December 23, 1825-January 29, 1892), daughter of Isaac Terry, of Royalton, Niagara County, N. Y. Four children survive him: Frederick Lyman, born November 10,

Page  81 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 81 1850; Herbert, November 18, 1854; Harriet Elizabeth, May 9, 1856 -married September 18, 1879, to Willard N. Van Brunt, of Adrianand Clifton Terry, July 14, 1866. Ada, born January 23, 1861, died April 1, 1865. Judge Geddes' pre-eminent characteristics were: the highest integrity; love of justice, truth and thoroughness; conscientious and laborious devotion to duty; an infinite capacity for taking pains; scorn of shams and deceits; lofty ideals; keen enjoyment of friendships; sympathetic interest in the young and in all who need the fostering care of others; esprit du corps in state, municipal and other organizations; and love of the best in all things. To the administration of the office of Probate Judge he gave a conscientious and enlightened devotion which can never be fully known. Difficult and intricate questions, involving large values, were constantly submitted to him by interested parties personally. To their solution he gave the most patient and laborious examination, frequently pursuing his investigations in the great law libraries of larger cities, and resorting to every means in his power to ascertain and to apply the true rules of law, of right and of justice. Though he deeply deplored, he never appeared to resent the frequent failures of interested parties to furnish him the aid of investigations and arguments of counsel. In large part this work was thankless, was indeed almost wholly unappreciated. The parties expected no more of him than his off-hand decision-would have unquestioningly accepted and been content with it. But despite his severe training, long experience and profound knowledge of the law, he could not be satisfied with anything less than the most thorough investigation he had opportunity to make. Most frequently his judgments were pronounced in well reasoned, carefully written and convincing opinions. There were few appeals from his decisions, and in some that were taken, "counsel eminent in the law," in argument for appellees, read and mainly relied upon the opinions rendered by the Probate Judge. His sense of responsibility, and his ambitions to be right and to do the best possible work, appeared intensified in public office. Yet, after reaching mature years, he never held office without pecuniary sacrifice. He was always appreciative of his associates, and during the later years of his life wrote, upon request of their families, many obituaries of the older residents of the county. JOHN KIRBY was born at Charlton, County of Oxford, England, October 22d, 1823. He came to the United States in 1848, and after stopping a few days in New York city, and Troy, finally settled at Oneida Depot, Madison County, N. Y. His father, William Kirby, was born at Charlton, England, in 1788, and lived there until his death in 1845. William Kirby married Miss Esther 6

Page  82 82 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Tuffery, daughter of Isaac Tuffery, of Weston-on-the-Green, Oxford. By this marriage there were eight children, all of whom came to the United States, John, the subject of this sketch, being the only survivor. Mrs. Esther Kirby, some time after the death of her husband in England, came to the United States, died at Grand Rapids, Michigan, April 6th, 1870, and lies in Oakwood cemetery, Adrian. When John Kirby was seventeen years old he was "bound out" to learn the trade of coach building, at the city of Oxford, and served his time of four years. He then worked three years in Oxford and one year in London, where he was engaged in building railroad cars. He left the London docks on the good ship Adriatic, March 28th, and arrived at New York on the morning of the 5th of May, 1848, being about five weeks on the water. His first employment in the United States was at Oneida Depot, N. Y., where he was engaged in the construction and repairing of cars in the shops of the Syracuse & Utica railroad, and has been in railroad service ever since. In 1853 new car shops were built at Syracuse, N. Y., and Mr. Kirby was employed there until he came to Adrian in July, 1854. At that time the late John Townsend was in charge of the car shops of the Michigan Southern railroad, Mr. Kirby comingr to Adrian to work for him as a journeyman, which he continued until 1856, when he was made foreman of the car shops. He held this position until July, 1858, when he was sent to Litchfield, Ill., to make plans and superintend the erection of car shops at that place for the Terre Haute, Alton & St. Louis railroad. After a short stay at Springfield, Mr. Kirby received a letter from the.late John D. Campbell, then general superintendent of the Michigan Southern & Northern Indiana railroad, asking him to return and accept the position of master car builder at Adrian. The position was at once accepted, and he held it until October 15th, 1870, when he was appointed superintendent of the car department of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern railroad, from Chicago to Buffalo, including all the branches. This position he held until October 1st, 1892, when he resigned with the intention of retiring to private life, but he is still in the service of the company, for in August, 1893, he was tendered a place on the Board of Arbitrators of Award, in the transportation department, during the World's Fair at Chicago, which was considered an honorary position. June 3d, 1851, John Kirby married Miss Ruth S. Hunt, of Oneida, N. Y., and three children were born to them, as follows: Martha Elizabeth, born at Oneida, May 6th, 1852; Mary Esther, born at Oneida, February 8th, 1854; Helen Ann, born at Adrian, February 4th, 1857, married C. E. Bray, November 7th, 1885. Mrs. Ruth S. Kirby was born at Salem, Mass., October 31st, 1829. Her parents were natives of Massachusetts, but died during her infancy.

Page  83 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 83 WILLIAM CROCKETT was born in Sodus, Wayne County, N. Y., February 4th, 1828. His father, Nathaniel Crockett, born in 1799, was the son of a sea captain, and a native of Maine. After the death of his parents, he removed to the State of New York, residing there until 1836, when he came to Michigan, settling on Section 35, in Ogden, this county. About the year 1823 Nathaniel Mrs. Minerva Crockett. William Crockett. Crockett married Miss Mary White, daughter of William and Lydia White, of Sodus, Wayne County, N. Y., and they were the parents of eleven children, William being the third child. Nathaniel Crockett died in Hardin County, Iowa, March 13th, 1872. His wife, Mary Crockett, was born in Maine in April, 1805, and died in Ogden, this county, January 18th, 1882. William Crockett, subject of this sketch, came to Michigan with his parents in 1836, when he was eight years old, and has resided in the town of Ogden ever since. When his parents settled in the township there were but very few settlers, and the town was considered nothing but a cottonwood swamp, most of the east half being under water half the year. Mr. Crockett remembers most of the settlers who had located here previous to 1836, and had made a beginning. They were as follows: Erastus Brockway, on section 3; Elisha Benton, on section 33; Samuel Graham, on section 29; Andrew Sebring, on section 28; William Johnson, on section 29; Nathaniel Graham, on section 29; N. B. Carter, on section 8; Ephraim Hicks, on section 6; Gideon Sheldon, on section 15; Jacob Gilbert, on section 15. At that time there were no settlers in the east half of the town, and for many years there were no settlers east of Nathaniel Crockett's, and no

Page  84 84 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL roads were cut through. Many times the water was so deep that for miles it would come up to the ox-bows, as the oxen wallowed through the woods. It was some time before anything except corn and potatoes could be raised, and they would often drown out during the "June freshets," which then occurred almost annually. Wheat was a failure until the timber was considerably cleared off, and the ditch system was inaugurated. There was not a frame house or barn in Ogden in 1836, and the first frame barn Mr. Crockett saw was Norman B. Carter's. William Crockett lived with his parents until he was twenty-one, but*worked the farm for some time, during which he purchased a farm on section 14 in Ogden, where he now resides. He has seen the township brought from a primitive, worthless state to one of the best and most promising in the county. He has spent nearly his entire life in this work, and has done his share in bringing about the great change. He has assisted in clearing away the wilderness, and subduing the rank and almost impenetrable swamp. He has expended much time and money, besides cheerfully paying all assessments for the ditching system that has proven so generally beneficial to every resident. He has grown up with the town, and has prospered slowly but surely as the town advanced in productiveness and value. The township is now entirely settled up, with no swamps and "cat holes." Mr. Crockett's present valuable and very productive farm was, in 1836, an impenetrable and worthless swamp, covered with water almost the year round. December 12, 1856, William Crockett was married to Minerva.Ann Potter, daughter of Morey S. and Minerva (Jones) Potter, of Amboy, Fulton County, Ohio, by whom he has had four children, as follows: Almond P., born November 1st, 1857, married Miss Sarah Jane Wilmouth, of Ogden, and they had three children, William B., Carrie A., Burt A. Almond P. Crockett died November 18th, 1885. Eldora L., born June 26th, 1861, married Smith Fairbanks, December 24th, 1882, and resides in Adrian city. Ida May, born January 22, 1867, married Allen McComb, November 25, 1886; they have two children, Pliny Dane and William C., who reside in Ogden. Pliny D., born August 14th, 1873, married Miss Minnie Sebring, daughter of Edgar and Josephine (Rice) Sebring, December 12, 1899; they have one child, Alma Leida, and reside in Ogden. Mrs. Minerva Crockett was born in Richfield, Herkimer County, N. Y., May 27, 1837, and moved to Fulton County, Ohio, with her parents, in 1844. Her father, Morey S. Potter, was born in Rhode Island, May 26, 1799, and moved to Herkimer with his parents in 1809. December 25, 1820, he married Minerva Jones, daughter of Jonathan and Polly (Hopkins) Jones, of Herkimer County, N. Y., by whom he had nine children, Mrs. Crockett being the eighth child. They had forty-two grandchildren and twenty-six great-grandchildren. Morey S. Potter died September 29, 1892, in his ninety-fourth year. His wife, Mrs. Minerva Potter, died May 25, 1886, aged 83 years.

Page  85 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 85 WALTER S. WESTERMAN was born in Riga, Lenawee County, Michigan, January 26th, 1855. His father, George W. Westerman, born in Pittsburg, Pa., June 24th, 1831, came to Michigan and settled on section 33 in Riga, this county, in 1852. He resided there until 1867. In 1861 he enlisted as a private in Company F, Fourteenth Ohio Infantry, and served three years in the great Rebellion. At the time of his discharge he was quartermaster-sergeant of the regiment. Previous served his township three terms as Supervisor, and Justice of the Peace two terms. Upon his return from the army he was again elected Supervisor and Justice of the Peace, and served in these offices until 1866, when he was elected County Clerk and served three terms. He served as County Drain Commissioner two years, and in 1888 was elected Justice of the Peace in the city of Adrian and served twelve years. Early in life he became a Mason, first joining the Blissfield Lodge. After- Hon. W. S. Westerman. wards he went into the Temple Lodge, of Adrian, and so on up to the Commandery of Knights Templar. He was also a member of the I. O. O. F., filling all the chairs, was Grand Master of Michigan and representative to the Sovereign Grand Lodge. He is a charter member of Woodbury Post, G. A. R., and has twice been elected Commander. He served the Third ward of Adrian one term as alderman. October 21st, 1850, Geo. W. Westerman married Miss Catherine Scott, daughter of Walter and Margaret (McDonald) Scott, of Conoquenessing, Butler County, Pa., and they are the parents of five children. Mrs. Margaret (McDonald) Westerman was born in Conoquenessing, Pa., May 5th, 1831. Her paternal ancestors were Pennsylvanians as far back as there is any knowledge, but her maternal ancestors were Scotch. Geo. W. Westerman's ancestors were English and German. Walter Scott Westerman is a native of Lenawee, and was born on a farm in the township of Riga, where he lived until he was about eleven years old. In the fall of 1866 his father was elected County

Page  86 86 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Clerk of Lenawee County, and in March, 1867, moved to Adrian, where Mr. Westerman entered upon his duties. Walter attended school, also went to Evans' Business College, and took his diploma March 31st, 1874. In 1867-8 he was made deputy clerk under his father, and later was deputy county treasurer, under the late Col. S. B. Smith. From 1872 to 1876 he was night watchman at the old court house. While here he selected law as his life profession. While attending to his duties, and whenever occasion would allow, he studied hard, having access to the late ex-Congressman F. C. Beaman's law library. He studied nights under the direction of Mr. Beaman and Hon. Andrew Howell, and the day he had reached his majority, January 26th, 1876, he was admitted to practice law. Three years later he was admitted to practice in the United States Circuit Court at Detroit, on motion of Hon. Sylvester Larned, and the presiding judge at that time was Chief Justice Brown, now of the United States Supreme Court. In 1881 he was formally admitted and practiced in the Supreme Court of Michigan, and May 31, 1889, was recommended by the late Judge Thomas M. Cooley, and was admitted to practice in the United States Supreme Court. In 1890 he was elected Secretary of the Lenawee County Bar Association, which position he has held to the present time. During 1892 Mr. Westerman was tendered a chair in the law department of the Florida State University, but declined on account of the small salary attached to the position. In 1890 he was appointed City Attorney, which office he successfully filled for three years. He was Assistant Prosecuting Attorney for three years, and in 1895 ran on the Democratic ticket for Circuit Judge against Hon. Victor H. Lane, being defeated in this county by 238 votes, coming the nearest to being elected of any man that has accepted the nomination on the Democratic ticket in years. During the campaign of 1894 he was a candidate for Prosecuting Attorney, and ran ahead of his ticket. In 1900 his name was placed on the Prohibition ticket for the position of Attorney General, receiving 12,000 votes in the state, running ahead of his ticket. The following spring, 1901, Mr. Westerman ran for Justice of the Supreme Court on the Prohibition ticket, making a good run. August 8th, 1902, he was nominated for Governor of Michigan on the Prohibition ticket, receiving more votes in his home city, county and the state than any candidate that ever ran on the Prohibition ticket. He was also nominated for Mayor of Adrian on the Prohibition ticket, in the spring of 1902, and carried more than the party vote. During the dinner served by the W. C. T. U., on election day, he received the majority of votes cast by the women for executive officer. At the quarterly conference held in August, 1901, at the M. E. Church, Mr. Westerman was granted a preacher's license. He is a member of that denomination, and is a teacher of one of the largest Sunday school classes in the city. He is president of the Humane Society, also attorney for the.Good Government League. He was married to Miss Emma I. Sizer, daughter of Mr.

Page  87 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 87 and Mrs. Charles F. Sizer, of Adrian, August 3d, 1875. Mr. and Mrs. Westerman have nine children, as follows: Ina Leone, born May 17th, 1876, married Elmer D. Knowles, July 6th, 1901; Orville S., born August 4th, 1877; Wilbur S., born April 24th, 1879; Chester A., born February 3d, 1881; Flora A., born April 9th, 1883; Clifford W., born December 18th, 1884; Harold L., born April 2d, 1887; Kenneth N., born May 13th, 1889; Walter S., jr., born May 1st, 1895. Mrs. Emma I. Westerman was born November 26th, 1853, in Lee, Berkshire County, Mass., and came to Michigan with her parents in 1859. Her father, Chas. F. Sizer, son of Osman and Mary P. (Field) Sizer, was born in Chester, Hampden County, Mass., May 30th, 1833. June 12th, 1851, he married Miss Samantha Jane Bawker, only daughter of Amos Green and Serilla (Stocking) Bawker, who was born at Vestal, Broome County, N. Y., July 24th, 1833. WILLIAM CRANE was born in Macedon, Wayne County, N. Y., September 4th, 1831, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1833. His father, Turner Crane, was born in Norton, Bristol County, Massachusetts, January 24th, 1789. He was of Quaker parentage, and descended from the very early settlers of Massachusetts. Turner Crane learned the trade of tanner, currier and shoemaker, and carried on the business in Massachusetts. About the year 1816 he removed to Wayne County, N. Y., and settled on a farm in Macedon Township. He resided there until the year 1833, when he emigrated to Michigan, in company with his brother, George Crane. He arrived here with his wife and family of nine children, and settled on section 13, in Madison. Here he cleared up his land, made a comfortable home, and enjoyed the results of his hard labor for only ten years, dying from a sudden illness, July 23d, 1843. November 26th, 1812, Turner Crane married Miss Phoebe Arnold, daughter of Asa Arnold, of Norton, Bristol County, Mass. They were the parents of eleven children, William, the subject of this sketch; Edwin, of Adrian city, and Mrs. Harriet Brittain, of Adrian township, being the only survivors. Mrs. Phoebe (Arnold) Crane was born in Norton, Mass., November 10th, 1796, and died in Madison, this county, March 10th, 1868. Her parents were Puritans, and lived and died in Massachusetts. William Crane was only about one year old when he came to Michigan, and since that event he has resided on the farm his father took up over seventy years ago. He has always followed farming, and was educated in the district schools of his neighborhood. He has grown with the county, and has witnessed a great transformation in his lifetime, having seen the primitive forest, inhabited by wild beasts and peopled with Indians, disappear before the approach and settlement of the Anglo

Page  88 88 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Saxon. He believes that with one exception he is the oldest resident of Madison now alive. He also believes there is no man in the county now alive who has trailed more wild deer, and other game, than he, or who enjoyed it more. In times past no hunting party was complete without "Bill" Crane. He has served his township as Justice of the Peace, and Highway Commissioner, for many years. February 5th, 1854, William Crane married Miss Hannah Davis, daughter of Isaac and Amelia Davis, of Palmyra, this county, and they had two children, as follows: Minnie D., born in Madison, this county, January 19th, 1861, at home; William Ernest, born in Madison, September 28th, 1869, married Miss Ora Raymond, daughter of John and Estella Raymond, of Ogden, December 6th, 1902. Mrs. William (Davis) Crane was born in Perrington, Monroe County, N. Y., August 11th, 1833; came to Michigan with her parents in 1833, and died at her home in Madison, this county, July 15th, 1894. Her coming to Michigan was a rare experience, being brought on a pillow by her mother from the State of New York. The trip was made in a lumber wagon and consumed twenty-two days. This is a sample of what pioneer mothers many times undertook and accomplished. FRANKLIN DEWEY TEACHOUT was born in Manchester, Ontario County, N. Y., February 29th, 1852. His father, Alonzo Teachout, was born at the same place, May 19th, 1819. He was brought up on a new farm, and always followed agricultural pursuits. His father, Jacob Teachout 2d, who was among the first settlers of Ontario County, N. Y., was born in Schuyler County, N. Y., in 1784. He lived in Ontario until 1864, when he disposed of his property, came to Michigan, and resided in Ransom, Hillsdale County, with a son and daughter, where he died, in 1876, at the age of 92. About the year 1806, he married Miss Rachel Curtis, daughter of Elijah and Polly (Wiley) Curtis, of Eastern New York. Polly Curtis died in Genesee County, Michigan, aged 88 years, and was the daughter of Major Wiley, who served in the Revolutionary War, and passed that memorable winter with General Washington at Valley Forge. This branch of the Teachout family in the United States sprung from Jacob Teachout 1st, who came from Holland about the year 1700, and settled in Eastern New York. From the best information obtainable it is related that Jacob Teachout 1st was married when he came to this country. His wife's name was Sabra, and they raised a large family. After the death of Jacob Teachout 1st, his wife Sabra lived with her daughter, Sabra Wood, in Schuyler County, where she died. Alonzo Teachout, the father of our subject, was the third son and fourth child of a family of thirteen children raised by Jacob 2d and Rachel Teachout, above

Page  89 Residence of Frank D, Teachout, in Adrian Township.

Page  90 90 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL referred to. June 2d, 1840, Alonzo Teachout married Miss Anna Dewey, daughter of Edmund B. and Sarah (Cooper) Dewey, of Manchester, Ontario County, N. Y., and they had five children, as follows: Oscar L.* Sarah Anna, born in Manchester, N. Y., July 2d, 1843, married Samuel Gambee, and had one child, Xara Anna, born December 28th, 1864, who married W. A. Ballow, of Denison, Texas. They had two children, both of whom died in infancy. Mrs. Xara A. Ballow died at Denison, Texas, May 5th, 1894. Dewey Edmund, born in Cambridge, Mich., June 20th, 1846, died in infancy at Manchester, N. Y. Curtis Marion, born in Manchester, N. Y., June 25th, 1848, and died there June 1st, 1853. Franklin *Dewey, born in Manchester, N. Y., February 29th, 1852. Alonzo Teachout died at his home in Manchester, N. Y., April 4th, 1855. Mrs. Anna (Dewey) Teachout was born in Manchester, N. Y., December 19th, 1822. Her father, Edmund B. Dewey, was born in Manchester, N. Y., June 2d, 1801, and was a farmer, miller and prominent citizen of his township. He won great notoriety throughout Ontario County, in 1823, when he raised a barn without the use of whiskey, absolutely refusing to allow it on the premises. October 14th, 1821, he married Miss Sarah Cooper, daughter of Jeremiah and Prudence Cooper, of Manchester, N. Y. They had twelve children, Mrs. Anna Teachout being the oldest. Mrs. Sarah (Cooper) Dewey was a native of Massachusetts. She was born in Cheshire, June 5th, 1803, and emigrated to Ontario County, N. Y., with her parents, in 1810. Her father and mother, Jeremiah and Prudence (Hathaway) Cooper, were natives of Massachusetts, and were married in Cheshire, October 17th, 1858, Mrs. Anna Dewey Teachout and Joseph F. Baker, of Rome, this county, were married at Clifton Springs, N. Y. One child, Cynthia Joanna, born to them January 10th, 1866, died February 17th, 1875. Joseph F. Baker died at his home in Adrian township, December 2d, 1899. (For the record of his life, see Whitney and Bonner's Biographical Record of Lenawee County, vol. 2, page 267.) Franklin D. Teachout came to Michigan when he was six years old, when his mother was married to Joseph F. Baker, who was the only father he ever knew. He was brought up a farmer, and that has always been his business. He was Deputy Sheriff under A. K. Whitmore, from 1885 to 1888. In 1888 he was candidate for Sheriff on the Democratic ticket, but was defeated. He spent five years as a commercial traveler, but was satisfied to return to his home, and now resides on section 32, in Adrian. In the spring of 1894 he went to Chippewa County, in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, and purchased 160 acres of land, where he resided one season. At this time it became necessary for him to return home to look after the farm and take care of his father and mother. April 27, 1872, he married Miss Cordelia L. Learnard, daughter of James and Elizabeth Learnard, of Franklin, and three children have been born to them, as follows: Learnard A., born in Rome, May 4th, 1873, married Miss Christine M. Anderson, of Adrian, February

Page  91 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 91 28th, 1894. They have two children, Dewey A., born in Adrian, March 5th, 1896; Harold E., born in Adrian, June 2d, 1899. Bessie M., born in Adrian, December 12th, 1875, married Erving W. Crandall, July 21st, 1899. Anna N., born in Adrian, August 1st, 1889. Mrs. Cordelia L. Teachout was born September 10th, 1852, in Franklin, this county. Her parents were pioneers of Cambridge and Franklin townships, coming to Michigan in 1831. James Learnard, a native of Vermont, was born October 11th, 1808, and died in Franklin, this county, July 25th, 1868. February, 1829, he married his first wife, Phoebe H. Fountain, who was born July 6th, 1804. His second wife was Elizabeth Pawson-Fisher, who was born at Denton, Yorkshire, England, June 12th, 1810. She came to Michigan in 1831 with her mother and sister. She was the mother of five children, Mrs. F. D. Teachout being the youngest. She died in Franklin, December 2d, 1858. *Oscar L. Teachout, son of Alonzo and Anna Dewey Teachout, was born in the town of Manchester, Ontario County, N. Y., July 22d, 1841. When the first call for troops was made in the spring of 1861, he enlisted in the Twenty-eighth Regiment, New York State Volunteers, and served for two years. He was taken prisoner and held at Richmond for some time. On the 13th day of December, 1865, he was married to Miss Mary S. Wells, daughter of John and Sophia Eckler Wells, of Manchester, Ontario County, N. Y. After his marriage he bought the farm near Wolf Creek, now owned by C. W. Selleck. On this farm were born his three children, a son, who died when an infant; a daughter, Alice Cary, who died at the age of seven months, and his only surviving child, a daughter, Ethel Adelphia, born in Adrian, February 7th, 1874. In the spring of 1874 Mr. Teachout sold his farm and moved to Adrian, where he was under sheriff of the county, under Col. Eldredge. In November, 1879, he removed to Texas, where he first settled in Austin, remaining there two years. He then moved to Denison and entered the railway mail service as a postal clerk. After being in the service seven years, a new division, the eleventh, was formed, with headquarters at Fort Worth, and Mr. Teachout moved there, being made assistant superintendent. In April, 1893, he was promoted to the position of superintendent, which he held until December, 1897, when he resigned to take charge of the mail service on the roads controlled by the Gould family, namely, the Missouri Pacific, St. Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern, Texas Pacific, International & Great Northern, St. Louis Southwestern, Denver & Rio Grande, Rio Grande Western, and Rio Grande Southern. When Mr. Teachout accepted this position, which he still holds, he removed to St. Louis, Missouri, and now resides there.

Page  92 92 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL JAMES T. LANE, was born in Hillier, Prince Edward County, Ontario, Canada, June 26th, 1835. His father, Francis K. Lane, was a native of New Hampshire, and was born August 15th, 1801. He went to Prince Edward County, Canada, with his parents, when he was about three years old, and lived in the wilderness. Soon after the family settled in Canada his father died, leaving his Mrs. Ruhama E. Lane. James T. Lane. mother with four children (sons), almost destitute. But it was fate that they should all live and endure the great battle of life. They became hardy, useful men, all living to a good old age and dying in the comfortable homes they had made out of the wilderness where they were so young left helpless. About the year 1829, Francis K. Lane married Miss Lydia B. Augustus, daughter of James and Hannah Augustus, of Hempstead, Long Island, N. Y., and they were the parents of ten children, James T. being the third child and second son. Mrs. Lydia B. Lane was born in Hempstead, Long Island, May 10th, 1811, and died at Saline, Washtenaw County, Mich., in 1897. James T. Lane, the subject of this sketch, lived at his home in Canada until he was about 25 years old. In the fall of 1860 he came to Michigan and settled in the township of Macon, this county. Before leaving Canada he had learned the carpenter's trade, and upon coming to Michigan followed this business until the spring of 1861, when, in May, he enlisted in Company G, Old Fourth Michigan Infantry, Capt. D. D. Marshall, remaining in the service until May, 1866, when he was honorably discharged at San Antonio, Texas. As a matter of honorable history, the following list of battles, sieges and engagements, every one of which Mr. Lane participated in, is given:

Page  93 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 93 Battle of Yorktown, April 4, 1862. Bristoe Station, Va., Oct. 14, 1863. Siege of Yorktown, May, 1862. Rappahannock Station,Va., Nov. 7,1863. Bull Run, Va., July 21, 1861. Cross Roads, Va., Nov. 26, 1863. New Bridge, Va., May 24, 1862. Mine Run, Va., Nov. 29, 1863. Hanover Court House,Va., May 27, 1862. Wilderness, Va., May 5, 6, 7, 1864. Mechanicsville, Va., June 26, 1862. Laurel Hill, Va., May 8, 1864. Gaines' Mills, Va., June 27, 1862. Po River, Va., May 10, 1864. Savage Station, Va., June 29, 1862. Spottsylvania, Va., May 12, 1864. Turkey Bend, Va., June 30, 1862. Ny River, Va., May 21, 1864. White Oak Swamp, Va., June 30, 1862. North Anna, Va., May 23, 1864. Malvern Hill, Va., July 1, 1862. Jericho Mills, Va., May 24, 1864. Harrison's Landing, Va., July 2, 1862. Noel's Turn, Va., May 26, 1864. Gainesville, Va.. Aug. 29, 1862. Tolopotomy, Va., May 30. 1864. Bull Run, 2d, Va., Aug. 30, 1862. Magnolia Swamp, Va., June 1, 1864. Antietam, Md.. Sept. 17, 1862. Bethesda Church, Va., June 2, 1864. Shepardstown Ford,Va., Sept. 20, 1862. Petersburg, Va., June 18, 1864. Snicker's Gap, Va., Nov. 14, 1862. Weldon Railroad,Va., Aug. 19,20,21, '64. Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13-14, 1862. Peebles' Farm, Va., Sept. 30, 1864. Morrisville, Va., Dec. 30-31, 1862. Hatcher's Run, Va., Oct. 27, 1864. U. S. Ford, Va., Jan. 1, 1863. Nottoway Court House,Va., Dec. 8, 1864. Chancellorsville, Va., May 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, Dabney's Mills, Va., Feb. 6-7, 1865. 1863. Hatcher's Run, Va., March 25, 1865. Kelly's Ford, Va., June 9, 1863. White Oak Road, Va., March 29, 1865. Ashby's Gap, Va., June 21, 1863. Five Forks, Va., April 1, 1865. Gettysburg, Pa., July 2, 3, 4, 1863. Amelia Court House, Va., April 5, 1865. Williamsport, Md., July 12, 1863. High Bridge, Va., April 6, 1865. Wapping Heights, Va., July 21, 1863. Appomattox Court House, April 9, 1865. Culpepper, Va., Oct. 13, 1863. Siege of Petersburg, Va., from June 17, Brandy Station, Va., Oct. 13, 1863 1864, to April 3, 1865. The above gives a list of 56 engagements, battles and sieges. It will be noticed that several battles lasted from two to seven days, besides the siege of Yorktown, which continued about two weeks, and the siege of Petersburg, which lasted nearly one year. The Old Fourth Michigan was organized and rendezvoused at Adrian, and Col. D. A. Woodbury, a citizen of Adrian, was its commander. The regiment was one of the best in the entire service. Col. Woodbury was killed at Malvern Hill. During the first three years, the regiment lost three colonels killed in action. Much of the best blood of Southern Michigan was in this organization. The subject of this sketch served nearly five years, having re-enlisted in 1864. He was one of about seven hundred men that received the equipments of Gen. Lee, at the surrender at Appomatox, April 9th, 1865. After the surrender, and the war was over, he was ordered to San Antonio, Texas, where he was stationed for ten months. He arrived home in Macon in 1866, and after again resuming his trade as carpenter, for some time, in 1869, he settled down to farming, which he has followed ever since. April 26th, 1877, James T. Lane married Miss Ruhama E. Hall, daughter of Edmund and Lucretia Hall, of Raisin, this county. Mrs. Ruhama E. (Hall) Lane was born in Raisin, September 24, 1841. Her parents were natives of Steuben County, N. Y. They came to Michigan in 1833, and settled on section 25, in Raisin. Edmund Hall was born February 20th, 1807, and died in Raisin, this county, November 16th, 1888. Mrs. Lucretia Hall, his wife, was born April 24th, 1811, and died in Raisin, February 4th, 1896.

Page  94 94 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL THOMAS J. FAXON was born in Whitesboro, Oneida County, N. Y., August 25th, 1803, and represented the seventh generation of the Faxon family in the United States. His parents were Thomas and Deborah (Tobey) Faxon. The ancestor of the Faxons in America, Thomas Faxon, came from England, where he was born, in 1601. The earliest record of him is in the marriage of his daughter Joanna to Anthony Fisher, September 7th, 1647, at Dedham, Mass. He brought with him to this country his wife, Joanna, and three children. He finally settled at Braintree, Mass., where he died November 23, 1680. He was a pioneer of Braintree, a man of probity and character, filling many places of trust and importance, and during the years 1669-70-72 he was a representative and selectman f rom Braintree. Thomas Jefferson Faxon, the subject of this sketch, was brought up on a farm, but learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed for several years. He came to Michigan in the Thomas J. Faxon summer of 1834, and worked at his trade in Detroit for some time. As he was able to make plans and construct buildings, his services were in demand, but he soon removed to Manchester, in Washtenaw County, where eastern friends had settled In October, 1835, he purchased of the Government 80 acres of land on section 13 in Raisin, this county, where he resided for about thirty years. The land was very heavily timbered He soon cleared up his original purchase, and added to his holdings from time to time until his farm consisted of 355 acres. He served several terms as Supervisor of Raisin township, and in 1847 was elected a member of the Michigan Legislature, serving one term. In 1860 he left his farm and moved to Adrian, purchasing a home on West Maumee street, which he soon afterwards disposed of to T. J. Tobey for the old Judge Rickey farm, on section 28, in Adrian township. After a year or two he again purchased a home on Scott street, in Adrian, and engaged in merchandising with his sons, continuing some four years. About this time he purchased a large tract of land near Topeka, Kansas. He was a man of more than ordinary ability, a student and thinker, with a mind well stored with practical and useful knowledge. His fine library was his

Page  95 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 95 greatest enjoyment. He was a successful business man and an honorable and respected citizen. He died at his home on Scott street, Adrian, April 25th, 1875. June 2d, 1834, he married Miss Delia E. Faxon, daughter of Allen and Margaret (Smith) Faxon, and they had four children, as follows: Theodore, born January 13th, 1837, unmarried, and resides in Adrian; Thomas J., born August 1, 1839, married Maria C. Canfield, October 9th, 1867, resides near Topeka, Kansas; Minerva E., born January 10th, 1842, married Jay Worden, June 14th, 1871, resides in Ypsilanti, Mich.; Eliza G., born May 4th, 1844, married William 1H. Rogers, October 7th, 1868, resided in Adrian, and died December 5th, 1884 Mrs. Delia E. Faxon was born in Hoosic, N. Y., April 14th, 1813, and died in Adrian, Mich., March 17th, 1874. ROBERT J. TOLFORD was born in Dover, Lenawee County, Michigan, December 6th, 1866. His father, John W. Tolford, was born in Danbury, Merrimack County, N. H., January 14th, 1826, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1833. John W.'s father, Hugh Tolford, was born in Grafton County, N. H., February 3, 1789, and died in Dover, January 23, 1861. About the year 1819 Hugh Tolford i -- Farm Home of Robert J. Tolford, Dover.

Page  96 96 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL married Miss Hannah Currier, and they had seven children, as follows: Philip C.; Sarah E., married the Rev. John Thomas; John W., Thomas and Mary, died in infancy; Lydia Jane, married Dusenberry J. Furman; Joshua P.. all of whom were residents of Lenawee County, John W. Tolford was only about seven years old when he came to Lenawee County from the granite hills of New Hampshire. Mrs. J. W. Tolford, Dover. 4 J. W. Tolford, Dover. His parents located in the virgin forest of the present township of Dover, and he grew to manhood doing battle with Nature, and did his full share in making a home and a comfortable abiding place for future repose and competence. He never wearied in his labors, and his fortitude and courage were abundantly rewarded. He became the owner of 350 acres of fine farming land on section 36, in Dover. He was twice married, first, October 31, 1849, to Miss Sally A. Ten Brook, daughter of Garrett and Hannah Ten Brook, of Madison. They were the parents of one son, Frank, born August 6th, 1851, who married Miss Jennie Leacock, and they have two children. Mrs. Sally A. (Ten Brook) Tolford died October 10th, 1851, November 10th, 1854, John W. Tolford married Miss Matilda Stumbaugh, daughter of John and Susanna Stumbaugh, of Seneca township. Six children were born, as follows: John C., born October 2d, 1856, married Miss Elizabeth McCabe. They have three children, and reside in Dover. Hugh P., born September 4th, 1858, married Miss Anna Lucas. They have two children, and reside in Weston, this county. Sarah Jane, born January 16th, 1861, married Robert McKnight, and resides at Sand Creek, this county. Mary A., born November 19th, 1863, married Eugene T. Crowe, was the mother of one child, and died July 8th, 1889. Robert J., born December 6, 1886. George W., born September 2d, 1873, died at the

Page  97 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 97 age of two years. Mrs. Matilda (Stumbaugh) Tolford was born in Southampton, Franklin County, Pa., September 11th, 1835, and came to Michigan with her parents in 1848, settling in Seneca township, this county. Her father and mother were natives of Pennsylvania, and when they came to Michigan they were the parents of ten children, eight of whom were daughters. John Stumbaugh died in Seneca, August 3d, 1870. His wife, Susanna, died there August 12th, 1865. Robert J. Tolford, the subject of this sketch, resides on the old homestead, on section 36, in Dover. His father's estate having been settled, he controls 190 acres of choice land, with good buildings, and everything to carry on and prosecute the most progressive farming. December 11th, 1889, Robert J. Tolford married Miss Alice Wilkinson, daughter of William and Jane Wilkinson, of Dover, and are the parents of four children, as follows: Eva Lee, born August 1st, 1895; Florence Eileen, born July 29th, 1898; J. Kenneth, born August 10th, 1902; the firstborn died in infancy. Mrs. Alice (Wilkinson) Tolford was born in Strathroy, Ontario, Canada, April 3d, 1869. Her father was a native of England, and was born January 20th, 1835. He emigrated to Prince Edward's Island when a boy about 16, but afterwards removed to Strathroy, in Ontario, where he married Miss Jane Thompson, August 8th, 1859. He came to Michigan in 1875 and settled on section 25, in Dover. Mr. Wilkinson died in Dover, May 31st, 1882. Mrs. Jane Wilkinson was born in Woodstock, Ontario, Canada, November 16th, 1837. Her parents were Scotch and English. DR. VINCENT A. BAKER was born in Watertown, N. Y., March 30th, 1833. His father, Freeborn Baker 2d, was born in Schuyler, Herkimer County, N. Y., July 6th, 1805. He was the son of Freeborn Baker 1st, who was born in 1776. He was a native of Rhode Island, and served in the war of 1812 as a musician. His parents were English born, and his wife, Jane Christian, was also of English descent. They were married in 1798, and had eleven children. From the earliest history of the Baker family, all were farmers, or followed agricultural pursuits. Freeborn Baker 2d, however, learned to make boots and shoes in his youth, and for some years of his life carried on the boot and shoe business in the oldfashioned way. After he was married he purchased a tract of land in St. Lawrence County, N. Y., which he cleared up from a wilderness, and lived there for many years. But the surroundings and educational advantages not being satisfactory for his growing family, he sold out and removed to Black River village, in Jefferson 7

Page  98 98 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL County, and again established himself in business. He remained there until 1867, when he came to Michigan and settled in this county, and died in Palmyra, May 22d, 1874. He was a man of a high sense of honor, and incorruptible in the broadest sense. December 30th, 1828, Freeborn Baker 2d married Miss Julia Ann Fredenburg, daughter of Joshua and Ruth Fredenburg, of Pamelia, N. Y., and they were the parents of eight children, Dr. V. A. Baker being the oldest. Mrs. Julia Ann Baker was born at Mohawk, N. Y., August 10th, 1810, and died in Buffalo, N. Y., April 24th, 1889. She was buried beside her husband in Oakwood cemetery, Adrian, Mrs. Merub R. Baker. Dr. Vincent A. Baker. Mich. Dr. V. A. Baker, the subject of this sketch, was the oldest of his family, and when a boy assisted his father in making a home in the wilderness. His early education was got in the country school, but later he attended Evans Mills Academy, and later the Jefferson County Institute, at Watertown, N. Y. At the age of eighteen he commenced the study of medicine, and by teaching school winters he finally graduated from Syracuse Medical College, in the spring of 1854. His first practice was at Carthage, N. Y., where he remained until the fall of 1859, when he accepted a professorship of Physiology and Physical Science in the Metropolitan Medical College, New York city. He filled this position successfully for six years, when, in 1866, on account of ill-health, a change of climate was advised, and he came to Michigan, settling in Adrian, where he now resides. In June, 1866, he opened his office in the

Page  99 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 99 rooms he still occupies in the Metcalf block. The advance in medical practice during Dr. Baker's long experience is decided. Bleeding, blistering, emetics, and the free use of cathartics, was the general practice in the early '50's, but the innovation and reformation brought about by the new or eclectic (of which Dr. Baker is a member) and homeopathic schools of medicine, has worked marvels in moulding public opinion and modifying medical practice, to a large extent unifying and socializing the medical profession. Dr. Baker, during his practice, has aided thirteen young men in getting a medical education, not including his brothers, four of whom were graduates (now all deceased), who practiced the healing art during their respective lives, three of them serving in the great Rebellion, two being promoted from the ranks to assistant surgeons, the other being detailed as a special detective in the secret service. Several farms in the vicinity of Adrian, and a number of residences in the city, that have been or are owned by Dr. Baker, bear evidence of his tendency to betterment, as thousands of dollars have been expended in building, improving and beautifying them. Advancement and improvement is his motto all along the line. According to his means, consistent with his necessities and duty to his kindred, he has taken pride in aiding various enterprises, church growth, etc., etc., in his home city. The Doctor says he has over sixteen thousand dollars outstanding on his books, much of it night work. He has virtually retired from active practice, but still greets his old friends and patrons at his office, and treats their maladies, especially in chronic troubles. What he may have of this world's goods he has by economy made himself, and has always paid one hundred cents on all obligations. January 1st, 1851, Dr. V. A. Baker married Miss Merub R. Hill, daughter of Hosea and Jerusha (Aldrich) Hill, of Natural Bridge, N. Y. They had two children, as follows: Franklin P., died at the age of four years; Helen, died at the age of one year. Mrs. Merub R. Baker was born in Natural Bridge, N. Y., October 10th, 1828, and died in Adrian, Mich., April 3d, 1902. Her parents were highly respected and prominent citizens at Natural Bridge, but finally went west to Minnesota, where they died. WARNER W. GOFF was born in Blissfield, Lenawee County, Mich., May 7th, 1832. His father, Sewall S. Goff, was born in Royalston, Massachusetts, January 29th, 1811. When a young man he went to Niagara County, N. Y., and lived at Lewiston until 1829, when he came to Michigan. He settled on section 29, in Blissfield, where he ever after resided. He died January 23, 1865. June 13th,

Page  100 100 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL 1830, Sewall S. Goff married Mrs. Esther M. (Frary) Buck, widow of Samuel Buck, who was the mother of one daughter, who married Frederick Cannon. By this second marriage she became the mother of three children, Warner W. and Almira A., who married Almond L. Bliss, of Adrian. One son died in infancy. Mrs. Esther M. Goff was born September 11th, 1809, and died in Blissfield, May 29th, 1839. In 1840 he married Miss Lucy Frary, sister of his first wife. By this marriage there were three children, Philander K., born December 24th, 1843; Leslie T., born April 1st, 1845; John H., born March 28th, 1849. Mrs. Lucy (Frary) Goff was born February 5th, 1820, and died in Blissfield, July 31st, 1850. Her father, David Frary, came to Michigan in 1817, settling in Raisinville, Monroe County, where he died October 1st, 1820. In 1851 Sewall S. Goff married Miss Flavilla Schenck, of Fulton, N.Y., who came to Michigan as a school teacher. She died of consumption in December, 1852. In 1855 he married Emeline Van Wormer, who is still living in this county. Warner W. Goff has always lived in Blissfield, this county, and, with the exception of five years, has lived upon the farm he now owns. It is the homestead of his parents, located just northeast of the corporation limits of Blissfield. He has always followed farming, but has taken an active interest in public affairs. He has served as Justice of the Peace, and for twenty years or more was an active member of the village school board. April 19th, 1853, Warner W. Goff married Miss Imogene Peters, daughter of James S. and Susan (Squire) Peters, of Preble, Courtland County, N. Y., and they became the parents of five children, as follows: Willis E., died in infancy; Margaret L., died in infancy; Walter S., born June 17th, 1858. At the age of sixteen he went to Manistee, Mich,, where he was employed by his uncle, R. G. Peters, in the great business Mr. Peters built up there. June 20th, 1883, Walter S. Goff married Miss Helen A. Magill. They had one son, Walter S., Jr., born March 28th, 1884. Mrs. Helen A. (Magill) Goff was born in Freesoil. Mich., April 12th, 1854, and died in Hudson, this county, February 19th, 1894. Her parents were pioneers of Manistee County, her father, William Magill, being one of the successful lumber men of that region. Walter S. Goff died June 26th, 1886. Burton L. died in infancy. Mrs. Imogene (Peters) Goff was born in Preble, Courtland County, N. Y., May 27th, 1836, and came to Michigan in 1850, living with her uncle, Richard Peters, the founder of the village of Petersburgh, Monroe County. She taught school in Monroe and Lenawee Counties until her marriage. Her father, James Peters, was born in Johnstown, N. Y., May 28th, 1802, and died in Cincinnati, Ohio, December 27th, 1853. Her mother, Susan Squire, was a native of Connecticut, her mother being a sister of Jay'Gould's. father. She died in Syracuse, N. Y., July 29th, 1847.

Page  101 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 101 WILLIAM GREEN was born in Fairfield, Lenawee County, Mich., December 3d, 1850. His father, James Green, was born in Antrim County, Ireland, May 3d, 1809. He was brought up on a farm, but when a boy he went to learn the linen weaver's trade, which he followed until 1830. May 3d, 1830, he married Miss Eliza McConnell, daughter of David and Eliza (Farr) McConnell. That Mrs. Amelia J. Green. William Green. same year, Mr. Green, with his young wife and her father, mother and eight children, came to the United States and first settled in Clinton County, N. Y., where they lived until 1836. That year they removed to Toledo, Ohio, and in 1838 came to Lenawee County, and settled on section 35, in Fairfield; but, after six or seven years, he traded for a farm on section 34, where he ever after lived. In 1865 he took the most active interest in founding the South Fairfield Christian Church, giving largely of his own means, and interested many others in the undertaking. He was an active member the balance of his life, and a trustee for many years. He died September 27th, 1888. His wife, Mrs. Eliza Green, is still living (1903) with her son, William, on the old homestead in Fairfield. She was born in Antrim County, Ireland, June 26th, i814. She is the mother of ten children, five of whom are now living. She is eighty-nine years old, and still enjoys her faculties to a remarkable degree. William Green, the subject of this sketch, has always lived in Fairfield township, and owns the old homestead where he was born. He was educated in the schools of his township, and always followed farm

Page  102 102 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL ing. His farm consists of 280 acres of land, with an abundance of buildings. He has been a successful farmer, has made his property by his own exertions, and never gave a mortgage or neglected an obligation. He is a stockholder in the Fulton County, Ohio, Savings Bank, of Lyons. He owns the bank building, consisting of three store rooms, besides other business places in Lyons. He is an active member of the F. & A. M. Lodge No. 434, of Lyons, also of I. 0. 0. F. Lodge No. 622, of Lyons, and Fairfield Grange No. 278. He is largely interested in dairying and general farming. There are four brothers with families, all of whose wives and children are on the most harmonious terms. There has never been any envy, jealousy or wrangle among them. There has never been a quarrel in the fam ily. December 20th, 1875, William Green married Miss Amelia J. Smith, daughter of George and Caroline Smith, of Fairfield, and James Green. are the parents of six children, as follows: Ralph, born May 15th, 1877, and died December 9th, 1883; Pearl, born June 10th, 1880, died August 28th, 1880; Sylvester, born July 18th, 1882, died September 22d, 1891; Welcome S., born June 17th, 1889; Caroline E., born March 23d, 1893; Frank D., born October 21st, 1895. All born in Fairfield. Mrs. Amelia J. (Smith) Green was born in Fairfield, this county, April 7th, 1857. Her father was born in Candor, Tioga County, N. Y., January 13th, 1826. He went to Sherman, Huron County, Ohio, in 1834, and came to Fairfield, this county, in 1853, where he died February 27th, 1865. Her mother was born in Mrs. Eliza Green. Fleming, Cayuga County, N.

Page  103 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 103 Y., January 2d, 1828, and her parents moved to Huron County, Ohio, in 1835. April 8th, 1868, she married Francis Davenport, and resides on section 15, in Fairfield. - I G > - - - -7:: E - '~ -...;! Family Homestead and Residence of William Green, Fairfield. GEO. W. BOND was born in York, Livingston County, N. Y., February 22d, 1839, and came to Michigan with his parents in the spring of 1848. His father, Josiah Bond, was born in Conway, Mass., September 25th, 1799, and was the son of Jonas and Laura (Howes) Bond, of the same place. The Bond family in the United States is in three branches, originating from three brothers, who were descendants of a Lord Bond, of England. Many years before the Revolutionary War three brothers came to America, one finally settling in Massachusetts, one in Maryland, and the other in one of the Carolinas. This branch of the family came from Massachusetts. The Revolutionary records show that Col. Bond, of Massachusetts,

Page  104 104 ILLUSTRATE D HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL served on Washington's staff in the Revolutionary War. Early in 1800 Jonas Bond and family emigrated to the State of New York, settled in Sullivan, Madison County, and resided there until about the year 1832, when he disposed of his farm and removed to York, Livingston County, where he and his wife, Laura, died about 1840. Josiah Bond bought a farm of the Holland Land Company, in York, cleared it up, and lived there until 1848. In the spring of that year he came to Michigan with his family of wife and four children, and settled on section 15, in Rome township, this county, purchasing 80 acres of land. He resided here until 1863, when he sold out and purchased a home at Rome Center, where he died February 25th, 1898, aged 98 years and 5 months, retaining his faculties until the last. In 1832 Josiah Bond married Miss Fidelia Flagg, daughter of Samuel Flagg, of Conway, Mass., and they had two children, Geo. W. being the youngest. She died in September, 1839, aged about thirty years. In 1841 Josiah Bond married Miss Tabatha Flagg, sister of Fidelia, and they had two children. Tabatha (Flagg) Bond died in Rome, this county, in July, 1861. George W. Bond, the subject of this sketch, has resided in Lenawee county since his first advent here in 1848. He lived with his parents on the farm in Rome until he was 23 years old. In 1862 he engaged in the mercantile business in Rome Center. In 1864 he, in company with Robert Sager, established a store at the Center, where he continued until 1874. In 1867 he was appointed postmaster, which office he held for seven years. In the fall of 1874 he removed to Adrian and engaged in the farm implement business, continuing for about four years, when he engaged as traveling salesman, which he has followed for many years. In 1890 a United States patent was granted him on a steel fence post, now known throughout the world as "The Bond Steel Post." In 1894 he succeeded in organizing a company for its manufacture in Adrian. It has proved a great success, is largely used by the Government for street mail boxes, sign posts, fences, etc. It was through the efforts of Mr. Bond the company was located in Adrian. The business is one of the utmost importance to the city. October 24th, 1861, George W. Bond married Miss Jane E. Marks, daughter of Cornelius and Fanny (Litts) Marks, of Rome, this county, and they are the parents of two children, as follows: Myron C., born in Rome February 5th, 1863, married January 8th, 1895, Miss Emma Siebeneicher, daughter of Wenzel and Magdeline Siebeneicher, of Grand Rapids, and they are the parents of two children, as follows: Loraine, born May 21, 1896; George C., born June 26th, 1898, resides in Adrian. March 20th, 1881, Myron C. Bond enlisted in the Michigan National Guard. May 8th, 1898, he was mustered into the United States service as second lieutenant, and served in the Spanish-American war for thirteen months. In March, 1899, he was promoted to first lieutenant in Cuba. Upon his return home he was elected captain the following March, and served one year. Fanny F., born in Adrian, September

Page  105 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 105 12th, 1876, married December 9th, 1898, Henry R. Houser, has two children, Irene E., born August 25th, 1900; Alma L., born August 3d, 1902, and resides in Adrian. Mrs. Jane E. (Marks) Bond was born in Rome, this county, April 2d, 1840. Her father, Cornelius Marks, was born at Brainard's Bridge, near Oswego, N. Y., April 6th, 1805, and came to Michigan, settling in Rome, this county, in 1835, and died in Rollin, October 20th, 1879. January 30th, 1828, Cornelius Marks married Miss Fanny Litts. and they had eleven children. Mrs. Fanny (Litts) Marks was born at Brainard's Bridge, N. Y., August 10th, 1811, and died in Rollin, this county, December 2d, 1870. DANIEL WELCH was born in Mandana, Onondaga County, N. Y., August 15th, 1817. His father, Samuel Welch, was born in Fort Ann, near Lake Champlain, about 1773,;:nd died there in 1825. His mother, Mary (Washburn) Welch, was also born at Fort Ann, Mrs. Rhoda M. Welch. Daniel Welch. and lived until she was 94 years old. Daniel Welch was brought up a farmer, and lived in the State of New York until 1847. In the spring of that year he came to Michigan and purchased a farm of eighty acres in the township of Brooklyn, Jackson County. In 1848 Mr. Welch engaged James Mills and Wm. L. Smith, then residents and builders of Adrian, to go to Brooklyn and build him a house,

Page  106 106 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL which they did in the good old way. The house stood there until February, 1902, when it was destroyed by fire. Mr. Welch resided in Brooklyn until the fall of 1849, when he removed to Adrian, where he has resided ever since. During his long residence in Adrian he was deputy sheriff, and had charge of the county jail for ten years. The first two years he served under J. R. Bennett, four years under Col. S. B. Smith, and four years under Wm. R. Tayer. Mr. Welch was in attendance at every term of court during this ten years' service. Since that time he has devoted himself to his personal interests, looking after his farm property, finances, etc., etc. June 30th, 1847, Mr. Welch married Miss Rhoda Maria Love, daughter of Calvin and Rhoda (Moore) Love, of Brooklyn, Jackson County, Mich., by whom he has had two children: Francis L., born in Adrian, June 22d, 1857, who resides in that city; Nellie C., born in Adrian October 6th, 1862, now the wife of John F. Navin. Mrs. Welch was born in Locke, Cayuga County, N. Y., September 25th, 1828, and came to Michigan with her parents when she was six years old. Her father, Calvin Love, was born in Washington County, N. Y., April 16th, 1791. He came to Michigan in 1834, and settled on a new farm in Brooklyn, Jackson County, where he lived until his death, June 30th, 1843. Her mother, who was Miss Rhoda Moore, was born in Heath, Mass., July 18th, 1790, and became the mother of six children. She died in Adrian, August 18th, 1854. Mr. Welch has resided in his present home on South Main street for thirty years. He is surrounded with all the comforts that modern improvements suggest, and enjoys his ripe old age with his wife and family. JAMES C. LINNELL was born in Pittsford, Monroe County, N. Y., December 11th, 1834, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1837. His father, Elijah Linnell, was born October 30th, 1799, in Barnstable, Mass, where he resided until after he had learned the trade of shoemaker, when he emigrated to Western New York, and settled in Pittsford, Monroe County. Here he purchased a farm, and afterwards established a tannery and opened a boot and shoe store. He was reasonably successful in his first business venture, but the reports from Michigan were so favorable that he was "taken with the fever," sold all his holdings in Pittsford, and came to Michigan, arriving in Adrian July 2d, 1837. Upon his arrival in Adrian, he was so well pleased with the outlook that he at once purchased a home on East Church street, now known as number 40. The house was just completed, and was considered a palatial home in those days. His next move was to open a shoe store on Maumee street, which he carried on for twenty years. He also purchased a farm of 160 acres in Madison, about two miles south of Maumee street. He

Page  107 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 107 was an active, enterprising business man, and was well and favorably known throughout the county. In religion he was a Presbyterian, and was an active member of the Adrian church, filling all the important offices at different times, and assisted largely with his means in building the first brick edifice the society erected. He was practical in all things, and devout and generous. His home life and relations with his fellow man were exemplary to a degree. In 1825 " Mrs. Martha (Lothrop) Linnell. Elijah Linnell. he married Miss Martha Lothrop, daughter of Alden and Mary Lothrop, of Enfield, Mass. By this marriage there were four children, as follows: Martha Ann, born in Pittsford, N. Y., in 1828, and died in Adrian in 1840; Uriah Lothrop, born in Palmyra, N. Y., in 1830, and died in Minneapolis, Minn., March 28, 1868; Caroline Eliza, born in Pittsford in 1832, and died in Adrian, November 22, 1854; James C., born in Pittsford, N. Y., December 11, 1834. Mrs. Martha Linnell was born in Enfield, Mass., February 26, 1798, and died in Adrian, August 18th, 1866. Her father, Alden Lothrop, was a direct descendant of John and Priscilla Alden, of the "Mayflower" of 1620. Elijah Linnell died in Adrian, June 29th, 1857, and was a direct descendant of Robert Linnell, who landed at Plymouth in 1636. James C. Linnell is the only survivor of Elijah Linnell, and has resided in Adrian continuously since 1837. He followed farming until he was about thirty years old, when he became a commercial traveler, and has visited nearly every state in the

Page  108 108 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Union. His business career has been successful, and he is now enjoying the results of a provident life. He became a member of the Adrian Presbyterian Church at the age of fourteen and has always endeavored to live in accordance therewith. June 11th, 1859, James C. Linnell married Miss Martha E. Hard, daughter of Augustus and Martha Hard, of Murray, Orleans County, N. Y. By this marriage there were four children, as follows: Fannie M., born in Adrian, May 19th, 1860, married Leon E. Townsend December 24th, 1888, and resides near Jamestown, Stutsman Co.unty, North Dakota; Lillian Hard, born in Adrian, August 5th, 1862, died in infancy; James C. Linnell. Mrs. Martha. E. Linnell. Minnie Ida, born in Adrian, November 5th, 1865, died in infancy; James Arthur, born in Adrian, September 28th, 1872, a physician of Chicago. Mrs. Martha E. Linnell was born in Pittsford, Monroe County, N. Y., June 6th, 1838. Her father, Augustus Hard, was born in 1809, and his parents resided in Penfield, N. Y. July 21st, 1832, Augustus Hard married Martha Freer, of Seneca, N. Y., by whom he had three children, as follows: Francis Jane. born October 4th, 1833, married E. P. Linnell, December 28th, 1855, and died in Adrian, March 14th, 1891; Elizabeth, born October 24th, 1835, and died April 19th, 1841; Martha F., born in Pittsford, N. Y., June 6th, 1838. Mrs. Martha (Freer) Hard was born in Seneca, N. Y., in 1814, and died in Adrian, March 10th, 1891. Augustus Hard, died in Adrian, January 26th, 1880.

Page  109 R ECORD OF LENAWEi C(UNTY, MICHIGAN. 109 Residence of James C. Linnell, No. 15 Allis street, Adrian. This building was originally a store, and stood on the corner of Maumee and Main streets, now occupied by Waldby & Clay's bank building. It was one of the first buildings erected east of Main street, was occupied by several parties as a general store, and finally by the late F. J. Buck as a hardware store. EBENEZER I. WALDBY was born at Cooperstown, Otsego County, N. Y., August 17th, 1828. His father was Ralph Waldby, (born in England, 1801, and died in Adrian, 1878), a printer by trade. His mother, Mary Ann Waldby, (born in Cooperstown, 1805, and died in Adrian, 1871), was the daughter of Ebenezer Ingals, a farmer of Otsego County, New York. Mr. Waldby resided with his parents until eighteen years of age-two years at Cooperstown, then at Utica, N. Y., until the fall of 1838, then at Rome, N. Y., (where his father established the Rome Sentinel), until the spring of 1845, then at Utica until the summer of 1846. During this period he received a common school and academic education, and spending, in all, several years in learning the printing business in his father's office. In August, 1846, in company with his brother, William H., he came to Adrian, taking a position in the Adrian Watchtower office, then owned by his uncle, R. W. Ingals, which he held until March, 1847, returning to Utica for the purpose of learning the

Page  110 110 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL telegraphic art. He gave close and attentive study to this then new calling, and received the appointment in 1848 of chief operator in the New York office of the New York and Boston Telegraph Company, which position he resigned in nine months, and accepted that of superintendent on "Morse" lines radiating from Cincinnati. In 1852, at the solicitation of his brother, William, who had established a banking house in Adrian (being one of the few at that time in Michigan, outside of Detroit), he accepted an engagement and was subsequently (excepting a period from 1858 to 1862, when he, the said E. I. Waldby, was in the banking business with Ira Bidwell, in St. Paul, Minnesota,) associated with him as partner, under the firm name of W. H. Waldby & Company. In 1872 the business was disposed of to the First National Bank of Adrian, of which E. I. Waldby was the cashier and a director. In 1877 the stockholders of said bank organized the State Savings Bank of Adrian, in which he occupied the same position. May 1st, 1878, Mr. Waldby and Frank W. Clay bought the business, good will, and bank building, and continued the banking business under the firm name of Waldby & Clay. Mr. Waldby was married in Adrian, May 3d, 1855, to Miss Emeline S. Backus, daughter of Clark B. and Alpa (Keeler) Backus. They have had three children, Harry B., Nellie A., and William G., all of whom are living. E. I. Waldby died at his home in Adrian, October 30th, 1887. Harry B. Waldby was born in Adrian, April 30th, 1857, married Emily Jane Radcliffe, daughter of John T. and Elizabeth Radcliffe, of Detroit, and they have three children, as follows: Elizabeth Emeline, born in Alma, Mich., February 21st, 1887; Frances Mildred, born in Adrian, May 6th, 1888; Marjorie Ethel, born in Adrian, January 22d, 1891. Mrs. Emily Jane (Radcliffe) Waldby was born in Detroit, June 17th, 1857. AMAZIAH DE ESTINE ELLIS was born near Plessis, Jefferson County, N. Y., November 16, 1845. The Ellis' are of Welsh descent, our great-grandfather coming from Wales and settling in Massachusetts, in an early day, near Deerfield. The name was spelled Allis, but by common consent of our grandfather's family, it was changed from Allis to Ellis. Our grandfather moved into Jefferson County, N. Y., from the Massachusetts home, and settled there. The father of the subject of this sketch, Amaziah P. Ellis, was born there March 13th, 1813, and died at Plessis, Jefferson County, N. Y., August 15th, 1890. He was married there to Joanna S. Peck, January 5th, 1837. She died at the same place August 8th, 1898, where they had lived for nearly sixty years. To them were born four children: Cythere C., who still resides in the old homestead; Cyrena 0., who married Jason C. Morrow, and died October

Page  111 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. Ill 21st, 1869; Amaziah D., and Catherine D., who married the Rev. Martin E. Grant, who died at the Plessis home, March 8th, 1892. Mrs. Grant afterwards moved to Blissfield with her two daughters. Amaziah DeEstine Ellis was educated at the district school, after which he became a school teacher and farm hand. March 21st, 1871, he came to Blissfield, Mich., and the next day, March 22d, 1871, he was married to Thirza J. Parker, only daughter of Alpheus Mrs. A. D. Ellis, Blisstield. A. D. Ellis, Blissfield. and Lucinda Parker, who with their family had moved from the same place in Jefferson County, N. Y., some four years previously. The Ellis' still live in the old Parker home, the place where they were married. A. D. Ellis got his first employment with Carpenter & Brown, who ran a general store in West Blissfield. The firm did a large business in those days, They owned a half interest in the broom handle factory. They bought railroad ties, timber and wood for the company, and oak staves and flat ash hoops on their own account, which were brought in by the farmers, who were clearing up their land. The firm sold to them everything to feed their families and teams while doing this work to improve their farms. In less than two years the firm name changed, F. H. Brown and A. D. Ellis buying out the entire business-store, broom handle factory, planing mill, and all. Brown & Ellis did a larger business than the old firm. Having bought out the other partner in the factory, they soon became the largest manufactory of basswood broom handles in the United States, if not in the world. Beside their business in Blissfield, they bought flat ash hoops at Antwerp and Convoy, Ohio,

Page  112 112 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL and the second year they bought and sold 2,700,000 black ash hoops. In December, 1876, Ellis traded his store interest to Mr. Brown for the factory and planing mill, thinking he would quit merchandising; but after a year he got uneasy, leased the store on the east side of the river, and opened up the corner store, April 6th, 1878, with a general stock. He sold his factory and mill two weeks later, and he is still merchandising at the same store, having occupied this place for a quarter of a century. There is but one merchant to-day doing business that was here when Mr. Ellis came to Blissfield in 1871. Thirty-two years in Blissfield have wrought many changes, and in these improvements he has been one of the leaders and contributors, to make the village, town and county what they are to-day. He has been a prominent elder and churchman in the Presbyterian Church at Blissfield for many years. He is vice and acting president of the Jipson-Carter State Bank of Blissfield, stockholder and director in the State Savings Bank, and Lamb Wire Fence Company, and stockholder of the Citizens' Telephone Company, of Adrian; stockholder and director in the Security and Trust Company, of Toledo, Ohio, and also stockholder in the Tefft, Walker Co., and Sweetzer, Pembroke & Co., of New York city, wholesale dry goods companies. JOSEPH E. EVERISS was born in Cheltenham, England, in 1832, and camne to America when he was about fifteen years old. He learned the cabinetmaker's trade in Troy, N. Y., and followed that vocation, together with building and construction, until 1867, when he established his present business of undertaking. He came to Adrian with his family in 1854, where he has ever since resided. In 1863 he went into the great Rebellion, and served two and one-half years with General Sherman, in the commissary department, General Beckwith being the chief commissary officer. Soon after his Everiss Building, 8 West Church St,, Adrian. return home from the army, he

Page  113 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 113 commenced the study of undertaking, embalming, etc., and in March, 1867, established the business in a modest way. By persistent effort and constant attention he has built up a large patronage and constantly increasing business. He is active, progressive and up-todate in his calling; hence his success and prosperity. In 1895 he purchased the choice property on the corner of Church and Winter streets, in Adrian, owned and occupied so many years by W. H. Cleveland, and the same year erected a brick building for his business, on a portion of the Church street front, but afterwards sold it to the Bell Telephone Company. In 1899 he erected the fine building he now occupies, a picture of which is here seen. This building is one of the best constructed and appointed in Adrian, and is said to be the most complete undertaking establishment in Michigan, being planned and arranged especially for that purpose. April 29th, 1852, Mr. Everiss married Miss Margaret Berry, at Troy, N. Y. Six children have been born to them. Two daughters reside in Rome, N. Y., three sons in Adrian and one in Chicago. April 29th, 1902, Mr. and Mrs. Everiss celebrated their golden wedding at their home on Chestnut street, in Adrian, their entire family and descendants being present. Mrs. Everiss was born in Patterson, New Jersey, in 1832, and is a sister of the late James Berry, so well known during the early days of Adrian. MRS. MARIA H. HIXON was born in Amenia, Dutchess County, N. Y., June 26th, 1800. She was the daughter of Isaac and Rebecca (Huff) Ketcham. In 1823 she was married to Daniel Hixon, and came to Michigan and settled at Tecumseh, this county, in 1826. She resided in Tecumseh for about two years, when Mr. Hixon located government land in what is now the township of Bridgewater, Washtenaw County, just north of Clinton village. Here the family resided until 1872, when Mr. Hixon died, September 23d. Mrs. Hixon is undoubtedly the oldest person living in Southern Michigan. The writer visited her on her one hundred and second birthday, and was much surprised at her well preserved appearance, activity and vitality. She conversed in a clear, strong voice, and seemed to retain all her mental faculties to an astonishing degree. Her vision was somewhat obscured, but her hearing was good, and her memory remarkably retentive. Her recollections of the war of 1812 were vivid and distinct. She related the fact that three of her brothers were soldiers in that conflict, together with many incidents of that stirring period in our national history. She has always enjoyed good health, although she is quite lame from receiving an injury to her hip many years ago. Her husband was a soldier in the Blackhawk War, and when she was about one hundred 8

Page  114 114 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Mrs. Maria H. Hixon in the 104th year of her age. years old the Government allowed her a pension, which she highly appreciates and is very proud of. She resides with a maiden daughter at Clinton, this county. She was the mother of seven children, only two of whom are living. She attended the annual meeting of the Lenawee County Pioneer Society, in August, 1903, at that time being in her 104th year. She was the attraction of the occasion. CHARLES W. SELLECK was born in Adrian township, Lenawee County, Mich., March 9th, 1843. His father, Ebenezer L. Selleck, was born in Stafford, Conn., September 19th, 1796, and when still a boy accompanied his parents, Peter and Mary (Lockwood) Selleck, to Oneida County, N. Y., where they were among the early settlers. Ebenezer L. Selleck learned the trade of a mason, and followed that business in New York until he came to Michigan in 1836. April 3d, 1822, Ebenezer L. Selleck married Miss Nancy Wetmore, daughter of Elisha and Cynthia Wetmore, who were natives of New England and pioneers of Oneida County, New York. Ebenezer L. and Nancy Selleck became the parents of ten children,

Page  115 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 115 six of whom were born in Oneida County, N. Y., and four in Lenawee County, Mich. They came to Michigan in the spring of 1836 and settled in Woodstock, this county, in June of that year. He resided in Woodstock until 1839, when he sold out and purchased 160 acres of land, two miles west of Adrian, on what is now known as the old ~ plank road. He re- $ sided on this farm until 1868, when he again: sold out and removed n to Adrian, where he? died, January 31st, ^ 1881. He was a sol- ' dier in the war of 1812, for which service he | received a government 3 land warrant, and upon coming to Michigan ' he located land in. Barry County. His > father, Peter Selleck,. was a soldier in the p Revolution, and drew a government pension. Mrs. Nancy Selleck > was born in Oneida County, N. Y., July 20th, 1802, and died in Adrian, September 22d, 1874. Mr. and Mrs. Selleck were members of Christ (Episcopal) Church in Adrian, were earnest workers and liberal givers in all church, Sunday school and benevolent causes, and were highly respected citizens.

Page  116 116 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Charles W. Selleck, the subject of this sketch, has always lived in Adrian township, Lenawee County, and has always followed farming. As an evidence that he has an intelligent idea of his calling, and a familiar knowledge of practical agriculture, it is only necessary to visit his fertile farm of two hundred and seventeen acres, on section 7, near Wolf Creek, in Adrian township, to satisfy any observer. The fine picture accompanying this sketch shows his comfortable home and buildings, the best evidence of thrift, culture and general usefulness. We doubt if any farmer in the county has a more complete and ample set of buildings. He has always taken an active interest in public affairs, having served his township as Clerk, four years as Supervisor, and four years as Justice of the Peace. In politics he is an earnest and consistent Democrat. January 23d, 1867, Chas. W. Selleck married Miss Phebe J. Kelley, daughter of Ira and Elizabeth (Bramble) Kelley, of Adrian township, this county. They have had three children, as follows: Clara I., born September 20th, 1869, married Lewis C. Brittain, November 11th, 1891, and resides on section 36, in Rome township; Lottie E., born March 27th, 1872, married John H. Maynard, January 25th, 1893, and is the mother of three children, Morris 0., Phebe I., and Charles S. They reside on section 12, in Rome. Albert L., born February 7th, 1875, married Miss Eva F. Ayers, daughter of Andrew and Josephine Ayers, of Cambridge, who are natives of Lenawee County, December 12th, 1900, and resides on the home farm in Adrian. Mrs. Phebe J. Selleck was born in Lodi, Seneca County, N. Y., February 5th, 1843, and came to Michigan with her parents in 1864. Her father, Ira Kelley, was born in Lodi, Seneca County, April 29th, 1818. In his younger days he owned and commanded a boat on the Erie canal for many years, but on coming to Michigan he engaged in farming in Adrian township, and died there August 4th, 1883, aged 65 years. His father, John C. Kelley, was a native of New York, and was a soldier in the war of 1812. He was born March 17, 1796, and married Charity Covert, who was born December 9th, 1796. February 16, 1842, Ira Kelley married Miss Elizabeth Bramble, daughter of Clement and Elizabeth (Prindle) Bramble, and they had six children, Mrs. Phebe J. Selleck being the oldest. Mrs. Elizabeth Kelley was born in Lodi, N. Y., February 29th, 1820, and died in Adrian township, May 13th, 1893. WILLIAM WEATHERBY was born in Manchester, Bennington County, Vermont, July 21st, 1813. His father, William Weatherby, was born near Boston, Mass., July 22d, 1769, and lived there until about 1798, when he removed to Bennington County, Vermont, and purchased a farm. He lived there until about 1823, when he moved to Tioga County, N. Y., where he resided eight years, when

Page  117 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 117 he came to Fairfield, Lenawee County, Mich., and died there August 19th, 1835. December 8th, 1797, he married Relief Miller, of Marlborough, Mass., by whom he had eight children, William being the youngest of six sons. Mrs. Relief Weatherby was born in Marlborough, Mass., February 20th, 1775, and died in Fairfield, this county, July 18th, 1835. William Weatherby, the subject of this sketch, lived with his parents until he was about eighteen years old, when the care of the family fell upon him, his father and mother Mrs. Sarah C. Weatherby. William Weatherby. being old and feeble. In 1831 he came to Michigan, and located the west one-half of the southeast one-quarter of section 9, in Fairfield, this county, bringing his parents with him. That part of the township was then a perfect wilderness. He followed marked trees and an Indian trail through the woods to his land, and was obliged to cut a road about two and a half miles to get his wagon through. He at once built a log shanty and went to "keeping house," his mother and sister being the housekeepers. This was just before the Black Hawk War, and occasionally Indians came along and wanted to stay all night, which caused the "women folks" considerable uneasiness, and the "men folks" were none too serene, as all Indians were regarded with suspicion. William was warned to appear at Adrian, with his gun, ammunition and rations, but he was attacked with ague, which excused him, much to the relief of his mother and sister. He afterwards added to his first purchase, until he owned 260 acres of land, which he cleared up, improved and built good buildings

Page  118 118 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL upon. In 1873 his,house burned, with nearly all its contents. The following year he built a new and better house. In the spring of 1878 he purchased the south sixty acres of the northwest one-quarter of section 28, in Fairfield, his adopted son and heir, William W. Wyman, occupying the home farm. He was the first man to own sheep in the town of Fairfield, and his wife spun, wove and made into cloth the first wool manufactured in the township, Mr. Weatherby making two trips to Tecumseh on foot to get the wool carded and the cloth fulled and colored. His flock of sheep was twice destroyed by wolves, with the exception of one old ewe, the pioneer sheep of the county, which both times escaped, and afterwards raised five lambs in thirteen months. She was subsequently taken to Bean Creek, in Seneca township, where she was again a pioneer, and flourished and replenished her kind, and escaped the hungry wolves, living to a happy old age. One day in December, a few years after he came, some of the settlers had brought their hogs to his place, for the purpose of butchering, and making one job of it, which was the custom in those days. A little before noon a man came along with a gun, saying that he had wounded a deer, over in Ohio, and had followed him to that vicinity, and learning that Mr. Weatherby had a famous dog, after dinner, suggested that all hands turn out with the dog and catch the deer. Everybody was ready for the sport, and away they went. There was a good "tracking snow" at the time, the deer's tracks being easily followed, and before they had got beyond Mr. Weatherby's land, the deer-a large buck-was captured. He had secreted himself in a tree top, and it so happened that Mr. Weatherby, Benjamin Baker, John Reynolds and the dog came upon the animal and started him, when Mr. Weatherby told his dog to catch him. The dog at once obeyed and grabbed him by the left ear. This so enraged the deer that in the struggle he threw the dog over his neck, and in this way the deer came down a little ravine in the direction of Mr. Weatherby, who jumped behind a small elm tree, which the deer, in his efforts to rid himself of the dog, ran against. At that instant Mr. Weatherby seized him by his large horns and brought them with all his strength against the opposite side of the tree, holding him there until Benjamin Baker cut his throat. The dog kept his hold until strangled by the blood that spurted into its mouth. This was considered the best dog in the entire settlement. December 31st, 1835, Mr. Weatherby married Sarah C. Carpenter, daughter of Elder James and Catharine Carpenter, of Fairfield. Mrs. Weatherby never had any children, but a sister died, leaving an infant, which she brought up, was adopted, and became the legal heir of the Weatherbv estate, as follows: William W. Wyman was born in Fairfield, February 1st, 1844, and died March 31st, 1880. July 3d, 1865, he married Miss Salina DeLand. By this marriage children were born as follows: Cora S., born in Fairfield, January 26, 1867, died December 2, 1878; Delight, born January 6, 1869, died March 1st, 1874; Laura A., born March

Page  119 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 119 30, 1871, and was married to George B. Schomp, September 18, 1887, and is now the mother of two children; Blond, born September 25, 1875, married to James B. Green, February 17, 1895, and now the mother of two children. Mrs. Selina Wyman was born in Fairfield,. August 13th, 1847, and was the daughter of Joseph and Sally DeLand, who were pioneers in Fairfield. Mrs. Sarah C. Weatherby was born in Shelby, Orleans County, New York, August 10th, 1815, and died from an injury (the breaking of the femur) February 25th, 1903. William Weatherby died March 15th, 1893. SAMUEL TINGLEY, Jr., was born in Ovid, Seneca County, N. Y., May 12th, 1818. His father, Samuel Tingley, Sr., was born in Sussex County, New Jersey, March 27th, 1781, where his father, Daniel Tingley, settled when he came to this country from Scotland. It was here that Daniel was married and reared his family. He afterwards lived some years in New York city, where he followed his trade of tanner and shoemaker. Accumulating some property there, he again sold out and returned to New Jersey, but finally removed to Seneca County, N. Y., where he died at the age of about eighty years. He married Miss Margaret Van Pelt, who survived Samuel Tingley, Jr. Mrs. Johanna Tingley.

Page  120 120 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL her husband many years, and died at the home of her grandson, Samuel Tingley, Jr., in Adrian township, this county, December 1, 1844. Samuel Tingley, Sr., also learned the trade of tanner and shoemaker, and followed that trade, together with carpentering, for many years. In 1806 he married Miss Rebecca Holcomb, daughter of John H. Holcomb, who was a native of England, and a pioneer of New Jersey. Mrs. Rebecca (Holcomb) Tingley was a native of New Jersey, and died in Adrian township in 1846. Samuel Tingley, Sr., died in Adrian township in 1839. Samuel Tingley, Jr., always followed farming and made agriculture a study. He farmed for success and profit, and made a competence for himself and family by his energy, intelligence and close attention. His father died when he was about twenty years old, and he at once assumed the responsibility of taking care of the family and clearing up the farm, which consisted of 240 acres on section 11, in Adrian, 160 of which was taken up from the Government by Samuel Tingley, Sr. Samuel, Jr., cleared and fenced the land, built the buildings, and made a success of the great undertaking. He ever after lived on this farm, where he died March 27th, 1895, after residing there for about sixty years. In 1844 Samuel Tingley, Jr., married Miss Johanna Engle, daughter of Jacob and Jane Engle, of Schoharie County, N. Y., and they had five children, as follows: Alfred D., born January 31st, 1845, and died June 1st, 1901; Charles E., born May 9th, 1851, married Miss Adela M. Willits, daughter of Darius and Eliza Willits, of Adrian. Charles E. died July 21st, 1899, and his wife, Adela, died December 12th, 1896. Samuel O., born March 31st, 1853, on the homestead; Esther J. and Ella J. (twins), born November 8th, 1857, at the homestead. Mrs. Johanna Tingley was born October 27th, 1822, and died in 1882. ' JAMES L. CARPENTER was born in Norfolk, St. Lawrence County, N. Y., April 11th, 1834, and came to Michigan with his parents in the fall of 1834. His father, Joseph P. Carpenter, was born in Swanzey, N. H., July 18th, 1803, and was the son of William and Lucina (Sumner) Carpenter, who lived in Swanzey. William was born in Charlestown, Mass., September 25th, 1752. Six generations before this, in May, 1638, William Carpenter landed in Massachusetts from the good ship "Beves," having come from his native place of Wherwell, England. He was an eminent Puritan, and settled at Rehoboth, Mass. His great-grandfather, John Carpenter, was a resident of London, England, in 1300, whose son, Richard, was the father of John, who was town clerk of London, and did more for education than any man of his century. He died there in 1442. William and Lucina Carpenter, of Swanzey, N. H., were the parents of twelve children, Joseph P. being the tenth child. William Car

Page  121 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 121 penter was a minute man in the Revolutionary War. He was called into service three different times, and fought at the battles of Bunker Hill and Bennington, and became a Revolutionary pensioner. In 1806 he emigrated with his wife and eleven children to Potsdam, N. Y., where he died July 24th, 1843. His wife, Lucina, died there James L. Carpenter and Family. November 15th, 1838. Joseph P. Carpenter ("Uncle Joe," as he was known in Lenawee County) lived in St. Lawrence County, N. Y., until 1834, when he moved to Michigan and settled in Kedzie's Grove (now near Deerfield village), where he resided until 1841. He then moved to the village of Blissfield. When a young man he learned the trade of edge tool maker, and followed that work, with ordinary blacksmithing, after coming to Michigan. He was a man of probity and sterling honesty, and was a highly respected citizen. He was three times married, first to Lydia Tracey Wright, Sept. 6th, 1831, and seven children were born to them, James L. being the second child. Lydia Tracey (Wright) Carpenter died in Blissfield, February 24th, 1842. February 19th, 1843, he married Celestia Stone, and one child was born to them. She was born in Vergennes, Vt., November 23d, 1812, and died in Blissfield, March 10th, 1845. His third marriage occurred July 1st, 1847, to Mrs. Orrilla (Keyes) Miner, and one child was born to them. She died at Lansing, Mich., March llth, 1903. Joseph P. Carpenter died in Blissfield, February 17th, 1892. He was an uncle of Guy, David and Joel Car

Page  122 122 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL penter, of Blissfield. James L. Carpenter, subject of this sketch, was only six months old when he came to Lenawee County. In the fall of 1851 he went to Toledo, Ohio, and engaged in the mercantile business, where he remained until November 5th, 1862, when he enlisted as a private in the Seventh Michigan Cavalry. He was later commissioned first lieutenant, being assigned to Company F, was in General Custer's brigade, and was wounded at the battle of GettysMrs. Joseph P. Carpenter. Joseph P. Carpenter. burg, in command of his company, being shot through the lungs, July 3d, 1863. He was commissioned as captain, to date from July 8th, 1863. May 26th, 1865, he was commissioned major, was on detached service at Denver, Colo., as A. A. General and post ordnance officer, with General Upton; was mustered out and honorably discharged at Detroit, Mich., April 3d, 1866. Upon leaving the army he went back to Toledo, and resumed the mercantile business with the same house he left to serve his country. In 1872 he went to St. Louis and engaged in the manufacturing business. In the spring of 1878 he went to New Orleans, La., in the same business. This was the year of the terrible yellow fever scourge. In 1879 he returned to Michigan, and located at Adrian, subsequently settling in Blissfield in the fall of 1880, where he still resides. February 20th, 1860, James L. Carpenter married Miss Mary E. Keyes, of Williamson County, Tennessee. She was born in Rose, Wayne

Page  123 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 123 County, N. Y., January 25th, 1836, and died in Toledo, Ohio, January 8th, 1862. There were no children. October 16th, 1873, he married Miss Susan M. E. Thompson, daughter of Dr. E. D. and Emeline (Tucker) Thompson, of Chapel Hill, Marshall County, Tennessee, and they became the parents of three children, as follows: Joseph T., born in St. Louis, Mo., November 2d, 1876, married Miss Grace A. Parmenter, August 1st, 1900, and has one son. Anna M. S., born in Adrian, Mich., December 24th, 1880, at home. Ewing L., born in Blissfield, Mich., December 8th, 1884, died December 8th, 1900. Mrs. Susan M. E. Carpenter was born in Rutherford County, Tenn., June 22d, 1838. She was a woman of many lovely traits and gifted with womanly qualities that made her loved and respected by all with whom she came in contact. She was educated at Franklin College, near Nashville, Tenn. She was a member of the Campbellite church, was consistent, charitable, and remarkably free from prejudice. She early espoused the cause of temperance, was a natural leader, and for many years was president of the Blissfield W. C. T. U. She was elected president of the Second district of Michigan four different times. and was filling that office at the time of her death, which occurred January 27th, 1902. WILLIAM H. KNIGHT was born in Adrian township, Lenawee County, Mich., October 30th, 1842. His father, William Knight, was born near Northampton, Mass., January 17th, 1807, and was the son of Erastus and Polly (Little) Knight. This branch of the Knight family in America, so far as is known, sprung from England, and the first record shows that Joshua Knight lived in Connecticut, was a farmer and shoemaker. He was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, won distinction for bravery and fidelity, and was promoted to lieutenant. William Knight was raised a farmer, and resided at home until he was about twenty years of age, when he went to New Jersey, where he worked at ship carpentering some time, but eventually to Massachusetts, where he remained for about three years, when, in the spring of 1834, he emigrated to Michigan, and settled in Rome township, this county. This was new land, which he commenced to improve, but being a single man, and finding some trouble in securing any conveniences or board, he soon determined to make a change, finally locating on section 18, in Adrian township. Here he at once began clearing and building, and by Christmas that year (1834) he had constructed a house, which he occupied until 1841, when merited reward for faithful labor enabled him to build a far more pretentious frame dwelling. He cleared up this farm and brought it to a high state of cultivation, enjoying the fruits of his

Page  124 124 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL industry for sixty-six years. He was a prominent and highly respected citizen, enjoying the confidence and esteem of all classes. He was prominent in school and church matters. He was the first to organize a school in his district, and was prominent in organizing the West Adrian Congregational Church. He was a deacon in the church from its foundation, and was always a zealous worker for the cause. He died in Adrian township, November 8th, 1901. December 25th, 1834, William Knight married Miss Anna Smead, daughter of Rufus and Anna (Hawks) Smead, and they were the parents of seven children. Mrs. Anna (Smead) Knight was born in Bolton, Warren County, N. Y., September 14th, 1810, and came to Michigan with her parents in 1834. She died in Adrian township, July 4th, 1885. Her parents were natives of Massachusetts, and settled on section 17, in Adrian, in 1834. Her father died at the age of 83, and her mother died in 1869, being nearly 95 years old. William H. Knight, the subject of this sketch, was brought up a farmer, and attended the district schools of his neighborhood, afterwards going two years to Raisin Institute, conducted by Aunt Laura Haviland; two years at the Ypsilanti Seminary, afterwards taking a business course at the Poughkeepsie, N. Y., Business College. Upon returning home, he went back to the farm. In 1866 he purchased his present farm home, on section 9, in Adrian township, which he has carried on ever since. About one and a half years he was employed as bookkeeper at A. Stevenson & Son's coal and lumber yards at Adrian. He served his township as Supervisor for three years, and several years as School Inspector. He is a member of the West Adrian Congregational Church, and has been superintendent of the Sunday school for the last twenty years. His home is known as Mapleside Fruit, Grain and Stock Farm. He is largely interested in feeding cattle for market. He is president of the Lenawee County Horticultural Society, and is engaged to a limited extent in cultivating and propagating choice fruits. November 25th, 1869, William H. Knight married Miss Frances A. McKenzie, daughter of Charles M. and Ann (Hawkins) McKenzie, and they are the parents of seven children, as follows: Anna E., born March 17th, 1871, married Harry Bartlett, is the mother of two children, and resides in Chicago; Alice C., born August 19th, 1873, teacher in Chicago public schools; Mary L., born February 14th, 1875, married E. C. Kenyon, a druggist, is the mother of one child, and resides in Chicago; Grace A., born May 13th, 1877, teacher in Chicago public schools; Laura F., born July 19th, 1879, died November 21st, 1899; William H., Jr., born February,28th, 1881, unmarried, and lives at home; Charles E., born January 9th, 1883, with First National Bank of Chicago. Mrs. Frances A. Knight was born in Woodstock, this county, May 14th, 1842. For a full sketch of her parents, see Whitney & Bonner's History and Biographical Record of Lenawee County, vol. 1, page 472.

Page  125 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 125 HON. JOSEPH R. BENNETT was born in Shelby, Orleans County, N. Y., May 18th, 1819, where he lived until he was six years old, when his parents moved to Sweden, Wayne County, where the family resided until the Indian reservation in Genesee County was opened. At this time his father purchased two hundred acres of land near Alabama Center. In 1834 he came to Michigan with his parents, and remained a resident of the county up to the period of his passing away. His father, Deacon Matthew Bennett, was born in Orange County, New York, in 1778. In 1792 he removed with his parents to Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania, where he resided until 1805, when he returned to his native state and purchased a new farm in Tioga County. Not being quite satisfied there, in 1816 he removed to Shelby, Orleans County, and again purchased a new farm, but subsequently settled at Alabama, in Genesee County. One of his sons, Davis D., came to Michigan in 1828, and lived in Adrian until the next year, when he returned to the old home in New York, with such glowing tales of the beauties and the opportunities in Michigan, that his father disposed of his property in Genesee County and came to Adrian in 1834, where his son, Davis D., who had married and returned, was then a pioneer in good standing. Deacon Bennett located four hundred and eighty acres of government land in Rollin, where he resided until the last few years of his life. He was the third man to build a house in Rollin township. He died in Fairfield in October, 1863. In 1790 Matthew Bennett married Miss Nancy Brace, of Wilkesbarre, Pa., which marriage resulted in ten children. Mrs. Nancy Bennett was born in Saratoga County, N. Y., and died in Rollin, this county. Joseph R. Bennett, the subject of this sketch, lived with his parents until he was twenty-one years old, and shared the hardships and privations of making two homes in the wilderness. His schooling and his opportunities were limited, and hard labor and a primitive life was his heritage. After assisting his parents in making a comfortable home in Rollin, when he reached his majority, he still possessed pluck and endurance sufficient to start in for himself on a new farm in the southern part of the township. He remained on this farm about two years, when the people "found him out," and demanded his services in a public capacity. In 1841 he was appointed Deputy Sheriff, and removed to Adrian. He held this office about two years, but business was dull, and having a family, he was forced to "scare away the wolf" by hard labor. He found employment with Mr. Crittenden, in hauling ashes to his ashery. The ashes were found scattered over the country, being the residue of the magnificent forest that had been burned by the settlers in clearing their land. Potash and pearlash, or saleratus, was made from the ashes. For this work Mr. Bennett was paid sixteen dollars per month. During this employment he was elected Constable, which led on to better things. In 1848 he was nominated for County Sheriff on the Whig ticket, but was defeated. He still persisted in his labors until

Page  126 126 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Hon. Joseph R. Bennett. "Uncle Joe."

Page  127 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 127 1850, when fortune favored him, for he was again nominated for Sheriff by the Whigs, and was elected by a majority of only thirtyone, being the sole survivor of his party. He was re-elected two years after by a majority of 2,000. He served in all four terms as County Sheriff, being elected in 1856-8 on the Republican ticket. He was a consistent member of the Republican party in Michigan. In 1861 he was appointed Deputy United States Marshal. In the fall of 1862 he was made Assessor of Internal Revenue for the First District of Michigan, and was removed by President "Andy" Johnson, because he would not endorse his policy. In 1869 President Grant appointed him United States Marshal for the Eastern District of Michigan, which office he held by reappointment until 1877. In 1870 it became his duty as United States Marshal to supervise the census returns taken that year for his district. In 1850 he took the census of the south half of Lenawee County. Mr. Bennett was always an active member of his political party, always attending the county and state conventions, and was sincere and earnest in his advocacy of the policies and principles set forth. His record as a public officer was without a blemish, and no man in Lenawee County was regarded with greater esteem by all parties. He always took a great interest in all public matters, and exerted a strong patriotic sentiment for his city, his county and his country. He devoted much time and money in gratuitous public service, and was always ready to lead or follow in any movement for the general good and enjoyment of the people. He was always active in all devotional exercises, celebrations and benevolent duties. To show his eminent popularity and activity in his declining years, we mention the fact that in 1900 he was a Presidential elector-at-large for Michigan on the Republican National ticket, and carried the returns to Washington casting the vote of Michigan for McKinley and Roosevelt. He was a member of the Republican state convention in 1902, and was chairman of the Lenawee County delegation casting the solid vote of the county for the Hon. Geo. B. Horton, of Fruit Ridge, for Governor. He was president of the Lenawee County Savings Bank, which he helped to organize in 1869, succeeding the late Governor Charles M. Croswell, in 1887. He was a director of the bank from its organization. His life was an eventful and successful one, and he enjoyed the beauties of the world and the triumphs of a well spent life in the highest degree. In April, 1839, Mr. Bennett married Miss Nancy J. Rowley, daughter of Caleb S. Rowley, of Hudson, this county, and two children were born to them, as follows: Helen M., born in Rollin, November 2d, 1841, married Maj. S. E. Graves February 20th, 1865, and died June 3d, 1883. She was the mother of one son, Walter J., born in Adrian, February 10th, 1870. Dora E., born in Adrian, November 2d, 1846. Mrs. Nancy J. Bennett was born in Elbridge, Onondaga County, N. Y., February 6th, 1821, and died in Adrian, April 18th, 1880. January 22d, 1903, "Uncle Joe" met with a severe accident while alighting from his buggy, in the

Page  128 128 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL evening, at his home. He slipped upon some ice and broke the cap of his left knee, which resulted in his death on the morning of February 19th following. No man in Lenawee County was more honored or respected than "Uncle Joe" Bennett. SQUIRE JOHNSON was born in Bedford, Monroe County, Mich., July 27th, 1844. His father, Silas M. Johnson, was born in Palmyra, N. Y., April 3d, 1818, and was the son of James and Millicent (Dodge) Johnson, of Palmyra, N. Y., where he was a pioneer. James Johnson was a soldier in the war of 1812. He received a land warrant from the Government for his services. About the year 1835 he came to Michigan with his family, consisting of his wife and seven children, and settled near Lambertville, in the township of Bedford, Monroe County. He took up Government land, and made a good home. In the latter part of his life he became blind and died Squire Johnson's Residence, Section 19, Palmyra Township.

Page  129 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 129 there in 1857. His wife, Millicent, died about the year 1854. Silas Johnson was about eighteen years old when he came to Michigan with his parents. He was reared a farmer. He purchased a farm adjoining his father, in Bedford, where he resided until 1863, when he removed to Wauseon, Ohio, where he engaged in the mercantile business, and continued until 1866. At this time he went to Toledo and engaged in the market gardening. He purchased land west of Toledo, on Dorr street. He carried on this business successfully until his death, which occurred March 15th, 1891. In 1842 Silas M. Johnson married Miss Harriet Pomeroy, of Bedford, Monroe County, Mich., and they were the parents of three children, Squire being the oldest. Mrs. Harriet Johnson was born in Thompson, Lake County, Ohio, in June, 1821, came to Michigan with her parents about 1835, and died at the home of her son, in Palmyra, this county, August 9th, 1895. Squire Johnson, the subject of this sketch, was reared a farmer and lived with his parents until 1862, when, in July, 1862, he enlisted in Company K, Eighteenth Michigan Infantry, as musician, and served in that capacity until the end of the great Rebellion, in 1865, when he was honorably discharged. Upon his return home he immediately went to work on a farm in Monroe County, and remained there until the winter of 1866. At that time he went to Toledo and engaged in market gardening with his father. He remained in Toledo in the same business until 1893, when he purchased land on section 19, in Palmyra, this county. Here he has made a specialty of celery growing, with market gardening as an adjunct. His success in the business is plainly shown by the accompanying engraving, showing his home and surroundings. He also owns a forty-acre farm on section 24, in Madison, where he is engaged in fruit culture. October 14th, 1865, Squire Johnson married Miss Sophia J. Miller, daughter of John Miller, of La Salle, Monroe County, Michigan, and they were the parents of four children, as follows: Fannie B., born in Toledo, July 3d, 1868, married John L. Arnold, and resides in Toledo; Frederick T., born in Toledo, October 9th, 1870, married Miss Ella E. Turley. They have one son, Squire Donald, and reside in Toledo. Harriet, born in Toledo, January 24th, 1872, married Chas. H. Skinner. They have two children, Hermia and Morley, and reside in Adrian. Florence L., born in Toledo, September 28, 1873, a teacher in the Toledo public schools Mrs. Sophia J. (Miller) Johnson was born in La Salle, Monroe County, Michigan, April 24, 1844, and died in Toledo, September 24, 1874. Her parents were early settlers of Monroe County, and were natives of Pennsylvania. January 20, 1876, Mr. Johnson married Miss Augusta A. Brigham, daughter of Winfield and Mary E. (White) Brigham, of Wauseon, Ohio, and they have four children, as follows: Erma C., born in Toledo, April 4, 1878, married Earl G. Kuney, and resides at Indianapolis, Ind.; Merle B., born in Toledo, December 27, 1881, a teacher in the Toledo public schools; Millicent M., born in Toledo, February 10, 1887, at home; Christine M., born in Toledo, August 9

Page  130 130 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL 16, 1890, at home. Mrs. Augusta A. (Brigham) Johnson was born in Chatham Center, Medina County, Ohio, March 30, 1849. Her father was born in Augusta, Oneida County, N. Y., December 30, 1814. He removed to Medina County, Ohio, in 1836, and now resides in Bowling Green, Ohio. September 22, 1836, Winfield Brigham married Miss Mary E. White, daughter of James and Anna (Peebles) White, and they were the parents of eight children. Mrs. Mary E. (White) Brigham was born near Sheridan, N. Y., May 27, 1816, and died in Lena, Fulton County, Ohio, February 8, 1863. Her oldest son, Joseph H. Brigham (brother of Mrs. Squire Johnson), was a lieutenant-colonel of the Sixty-ninth Ohio Infantry during the Rebellion, and afterwards master of the Ohio State Grange. He served one term as master of the National Grange, and was appointed by President McKinley, Assistant Secretary of Agriculture. DUSENBERRY J. FURMAN was born in Penfield, N. Y., May 7, 1827, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1835. His father, Robert Furman, was a native of the State of New York, and was born December 31, 1801. He was a pioneer of Western New Mrs. Lydia J. Furman. Dusenberry J. Furman. York, where he lived until 1835, when he emigrated with his wife and five children to Michigan, and settled on section 34, in Dover. His brother, Oliver, came at the same time, and they took up Government land. They at once put up their log houses and moved in, but when the surveyor came along it was discovered they had built

Page  131 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 131 upon the wrong land. They tried it again, with the same result, and the third house was put up before they were permanently located. Mr. Furman, with his three rugged sons, soon made a farm out of the wilderness, and assisted many other settlers in making homes. He was active in the new settlement, and was ever ready to assist in making roads, building bridges, raising buildings, etc., and never wavered in doing his duty and answering the call for assistance in the many misfortunes and incidents among his neighbors. He was a highly respected citizen, and died at the ripe old age of ninety years, in 1890. November 13, 1823, Robert Furman married Miss Jane Dusenberry, daughter of John Dusenberry, of Penfield, N. Y., and they had five children, as follows: Elizabeth, born in Penfield, N. Y., August 13, 1824, and died in Blissfield, this county, in 1894. Walter, born at the same place, Hugh Tolford. December 6, 1825, resides in Blissfield. Dusenberry, born May 7, 1827. Asa, born at the same place, March 22, 1829, resides in Dover. Mary, born at the same place, December 14, 1831, married Chas.!:! Middleton, and resides in Dover. Mrs. Robert Furman was born near the city of New York, April 5, 1805, and died in Dover, this county, in February, 1868. Dusenberry Furman, the subject of this sketch, came to Michigan when he was eight years old, and has resided in the township of Dover, this county, ever since. He lived with his parents until he was twenty-one, and was educated in the log schoolhouses of his neighborhood. Mrs. Hannah Tolford.

Page  132 132 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL He worked by the month for about three years, when, in 1851, he purchased land on section 34, in Dover. In 1854 he sold his first purchase and bought land where he now resides, on section 25. This was new land, but he soon made a most productive farm, and by close application to his own affairs he has been successful, and has added to his first purchase until he now owns 214 acres. He has erected good buildings, and is surrounded with comfort and plenty. For more than forty years Mr. Furman has been active in church work, and has been a sincere member of the Free Will Baptist Church. IHe has assisted in erecting three church edifices, one at Baker's Corners, in Fairfield; one at Stockwell's Corners, in Dover; one at Sand Creek, in Dover, and also a Methodist Church at Deming's Lake. He was one of the founders of the church at Sand Creek, which was erected in 1892. November 9th, 1851, Dusenberry J. Furman married Miss Lydia J. Tolford, daughter of Hugh and Hannah Tolford, of Dover, and they have four children, as follows: Edgar T., born in Dover, February 14, 1854, married Miss Maria Inman, August 3, 1875. Robert Furman. They have one daughter, and reside at Cadmus. Lydia M., born at the same place January 9, 1857, married John B. Wilson, May 28, 1876 She is the mother of three children, and resides in Madison. Gillman B., born in the same place, November 9, 1865, married Miss Hattie Wilkinson, November 14, 1888. They have two children, and reside in Dover. Hervey B., born in the same place, December 17, 1872, married Miss Julia Roberts, March 23, 1892, has two children, and resides in Dover. Mrs. Hannah (Tolford) Furman was born in Danbury, N. H., September 10, 1833. For her family connection, see John Tolford's record in this volume. SAMUEL CUTLER BALDWIN was born in Windsor, Berkshire County, Mass., September 13, 1829, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1835. (See 1874 atlas for his father's record.) Samuel C. Baldwin had but little education, as schools were not

Page  133 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 133 regularly established in the county when he was of school age. He was the "oldest boy," and his services were required in assisting his father in making a home and producing food for the family. He always followed farming, and lived with his parents until he was over twenty-four years old. He has always lived on the farm he now owns, consisting of 225 acres, on section 6, town 9, in Seneca, and sections 7 and 8, in the town of Chesterfield, Fulton County, Ohio. The most of his farm is in Ohio, but his residence is in Morenci. His entire life has been passed in working on his farm, although he has served two years as village trustee. January 8, 1854, Samuel C. Baldwin married Miss Maria J. Schoonover, daughter of Thomas and Ellen Schoonover, of Chesterfield, Ohio, and they had five children, two of whom died in infancy: Olive L., born in Morenci, August 23, 1858, married James Fuller, has two children, and resides in Cedar Falls, Iowa; Vernon E., born November 19, 1865, married Miss Jennie Marvin, has two children, and resides in Morenci; Jessie N., born August 23, 1873, married October 18, 1893, Herbert L. Baker, has one child, and resides in Whitecastle, La. Mrs. Maria J. Baldwin was born at Northampton, Summit County, Ohio, July 8, 1835, and died in Morenci, October 3, 1892. Her parents were early settlers in Summit County, Ohio, and her father was a native of the State of New York. April 4, 1894, Mr. Baldwin married Mrs. Susan (Gehring) Stevenson, of Wauseon, Ohio. She was a native of Switzerland, born December 17, 1843, and came to this country with her parents in 1848. ISAIAH W. ROBERTSON was born in Preston County, West Virginia, April 11, 1842, and was the fifth son of his parents, whose family consisted of twelve children, ten of whom are now living. (For family history, see sketch of James Robertson.) Isaiah W. Robertson was brought up a farmer, and has always followed that avocation in life. He was educated in the district schools of his neighborhood. He came to Michigan with his parents when he was thirteen years old, and until he was twenty-one assisted his father in clearing and ditching his land, and fully realizes what it means to make a farm out of the dense forest and flat lands of Ogden. But he was not discouraged, and dutifully assisted in the strenuous labor until August 4, 1862, when he enlisted in Company B, Eighteenth Michigan Infantry, and served as a soldier until the close of the great Rebellion, being honorably discharged at Nashville, Tenn., June 26, 1865. Upon his return home he again assumed his old duties, and went to work on his father's farm, coming back as he had entered the ranks of the victorious army, a patriotic, law-abiding, industrious citizen. He worked for his father by the month until

Page  134 134 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL 1867, when he, with his brother, rented his father's farm for three years, at the expiration of which time he purchased forty acres, where he now resides, on section 15. By his courage, industry and attention to his own affairs, he now owns a magnificent farm of 330 acres, with fine buildings and all the conveniences, tools, etc., that progressive farmers enjoy. Besides general farming, he is largely engaged in stock raising and feeding for market. Mr. Robertson is a prominent man in his township, and has filled several public offices. He has always been interested in the public schools, and served nine years as School Director, and afterwards as School Isaiah W. Robertson, Ogden. Mrs. Amanda Robertson. Assessor. He was for twenty-one years Highway Commissioner, and the good roads in Ogden show the efficiency of his work. He has also served as Treasurer of his township. He is of a social nature, being a member of David Becker Post No. 25, G. A. R.; Blissfield Lodge No. 114, F. & A. M.; Adrian Chapter No. 10, and Adrian Commandery No. 4, Knights Templar. March 17, 1867, Isaiah W. Robertson married Miss Amanda Packard, daughter of Nathaniel B. and Mary (Potter) Packard, of Seneca, this county, and they are the parents of one son, Joseph Nathaniel, born in Ogden, December 13, 1867, who married Miss Louisa Burk, December 18, 1889. They have three children, as follows: Forest P., born March 17, 1891; Sylvia A., born September 30, 1894; Isaiah R., born February 6,

Page  135 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 135 1897,-all born in Ogden, this county. Mrs. Amanda (Packard) Robertson was born in Amboy, Fulton County, Ohio, February 21, 1848. Her father, Nathaniel B. Packard, was born in Madison, Wayne County, N. Y., May 22, 1817. He came to Michigan with his parents in 1833, and settled in Madison township, this county. He married Miss Helen Johnson in 1843, and she died in 1845. December 28, 1847, he married Miss Mary Potter, daughter of Morey S. and Minerva (Jones) Potter, and they had three children, Mrs. Amanda Robertson being the first child. Mrs. Mary (Potter) Packard was born in Richfield, Herkimer County, N. Y., May 22, 1829. She moved to Ohio with her parents in 1844, and lives in Weston, this county. DR. DANIEL KINGSLEY UNDERWOOD was born in Enfield, Mass., June 15, 1803, the son of'Kingsley and Elizabeth Allen Underwood, and died at Adrian, Mich., May 6, 1875, nearly seventytwo years of age. His family on both sides was of English origin, the Underwoods emigrating in 1636 to Massachusetts from that part of England which still best preserves among its people the evidences of their Saxon origin. His mother's fami]y came from the south coast of England six years earlier, or in 1830. Dr. Underwood was educated in the common schools of Enfield, his native town, and then prepared for college at Amherst Academy. Graduating there, he entered as freshman William College, in the class of 1827. Here he remained two years, and then took up the study of medicine, graduating with honor at the medical school of Dartmouth College, then one of the most noted medicalschools in New England. After this, he Dr. Daniel K. Underwood, started in the practice of his profession at Yarmouth, on Cape Cod, in Massachusetts, but remained only about two years, and then settled for a short time in Quincy, Mass., but after a short residence returned to Amherst and entered into partnership with Dr. Gridly, one of the best known physicians and surgeons of Central Massachusetts. His object in choosing

Page  136 136 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Amherst was largely influenced by its proximity to his native place. His parents were becoming advanced in years; his favorite sister was in delicate health, and the family all felt that Kingsley should be near to them, particularly to the sister. Amherst, after Dr. Underwood left the academy and prior to his going there to live, had become the seat of Amherst College, which rapidly took rank among the educational institutions of New England. The young doctor's office became the resort of the more serious-minded and thoughtful of the students, and many were the discussions of the problems of nature, science and of life which took place there. The late Reverend Henry Ward Beecher was a constant frequenter during his four years at college at Amherst, and he, on several occasions, said to the writer, "I believe I owe more to your father's companionship, and the discussions we had in his office, than to any other one thing connected with my college course." In 1834, the husband of Dr. Underwood's youngest sister felt a call to become a missionary in what was then the western wilderness, and taking his wife and three children, he went to Michigan and took up a farm (all forest of the heaviest kind) at what was afterwards called "Keene," about two miles due north of the present city of Hudson. Who there was to be a missionary to no one ever discovered. The Indians had, except for a few stragglers, entirely gone from the country. The whites had not yet come in, but there he settled. Mails were slow; communications were infrequent. There were no complaints in the few letters which came, but the family at home were uneasy. The husband was thought to be impracticable and entirely incapable of a pioneer life. During the spring and summer of 1836, no letters came, and it was decided that Kingsley should go and see and help, if necessary. So the latter part of the summer of 1836, Dr. Underwood started for Michigan, taking a stage to Northampton, Mass., thence another stage to Albany, N. Y.,,and thence by another to Schenectady; from there a packet on the Erie Canal to Buffalo, and from there the steamer "Daniel Webster" carried him to Detroit in a week's time. Here, with two fellow passengers, they engaged a wagon, and in two days more reached Adrian, arriving about the first of September. The three left most of their luggage at the old red mill on North Main street, the owner of which was known to one of them, and then drove to the tavern called the "Adrian House," situated nearly where there has been for many years a drug store, on the northwest corner of Main and Maumee streets. The tavern was kept by the late Pomeroy Stone, assisted by his son, the late William H. Stone, then a bright-faced lad of some ten years of age. The next morning Dr. Underwood started to find his sister. There was no road except the winding path used by ox teams, and Dr. Underwood walked. During the day he passed one house on what has since been called the "Jake Jackson Place," and at nightfall came upon a second house belonging to the late John Colwell, near the township line between Dover and Hudson. Here he remained over

Page  137 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 137 night, being most hospitably treated, and the next morning pursued his journey, arriving at his destination about noon. He found his gloomiest anticipations realized-the husband and father sick, the mother also, the children just able to be about. Malarial fever, or ague they called it then, was the pest of the country. There were hardly any provisions in the house, and after some necessary medical attendance, Dr. Underwood started for one of the nearest neighbors, of whom he had heard from Colwell, as being likely to have provisions to sell. It was nine miles through the woods toward the southeast corner of Medina. There he procured as much provisions as he could carry back on his shoulders, and returned, and after doing what was possible for his sister and family, went back to Adrian and sent out a wagon-load of necessaries. He finally made up his mind to settle in this neighborhood and had heard of Toledo as a town of much promise, so he went down there, and thought the same thing. He therefore rented a store which was in process of erection and nearly complete, and went East to get a stock of goods shipped in before the winter closed the canal and lakes. He bought a stock of drugs, medicines, groceries, paints, oils, etc., in New York, and returned with it to Toledo by the last boat of the season, only to find that the owner of the store he had rented, finding an opportunity to sell at large profit, had sold the building and lot in his absence, and the new owner was in possession. No room was to be had in Toledo, and he must sell his goods during the winter to pay what he owed for them in the spring, so he transported his goods to Adrian by wagon and opened business on the west side of North Main street, eight or ten doors north of the corner, afterwards buying the building. The building and stock were afterwards destroyed by fire, but he rebuilt and finally bought the ground and built a building on the southwest corner of Main and Maumee streets, afterwards occupied by Hart & Shaw. He never practiced medicine except in the families of one or two friends after coming to Michigan, but he carried on his drug business until about 1850, when, having been severely ill for some time and despairing of ultimate recovery, he sold out to the late Samuel E. Hart, who had been a clerk for him for several years. Then for several years he gave his attention to his books, his fruit and his garden until his death in 1875, except that for two or three years he was engaged with the late Abel Whitney, under the name of D. K. Underwood & Company, in a private banking business in Adrian. Among those employed by Dr. Underwood, probably the following will be best remembered by their cotemporaries: The late Fayette Hooker, of Chicago; Paul Raymond, D. B. Spooner (a cousin of the present Senator Spooner, of Wisconsin), and the late Samuel E. Hart. Dr. Underwood was an exceedingly shy man. He had a very humble opinion of himself. Apparently he was reserved, and to a certain extent that was true, but to those who knew him well he was the most charming companion. I met a college friend the other day whom I had not seen for more

Page  138 138 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL than thirty years. He, then an instructor in the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, at Troy, New York, had spent a week at our house in 1869. Now he is president of one of the largest anthracite coal companies in Pennsylvania, and one of the first things he spoke to me about was my father. He said: "I have often thought of that week. Your father opened up such fields of thought, and in after years, as some new scientific principle was developed, I could recall he had in several instances discussed it with me, anticipating its actual discovery." The late Judge Beaman said: "Dr. Underwood knows more of the political history of this country, and the historical and other reasons for political action and their significance, than any man I know." The late Dr. Mahan said of him: "He is better posted in every system of theology which has existed, knowing what the ruling thought in each has been, than any person I have met." He was equally well versed in natural history-the habits of animals, fish and insects, and in all manifestations of plant life. He had a wonderful memory and a reasoning mind. During all of his life, and particularly the last twenty-five years, he had much leisure to think. Dr. Underwood was a deeply religious man. He contributed about one-quarter of the cost of Plymouth Church, and that it cost not more than it did was largely attributable to his personal supervision and painstaking oversight. The writer well remembers the sacrifices made in the family to give to the church. He was interested in public education, serving as a member of the school board for several years. He gave one-half of the land and about two thousand dollars in money to the college at Adrian. While not participating actively in politics, his influence and sympathies were always for the advancement in manhood of all mankind; like his father before him, who had been an outspoken abolitionist since 1818, Dr. Underwood held the same views. Mrs. Haviland never had to ask him twice for aid for a fugitive from bondage. From the earliest recollection of the writer he recalls as though it were but yesterday the daily wrestling with the Lord in prayer "that the downtrodden and oppressed may everywhere go free." It was not only the negro slavery of the South, but his heart's desire went out to wherever human beings were downtrodden and oppressed, and that they might stand up each in 'the glory of manhood, free and independent. Dr. Underwood' married, in 1842, Miss Maria Agnes Mitchell, of Montgomery County, New York. She survived him three years. They had two children, both of whom survived their parents, William Allen Underwood, now a lawyer in the city of New York, and Charles Mitchell Underwood, who died in Grand Rapids in 1879. Maria Agnes Mitchell Underwood was born in Charleston, Montgomery County, New York, August 9, 1809, and died at Adrian, Michigan, May 25, 1878. She was the daughter of Charles Mitchell and Lydia Brown Mitchell. She was a sister of the late Charles T. Mitchell, of Hillsdale, and John Mitchell and Sophia Mitchell, of Adrian, and also of the late Mrs. Edward H. Winans, of Adrian. In

Page  139 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 139 1838 she accompanied her sister, Mrs. Winans, to Adrian. Mrs. Winans, with her husband and family, were then removing from Montgomery County, New York, to Adrian to live, and Mrs. Underwood accompanied them and remained with them a year or two on this occasion. Here she met Dr. Underwood, and in 1842 they were married. It was almost an ideal marriage, not consummated early in life, but the two natures seemed to be entirely in harmony. Dr. Underwood died in 1875. Mrs. Underwood survived him about three years, and died in 1878. CULLEN R. PORTER was born in Macedon, Wayne County, N. Y., November 26, 1824, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1833. His father, Deacon William R. Porter, was born in Macedon, N. Y., April 21, 1799, and was a pioneer in Western New York. Cullen R. Porter. Mrs. Cynthia Porter. His father was a farmer and operated a sawmill in Wayne County. William R. Porter married Miss Marina White (daughter of General David White, who served in the war of 1812, and was one of the earliest settlers of Sylvania, Ohio), November 26, 1823, and resided in Wayne County, where they followed farming until 1833, when with three small children they came to Michigan and settled on section 18, in Madison township, this county, taking up Government land. After erecting a good log house, in which the family lived for many years, he also built a sawmill on the south branch of the River Raisin, and manufactured a large amount of lumber, which was

Page  140 140 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL much needed by the settlers in that vicinity. His family consisted of four children, as follows: Cullen R., born November 26, 1824; Seymour S., born December 11, 1826; Cynthia S., born February 4, 1829-all born in Macedon, Wayne County, N. Y.; Halsey D., born in Madison, this county, January 4, 1839. Cynthia S. married Allen Warren, December 12, 1849, and was the mother of three children. Mrs. Marina (White) Porter was born in Macedon, N. Y., May 17, 1806, and died in Madison, March 28, 1877. Deacon William R. Porter died in Madison, December 11, 1872. He was a deacon in the First Baptist Church of Adrian for many years, and was one of the founders and constituent members of that body. He and his wife were active members up to the time of their death. Cullen R. Porter was always a farmer, and resided in Madison from childhood until his death. He was a prominent resident in his township, a thrifty, energetic business man, and served as Supervisor for several terms. He was successful in his efforts, but modest and unassuming in his manners and methods, honorable and just in all transactions, enterprising and progressive as a citizen and neighbor. He died at his home in Madison, June 8, 1902. January 3, 1855, Cullen R. Porter married Miss Cynthia Hutchinson, daughter of Chester and Rachel (Childs) Hutchinson, of Madison, this county, and they had three children, as follows: Orson Chester, died in infancy; Lucius A., born in Madison, January 6, 1857, married Miss Anna E. Burr, daughter of Theron and Hattie (Wilson) Burr, of Adrian; William Duane, born in Madison, January 29, 1859, married Miss Vinnie Allen, daughter of Thomas and Mary Allen. Mrs. Cynthia (Hutchinson) Porter was born in Perrington, Monroe County, N. Y., March 31, 1838, and came to Michigan and settled on section 30, in Madison, this county, in 1831, with her parents. Her father, Chester Hutchinson, a native of New York, was born September 7, 1799, and died in Madison, this county, March 10, 1844. Her mother, Rachel (Childs) Hutchinson, was also a native of New York. She was born April 28, 1803, and died in Dover, this county, March 29, 1863. COL. LYMAN S. ELLIOTT was born in Erie County, N. Y., August 23, 1816. He came to Michigan with his parents in 1834, and settled in Rome, Lenawee County. His father, Smith Elliott, was a soldier in the war of 1812. He was always a farmer. He came to Michigan with a family of a wife and five children, and settled on a new farm in Rome, where he lived until his death, January 21, 1861. In 1815, Smith Elliott married Philatta Lansing, of Canastota, N. Y., and they were the parents of eight sons and two daughters. Mrs. Philatta Elliott died in Rome in 1844. Col. Lyman S. Elliott, the subject of this sketch, was the oldest child of his

Page  141 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 141 parents, and had attained the age of eighteen when he came to Michigan. The family moved into the woods, and it became very necessary for him to find some employment that would bring in some support. He worked at Adrian and Tecumseh for a few years at whatever he could find to do. He finally got into the hotel business, and with his brother-in-law kept the old Michigan Exchange, in Adrian, for a year or more. He sold it out, at a profit, and in 1845-6 Col. Lyman S. Elliott and Family. kept the Exchange Hotel at Hillsdale. About this time he got into the railroad business, which he followed until the breaking out of the great Rebellion in 1861. He was connected with the New York & Erie, Indianapolis & St. Louis, and the Cincinnati & Marietta railroads, as traveling auditor. August 23, 1861, he enlisted and joined the Forty-seventh Ohio Infantry, and was commissioned lieutenant-colonel. His regiment was sent to West Virginia, and afterwards joined Sherman's army. He was promoted colonel, July 17, 1862. He took active part in all the engagements of his regiment, and received an honorable discharge at Memphis, Tenn., February 17, 1864. Two of his brothers served in the Union army, also. He died in Chicago, June 5, 1865. July 30, 1846, he married Miss Harriet T. Lyman, daughter of Russell and Eunice Lyman, of Adrian, and two children were born to them, as follows: May A., born in Adrian, July 7, 1848, married Prof. J. M. Thompson; Charles A., born in Cincinnati, January 8, 1853, died in Adrian, August 11, 1855. Mrs. Harriet T. Elliott was born in Warren, Pennsylvania, July 11, 1829. Her father was a native of Vermont and was born in 1800. About 1825 he moved to Pennsylvania, and in 1828 he married Eunice Winter, daughter of Asa and Amelia (Conant) Winter, of Warren, Pennsylvania, who settled in Adrian in 1835. Mrs. Russell Lyman was born in Connecticut, July 7, 1804, and died in Adrian, December 1, 1859. Mrs. Harriet Elliott came to Michigan in 1834 with her parents, and has called Adrian her home for 68 years. She is comfortably located on North Winter street, where she enjoys recounting her former days.

Page  142 142 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL ALBERT. G. BAKER was born in Madison, Lenawee County, Michigan, September 6, 1848. His father, Rufus Baker, was born in Palmyra, Wayne County, N. Y., June 30, 1821, and was the son of John and Polly Baker. John Baker was born in Adams, Massachusetts, January 17, 1798. In 1800 his father, Moses Baker, moved to Wayne County, New York, where he was a pioneer, and assisted in building the aqueduct for the Erie canal over the Genesee river, at Rochester, and also worked on the canal. Moses Baker took up a large tract of New land in Macedon, Wayne County, New York. He afterwards divided this land among his sons, John coming into possession of a part of it, where he lived until 1832. In the fall of 1831, Moses Baker and two of his sons, John and Orin, sold out and all came to Michigan, arriving in Detroit Rufus Baker. June 1, 1832. Being well acquainted with Darius and Addison J. Comstock, in Wayne County, and John having a brother-in-law already settled here - Levi Shumway - they naturally came to Lenawee County, where they finally settled, as follows: Moses taking the s. e. ' of the n. e. frc'l I/ of sec. 3; Orin took up the n. 2 of the n. e. frc'l ' of sec. 3; John, the n. w. frc'l '4 of sec. 2, all in Fairfield, the locality for years being known as "Baker's Corners," now the platted village of Fairfield. Moses Baker lived in Fairfield upon his original purchase until his death, which occurred November 26, 1853. Orin Baker died on his old farm in Mrs. Maria D. Baker. Fairfield, January 30, 1871.

Page  143 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 143 April 6, 1820, John Baker married Miss Polly Smith, daughter of Ezekiel and Sylvia Smith, of Macedon, Wayne County, New York, by whom he had ten children, Rufus being the oldest. Mrs. Polly Baker was born in Lower Canada, December 1, 1800, and died in Fairfield, this q county, January 17, 1871. John Baker died | in Fairfield, this county, on the farm he purchased of the Govern- N ment, May 7, 1873. Rufus Baker was brought up a farmer, and only received a. common school educa- t tion. He was but eleven years old when he came to Michigan x with his parents, and therefore passed e through all the different phases of pioneer: life, many of the hard- > ships and pleasures of? living in the woods c being impressed more | vividly upon his mind than upon those who were older and had more cares and anxieties. He grew with the country and improved with it, and at the age of nineteen commenced teaching school, his first term being two months, for which he was to have ten dollars per month,

Page  144 144 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL but he never received all his pay. He taught eleven winter terms of school. He never believed himself fully qualified to teach, but thought he could do as well as many others in the same capacity, and decided to do what he could. He worked by the month summers and taught school winters, until 1846, during which time he purchased forty acres of land in Madison, where he lived until 1855. He then purchased 160 acres of land, it being the s. w. ' of sec. 2, in Fairfield. He added to his farm until he owned 370 acres of choice land. His health failing him, in 1853, he commenced dealing in live stock, which he followed with energy and success until 1860. In the spring of 1860 he commenced dairy farming with eighteen cows, gradually increasing until 1866, when he built the Fairfield cheese factory, the first to be operated in Michigan, preceding Mr. Samuel Horton, of the same township, only four days. He engaged, with his son, E. L. Baker, largely in the business, manufacturing, during some seasons, as high as $60,000 worth of cheese. During the year 1865, his dairy consisted of forty-eight cows, producing 640 pounds of cured cheese each, netting for cheese and butter $105 per cow. In 1872 Rufus Baker & Son opened a wholesale cheese store in Adrian, and continued until 1874, when L. Ladd was admitted as a partner, and the firm, then known as Rufus Baker & Co., continued until December, 1878, when E. L. Baker went out. March 23, 1846, Rufus Baker married Miss Maria D. Vail, daughter of Moses and Amanda Vail, of Seneca, this county, by whom he had three children, as follows: Edwin L., born in Madison, January 5, 1847, a resident of Adrian; Albert G., born in Madison, September 6, 1848; Angelia M., born in Madison, June 28, 1850, married Edwin D. Stone, of Fairfield, is the mother of four children, two of whom are living. Rufus Baker died at his home, in Fairfield, in December, 1898. Mrs. Maria D. Baker was born in Fabius, Onondaga County, New York, September 17, 1828, and came to Michigan with her parents in 1836. Her father was born in Dover, Duchess County, New York, January 25, 1801, and died in Seneca. Her mother was born in Onondaga County, New York, November 20, 1803, and died in Seneca, December 17, 1853. February 15, 1872, Albert G. Baker married Miss Adell F. Paddock, daughter of Andrew and Emily Paddock, of Reading, Hillsdale County, and they are the parents of four children, as follows: Rufus A., born in Reading, Hillsdale County, December 28, 1872; Lena C., born same place, November 28, 1874; Burton E., born in Fairfield, this county, February 5, 1877; Lulu M., born same place, April 1, 1879, married November 28, 1901, Harry C. Osgood, has one son, Gerald B., and resides in Deerfield, this county. Mrs. Adell F. Baker was born in Aurelius, Cayuga County, N. Y., April 24, 1853, came to Michigan with her parents in 1858, and settled in Reading, Hillsdale County. Her father, Andrew Paddock, was born near Auburn, N. Y., February 17, 1831, and died in Reading, Hillsdale County, April 22. 1895. Her mother, Mrs. Emily (Mills) Paddock, was born near Auburn, New York, December 20,

Page  145 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 145 1832, and now resides in Reading, the mother of four children. Albert G. Baker resides on his father's homestead, on section 2, in Fairfield, and is largely interested in general farming and dairying. SAMUEL T. SCHUREMAN was born in Rome, Lenawee County, Mich., March 26, 1838. His father, John B. Schureman, was born in Westchester, Westchester County, N. Y., April 26, 1795. His paternal ancestors were Hollanders. His maternal ancestors were French Huguenots, and came to America in 1719. They settled in New Rochelle, New York, where they purchased a large tract of Mrs. Martha A. Schureman. Samuel T. Schureman. land. There were three brothers who originally came to America, two settling in New York and one in New Jersey. The family became prominent and prosperous, participated in the Revolutionary War, and the descendants have always been loyal, energetic and prominent in their callings. John B. Schureman, son of Frederick Schureman, lived in the county of his birth until the spring of 1832, when he came to Michigan and settled on sections 22 and 23, in Rome township, taking up 320 acres of Government land. He also took 160 acres in Dover. He at once built a house, in 1832, and it immediately became headquarters for all new settlers. Mr. Schureman was a well educated man, with considerable business experience, 10

Page  146 146 ILLUSTIKATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL and the settlers depended upon him in many ways. (See page 226 in Whitney & Bonner's Historv of Lenawee County.) Samuel T. Schureman always lived on the farm on which he was born. He was a practical and successful farmer, and never had any other employment until August 28, 1864, when he enlisted in Co. H, Eleventh Michigan Cavalry, and served until the end of the war. He returned home in 1865, in poor health, from which he never recovered. He was a member of Woodbury Post No. 45, G. A. R., of Adrian. He was a thrifty, prosperous farmdr, a good citizen, and genial man. He died in the home of his birth, July 22, 1901. June 18, 1862, Samuel T. Schureman married Miss Martha A. Todd, daughter of Ransom and Sally Ann (Wade) Todd, and they were the John 1. Schureman. parents of nine children, as fol The Schureman home in Rome. First frame house built in the Township.

Page  147 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 147 lows: Eliza S., born March 28, 1864, married Herbert Barnum, July 4, 1880, was the mother of one son, Chester A., and died March 2, 1895; John B., born April 7, 1866, and died in his third year; Frances I., born January 17, 1871, married June 18, 1894, Delila S. Judd, has one daughter; C. Gertrude, born December 25, 1873, married George L. Aldrich, December 2, 1896, has two children, Elwood S. and Claire Vincent, and resides in Rome; Sarah E., born March 7, 1876, married W. S. Lister, August 6, 1902, and resides at Dundee; Jephtha VW. and Susie W. (twins), born January 6, 1879; Edna T., born May 12, 1884. One child died in infancy. Mrs. Martha A. (Todd) Schureman was born in Adrian 'township, this county, February 9, 1843. Her parents were pioneers of Deacon Ransom Todd. Michigan, settling in Ypsilanti in 1829. In the spring of 1833 they came to Lenawee County and took up 160 acres of Government land on section 19, in Adrian township. This farm was cleared up from a rude wilderness, and the family resided there for over thirty-three years. They were constituent members of the First Baptist Church of Adrian, and Deacon Todd was a highly respected man. He was born at Palmyra, N. Y., July 6, 1805, and died in Gorham, Ohio, April 21, 1883. His wife, Sally Ann Wade, was born November 2, 1808, and died at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, January 11, 1893. Mrs. Sally Ann Todd.

Page  148 148 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL EDWARD J. CARPENTER was born in Madison, Lenawee County, Mich., June 10, 1862. His father, Silas B. Carpenter, was born in Shelby, Orleans County, N. Y., July 1, 1832. He came to Michigan with his parents in 1832, and settled on section 2, in Fairfield. [For record of Mr. Carpenter's ancestors, see Whitney & Bonner's History and Biographical Record of Lenawee County, page 189, vol. 2.] Edward J. Carpenter, the subject of this sketch, has always resided in Lenawee County, and is now at home on section 6, in Ogden. He is a farmer from choice, and is successful and progressive in his ideas and methods. January 27, 1882, he married Miss Julia M. Freeman, daughter of Jerome S. and Mary A. (West) Freeman, of Palmyra, this county. They have four children, as follows: Jerome S., born in Ogden, August 18, 1890; Nellie E., born at the same place, October 12, 1892; Marian R., born at the same place, April 26, 1894; Bradley E., born at the same place, June 20, 1897. Mrs. Julia M. Carpenter was born in Palmyra, this county, February 1, 1869. Her father is a native of this county and was born in Palmyra, November 17, 1842. He now resides at Stanberry, Mo. Her mother was Mary A. West, and born in Massachusetts of Irish parents. Mrs. Carpenter's mother died when she was three years old. She was brought up by Mr. and Mrs. B. L. Hicks, and has always lived in Ogden. She has the dearest memory of the kindness and love bestowed upon her by this amiable couple, and only remembers them as the most considerate of parents. REV. JACOB BAKER was born in Perington, Monroe County, N. Y., May 10, 1827, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1833. His father, David W. Baker, was born in Massachusetts, June 24, 1799. He was a son of Moses and Cynthia (White) Baker, who were natives of Massachusetts, and who traced their ancestry back to three brothers named Baker, who came to America early in 1600, from England. David W. Baker was a pioneer in Lenawee County, and settled on Government land on the n. e. X of section 4, in Palmyra township. He was brought up a farmer, and was a birthright Quaker. He came to this county with his wife and three children, and at once identified himself with the Friends Church, which had been established the year before (1832) by the Westgate, Bowerman and Haviland families, who had come from Niagara County, New York. These families comprised nearly the entire membership of a meeting in the township of Royalton, Niagara County, and upon coming to Michigan they brought their books and transplanted the organization to Raisin, this county, and worshiped here without any formal organization in their new home. Their first church edifice was a log building about 12x16, on section 28, in

Page  149 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 149 Raisin. David W. Baker ever after 1833 resided in Palmyra, where he became an active and useful member of society, and did much to develop and improve the new county. In 1823 David W. Baker married Miss Elizabeth Hoag, daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth (Palmer) IHoag, of Macedon, Wayne County, N. Y., and they were the parents of nine children, Jacob being the oldest. David W. Baker died in Rev. Jacob Baker and Wife. Palmyra, this county, April 3, 1876. Mrs. Elizabeth (Hoag) Baker was born in Macedon, Wayne County, N. Y., August 18, 1803, and died in Palmyra, this county, October 2, 1849. Jacob Baker, the subject of this sketch, was about six years old when he came to Lenawee County, and his home has been here ever since. He was educated in the schools of the county, including one term at a Friends select school in Tecumseh, and one term at the Raisin Institute, established by Aunt Laura Haviland. For ten years he taught school in different parts of the country. He was brought up in the Quaker church and was converted in the church when he was 36 years old, and became conscious of a call to the ministry soon after. When he was 38 years old he commenced preaching, and was recorded a minister by the church in December, 1870. He at once became the resident minister of Raisin Center Church, and remained there for ten years. In 1880 he was called to the Green Plains meeting, in Clark County, Ohio, where he remained for three years. In the spring of 1883 he returned to the Raisin Center Church, where he preached until the spring of 1886, when he answered a call to Damascus, Columbiana County, Ohio. He remained there until De

Page  150 150 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL cember 1, 1892, when he was again called back to Raisin Center, where, during the past ten years, he has supplied the spiritual 'needs of the large congregation in the church of his nativity. Mr. Baker has at different times received credentials from his church for evangelistic work in various parts of the country, reaching from Maine to California, and has attended ten of the Friends yearly meetings of America. He has also been a delegate to four general conferences of the American yearly meetings, which are held every five years, and is now the oldest active minister in the Ohio yearly meeting. May 8, 1851, Jacob Baker married Miss Phila A. Colvin, daughter of Isaac A. and Elizabeth W. (Crane) Colvin, of Palmyra, and they are the parents of three children, as follows: Clara E., born in Palmyra, this county, October 13, 1853, at home; Florence E., born same place, February 5, 1856, married Ezra H. Porter, is the mother of one child, Bertha, and resides in Fairfield, this county; George H., born same place, September 12, 1861, and died September 22, 1863. Mrs. Phila (Colvin) Baker was born in Macedon, Wayne County, N. Y., March 13, 1828, and came to Michigan with her parents in 1832. Her father, Isaac A. Colvin, was a native of Wayne County, N. Y. He married Elizabeth W. Crane, daughter of the Hon. George Crane, one of the early and very prominent pioneers of Lenawee County. May 8, 1901, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Baker celebrated their golden wedding at their pleasant home at Raisin Center. Among the incidents of coming to Michigan, Mr. Baker remembers the trip up Lake Erie from Buffalo, and the arrival at Port Lawrence, now Toledo. In coming up the Maumee Bay and river, the captain was unfamiliar with the channel, and the old steamboat, the "DeWitt Clinton," run on a sand bar and stuck for many hours. The unusual noise made by the steam and paddle wheels, in the frantic efforts of the captain to get off the bar, attracted many hundred Indians to the shore, to witness the novel scene. The antics of the red men he has never forgotten. To show the difference between pioneer life in 1833 and modern 1903 life, he remembers that his father had erected a log house and had shingled enough of the roof to cover the bed in one corner, with no chimney or windows or doors, with only floor enough to set the table on, and no chinking between the logs. One day the family visited a neighbor several miles away, shutting the door by hanging up a blanket. Upon returning home, they found that the pigs, which had been left in a pen, had changed quarters and were quietly sleeping in the trundle bed. HON. JOEL CARPENTER was born at Potsdam, St. Lawrence County, New York, September 3, 1818. He was a brother of the late Guy Carpenter and of David Carpenter. He was a direct descendant from the Carpenters of Surrey, England, through William Carpenter, who settled near Rehoboth, Massachusetts, in

Page  151 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 151 1638, and whose great-great-grandson, the Rev. Ezra Carpenter, of Swanzey, New Hampshire, born at Rehoboth in 1698, was the greatgreat-grandfather of the subject of this sketch. His great-grandfather was Greenwood Carpenter, of Swanzey, New Hampshire, for many years high sheriff of Cheshire County. His grandfather, William Carpenter, whose wife was a daughter of the Rev. Clement Sumner, of Keene, emigrated to St. Lawrence County, New York, in 1806, and died at that place in 1843, in the ninetysecond year of his age. Joel Carpenter lived with his father on the family homestead until his eighteenth year, when he entered St. Lawrence Academy, where he attained an ordinary English education. September 15, 1838, at the age of twenty, he left his father's house and arrived in Blissfield, Lenawee County, September 23. During the winter of 1838-9 he taught a district school near the present village of Deerfield, in this county. On the 10th day of June, Halsey & Greenly, in Adrian, ion. Joel Carpenter. the county seat, as a student at law. He was admitted to the bar April 9, 1842, Justice Fletcher presiding at the court. October 12, 1842, he married Miss Theodocia A. Carpenter, youngest daughter of the late Dan Carpenter, of Potsdam, New York, and returning to Blissfield he opened a law office at that place in the winter of 1842-3. He buried his young wife December 7, 1843. December 25, 1844, he married his second wife, Minerva L. Mead, daughter of Hon. Darius Mead, of Blissfield. Three children were born to him by this wife: Clement D., born March 23, 1848; Carrie F., born August 6, 1850, and Minerva E., born February 24, 1852, and died March 18 of the same year. His son, Clement D., is a lawyer, of Toledo, Ohio. His daughter, Carrie F., died at Blissfield, February 16, 1891. Minerva L. Carpenter, his second wife, was born at Lanesboro, Massachusetts, August 3, 1823, and came with her father to Blissfield in 1833. She died March 12, 1852. In April, 1850, in company with his brother, David Carpenter, he went into the mercantile business, and two years later, having bought out his brother, he formed a co-partnership with his brother-in-law, the late Marvin L. Stone, in the same business, and after Mr. Stone's

Page  152 152 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL death, July 24, 1854, he carried on the business alone until the fall of 1858, when he sold out and again opened a law office. September 1, 1859, he married his third wife, Miss Lucy M. Gilmore, daughter of Asa Gilmore, of Tecumseh, by whom he had one child, Guy D., born September23, 1861, and who died March 4, 1864. Lucy M., his third wife, was born at Tecumseh, January 28, 1838, and died October 1, 1861. January 14, 1864, he married his fourth wife, Miss Esther C. Newton, daughter of Ezra Newton, of Blissfield. She was born at Blissfield, May 24, 1833. Mr. Carpenter has held many positions of trust and honor from the people. He has been supervisor and postmaster of Blissfield, enrolling officer and deputy United States assessor during the Rebellion; was State Senator for two terms, beginning January 1, 1859. He introduced and secured the passage of the first general insurance law ever adopted in this state, under which himself and the late Royal Barnum, of Adrian, organized the Michigan State Insurance Company, of Adrian. He was a warm Republican in politics, and was always a strong anti-slavery man. He attended, as a delegate from Michigan, the great Free Soil convention, held at Buffalo, August 9, 1848. He was also a delegate to the celebrated convention held "under the Oaks" at Jackson in 1854, which first organized and named the Republican party, and was one of the delegates-at-large to the Republican national convention in Chicago, in 1880, that nominated Garfield. He died at his home in Blissfield, January 22, 1891. ROBERT S. MORELAND was born in Adrian, Mich., February 8, 1854. His father, James Moreland 3d, was born in Dromara, County Down, Ireland, February 14, 1816, where his father, James Moreland 2d, and his grandfather, James Moreland 1st, owned a farm and lived and died. The wife of James Moreland 1st was Ann Scott, who was born and died in the same county. The ancestors of the Moreland family fled from Scotland during the religious persecutions. The Morelands were inhabitants of the Moorlands of Scotland, hence the name Moreland, as distinguished from the Highlands. James Moreland 2d, in 1788, married Miss Margaret Curry and six children were born to them, the youngest of whom, Samuel Moreland, settled in Somerset, Hillsdale County, Mich., and died there, May 20, 1881. Mrs. Margaret (Curry) Moreland died in 1804, and about two years subsequently Mr. Moreland 2d married Miss Fanny Magee, and six children blessed this union, James Moreland 3d being the third son and fifth child. Mrs. Fanny (Magee) Moreland was born in Antrim County in 1780. Her father, John Magee, was of Scotch extraction, whose ancestors were among the first of the dissenters to flee from Scotland, settling on an

Page  153 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 153 island called Island Magee, which island derived its name from this family. James Moreland 2d died on the farm where he was born, in 1828, and his wife, Fanny Moreland, died there in 1842. James Moreland 3d lived in Ireland until 1837. He learned the weavers' trade, but upon going to Scotland he found employment in a large Residence of Robert S. Moreland, No. 15 Front street, Adrian. iron smelting works at Dairy, where he remained until the spring of 1841, when he came to America, landing at Quebec July 1. He came to Michigan in November, 1843, and in the spring of 1844 settled in Adrian, where he resided until 1863, when he moved to Hudson, this county. May 30. In 1849 James Moreland 3d married Miss Ann Stephenson, daughter of William and Martha (Small) Stephenson, of County Monaghan. Ireland, and four children were born to them, as follows: Fannie Jane, born in Adrian, April 21, 1850; Rilbert S., born in Adrian, February 8, 1854; James H., born in Adrian, February 19, 1857; William T., born in Hudson, Mich., July 7, 1864. Mrs. Ann Moreland was born in County MonaZhan, Ireland, in 1829, and died in Hudson, this county, January 1, 1871. She was a sister of the late Dr. Robert and John Stephenson, and came to

Page  154 154 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL America with them in 1847. Robert S. Moreland, the subject of this sketch, was educated in the public schools of Adrian and Hudson, and attended Eastman's Business College at Poughkeepsie, N. Y. In the fall of 1870 he accepted a position in John K. Boies & Co.'s general store, in Hudson, as bookkeeper and cashier. He held this position until the spring of 1873, when he went to Chicago as bookkeeper for the wholesale grocery firm of Boies, Fay & Conkey. He remained there for about six months, when the late M. E. Chittenden, who was then engaged in the wholesale oil and tobacco business in Adrian, offered him the very desirable position of manager of the office business of the firm of M. E. Chittenden & Co. After a service there of eight years, a co-partnership, since known as Moreland Bros. & Crane, for carrying on the business of jobbers of oils, tobacco and cigars, in the city of Adrian, was organized, which firm is still doing a prosperous business, and is one of the solid commercial enterprises of Adrian. The firm originally consisted of R. S. Moreland, J. H. Moreland and Eugene W. Crane. The original firm existed until April 14, 1895, when James H. Moreland died. For business reasons the firm name has never been changed, and is continued by the surviving partners. In the spring of 1884 Robert S. Moreland accepted the position of secretary and treasurer of the Musselman Tobacco Company, of Louisville, Ky., without relinquishing his interest in the Adrian firm. He remained in Louisville four years at a lucrative salary, but returned to Adrian in 1888, and resumed his duties with the successful firm that he helped to establish, since which time he has given his entire attention to the business in Adrian. Moreland Bros. & Crane's business extends through Southern Michigan, Northern Ohio and Indiana. Robert S. Moreland is vice president of Waldby & Clay's State Bank, treasurer of the Adrian Building and Loan Association, one of the really prosperous institutions of the city. He is also vestryman of Christ (Episcopal) Church, of Adrian. November 14, 1873, he married Miss Ella J. Dickinson, daughter of Dr. Julius C. and Phoebe (Tabor) Dickinson, of Hudson, Mich., by whom he has had three children, as follows: Fred L., born March 9, 1876, married Miss Irene Morgan, daughter of Dayton B. and Julia (Morrison) Morgan, of Adrian, February 22, 1899, and they have two children, Charles Tabor and Helen I.. both born at Montgomery, Alabama. Anna L., born October 18, 1877, died April 18, 1898, at Sea Breeze, Florida, and was buried in Oakwood, at Adrian. Jennie M., born July 11, 1879, married Charlas M. Smith, of Montgomery, Alabama, June 5, 1900, where they now reside. They had one child, Robert Milton, born August 15, 1901, died November 6, 1901. Mrs. Ella J. Moreland was born in Hudson, Mich., August 8, 1851. Her parents were pioneers of the Bean Creek Valley, and her father was one of the first physicians to settle in that part of Lenawee County. He was born in Potsdam, N. Y., August 10, 1821, and graduated in medicine from a Cleveland college in 1846, died at DeLeon Springs, Florida, March 12, 1893,

Page  155 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 155 and is buried in Oakwood, Adrian. His father was Anson Dickinson, and his mother was Miss Eliza Carpenter, both being natives of New York. Dr. Julius C. Dickinson settled in Hudson in 1848, as a physician. He married Miss Phoebe J. Tabor, March 22, 1848, daughter of Thomas and Abigail (Drew) Tabor. She was born in Bradford, Vermont, July 31, 1824, came to Michigan with her parents, and settled in Adrian in 1837. James H. Moreland 3d, third child of James and Ann Moreland, was born in Adrian, February 19, 1857. He was educated in the public schools of Adrian and Hudson, Mich., and at the age of nineteen commenced the study of medicine with his Uncle, Dr. Robert Stephenson, of Adrian, Mich. After a year's study he deserted the Esculapian followers and entered upon a commercial career, the successful outcome of which indicated that his choice of vocation was a happy one. At the age of twentyone he entered the employ of M. E. Chittenden & Co., and from a small beginning advanced himself with this firm to the position of traveling salesman, building up and controlling a very large trade throughout the territory in which he traveled. It was through his standing as a business man of honorable methods, coupled with his sympathetic and genial qualities, that enabled him to transfer the trade that he secured to the establishment of the firm of Moreland Bros. & Crane. On February 16, 1882, he married Miss Susie B. Treadwell, only daughter of Chauncey and Marcia Treadwell of Wheatland Township, Hillsdale County. One child was born to them, Robert T. Moreland, January 8, 1889, the mother yielding up her life for the birth of her baby, eight days after, January 16, 1889. James H. Moreland died April 14, 1895. He was the victim of an accident, which, through the severity of the injury, necessitated the amputation of his limb. The injury had progressed to a point where medical science was powerless to aid him, and he passed away at Asheville, N. C., where he was removed in a hope that the change might benefit his condition. Fanny J. Moreland, first child and only daughter of James and Ann Moreland, was born in the City of Adrian, April 21, 1850. She was educated in the public schools of Adrian and Hudson, Mich., and after graduation, became a teacher, which vocation she has successfully followed for a number of years, being now employed in the public schools of Adrian. William T. Moreland, fourth child of James and Ann Moreland, was born in Hudson, July 7, 1864. He was educated in the public schools of Hudson and at Eastman's Business College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. Upon the establishment of the firm of Moreland Bros. & Crane, in July, 1881, he was employed by this firm as shipping clerk. He has remained with this institution, advancing through the different positions; and at present is in charge of the oil and gasoline department. On May 11, 1899, W. T. Moreland married Miss Carrie E. Sword, only child of Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Sword of Adrian, Mich. One child blessed this union, Edwin Stephenson Moreland, being born in Adrian, Nov. 2, 1900.

Page  156 156 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL WILLIAM ALLEN UNDERWOOD, oldest son of Daniel Kingsley Underwood and Maria Agnes (Mitchell) Underwood, was born at Adrian, Michigan, November 16, 1846. He was educated in the public schools at Adrian, and finished his preparatory course for college at Williston Seminary at Easthampton, Mass. In the fall of 1863 he entered Yale College as a freshman, and remained through his freshman and part of his sophomore year, when he returned home,.: — and the following autumn en1tered the University of Michigan as a sophomore and rem: ained during the sophomore and junior years. He was very... anxious to go into business, i: and at his earnest solicitation his father permitted him to leave college at the end of the junior year, but would not hear of his entering into any business, insisting on his becoming a lawyer. The result was, that he entered the office of Eldredge & Walker, in Adrian, as a student in the summer of 1867, and went to the Law School at Ann Arbor in the fall of that year. After being there a time he determined William Allen Underwood. that he could not to the best advantage carry on his studies at Ann Arbor, for some reasons which seemed to be well known to himself. After consultation with his father, he returned to Adrian and again entered the office of Eldredge & Walker in January of 1868, and remained there until September of 1868, when he entered the Law School at Albany, New York, taking the full course, graduating there in 1869, and there being admitted to the Bar of the Supreme Court of the State of New York. After graduating he returned to Adrian and during the next few months continued his studies in the office where he had previously been. He was admitted to the bar at Adrian, and then for a short time took up his residence in Chicago. While in Chicago he became ill, and for several months was able to do but very little, with the result that he returned home and after a few months entered the office of the late Consider A. Stacy as a clerk. This was in 1871. He remained with Judge Stacy as a clerk for two years, and then entered the firm, composed of Judge Stacy and his son Scoville, and upon Scoville's retiring in 1876, a new firm was formed called Stacy & Underwood, which continued until sometime in 1879, when it was dissolved and Mr. Under

Page  157 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 157 wood began business for himself. He continued by himself until the fall of 1881, when he entered partnership with the late Seth Bean and the firm was called Bean & Underwood. This continued until some time in 1884, when the Hon. Victor H. Lane was admitted to the firm and the firm became Bean, Underwood & Lane, and so remained until the 1st of July, 1885. In 1874 Mr. Underwood was appointed by the late Chief Justice Waite of the United States Supreme Court, to be Register in Bankruptcy for the Second Congressional District of Michigan. He continued to hold this office until the spring of 1876, when he resigned, and in the fall of that year was elected Prosecuting Attorney of Lenawee County, and was re-elected in 1878. In 1884 Mr. Underwood was one of the two delegates from the Second Congressional District of Michigan to the National Republican Convention at Chicago. During the last three or four years previous to 1885 Mr. Underwood had been developing, in addition to his legal practice, a business for people in the East throughout the West, and that took such a course that he was solicited by some of his clients to establish himself in Detroit, as being a better place from which to carry on that class of business. The result was that in July, 1885, he moved to Detroit and entered into partnership with Henry M. Cheever, Esq., of the Detroit Bar. This partnership lasted for only seven months, when it was dissolved and Mr. Underwood started in business for himself. His stay in Detroit, however, was comparatively short. He then removed East, remaining a short time in Boston, and finally, in 1889 settled in New York. In 1891 he opened a law office there, where he still continues as a member of the firm of Underwood, Van Vorst & Hoyt. In 1870 Mr. Underwood married Miss Virginia Garland Deas, a daughter of the late Col. Geo. Deas of the United States Regular Army, and his wife, Mrs. Elizbeth Garland Deas. Two children have been born to them-Elizabeth Garland Underwood and Ethel Virginia Underwood, both born in the old Underwood homestead at the corner of Broad and Church streets in Adrian, being the same house where Mr. Underwood was born-both of whom are still living. In this connection it may be of interest to say that this house was begun by Dr. Underwood previous to his marriage, and he and his wife began housekeeping there. Both their children were born there. Dr. and Mrs. Underwood both died and were buried from there. Both of Mr. William A. Underwood's children were born there, and from that house Mr. Underwood's only brother, Charles, was buried. ALFONSO R. TAYER was born in Clarkson, Monroe County, N. Y., May 5, 1835. His father, Gersham R. Tayer, was born in Stephentown, New York June 28, 1793, and when young learned the blacksmith's trade. About the year 1815 he married Delia D. Perry, who was born in Rhode Island, May 10, 1796. About this time

Page  158 158 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL he removed to Clarkson, Monroe County, N. Y., where he established a shop for forging out plowshares to be used in excavating and constructing the Erie Canal. He resided there until the fall of 1835, when he came to Michigan and located on Section 5, in Madson. The land had not been improved enough to produce sufficient to support his family, and he erected a blacksmith shop and did a great deal of much-needed work for the settlers. He cleared up his land as soon as. possible, and raised a family of ten children to man and womanhood. He erected a good dwelling and commodious barns, and fenced and improved the farm to a high state of cultivation. He resided there until his death, Aug. 5, 1853. His wife, Delia D. Tayer, died at the old home in Madison, in October, 1876, in the 86th year of her age. Alfonso R. Tayer was always a farmer, and ran the home farm for many years. He was domestic in his habits, Alfonso R. Tayer. and honorable and earnest in all his relations of life. September 19, 1860, he married Miss Julia F. Sword, daughter of James and Ruth Sword of Adrian, and one son was born to them, Fred S., born in Madison, October 17, 1872. Mrs. Julia F. Tayer was born in Harmony, N. Y., September 1, 1833, and died in Madison, this county, April 10, 1876. In January, 1877, he was married the second time to Miss Mary P. Sword, also a daughter of James and Ruth Sword, and one daughter was born to them; Harriet Ursula, born in Adrian, December 9, 1878. Miss Mary P. Sword was born in Harmony, N. Y., May 16, 1837. Her father, James Sword, was a native of England. He came to the United States about the year 1817. and settled in East Bloomfield, Ontario County, N. Y. There he learned the potter's trade, and made earthenware for several years. In the fall of 1837 he came to Michigan, first settling in Rome, this county, but he removed to Adrian in 1839, and ever after resided there. He followed his trade in Adrian for some time, but finally established a brick yard, which he operated for several years, and the business is still being carried on by his youngest son, E. C. Sword. When a boy, James Sword entered the British army as a drummer boy, and participated in many great battles. He afterwards served as a soldier, and the last engagement he took part in was the battle of

Page  159 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 159 Orthez, fought February 27, 1814. The British army was commanded by the Duke of Wellington, while the French army was under the command of Napoleon. His father was a colonel in the British army. October 28, 1821, James Sword married Miss Ruth Durham, and they raised a family of ten children, all born in the State of New York. James Sword was born at Margate, Kent, England, January 14, 1795, and died in Adrian in April, 1878. Mrs. Ruth Sword was born in Vermont, October 24, 1800, and died in Adrian in August, 1884. COL. BENJAMIN F. GRAVES was born in Charlotte, Chautauqua County, N. Y., May 19, 1839. His father, Zurr H. Graves, was born in Onondaga County, N. Y., in 1818, and came from sturdy stock, as the family consisted of 19 children, and with one exception all made men over six feet in height. Zurr Graves' father, Waters Graves, was a giant in stature, a master builder in Colerain, Mass., and was the father of nineteen children. In early life Zurr Graves was a blacksmith, but afterwards studied law, and in 1845 went to DeKalb County, Ill., but afterwards moved to Butler County, Iowa, where he practiced until 1862, when he enlisted in the Third Iowa Battery. After serving about two years, he was wounded and so badly disabled that he was discharged from the service. He died at Panama, Shelby County, Iowa, April 11, 1893. He had a brother, Almiron Graves, who was a blacksmith, and lived to be 87 years old. He was the father of twelve boys and six girls. All his sons weighed two hundred pounds and upwards. All were blacksmiths, together with the remarkable fact that nearly every one of the eighteen children had double teeth, upper and lower, both front and back. He also had a brother, John W. Graves, of Medina, N. Y., who was one of the leading lawyers of Western New York. He was one of the eminent men of his section, and was appointed Assessor of Internal Revenue by President Lincoln. In the spring of 1838 Zurr H. Graves married Miss Alvira Fisher, daughter of Benjamin and Delight Fisher of Charlotte, N. Y., and became the parents of two sons, the youngest of whom, Roswell W., was a member of the 103d N. Y. Infantry, served about three years in the great Rebellion, and died in the service in November, 1864. Mrs. Alvira (Fisher) Graves was a native of New York, and died in Charlotte, that State, about 1880. Capt. B. F. Graves passed his early years upon a farm. His limited circumstances compelled him to enter upon the active duties of life with a common school education, leaving the high school of Sinclairville, in Chautauqua County, in 1859. For the following eighteen months he was actively engaged in lumbering in Warren County, Penn. Early in the spring of 1861 his lumber interests called him to Pittsburg, Pa., where he found himself in the midst of active preparations for war. Recruits were being rapidly

Page  160 160 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL enlisted, companies and regiments were leaving for their rendezvous, and on his way home via Cleveland, early in April, he enlisted in Co. G, 19th Ohio, and went with that regiment through its West Virginia campaign, participating in the battle of Rich Mountain. At the end of five months, that regiment, having completed its term of enlistment, was mustered out, and Mr. Graves at once entered the service again as a private in the 2d Ohio cavalry, and with that regiIndependence, Mo., Pea Ridge, and a dozen other engagements that took place in Southwestern Missouri, Arkansas, Indian Territory and Kansas. Early in 1863 in a cavalry charge made by th at regiment near Elks Mills, I. T., he was badly injured, and when the regimenet returned to Columbus, Ohi o, in that year t o recruit, he was discharged for disability.n During his service with that regiment he was three times promoted for gallant conduct in action. After leavto Adrian, Capt.ng Graves this regiment he again ente red the service with a captain's commission, but finding he was no longer fit for active service, he resigned and commenced the study of law. He was admitted to the bar at general term, Buffalo, N.Y., and in 1871 removed with his family to Bit, No. 45. He Rapids, in this State, where he entered upon the active duties of his profession. He was three times elected prosecuting attorney of Mecosta County, and held the office of city attorney of Big Rapids for three terms. He was a member of the board of education in that city and agent for the reformatory institutions of the State He moved to Adrian in February, 1879.Michigan Since coming to Adrian, Capt. Graves has been employed in his profession, but is an active, public-spirited man, ready to help in the promotion of any enterprise that promises to aid the community. He is an enthusiastic Grand Army man, and served four terms as commander of Woodbury Post, No. 45. He was a delegate from this department to the Portland encampment in 1885. He was Judge Advocate of the Department of Michigan, G. A. R., during Washington Gardner's administration as Department Commander. In 1892 he was Member of the Council of Administration of the National Encampment at Washington. He was one of the Managers of the Michigan Soldiers' Home and

Page  161 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 161 resigned in 1893 to take the position of Commandant, which he held for three years. He is now a resident of -Adrian, and successfully practicing his profession. He is also vice president of the Adrian Knitting Works Company. June 22, 1864, Col. B. F. Graves married Miss Elizabeth Bailey, daughter of John and Samantha (Eldridge) Bailey of Warsaw, N. Y., by whom he had five children, as follows: Clinton Bailey, born in Gainesville, N. Y., January 26, 1867, now a resident of Adrian; Benton F., born same place August 3, 1868, married Miss Mary Goodrich, of Nashville, Tenn., and died in El Paso, Texas, December 5, 1895; Florence Elizabeth, born in Warsaw, N. Y., October 8, 1869, married Elmer Clement, of Adrian, August 30, 1893, and is the mother of two daughters, Dorothy and Elizabeth. Mr. Clement died at Windsor, Canada, August 7, 1899. Grace Louise, born in Big Rapids, Mich., and died in infancy; Mary Ida, born same place, died in infancy. Mrs. Elizabeth (Bailey) Graves was born in Gainesville, N. Y., June 12, 1838, and died in Big Rapids, Michigan, March 6, 1876. June 6, 1877, Mr. Graves married Miss Elizabeth Kinney, daughter of Samuel K. and Mary Kinney, of Seneca, this county. No children have been born to them. Miss Elizabeth Kinney was born June 6, 1849, in Seneca, this county. Her parents were pioneers. Mr. Kinney came to Lenawee County in 1828, a lad ten years of age, and always lived in Seneca, but died in Grand Rapids. November 29, 1846, Mr. Kinney married Miss Mary Secor of Seneca, whose parents were also pioneers of that township. DR. JULIUS E. WESTGATE was born in Reading, Hillsdale County, Mich., May 27, 1849. His father, Henry G. Westgate, was born in Niagara County, N. Y., December 18, 1825, and resided there until he was about seven years old, when he came to Michigan with his parents, in 1832. He was the son of Sylvanus and Esther (Haviland) Westgate, who settled on Sections 26 and 27, that year. Sylvanus Westgate, probably a native of New York, was a pioneer in Niagara County, New York, and also in Raisin, this county. He died in Raisin in May, 1871. His wife Esther, who was also a native of New York, was the mother of thirteen children, nine sons and four daughters. She died in Raisin in January, 1883. Henry G. Westgate was educated in the district schools of Raisin, being compelled to give his attention more to the work of clearing the land and providing for a home, than to mental culture or scientific research. He was reared in the Quaker church. His parents being Quakers, he took kindly to the tenets of that faith, and for many years filled the sacred office of preacher, which he followed until about 1873, when owing to the new tenets of "sanctification" becoming a doctrine in the church, he withdrew, and united with the 11

Page  162 162 162 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL -Methodist Episcpal church at Palmyra, afterwards serving several years as circuit preacher. March 16, 1847, Henry G. Westgate married Miss Hannah H. Lovejoy, daughter of Joseph and Martha Lovejoy, Mrs. Lydia J. Westgate. Dr. Julius E. Westgate. Dr. C. H. Westgate. Mrs. Laura C. Westgate.

Page  163 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 163 of Raisin. They were the parents of four children, Dr. Julius E. being the oldest. Mrs. Hannah H. Westgate was born in Augusta, Maine, July 11, 1828, came to Michigan with her parents in 1843, and died in Detroit, Mich., January 27, 1898. Dr. Julius E. Westgate, the subject of this sketch, attended the district schools of his neighborhood, in Hillsdale County, and Lenawee County, until he '1 K / Residence of Dr. J. E. Westgate. on Section 8, Adrian Township. was about fifteen years old. He then attended the Raisin Valley Seminary for one year. In the fall of 1865 he commenced teaching school in this county and followed it for six years. In 1871 he purchased a farm in Wheatfield, Ingham County, where he remained until 1878, when he sold out, returned to Lenawee County and purchased a farm in Adrian township, where he lived until 1887, when he commenced the study of medicine with Dr. F. R. Seager, of Adrian, and graduated at the Michigan College of Medicine and Surgery, Detroit, March 14, 1890. He practiced medicine in Detroit for ten years, when, owing to failing health, he again returned to Lenawee County and purchased a farm of 160 acres on Section 8, in Adrian township, where he now resides. April 30, 1871, Dr. Julius E. Westgate married Miss Lydia J. Shumway, daughter of Josiah and Lydia (Mason) Shumway, of Ogden, this county, and they have had two children, as follows: Ellen Florene, born in Wheatfield, Ingham County, Mich., December 17, 1876, met with accidental death in Detroit, being burned while practicing for a Christmas cantata at

Page  164 164 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL the school house, December 19, 1889; Clarence Henry, born in Wheatfield, Ingham County, Mich., September 28, 1880. Graduate of Detroit Medical College, now a practicing physician, married Miss Laura C. Davis, daughter of the Rev. Lyman E. and Ella (Hood) Davis, of Shaftsburgh, Pa. Mrs. Lydia J. Westgate was born in Fairfield, Lenawee County, Mich., April 15, 1848. Her father, Josiah Shumway, a native of Connecticut, born in 1795, was a soldier in the war of 1812, was a pioneer of this county, but died near Lagrange, Indiana, October 14, 1847. He was the son of Isaac and Patience Shumway, natives of Connecticut. In 1842 Josiah Shumway married Miss Lydia Mason, daughter of Bernard and Martha (Fisk) Mason of Battle Creek, Mich., and they had two children, Mrs. Westgate being the only survivor. Mrs. Lydia Shumway was born in Chelsea, Mass., August 5, 1803, came to Michigan in 1839, and died August 6, 1871. WENDELL A. MACE was born in Haverstraw, N. Y., January 14, 1818. He came to Michigan with his parents in 1837, and finally settled in Gorham township, Fulton County, Ohio, just south of the Michigan State line. His father, Wendell Mace, a native of New York, learned the blacksmith trade. About the year 1822 he removed from Haverstraw to Lysander, Onondaga County, where he followed his trade until he came to Michigan in 1837. He built a log shop in Gorham, and did blacksmithing for the settlers in two states for a number of years. He died, aged about 75 years. About the year 1812 he married Mary McDuffie, and they had four children, W. A. being the third son. She died in Morenci, aged 81 years. Her ancestors were German and Irish. Wendell A. Mace, subject of this sketch, is the oldest resident in the vicinity of Morenci Village, having resided either in the village or within six miles of it for sixty-four years. Until 1858 he resided in Gorham township, six miles west of Morenci, and followed farming. On his removal to Morenci, in 1858, he purchased a livery stable of George Briggs, and in the fall of 1860 he purchased the Exchange hotel, and became interested in a stage line between Morenci and Clayton. In 1866 he disposed of his hotel business. That year the firm of Mace & Gates was organized, and a hardware store was opened in Morenci. After a short and successful career, Mr. George Acker was taken in as a partner, and dry goods were added to the stock. This firm occupied four store rooms, and owned them all. After about seven years of successful trade, Mr. Mace withdrew. Since that time he has given his attention to his farming interests, owning three good farms. He possesses a comfortable home in the village, where he has lived for many years. Nov. 25, 1842, Wendell A. Mace married Miss Amanda Bush, daughter of Christopher and Sarah Bush, of Medina, this county, and they had five children, as

Page  165 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 165 follows: Sarah Jane, born in Gorham, Fulton County, Ohio, Sept. 6, 1843, married Z. Layton, had three children, and died Feb. 21, 1883; Mary Ellen, born same place, Nov. 2, 1845, married Aretus Holmes and resides in Morenci; Olivia, born the same place, Sept. 6, 1847, married June 4, 1873, George W. Acker, has one child, and resides in Morenci; George L., born same place, August 13, 1849, married Dec. 8, 1874, Miss Jennie Starkweather, and they had one child, Georgia L., born Nov. 19, 1876, married Nov. 30, 1897, Casper M. Rorick, and has two children. George L. Mace died in Morenci, March 30, 1877; Joy, born same place, July 23, 1852, and died Sept. 9, 1853, Mrs. Amanda (Bush) Mace was born in Dutchess County, N. Y., March 6, 1825, came to Michigan with her parents in 1836, first settling near Adrian, but afterwards locating in Medina, and finally in Morenci. Mrs. Mace died in Morenci, March 21, 1887. Mr. Mace cast his first vote for Van Buren in 1840. He has voted the Democratic ticket ever since, and hopes to live to see another Democratic president. THOMAS R. HOLLAND was born in Buckinghamshire, England, July 29, 1811, and was the son of Thomas R. and Anna Holland, of Buckinghamshire, where they always lived until called away. Mr. Holland, the subject of this sketch, lived in England until his twenty-first year, when in 1832 he emigrated to America, and arrived in the then territory of Michigan in June of that year. He first went to the village of Vistula (now Toledo), where he lived until 1836. He was a resident there during the "Toledo War," remembers Gov. Mason, and often saw the commander-inchief of the army, Gen. J. W. Brown of Tecumseh. In the spring of 1835 he went to Monroe and took up 80 acres of land situated in town 9 s. range 3 e., the w. 5 of the n. e. / of Sec. 24, but when the "Toledo War" was all over, and the final result of the conflict was settled he found that instead of being in Michigan he was in Ohio, and about two and three-quarters miles south of the Michigan line. The farm is now a part of Royalton Township, in Fulton County, Ohio. Mr. Holland resided on this farm until 1862, when he sold out, and has ever since resided in Fairfield. July 7, 1836, Mr. Holland married at Perrysburg, Ohio, Miss Deborah M. Thompson, by whom he had five children, as follows: Annie Maria, born in Lucas County, Ohio, May 21, 1837, married Henry Richey, was the mother of nine children, and died in Morenci Oct. 28, 1885; Ezekiel Uze, born in Royalton, Ohio, December 18, 1839, and now resides in Amboy, Ohio; Louisa Ann, born in Royalton, Ohio, August 18, 1842, married George Herrick in 1862. Mr. Herrick was a soldier in the Rebellion, and died in the service in 1864. She was married a second time to Joseph Southworth. John Philo, born in Royalton, December 26, 1844, a soldier in the Rebellion, now resides in Royalton;

Page  166 166 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Esther Jane, born in Royalton, May 31, 1847, married Lewis Miller, was the mother of six children, and died in Seneca, October 8, 1892. Mrs. Deborah Maria Holland died in Royalton, May 16, 1849. May 23, 1852, Mr. Holland married Mary Ann Boyce, who died at Royalton, August 25, 1861, without issue. April 30, 1862, Mr. Holland married Elizabeth C. Hindee, of Fairfield. She was the daughter of Andrew and Rosina (Moore) Hazlett, and came to Michigan in 1852, settling in Fairfield. Her father, Andrew Hazlett, was born near Philadelphia, about 1762, and was a revolutionary soldier. He participated in many of the memorable struggles. His father, mother and child were killed, and sister tomahawked by the Indians. Mr. Hazlett always lived in Pennsylvania, where he died in 1833. Mrs. Elizabeth C. Holland was born in Fairfield, Westmoreland County, Pa., and came to Michigan with her first husband, William Hindee. CHARLES F. GUSTIN was born in Columbus, Chenango County, N. Y., April 11, 1857, and came to Michigan in May 1884. His father, Levi Gustin, was born in Sherburne, Chenango County, N. Y., April 21, 1821. He always lived in Chenango County, where he learned the stone mason's trade and owned a small farm. Of his ancestry there is very little known, but evidently the family came to New York from Connecticut. He died at Columbus, July 18, 1899. September 16, 1842, Levi Gustin married Miss Mary A. Fenton, daughter of Stephen and Mercy (Myers) Fenton, of Chenango County, N. Y., and they had nine children, as follows: Lucy A., born January 13, 1844; Mercy L., born March 16, 1845; Helen M., born September 28, 1846; Maria, born December 28, 1847; Alphonzo D., born February 13, 1849, died April, 10, 1849; Mary L., born May 31, 1850; William W., born August 18, 1851. Charles F. was a twin, his sister dying in infancy. Mrs. Mary A. (Fenton) Gustin was born in Cambridge, Middlesex County, Mass., December 16, 1817, and resides with her son in Madison, this county. Her parents were natives of Middlesex County, Mass., but emigrated to Brookfield, Madison County, N. Y. Her father, Stephen Fenton, was born June 29, 1791, and died in Otsego County, N. Y., May 11, 1870. Mercy (Myers) Fenton was born in 1787, and died in Madison County, N. Y., July 13, 1826. Mr. Fenton was three times married, the second being Lucinda Shumway, whose ancestors were Huguenots, the third, Philena Cutter, and was the father of nine children. Charles F. Gustin, subject of this sketch, lived in Chenango and Otsego Counties all his life till he came to Michigan. He was brought up a farmer, but learned to make cheese, which business he followed for many years, during the season. In the winter he sold nursery stock, and thus cultivated a taste for horticulture. He was educated in the country schools and Morris Academy, in Otsego County.

Page  167 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 167 Soon after coming to Michigan he engaged in the nursery business, and purchased land on Section 10, in Madison. Beginning in a small way, he has, by perseverance and close attention to his own affairs, succeeded remarkably well, and now omns 140 acres of land, and Charles F. Gustin's Residence on Section 9, Madison. one of the most desirable farm homes in Madison township, on Section 9, it being known in the 50's as the old Prairie Cottage race course farm, the finest one mile track in Michigan at that time. He now grows and markets from 50,000 to 75,000 trees annually, and will increase the business now that he has more land suitable for cultivation. October 3, 1882, Charles F. Gustin married Miss Sarah R. Turner, daughter of James P. and Harmony (Daly) Turner, of Blissfield, this county, and they have had two children, as follows: Newel Wolcott, born December 23, 1885, died November 14, 1886; Beulah Elida, born January 18, 1887. Mrs. Sarah R. (Turner) Gustin was born in Portage, Wood County, Ohio, August 2, 1862. Her father, James P. Turner, was born in Ridgeway, Orleans County, N. Y., and died in Blissfield, Mich., in 1899. Her mother, Harmony (Daly) Turner, was born at Lockport, N. Y., Nov. 17, 1823, and died in Blissfield, this county, May 7, 1889. They settled

Page  168 168 ILLUSTRATED HISTOIRY AND BIOGRAPHICAL I i ft 11. I/ ~t This Shows a Large Block of Trees in Mr. Gustin's Nursery. in Blissfield in 1864. James P. Turner's ancestors came from Massachusetts, his mother being Miss Sarah Adams, a cousin of John Quincy Adams. FRANKLIN TITUS was born in Rensselaerville, Albany county, N. Y., June 1, 1827, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1830. His father, William Titus, was born in the same place, in 1802. He was raised a farmer and lived in Albany county, where he owned a farm. He was the son of Richard and Elizabeth (Haight) Titus, who were Quakers, and born near Hartford, Connecticut. William Titus married Miss Elizabeth Snyder, daughter of Ephriam and Mary (Niver) Snyder, of Rensselaerville, N. Y., about the year 1822, and they had six children, Franklin being the only survivor. William Titus owned a farm in Albany county, and lived there until the fall of 1829, when he sold his farm and started for Michigan. He was nearly all winter getting from Albany to Buffalo with a team of horses. His family then consisted of his wife and two children. In the spring of 1830 he shipped

Page  169 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 169 his team, wagon and all his possessions on the old steamboat "Superior," and arrived in Detroit in good time. He had intended to settle near Ann Arbor, but meeting Darius Comstock he was persuaded to come to Adrian. He first located on Section 27, in Adrian, where he resided for about six years. He then sold his improvements, and moved upon land he had taken up on Section 33, in Adrian, where he died January 1, 1838. His wife was left on a new farm with her family, but she succeeded in clearing up the land, and bringing up her children. She was indeed a pioneer, and realized to the fullest extent the trials and hardships of a new country. Her ancestors came from Holland, and her grandfather, Jeremiah Snyder, was a captain in the Revolutionary war. He was taken prisoner and carried to Quebec, where he was held two years, when he escaped and returned home. She died at her home in Adrian, August 22, 1887, in her 89th year. Franklin Titus, subject of this sketch, has lived in Lenawee county 73 years, on the same farm that he now owns, two miles west of Adrian. He has seen Adrian grow up out of the woods and stumps, and has watched its progress from almost the first house. He can hardly realize that such a transformation could have taken place in his lifetime. March 8, 1853, Franklin Titus married Miss Cynthia M. Perkins, daughter of Stephen and Freelove (Turpeny) Perkins, of Hudson, and they had five children as follows: William F., born January 19, 1855, died in April, 1859. Emerson G., born February 20th, 1857; married February 12, 1879, Miss Lottie A. Gould, of Schnectady, N. Y., and has three children as follows: Edith L., born Augut 30th, 1880, married Henry J. Haig, January, 1897, and has one child, Effie A., born October 2d, 1883. Eva C., born September 10, 1890. Emerson G. resides in Adrian township. Elmer E., born August 25, 1861; married October 2, 1888, Minnie May Bugbee, and has one child, Franklin E, born December 29, 1893, and resides in Adrian township. Effie Alla, born August 3d, 1865, married May 29, 1889, Frank Wickham; has two children: Lena B., born April 6, 1891; Andrew T., born July 6th, 1893, and resides in the city of Adrian. Urs. Cvnthia M. (Perkins) Titus was born in Dover, Lenawee County, Mich., October 4th, 1837, and died in Adrian, May 4th, 1877. Her parents came to Michigan in 1833, first settled in Dover, and afterwards went to Hudson, where they died. EDGAR F. CLEVELAND was born in Adrian, Mich., July 21, 1865, and has always resided there. His father, Charles NM. Cleveland, was also born in Adrian, November 2d, 1836, and resided there continuously until his demise. In his youth he mastered the art of telegraphy, and for a few years he acted as telegraph operator, but most of his active life was passed in merchandising. He died at his

Page  170 170 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL home in Adrian, June 6, 1895. He was the third child and second son of Joseph H. and Julia A. Cleveland, who were very early settlers in Adrian. Joseph H. Cleveland was born in Athens, Greene County, N. Y., June 27, 1809, and was the son of John Cleveland, of Hillsdale, Columbia County, N. Y., who was born December 22, 1786, and married Miss Mary Scutt, also born in Athens, February 20th, 1791. Mary Scutt's ancestors came from Holland, and her grandfather, Philip Scutt, was a captain in the American Army during the Revolution. The Cleveland family in the United States, so far as known, sprung from Moses Cleveland, who came from Ipswich, England, in 1635, and settled in Woburn, Mass. Joseph H. Cleveland came to Adrian in October, 1831, and at once engaged in merchandising. He was a very competent and energetic man, and was soon recognized as a leading spirit among the new settlers. He was foremost and active in opening roads, building bridges, etc., and took a lively interest in making Adrian a centre for travel and trade in those days of emigration and settlement. He was town clerk in 1833, and was a potent force in locating the county seat at Adrian. No man did more to obtain the location of the Michigan Southern railroad at Adrian. He was a volunteer in the first call for troops for the "Black Hawk" war, but did not participate in the "Toledo War." He was the first sheriff elected in Lenawee county, in 1836, under the original state constitution, and was re-elected in 1838. In 1842 he became superintendent of the Michigan Southern railroad, and filled that position until 1846, when the state disposed of the road. During the balance of his active life, he was engaged in merchandising in Adrian and Chicago. He died in Adrian, October 23d, 1888. February 4, 1830, Joseph H. Cleveland married Miss Julia A. Yaple, born October 20, 1812, in Middletown, Delaware county, N. J., who became the mother of six children. [See History and Biographical Record of Lenawee County, Vol. 1, page 256.] May 3d, 1858, Charles M. Cleveland married Miss Susan A. Jennings, daughter of Russell and Laura (Tracy) Jennings, of Adrian, Mich, and they had five children, Edgar F. being the third child and son. Mrs. C. M. Cleveland was born in Ontario, Wayne' County, N. Y., December 27, 1839, and came to Michigan with her parents in 1842. Her father was a native of New York, and died in Adrian in 1849. Her mother was born in Rutland, Vt., and is still living, at the age of 89 years. Edgar F. Cleveland was educated in the public schools of Adrian. After completing his schooling in 1883, he was appointed Deputy Oil Inspector at Jonesville, Mich., by State Inspector E. J. Smith, but resigned in 1884, to enter his father's store, and has been actively engaged in mercantile pursuits ever since. He has made a success of his business, and has been for several years one of the responsible and hustling young business men of Adrian. He also has a liking for agricultural pursuits, carries on a small farm in Madison, and a large and excellent one in Rome, this county. June 3, 1885, Edgar F. Cleveland married Miss Jane

Page  171 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 171 Hedges, daughter of James N. and Sarah Jane (Mullings) Hedges. Two children were born to them as follows: Oliver H., born in Adrian, Mich., October 22d, 1886; J. Beatrice, born August 2, 1888, died March 22, 1889. Mrs. Edgar F. Cleveland was born in Luton, England, February 12, 1865. Her father, James N. Hedges, was was born in Luton, England, in January, 1839, came to America in September, 1868, lived in Upton, Mass., until coming to Adrian, Mich., in 1881. Mr. Hedges learned the machinists' trade, and is the inventor of many valuable and useful machines for braiding straw, and straw braid material. Sarah Jane (Mullings) Hedges was born in Dunstable, England, in December, 1839, and died in Foxboro, Mass., in August, 1898. She was the mother of seven children, Mrs. Cleveland being the third child of the family. CHARLES KAYNER was born in Royalton Centre, Niagara County, N. Y., August 27, 1833. His father, Dr. George Kayner, was a native of Herkimer County, and was born about the year 1805. His ancestors came from Holland and settled in New Amsterdam, now New York City, in the seventeenth century. His father, David Kayner, was a pioneer of Niagara County, where George was reared and went to school until he arrived at a suitable age, when he went to New York City and entered college to study for a physician. After graduating at the Reformed Medical College in April, 1831, he returned to Niagara County, where he practiced his profession until his death in 1835. About the year 1832 Dr. Kayner married Miss Dorcas Bowerman, daughter of Joshua and Abigail Bowerman, of Niagara County, N. Y., and they had two children, Charles and Elizabeth, who is now the wife of Ira Haviland, of Raisin, this county. Mrs. Dorcas Kayner, after the death of Dr. Kayner, married Jeremiah Westgate, and died in Raisin, this county, in 1853. She was a native of the State of New York, of Quaker lineage. Charles Kayner came to Michigan with his widowed mother and sister in 1835, and settled in Raisin, this county, where he has resided ever since. He was brought up a farmer, and has always followed agriculture, but for about ten years was employed in a saw mill at Raisin Center. In 1866 he purchased his present home farm on Section 29 in Raisin, consisting of over 100 acres, having built his own large and comfortable house, and outbuildings since his residence there. Mr. Kayner has always been an active, enterprising man, and has for many years been well considered by his fellow townsmen. He has served twelve years as justice of the peace, town treasurer for three years, township drain commissioner one year, highway commissioner fifteen years, and been four times elected a

Page  172 172 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Director of the Lenawee County Farmers' Mutual Insurance Company. August 20, 1853, Charles Kayner married Miss Phebe Alice Haviland, daughter of Wing and Betsy Haviland, of Raisin, this county, and they had four children, as follows: Chester G., born June 17, 1854; married Ida Moore, daughter of Samuel and Mary Moore, and they have one daughter, who resides in Adrian; Ida Jane, born January 3, 1856; married George L. Waite, and is the mother of three children; Edwin, born January 7, 1859, a farmer of Oil Mrs. Ann Kayner. Charles Kayner. Raisin, married Miss Eva Drown, and they have two children; Bertha May, born August 18, 1875; married Alfred Crabb, of Fairfield, and they have one child. Mrs. Phebe Alice Kayner was born in Niagara County, N. Y., April 2, 1834. Her parents were Quakers, and were pioneers in Raisin township. She died July 21, 1880. May 23, 1882, he married Mrs. Ann (Brittain) Kent, daughter of Abram W. and Harriet (Crane) Brittain, and they have had two children, as follows: Jessie E., born -January 5, 1884, died April 28, 1895; Nellie A., born September 27, 1885, a student in the Adrian High School. Mrs. Ann Kayner was born in Adrian, December 12, 1843. Her father, A. W. Brittain, was born in Huntington, Luzerne Co., Pa., March 10, 1810. [For full sketch of Mr. Brittain's life see Whitney & Bonner's History and Biographical Record of Lenawee County, Vol. 2, page 100.] Mr. Brittain died at his home in Adrian township, March 2, 1884. Mrs. Harriet (Crane) Brittain still resides at her home in Adrian township.

Page  173 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN.:173 EDWARD W. BEERS was born in Knowlesville, Orleans County, New York, May 4, 1827. His father, Charles W. Beers, was born in Romulus, Seneca County, N. Y., August 4, 1797, where he lived until the spring of 1821, when he moved to Orleans County. He resided there until the fall of 1831. During the summer of 1825 he came to Michigan and prospected for land through Wayne, WashMrs. Hannah B. Beers. Edward W. Beers. tenaw and Oakland Counties, but did not locate. In the fall of 1831 he came to Michigan with his family, and settled three miles southeast of the village of Ypsilanti, where he lived until the fall of 1833. He then came to Lenawee County and located 80 acres of land on Section 19 in Adrian, where he lived most of the time until his death, which occurred June 5, 1874. December 7, 1817, he married Miss Keziah Wade, daughter of Jephtha and Sarah Wade, of Romulus, New York, by whom he had nine children, Edward W. being the third son and fourth child. There were six boys and three girls, seven of whom lived to become men and women. Mrs. Keziah Beers was born in Morristown, New Jersey, August 16, 1800, and died in Adrian, Febrnary 15, 1872. Her father, Jephtha Wade, was born in New Jersey, his ancestors coming from Wales. He died in Seneca County, New York, about the year 1807. Her mother, Sarah Wade, was born in New Jersey, and died in Charlotte, Michigan in 1852. Edward W. Beers lived with his parents until his twenty-second year, when he commenced working by the month on a farm, and continued until the fall of 1851, when he went to California. He

Page  174 174 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL took the Panama route, and sailed from New York with 1,600 passengers, on board the old steamship Georgia. When about the third day out, nearly 1,000 of the sturdy and impatient gold-seekers were most horribly sea-sick, but finally all recovered and the Isthmus was crossed. This was the first ship-load of passengers that ever rode over the Panama railroad, ten miles of which was then completed. Mr. Beers remained in California until January, 1856, when he returned to Adrian. Since that time he has given his attention to farming, and now owns his father's homestead, a place that he has called his home for about seventy years. March 27, 1856, he married Miss Hannah B. Hood, daughter of William and Louisa Hood, of Rome, this county, by whom he has had three children, as follows: Elmer S., born in Adrian township, July 27, 1857; married December 23, 1880, Miss Adella A. Gambee, daughter of George and Ellen Gambee, of Adrian. They reside in Cleveland, Ohio, and have one daughter: Ellen L., born November 3, 1881; Cass H., born August 28, 1865; married, November 26, 1891, Miss Eliza M. Sayers, daughter of George and Jane Sayers, of Adrian. They reside on the home farm on section 19, in Adrian, and have one daughter, Ethel M., born August 20, 1892. Mrs. Cass H. Beers was born in Riga, this county, August 29, 1864. Her parents came from England. Carrie L., born August 29, 1869, died July 18, 1874. Mrs. Hannah B. Beers was born in Romulus, Seneca County, New York, November 8, 1832, and came to Michigan with her parents in 1837, who settled on Section 26 in Rome. MARSHAL R. MORDEN was born August 12, 1844, on the south shore of the Bay of Quinte, opposite to the city of Belleville, Ontario, Canada. All his grandparents were United Empire Loyalists from the Delaware and Connecticut Valleys, whose property was confiscated on account of their adherence to the crown, in the war of the American Revolution. He received his education in the excellent common schools of his native land, at the Belleville Grammar School, Albert College and the University of Michigan. He graduated in medicine at the latter institution, March 30, 1871, and immediately entered into active practice, with Dr. S. P. Root, a prominent practitioner at Somerset, Hillsdale County, Mich. In September, 1875, he removed to Adrian, Mich., where he has continued in practice ever since. In July, 1871, he married Miss Sarah Jane Terrill, of Brighton, Ont., Canada. Their family consists of two sons, E. J Morden, and Dr. Esli T. Morden, both living in Adrian. He was the first medical practitioner in Lenawee County to pay especial attention to diseases of the eye and ear, and the first one to treat astigmatism and other refractive disorders with glasses. Dr. Morden has always been an ardent supporter of the doctrines of peace, and of law and

Page  175 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 175 good order. He is an outspoken and aggressive opponent of war, imperialism, and the militant spirit, as being pagan, and opposed to the spirit of true democracy, as well as of Divine teachings. Against gambling and gambling devices he he has ever been ready to support the law, as he would against theft and robbery. He regards intemperance as a disease, that should be studied and dealt with in the same charitable spirit as we would meet the requirements of insanity, or other diseases. In politics Dr. Morden was a vigorous supporter of the Republican party until what he styles the "Philippine Crime," since which time he has been an independent. He is a great lover of nature, and spends his happiest hours in the woods, along the river, and in attending his flower garden. He is an open defender of religion and supporter of the church, and favors all creeds, beliefs and organizations that teach the blessings of Divine grace. JAMES H. GREEN was born in Fairfield, Lenawee County, Michigan, February 24, 1840. His father, James Green, a native of Antrim County, Ireland, was born there May 3, 1809. He became a linen weaver, and an uncommon circumstance, in this country at least, was the fact that when he was married he had woven, in the finest fabrics, the wedding outfit of sheets, bed-ticks, pillow cases, etc., etc. He followed his trade of weaver until 1830, when he came to America, where he became a pioneer and farmer, and his later life was passed in comfort and happiness. [For fuller particulars of his life see sketch of William Green, in this volume.] James H. Green, subject of this sketch, has spent the most of his life in Fairfield, where he was educated in the district schools. He lived with his parents until he was twenty-one years old. The first of April, 1861, he started for California. He went by way of the Isthmus, and was 28 days en route to San Francisco. The cause of the delay was the piratical depredations of the rebel gunboat Alabama. This boat was seeking to destroy the commerce of the Union, and the government was obliged to send out gunboats to protect passenger and freight boats going to foreign countries. At that time the Panama boats put to sea and passed the West India Islands to the West. Upon arriving in California he at once went to work in the mines in Sierra County. He was moderately successful, and remained there for nearly three years. In 1864 he returned home and bought one hundred acres of land on Section 27, in Fairfield, where he now resides. Since that time he has added to his farm until he now owns three hundred and fifty acres. During his business career he has never given any obligation stronger than a note of hand, and he is today entirely out of debt. He has been for many years engaged in the dairy business, and owns and operated for 15 years a cheese fac

Page  176 176 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL tory in South Fairfield. He was several years engaged in buying stock for the Toledo wholesale market. He assisted in organizing the Fulton County Savings and Banking Co., of Lyons, Ohio, and is a director of the same. He has never been an office seeker, although a party man and earnest Republican. He served one term as Justice Mrs. Clarissa M. Green. James H. Green. of the Peace, and many years as School Director; is a member of I. 0. O. F. Lodge, No. 481, a charter member of Ridgeville Grange, No. 278, and was for three years fire insurance director of the Grange. March 1, 1867, James H. Green married Miss Clarissa M. Salsbury, daughter of Curtis and Margaret (Force) Salsbury, and they have had six children, as follows: Edwin, born July 19, 1868, died October 3, 1870; Hartie E., born December 10, 1871, married Miss Lena Wyman, February 28, 1895. They have two children, and reside in Fairfield; Florence C., born January 1, 1874, was married November 6, 1895, to William T. Day, and resides in Seneca; James B., born March 11, 1876, was married to Miss Blond Wyman, February 17, 1895, has two children and resides in Weston Village; Bessie M., born November 19, 1879; Burt H., born November 15, 1886. Mrs. Clarissa M. (Salsbury) Green was born in Fairfield, this county, December 13, 1845. Her father was a native of the State of

Page  177 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 177 New York, born July 14, 1819, and was a pioneer in this county. Her father died in Adrian, Nov. 6, 1848, Her mother died in Fairfield, December 16, 1873, aged 45. For her second husband she married A. A. Russell, of Fairfield. LUCIUS LILLEY was born in Homer, Cortland County, N. Y., April 21, 1823, where he resided until 1834. He then removed to Cleveland, Ohio. Capt. Reuben Lilley was born at Brimfield, Mass., February 14, 1745, and was a captain in the Revolutionary War. Zenas Lilley, 1st, was the son of Capt. Reuben Lilley, born in Brimfield, Mass., Nov. 17, 1769. Zenas Lilley, 2d, was born in Homer, N. Y., July 29, 1799, married Miss Sarah Burke, April 18, 1822. Lucius Lilley, subject of this sketch, was the son of Zenas Lilley, 2d. After going to Cleveland he engaged in the mercantile business until 1847, when he became proprietor of the Weddell House, then one of the largest and finest hotels in the West. There were no railroads, telegraph or street cars in Cleveland at that time. Mr. Lilley remained in the Weddell House until 1853, at which time he was appointed agent for the Michigan Southern and Northern Indiana Steamboat Line between Cleveland and Toledo, and the following year he went to Buffalo, where he was employed in the general ticket office of the Michigan Southern and Northern Indiana (now Lake Shore) Railroad Company for a number of years. In 1855 he engaged in the banking business in Tecumseh, where he has remained in the same business in the same room up to this time, now nearly forty-nine years. He is now president of the Lilley State Bank, and is one of the oldest, best known and conservative bankers in the State. At the meeting of the Michigan Bankers' Association in 1902 he was made Vice President for Michigan of the National Bankers' Association, to be held at New Orleans. He is also a Director of the Detroit Trust Company, one of the largest and strongest financial institutions in Michigan. His has been an active life, and he looks back to wonderful changes. He has long been considered a thorough banker and financier. February 18, 1848, Lucius Lilley married Miss Sarah McEachron, daughter of Malcolm and Sarah McEachron of Cleveland, Ohio, and they have had two children as follows: James Rayner Lilley, born in Adrian, Mich., Sept. 3, 1854, married Miss Elizabeth Daniels, daughter of Judge Daniels of Buffalo, N. Y., Oct. 12, 1882; Julia G., born in Tecumseh, Sept. 3, 1856, married Lester P. Tribou, June 17, 1880, who died July 6, 1898. December 17, 1902, she married Major Albert S. Cummins, now stationed at Fortress Monroe, Va. Mrs. Sarah A. Lilley was born February 5, 1829, at Cleveland, Ohio. Her father was a native of Scotland, and her mother, Sarah A. McEachron, was a native of England. They settled in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1829. 12

Page  178 178 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Lucius Lilley; Tecumseh.

Page  179 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 179 EZRA BERTRAM, Jr., was born in Rome, Lenawee County, Mich., October 6, 1836, being one of the first to be born in the township, and is now one of its oldest residents. His father, Ezra Bertram 2d, was born in Redding, Conn., November 5, 1806. When he was six years old, his father, Ezra Bertram 1st, was a sailor, commanded an ocean merchant ship and lived in Redding, Conn., his family consisting of his wife and four children. In 1812 he gave up his ship and removed to Roxbury, Delaware County, N. Y., and purchased a farm, engaging in the dairy business, making butter for the New York market. Here his oldest son, Ezra 2d, lived until he was sixteen years old, when he was appointed a cadet to West Point. He remained at the Academy for two years, when he was ordered to Fortress Monroe. In 1826 he resigned his commission, not liking a soldier's life. He at once returned to the State of New York and settled in Hartland. Here his first employment was in teaching school. He also learned the carpenter's trade, working summers and teaching winters, until 1833, when he came to Michigan, settling on Section 29 in Rome, this county. He entered his first land from the government, but afterwards added to it until he possessed two hundred acres. In 1870 he erected a large brick house on "Bertram Hill," on the same section where he resided until his death, August 29, 1888. He was as well known as any man in his township. He participated in the "Toledo War," was elected for several terms as Justice of the Peace, but finally practiced in the justice courts, being a successful pleader and formidable opponent to professional lawyers. His gift for "story telling" was remarkable, being able to frustrate the "other side" with apt sayings and ridiculous comparisons, often convulsing the Court and jury. In 1829 he married Miss Charlotte A. Bates, daughter of John and Aveline (Calvin) Bates, of Hartland, Orleans County, N. Y., and they became parents of twelve children, Ezra, Jr., being the fourth child and third son. Mrs. Aveline (Bates) Bertram was born in Hartland, N. Y. Her father was a soldier in the war of 1812, and was with Gen. Scott in the battle of Lundy's Lane and other important engagements. He came to Lenawee County in 1833, and died in Rome, this county, on the land he took from the government, in October, 1861. Her mother, Aveline (Calvin) Bates, was born in Rutland, Vt., and died in Rome in 1867. Ezra Bertram, Jr., subject of this sketch, was born upon the farm that he now owns, on Section 29 in Rome, and has always lived there. In September, 1861, he enlisted in Company E, Third Regiment, Michigan Cavalry, and served through the great Rebellion. Most of his service was in the Western army. The regiment was rendezvoused at Grand Rapids in the fall of 1861, proceeded to St. Louis and at once became a part of Gen. Sheridan's brigade. In the Texas campaign the regiment was in Gen. Custer's brigade. The regiment was re-enlisted in the fall of 1863, and served in all four and one-half years. He was wounded twice in battle. He was discharged at Jackson, Mich., in February, 1866. Upon his return

Page  180 180 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL from the army he returned to his home in Rome, and has given his attention to farming ever since. He now owns a fine farm of 245 acres, under a good state of cultivation. He served his township as Supervisor for two terms, three terms as Highway Commissioner, School Director, etc., etc. February 19, 1864, Ezra Bertram, Jr., married Miss Patience Daniels, daughter of Reuben and Sarah Daniels, of Woodstock, this county, and they are the parents of three children, as follows: Fred E., born November 6, 1869, married Miss Frankie Tomer, has two children and resides in Rome; Frank E., born April 2, 1873, married Miss Katie Graw, has two children, and resides in Adrian City; Minnie E., born October 7, 1878, married John H. Bates and resides in Rome. Mrs. Patience (Daniels) Bertram was born in Madison, Somerset County, Maine, November 1, 1840, and came to Michigan with her parents in 1856. Her parents were natives of Maine, and died in Robinson, Ottawa County, Michigan. Her father died in 1882, aged 72. Her mother died August 19, 1899, aged 86 years. JAMES SERVICE, Jr., was born in Philadelphia, Pa., January 5, 1818, a few days after his mother arrived from Scotland. His father, James Service, was a native of Scotland. [For his record see John Service's sketch in this volume.] August 5, 1841, James Service, Jr., married Miss Elizabeth Hardy, daughter of John Hardy, of Edinburg, Scotland, and they had eight children, as follows: Andrew J., born in Canandaigua, N. Y., April 7, 1842, resides in Fairfield; Elizabeth, born same place, April 3, 1844, died September 20, 1848; John H., born same place, January 6, 1846, married Hannah C. Jackson, daughter of David and Caroline (Whitney) Jackson, who have five children, as follows: Frank, born in Seneca, this county, July 28, 1871; Elizabeth, born same place, September 8, 1873, married R. D. Whitney, resides in Wisconsin; Burt J., born same place, March 3, 1875; Eugene J., born same place, Nov. 22, 1876; Charles, born same place, May 22, 1887. Mrs. Hannah C. Service was born in Shelby, Orleans County, N. Y., December 3, 1845, and died in Seneca, this county, in October, 1888; James, born June 7, 1848, and died March 17, 1862; Emma, born same place, November 27, 1849. [For her family relation, see Solomon Force's record in this volume.] -Clarissa, born in Fairfield, this county, October 1, 1855, died September 19, 1881; Janet, born same place, June 24, 1857, married Thos. J. Pickles, is the mother of four children, and resides in Fairfield; George, born in same place, June 26, 1861, resides in Fairfield. Mrs. Elizabeth Service was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, February 15, 1817, and died in Fairfield, this county, May 27, 1872. She was the only member of her family that ever came to America. One of her brothers was a soldier in the English army, and died in India. James Service, Jr., resides on Section 29 in Fairfield, where he has lived since he came to Michigan.

Page  181 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 181 JOHN C. ANDERSON was born in Madison, Lenawee County, Mich., October 16, 1846. His father, John C. Anderson, was born October 10, 1810, in Scotland, and came to this country when he was a young man, and finally settled in Madison, this county. About 1841 he married Miss Almira G. Griffith, who came from New York to this county with her parents, Lazarus and Elizabeth (Eliger) Griffith, in 1833. John C. and Almira Anderson were the parents of six children, three of whom are still living. Mr. Anferson died in Old residence of John C. Anderson, now replaced by new one, Section 35, in Dover. Chesterfield, Ohio, December 19, 1861. Almira G. Anderson died in Adrian township, March 1, 1854. John C. Anderson, the subject of this sketch, has always resided in Lenawee County. He first purchased a small farm in Fairfield, but after a few years sold out and purchased a farm on Sections 35-6 in Dover, where he has since lived and prospered. He added to his first purchase in Dover until at one time he owned 345 acres of land. He now has two sons settled upon the estate, and is about to build a new and modern house for himself. A glance at the engraving accompanying this sketch will show the old house, with the material piled around for the more pretentious and comfortable abode to be immediately erected. Mr. Anderson served his country as a soldier in the Rebellion, and was a member of Company K, llth Michigan Infantry.. He is a prominent

Page  182 182 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL member of Fruit Ridge Grange, and a thrifty and prosperous citizen and farmer. October 9, 1870, Mr. Anderson married Miss Mary J. Firth, of Coldwater, Mich., which resulted in three children, as follows: Burt H., born in Seneca, June 1, 1875, now lives on the home farm; George F., born in Madison, March 9, 1877, and now lives on the home farm; Lilly M., born in Dover, March 17, 1884. February 26, 1895, Mr. Anderson married Miss Augusta Votzke, of Seneca, this county, resulting in one child, J. Clyde, born December 1, 1895. Mrs. Anderson is a native of Germany, and was born near Berlin, April 28, 1870. She came to this country with her parents in 1884. Her parents now reside in Fairfield. JOHN CADOO was born in the city of Adrian, Mich., April 17, 1862, and has always lived in Lenawee County. His father, James Cadoo, born near Belfast, Ireland, June 1, 1829, was the son of John and Mary Cadoo, who came to America in 1853, and settled in Adrian, where they died. James learned to make brick in Ireland, and his first employment in Adrian was for James Sword in making brick. After a residence in Adrian of about twenty years, he purchased a farm on Section 24 in Dover, where he still resides. December 18, 1859, James Cadoo married Miss Eliza M. Magill, and they had three children, John, the subject of this sketch, being the oldest. Mrs. Eliza (Magill) Cadoo was born near Belfast, Ireland, November 14, 1833, and came to America with a brother and sister in 1855. She is still living in Dover. John Cadoo, of whom we write, lived in Adrian until he was seven years old, when his parents moved to Dover upon the farm. He was brought up a farmer, and received his education in the country schools, and one year at Evans' Business College. He now owns a farm on Section 17, in Madison, where he resides, and carries on dairying and general farming. December 3, 1883, John Cadoo married Miss Emma A. Meech, daughter of Lorenzo Dow and Clara (Robbins) Meech, and they have three children, as follows: Lorenzo D., born June 5, 1891; Clyde V., born May 18, 1894; Harley C., born February 15, 1897. Mrs. Emma A. (Meech) Cadoo was born in Madison, Lenawee County, Mich., February 25, 1860. [For her family relation, see P. L. Meech's record in this volume.] DE WITT C. CLARK was born in Adrian, Mich., November 22, 1837. He was the oldest child of the lion. Elihu L. and Isabella T. (Bean) Clark, who were pioneers of Adrian, Mr. Clark being among the first and most prominent and successful merchants of Lenawee County. [For a full history of the Hon. E. L. Clark, see

Page  183 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 183 both volumes of Whitney & Bonner's ord of Lenawee County.] De Witt C. home. Previous to 1860 he went to until the breaking out of the great Company H, First Regiment, California Cavalry, and served three years in the Union army. At the close of the war he returned to Adrian. May 22, 1867, he married Miss Lucia M. Paine, at Brooklyn, Jackson County. She was born in Rome, this County, December 22, 1847, and died without issue, December 3, 1879. For some time after his return from the army he followed farming. In'1878 he went to Mandan, Dakota, and engaged in a general mercantile business. He disposed of his interests there in 1880, and in 1881 he went to Saginaw, Mich., and established a wholesale drug store. He remained in Saginaw until the fall of 1884, when the business was disposed of and he returned to his home. Upon his return to Adrian at this time he gave his entire attention to looking after his property interests. He died in Adrian October 15, 1895. January 26, 1881, De Witt C. Clark married Miss Sophia Maude Wetmore, daughter of Timothy Robert and Mary Ann Sophia Wetmore of Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick, Canada, and one son was born to them, who died in infancy. One child was legally adopted (a brother's son) Bonnell Wetmore, born in Gagetown, New Brunswick, August 1, 1883, at home. Mrs. Sophia Maude (Wetmore) Clark was born in History and Biographical RecClark always called Adrian his California, where he remained Rebellion, when he enlisted in I De Witt C. Clark. Mrs. De Witt C. Clark.

Page  184 184 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Gagetown, New Brunswick, June 19, 1850, and came to Adrian in 1876 with her brother, the late Charles I. Wetmore. Her father was born in Frederickton, New Brunswick, May 3, 1803, and died in Gagetown, December 26, 1883. November 19, 1845, he married Miss Mary Ann Sophia Bonnell, and they had nine children, seven of whom are now living. Mrs. Mary Ann Sophia (Bonnell) Wetmore was born in Digby, Nova Scotia, Canada, February 24, 1819, and resides with Mrs. Clark in Adrian, in her 85th year. WEBSTER C. JIPSON, was born in Rochester, N. Y., September 21, 1851, and came to Michigan with his parents in the fall of 1860. His father, Orrin W. Jipson, was born March 4, 1814, in Cayuga County, N. Y. He was the son of Webster Jipson, whose paternal ancestors were English and French, and whose mother was related to the Webster family of Massachusetts. Orrin W. Jipson, when a young man, learned the iron workers' trade. He also became an expert draughtsman and metal worker In 1835 he made an extended tour of the then far West and South. He landed in Detroit that year. After some little time he started for Battle Creek on foot. He took the old territorial road, following it to his destination, losing his boots in the mud on the way, being obliged to finish the distance in his bare feet. From Battle Creek he went to Chicago, which was then a mere bog, and as there was no inducement to stop there he proceeded on his tour to Springfield, Ill., where he found employment for nearly one year. He then went to St. Louis, Mo., where he remained about three years. He took a Mississippi steamer and went down the river to New Orleans, where he found passsage on a fruit ship for New York. About the year 1845 he found himself in Rochester, N. Y., where he became connected with the Duryee & Forsyth Scale and Safe Works. Here he took a contract to construct and furnish to the company all the weigh-lock, railroad and other scales which they marketed. In 1859 he secured a patent upon a new form of lever, and what has lately been developed as the "tare beam" scale. In 1860 he severed his connection with Duryee & Forsyth, and came to Blissfield, Mich., where he purchased the Almond Harrison property, consisting of a farm of 160 acres, and grist mill and saw mill. The mill property he sold in 1870, but carried on the farm, where he resided until his death, which occurred March 8, 1875. In 1848 Orrin W. Jipson married Miss Jane Bly, daughter of Asa Bly, of Log City, Madison County, N. Y., and they had two children, as follows: Webster C.; Adele M., born November 14, 1858, married Webster E. Tooke, and resides at Corry, Pa. Mrs. Jane (Bly) Jipson was born at Log City, N. Y., September 10, 1819, and is now living, in good health, with her daughter,

Page  185 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 185 at Corry, Pa. Her parents were natives of Massachusetts, and went to Madison County, N. Y., in 1800, among the first settlers there. Webster C. Jipson came to Blissfield when he was nine years old. He attended the Blissfield public schools. In 1865 he became a student in Hillsdale College for one year. In 1869 he entered the Agricultural College at Lansing. In 1871 he was employed in a civil engineer's office in Toledo, Ohio, and in 1872 became assistant to the resident engineer of the Pennsylvania Railroad, at Toledo. In 1873 he engaged in land surveying and map making on his own account. He compiled the first map of Blissfield Village. In the fall of 1873 he entered Cornell University in the Architectural Department and took special work in the Civil Engineering Department. He returned to Blissfield in 1875 and for three years carried on his father's farm. In the spring of 1879 he went to Georgetown, Colo., where he passed examination and was appointed Deputy U. S. Mineral Surveyor. He afterwards entered the employ of the Denver & R. G. Railroad as draughtsman in the chief engineer's office at Denver. In November, 1881, he returned to Blissfield, and in 1885 the bank of Jipson, Carter & Co. was organized, Mr. Jipson becoming the cashier. The bank has been very successful from the first. March 1, 1900, it was reorganized as the Jipson-Carter State Bank, with a capital of $25,000, Mr. Jipson filling the position of cashier. January 10, 1882, Webster C. Jipson married Miss Cora Almyra Carter, daughter of Russell C. and Lucinda A. (Bowen) Carter. Her father was the son of Norman B. Carter, one of the most prominent pioneers of Ogden, this county, who came to Michigan in 1832. Her mother was Lucinda A. (Bowen) Carter, whose mother was Sarah R. Richardson. Mr. and Mrs. Jipson have no children. DAVID SMITH, SR., was born in Camington, Conn., February 8, 1786. When he was yet a child his father, Ezekiel Smith, moved to Vermont on the river Lamoille, where he followed farming until 1798. About the year 1789 Mrs. Ezekiel Smith (Mary Flint) was drowned in the Lamoille river. Ezekiel Smith afterwards marMiss Mary Bullen, and in 1798 moved to Lower Canada, where he lived until the breaking out of the war of 1812, when he, owing to the "exigency of the times," was compelled to leave his property and move into the State of New York, and finally settled in Constable, St. Lawrence County. He afterwards moved to Manchester, Ontario, where he lived until his death. David Smith, Sr., came to the "States" at the same time and for the same reason that his father did, and finally settled in Manchester, Ontario County, N. Y., where he purchased a farm. He lived in Manchester until the spring of 1833, when he came to Michigan and located nearly 200

Page  186 186 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL acres of land on Section 6. in Logan, now Adrian township. In 1835 he built a saw mill on his farm, the motive power being had from Wolf Creek. He was one of the very first settlers on Wolf Creek, his neighbors being Cary Rogers, who lived on Section 7, in Adrian, and John Wood, who lived on Section 1, in Logan, now Rome, and William Hawley, who lived one mile south. Mr. Smith was foreDavid and Emeline Smith of Rome. most in all the first public improvements. He was appointed a commissioner to lay out public roads, and assisted in chopping out the roads, building bridges, etc., between Adrian and Devil's Lake. He was a very enterprising man, and much respected, especially by all the first settlers, to whom he lent all the assistance in his power. He died at the age of 95 at his son's home in Rome. November 6, 1807, David Smith, Sr., was married in Armstown, Lower Canada, to Miss Lydia Roberts, daughter of David and Lydia Roberts, of Armstown, by whom he had eleven children, ten sons and one daughter; David, Jr., who was born in Constable, St. Lawrence County, N. Y., October 30, 1812, being the third child. Mrs. Lydia Smith was born in Vermont, May 3, 1789, and died in Rome, this county, May 14, 1875. David Smith, Jr., was brought up a farmer, and received only a common school education. He came to Michigan in 1832, with his brother, Henry Smith. His parents came in the spring of 1833, and David located a farm on Section 12, in Rome, adjoining his father's. He has lived upon this land ever since that time, and has subdued it from a wilderness, erecting good buildings and making a valuable farm. He has done his full share in all that is necessary to be done in establishing

Page  187 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 187 school districts, societies of different kinds, and in enforcing and obeying the common laws. Having come into the country when he was in his twentieth year, of course he was very active during all the period of clearing up the country, establishing society, developing its resources, etc. August 6, 1837, David Smith, Jr., married Miss Emeline Hawley, daughter of Levi and Olive Hawley, of Rome, this county, by whom he had eight children, as follows: Hercelia, born October 28, 1838, married Myron Every, of Rome, is the mother of three children, two of whom, Erwin and George, are living; Harriet S., born April 15, 1840, married Almond W. Hawley, April 24, 1895, who died May 22, 1901; William H., born April 5, 1844, enlisted in the Union army in 1862, in Company A, 17th Michigan Infantry. His company was in every battle with the regiment except one. He was wounded at Spottsylvania Court House and was mustered out June 15, 1865. He married Elizabeth Wood, resides on Section 6 in Adrian and has two children, Adeline and Glenwood. Adeline is the wife of Frank Billington, and resides in the city of Adrian. Glenwood married Bernice Lewis, and resides in Rome. Emily, born September 10, 1847, married Philip Bates of Rome, has one daughter, Florence, who is the wife of Alford Billings, a merchant at Jasper; Florence A., born November 20, 1849, married C. R. Knowles, has a son, Clarence D., and resides in the city of Adrian; Thaddeus, born October 13, 1853, and died December 19, 1853; Jessie E., born January 23, 1857, married Albert Knowles of Rome, and has one child, Edith May. Mrs. Emeline Smith was born in Seneca, Ontario County, N. Y., June 11, 1814. She came to Michigan with her parents in 1835. Her father was a native of New York, and died in Rome, at his old home, on Section 13, May 7, 1852. His wife, who was Miss Olive Payne, was a native of Rhode Island. She died in Rome, January 4, 1853. Mr. and Mrs. David Smith, Jr., are still living at their old home, and attended the county fair in the fall of 1903. MICHAEL WESLEY HENSEL was born in New Alexandria, Westmoreland County, Pa., January 23, 1867. His father, Jacob B. Hensel, was born September 18, 1831, and has always resided in Westmoreland County, Pa. His paternal ancestors were German, and came to this country in the seventeenth century. His maternal ancestors were French (Bossart by name), and came about the same time. Jacob B. Hensel was raised a farmer, and that has been his principal occupation through life. He has held many positions of trust at the hands of his fellow citizens, and enjoys the utmost confidence of all. In 1856 Jacob B. Hensel married Miss Mary Ann Bash, daughter of Michael and Anna Mary (Fennel) Bash, of Westmoreland County, Pa., and they became the parents of fourteen children, eight of whom were boys. Twelve of these children grew to

Page  188 188 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL maturity. Mrs. Mary Ann (Bash) Hensel was born in Bell, Westmoreland County, Pa., April 2, 1841. Her ancestors came from Holland early in the history of the country. Both Mr. and Mrs. Jacob B. Hensel are at this time (1903), in good health, and retain all their faculties to a remarkable degree. Michael W. Hensel, subject of this sketch, lived at home until he was about 17 years old, when he embarked upon life's voyage for himself, taking up a family characteristic, that of teaching school. With a district school education that passed him through the county teachers' examination, he secured his first school. His first school was the fall term of 1884. From this time he taught winters and went to school summers until 1890, when he entered as an irregular student at Allegheny College, at Meadville, Pa. After two years at Meadville, he entered the Ohio University at Athens, and graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1893. In August, 1893, he came to Michigan, settling in Blissfield, where he was engaged as superintendent of the public schools. After filling that position for four full school years, he was elected on the Republican ticket County Commissioner of Schools, and was installed in office July 1, 1897. He was re-elected in 1899, and again in 1901, and in 1903 he was elected under the new law, for a four years' term. Previous to his election as commissioner, he had served for more than two years as County School Examiner. July 3, 1895, Michael W. Hensel married Miss Nellie E. Dickinson, daughter of Anson and Mary J. Dickinson, of Blissfield, and they have two children, as follows: Linda, born August 31, 1891, (by previous marriage of Mrs. Hensel); Grant D., born May 5, 1896. Mrs. Nellie E. (Dickinson) Hensel was born in Blissfield, April 4, 1869. Her father, Anson Dickinson 2, was born in Blissfield, this county, December 31, 1834. His father, Anson Dickinson 1, died in August, 1834, leaving his wife and children in the wilderness. The family was taken back to Potsdam, N. Y., by Mrs. Dickinson's father, Clement Carpenter. Anson Dickinson 2 grew to manhood in Potsdam, but returned to Blissfield in 1854, where he has resided ever since. October 3, 1856, Anson Dickinson married Miss Mary J. Loomis, daughter of Gad R. and Mary (Whitney) Loomis, of Madrid, N. Y., and they have three children, as follows: David E., born April 30, 1861, resides in Blissfield; Nellie E., now Mrs. Hensel. One died in infancy. LEWIS A. WHITE was born in Fairfield, Lenawee County, Mich., November 1, 1853. His father, Allen N. White, was born in Royalton, Niagara County, N. Y., April 21, 1827, and was the son of David and Hannah (Cross) White, who were pioneers in Niagara County. Allen N. White came to Michigan with his parents in

Page  189 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 189 1840, and settled on Section 26, in Fairfield. In 1847 he went to Fairfield Village and learned the wagon makers' trade with William McNames. About the year 1861 he erected a grist mill and saw mill in Fairfield Village, which was burned in 1863. He afterwards erected a wagon shop and planing mill, which is now being operated as a cheese-box factory by his sons, Lewis A. and Orlando H. White. In 1874 he engaged in the undertaking business. During the winter of 1876-7 the small-pox broke out in Fairfield, and in March, 1877, Lewis A. and Orlando H. White, of Fairfield Village. he was stricken with the disease, having been exposed to it while prosecuting his calling. He died March 26, 1877. December 25, 1849, Allen N. White married Miss Cyntha W. Baker, daughter of John and Polly Baker, and they were the parents of seven children. [For her family record see sketch of A. G. Baker, in this volume.] Mrs. Cynthia W. White died December 24, 1869. Mr. White was married the second time to Miss Maria Odell, daughter of John C. and Polly Odell, of Fairfield. They had one son. She died June 1, 1875. Lewis A. White has always lived in Fairfield Village, where he was educated. He commenced work with his father when he was about sixteen years old, and is still working in the same shop. He, with his brother, Orlando H., carry on the largest cheese-box factory in the county, turning out between sixty and seventy thousand boxes yearly. They also carry on the undertaking business, and keep a stock of mortuary goods on hand. For the past 18 years he has served on the village school board. He is a member of the Fairfield M. E. church, belongs to the Fairfield Lodge, F. and A. M., No. 125, and the Jasper Lodge of Maccabees, 896. July

Page  190 190 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL 22, 1875, Lewis A. White married Miss Annie E. Morley, daughter of Robert and Serena (Sparrow) Morley, of Chicago, Ill., and they are the parents of five children, as follows: Nellie E., born July 28, 1876, married Alfred D. Hall, Oct. 27, 1897, is the mother of two daughters, and resides near Tecumseh; Claude N., born November 12, 1879, married Miss Mabel Baker, November 12, 1899, and has one daughter; Mina G., born September 18, 1884, at home. Two children, died in infancy. Mrs. Annie E. (Morley) White was born in New York city, June 17, 1853. Her father, Robert Morley, was born near Bath, England, July 25, 1827. He came to the United States in 1849. He was a carpenter and builder, and resided in New York, Boston, Chicago and LaSalle, Ill., and died in Fairfield, this county, November 4, 1885. January 12, 1848, he married Serena Sparrow, daughter of Charles and Serena Sparrow, of near Bath, England. She died in Chicago, Ill., in 1863, aged 36 years. BURTON E. TOBIAS was born in the township of Dover, Lenawee County, Mich., January 8, 1866. His father, Charles M. Tobias, was born in Tompkins County, N. Y., July 5, 1827, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1851. He had been reared a farmer, but soon after coming to Michigan he engaged in railroading and followed that calling in different capacities for nearly twenty years. In 1867 he purchased a fine farm in Dover, this county, and in 1869 settled thereon with his family, and gave his entire attention to it. He was a successful farmer and stock raiser, until his death, which occurred July 14, 1897. His parents, Moses and Jane (Manning) Tobias, were natives of New York, being born respectively in Ulster and Dutchess Counties, both of whom died at White Pigeon, this State, (Moses, September 30, 1876; his wife, Jane, May 7, 1876.) Charles M. Tobias married Miss Angelina McLouth, daughter of William W. and Betsey McLouth, of Dover, this county, February 9, 1859, and they became the parents of four children, Burton E. being the third child and son. Mrs. Angelina Tobias was born in Dover township, July 4, 1835. Her parents were natives of Massachusetts, and came to Michigan in 1835. William W. McLouth was born in Cheshire, Mass., September 10, 1792; died December 4, 1860. Mrs. Betsy McLouth was born in Clarksburg, Mass., March 26, 1798, and died July 25, 1873. Burton E. Tobias passed his early years on the farm, and attended the district school. After sufficient advancement he entered Adrian High School, and graduated in June, 1887, winning the scholarship of the class. After graduation he taught district school for two terms, and then became a student at Adrian College. In July, 1889, he accepted a position as bookkeeper in the bank of Whitney & Wilcox, and re

Page  191 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 191 mained in that capacity until June, 1893, when the Adrian State Savings Bank was organized. He was then promoted to assistant cashier, and in January, 1894, he was made cashier, which position he still holds, having thus served over thirteen years in the banking business in the same location. Besides being cashier and director in the Adrian State Savings Bank, he is a stockholder and director in the Adrian Telephone Company, stockholder, director and treasurer of the Times Printing Company of Adrian, and a stockholder in the Page Woven Wire Fence Company, the Lamb Wire Fence Company, and several other business enterprises of Adrian. He is a member of the Presbyterian church of Adrian, and has been president of the Young Men's Christian Association of Adrian since its incorporation under the State law. He is also one of the trustees, and treasurer of the Adrian High School Alumni Scholarship Fund Association. September 28, 1897, he married Miss Kate Humphrey, daughter of Gen. William and Mary Elizabeth Humphrey, of Adrian. They have one child, Harriet Elizabeth, born in Adrian, April 8, 1901. [For Mrs. Kate Tobias' family connections, see sketch of Gen. William Humphrey, in this volume.] NATHAN NASH was born at Stoney Creek, near Hamilton, Canada, February 12, 1832, and came to Michigan with his parents in June, 1836. His father, Samuel Nash, was born' in Norwalk, Conn., April 10, 1805, and was the son of Nathan and Barbara (Brown) Nash, who were natives of Connecticut. All that is known of the ancestors of the Nash family is that early in our national history, three brothers came from England, and from them the Nash family in the United States descended. Samuel Nash lived in Connecticut until 1822, when he went to St. Catherines, Canada, where he found employment in a woolen mill, and remained about ten years. About this time he purchased a farm at Stoney Creek, near Hamilton, where he remained but a short time, when he sold out and removed to Niagara County, N. Y., and purchased a farm near Lewiston. Here he soon became dissatisfied, and again sold out, came to Michigan, and settled on Section 15, in Rome, this county, residing there but a few years when he purchased land on Section 36 in Adrian, and Section 1 in Madison, Here he resided until 1869, when he again sold to T. J. Tobey. He died in Palmyra, this county, October 16, 1875. January 6, 1828, Samuel Nash married Miss Sarah M. Becker, daughter of Garardus and Sarah (Finney) Becker, and they were the parents of ten children, five sons and five daughters, nine of whom grew to manhood and womanhood. Mrs. Sarah M. (Becker) Nash was born near Schenectady, N. Y., in 1809, and died in Madison, this county, June 22, 1863. Their oldest son, Samuel, Jr., who died March 30, 1898, had a remarkable

Page  192 192 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL career. [For a sketch of his life, see Whitney & Bonner's History and Biographical Record of Lenawee County, Vol. 2, page 229.] Nathan Nash, the subject of this sketch, was raised a farmer, but worked two years at blacksmithing in Connecticut. In 1855 he purchased a farm on Section 10, in Adrian township, where he resided for about seven years. Since that time he has owned four different farms, not including the one he possesses now on Section 16, in Adrian. He has always been an active man, and has done his full Residence of Nathan Nash. on Section 16. Adrian Township. share in developing the resources of Lenawee County. March 13, 1855, Nathan Nash married Miss Eunice M. Beckey, daughter of William and Miriam (Sawtell) Beckey, of Adrian township, and they are the parents of three children, as follows: Harriet E., born December 23, 1855, unmarried and at home; Edwin N., born September 14, 1859, married Miss Harriet E. Hill, and they have four children; Ernest A., born November 2, 1866, married Mary 0. Wiggins, and they have three children. Mrs. Eunice M. Nash was born July 11, 1834, near Augusta, Maine, and came to Michigan in 1837 with her parents, who settled in Adrian township, this county. She died December 23, 1887. Her parents were natives of Maine. Her mother died in Adrian township in 1866, and her father died in 1871. Mr. Nathan Nash has a granddaughter, the youngest child of his oldest son, Miss Lillian B., who has been brought up in his home. Her mother died when she was two years old, in 1893, and Miss Harriet Nash took her at that time. The child has twined herself around their hearts so that she has become a fixture in the family.

Page  193 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 193 GEORGE LANE was born in Blissfield, Lenawee County, Mich., March 27, 1827. His father, Jacob Lane was a native of New Jersey, born October 1, 1798, where he grew to manhood, on a farm. He learned the blacksmith trade in that State, and came to Michigan in 1825, first settling in Monroe County. He worked at his trade there until 1826, when he came to Lenawee County and settled in Blissfield. He entered land on Section 31, where he built a log house, and blacksmith shop. For three or four years he did what work came to him, and did what he could in clearing land. He then went to Monroe, working at his trade until his health failed him, when he returned to Blissfield and began keeping hotel. In 1836 his wife died, when he abandoned the hotel and went to Philadelphia, where he worked at the machinist trade for three years. He then returned west, worked in Detroit and Monroe, became foreman of the railroad shops at Monroe, where he was killed, by the cars November 9, 1846. In 1826 he married Miss Eliza Giles, daughter of George and Margaret Giles, then of Monroe County, and they had four sons and one daughter, George being the oldest. One son, Charles, served in an Ohio regiment during the great Rebellion, and was killed in battle at Atlanta, Ga., in July, 1864. Mrs. Eliza (Giles) Lane died November 9, 1836. She was born near London, Canada, March 24, 1811. Her father, George Giles, was born in Cayuga County, N. Y., in 1789, came to Michigan soon after the war of 1812, settled in Blissfield, this county, in 1826, was the first hotel keeper in that settlement, and died there May 23, 1841. Her mother, Margaret Crow, of Pennsylvania, who was born in 1793, was the mother of nine children, and died in Blissfield, October 14, 1864. George Lane, the subject of this sketch, was the first child born in Blissfield, and among the very first to be born in Lenawee County. He has called Blissfield his home for 76 years. His mother died before he was nine years old, and he afterwards lived with his grandfather, George Giles. He was educated in the pioneer schools, and was reared a farmer. Before he was twenty years old he commenced to work for the Michigan Southern and Northern Indiana Railroad as fireman of the old locomotive "Hillsdale." This locomotive was the largest on the road, had double driving wheels, and required two firemen to keep it supplied with wood. After firing about eighteen months, he became a full-fledged engineer, and got an engine on the old Mad River road, running between Sandusky and Springfield, Ohio. During his railroad career he saved money enough to purchase a farm of 114 acres on Section 6, in Riga, this county. After several years he sold the Riga farm and purchased a home on Section 32, in Blissfield, where he now resides. For about twelve years he was engaged in the manufacture of staves in Blissfield, the firm being Dewey & Lane. In religion Mr. Lane is a Methodist, and one of the oldest members of the church in Blissfield. In politics he is a Republican. January 20, 1850, George Lane married Miss Sarah A. Elsey, daughter of William and Susan 13

Page  194 194 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Elsey, of Sandusky City, Ohio, and they are the parents of thirteen children, as follows: Eliza Ann, born in Sandusky, Ohio, October 11, 1851, died February 6, 1854; Urzelay, died in infancy; Charles Henry, born in Riga, this county, January 8, 1854, married Alice Paddock, has three children, and resides at Ottumwa, Iowa; Leona S., born in Union City, Ind., March 11, 1856, married Col. D. V. Hazzard, June 16, 1880, and resides in Eustis, Florida; Allen J., died in infancy; William L., born in Riga, August 10, 1859, married Miss Annie Bloom, and resides in Maysville, Mo. Georg e W., born in Riga, October 2, 1861, married Miss Daisy Black, has four children, and resides in Gentry, Mo.; Mary E., born in Riga, December 13, 1863, married William Edgar, November 10, 1888, and resides in Toledo, Ohio; Clara L., born in Riga, March 21, 1866, married Charles Bird, and they have one child, and reside in Detroit, Mich; Bradford D., born in Blissfield, January 11, 1868, married Lillian Hall, July 25, 1900, and resides in Blissfield; Annabell, born in Blissfield, January 10, 1871, at home; John R., born in Blissfield, March 18, 1873, resides at Sayer, Oklahoma; Jennie J., born in Blissfield, April 7, 1876, at home. Mrs. Sarah A. (Elsey) Lane was born in Staten Island, New York, May 4, 1833. Her father was a native of Portsmouth, England, came to the United States when a young man, and married Miss Susan Thompson, of Staten Island, N. Y., whose father was a soldier in the war of 1812. HENRY WILCOX was born at Westminster, Vermont, November 14, 1812, where he resided for but a few years. His father was drowned in the Connecticut river, in 1817. His mother soon after moved to the State of New York, and lived for many years at Mt. Morris, where she died. Mr. Wilcox was reared and received his schooling at Mt. Morris, and lived there until 1835, when he came to Michigan and located some government land in Franklin, this county. He soon after sold his first purchase, and settled in Cambridge, near Springville, where he remained several years, but finally purchased a large farm in Franklin, ten miles west of Tecumseh, where he followed farming until he removed to the city of Adrian in 1852. After coming to Adrian, he followed building and contracting, but for many years he was in poor health, and only attended to his personal affairs. He was truly a pioneer, and in his young manhood was ever ready to assist in every way in building up and organizing churches, schools, roads, bridges, etc., and in subduing the forest and making the country desirable. He was a prudent, thrifty man, with untiring energy and good judgment. His efforts were rewarded in saving a competency. He was a man of fine mind and quiet habits, and was ever mindful of those dependent

Page  195 lIECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 1.95 upon him. IHe lived to a good old age, and enjoyed all the faculties of youth to the last. He passed away as if in sleep, in his 8(th year, dying December 2, 1897. September 3, 1836, he married Miss Elmina Roberts, daughter of Reuben and Mary (Harrison) Roberts, of Mt. Morris, N. Y., and one son, Isaac L., was born to them March 30, 1855. Isaac L. married Mary: E. Rogers, daughter of William H. and Melinda (Tracy) Rogers, July 14, 1875, and they have had five children, as follows: Laverfgne H., born October 13, 1876, / was a member of Company B.,. \ 31st Michigan Infantry, in the Spanish-American war, and died in the service September 9, 1898; Florence May, born December 7,: 1897, married Lemoine C. Wells, June 25, 19)02, ad resides at Wellsville, Ohio; Ernest R., born October 11, 1879, died in infancy; Clarence E., born December 1.4, 1880; Vera E., born June 13, 1882. All were born in Adrian. Mrs. Isaac L. Wilcox was born in Madison, Lenawee County, Henry Wilcox. Mich., February 22, 1847. Mrs. Henry Wilcox was born near Saratoga Springs, N. Y., February 25, 181 8. Her father was a farmer, and for many years resided near Mt. Morris, N. Y. He came to Michigan to visit his daughter and died at her home in Adrian in 1870. He was born near Saratoga, in 1793. Her mother was of English parentage, her father, Robert Harrison, being an English soldier. He was the second son. His elder brother, under the law of primogeniture prevailing in England, got all the family estates, and he was put upon a man of war to fight out his inheritance. His vessel was sent to America, at the breaking out of the Revolution. Mr. Harrison was taken prisoner, Mrs. Elmina Wilcox.

Page  196 196 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL swore allegiance to the American cause, and served nearly seven years in the continental army. He witnessed the execution of Major Andre, and often spoke of the sad scene in his declining years. Mrs. Wilcox, a zealous church adherent, was an active, working member of the temperance army that made the crusade in Adrian, and labored long and unremittingly in the cause. She was an active member of the Soldiers' Aid Society during the great Rebellion of 1861-5, and was untiring in her efforts to relieve the suffering of the soldiers. She possessed talent as an artist, and has painted many meritorious landscape and pastoral scenes. One painted in her 85th year shows remarkable vitality and talent. GEORGE E. WHALEY was born in Verona, Oneida County, N. Y., November 25, 1823. His father, Dr. Alexander Whaley, was a native of Connecticut, and migrated to Central New York. He settled in Verona, where he practiced his profession for over fifty years. He started from his native town in Connecticut when a young man, with a horse and his "saddle-bags," to look for a location. He followed marked trees through the country until he was weather-bound by a snow storm at Verona. He remained there for a few days until the "roads" could be made passable, intending to continue his journey; but after mingling with the people there for a day or two, he was so well pleased with the location, that he was easily persuaded to remain there and teach a term of school, as well as practice medicine. He afterwards purchased 160 acres of land, which is now nearly covered by the village of Verona. After locating there, he returned to his native town in Connecticut, married Abigail Snow, and raised a family of nine children, two daughters and seven sons. George E. Whaley, the subject of this sketch, was the eighth child and sixth son, and resided in Verona several years, where he was engaged in the mercantile business. In 1863 he removed to Iowa, settled near DesMoines, and engaged in the sheep business. He was not satisfied, and after a residence of about eighteen months he sold his large farm, came to Michigan, and settled in Adrian. He had made a short stop at Adrian when going to Iowa, and was so well pleased with the place that he came here as soon as he could sell his property in Iowa, coming in March, 1865. He was an active, honorable business man, and soon identified himself with the business interests of Adrian. He purchased a large farm about two miles west of the city, where he resided some years. He was actively engaged in merchandising for several years, and won the respect and esteem of all good citizens. He died in Adrian, September 24, 1887. May 15, 1849, he married Miss Sarah C. Dunbar, daughter of Horace and Alice Dunbar, of Camden, Oneida

Page  197 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 197 County, N. Y., by whom he had one child, Charles E., born October 17, 1850, now a merchant in Adrian. He (Charles) married Miss Frances Tayer, June 22, 1882, daughter of William R. and Harriet Tayer, and they have one daughter, Jessie Louise, born September 17, 1884. Mrs. Sarah C. Whaley was born in Camden, N. Y., November 26, 1828. Her father traced his ancestors back to the Pilgrims. His father and mother were natives of Plymouth, Conn. Her mother was a native of Livingston County, N. Y., and was the daughter of Jacob Park. For eight years Mr. Whaley was connected with the Rome, Ogdensburg and Watertown Railroad, as agent at Camden, N. Y. He afterwards engaged in the drug trade at Syracuse, New York. FREDERICK SIMS was born in the village of Harwell, Berkshire, England, October 8, 1835, and came to the United States with his parents when he was about six months old. His father, Richard Sims, was a native of Harwell, England, where he lived and followed farming until 1836, when he came to America and settled near Rochester, Monroe County, N. Y., where he engaged in horticultural work in one of the leading nurseries. He left his native land with his wife and family of five children, one of whom died at sea. He supported this family by his labor, near Rochester, for about sixteen years, when he had accumulated money enough to think of purchasing a farm of his own. In the fall of 1851 his oldest son, Robert, came to Michigan and selected a farm on Section 19, in Seneca, this pre Frederick Sims. county, and the family followed in the spring of 1852. Here Richard Sims lived with his family until his death in 1863, aged 75 years. About the year 1827 Richard Sims married Susan Dandridge, of Culham, Oxfordshire, England, and they were the parents of seven children. Mrs. Susan Sims was born in 1798, and died in Seneca, this county, in 1864. Frederick Sims, the subject of this sketch, lived with his parents and followed farming until he

Page  198 198 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL was married. His education was limited to what he could learn in the country schools. He was an expert penman, and during the winter months taught writing school, for it was necessary in those days for him to turn every penny to make ends meet. In 1863 he purchased a farm on section 30, in Dover, where he resided until 1872, when he removed to the village of Morenci. Here he engaged in money loaning and speculation, and was very widely known in that part of Lenawee. Being shrewd, calculating, careful and pushing, he achieved the name of a successful financier. He died in Morenci June 12, 1891. October 16, 1863, Frederick Sims married Miss Elida M. Crampton, daughter of Bela aud Angeline Crampton, of Morenci, this county, and they had two children, as follows: Susie A., born January 25, 1865; Mary Ella, born February 7, 1867. Mrs. Elida Sims was born in Bergen, Genesee County, N. Y., July 25, 1841, and came to Michigan with her parents in 1850. JONATHAN H. GREEN was born in Rush, Monroe County, N. Y., September 19, 1828, where he resided until he came to Michigan in 1850. His father, Nathan Green, was born in Scipio, N. Y., April 5, 1804, and when he was yet a child his widowed mother removed to Monroe County, N. Y. Here he grew to manhood, and received a country school education. He learned the moulders' trade, and made the first cast iron plow with cast iron standard in New York. He afterwards, for several years, kept the half-way house between Rochester and Geneseo. He finally purchased a farm in Rush township, where he died, August 26, 1874. July 1, 1827, Nathan Green married Miss Maria Green, daughter of Jonathan Green, of Saratoga, N. Y., and they had seven children, Jonathan H. being the oldest. Mrs. Maria Green was born in Balston, Saratoga County, N. Y., and died in Rush, N. Y., March 15, 1846. Jonathan H. Green came to Michigan, when he was nearly 23 years old, and first settled in Southfield, Oakland County, where he purchased a farm, but only remained one year, when he sold out and came to Lenawee County, where he has resided ever since. In 1852 he purchased a farm on section 16, in Raisin, this county, where he now resides. He now owns 240 acres of land, with good buildings, and enjoys all the comforts of a prosperous farmer. In 1854 he was elected Justice of the Peace, and filled that office for nine years. In 1863 he was appointed by Hon. Joseph R. Bennett, who was at that time U. S. Assessor of Internal Revenue for Michigan, assistant assessor for the 8th district, which then comprised the eastern half of Lenawee County. On the following year, 1864, this appointment was confirmed, under a change of law, by Salmon P. Chase, Secretary of the Treasury. In 1867-8 he was re-appointed by the Secretary of the

Page  199 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 199 Treasury, assistant assessor. In 1869 he was appointed U. S. Deputy Marshal for the Eastern District of Michigan, by the Hon. Joseph R. Bennett, was re-appointed by S. S. Mathews in 1877, and continued in the service until 1880. He was appointed Undersheriff by John G. Mason. Since that time he has lived quietly on his farm and enjoyed life and the fruits of honest labor. October 17, 1859, Jonathan H. Green married Miss Jane M. Cornelius, daughter of William and Mary Ann (Mead) Cornelius, of Rush, Monroe County, N. Y. They have three children, as follows: Maria A., born in Rush, N. Y., March 5, 1851, married Madison M. Graves in December, 1870, resides in Ridgeway, this county, and has three children; Chauncey A., born June 3, 1873, married Catherine Mosher, July 28, 1898, have one child, Jonathan R., born March 31, 1903; Olive Jane, born June 1, 1883, married Mr. Smith, March 27, 1902, has one child, Clayton M., born January 5, 1903; Alice C., born in Raisin, this county, May 14, 1856, married David E. Banker, November 1, 1883, resides in Macedon, Wayne County, N. Y., has two children, Addie, born March 26, 1887; William J., born June 10, 1890; Arthur C., born in Raisin, May 21, 1864, married Sarah L. Hunt, November 19, 1885, has two children, Florence E., born February 13, 1888; Elmer H., born November 30, 1895. Mrs. Jane M. (Cornelius) Green was born in Dutchess County, N. Y., April 26, 1828. Her parents were natives of Dutchess County, came to Michigan in 1851, and settled in Adrian township, where they died. CLARK KNOWLAN was born in Parma, Monroe County, N. Y., April 21, 1845, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1847. His father, Thomas Knowlan, was born in the same place, November 10, 1811, where he was brought up a farmer, and resided until 1847, when he came to Michigan and settled on section 10, in Dover. He resided there for about ten years, when he sold to Brackley Shaw, and purchased again on Section 11, where he died January 16, 1898. About the year 1841 Thomas Knowlan married Miss Catherine Bush, daughter of Christopher and Polly Bush, and they had three children, Clark being the oldest. Mrs. Catherine (Bush) Knowlan was born in Parma, N. Y., March 6, 1810, and died in Dover, this county, October 2, 1891. Her parents were natives of New York State, and pioneers in Monroe County. They died there at their old home. Clark Knowlan was less than three years old when he came to Lenawee County, and it has been his home ever since. He was educated in the schools of Dover township, and has always followed farming. He resided with his parents until he was about twenty-seven years old, when, in 1862, he purchased 80 acres

Page  200 200 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL of land on Section 33, in Rome township. He afterwards purchased land in Dover, on Section 3, where he now resides. He has added to his farm from time to time, until he now owns about one thousand acres in the townships of Rome, Dover and Hudson. His idea from the first has been to engage in mixed farming, and he has been successful in his method, being out of debt, and enjoys the results of his efforts. In religion he is a Presbyterian, and is a Clark Knowlan. Mrs. Ann Janetta Knowlan. member of the Cadmus church. In politics he is an enthusiastic Republican, but never has been an office-seeker. February 4, 1873, Clark Knowlan married Miss Ann Janetta Schaeffer, daughter of William and Sarah (Gamber) Schaeffer, of Madison, Lenawee County, and they have four children, as follows: William H., born November 15, 1873, resides in Hudson township; Millard C., born July 9, 1875, married Addie L. McNutt, has one daughter, and resides on Section 23, in Dover; Thomas H., born February 23, 1878, married Hilda B. Ikle, December 20, 1899,.has one daughter, and resides in Hudson township; Vera S., born March 3, 1887, at home. Mrs. Ann Janetta Knowlan was born in Seneca County, N. Y., October 10, 1844. Her father was a native of Pennsylvania, but went to Seneca County, N. Y., when he was young, with his parents. He afterwards settled in Erie County, Ohio, came to Michigan, and settled on Section 11, in Dover, in 1862. He died in Adrian, April 30, 1891. His wife was Miss Sarah Gamber, a native of Seneca County, N. Y. She was the mother of eight children, and died in Dover, this county, September 15, 1901.

Page  201 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 201 Winslow and Lucina Bates of Rome. For a full sketch of the life of Winslow and Lucina Bates, of Rome, see Whitney & Bonner's History and Biographical Record of Lenawee County, Vol. 1, page 388. Mrs. Lucina Bates died at her home in Rome, September 24, 1903. WESLEY REYNOLDS was born in Benton, Yates County, N. Y., December 9, 1835, and came to Michigan with his parents in September, 1836. His father, Leonard Reynolds, was born in Green County, N. Y., in August, 1800, and was the son of Samuel and Abigail (Belding) Reynolds, who were farmers of Green County, N. Y. Samuel Reynolds was a soldier in the war of 1812. He came to Michigan with his wife, late in life, and died at his son William's, at Wolf Creek, this county, in 1850, aged 76. His wife died about two years after, aged 75 years. Leonard Reynolds came to Michigan with his family in 1836, and purchased a farm on Section 14, in Rome, where he ever after lived. When he settled on this farm his family consisted of his wife and six young children. The "farm" at that time was all covered with heavy timber, but he succeeded in providing for those depending upon him, cleared up his land in good time, made a comfortable home, and lived to enjoy it for many years. In 1822 Leonard Reynolds married Miss Betsey Halstead, daughter of John and Polly (Wendle) Halstead, of Yates County, N. Y., and they had eleven children, Wesley being the sixth child

Page  202 202 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL and fourth son. He died March 27, 1882. His wife died October 3, 1880. Wesley Reynolds, subject of this sketch, was nine months old when he came to Michigan, and has lived in the township of Rome, with the exception of about one year, ever since. He was brought up a farmer. In 1866 he purchased 60 acres of land on Section 24, in Rome. At that time a log house and one small barn comprised his buildings. He pushed along with characteristic energy, until now his buildings consist of a good framed house, a tenant house, six good barns and outbuildings, and his farm, consisting of two hundred acres. He has for many years dealt quite largely in fat cattle and other marketable stock. November 22, 1860, Wesley Reynolds married Miss Clarissa A. Thomas, daughter of Charles L. and Sally Thomas, of Adrian township, and they have two children, as follows: Xara Luella, born October 30, 1862, marred, May 8, 1889, George E. Baragar, has one daughter and resides in Rome; Charles L., born May 24, 1865, married Maude Seager, October 15, 1891, has one son, and resides in Onsted, this county. Mrs. Clarissa A. (Thomas) Reynolds was born in Adrian township, this county, June 14, 1838. [For her family record see Joseph M. Baker's sketch, in this volume.] EUGENE BYRON KNAPP was born in Rome, Lenawee County, Michigan, March 22, 1854. His father, Hiram Knapp, was born near Clyde, N. Y., in 1827, and came to Michigan with his parents when he was seven years old. Hiram Knapp was the son of Abram and Elizabeth (Drake) Knapp, who came to Michigan in 1834 and settled in Rome township, this county, on Section 36. Hiram Knapp purchased of his father a part of the family home farm in Rome, and resided there until his health failed him in 1867. He was a popular and well-known auctioneer, and for many years conducted public vendues in all parts of the county. He died in Adrian in February, 1869. In January, 1853, Hiram Knapp married Miss Charlotte Selleck, daughter of E. L. and Nancy Selleck, of Adrian township, who was born May 3, 1838. [For Mrs. Charlotte Knapp's family record, see sketch of C. W. Selleck in this volume.] Eugene B. Knapp has resided the most of his life in Lenawee County. He lived on a farm until he was about thirteen years old, and was educated in the Adrian city schools. His first employment, in 1872, was for F. R. Stebbins, the well-known pioneer cabinet maker and furniture dealer, remaining there until 1874, when he engaged in the mercantile business in Adrian. In the spring of 1876 he sold his business and went to Henrietta, Clay County, Texas, where he purchased a tract of 360 acres of public land. This land he improved and engaged in general farming. He built buildings,

Page  203 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 203 and founded a comfortable home. He liked the country and was prospering, but owing to illness in his family, and a disposition to make a good "deal" when the opportunity came to him, he disposed of all his holdings there in 1879 to a gentleman from Tennessee. He at once returned to Michigan. On recovering his health he en Home of E. B. Knapp, on Scott Street, Adrian. gaged in the agricultural implement business, as a traveling salesman, and followed that calling until 1896, when he engaged with the Page Woven Wire Fence Company of Adrian as a salesman in the State of Ohio, and was promoted as an assistant at the home office to C. 11. Page, until August 1, 1898, when he was regularly installed as correspondent or sales manager for Michigan and Ohio, which position he still holds. September 16, 1875, Eugene B. Knapp married Miss Melinda Estella Dodge, daughter of Dr. T. F. and Lucinda Dodge of Adrian, and they have five children, as follows: Maggie Dell, born in Adrian, July 31, 1876, married J. H. Wilson, is the mother of one child and resides at Lewiston, Ohio; Halbert M. born same place, November 7, 1879, married Miss Mary 0. Scott, and resides in Adrian; Glenn J., born same place, August 17, 1881; Frank G., born same place, April 3, 1884; Louise A., born same place, May 20, 1890. Mrs. Melinda E. Knapp was born in Adrian, September 28, 1851. Her father, Dr. Thomas F. Dodge, was born in Andover, Vermont, August 21, 1806. He came to Michigan in

Page  204 204 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL 1830, and first settled in Blissfield, but subsequently purchased land on Section 20, in Madison. In 1836 he sold to Seth P. Benson and removed to Adrian, where he died May 28, 1877. Her mother, Mrs. Lucinda (King) Dodge, was born in Fishkill, N. Y., June 26, 1827, and died in Adrian, December 18, 1901. E. B. Knapp's home is on Section 20, in Adrian township, now on Scott street in Adrian. It was taken up from the government by James Whitney in 1827, who conveyed it to Marian Stephens in 1832; Abel Whitney to N. Fratts in 1834; N. Fratts to O. M. Roode in 1838; in 1849, 0. M. Roode to J. W. Scott; Scott to E. H. Winans, etc., etc. HON. JOHN K. BOIES, a prominent and active citizen of Hudson for many years, was born in Blandford, Hampden County, Mass., December 5, 1828. His father, Samuel Boies, was born in Blandford, and lived and died there. The family was originally French, with the name of Du Boyce. But pending the persecution of the Protestants in France during the 16th Century, they fled to Scotland and changed their name to Boies. In the chaos that followed the rule of Oliver Cromwell they were driven from Scotland to Ireland. But even in Ireland they were not to be let alone, and again started in search of a home, and came to America. Deacon David Boies,. who is the progenitor of all of the name in this country, landed about 1727, and first settled in Hopkinston, Mass. Some time later he removed to Blandford, where he died in 1752. From the time of Deacon David Boies to the present date the family has taken an honorable part in the public affairs of Blandford, and at many different times members have held seats in the State Legislature. In 1813 Lemuel Boies married Experience Keep, of Longmeadow, who was descended from rugged Puritan stock. Her brother, Rev. John Keep, was one of the founders of Oberlin College. Lemuel Boies and Experience (Keep) Boies had three children: Franklin, who died young; Henry M. Boies, and John Keep Boies. Lemuel Boies died when his youngest son was only four years old, and the family soon removed to Westfield, where John K. Boies was educated in the Westfield Academy. In 1845 he came West to Oberlin, Ohio, where he intended to study law, but in December he visited his brother, H. M. Boies, who was engaged in mercantile business at Hudson. He decided to enter into business with his brother, and make Hudson his home. When he was twenty-one a partnership was formed under the name of H. M. Boies and Brother. This firm continued until about 1857, when the business was sold to a stock company. But the next year J. K. Boies & Co. bought it back and continued to do business at the Old Corner Store for 30 years. In addition to his mercantile interests, Mr. Boies dealt

Page  205 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 205 -g i:-:::, =no Hon. John K. Boies, Hudson. largely in grain, pork, wool and other kinds of farm produce. In 1855, in company with his brother and Nathan Rude, he started the first bank in Hudson, under the name of Boies, Rude & Co. The bank continued, with changes in the partnership, necessitated by the death of the senior members, and at the death of J. K. Boies in 1891, the Boies State Savings Bank was incorporated and succeeded to the business. Politically, Mr. Boies was a staunch adherent and supporter of the Republican party, and in every campaign devoted

Page  206 206 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL his eloquence to its service. He was elected President of the village of Hudson in 1863, and was re-elected in 1867. In 1864 he was elected to the Michigan Legislature, and was re-elected at the end of his term. In 1868 he was elected to the State Senate, and was re-elected in 1874. In 1871 he was appointed by Gov. Baldwin a member of the State Board of Control of Railroads, and served four years. In 1878 he was re-appointed as a member of that board by Gov. Croswell, and held the position nine years. In 1880 he was appointed by President Garfield a member of the United States Board of Indian Commissioners, serving in this capacity until he resigned in 1885. In the campaign of 1882 he was the Republican candidate for Representative in Congress for the second district of Michigan. His defeat was due entirely to unfortunate differences between factions in the party. Ie served many years as trustee of the public schools and Congregational church of Hudson. October 22, 1852, he married Miss Sarah Amelia Spear of Hudson, who died January 5, 1870, leaving' three children: Eva A., now Mrs. Frederick A. Wing of Seattle; Clarissa E., now Mrs. H. V. C. Hart of Adrian, and John Henry, who married Edna Bel Beachboard, of Hudson, and died at Denver, Colo., December 10, 1894. August 26, 1875, Mr. Boies was married to Mary W. Colton, daughter of Rev. T. G. Colton of Hudson. Mrs. Mary (Colton) Boies died September 10, 1888, leaving one child, Bessie. Mr. Boies died at Washington, D. C., Augnst 21, 1891. His memory will long be revered by those who knew him best. and can recall his devotion to the affairs of state and community of his adoption, often to the sacrifice of his personal interests. JOHN ALLEN was born in Farrington, Ontario County, N. Y., April 19, 1829, came to Michigan in 1848, and settled in Medina Village, Lenawee County. His father, Timothy Allen, was born near Bennington, Vt., in March, 1788, and was the son of Elijah Allen, a native of Vermont, who was a nephew of Gen. Ethan Allen. Timothy Allen, when he was about twenty-four years old, in 1812, removed to Farrington, Ontario County, N. Y., where he followed his trade of brick and stone mason. He lived there until 1848, when he came to Michigan and lived in Lenawee County until his death, which occurred in January, 1857. About the year 1815 he married Miss Prudence M. Eddy, daughter of Elikim and Eunice Eddy, of Massachusets, and they had seven children, six of whom came to Michigan and settled in this county, as follows: Marvin, Seymour, Franklin, Darwin, Thomas and John. John is the only one now alive. Mrs. Prudence M. Allen was of Quaker parentage, a native of Vermont, and was born in March, 1790, went to Farrington, N. Y., when a girl, with her parents, and died in Farring

Page  207 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. ton, in September, 1847. John Allen, subject of this sketch, came to Michigan, when he was about nineteen years old. He learned the trade of watchmaker, and jeweler, and has followed it for 52 years in this county. He has been in business in Morenci for 50 years. In July, 1861, he enlisted in the 14th Ohio regimental band, and was in the service for one year when, by act of Congress doing away with the regimental bands, he was mustered out. He has served as treasurer and trustee of the village of Morenci, and school inspector of Seneca under the old law. IHe is a member of Morenci Lodge, F. and A. M., No. 95, and of Baker Post, No. 33, G. A. R. For several years he was agent for the U. S. Express Company, and about two years for the American Express Company. September 15, 1852, John Allen married Miss Jane C. Williams, daughter of Thomas and Charlotte Williams, of Medina, this county, and they have four children, as follows Clara M., born in Morenci, April 14, 1854, married, April 2, 1879, Dr. 0. S. Armstong, has two children, and resides in Detroit; Harris E., born June 9, 1872, married April 14, 1897, Miss Susan Whaley, and resides in Morenci; Grace W., born September 28, 1874, and resides in Detroit; Edith T., born September 2, 1878, married April 7, 1903, Alfred A. Hammett, and resides in Seattle, Wash. Mrs. Jane C. Allen was born in Batavia, N. Y., May 19, 1833, came to Michigan with her parents in 1836, settled in Medina, this county. Her father was born near Batavia, Genesee County, N. Y., and her mother was born near Attica, in the same county. ALMOND L. BLISS was born in Blissfield, Lenawee County, Mich., November 7, 1832. His father, Hervey Bliss, was born at Royalston, Mass., in 1779, and was married October 28, 1815, to Nancy Woodbury, and of their lives more will be said further on in this sketch. It is usually a difficult task to trace family history far back into the past, but John Homer Bliss, of Norwich, Conn., the faithful and painstaking chronicler of the Bliss family, says "'tis supposed they are of Norman descent; that the name was originally Blois, (gradually modified to Bloys, Blyse, Blysse, and in America to Bliss); that its introduction into England occurred at the time of the Norman conquest (1066), previous to which time hereditary surnames were not assumed in England." The coat-of-arms as de scribed in Edmonson's Heraldry, and also in volume II., of "Encyclopadia Heraldica," of the Bliss family, was "Gules, a bend vaire, between two fleur-de-lis; or, it appears that gules, (red) is a royal color. The origin of vaire is from the fur of a beast called varus, the fleur de-lis representing a lily, and as in English Heraldry, the fleur-de-lis indicated the sixth son, it is supposed the orignal grant of arms to a Bliss was to a sixth son. The motto (on the shield)

Page  208 208 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Almond L. Bliss. Mrs. Almira A. Bliss. Frederick B. Stebbins. Mrs. Elois M. (Bliss) Stebbins.

Page  209 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 209 "semper sursum," translated, means "ever upward." The ancient traditions of the family represent them as living in the south of England, and belonging to that staunch class known as English yeomanry or farmers. From time immemorial they had inclined to Puritanism, detesting the looseness of the clergy and laymen, and the Sunday sports in which they indulged. These Sunday sports had been fostered by Elizabeth, and her successor, James, had reduced them to a system by publishing a book of "Sports on Sunday," and enjoining the practice of them by those of his subjects who had attended church in the morning, and it is said that one of the Blisses was fatally injured while passing the scene of these sports on Sunday. The beginning of the misfortunes of this family in England appears to have occurred in this wise, and brought about by the contentions of King Charles I. and his Parliament. Writs were issued by this King, January 29, 1568, for the assembling of the two Houses of Parliament. There was great excitement throughout the country, and Cassell's History, volume III., pp. 134, shows as one of the causes the court enmity directed against this family (Bliss) a number of foreign troops were about to be brought into the country, and the people were worked up to a pitch of extreme excitement, and sent to the House of Commons men not readily intimidated. Westminster sent up one Bradshaw, a brewer. Huntington elected Oliver Cromwell, a farmer. Two of the men who went up from Devonshire with their "member" were the brothers, Jonathan and Thomas Bliss. They rode two iron grey horses, and remained in the city long enough to be observed by the spies of Charles the I., and very soon thereafter they were fined,1,000 for nonconformity and thrown into prison, where they lay for many weeks. Even their old father, Thomas Bliss, was dragged through the streets, with great indignity. At another time the three brothers, with twelve more, were led through the market place in Okehampton with ropes around their necks, and fined heavily; and Jonathan and his father were thrown into prison, where the sufferings of the former caused his death. They began to think England was no longer a home for them, and they turned their eyes toward the wilds of America. First Generation.-The first generation of the Bliss family of which we have any reliable information, is comprised of a single individual, Mr. Thomas Bliss, of Belstone Parish, in the County of Devonshire, England. Very little is known of him, except that he was a wealthy land-owner; that he belonged to a class stigmatized as Puritans, on account of the simplicity and purity of their worship, and that he was maltreated, imprisoned and finally ruined in health (and financially) by the many indignities and hardships forced upon him by the intolerant church party. He is supposed to have been born about the year 1550 or 1560. Second Generation.The second generation of this family comprises the children of Thomas Bliss, of Belstone, England, two of whom (Thomas and George) removed to America in 1635, while another, Jonathan, (the 14

Page  210 210 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL ancestor of the subject of this biography) languished in prison, where he contracted a fever of which he eventually died. Jonathan Bliss, thirdgeneration, son of Thomas Bliss of Belstone, England, was born at that village about the year 1575, and, like his father, was doomed to bitter persecution, on account of his nonconformity and opposition to the dominant church party, which had assumed, not only to control the government, but the consciences of men. He died about 1635 or '36. Thomas Bliss, fourth generation, of Rehoboth, Mass., son of Jonathan Bliss, of Belstone, England, was born at Belstone, and upon the death of his father in 1636, emigrated to America, landing at Boston, whence he removed to Braintree, Mass., thence to Hartford, Conn., thence to Weymouth, Mass.. from which place he removed in 1643, and commenced a new settlement called Rehoboth, and died there in June, 1649. Jonathan Bliss, fifth generation, of Rehoboth, (son of Thomas), was born in England about 1625, and died in 1687. He was one of the eighty who made the Rehoboth "North purchase" in 1666, and March 18, 1668, according to "Daggett's History of Attleborough," drew a lot in said purchase. Samuel Bliss, sixth generation, of Rehoboth, Mass., son of Jonathan, born June 24, 1660, died February 8, 1705 Residence of A. L. Bliss, No. 31 Front Street, Adrian.

Page  211 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 211 or '6. Captain Nathaniel Bliss, seventh generation, of Rehoboth, Mass., born August 28, 1702, died February 21, 1767. Timothy Bliss, eighth generation, of Royalston, Mass., son of Captain Nathaniel, born January 4, 1733, died January 4, 1822. Israel Bliss, ninth generation, a farmer of Royalton, Vt., son of Timothy, born February 14, 1760, died --. Hervey Bliss, tenth generation, of Blissfield, Lenawee County, a farmer, son of Israel, was born in 1789, and was married to Nancy Woodbury (as above stated.) He died in December, 1841; she died April 28, 1849, aged fifty-eight. In 1814 Hervey Bliss, with his brother Sylvanus, moved to the (then) far West, and settled in Huron County, Ohio. In the spring of 1816 he removed to Monroe, then a hamlet of four families, and a year later, with several other families, settled on government land, thirteen miles up the river Raisin, from which, in 1819, with the other families, they were driven from their houses by the Indians, who claimed the land, and which land was subsequently set apart as the "Macon Reserve." He then removed to Rainsville, three miles below, and resided there until the year 1824, when he removed some twenty miles up the river, cutting his way through heavy timber from Petersburg, a distance of ten miles (which was the nearest place from whence supplies could be had), and purchased and settled on government land now occupied by the village of Blissfield, of which he was the founder, and which was named in his honor. He was ruling elder in the Presbyterian church, which he joined in 1829. In 1827 he was commissioned by Governor Cass, as Justice of the Peace, which office, with that of Township Clerk and Postmaster, he held at the date of his decease. He left four sons and two daughters, (a son, Whiting Bliss, having died in infancy), William W. Bliss, the eldest, was a successful merchant at Blissfield, having held many offices of honor in his town and county, and prominent in the religious and social interests of his locality; Hiram W. and Harvey K. Bliss were worthy men and farmers in this county. The daughters, Emeline E. Printup and Caroline L. Knight, being also residents of this county, and crowned in their old age with the laurels of a life of pure womanhood. Almond L. Bliss, eleventh generation, son of Hervey Bliss, attended the district school in his native village until sixteen years of age, when he entered the employ of Marvin L. Stone, then the leading merchant of Blissfield, and gained the confidence of his employer so rapidly that the second year he was selected from the force of employes as book-keeper of the establishment and confidential clerk to his employer. At the age of nineteen years Mr. Bliss formed a co-partnership with his then brother-in-law, Myron E. Knight, under the firm name of Knight & Bliss, and kept a general stock of merchandise, the firm continuing business about two years, when a new firm was organized (Mr. Knight retiring), under the firm name of A. L. Bliss & Co., with Sewell S. Goff as copartner, and the business was continued until 1856, when Mr. Bliss was elected County Clerk on the

Page  212 212 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Republican ticket, in the ever memorable "Fremont campaign" of 1856, and his services being so acceptable to his constituents he was re-elected in 1858 and again in 1860, a compliment to efficient services then unprecedented in the political history of the county. Mr. Bliss was elected clerk of his township as soon as he arrived at his majority, and was continued in said office until 1856, and was twice elected by the Board of Supervisors as one of the county superintendents of the poor. In 1858, (while clerk of the county) Mr. Bliss commenced the compilation of the records of land titles of Lenawee County, which system has since been universally adopted in all the Western States, and has built up an extensive land business, and acquired a well merited reputation as an examiner of land titles. He has a complete history of the title of every tract of land in the county, written on his books, which makes a library of about 150 large volumes, and contains an abstract of every piece of land in Lenawee County, and cost to compile and perfect over $25,000. So important is this compilation of titles, that no person at this time thinks of purchasing a piece of property in Lenawee County, without an abstract from the books in his office. Mr. Bliss removed to Adrian in January, 1857, and was connected with the choir of Plymouth church and Sabbath school most of the time as chorister, for more than twenty years, and until the disorganization of the church and society in 1879, and is identified with the musical interests of the city and county, and has gained much local notoriety as a singer, and is active and efficient in all public enterprises of the day. Mr. Bliss, on the 25th of November, 1853, was married at Blissfield, to Miss Almira A. Goff only daughter of the late Sewell S. Goff (his former partner), by whom he has had two children, as follows: Nellie S., born October 6, 1854, died May 1, 1857; Eloise M., born at Adrian, Mich., May 27, 1860. She was a graduate of the public schools of Adrian, and the musical department of Adrian College. Married Frederick B. Stebbins of Adrian, October 31, 1895, and died October 15, 1902. Fred B. Stebbins is a son of the late F. R. Stebbins, one of the very early settlers and business men of Adrian. Fred B. Stebbins is an active young business man of Adrian. For some time he assisted in carrying on his father's extensive business, but is now conducting an extensive real estate and insurance business. Mrs. Frederick B. Stebbins was one of the prominent young married ladies of Adrian. She was a fine musician, an accomplished conversationalist, much loved by her friends and acquaintances for her many virtues, accomplishments, and happy, cheerful personality. She was an active worker in all benevolent undertakings, and always sought to relieve and help the suffering graciously, but unostentatiously. Mrs. Almira A. Bliss was born at Blissfield, January 7, 1834, received a good common school education, and takes a lively interest in educational matters in the city. She is interested in music, and has sung in the church choirs with her husband since her childhood. During her long residence in Adrian Mrs. Bliss has

Page  213 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 213 been active in all benevolent, social and literary enterprises. Her father was born January 29, 1811, at Royalston, Mass., removed to Blissfield in 1829, was supervisor and justice of the peace of his township for many years, and represented his district creditably in the State Legislature for one term; was a successful farmer and merchant, and died January 23, 1865, respected and honored by his fellow citizens. The mother of Mrs. Bliss, Esther Margaret Goff, was a woman possessed of all the womanly virtues of her sex, and died at Blissfield in 1839. "One generation comes, Another goes and mingles with the dust; And thus we come and go. Each for a brief moment filling Some little space; and thus we disappear In quick succession. And it shall be so Till time in one vast perpetuity Be swallowed up." HENRY HART. From either parent Henry Hart inherited, on the one hand, the traditions of a long line of hard-headed, hardfighting Dutch ancestry, the kind of men, for liberty's sake, to tear down their dikes and come trooping up into the new world in the wake of Hendrik Hudson's keel; and, on the other, a strain of that thrifty and sterling British commercialism that is forever pushing its way into new fields under a colonial flag; qualities not unfitted to blend in the great crucible from which the builders of the west were to draw their strength and inspiration. His father was a son of that next preceding Henry Hart (born in London, England, about the middle of the eighteenth century), who came early to this country to become one of the first settlers of Albany County, New York, and his wife, Elizabeth Visger, whom he married there in 1782. Herman Visger Hart, their eldest son, afterward an influential citizen and politician of Albany (and later of Adrian), and his wife, Miriam Leonard, granddaughter of stout old Colonel Cornelius Van Vetchen, of revolutionary renown, and his wife, Anna Knickerbocker, became the parents of eleven children, the second of whom, born in Albany, N. Y., on January 28, 1818, was destined to bear the ancestral name of Henry, and, like his grandsire of that name, to plant the surname anew in distant soil. Who shall write the life of a boy? Who can say from what chance surroundings, from what accidents of environment and influence his character may take form and color and impulse? We know that the public school is the product of a later growth; education was not then dragging us from every hiding place; the college was not yet built on every village green. And yet there were compensations; and the old Albany Academy stood well in the lead of a class of institutions in the East that turned out some strong and notable men. It was left for one of its

Page  214 214 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL BY_ //jI T/ ^ y^."/ /y^

Page  215 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 215 own alumni, the firm but gentle Dr. Joseph Henry, one of the brightest scientists of his day, to raise it to its highest plane of efficiency. And thus it happened, under the man who invented the electro-magnet (and made telegraphy possible to Morse), and who later for nearly half a century was the world-famous first secretary and director of the Smithsonian Institute at Washington, that Henry Hart received his education. Mathematics, the practical sciences and the rudiments of engineering were the topics to which the young man most naturally turned, and in these his opportunities were unsurpassed. Graduating early, young Hart secured employment for a time on the preliminary survey of the Boston and Albany Railroad, his father's friend, Erastus Corning, then at the outset of his great railroad career, being one of its promoters. But this Henry regarded as temporary. His future was calling him. At home the family was large, and there had been reverses, and he felt that the serious business of his life was a problem no longer to be deferred. All eyes were turned to the West, and especially to Michigan, the newest in the galaxy of states. Though in one view only a far off wilderness of swamps and fevers, and Indians and bears, to the hopeful eye of youth it took all the colors of a very fairy land of promise. There was lumber there, and more than a suspicion of minerals; rumors there were too of various projected railroads. Its future was somehow in the air. And when did youth hesitate? And so it fell out that in August, 1837, Henry Hart came West, by way of the Erie Canal and Lake Erie, arriving at Monroe, Michigan, in company with Henry Waldron, who had graduated from the same school, the young men being then respectively 19 and 18 years of age. Both readily found employment at their profession as civil engineers in the survey and construction of the Michigan Southern Railroad, which was then being built by the State. Their first employment was near Jonesville, and they continued in this work until the final location of the route. Mr. Hart was then put in charge by the commissioner of the final location and construction of the work between Monroe and Adrian. The road was completed to Adrian in 1840, and in the fall of that year Mr. Hart finally located in Adrian. Mr. Waldron settled in Hillsdale at about the same time, and afterwards served 12 years in Congress. Mr. Hart at once formed a copartnership with Abel Whitney and opened a dry goods store in Adrian, which firm continued for about two years, when Mr. Hart purchased Mr. Whitney's interest, and carried on the business continuously until 1866. During that time he was appointed, under President Franklin Pierce, special agent of the Postoffice Department for the states of Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota and Northern Illinois, which position he held for about six years. During his absence in New York in the spring of 1859 he was elected Mayor of Adrian, and held the office one year, declining a re-nomination. In 1866 he was elected secretary of the Michigan State Insurance Company of Adrian, which, under his management, became known as one

Page  216 216 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL of the most successful enterprises of its kind ever organized under Michigan laws. He was one of its founders in 1859, and remained its secretary up to the time of his death. In 1865, at a called meeting of the citizens of the county for the purpose of organizing a Soldiers' Monument Association, he was elected its president, and continued in that position until the erection of the fine memorial which now stands on Monument Square, in Adrian, the main shaft of which was originally one of the pillars of the old United States Bank at Philadelphia, which, through Mr. Hart's solicitation, the Hon. Henry Waldron, then in Congress, was influential in obtaining. The monument was dedicated July 4, 1870, and Mr. Hart acted as president of the day. He also acted in a like capacity at the centennial celebration in Adrian July 4, 1876. The meager outlines of a busy career, thus faintly sketched, afford no hint of the living, breathing presence of the man as he moved and played his part among his fellows; and so deep is the poverty of words, and so narrow the limitations of human expression, that only by those who knew him long and well can the gaps be filled, and the life of the man, in its higher form and meaning, be read between the lines; youth unfolding into manhood, and manhood ripening, rounding and mellowing to its close. On Thursday, October 2, 1879, Mr. Hart received injuries at the fall of the grand stand on the county fair grounds in Adrian, a memorable and most distressing accident, which took place at about 3 p. m., and resulted in 16 deaths and many permanent injuries. Mr. Hart was removed to his home, but lingered only long enough to be surrounded by his family, and expired in the arms of his wife at about 5 o'clock on the following morning. In the city of his adoption, already steeped in the profoundest sorrow of its history, there were few hearts not stirred to an added sense of a personal calamity, as on Sunday, October 5, the remains of Henry Hart were borne to fair Oakwood, that city of the dead which he had helped to plan and beautify. For it is safe to say that through forty years, in the community with which his life and work were interwoven, no name stood more positively for all the qualities to which men accord respect; for integrity in its highest and most unselfish sense; for broad intelligence and enlightened public spirit, and for quick and helpful feeling for every form of need. Never were the kindly spirit and the strenuous life more deftly blended than were his, and if, between them, the quick, impatient flash of resentment sometimes answered to the touch of injustice, indolence or untruth, it passed almost as quickly as it came. Like Brutus, he carried anger "As the flint bears fire, Who, much enforced, shows a hasty spark And straight is cold again." A man of broad sincerity and simple directness of purpose, a citizen who in any strain of conflicting interests looked last after his own, a friend and helper of his fellow men without the instinct of leader

Page  217 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 217 ship, a life-long adherent of the democracy of Jackson and of Jefferson, with none of the small ambitions of the politician, a never-failing counselor in matters of local concern, with a judgment that was sought and an influence often quietly felt in the larger affairs of the state and nation, the life of Henry Hart was narrower than his endowments, and greater than its opportunities. On January 12, 1842, Mr. Hart was married at Adrian to Miss Jane Swan Chittenden, daughter of Joseph and Olive (Hooker) Chittenden, who was born at Aurora, Cayuga County, N. Y., on January 5, 1818, and removed with her parents to Michigan in 1836. She survived her husband nearly twenty years, dying at her daughter's residence in Detroit on June 26, 1899. A woman of rare sweetness and gentleness of character, whose life and influence were particularly beautiful in their bearing upon the less patient but more forceful temperament of her companion, and are cherished as a priceless legacy by her descendants. Though never narrow in beliefs or practices, both husband and wife were always active and consistent members of the Protestant Episcopal church, Mr. Hart serving Christ church in Adrian for many years as vestryman. Four children were born to this union: Joseph Chittenden, in 1843; Henry Chittenden, in 1847; Jennie Chittenden, (now Mrs. James D. Standish), in 1851, and Herman Visger Chittenden Hart in 1856. Of these the three former have long been residents of Detroit, while Mr. H. V. C. Hart is still a well-known citizen of Adrian. HON. HENRY C. SMITH was born in Canandaigua, N. Y., June 2, 1858, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1860. His father, Wanton Green Smith, a substantial and favorably known farmer of Palmyra township, built a fine brick home on Section 22, where, with his wife, equally loved and respected, he lived for about twenty-eight years, and reared a family of six children; one, Lucy M., having died October 20, 1864, of diphtheria, at the age of six years. Born in Farmington, Ontario County, N. Y., January 26, 1822, the son, Wanton Smith, a native of Berkshire County, Mass., who was a son of Joseph Smith, born in Smithfield, England, was married to a French lady at Paris, France, soon after which he emigrated to Berkshire, Mass., and from there went to Ontario County, N. Y., about the year 1783. He purchased a tract of land which included the present sight of Farmington, and Victor, N. Y., and built a grist mill, which was one of the first manufacturing industries of the kind in that section. He died in 1815. Wanton Smith was seven years of age when his parents moved to New York State, and he there grew to manhood, and continued in the milling business. He was remarkably industrious and accumulated a fine and /

Page  218 218 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL valuable property in Farmington. Married Lucy Eddy, daughter of Caleb Eddy, and a native of Vermont. They were the parents of seven children, four of whom lived to years of maturity. Wanton Green Smith received a common school education, was also a student at the Academy of Canandaigua, and after the death of his father, took care of the family. He was married in Wayne County, N. Y., October 11, 1849, to Maria Mitchell, a native of Madison County, N. Y., daughter of William and Millie Mitchell, and was born December 22, 1822. In the spring of 1860, desiring a change of location, and because of the ill-health of his wife and children, he came to Michigan and purchased the homestead where he lived the rest of his life. The father of Mrs. Smith was born in Dutchess County, N.Y., and whas the son of Joseph Mitchell, a native of Nantucket Island. Mrs. Smith's mother was the daughter of Henry Clapp, of Dutchess County, N. Y. Mrs. Smith received a good education and began teaching at the age of nineteen years, being thus occupied until her marriage. Both Mr. and Mrs. Smith were Quakers. The oldest son, Mitchell C., is a locomotive engineer, and has been since 1873. He lives at Maquoketa, Iowa, where he has a fine family and has attained good success. Frank A., the oldest daughter, was married to Edward F. Hutchinson. She has Louis G.olivon the old farm in W an & Henry C. S mith. subHon Henry C Smith. been a successful teacher for years, and still follows that profession with marked ability. Henry C. Smith has served two terms in Congress, and is an attorney at Adrian, Mich., member of a good firm. George C., the next son, is also an engineer in Iowa. Clara C. is married to John D. Kinney, and lives in Adrian, Mich. Louis G. lives on the old farm in Palmyra. Henry C. Smith, subject of this sketch, was educated in the district schools of Palmyra, this county, and at Adrian College. He worked on a farm, taught school in the winter, and graduated from the college in 1878. He studied law, and in 1880 was admitted to the bar. Was appointed Assistant Prosecuting Attorney of Lenawee County, January 1, 1881, and was chosen City Attorney in 1880. He subsequently became a member of the law firm of Watts, Bean & Smith, and is now the leading member of the law firm of Watts, Smith & Baldwin. In

Page  219 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 219 November, 1898, he was elected to Congress, and was re-elected in 1900. He is an eloquent public speaker, an able lawyer, and is respected by all classes. December 20, 1887, Henry Smith married Miss Emma Watts, daughter of Col. R. A. and Susan A. Watts of Adrian, and resides at No. 45 Toledo street, Adrian. RICHARD ILLENDEN, of Adrian, Mich., was born in Canterbury, Kent, England, July 8, 1824. His father, Richard Illenden, was born in Woodchurch, Kent, England, in May, 1776, where he was educated and always lived until 1824, when he moved to the city of Canterbury, and resided until he came to America in July, 1830. He owned about 200 acres of land in Woodchurch, known as the Shirk-Oak farm. The grandfather of our sketch, John Illenden, came from the town of Illenden, in Northumberland early in the eighteenth century. He was a land-owner and miller. The town of I1 -lenden had always been the residence of the family until John Illenden left there. He being the last male representative of the family, carried all its history with him when he went to Woodchurch. For 150 years there have been but three male representatives of the family. The Illenden coat-of-arms consisted of a half moon and sheaf of wheat, with the sickle thrust in. They were members of the Church of England until the advent of John Wesley, when Richard Illenden, the father of our sketch, became a convert to Methodism. September 19, 1805, Richard Illenden married Miss Sarah Grant, daughter of Vincent and Johanna Grant, of St, Nicholas, Isle of Thanet, Kent, England, by whom he had ten children, as follows: Ann, born October 12, 1808, died in London, October 28, 1834; Sarah, born October 12, 1811, married W. H. Pillow, and died in Adrian, July 28, 1883; John, born May 6, 1813, died in Woodchurch, January 27, 1819; Johanna Chapman, born October 11, 1814, married John Henry, died in Vevay, Indiana, January 27, 1892; Grace Waters, born May 7, 1816, married Thomas

Page  220 220 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL E. Bonner, and died in Adrian, December 25, 1860; Mary, born September 27, 1817, and died in Buffalo, December 16, 1834; Elizabeth, born November 29, 1818, married Stephen M. Hoyt, died January 30, 1899; Mercy, born May 8, 1821, the widow of William Ward, of Junction City, Kansas; Jane Parton, born December 21, 1822, marMrs. Mary R. Illenden. Richard Illenden. ried Dr. Woodland Owen, died in Brinkley, Arkansas, July 1, 1902; Richard, born July 8, 1824, married Miss Mary Ann Rulon, September 28, 1853. All the children except Richard were born in Woodchurch, Mrs. Sarah Illenden was born at St. Nicholas, Isle of Thanet, Kent, England, December 11, 1782. Her father, Vincent Grant, was a manufacturer of St. Nicholas. His family may be traced back to Inverness, in Scotland, in the twelfth century. The Grant coat-ofarms is a shield with three crowns, guarded by two nearly nude sentinels with battle clubs. The crest is a burning mountain, and the motto on the scroll beneath is "Stand Fast." Mrs. Sarah Illenden's mother was Miss Johanna Chapman, who was disowned by her family because she became a convert of John Wesley. Mrs. Sarah Illenden was also a convert of John Wesley, and was an earnest Christian, a profound reasoner, and a zealous worker in the church for over 60 years. July 8, 1830, Richard and Sarah Illenden, with eight children, left London, and after a voyage of seven weeks and three days, landed in New York. They immediately went to Buffalo, and shortly afterwards purchased a farm of the Holland Land Company, in Pembroke, Genesee County, N. Y. Here they found pioneer life

Page  221 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 221 in earnest. They were in the midst of the primeval forest. The log house to which they came was without a floor, covered with a bark roof, and the chimney was made of sticks and clay. At night the cry of the wolf and panther could be heard. The husband and father was sick with an incurable disease, and the care of the family of eight children, and the management of the farm devolved largely upon the wife and mother. But she never faltered. She was a woman of noble attainments, and her friends admired her for her daily actions, and loved her for her pure, sympathetic nature and constant watchfulness for the good and welfare of others. Richard Illenden, the father of our sketch, died in February, 1837. Mrs. Sarah Illenden died in Three Rivers, Mich., January 29, 1866. Richard Illenden, the subject of our sketch, was brought up a farmer, and lived on his father's farm in Pembroke until the fall of 1844, when he came to Michigan, and stayed in Ypsilanti during that winter. He followed different avocations until 1854, when he purchased the Amos Aldrich farm, on Section 36, in Adrian township, which is now mostly embraced in Oakwood cemetery. He sold to the Oakwood Residence of Richard Illenden, on Beecher Street, three miles west of Adrian.

Page  222 222 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Cemetery Association in 1865, and purchased a large farm near Three Rivers, St. Joseph County, Mich. He resided there until 1874, when he returned to Adrian and purchased the old Webster farm on Section 5, in the township of Madison, where he now resides. Mr. Illenden, at the age of 16, became a member of the M. E. church and served her cause with fidelity, until the question of slavery agitated that body, and finally culminated in the division of the church. He was a member of the convention held at Chestnut Ridge,near Lockport, N. Y., in in the organization of the Wesleyan Methodist church. But as that denomination did not agree with his ideas on slavery, he finally espoused the Garrisonian movement. He was the treasurer of the Michigan Anti-Slavery Society during its existence. William Lloyd GarEphraim and Sarah Rulon. rison and all the noted Abolition champions made his house their home when they were in Adrian. September 28, 1853, he married Miss Mary Ann Rulon, daughter of Ephraim and Sarah Rulon, of Raisin township, this county, by whom he has had four children: Johanna, born May 23, 1855, died December 26, 1855; Jessie, born December 9, 1856, died April 15, 1865. Albert Edward, born November 15, 1861, married Miss Clara L. Holloway, January 17, 1894. Two children were the result of this union, Jessie Lillian and Mary Rulon. He owns a large farm on Section 5, in Madison, on which he resides; Ephraim Rulon, born in Three Rivers, Mich., January 2, 1870, married Miss Eva I. Edwards, July 30, 1902, and resides on the old homestead in Madison. Mrs. Mary Illenden was born in Richmond, Ind., October 2, 1828, and died in Adrian, July 16, 1901. She came to Michigan with her parents in 1832. Her father, Ephraim Rulon, was born in Fairfield,

Page  223 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 223 N. J., January 2, 1804. His ancestors were French Huguenots, and the genealogy of the family shows that a man named Rulon came from France in a hogshead, being sent as merchandise, to escape death, and landed in New York previous to 1704. Her mother, Mrs. Sarah Rulon, was the daughter of Caleb and Sarah Atkinson, of Burlington County, N. J. Mr. Atkinson was an elder in the Society of Friends, and died at the age of 99 years and 7 months. His ancestors were Friends for many generations back. Mrs. Sarah Rulon died in Three Rivers, Mich., February 20, 1871. Ephraim Rulon died in Adrian, June 3, 1886. Mr. and Mrs. Rulon came to Lenawee County, Mich., in 1832, and lived in Tecumseh during the first year. In 1833 Mr. Rulon bought a part of the school section in Raisin township, erected a log-house thereon, and proceded to clear up and improve his farm in true pioneer fashion. He was prominently identified with the development of Raisin township during those early days, holding many positions of trust and responsibility, and being a township officer for many terms. Mr. and Mrs. Rulon were Hicksite Quakers, and leading members of the church of that denomination for several years, Mr. Rulon being one of the elders of the meeting. They were among the first to join the anti-slavery movement, and did all they could to help on the cause of freedom. About 1856 Mr. and Mrs. Rulon sold their farm in Raisin and moved to Adrian. WARREN GILBERT was born in Richmond, Ontario County, N. Y., April 3, 1822, and was the son of Elias Gilbert, Jr., who was born near the city of Hartford, Conn., November 29, 1776. The paternal grandfather of our subject, Elias Gilbert, Sr., served in the Revolutionary War, and besides being a soldier was a farmer, tanner and currier. In 1852 he accompanied his son Elias to Davenport, Iowa, and there died at the age of ninety-five years. He was married twice, and his family included nine children, of whom Elias, Jr., was the eldest born of the second marriage. The latter, upon reaching manhood, was first married to Miss Polly Steele, who was born in Connecticut, in 1781. She removed with her husband to Ontario County, N. Y., and died there while a young woman thirtyfour years of age. Of this marriage there were born four children. Elias Gilbert, Jr., became the father of the following children: Polly, Amanda, Marietta, Warren, of our sketch, Theodosia and Ann E. Warren Gilbert remained with his parents in his native county, and assisted his father at farm work until reaching his majority, then starting out for himself, he came to Grand River, Clinton County, this State, in October, 1843, and purchased a tract of land, farmed one year, then traded it for ninety-three acres on Section 2, in Rome township, this county. To this he added by degrees,

Page  224 224 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL and was uniformly prosperous in his labor of tilling the soil and stock-raising. In this latter enterprise he had an experience of forty years. Mr. Gilbert, in 1845, was married to Miss Almira M. Reed, who was born in Ontario County, N. Y., September 29, 1825, and was the daughter of Wheeler and Hannah Reed, natives of VerMrs. Almira Gilbert. Warren Gilbert. mont. From the Green Mountain State Wheeler Reed's parents removed to Ontario County, N. Y., where they spent the remainder of their days. Wheeler Reed's family consisted of nineteen children, several of whom came to Michigan and settled in this county. To Mr. and Mrs. Warren Gilbert there were born three children: William Goodell, born April 18, 1846, and married Miss Albina Eddy. They settled on the Gilbert homestead and engaged in stock-raising, but Goodell died March 26, 1884; Theodosia Gilbert, born September 24, 1848, is the widow of William M. Shepard, and has one child, Warren G., born September 1, 1871, married Miss Mary Middleton, and they have two children: Curtis, born April 1, 1899; Seward, born June 30, 1902; Frank W., born May 14, 1853, married December 25, 1883, Miss Mary, daughter of William and Ellen (Lewis) White, of Cambridge, born December 13, 1862, and they have two children, as follows: Gale W., born January 8, 1888; Lucile, born July 26, 1897. Both reside on Section 2, in Rome. At a time when it was considered almost a disgrace to be characterized as an abolitionist, a champion of woman's rights or an apostle of temperance, Warren Gilbert was a staunch friend of

Page  225 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 225 each cause, and strove by voice and vote to advance every good work. His home was one of the stations of the underground railroad, and many a poor black fugitive has been helped on his way to freedom by his aid. During 54 years of married life together, Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert did much to build up the interests of the community in which they lived by their hospitality, which was so freely extended to all who knew them. Warren Gilbert died November 21, 1899, and his wife, Almira M. Gilbert, died November 11, 1901. FRANCIS R. STEBBINS was born at Williamstown, Vt., on the 26th of October, 1818. His father, Captain Bliss Stebbins, was born in Wilbraham, Mass., December 12, 1777, and in 1805 settled in Williamstown, Vt., where he resided until his death, March 10, 1826. His ancestors were English. November 17, 1802, he married Miss Betsey Ruth Cossitt, of Claremont, N. H., by whom he had five children, Francis R. being the youngest. Mrs. Betsey Ruth Stebbins was born in Claremont, N. H., April 21, 1783, and died in Adrian, Mich., February 21, 1870. She was of French descent. Francis R. took his name from an uncle, Francis Reub Cossitt. At the age of 16 years he commenced to learn the cabinet maker's trade, with his brother-in-law, Lyman Briggs, at Montpelier, Vt., earning money enough to pay for several terms tuition at the Academy at Montpelier. In 1837 he came to Michigan and joined his brother, C. B. Stebbins, who was carrying on the cabinet business at Palmyra, in Lenawee County. Here he remained for about two years, and then went to Buffalo, N. Y., in the employ of Cooley & Galligan, cabinet makers. While at Palmyra he wrote articles for the Michigan Whig. He also contributed to the Michigan Observer of Detroit, and to the Emancipator of New York. While in Buffalo he wrote for the Buffalonian, The Commercial Advertiser, The Republican and several other papers, and was finally given charge of the editorial work of the Morning Tattler, a society paper, with the understanding, however, that it should not interfere with his work as a cabinet maker. Alternating between Vermont, Buffalo and Palmyra for a few years, he finally came to Adrian in the fall of 1841, and from that time until his death, which occurred on the 29th day of September, 1892, resided in that city. With the exception of a few months spent in the study of law, in the office of Baker, Harris & Millard, Mr. Stebbins, during the entire period of his residence in Adrian (comprising more than half a century of time), was continuously engaged in the business of which he had made himself master in his youth, commencing in a small way, working at the bench himself, he gradually built up one of the largest, best and most successful factories and furniture stores in Southern Michigan. A part 15

Page  226 226 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL of the time he was in partnership with his brother, C. B. Stebbins. A part of the time the two brothers carried on the same business separately, side by side, and always in perfect harmony. In 1852 the brothers, in connection with S. P. and T. D. Jermain, built a four story brick block on East Maumee street, in the city of Adrian -then the only four story building in Lenawee County-and in that portion of the block erected upon his land, he continued in business until the dav of his death. While Mr. Stebbins was thoroughly master of his trade, yet his strong literary bias and the urgent soMrs. Sarah Louise Stebbins. Francis R. Stebbins. licitations of the proprietors, induced him to assume the editorship of the Weekly and Tri-Weekly Expositor, of Adrian, which position he held from 1850 to 1860, and so long as he lived he continued to write for the press. For nearly thirty years prior to his decease, he spent a portion of each year in travel, and while on these excursions wrote many interesting and instructive letters, covering the country from Lake Superior and the River and Gulf of St. Lawrence, to the Gulf of Mexico. He was fond of what is termed "outing," had a cottage at Grand Lake, Presque Isle County, Mich., and one at Sand Lake, Lenawee County, and during the latter part of his life a part of each winter was spent in Florida, where he made very thorough explorations of Indian River. Mr. Stebbins was a public spirited man, and was identified with the growth and prosperity of the city of Adrian and the State of Michigan for more than half a century. He was a zealous and active member of the Pioneer Society of the County of Lenawee, and also of the State Pioneer Society, contributing during his membership, interesting and valuable ar

Page  227 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 227 ticles to each society. He served as alderman of his ward in Adrian, also as member of the Public School Board, where either as president or chairman of the building committee, he had the leading charge of the erection of the present Central School building, the main features of the plan of which were furnished by him, and adopted by the board. He served as a member of the old volunteer fire department of the city, and had much to do with the erection of its buildings; was a member of the committee having charge of the erection of the soldiers' monument, furnishing the design which was adopted for the base, and in short, has been directly or indirectly identified with almost every movement that has been made, calculated to advance the best interests of the city, during his long residence therein. In politics Mr. Stebbins was a Whig, and cast his first vote in Buffalo for William Henry Harrison for President, and subsequently became identified with the Republican party. He was an active politician, but never sought for any public office. He was a religious man in the best and broadest sense of the word, was liberal and catholic in his views, and a member of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Stebbins was twice married, his first wife being Miss Mary E. Meyer, of Buffalo, N. Y., to whom he was married on the 3d day of August, 1841, and by whom he had three children: Francis G. Stebbins and Mary L. Colvin, who survive him, and Ellen C., who died in childhood. Mrs. Mary E. Stebbins was born in Coxsackie, N. Y., June 15, 1820, and died in Adrian, April 16, 1852. He was again married October 24, 1853, to Miss Sarah Louise Briggs, of Claremont, N. H., by whom he had three children: Lillie Louise, Fred B. and Edwin J. Mrs. Sarah Louise Stebbins was born at Charlestown, N. H., February 25, 1833. She and her two sons, above named, survive her husband, and reside in the city of Adrian. Lillie Louise, the daughter, married Mr. Edwin J. Pierce, and died in Hingham Center, Mass., on the 27th day of September, 1890. WILLIAM B. SERVICE was born in Fairfield, Lenawee County, Mich., April 14, 1845. His father, John Service, was a native of Scotland, but came to this country a child. [For a full history of the Service family see the biography of John Service, in this volume.] William B. Service, the subject of this sketch, has always abided in Lenawee County, and lived in Fairfield until he was about thirty years old. He was brought up a farmer, and has always followed that calling. In connection with farming he learned to make cheese, and followed that for some years. In 1887 he purchased a farm on Section 21, in Seneca, where he now resides. He has given his attention entirely to agricultural pursuits, and has never been engaged in any speculative enterprises. May 21, 1879, William B.

Page  228 228 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Service married Miss Mary A. Shearson, daughter of James and Elizabeth Shearson. of Seneca, and they have had two children, as follows: Katie Bell, born August 25, 1880, and died November 28, 1882; Mollie E., born in Seneca, March 1, 1884; at home. Mrs. Mary A. Service was born in Seneca, Lenawee County, Mich., March 11, 1853. Her father was born in County Mayo, Ireland, in 1821. He came to America in 1851, and settled in Toledo, Ohio. He afterwards came to Michigan, and settled on Section 21, in Seneca, this county, where he died January 31, 1891. August 18, 1846, he was married to Miss Elizabeth Darby, of County Mayo, Ireland, and they had five children. Mrs. Elizabeth Shearson was born in County Mayo, Ireland, August 3, 1823, and died in Seneca, this county, June 30, 1896. MRS. DORCAS (FISK) WHITNEY was born in Veteran, Chemung County, N. Y., December 18, 1823, and was the fourth child and second daughter of Jabez and Catherine (Ten Brooke) Fisk. Her father, Jabez Fisk, was born in Wendell, Mass., June 3, 1794, and was the son of Daniel Fisk, who was a native of Worcester, Mass., where he was born, June 26, 1772, and could trace his ancestry back to Suffolk, England, in 1208. He was a farmer and a Puritan, and the family was numerous and prominent in the American Revolution. He died in Albany, N. Y., July 25, 1810. Jabez Fisk left his native place in Massachusetts when he was about eight years old, and with his parents, went to Albany, N. Y. After he became of age he purchased a farm in Chemung County, N, Y., where he resided until he came to Michigan and settled Hon. R. H. Whitney. on Section 32, in the town of Madison, June 3, 1833. About the year 1819 he married Catherine Ten Brooke, and raised a family of thirteen children. Catherine Ten Brooke was born in Chemung County, N. Y., in 1788, and it was said that many of her relatives and friends were victims of the Wyoming massacre. Jabez Fisk

Page  229 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 229 was a thrifty farmer. He owned over 400 acres of land. He died in 1867, and his wife followed him in 1870. March 22, 1853, Mrs. Dorcas (Fisk) Whitney was married, at her father's house in Dover, Lenawee County, Mich., to Richard H. Whitney, of Adrian, Mich., and two children were born to them, as follows: Richard H., born in Adrian, September 22, 1856, and died in Adrian, October 1, 1893; Henry Hart Whitney, born in Adrian, January 18, 1859, and died September 22, 1860. Richard H. Whitney was born in Harvard, Mass., in 1808, and came to Michigan and settled in Adrian in 1831. Before coming to Michigan he was engaged in general mercantile pursuits, but after locating in Adrian he became largely interested in the development of farming lands, built several houses in Adrian, and for twenty-five years served as Justice of the Peace. He was elected Mayor of Adrian in 1856, was a member of the School Board, and was actively identified with the founding of the public school system. He was a thrifty, provident business man, and when he died July 11, 1867, he left a comfortable estate. Since his death Mrs. Whitney has wisely managed the financial interests left by her husband, and been the source of much good in a social, religious and esthetic way. She still resides in the old homestead on South Main street and Michigan avenue, which is often the scene of social and intellectual gatherings. Mrs. Whitney donated to the First Baptist church of Adrian, a lot adjoining the church edifice, upon which now stands the Dorcas chapel, a most complete and beautiful annex to the church. She also donated to the church several hundred dollars towards constructing and equipping the chapel. JOHN W. WOOLSEY was born in Madison, Lenawee County, Mich., August 24, 1839, and always lived in the same township. His father, Alanson Woolsey, was born in Austerlitz, Columbia County, N. Y., February 5, 1813, came to Lenawee County in 1838, and settled on the school section in Madison, where he resided until his death, June 27, 1900. [For a complete history of Alanson Woolsey's life see Vol. 1, Whitney & Bonner's History and Biographical Record of Lenawee County, dictated by himself.] John W. Woolsey lived at home with his parents on the farm until he was about 22 years old, when he purchased land on Section 21, in Madison, where he ever after lived. He erected a good brick house, fine barns and out buildings and improved the land in the most scientific manner, until he had a first-class and very desirable home. He was an earnest, intelligent and useful man in his township. He was an active and honored member of Madison Grange, and served several terms as master. He was also a member of the County Grange, and filled the master's chair with fidelity and honor. He acted as Treasurer,

Page  230 230 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Town Clerk and Supervisor of Madison several years, and was very much interested in the progress and prosperity of the township. He died May 11, 1902, at his home in Madison. June 26, 1861, John W. Woolsey married Miss Jennie Carter, daughter of Nicholas and Mary A. Carter, pioneers of Madison, and three children were born to them, as follows: Gertrude Alena, born February 9, 1863, married E. W. Carpenter, of Madison, and is the mother of four children: Frank Alanson, born September 28, 1865, farmer of Madison; Harvey, born August 16, 1869, died in infancy. Mrs. Jennie (Carter) Woolsey was born at Pultneyville, N. Y., June 15, 1842, and came to Michigan with her parents in 1846. Her father was born in New Jersey, September 2, 1811. Her mother was born in Pultneyville, N. Y., February 12, 1815. RUDOLPH A. WOOLSEY was born in Madison, Lenawee County, Mich., December 12, 1850. His father, Alanson Woolsey, was born in Austerlitz, Columbia County, N. Y., February 5, 1813. Mrs. Mahala Woolsey. Alanson Woolsey. His father, Richard Woolsey, was born in Delaware County, N. Y., OctoLer 11, 1769, but went to Columbia County before he was of age. In 1826 he sold his farm in Columbia County, and removed to Perrington, Monroe County, N. Y., where he died in 1848. His ancestors were English. In 1794 he married Miss Mercy Mosher,

Page  231 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 231 daughter of Lemuel and Abigail Mosher, of Columbia County, by whom he had thirteen children, Alanson being the 11th child. Mrs. Mercy Woolsey was born in Hillsdale, Columbia County, N. Y., Oct. 5, 1777, and died March 4, 1856. Alanson Woolsey began working out by the month when 13 years of age, his o father collecting his I wages until he was > twenty-one, consequently he never had the advantages of an education. During the first year after becoming of age,. he saved enough money with which P to come to Michigan and locate 80 acres of land in Dover, G Lenawee County, but 2 immediately returned to New York. November 29, 1837, i he married Miss Ma- | hala Ladd, daughter of John and Betsy Ladd, of Victor, On- P tario County, N. Y., and in the fall of 1838, they removed to Michigan,settling on the land previously purchased in Dover, but only remaining there until December 24, same year, when they removed to land pur

Page  232 232 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL chased on Section 16, in Madison township, where he died June 27, 1900. Mrs. Mahala Woolsey was born in Victor, August 7, 1818. She was the third of a family of ten children. Her father was born in Cheshire, Mass., July 13, 1786. He removed to Victor in 1816, where he died November 12, 1852. Her mother, Miss Betsey Olney, was born near Providence, R. I., June 4, 1790, and died in Victor, December 13, 1834. To Alanson and Mahala Woolsey were born five children, as follows: John Wellington, born August 24, 1839, died May 11, 1902; William C., born January 27, 1842, died SeptemMrs. Elizabeth Woolsey. R. A. Woolsey, Madison. ber 18, 1847; Calista T., born February 2, 1845, now the wife of P. B. Chase, and residing in Los Angeles, California; Charles S., born November 1, 1848, and now residing in Chicago. Ill.; Rodolph A., born December 12, 1850, and now residing on the old homestead. Mrs. Mahala Woolsey is now living (September, 1903), with her son, R. A., and at the age of eighty-five years, retains her mental and physical faculties remarkably well. R. A. Woolsey has a farm of 320 acres, which he successfully manages. He has been several years Clerk of Madison, has declined many times to serve his township in other responsible positions. He is a prominent Granger, has filled most of the chairs of the Madison Grange, and is a broadgauge, progressive citizen. Being a native of Lenawee County, no man takes more interest in county progress. He has been secretary of the Patrons' Mutual Insurance Company of Lenawee County since its organization, in 1897. Rodolph A. Woolsey was married to Miss Libbie Douglass, December 13, 1871. Mrs. Libbie Woolsey was born

Page  233 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 233 in Byron, Genesee County, N. Y., September 12, 1851. Her father, Edmund Douglass, was born in Rutland County, Vt., in 1824, and is now living (September, 1903), with his daughter. Her mother, whose maiden name was Elsie Ann Boyd, was the daughter of Oliver Boyd, and was married to Edmund Douglass in 1850. She died in Byron, N. Y., in 1855. To Rodolph A. and Elizabeth Woolsey was born one son, Edmund D., November 25, 1872. He is unmarried and lives at Los Angeles, Cal. COL. NATHANIEL BUEL ELDREDGE was born at Auburn, Cayuga County, N. Y., March 28, 1813, received an academic education, and taught school for several winters, commencing when sixteen years old. At the age of sixteen he was appointed a cadet to the Military Academy at West Point, by President Jackson, but for the reason that his father felt unable to furnish the outfit, he was obliged to decline. At the age of twenty he commenced the study of medicine, under the instruction of his brother, Dr. H. D. Eldredge, and afterwards with Dr. Lansingh Briggs, attending the medical college at Fairfield, N. Y. After graduating, in October, 1837, he moved to Michigan and settled at Commerce, Oakland County, where he practiced his profession six years. He was married at Commerce April 21, 1839, to Janette Patten, the daughter of George Patten, a Scotchman, an extensive farmer. In August, 1843, he moved to Lapeer and formed a co-partnership with Doctor DeLasker Miller, for many years professor in Rush Medical College, of Chicago. He continued the practice of medicine until 1852. He was elected Justice of the Peace four times, and was chairman of the Board of Supervisors of Lapeer County four successive years. He was Clerk of the Senate of the Michigan Legislature, in 1845, and a member of the House in 1848, which was the year the Legislature first convened at Lansing. In 1852 he was elected Judge of Probate of Lapeer County, and in 1853 was appointed postmaster of Lapeer. While Judge of Probate the late Charles M. Walker, then a law student, was his clerk. In 1854 Col. Eldredge was admitted to the bar, and from that time commenced the practice of law, and as soon as C. M. Walker was admitted to practice, they formed a partnership. While they were partners they were twice opposing candidates for prosecuting attorney. In the spring of 1861 Colonel Eldredge was the first man who enlisted from Lapeer County, and C. M. Walker, his partner, the second. He raised a company and appointed his partner Orderly Sergeant. His company was assigned to the 7th Infantry, and before the regiment left the State, in September, 1861, he was promoted to Major, and C. M. Walker to Quartermaster. Colonel Eldredge was with his regi

Page  234 234 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL ment at the affair of Ball's Bluff and Edward's Ferry, on the 21st of October, 1861, and after the disaster, wrote home a letter, in which he severely blamed General Charles P. Stone, which letter got into print, and for which General Stone ordered him under arrest. After waiting six weeks without obtaining a trial, he resigned, and Gov. Blair, upon his return home, immediately appointed him one of the State Military Board, and in April, 1862, appointed him Lieutenant Colonel of the 11tlh Infantry. He at once joined this regiment, which was then in Tennessee, and was with it in several skirmishes and battles, until his health failed and he resigned in 1863. He moved to Adrian in 1865, and with his old partner, C. M. Walker, commenced the practice of law. In 1870 he was elected Mayor of the city of Adrian, and in the fall of the same year was the Democratic candidate for Congress, in the district composed of Hillsdale Counties. In 1874 he was elected Sheriff of Lenawee County. Colonel Eldredge's family consists, at present, of six sons and two daughters. His oldest son, Lansingh B. Eldredge, was Major of the 4th Michigan Cavalry, and was (ol. N. B. Eldrcdge. elected sheriff of Lapeer County after the war, at the age of 26. Colonel Eldred g e's father, Captain Daniel Eldredge, was born in Connecticut, February 7, 1772, and was married to Mehitable Bristol, at Sanydat, Vt., in 1796, and moved, the same eear to Cayuza County, N. Y., where he engaged in farming, and died there in 1863. During the war of 1812, he commanded a company and was in the battle of Queenston, and with the American army, under General Van Rensselaer, was taken prisoner. Colonel Eldredge's grandfather, Lieutenant Daniel Eldredge, was born in Massachusetts, Felbruary 25, 1745, and was a Lieutenant, commanding a company d(luring the entire Revolutionary war. His commission, dated Dect.mber 2, 1776, is now in the possession of his grandson, Colonel Eldredge. His grandmother, wife of Lieutenant Daniel Eldredge, was born in Massachusetts, June 14, 1743, and was the daughter of Colonel Silas Warner, the great Indian fighter of Massachusdtts. Colonel Eldredge is descended from the English on the paternal and from the Welsh on the maternal side. His mother was

Page  235 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 235 the granddaughter of a Welsh physician, who settled in Vermont in an early day. Colonel Eldredge was one of five brothers. He was, as will be seen, one of the pioneers of this State. He was always a constant and persistent member of the Democratic party, having held various offices within the gift of his party, and frequently been forced to be a candidate when there was little hope of success. He was elected to the Forty-Eighth Congress, receiving 15,257 votes against 14,609 votes for J. K. Boies, being the first Democrat elected in twenty-five years, overcoming 3,500 Republican majority, thus making a change of over 4,000 votes. He was his own successor, being elected to the Forty-Ninth Congress over Captain E. P. Allen. While in Congress he was placed on some of the most important committees, such as the Committee for the District of Columbia, which is all the government the District has. He was also made chairman of the Committee on Pensions, being the only Congressman from Michigan to receive a chairmanship on the second term. An important committee, it placed him in a position to shape the pension laws, which he went about to do in his own hearty way. How well he succeeded the records show, and many veterans can give proof that it was thereby made easy for them to obtain their due. It was through his work on the committee, on the floor, and in the department, that he made himself felt. With him it was work. He was the oldest man in the Forty-Ninth Congress. The writer of this takes great pleasure in giving a few kindly expressions by his friends and political opponents-he had no other foes. The following is from the Adr.ian Times and Expositor, which had given him many a hard battle: "Col. Eldredge was a man of character, as stalwart and upright as his own commanding form. He was exemplary in both his public and domestic life, a friend to his friends, frank and generous to his enemies, and a man whose outspoken word left no room for misinterpretation. A public man all his life, his honesty is attested by the fact that never was he accused of perverting his position to self gain or aggrandizement. What he was he owed all to himself. Indomitable energy, industry and courage were characteristics which made him, in some respects, remarkable." Resolutions by the Bar, Woodbury Post and other orders, all give proof of his high character. As the Bar resolutions state: "He succeeded in the four positions in life-political, military, and in two of the learned professions, medicine and law." The gifted pen of James Schermerhorn, editor of the Hudson Gazette, pays this graceful tribute: "There went the way of all the earth at Adrian Monday, a silver-haired hero, whose long and patriotic career illustrated the truth that corruption wins not more than honesty. ExCongressman Eldredge was the soul of honor, every inch a patriot, and whether serving his country on the field of battle or in the national councils, his nobility of character and rugged personality made him a striking and conspicuous figure. In the fullness of years he goes down to the grave leaving his children the priceless

Page  236 236 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL heritage of a life crowned with honor and usefulness." His death occurred at his home in Adrian, Mich., November 27,1893. The six sons who seven years before tenderly bore to the grave the casket containing the mother's remains, performed the same sad duty for the father. He saw the State of Michigan with 110,000 inhabitants, in 1837, with but one member of Congress, and with few resources but the virgin soil and the brawny arms and stout hearts of its early settlers, grow to one of nearly 2,000,000 inhabitants, with eleven members of Congress, the best school system in the United States, with a university equal, if not superior, to any in our land, and unequaled in its resources of wealth by any of the whole sisterhood of States. April 21, 1839, N. B. Eldredge married Miss Janette Patten, daughter of David and Janette (Anderson) Patten, who settled in Oakland County in 1837. Mr. and Mrs. Eldredge became the parents of eleven children, as follows: Lansingh B., born in Commerce, Mich., February 25, 1840, married Miss Elmarette Gage, February 11, 1862, has five children and resides at Milford, Mich.; Louise A., born same place, August 7, 1842, married Robert T. Quaife April 27, 1868, had one daughter, Jessie, now a teacher in the Adrian public schools; Frank P., born same place, May 8, 1845, died March 23, 1849; Janette A., born July 7, 1847, who died November 6, 1868, married Robert C. Stewart, December 18, 1867, and had one daughter; Lewis T., born in Dryden, Mich., August 5, 1849, married Miss Kate Turner, September 30, 1886, and resides in Quincy, Mich.; Daniel B., born in Dryden, Mich., September 29, 1851, married Miss Ada Lounsbury, May 11, 1881, has three children and resides in Denver, Col. He is traveling freight and passenger ageht of the St. Louis & San Francisco Railroad; May Ella, born in Lapeer, Mich., January 18, 1854, married W. P. Smith, December 28, 1880, and resides in Palo, Mich.; George H., born in Lapeer, Mich., January 10, 1856, married Miss Felicia Gaston, November 19, 1883, has one daughter, and resides in Adrian; Lydia, born in Lapeer, Mich., March 2, 1858, and died March 23, 1858; John B., born in Lapeer, January 17, 1859, married Miss Clara E. Cope, May 18, 1881, has one son and resides in Adrian; David D., born in Lapeer, Mich., May 6, 1862, married Miss Elizabeth A. Kehoe, October 18,1892, who died March 11, 1900. They had two children and resided in Adrian. Mrs. Janette (Patten) Eldredge, wife of the subject of this sketch, was born in Schoharie, N. Y., February 17, 1821, and died in Adrian, Mich., November 2, 1886. Her life was devoted to care and solicitude for her home and family, more especially during the civil war, when she went on a farm in the spring of the outbreak, and accepted patriotically, cheerfully and willingly, the superintending of that and the care of a large family of small children, that her husband and eldest son might respond to their country's call. The country is indebted to her heroines as well. She was a thoroughly christian woman, a member of the Presbyterian church. With her there was always a silver lining to be found in every cloud that overshadowed her. She was

Page  237 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 237 sincere and warm in her friendships, always ready with a plea for the erring one. Prudent and cautious, her judgment and forethought were ever relied upon. She was an exemplary wife, mother and neighbor, loved and revered by all who knew her. FRANCIS YOUNG was born in Crowle, England, March 20, 1817. Died in Adrian, Mich., October 7, 1899. He first settled in Adrian in 1844. Sailed from Hull, England, on the ship Triton, Captain Keeley, April 10, 1834. Was seven weeks and three days crossing the ocean. Landed at Quebec. From Quebec, went to Rochester, N. Y., arriving there on the day Rochester became a city-June 1, 1834. Went thence to Geneseo, Livingston County, N. Y., where he resided ten years, during which period he visited the West, traveling on foot some 400 miles in Michigan and Indiana in 1837. He resided in Adrian, with the exception of six months, since 1844. For fiveyears he solicited as agent the sale of pumps, at which he was very successful. From that time until a few years of his death he was a grain and wool buyer, and knew personally nearly every farmer in the county, having rni ng dealings with the majority ofrancis You them. The name of Frank Young was like a household word to nearly every one in the city of Adrian and county of Lenawee. No man was better known or had a more honorable record. In 1851 he was elected Treasurer of the township of Madison, which office he filled for many years. He was also elected Constable for several terms and acted as Under-Sheriff for six years. He also filled office as supervisor of two wards in the city for seven years. Mr. Young came to Adrian with small means, but by industry, economy and thrift he became one of the solid men of the county. Elizabeth Watson, born in Gilberdike, England, August 23, 1816, married to Francis Young at Perry, N. Y., Decem

Page  238 238 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL ber 22, 1842, died at Toledo, Ohio, March 30, 1882. Both husband and wife were buried at Toledo, Ohio. Mary Elizabeth Young, daughter of Francis and Elizabeth Young, was born in Geneseo, Livingston County, New York, November 3, 1843, was married to William H. Simmons, at Adrian, Mich., September 7, 1865. W. H. Simmons was born in Toronto, Canada, July 12, 1837. Francis W. Simmons, son of W. H. and M. E. Simmons, was born in Toledo, Ohio, August 7, 1874. DR. GEORGE HOWELL was born at Macon, in the territory of Michigan, November 4, 1836. His parents, Joseph Howell and Lutitia (Vanduyn) Howell, then lived in a little log house fourteen feet by twenty, on the east half of the northeast quarter of section eight. He grew up amid the scenes and incidents of pioneer life, and was accustomed to all kinds of farm work-clearing off the forest, driving the ox-team, splitting rails and sowing and harvesting the grain. He attended the summer terms of the district school until fifteen years of age, and the winter terms until nineteen. While at work on the farm and attending the district school he became the possessor of Comstock's Botany, Flint's Surveying, published in 1818, and an old compass and chain that were once owned and used by Musgrove Evans, one of the founders of the village of Tecumseh'. With the botany he became quite proficient, and many and pleasant were the hours with the wild flowers. To master trigonometry and surveying without a teacher was not an easy task. Once mastered, the compass came to be the source of unfailing pleasure. There ran through the township and across his father's farm a creek called the Macon, and as much of its course lay through woodland abounding in game, it gave an opportunity for hunting, trapping and fishing. With his gun and traps, his compass and chain, and his botany and the wild flowers, in the quiet stillness of the woods he found greater enjoyment than in society, and far greater pleasure than when in later years he grasped the hand of senators, diplomats and presidents. When nineteen years of age his father gave him his time and he worked the farm on shares. At twenty-one, 1857, he entered Hillsdale College and attended five terms, and then in 1859 he attended the summer term of the Tecumseh High School. In 1860 he entered the medical department of the University of Michigan, and graduated March 25, 1863. He at once began the practice of medicine in his native township and there for twenty-three years closely applied himself. Among Dr. Howell's first schoolmates at the district school, was Ann Amelia Remington, a quiet, modest, bare-foot girl. Her hair was always nicely combed and neatly tied with a rib

Page  239 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 239 bon. Her pleasant face was shaded by a calico sunbonn.-t, and over a neatly fitting dress she wore an apron with sleeves and long, wide apron strings, tied in a double bow knot. She was born February 8, 1844. Her schooling was at a Macon district school, the Adrian High School, and at the State Normal School at Ypsilanti. She was married to Dr. Howell, January 7, 1864. They have three children, Edith, Viva and Gertrude. For many years the doctor was school inspector, and under the old systern of examination of teachers by school inspectors, he examined teachers and gave certifi.. cates. In 1881 he was elected Supervisor of Macon, and remeasures he introduced and strongly advocated while on the Board of Supervisors in 1881 was that of building a new court house. It cam about in this way: Jesse Warr en, chairman of the Board, appoin ted S hepherd of Dover, Manning of Deerfield, and Howell of Macon, committee on publ ic buildings. Atreport of the committee that time the courts were held in Dean's opera house, and there the Board of Supervis ors met, and the county office building was inadequate for the purposes for which it was used. The need of the county for better conven iences was very great. The question of an appropriation for a new court house had several times been submitted to tho, voters of the county, and they had always voted it down. The Board of Supervisors had little or no faith in submitting the question to them again. The committee carefully examined every project that promised relief, but no suggested plan was practicable, and the final report of the committee was made up without recommendations. The report of the committee was completed and signed in the little hallway leading from the court room to the supervisors' room in Dean's opera house. Before the committee left the building Mr. Howell said to Mr. Shepherd: "My town sent me here to represent their interests, and I believe their interests demand greater security for the records, and better conveniences for the courts. When our report has been adopted, I will offer a resolution to again submit to the voters the question of an appropriation to build a new court house." "I will stand by you and second the motion," said Shepherd. The report of the commit

Page  240 240 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL tee Was made and adopted Wednesday morning, March 22, 1882. At the opening of the afternoon session Mr. Howell offered the resolution to submit to the voters the question again. Mr. Dewey moved that the resolution be made the special order for 9 a. m. of the following day. At 9 a. m. March 23, the resolution was taken up for consideration. The amount named in the resolution was $75,000. Mr. Dewey moved to strike out $75,000 and insert $50,000. Mr. Shepherd moved to amend Mr. Dewey's amendment and make it $60,000. Mr. Shepherd's amendment was lost, yeas 9, nays 14. The question then came on Mr. Dewey's amendment, which was lost, yeas 10, nays 14. Mr. D. Bixby then moved to reconsider the vote by which Mr. Dewey's amendment was lost. This was carried. After much discussion the resolution as introduced by Mr. Howell, as amended by Mr. Dewey, was carried, yeas 18, nays 6; two-thirds of the supervisors-elect being necessary to submit. The question was submitted to the people November 7, 1882, and carried. In 1882, after twenty years of close attention to practice, Dr. Howell went into politics for recreation, and for acquiring a practical knowledge of state affairs. He says there is no trade in which honesty and integrity has less influence and the judicious use of money more than in politics. That one may climb the lower rounds of the political ladder with but little money, and there work for the good of all without discrimination, but that the higher rounds are only attained at a great price and by favors; that "politics is a kid glove and an iron hand." In 1882 he and James Clark of Raisin were candidates for nomination to the Legislature from the First Representative District of Lenawee County. The contest was exciting. Mr. Howell received the nomination, and ran against James Bradner, Democrat, and W. H. Moore, Prohibitionist, and was elected a member of the Legislature of 1883 by a small majority. One of the measures he introduced and which became law was an act to regulate the practice of medicine in the State. It is the first law ever enacted for that purpose under our present constitution. All previous efforts had failed. In 1884 he was re-elected to the House, running against Horace Holdridge, Democrat, and George Humphrey, Prohibitionist. In 1886 Dr. Howell was given the nomination to the State Senate by acclamation. His opponents were Henry C. Hall, Fusionist, and Cornelius Quick, Prohibitionist. His majority was 466. At the Republican convention in 1888, he was delegate. He had incurred the displeasure of Charley Redfield, a politician whose displeasure might (possibly) have been averted by the judicious use of money. From 1888 to 1898 Dr. Howell applied himself closely to his practice, when he again (1898) sought recreation in politics. The contest for nomination to the House was very sharply and almost bitterly fought out. He supported Mr. Pingree for Governor, for Mr. Pingree believed as he did in taxing railroads on the same basis of valuation as other property is taxed. He also supported Mr. Burrows for U. S. Senator, for he believed Mr. Burrows capable and well qualified for the

Page  241 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 241 Senate. He was opposed by an out and out Pingree man, who was opposed to Mr. Burrows-and an out and out Burrows man who was opposed to Mr. Pingree. The candidates hotly contested the field. Dr. Howell was re-nominated. He ran against Dr. O. M. Rice, Democrat, and Thomas Beals. Prohibitionist. His plurality was 362. In the session of 1899, Dr. Howell strongly supported Governor Pingree in the repeal of the railroad charters given under the first constitution and the taxing of railroads on an ad valorem basis. To accomplish a work of such importance the State needed a man of the sterling qualities of Mr. Pingree. He had just taken his rest after his best effort to secure the taxation of railroads equal to that of other property, when a message came from the Senate stating that when the next convention should meet to nominate his successor, he would not be in it! and he was not. The doctor says that politics as a recreation has many exciting pleasures, and as an educator it has a fruitful field for wise investigation, but that "Every rose has its thorn And every sweet its sting." In 1886 Dr. Howell moved from Macon to Tecumseh, where he closely applies himself to practice. CAPTAIN CHARLES ROLLIN MILLER was born in Moravia, Cayuga County, N. Y., June 7, 1834, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1837. His father, Amos Miller, was a native of Cayuga County, N. Y., whose parents came to Central New York from Connecticut, and were of German ancestry. Amos Miller married Miss Katherine Bartlett, daughter of Moses Bartlett, who was a native of Vermont. She was born in Moravia, N. Y., and her grandfather, Colonel Bartlett, who was of English descent, was an officer under Ethan Allen in the Revolutionary War. In the spring of 1837 Amos Miller, with his family, started from Moravia, N. Y., with a team and lumber wagon for Michigan, traveling the entire distance, via Canada, to Washtenaw County, where he settled on a farm in Bridgewater, without any serious mishap. Here the subject of our sketch was reared, in the very heart of nature's wilds. Here the family lived for some time in the rudest kind of a log cabin, and until the virgin forest could be subdued, and the soil could be made to produce, it was only by the greatest fortitude and such indomitable courage and hope as the true pioneer possessed, that life and faith were sustained. After about three years he moved to Saline. Here our subject remained and labored with his father until he was nineteen years old. During this time he had profited by all the school privileges that were then extant. He determined to have an education, and labored hard to acquire it. He labored at farm work 16

Page  242 242 ILLUST 'ATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Captain Charles R. Miller.

Page  243 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 243 summers and taught school winters until he was able to attend the State Normal School at Ypsilanti, from which he graduated in 1855. He then entered the literary department of Michigan University. He graduated from there in 1858, and from the law department of the University in 1860. He then located in St. Joseph, Mo., and commenced the practice of law, but after about two years' residence there he found the secession sentiment very strong, and it was difficult for him, with his love of country, and veneration for the constitution and law, to abide with rebels and lawless frontiersmen. In the winter of 1861-2 he returned to Michigan. In August, that year, he enlisted in Company C, 18th Michigan Infantry. He was first made Second Lieutenant, but soon after service in the field he was promoted to First Lieutenant. After some twelve months' service in the field in Kentucky, he was made Captain. At Nashville, Tenn., he was detached from his company and put on the staff of the Post Commander, and soon after was made Assistant Judge Advocate, on the staff of Maj. Gen. Rousseau. Not many months after this, by special order of Gen. George H. Thomas, he was made Assistant Judge Advocate of the Department of the Cumberland, on the staff of Gen. Thomas. At the close of the war in 1865, he was mustered out with a captain's commission. After the close of the war, in the summer of 1865, he returned to Adrian, and immediately entered into a law partnership with Hon. Norman Geddes, under the firm name of Geddes & Miller, which partnership continued for over twenty years, when Mr. Geddes was elected Judge of Probate. Mr. Miller carried on the business until 1894, when he retired from the law, to give his entire attention to his extensive business interests. During Mr. Miller's active professional career, he was twice elected Prosecuting Attorney for Lenawee County, in 1868-70. He was for eleven years a member of the Adrian School Board, and acted as secretary during that time. He was appointed by Governor Croswell one of the Board of Management of the State Industrial Home for Girls, and was reappointed by Governor Jerome, and is now a member of the Mackinac Island State Park Commission, and secretary and treasurer of the commission. He has served many years as one of the trustees of the First Presbyterian church of Adrian. He was at one time the unanimous choice of the Republican county delegation for nomination as candidate for Congress. Mr. Miller has been very successful in his business career, and as a financier is highly regarded. He was one of the charter members of the Commercial Savings Bank corporation, of Adrian, and is now its president. He is also president and principal stockholder in the Tecumseh State Savings Bank. He is undoubtedly the largest land owner of improved farms in the county, as he owns and operates over 1,200 acres. He is president of the Anthony Fence Company of Tecumseh. He owns the site and platted the village of Millersburg, in Presque Isle County, which is now a prosperous, incorporated, growing place of 700 people. He also has large landed interests in

Page  244 244 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Presque Isle, Cheboygan and Chippewa Counties, and Mackinac Island. In October, 1865, Captain Charles R. Miller married Miss Mary L. Becker, of Ann Arbor, daughter of Hiram and Sophia Becker, and they became the parents of two daughters, as follows: Mary S., an undergraduate of Wellesley College, and Jessie F., a graduate of Michigan University. Mrs. Mary L. Miller was born in the State of New York, in 1838, and died in Adrian in 1889. In 1890 Mr. Miller married Mrs. Anna Marie Wendell. She was a native of Virginia, and descends from the Hale and Beale families. CHARLES M. WALKER, a native of Michigan, was born in Farmington, Oakland County, September 24, 1834. His was a strenuous life, commencing as it did before Michigan was a state, and (luring the period of settlement and transformation from a vast wilderness into homes and fields of productiveness. His eyes opened upon a vast, illimitable wilderness, inhabited by the red man and exploited by the wild beasts of this latitude, but they closed upon a scene of beauty. A vast state had been developed, and all the blessings of civilization were enjoyed, as the result of the a heroic pioneers who had conquered and won their heritage. He did his part in this great work. He believed in human effort, and never wearied in his labors. His was a receptive mind. He found pleasure and profit in study and employment, and never shirked a responsibility or duty. He grew to manhood under the inspiring influence of his old Charles M. Walker. Granite State parentage. His mother came to Michigan a young wife, giving up a happy home in New Hampshire, with her husband to endure thq hardships, hopes and dangers of pioneer life, and her heroism and fortitude, her love and faith, and pure womanly character, so imbued her son that he never failed in manhood. This, with his father's Puritan virtue of faith, sterling honesty and untiring zeal, gave

Page  245 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 245 our subject the faith and hope in life that made him what he was-a noble man. He was always a student. He early became a good lawyer and a strong advocate; but was honorable, and never resorted to low or abusive methods in his practice. He was a good soldier, served in the war of the great Rebellion of 1861-5 with much distinction, and at its close settled in Adrian in 1865. His home life was beautiful, and his greatest enjoyment was with his family and immediate friends. Modest and simple in his desires, and exemplary in his daily life, he died at his home in Adrian, October 20, 1878. [For a full record of his ancestry, family relations, etc., see Whitney & Bonner's History and Biographical Record of Lenawee County, page 161, Vol. 1.] ABRAM W. BARAGAR was born in Clarkson, Niagara County, N. Y., October 7, 1830. His father, John Baragar, was born in New York City, August 23, 1803. He was the son of Peter and Rebecca Baragar. Peter Baragar was a soldier in the war of 1812. He came to Michigan about the year 1840, and settled at Allegan, where he and his wife died. In 182)6 John Baragar married Miss Amelia Lewis, daughter of Isaac and Mary Lewis. Isaac Lewis was a native of Connecticut, and Miary Lewis descended from early Holland settlers. Mrs. MIary Baragar was born in Niagara County, N. Y., in 180', and died in Adrian, Mich., December 7, 1874. John Baragar died in Adrian, November 23, 1876. He came to Michigan in 1833, and took up land in Madison. He cleared up this farm, built buildings and fences, got it under a good state of cultivation and resided there for some years, when he sold out, removed to Adrian and engaged in hauling freight from Detroit and Toledo to Adrian for merchants and emigrants. He was the first man to haul a car over the wooden track of the Erie & Kalamazoo Railroad from Toledo to Adrian, in 1836. He drove his horses tandem between the rails. This was a slow, tedious trip of thirty-three miles, and very unpleasant on account of the mud, as at that time the old "Cottonwood" Swami) was under water nearly the year round, and mud between the rails was something "fierce" to contend with. The lead horse would become so covered with mud that it was impossible to clean him, and it became necessary to swim the animals in the river to soak the mud off. This operation had to be gone through with at the end of each trip. Some days when everything went right it was possible to get through from Toledo to Adrian between "sun and sun," but it often required the most of two days to make the trip one way. Compare that kind of railroading with the present. He continued as "engineer" on this railroad until the first locomotive arrived in 1837. John Baragar was a typi

Page  246 246 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL cal pioneer and "hustler." After the advent of the new locomotive, the "Adrian, No. 1," he turned his attention to giving aid and furnishing supplies to the new settlers. He opened a supply store on North Main street, and in company with an old stage driver named Decker, who was crippled by being thrown from his seat, supplied groceries, pork, fish, etc., and they were the first men to introduce oysters into Adrian. Mr. Decker established an express line between Toledo and Adrian, and carried packages between the two places for prompt and immediate delivery. It is believed by many that this was the foundation of the express business in the United States. Mr. Baragar was in full sympathy with all new comers and was very active in getting them on the right road or the location or land they wished to find. For a number of years he was active in all the enterprises of the growing town. He was a man of resource, intelligence and integrity, and held many positions and offices of trust. John and Amelia Baragar were the parents of seven children, three of whom died in infancy. Abram W. Baragar, the oldest son, lived with his parents until he was twenty-one years old, and was educated in the old district schools of Adrian. He resided there until 1868, when he purchased a farm on Section 36, in Rome, where he now resides, comfortably situated, surrounded by family and friends. March 7, 1854, Abram W. Baragar married Miss Esther C. Cornell, daughter of Charles and Abigail M. Cornell, of Adrian, and they have had two children, as follows: Charles J., born in Rome, December 23, 1856, married Miss Carrie Wiggins, daughter of Henry and Emily Wiggins, of Cambridge, this county, and they have one child, Lloyd W., born in Rome, April 27, 1895; George E., born in Adrian April 21, 1861, married Miss Lulu Reynolds, daughter of Wesley and Clarissa Reynolds, of Rome. They have one child, Bernice I., born April 17, 1892. Mrs. Esther C. Baragar was born in Westchester County, N. Y., December 23, 1831, and came to Michigan in 1836, with her parents. Her father, Charles Cornell, was born January 20, 1808, of Quaker ancestors, and died in Adrian, November 9, 1860. Her mother, Abigail (Champenois) Cornell, was born October 18, 1809, in Westchester County, N. Y., and died in Rome, this county, May 10, 1839. Charles and Abigail Cornell were very early settlers in Rome, this county, locating on Sections 14 and 11, in 1836. ALBERT B. GRAHAM was born in Madison, Lenawee County, Mich., January 3, 1858. His father, Edwin P. Graham, was born in Fairport, N. Y., March 21, 1824, and came to Michigan with his parents, Walter, born in Connecticut, December 19, 1795, died in Madison, this county, November 18, 1852, and Hannah (Peck) Graham, born in Providence, R. I., November 27, 1787, died in Madison,

Page  247 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 247 this county, January 13, 1880. They settled on Section 19, in Madison, where Edwin P. was brought up, and ever after lived. He purchased a farm on Section 19, about the year 1848, which he improved, and erected good buildings. In 1876 he built a large house, one of the best farm houses in the township. He was twice married, first to Miss Nancy Meech, January 27, 1848, daughter of Peter and Catherine Meech, who were pioneers of Lenawee County. Mrs. Nancy (Meech) Graham died March 26, 1854, aged 27 years, without issue. April 7, 1857, Edwin P. Graham married Miss Jane B. Warren, daughter of Thomas and Martha L. (Kester) Warren, of Norwalk, Huron County, Ohio. They had five children, as follows: Albert B., born as above; Wellingrton C., born August 1, 1860, died March 3, 1865; Elmer W., born October 1, 1864, and resides in Didsbury, Province of Alberta, Canada; Addie J., born November 23, 1870, married William A. Hubbard, De-Edwi n P. Graham Madison. cember 31, 1891, and resides at Mankato, Minn.; Charles, born October 24, 1872, and died... August 25, 1886. Mrs. Jane B. (Warren) Graham was born in Bronson, Huron County, Ohio, February 25, 1835. May 30, 1882, she married David L. Warren of Ovid, Mich., who died February 10, 1902. Her parents were pioneers of Huron County, Ohio, had eleven children, and resided in Huron County for about fifty years, when they removed to Hillsdale, Mich. Thomas Warren was. brn at Egg Harbor, N. J., February 12, 1802, and died in Hillsdale, November 7, 1884. Iiis ancestors were English, and of the Mrs. Ja ie i. Graham.

Page  248 248 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL same family as General Joseph Warren, of Revolutionary fame. His wife, Martha (Kester) Warren, was born in New Jersey, January 8, 1810, and died in Hillsdale, Mich., October 11, 1897. They celebrated their Golden Wedding April 2, 1878. Her ancestors came from Holland in the seventeenth century. Albert B. Graham, the subject of this sketch, has always lived in Madison, on the farm he I Farm Home of Albert B. Graham. Section 19, Madison. now owns, on Section 19. HIe was brought up a farmer, receiving his education in the schools of his neighborhood, and at Adrian College. When he was twenty-one years old he took charge of his father's large farm of 180 acres, and since that time he has purchased the interest of the heirs as far as possible, and added 65 acres to the farm. He is engaged in genera} farming and dairying. In 1894 he built a butter factory and has operated it successfully ever since. His output of butter in 1902 was 55,000 pounds, besides 2,364 gallons of cream. He keeps a herd of forty head of choice Jersey cows. The factory is well maintained by patrons, their butter being made by the pound. He is successful as a swine raiser, and generally sells more than one hundred hogs yearly. He has also been quite successful as a horse raiser, and has produced some good ones.

Page  249 RECORD 0F LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 249 "Ding Dong Bell" came out in 1901 in 2:252. He is now breeding her. He deals in the very best strains of blood. April 26, 1881, Albert B. Graham married Miss Clementina Thompson, daughter of Smith and Lucinda (Phillips) Thompson, and they have two children, as follows: Bertha Irene, born September 19, 1882; Florence Adelaide, born June 16, 1890. Mrs. Clementina Graham was born in Mason, Ingham County, Mich., July 1, 1854. WARREN M. BEAL was born in Bronson, Huron County, Ohio, September 11, 1850. His father, Edward Beal, was born in the old town of Marcellus, Onondaga County, N. Y., June 9, 1825. He resided there until he was a young man, when he emigrated with his parents to Huron County, Ohio, where a new farm was purchased and the struggle of his life began. The land was covered with heavy timber, it being stipulated in the contract that to pay for it, a certain quantity of staves were to be split and hauled to Milan, Ohio. This work was done, and a good home was soon worked out. A saw mill was estal)lished by Mr. Beal, and for several years he did well with it. In the spring of 1860 he sold his property in Huron County and came to Michigan, bring-ing his saw nmill with him. lIe purchased land on Section 25, in Dover, where he put up a saw mill, which is still in operation. Mr. Beal erected gorod buildings, and ever after resided on this place. He was an active, honorable man, of sterling qualities, and was entrusted by his neighbors with several public places, including Justice of the Peace and Highway Commissioner. He was always active in the growth and prosperity of the county agricultural society, and served as director from Dover. He also acted for several years on the executive comniittee. He was the son (of Aml7i and Mlaria (Billard) Beal, who came to Michigan with himn Anzi Beal was born in Massachusetts, June 20, 1801, and died in Dover, August 1), 1872. Maria (Billard) Beal was born MaIrch 20, 1805, and died in Dover, July 7, 1871. She was the mother of four children. Edward Beal died in Dover, November 30, 1894. December 4, 1849, Edward Beal married Miss Lucinda Warren, daughter of Thomas and Martha L. Warren of Bronson, Ohio, and they had five children, as follows: Warren M., born September 11, 1850; Eva Jane, born same place, December 12, 1852, died November 24, 1871; Frank E., born same place, January 2', 1855, of Boise City, Idaho; Cora L., born in Dover, this county, November 4, 1863, married Darius C. Clark, has one son, and resides at Ellensburg, Wash.; Estella, born in Dover, December 21, 1865, married Frank A. Woolsey, and resides in Madison. Mrs. Lucinda Beal was born in Bronson, Huron County, Ohio, September 11, 1832, and resides in Madison. Her father, Thomas Warren, was born in Little Egg Harbor, N. J., February 12, 1802; emigrated to

Page  250 250 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Ohio about the year 1827, and came to Michigan in 1865. He died in Hillsdale, November 7, 1884. April 2, 1827, he married Miss Martha L. Kester, who was born in Essex County, N. J., January 8, 1810, was the mother of eleven children, and died in Hillsdale, October 11, 1897. Warren M. Beal, the subject of this sketch, came to Michigan when he was ten years old, and has resided in Lenawee County ever since. He was educated in the district schools of his township, with the exception of two terms in Evans' Business College in Adrian. He has always followed farming and is a charter member of Madison Grange. He has never sought political honors, and has many times refused to accept office. He means to be a progressive and an aggressive farmer, and is content with that. October 2, 1876, Warren M. Beal married Miss Harriet M. Moore, daughter of Thomas F. and Rachel (Todd) Moore, of Madison, and they had two children, as follows: S. Roy, born in Madison, August 27, 1879, teacher in the public schools of Port Huron, Mich.; Frank C., born same place, June 15, 1882. Mrs. Harriet N. Beal was born in Medina, this county, November 25, 1853, and died January 15, 1895. Her father, Thomas F. Moore, was born in Peterborough, N. H., October 2, 1819. His father was Nathaniel Moore, who was born there in 1776, and his grandfather was William Moore, who was a soldier in the French and Indian war, and afterwards served in the Revolution. Thomas F. Moore died in Madison, November, 1896. His wife, Rachel Moore, born May 5, 1819, also died in Madison, June 28, 1895. December 15, 1897, Warren M. Beal was married to Miss Mary C. Allis, daughter of Edward P. and Hannah J. Allis, of Madison. Mr. and Mrs. Allis were pioneers in that township, who died December 18, 1899, and February 26, 1900. SPIELMAN BROTHERS' NURSERY. Twenty-one years ago we began growing trees and plants on ten acres of land, and by constant working and honorable dealings with our customers we have become growers of over 200 acres of nursery stock. The soil hereabout being of a character best suited to produce the healthiest condition of growth, that solid, firm texture of wood, with abundant fibrous roots so necessary to successful transplanting, we are enabled to offer the choicest nursery stock to planters with entire confidence. The many friends we have made, and their continued support for many years, has induced the belief that our efforts have not proved an entire failure, and to all we send greetings, with a desire to deserve still further their patronage and influence. Starting out with the positive assertion that every tree and plant sold should be true to name and of the best quality, we confidently believe this course to have been the mainspring of our success and the confidence

Page  251 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 251 reposed in us by thousands of planters. Reputation is nowhere of so great value as in the nursery business, and the buyer of nursery stock who does not consider this will reap disappointment-will be taught by his own experience what he ought to have learned from experience of others. We aim to conduct the nursery business on Residence of John Spielman, and entrance to Adrian City Nurseries on Bent Oak Avenue. liberal principles, and we like always to do any favors our customers ask. Friction is what impedes business. Life is too brief to encumber commercial transactions with unnecessary coriditions. A lifetime of energy and experience has been spent, not only to acquire, but in our turn to impart exact information about trees and fruits. For the success attendant upon our efforts to supply the best stock at moderate prices, we spare no pains or expense to grow high grade stock. We are content to sell at a small profit. We give careful attention and continuous study to perfecting every detail. Our salesmen all have certificates of agency signed by us. With a large nursery business interest, our aim has been to build for the future rather than to try to squeeze out the most money each year in the way of dividends. Hence we have kept reinvesting our money in the business. We are in it to stay-not alone for profit-but because we love it. It is our life work. Success in it means to us far more than meremoney making. We hope to contribute to the happiness and welfare of everyone with whom we have dealings. A trial order

Page  252 252 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL we respectfully solicit, if we have not yet had the pleasure of doing business with you, and we venture to believe it will lead to further business to our mutual benefit. If zeal and restless energy count, if quality, reasonable prices, prompt attention count, if you are particular about any of these points, try us and see how we serve you. Address, Spielman Bros., Adrian City Nurseries. WILLIAM R. HIBBARD was born in Vienna, Oneida County, N. Y., August 22, 1833, and came to Michigan with his mother in 1836. His father, John Hibbard, was born in Oneida County, N. Y., about the year 1798, and died there in 1835. He was a farmer, and assisted in the pioneer settlement and early growth of Oneida County. March 29, 1818, John Hibbard married Miss Eva Smith, daughter of George Adam Smith, of Vienna, Oneida County, N. Y., and they had seven children, William R. being the youngest and only survivor. Mrs. Hibbard was left a widow in 1835, with five children. She came to Michigan in the spring of 1836, and settled in Dundee, Monroe County. In the fall of that year she married George Wilcox, the first settler of Dundee, he locating there in 1830. Mrs. (Hibbard) Wilcox was a veritable pioneer. Her father and mother were Germans, and were pioneers in Oneida County, N. Y., and she was the first white child to see light in Oneida County, being born March 25, 1795. She died at Dundee, August 21, 1880. Mr. Wilcox died at Dundee, May 1, 1860. William R. Hibbard came to Michigan when he was three years old, and resided in Dundee until 1862, when he enlisted in Company H, 18th Michigan Infantry. When he was a young man, he learned the carriage maker's trade, and upon returning from the army again engaged in the carriage business. He was four years in Kalamazoo, and in June, 1876, he came to Ogden Centre, where he now resides. For more than thirty years he carried on a shop in the village, but has now retired from business. October 3, 1853, William R. Hibbard married Miss Ellen Palms, daughter of Andrew and Harriet Palms, of Dundee, and they had five children, as follows: Fred H., born in Dundee, and now residing in Monessen, Pa.; Clara A., born in Dundee, married John Landy, resides at Onaway, Mich.; Hattie E., born in Dundee, married Charles Mead, and resides in Dundee. Two sons died in infancy. Mrs. Ellen Hibbard was born in Dundee, October 3, 1840, and died there in January, 1865. April 10, 1870, William R. Hibbard married Miss Harriet L. Hydorn, of Kalamazoo, Mich., and they had four children, as follows: Cora M., born in Kalamazoo, May 28, 1872, married Asa Phetterplace, and they had two children; Claude A., born in Ogden Center, August 19, 1878, resides at Sault Ste. Marie, Mich.; Clarence G., born in Ogden, June 12, 1881;

Page  253 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 253 Bernice J., born in Ogden June 21, 1884, at home. Mrs. Harriet L. (Hydorn) Hibbard was born in Kalamazoo, Mich., March 2, 1845, and died in Ogden Centre, December 6, 1896. Her parents were among the first settlers of Kalamazoo, and her ancestors came from Holland. CHARLES E. HENIG was born in Woodville, Wood County, Ohio, October 5, 1860. His father, John Henig, was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, January 14, 1821. He learned the trade of carpenter and builder, and followed that business in his native town until about the year 1847, when he came to the United States and first settled in Lancaster, Pa., where he resided until he removed to Woodville, Ohio. He lived there until 1861, and then came to Adrian, Mich. He followed his trade in Adrian for many years, and was a respected, honored citizen. His death occurred September 16, 1885. He married Miss Mary Nachtrieb, of Lancaster, Pa., and they became the parents of four sons and four daughters. Mrs. Mary (Nachtrieb) Henig was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, in May, 1823, and came to the United States with her brother. Her father was a Burgomaster, and well-to-do citizen of his native village. She now resides in Denver, Colorado, with a daughter. Charles E. Henig, subject of this sketch, has passed very nearly all his life in Adrian. He was educated in the public schools of the city, and commenced to learn the carpenter and builder's trade in 1875. That has been his principal business ever since. He was City Marshal of Adrian in 1896 7, was appointed Deputy Sheriff by W. F. Shepherd, in January, 1901, and is still holding that office. He is a member of Adrian Lodge, F. & A. M., No. 19, and I. O. 0. F., No. 8, of Adrian. February 26, 1896, Charles E. Henig married Miss Elizabeth D. Buck, daughter of Joseph and Caroline Buck, of Adrian, and they have two children, as follows: Frances L., born April 1, 1897; Helen M., born December 13, 1900. Mrs. Elizabeth D. (Buck) Henig was born in the city of Adrian, January 14, 1875. C. A. CONKLIN was born in Eaton Rapids, Mich., August 8, 1838, and has always lived in Michigan. He came to Adrian with his parents in 1848. His parents came from Ontario County, N. Y., and were among the first settlers of Eaton Rapids. Mr. Conklin, the subject of our sketch, was educated in Adrian, and has been an active business man in the city for many years. In January, 1866, he established the first exclusive undertaking establishment in

Page  254 254 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Southern Michigan, and at that time was also the youngest man engaged in the business. He was known as the "boy undertaker." During his first year he attended over one hundred and twenty-five funerals. During the past thirty-five years he has buried several Charles A. Conklin_ Mrs. Mary A. Conklin. Conklin & Mott's Undertaking Establishment, 18 South Winter Street, Adrian.

Page  255 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 255 entire families, and in one instance he has laid away three generations from one house. Mr. Conklin, by his close attention to all the details, and fully understanding and adopting all the modern ideas and methods that are desirable in an intelligent community, has succeeded in building up a large patronage, and it is no exaggeration to say that he has one of the most complete and best equipped establishments in Michigan. His place of business is located on the corner of South Winter and Pearl streets, and within the walls of his large building can be found everything needed in his business. Some fourteen years ago he secured patents on several casket attachments, which he has since manufactured and supplied to the trade. December 25, 1860, Mr. Conklin married Miss Mary A. Bradish, daughter of John W. and Lydia A. Bradish, of Madison, Lenawee County. This marriage resulted in six children, four of whom are living. Residence of C. A. Conklin, No. 72 South Main Street, Adrian.

Page  256 256 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL JOSEPH M. BAKER was born in Adams, Mass., February 19, 1780, and was the son of Joseph and Experience Baker, who were of Quaker origin, and of English and German ancestors. When Joseph M. Baker was a young boy, his parents removed to Ira, Rutland County, Vermont, where he lived with them until the year 1800, when he left home and went to Manchester, Ontario County, Charles L. Thomas. Aunt Sally Thomas. N. Y., where he purchased a farm in the woods. HIe at once commenced clearing his land, and built a log cabin, and the following year, December 27, 1801, he married Miss Sally Cruthers, daughter of John and Betsey Cruthers, of Phelps, Ontario County, N. Y. They had eleven children, as follows: Norton, born December 9, 1802, married Almeda Howland, daughter of Jonathan and Mary Howland of Manchester, N. Y., September 12, 1830, and they had ten children; Norman C., born January 17, 1804, married Harriet Robinson, daughter of Robert and Deborah Robinson, of Manchester, N. Y., December 28, 1835, and they had seven children; Lyman W., born January 15, 1806, married Miss Asenath S. Warner, daughter of Russell and Orra Warner, of Manchester, N. Y., February 11, 1830, and they had seven children. Asenath Baker died in Rome, April 12, 1856. October 22, 1856, he married Miss Jerusha T. Hinckley, daughter of Benjamin and Lydia Hinckley, of Johnstown, Mich., and they had five children. Mrs. Jerusha T. Baker was born in Batavia, Genesee County, N. Y., June 1, 1831; came to Michigan with her parents in 1845, and died in Rome December, 2, 1885;

Page  257 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 257 Experience M., born March 8, 1808, married Uri Decker, and was the mother of ten children; Anna, Nancy and Russell, all died in infancy; Sally F., born June 18, 1819, married Charles L. Thomas, was the mother of seven children; Joseph F., born June 18, 1819, married Cynthia Dewey, daughter of Edmund B. and Sally Dewey, of Manchester, N. Y., October 28, 1845, and they had three children. Mrs. Cynthia (Dewey) Baker died in Rome, this county, October 15, 1857. Joseph F. then married, October 17, 1858, Mrs. Anna D. Teachout, sister of first wife, and they had one child: Russell C., born April 19, 1821, never married; Huldah J., born December 20, 1822, married Riley Cole, and was the mother of four children. All of Joseph M. Baker's children were born in Manchester, Ontario County, N. Y. Mrs. Sally (Cruthers) Baker was born in Half Moon, N. Y., January 24, 1778, and died in Rome, this county, September 15, 1851. Her parents came from Ireland early in the 18th century. Joseph M. Baker died in Adrian township, this county, May 27, 1872. Joseph M. Baker was a veritable pioneer. The first thing he did after leaving the parental roof in Vermont was to go into the unbroken forest in Ontario County, N. Y., and make himself a home. He married a pioneer's daughter, raised a family of eleven children, and resided there until the country was well improved. He erected alarge and fine house, and the family enjoyed all the comforts and many of the luxuries of that period. But he had five sons, and as they became men they grew uneasy and wanted homes and farms of their own. Michigan at that time being the Eldorado, these young men began to talk about emigrating to that unknown country, and the parents, rather than have the family separated, finally decided to sell and abandon the pleasant home they had worked so hard to make, again to go into the woods and start once more. This they did, and in the spring of 1833 Joseph M. Baker and the entire family came to Michigan and settled in the virgin forests of Lenawee County. Mr. Baker purchased from the government one thousand acres of land on Sections 12, in Rome, 5, 6 and 7, in Adrian, and 30, in Franklin. Each of his sons was given 160 acres, and his daughters 80 acres of land. The family arrived in the woods on the 7th of August, 1833. This day is now celebrated by Mr. Baker's descendants, to the number of nearly four hundred, by the annual Baker picnic. The members of Joseph M. Baker's family who came to Lenawee County in 1833, died upon the following dates: Norton, died March 15, 1880; Norman C., died February 22, 1881; Lyman W., died March 14, 1887; Experience, died July 10, 1892; Joseph F., died December 2, 1899; Russell C., died in January, 1883; Huldah, died April 12, 1851. The only direct descendant of Joseph M. and Sally Baker now alive, (1903), is Mrs. Charles L. Thomas, who resides at her old home on Section 19, in Adrian, that her husband purchased 67 years ago. Aunt Sally, as she is familiarly called, was married to Charles L. Thomas, September 17, 1837, and is the mother of seven children, as follows: Clarissa A., born 17

Page  258 258 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL June 14, 1838, married Wesley Reynolds, and is the mother of two children; Marcelline R., born October 28, 1840, died August 24, 1845; Statira E., born April 12, 1843, died August 15, 1845; Amanda S., born February 10, 1845, for ten years a teacher in the Adrian public schools; Jefferson R., born May 15, 1848, married Miss Ida Spear, daughter of George Spear, of Rome, December 9, 1878, and they have four children; Xara F., born June 30, 1851; Fred, born December 26, 1854, resides on the home farm. Charles L. Thomas was born in the town of Penfield, Ontario County, N. Y., June 21, 1814. His father, Ransom Thomas, was a pioneer of Western New York. He was born in Connecticut, December 31, 1787. In 1810 he married Miss Kate Cure, daughter of John and Eleanor Cure, of Saratoga, N. Y., and they had a family of nine children. Mrs. Kate (Cure) Thomas was born in the State of New York, near the Hudson river, in 1792, and died in Adrian in 1865. Ransom Thomas came to Michigan with his family in 1833, and settled in Adrian township. He died there in 1850. Charles L. Thomas came to Michigan with his parents in 1833, and always followed farming. He was an active, energetic man, and took a great interest in all public affairs, but never would accept public office. He was a successful farmer, and a much respected citizen. He was a member of Greenly Lodge, 103, F. & A. M., of Adrian. He was one of the earliest settlers in the township of Adrian, and no man did more to help the new settlers in locating, and relieving their sufferings and wants than he. He was stricken with heart trouble while eating breakfast, June 14, 1876, and passed away, beloved by all who knew him. FRANK W. CLAY was born in Farmer Village, Seneca County, N. Y., May 24, 1837, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1839. His father, Rev. Bradbury S. Clay, was born in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and was one of the pioneer Baptist ministers of Michigan. Mr. Clay preached in Adrian for five years during the early days of the first Baptist church, and afterwards preached for many years in Indiana and Illinois. He did a noble work among the pioneers during their struggle in making homes and subduing the wilderness. He died in 1870, in his 75th year. He married for his second wife, Miss Mary Raymer, of Bolton, N. Y., and they became the parents of five children, of whom our subject was third. Miss Sarah Frances Clay, daughter by his first wife, became the wife of the Hon. W. S. Wilcox, of Adrian, in 1844, and died February 12, 1852. Mrs. Mary (Raymer) Clay died in 1880, in her 82d year. Frank W. Clay, the subject of this sketch, resided with his parents until he was eleven years old, when he commenced the great battle of life. After acquiring such education as the pioneer schools af

Page  259 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 259 forded, he went at seventeen, to Oberlin, Ohio, and by his own efforts took a two years' course at Oberlin College. In 1855 he returned to Adrian and found employment as a clerk in the drug store of the late Samuel E. Hart, and subsequently with Remington & Bennett, and Norman Bidwell, also druggists. In 1860 he formed a partnership with Rial Niles, and carried on the drug and grocery business for about five years, building and occupying the Shepherd store on North Main street. In 1866 Mr. Clay accepted the position of conFrank W. Clay. Mrs. Amelia C. Clay. fidential manager of the late E. L. Clark's loan office, and remained in that capacity until 1870, when he engaged with Waldby's bank, of Adrian, as teller. In 1871, this bank was transformed into the First National Bank of Adrian, Mr. Clay still remaining in the same position. This bank wound up its affairs after a few years, when the late E. I. Waldby and Mr. Clay purchased the building and continued the business as private bankers, under the firm name of Waldby & Clay. This business continued until 1894, when a new organization was effected, and the present institution known as Waldby & Clay's State Bank, was founded. Mr. Clay is the president. The bank enjoys the utmost confidence of the people, and its business is among the largest in Southern Michigan. Mr. Clay has always taken a great interest in the growth and prosperity of Adrian, and his policy has been as liberal as safe and conservative banking will admit. He was twice elected city treasurer, and served as school director three years. In December, 1862, Frank W. Clay married Miss Amelia C. Hickox, daughter of Reuben K. Hickox, of Avon Springs, N. Y., and they are the parents of two children, as

Page  260 260 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL follows: Rial, born in Adrian, February 20. 1864, and Geraldine, born in Adrian, July 8, 1865, who married Joseph H. Ames, of Detroit, Mich., in 1889. Rial Clay, referred to above, is now a prominent young business man of Adrian, whose career is a standard for all ambitious sons of Lenawee County. He was educated in the public schools of his native city, and entered his father's bank as Residences of Frank W. Clay and his son, Rial Clay, in Adrian. a messenger after graduation. By his enterprise and application to business he has gradually advanced to the position of cashier. In 1900 his health failed him. This obliged him to seek relief in another climate. He immediately abandoned his pleasant home and surroundings and sought relief in a high altitude among the Alps of Switzerland. He remained there for two years. He was accompanied most of the time by his wife, and has recovered his normal condition of vigorous health. September 11, 1888, Rial Clay married Miss Fanny Ketchum, daughter of Daniel and Martha E. Ketchum, of Adrian, and they have two children, as follows: Frank D., born in Adrian, March 14, 1890; Martha Amelia, born in Adrian, September 17, 1894. Mrs. Rial Clay was born May 12, 1864. Her father, Daniel Ketchum, was born in Schenectady, N. Y.. October 19, 1828, came to Michigan in 1855, settled in Adrian, and has been in the employment of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Rail

Page  261 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 261 road as locomotive engineer and conductor ever since. Her mother, Mrs. Martha E. Ketchum, was born in Ashland, Mass., March 30, 1834. She was the daughter of Ellis and Emeline Richards, who were natives of Ashland, Mass. Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Ketchum were married at Attleboro, N. Y., March 5, 1853. ARCHIMEDES STEVENSON was born in Hannibal, Oswego County, N. Y., September 20, 1821. His father, James Stevenson, was a native of the north of Ireland, of Scotch-Irish ancestry, and came to the United States in the latter part of the 17th century with his parents, Samuel Stevenson and wife, when he was an infant. Samuel Stevenson settled on a farm in the town of Salem, Washington County, N. Y., where he died. James Stevenson lived with his parents in Salem until he was about twenty-one, when, in 1808, he made a tour of the then almost unknown great West, going through the northern part of Pennsylvania and Ohio, from Lake Erie to the Ohio river. He then went down the Ohio and Mississippi rivers to New Orleans. After spending all the summer on this exploration trip, he returned to Salem, N. Y., and settled in the town of Hannibal, Oswego County. Here he purchased a farm in the wilderness, cleared it up, made a comfortable, desirable home and resided there until his death in September, 1828. About the year 1810 he married Miss Isabel Carson, daughter of Patrick and Margaret Carson, of Salem, Washington County, N. Y., and they became the parents of eight children, four of whom lived to become men and women, as follows: James, born in Hannibal, June 13, 1816, a resident of Adrian, Mich.; Susan, born same place, in 1818, married James McKissick, and resided in Jordan, N. Y., where she died; Archimedes, born same place, September 20, 1821, resident of Adrian; David C., born same place in 1824, and died in Jordan in 1845. Mrs. Isabel (Carson) Stevenson was born in Salem, N. Y., and died in Jordan. Her ancestors were Scotch-Irish. Archimedes Stevenson, subject of this sketch, was educated in the schools of his neighborhood, and finished at Elbridge Academy, Onondaga County, N. Y. In 1835 he engaged as a clerk in a store at five dollars per month, in Jordan, following that occupation for about three years, when in the fall of 1837 a man came to Jordan who was interested in merchandizing and handling goods in Texas. Famous stories were told of great opportunities in the Lone Star State. Mr. Stevenson, then seventeen years old, being very susceptible, was lured away by the tales of the smooth talker. He went to New York, and after seeing the sights for about a week, engaged passage on a " Baltimore Clipper" for Matagorda, Texas. After a passage of forty-three days, he landed at his destination. It was a long, eventful sea voyage. The

Page  262 262 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL boat was small and unseaworthy, but the trip proved to be only a prelude to the experience he was bound to realize for nearly three years, among the Indians, the Mexicans and the pioneer white men. Nearly the first year was spent in helping survey land along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico, from Velasco to Galveston Bay. At that time there were thousands of Buffaloes and wild horses. Many of these horses were killed for the hair in their manes and tails, which was used to make hair rope, that would not curl and shrink in an expert writer of romance, capes, and many pages to faithfully chronicle all that happened to the young man during his stay. The money consisted of Mexican standard silver dollars and Texas wildcat currency. The silver dollars were about sixteen to one — pound, and a few coins became a burden to carry, and whenever possible the coin was exchanged for Texas bank bills. In 1838 a law was passed to locate the capital at Austin, and Mr. Stevenson drew the first load of lumber to the new town, from Bastrop, twentyfive miles down the Colorado river. At this time the town only consisted of wagons, three or four army tents, and the State officers. In the fall of 1840 he made up his mind to return home. He traveled to Galveston, then a town of about 500 people, and from there to New Orleans. At New Orleans he exchanged his Texas bank bills for current funds, being compelled to give six dollars for one, and took passage for New York on the Mrs. Susan E. Stevenson. ship "St. Mary," arriving

Page  263 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 263 there in January, 1841. Upon his return home, he, with his brother James, purchased 80 acres of land in the town of Elbridge, Onondaga County, N. Y. He soon after, however, purchased other land and quickly made a most desirable home. He resided in Elbridge until 1856, when he came to Michigan. He lived one year in Blissfield, and in 1857 purchased the Lewis Kemp farm on Section 22, in the township of Adrian. This is one of the choice farms of the county, and Mr. Stevenson has greatly improved it since his purchase. Some of the very best farm buildings and stock barns in the township are to be found there. In 1873 he, with his son Jasper, purchased five houses and lots on Michigan and Erie streets, in Adrian city, and established the A. Stevenson & Son lumber and coal yard, which has ever since been one of the important and prosperous business enterprises of Adrian. In 1882 he erected a fine residence, corner of Dennis and Union streets, in Adrian, where he has resided to this time. Mr. Stevenson, since his residence in Lenawee County, has been an active, prosperous farmer and business man. He is interested with his son, Jared W., in carrying on his farm, feeding sheep and shipping stock. He is also still at the head of the firm of A. Stevenson & Son in the lumber and coal trade, his son, Frank A., attending to the active business. December 4, 1844, Archimedes Stevenson married Miss Susan Elvira Whitney, daughter of Jared and Susan Whitney, of Elbridge, N. Y., and they had four children, as follows: Jared W., born in Jordan, Onondaga County, N. Y., March 13, 1848; Edward Jasper, born same place, November 5, 1850. He married Miss Minnie Hall of Tecumseh in 1874. They had two sons, George Edward and Fred Covert. He died November 12, 1881. His wife. Minnie, died December 24, 1897; Frank A., born at the same place, April 12, 1852, married Miss Laura E. Bradley, daughter of R. J. and Laura W. Bradley, of Adrian, and they have two children, Alice L. and William H. Mrs. Laura E. (Bradley) Stevenson was born in Adrian May 11, 1851. Mamie S. Spingler, born February 5, 1857, adopted child. Her parents came to Blissfield in 1858. Her mother was Mrs. Frances L. (Whitney) Spingler, a sister of Mrs. A. Stevenson, and died of fever, in November, 1860, at Blissfield. Miss Spingler has always been a member of the Stevenson family. Mrs. Susan Elvira (Whitney) Stevenson was born in the town of Onondao-a, N. Y., January 6, 1821, and (lied in Adrian, Mich., March 5, 1898, after a happy married life of fifty-four years. Her parents were natives of Connecticut, of Puritan stock, and were pioneers in Onondaga County. SILAS A. SCOFIELD was born in Lysander, Onondaga County, N. Y., October 5, 1826, his ancestors coming from Scotland. He was reared on a farm until he was fifteen years of age. From the age of 12 he worked the homestead on shares, and accumulated some

Page  264 264 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL $350, which he gave his father for the balance of his time until he attained his majority. He was a natural tradesman, and first began clerking in a store at Plainville, N. Y., where he remained between two and three years. At this time he received from his brother-inlaw an offer which led him to engage in peddling looking-glasses, pictures and picture frames. Later he engaged in the same business for himself, and then secured a one-third interest in in which they carried on a quite extensive trade. He had reached the age of twenty when he suddenly decided to go West, and started for Watertown, N. Y., with his horses and wagon, peddling as he went. He set out for Gorham, O., where he had relatives. The following spring he located in Adrian, where he sold furniture and resided there until the fall of 1851, when he went to Morenci, opening a alsimilar store there. From that time until his late sickness Morenci was his home-athe place where his best physical and laboring. mental powers were expended; Silas A. Scofeld. where he finally established a successful business, and where he was a potent factor in the general welfare of the town. Fires devastated his establishment, but he was never the sort of man who gives up because of misfortune. He became noted far and wide as an undertaker, and he personally had charge of over 3,000 funerals up to the time that his activity in that respect ceased. We have referred to him as a village-maker. Besides all that he did in and for Morenci, he established the village of Scofield, in Monroe County. He cleared up considerable land there, and furnished the Canada Southern with all of its ties, timber and piling from the State line of Ohio to the Detroit river, also furnished 40 miles of telegraph poles. He built a depot, furnishing the funds himself, and otherwise helped the place. He did much altogether in giving mechanics and other laboring men employment, in the manufacture of furniture and coffins in the earlier days, and in other lines in a later period. He also busied himself in inventing sundry devices, the most important of which was his casket fastener and other articles connected with the mortuary trade. These devices have made the name of Scofield noted in many parts of the country, as they are largely used, and

Page  265 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 265 contributed to a considerable degree to his financial success in connection with the extensive furniturestore, of which he was the head. The factory where these articles are made is one of our valuable industries. The automatic rug machine was Mr. Scofield's invention, and at one time had a large sale. Mr. Scofield had an alert mind and was an indefatigable worker, continuing his active labors considerably beyond the time when the majority of men are ready or forced to retire. He was married to Miss Emily A. Wakefield, his now bereaved wife, January 1, 1850, and they were the parents of six children, three of whom are dead, namely: Andrew, aged 8 years; Josephine, aged 19; Vernon, 16 years. Those living are: Mrs. F. E. Cawley, of Morenci; Ernest Wilber Scofield, his father's faithful and efficient partner since 1884, and Mrs. M. E. Keyes, of Detroit. There are eight grandchildren. Mrs. Emily A. (Wakefield) Scofield was born in Thompson, Windham County, Conn., June 29, 1831. Mr. Scofield belonged to a family of 12 children of whom there are six living, Mrs. P. A. Rae, of Fremont, Neb.; Mrs. Eliza Simmons, Nora, Ill.; James A. and William N. Scofield, also of Nora; John B. Scofield, of Carson City, Mich., who was at the funeral, and Mrs. Adele Winchell, of Lysander, N. Y. Mr. Scofield was not a politician, yet took a keen interest in local and general politics, and kept himself well informed, always having pronounced views. He voted the Republican ticket. Such, in brief, is the life work of an enterprising, industrious, valued citizen-one whose life labors form a conspicuous place in the annals of Morenci, and whose name will long be perpetuated. Ernest W. Scofield was born in Morenci, Mich., September 9, 1863, and has always lived there. He was educated in the public schools of Morenci, and at a business college in Detroit. He became a partner in his father's extensive business in Morenci, January 1, 1884. Since his father's death he has become the sole owner. He is the owner of the only electric lighting plant in the village, and carries on an extensive manufactory of casket shell hardware, devices patented by his father and himself. He is one of the largest dealers in furniture, carpets and undertaking goods in Southern Michigan, and employs from ten to twelve men permanently. December 29, 1886, Ernest W. Scofield married Miss Mertie V. Packer, daughter of Isaac D. and Lavina C. (Carscaddon) Packer, of Morenci, and they have had five children, as follows: Harold W., born May 14,. 1888; Gladys L., born April 18, 1890, died February 18, 1896; Marguerite E., born June 18, 1892; Eleanor V., born October 11, 1899; Ernest W., born September 8, 1901. Mrs. Mertie V. Scofield was born in Morenci, July 18, 1863. Her father, Isaac D. Packer, was born in Berks County, Pa., April 2, 1819, and was the son of Eli and Ann (Thomas) Packer, of Center County, Pa. He came to Michigan in 1851, first settled in Medina, and afterwards in Seneca, where he died June 20, 1897. Mrs. Lovina C. Packer was born November 1, 1821, in Center County, Pa., her father being a native of Ireland, and her mother of Scotland. She died in Morenci, October 9, 1902.

Page  266 266 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL William W. Bliss. Mrs. Elizabeth G. Bliss. The old Homestead, erected by Hervey Bliss, in Blissfield Village.

Page  267 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 267 W. IRVING BLISS was born in Blissfield, Lenawee County, Mich., December 23, 1840. His father, William W. Bliss, was born in Raisinville, Monroe County, Mich., March 28, 1817, and was the oldest son of Hervey and Nancy Bliss, the first settlers and founders of Blissfield, after whom the township and village were named. William W. Bliss came to Lenawee County in December, 1824, with his par-.. ents, and ever after resided in Blissfield, with the exception?: of about four years, which he spent in Hillsdale. When a young man he embarked in the mercantile business in James T. Kedzie. After a partnership of about five years, Mr. Kedzie withdrew, Myron E. Knight taking his interest. The firm of Bliss & Knight existed until 1861, when Mr. Knight's interest was purchased by W. W. Bliss & Son. The business was carried on by this firm until 1885, when w. Irving Bliss, of Blisslield. the son, W. Irving Bliss, purchased his father's interest. W. W. Bliss was one of the foremost men of Blissfield, ar d was highly regarded. His honorable career as a business man and citizen, d(uring his entire life, endeared him to all who knew him. He held many political offices, and was postmaster, member of the School Board, an elder in the Presbyterian church, in addition to many other positipns of trust and honor. He died at his home in Blissfield, January 4, 1897. William W. Bliss married Miss Elizabeth G. Knight, daughter of Roswell W. and Hannah (Granger) Knight, and became the parents of three children, as Charles M. Bliss, of Toledo.

Page  268 268 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL follows: W. Irving, born as above; Roswell L., born June 8, 1845, died September 6, 1847; Charles M., born August 16, 1849, resides in Toledo, Ohio. Mrs. Elizabeth G. (Knight) Bliss was born in North Almond, Allegany County, N. Y., February 16, 1818, and now (1903) resides in Blissfield, in good health. Her parents were pioneers in Blissfield and Riga. W. Irving Bliss, subject of this sketch, has spent most of his life in Blissfield, and is the only male member of the Bliss family who now resides there. He was brought up in the mercantile business, and it is only on account of poor health that he is not actively engaged at this time. For many years he was interested in a "general store," and was closely identified with all the business, public and social progress of Blissfield. He has served several years upon the Village Board, and was on the School Board nine years. He is now interested in a real estate business, loaning money, and looking after and renting his property in village and country. He does a prosperous insurance business. May 23, 1867, W. Irving Bliss married Miss Rose E. Whitman, daughter of Jephtha and Alvira (Mitchell) Whitman, pioneers of Lenawee County, settling in Adrian previous to 1830. Mrs. Rose E. (Whitman) Bliss was born in Morenci, this county, March 10, 1849. [For a complete history of the Bliss family, see Almond L. Bliss' record in this volume.] REV. GEORGE HUMPHREY was born in Pittsburg, Pa., August 5, 1849. He came to' Michigan with his parents in 1852 and settled in the city of Adrian. His father, Thomas Humphrey, was born near London, England, where he resided until about the year 1847, when he came to America. He was like many another Englishman, when a young man he married the girl of his heart's choice, and was disinherited. He learned the carpenter's craft and on coming to America, followed that trade in Pittsburg and Beaver, Pa., until his death, which occurred at Beaver, in 1850. About the year 1840, he married Miss Anna White, of Windsor, near London, England, where she was born, and where her parents resided. In 1852 she married her second husband, John C. Smith, with whom she came to Adrian. She was the mother of eight children, four by each husband. She died in Palmyra, this county, November 7, 1860. George Humphrey, the subject of this sketch, was left an orphan in his eleventh year, and became a township charge, but was indentured by the County Poor Commissioners to W. H. Colvin of Palmyra, where he remained until he was nineteen, when he purchased his remaining two years' time of service. No orphan was ever more fortunate in finding a good home, or kinder or more sincere friends, than were Mr. and Mrs. Colvin. During his service there he was allowed three months' schooling each year. He became so anxious for an education, that in 1869 he became a student of Adrian Col

Page  269 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 269 lege, where he remained two years. In the spring of 1871 he entered the scientific department of Hillsdale College, where he remained for two terms, when his health failed him and he was obliged to abandon study for a time. In the fall of 1871 he purchased his present farm home on Sections 8-5 in Palmyra township, this county. Following this purchase he taught six terms in the graded school at Palmyra village. His farm consists of 166 acres which, since his marriage, he has given intelligent and successful attention. At the age of eighteen years he became a convert of the Palmyra Presbyterian church, and being of a spiritual and religious nature, made deep and fervent study of all moral and religious thought. He was called to the ministry by the congregation, which petitioned the Presbytery to license him to fill its pulpit with the end in view that he be ordained and installed as its pastor. In the spring of 1889 he was licensed to preach, and after taking the necessary course of study in theology, he was ordained and installed. For a period of five years he was the stated supply of the Blissfield Presbyterian church. The Palmyra Presbyterian church is known as one of the most prosperous in Lenawee County. March 21, 1872, George Humphrey married Mrs. Sarah C. Latham, youngest daughter of George and Mary Ann Colvin, of Palmyra, and they are the parents of six children, as follows: George C., born February 13, 1875, married, June 25, 1902, Eva Doty, daughter of William and Caroline (Raymond) Doty, of Raisin, and resides in Lansing, where he is a professor of animal husbandry in the Agricultural College; Ethel C., born June 15, 1876, a teacher in the public schools of Ludington, Mich.; Thomas W., born May 24, 1878, at home; Edwin L., born June 30, 1879, married, December 25, 1902, Miss Beulah Atwell, daughter of Herrman and Elizabeth Atwell, of Palmyra, and a resident of Palmyra; Elizabeth A., born February 5, 1883, at home; Mary A., born November 29, 1886, at home. Mrs. Sarah C. Humphrey was born February 28, 1846, in Palmyra, this county. Her father, George C. Colvin, was born in Cranston, Providence County, R., I., January 6, 1808. He came to Michigan in 1831, took up land in Raisin, in 1833, but finally located on Section 15, in Palmyra, August 6, 1834, he married Miss Mary A. Rogers, daughter of Deacon Obediah and Lydia (Reed) Rogers, of Raisin, and they became the parents of six children, Mrs. Humphrey being the youngest. [For the ancestry of Mrs. Humphrey see pages 167 and 304, Vol. 1, Whitney & Bonner's History and Biographical Record of Lenawee County.] HON. WILLIAM SEWARD WILCOX was born in the town of Riga, Monroe County, N. Y., April 25, 1819, and came to Michigan with his brother-in-law, Ira Bidwell, September 18, 1836. His parents were Austin and Clarissa Wilcox, who, during the childhood of our subject, removed from Riga to Bergen, Genesee County, N. Y.,

Page  270 270 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL lion. William S. Wilcox. and purchased a farm. Here Mr. Wilcox, Sr., established a farmers' hotel, a stage line, and became postmaster, the son, William S., living at home and assisting until he was seventeen years old. In 1836 he came west to Milan, Ohio, where he engaged as clerk in the dry goods store of Mr. Ira Bidwell. That fall Mr. Bidwell removed his stock of goods from Milan to the then growing village of Adrian, Mr. Wilcox coming with him. Here Mr. Bidwell prospered, and for many years was a respected and leading citizen. Mr. Wilcox re

Page  271 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 271 mained in his employ until 1840, when he became a partner in the business, continuing four years. In 1844, in the spring, Mr. Wilcox commenced business for himself, with a new and suitable stock of dry goods. He was successful in this venture, and during the following ten years, a portion of the time taking in as partners Justus H. Bodwell and William D. Tolford. In 1854 he sold out to Bodwell, Carey & Clay. He at once engaged in the hardware business, and opened a store, the firm being Wilcox & Chappell. This firm continued for about eighteen months, when Mr. Chappell withdrew, and Mr. Wilcox carried on the store until 1867, when his brother Henry became a partner. In 1873 the firm name was changed to Wilcox Bros. & Co., when George A. Wilcox, son of W. S., was taken in. In 1864 William S. Wilcox was elected to the Michigan Legislature, was re-elected in 1866, and was chairman of the ways and means committee. He was elected Mayor of Adrian in 1865. In 1870 he was elected State Senator, and was chairman of the finance committee. In 1869 he was appointed by Gov. Baldwin, State Prison Inspector, and was at once elected chairman of the Board. He was elected President of the Michigan State Insurance Company in 1866, which position he held for seventeen years. In 1863 he was elected President of the Oakwood Cemetery Association, and held the office at the time of his death. He became an active member of the Adrian Volunteer Fire Department in 1841 and continued until the paid department was organized in 1867. He became superintendent of the Baptist Sabbath School in 1839, and for over fifty-one years he faithfully filled that position. In 1880 he became interested in banking, and after that time gave most of his attention to the interests of the Commercial Exchange Bank of Adrian. He was a man of large affairs, and did much for the upbuilding of Adrian. He erected two fine residences, and in both instances added to the beauty and importance of the city. He was active and liberal in every public enterprise, and his good judgment and business ability were sought in every public undertaking. He died in Adrian, September 15, 1893, beloved and respected by all classes of citizens. William S. Wilcox was twice married. His first Mrs. Sarah Frances Wilcox. wife was Miss Sarah Frances

Page  272 272 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Clay, daughter of Rev. Bradbury S. and Mary (Raymer) Clay, and they had three sons, two of whom died in infancy, George A. being the only survivor. Mrs. Sarah Frances Wilcox died February 12, 1852. August 17, 1854, Mr. Wilcox married Miss Josephine Southworth, daughter of Dr. William Southworth, of Avon Springs, N. Y. There were no children by this marriage. Mrs. Josephine Wilcox died in Adrian in October, 1897. She was a lady of much intelligence and possessed rare literary ability, being highly esteemed by all who knew her. Previous to her death, she bequeathed the sum of five thousand dollars to Oakwood Cemetery Association, for the purpose of constructing an entrance way to the beautiful grounds, to the memory of her husband. JOSEPH H. SMITH was born in Cambridge, Lenawee County, Mich., April 26, 1853. His father, William H. Smith, was born in Onondaga, N. Y., April 16, 1831, came to Michigan with his parents in 1833, and settled on Section 4, in Cambridge, this county, in 1836. He followed farming until he was about twenty years old, and helped in clearing up a new farm. When they located in Cambridge he assisted his father in cutting a road for a distance of nearly four miles to get to their land, which was located on Stony Lake. About the year 1851 he went to learn the carpenter's trade, which he still follows. He has been a resident of Tecumseh for many years. In 1849 he married Miss Julia Herrick, and they had six children, four of whom are now dead, Joseph H. and Charles D. being the survivors. Mrs. Julia (Herrick) Smith was a native of Ireland, was born June 12, 1830, and came to America with her parents in 1844. She died in Tecumseh, this county, August 22, 1897. Joseph H. Smith, the subject of this sketch, can trace his ancestry back for five generations. His great-great-grandfather was Aaron Smith, who was born in 1745, and always lived in Worcester, Mass., where he died in 1840. His son Aaron was born in the same place in 1773, and died there in 1848. His son, Henry Smith, was also born in Worcester, in 1798, emigrated to Onondaga, N. Y., in 1803, coming to Michigan in 1833. He died in Cambridge, this county, in 1891. Joseph H. Smith was educated in the district schools of Cambridge, and at Adrian College. When he was seventeen years old he went at carpenter work, and served five years' apprenticeship, after which he followed contracting and building until 1883, when he removed to Tecumseh and took charge of a lumber yard and sash and blind factory. In April, 1893, he organized the Tecumseh State Savings Bank, and he became its cashier, which position he holds at the present time. Previous to organizing this bank he was cashier of the bank of O. P. Bills & Co. for five years. He was township clerk of Cambridge for four

Page  273 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 273 years. Has served in Tecumseh as township clerk and treasurer, and village treasurer, and three terms as president of the village of Tecumseh, his last term expiring in March, 1903. He is also serving his tenth year as trustee of Tecumseh High School. He is a member of the Presbyterian church, and has served as trustee for five years. He is a prominent Mason, has held nearly all the chairs in his lodge, and is a member of Adrian Commandery, No. 4, Knights Templar. January 1, 1877, he married Miss Mary F. Rogers, daughter of R. L. and Susan A. Rogers, of Cambridge, and they have had two children, as follows: Laverne W., born in Cambridge, this county, October 10, 1877, graduated from Tecumseh High School in 1896, entered S. W. Anderson's dry goods store in Tecumseh, where he remained five years, and is now in his second year with W. C. McConnell, in Adrian; Lena F., born in Cambridge, this county, January 19, 1883, is a graduate of Tecumseh High School class of 1900, at home. Mrs. Mary F. Smith was born in Cambridge, August 22, 1854. Her father, R. L. Rogers, was a pioneer of Cambridge, where he now resides. He was born in Steuben County, N. Y., February 3, 1831. Mrs. Susan A. Rogers was born in Erie County, Pa., September 1, 1833. They were married September 28, 1853. JOHN W. DEWEY was born in Cambridge, Lenawee County, Mich., March 17, 1841, and has always lived on the farm upon which he was born. His father, Francis A. Dewey, was born at Three Rivers, in the Province of Quebec, Canada, February 25, 1811. He came to Michigan with his parents in 1829, and settled in Tecumseh. In 1836 he took up from the government 160 acres of land on Sections 17 and 18, in Cambridge, and ever after resided in that township. [For the full family record of Francis A. Dewey, see Whitney & Bonner's History and Biographical Record of Lenawee County, Vol. 1, page 375; also the Life of Admiral Dewey, and the Dewey Family History, published in 1898.] John W. Dewey, subject of this sketch, was born upon the farm on which he now lives. He always followed farming for a business, and has been reasonably successful. He has never been an active politician or sought after office, but has given his attention to domestic affairs and the general welfare of his township. When he was seventeen years old he became a member of St. Michael's Episcopal church of Cambridge. Ever active in church work, he has been superintendent of the Sunday School for more than thirty years, with an attendance of from sixty to eighty scholars. The parish was organized in 1843, by Rev. William N. Lyster, and the society built a fine brick church in 1855, near Cambridge Junction. Mr. Dewey has been an officer in the 18

Page  274 274 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL church for forty-one years. April 3, 1866, John W. Dewey married Miss Caroline White, daughter of Samuel and Ann (Smith) White, of Cambridge, and they are the parents of three children, as follows: Anna H., born April 21, 1867, married December 12, 1894, Emery D. Neeley, has two children, Leroy J., born June 17, 1897; Glenn D., born October 31, 1899; Lydia Bell, born October 9, 1869, died April 12, 1875; Bessie L., born October 2, 1879, married March 21, 1900, Percy I. Alderdyce. Mrs. Caroline (White) Dewey was born November 5, 1843, in Cambridge township. Her parents were natives of Sussex, England, where they were married in 1830, and immediately came to the United States, first settling near Palmyra, N. Y., where he followed his trade of carpenter and joiner until 1836, when he came to Michigan and settled in Cambridge, this county. He died there February 20, 1892, aged 81 years. His wife Con, ad died in Cambridge, June 22, yeaFrancis A. Dewey, of 1877, she being the mother of eight children. AARON R. TUFTS was born in Stafford, Genesee County, N. Y., April 21, 1825. His father, Aaron Tufts, was born in Massachusetts, November 5, 1803, and resided there with his parents until 1821, when he emigrated to Genesee County, N.Y., where he afterwards purchased a farm and lived until his death in 1882. The ancestors of the Tufts family in America were Irish, and naturally became patriots, some of whom participated actively in the Revolutionary war, as well as the war of 1812. About the year 1822 Aaron Tufts married Mehitable Persons, daughter of Eli Persons, of Genesee County, and they had dix children, Aaron R. being the first son, and fourth child. Mrs. Mehitable (Persons) Tufts was born in Connecticut, and died in Genesee County, N. Y., in her 29th year. Aaron R. Tufts, subject of our sketch, lived with his father until he was twenty-one years old. He followed farm work until 1850, when he came to Michigan, having saved about $500 in money.

Page  275 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 275 In November, 1850, he purchased of Sumner W. Rice, one hundred and sixty acres of land on Section 3, in Seneca, this county, and has resided there ever since. In 1855 he purchased an adjoining 80 acres. Since that time Mr. Tufts has devoted all his time and energies to systematic, intelligent farming, and by applying himself to his own affairs, and giving serious and reasonable attention to the public weal, he has been successful in his efforts. His methods have been progressive, and his ideas that mixed farming is the most lucrative and pleasant have been demonstrated to his satisfaction. Mr. Tufts has his ideals, and one of them is a comfortable and commodious home. He has been fortunate enough to be able to gratify his taste and desire, in building, under his personal supervision, one of the most complete rural homes in his township, and perhaps, the county. We are pleased to be able to give a fine illustration of it. To fully appreciate its completeness and imposing appearance, a visit is necessary. It is one of the beauty spots of old Lenawee, where beautiful homes and pastoral scenes abound. Mr. Tufts is located about thirteen miles from Adrian, and seven miles from the village of Morenci. January 17, 1850, Aaron R. Tufts married Miss Margaret Ann Perry, daughter of Roswell and Dolly Perry, of Bethany, Genesee I I 4 k kl mar", Home of Aaron R. Tufts, Seneca.

Page  276 276 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL County, N. Y., by whom he has had four children, as follows: Florence V., born December 25, 1851; Eva A., born January 1, 1855, married Harvey Upton, of Medina, and has three children; Mary Ann, born December 27, 1859, married Thomas Clarkson of Seneca; Charles L., born March 8, 1865, resides at the homestead, married Miss Ida M. Deline, October 21, 1885, has three children, as follows Bertha M., born August 12, 1888, Altha N., born July 15, 1890; Alice M., born February 16, 1896. Mrs. Margaret Ann (Perry) Tufts was born in Pavilion, Genesee County, N. Y., March 5, 1830, Her father was a native of the State of New York, and died there, in Erie County, in 1840. Her ancestors were English, but her grandfather was a soldier in the Revolution. Her mother was a native of Genesee County, N. Y., born in 1786, and came to Michigan after the death of her husband, to reside with her daughter, and died in Seneca, this county, in 1865. Mrs. Margaret Ann (Perry) Tufts died at her home in Seneca, April 2, 1890. October 28, 1892, Aaron R. Tufts married Frances M. Winship, daughter of W. L. and Emma Winship, of Fairfield, this county. RICHARD A. BURY was born in Albany, N. Y., February 20, 1830. He was the son of an Episcopal clergyman, Rev. Richard Bury, who came West as rector of St. Paul's church in Detroit in 1832. It was during the residence of the family in Detroit, that the son, the subject of this sketch, was educated in the famous school of the Rev. Moses H. Hunter, at Grosse Isle, Mich., his education being finished in the schools of Cleveland, Ohio. From the age of twenty he was in business for himself and made a mark in the lumber traffic. In 1862 he moved to Adrian, opening a lumber yard and planing mill, on the lot bounded by Frank, Church, Locust and Center streets. He removed later to the corner of Michigan and Division streets, where he took in D. M. Baker as a partner. January 1, 1872, he was appointed lumber agent of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad, selling his interest in the lumber business to Mr. Baker. He retained his position with the railroad until the time of his death. He was a member of Adrian Lodge, No. 19, F. & A. M., Adrian Chapter, No. 10, R. A. M., and one of the oldest members of Adrian Commandery, No. 4, Knights Templar. He gave freely of his time and money to the construction of the present Masonic Temple in Adrian. He was a member of Michigan Consistory, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, and was made a member of the Supreme Council of Sovereign Grand Inspectors General of the Thirty-third Degree, at Boston, on August 28, 1872. In religious work, born and raised in the fold of the Protestant Episcopal church, he never wavered in his allegiance: every effort to strengthen and upbuild he aided to the

Page  277 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 277 extent of his ability. He served as senior warden of Christ church nearly forty years, and for many years was superintendent of the Sunday school. Always deeply interested in the welfare of the city of Adrian, in the days of the old volunteer fire department, he was for many years an enthusiastic member. He served several terms as member of the school board, and one term as Mayor. September 5, 1854, he was united in marriage to Caroline Louisa Choate, daughter of Nathan and Louisa (Kimball) Choate, she being born at Derry, N. H., March 29, 1832, and moving with her parents to Adrian, during her early life, dying at Adrian, February 28, 1882. The children by this union were Frank Choate Bury, of Detroit; Mrs. W. E. Germaine, of Salt Lake City, Utah, and Richard Alfred Bury, of Cleveland, Ohio. March 27, 1883, he was united in marriage to Mrs. Mary W. Hoag. Mr. Bury died at the family home on Division street, June 6, 1902. RUFUS MERRICK was born in Corinth, Orange County, Vermont, April 15. 1800. HIe was the oldest son of Joseph and Sarah (Herriman) Merrick, who were natives of Rockingham County, New Hampshire. Joseph Merrick was the son of Joseph and Judith (Little) Merrick. Joseph Merrick, Sr., was also a native of New Hampshire, and a farmer of Rockingham County. Joseph Merrick, Jr., was brought up a farmer. When he was a young man he went to Corinth, Vt., and followed farming for a few years. In 1802 he moved to New Hampshire, and finally settled at Newburyport, Mass., where he followed ship carpentering until 1812, when the war broke out and business was suspended. He returned to New Hampshire, and finally back to Corinth, Vt., where he lived until 1816. In the spring of that year he left Corinth with an old horse team and sleigh, with his wife and eight children, for the State of New York, having no definite point of destination. He got as far as Brutus, (now Sennett) Cayuga County, in March, when the snow went off and he was compelled to stop. It so happened that an abandoned log house stood near by, which he took possession of and occupied for several days, until he could find a more comfortable place. He settled there and finally purchased a farm and lived there until 1834, when he sold out and came to Michigan, settling in Adrian, purchasing eighteen acres of land, all of which is now in the city, and comprises that portion lying west of South Main street and south of Merrick street. The old house built by him on South Main street, near Cross street, is still standing (1903). He died in Adrian, January 9, 1854. Mrs. Sarah Merrick also died in Adrian, March 2, 1870. Rufus Merrick lived with his parents until the spring of 1817, when he went to Auburn, N. Y., and learned the cabinet maker's trade with Abijah Keeler, remaining there until he was twenty-one, when he went to

Page  278 278 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Kingston, Canada, worked six months and returned to New York. He worked in Auburn one year, in Elbridge, Onondaga County, eight years, and in 1830 he came to Michigan, arriving in Adrian in October, where he resided until his death, January 2, 1882. There were but three frame houses in Adrian at that time. He immediately opened a cabinet shop, and during the first nine months his cash receipts were only 75 cents. There was nobody to buy his work, or need Rufus Merrick. Mrs. Artemicia Merrick. his services, nor money to do business with. He struggled along until the tide of emigration set in in 1834, and from that date for many years he flourished. During the summer of 1830 he purchased of A. J. Comstock a mill privilege, and in the fall of 1832 he built a cabinet and chair shop which he carried on for about thirty years. In 1854 he changed his shop into a flouring mill, and in 1856 he sold it. For several years, in connection with his furniture shop and mill, he carried on wool carding and cloth dressing, and in 1850 he had a large lot of cloth in the mill that had been dressed and was ready for delivery. One night the whole lot, valued at about $400, was stolen. Old "Sile" Doty was afterward indicted by the grand jury for the robbery, but the indictment and proofs were destroyed when the court house was burned in 1852. In 1832 he purchased of A. J. Comstock the lot upon which his house now stands on West Maumee street, consisting of about one acre, for which he gave a wooden clock and a bedstead. In 1834 he built a house on it, and in

Page  279 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 279 1846 built the large brick residence. In 1821, at Rochester, N. Y., Rufus Merrick married Sarah Robbins, by whom he had three children, two of whom died in childhood. George W., born in Auburn, N. Y., March 16, 1834, died in Adrian, April 18, 1892, where his widow, nee Rachel Lovisa Wright,'still lives (1903). He afterwards married Mrs. Artemicia Hunt, widow of Morris Hunt and daughter of William and Huldah Stone, by whom he had three children, as follows: Philo, died at the age of fourteen months; Rufus P., born in Adrian, November 17, 1842; Sarah E., born in Adrian, October 7, 1844. Mrs. Artemicia Merrick was born in Burlington, Conn., April 12, 1810, and came to Michigan with her husband, Mr. Hunt, in 1838. She died September 14, 1885, at Adrian. Her parents were natives of Burlington, Conn., where her mother died. Her father afterwards went to Lima, Ohio, living there until his death. Rufus P. Merrick, after serving three years in the Civil War, married Marie Antoinette Ripley, they making their home in Adrian until the year 1886, when, with their four children, they removed to Charlotte, Mich., where they now reside. Their son, Lauren E., served in the war with Spain, and is now married and living in Detroit, Mich. Two daughters are married and living in or near Charlotte, and one is at home with her parents. Sarah E. Merrick married on October 13, 1863, John S. Nash. They shortly after removed to Toledo, Ohio, where their daughter, Ida Luella, was born, returning later to Adrian. It was the daughter's privilege to minister to her parents in their last days, her father, Rufus Merrick, passing from earth January 2, 1882, at the ripe age of eighty-two years, in active usefulness until within the last two weeks, his first warning of the end coming to him in a fall upon the floor while standing at his wood-turning lathe at his customary occupation. From this time he was confined to the house, but very little to his bed, and his final succumbing was unexpected, the physician's verdict on the previous day being that he would recover. His wife, Mrs. Artemicia Merrick, survived him three years and eight months, passing away September 14, 1885. She lives in the memories of her children and others who knew her as the faithful mother and kindly neighbor, a lifelong member of the Baptist church and largely endowed with the chiefest grace-charity. After the death of John S. Nash, February 1, 1886, his widow and daughter removed to DesMoines, Iowa, where they now reside. In 1897, fifteen years after the departure to the spirit world of Rufus Merrick, the railroad engine shrieked its rapid flight across the grounds he once owned and occupied. Reminiscently his children and grandchildren see him in his favorite seat at the east porch window, commanding an extended outlook over the tract now occupied by the railroad, and think what an interesting diversion it would have afforded him who always took such profound interest in the city's progress and in improvements of whatever kind. But even in his day, the possibility of a railroad on the present site was not unconsidered.

Page  280 280 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Mrs. Harriet H. Knapp. Hon. Cornelius Knapp. For a complete record of the life of Hon. Cornelius Knapp, see Whitney & Bonner's History and Biographical Record of Lenawee County, Vol. 1, page 457; also see Biographical Album of Lenawee County, page 1004. JAMES S. WILCOX was born in Whitesboro, Oneida County, N. Y., September 10, 1821. His father, Morris Wilcox, was born in the same place, June 12, 1796, died June 6, 1879, and was the son of Reuben, born 1762, and Hannah Wilcox, born 1760, who were natives of Connecticut, pioneers of Oneida County, N. Y., and located on government land in the township of Whitesboro, where they died respectively in 1853, aged 91 years, and 1837, aged 76 years. Morris Wilcox was raised a farmer, but became a mechanic and contractor, building many of the first large buildings in Utica. He constructed the locks on the Chenango Canal at Utica, and was in the employ of the State of New York for many years. He was a prominent man

Page  281 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 281., ", 6., 9! q".." W - z%,,aF I A 6 t, *.,. 1- I Mr. and Mrs. James S. Wilcox. in Utica, and held important public offices there. During the latter portion of his life he filled the office of Justice of the Peace, suddenly.dying in office. About the year 1817 Morris Wilcox married Miss Phoebe Brown, daughter of Nathan and Hannah Brown, of Leonardsville, Madison County, N. Y., and they became the parents of six.children. Her parents were pioneers in Madison County, where they were farmers and became prominent citizens. James S. Wilcox was born on a farm near Utica, N. Y., where he received a limited education. When he was twelve years old he left home and went to Norwalk, Ohio, where he found employment and remained several years. Most of his time was spent in merchandizing, and at the age of about twenty-one he was made manager of a large general store. In 1848 he went to Milan, Ohio, where he was engaged in merchandizing until 1852, when he went to New York city, and for two years traveled for a wholesale cloth house. In 1854 he went to Utica and.engaged in the flour and grain trade. In 1864 he came to Michigan and settled in Adrian. In 1864-5 he engaged in the sheep business, buying in Ohio and driving to Illinois. In 1866 he was in the employ of the Michigan Southern & Northern Indiana Railroad Company, as clerk to Supt. J. E. Curtis. In 1867 he organized a company for the manufacture of woodenware, at Toledo, Ohio. The firm was known as Wilcox, Kidder, Treat & Co., Mr. Wilcox being the manager. In 1867 a large fire wiped the factory out of existence. In 1868 he engaged in the life insurance business, and was -very successful. He has followed this calling for 35 years, and at 82 years of age is as energetic for business as many much younger Ymen. March 3, 1847, James S. Wilcox married Miss Eudotia M. Stur

Page  282 282 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL gis, daughter of Thaddeus B. and Eudotia (Beach) Sturgis, of Norwalk, Ohio, and they are the parents of four children, as follows James M., born in Milan, Ohio, March 31, 1848, married Miss Mary Wood of Adrian, has three children and resides in Grand Rapids, Mich. Lewis S., born in Milan, Ohio, July29, 1852; Jennie E.,. born in Utica, N. Y., October 3, 1859, married H. N. Montague, May 13, 1886, is the mother of two children, and resides at Caro, Mich. Mattie L., born in Utica, N. Y., February 7, 1861, married W. H. Burnham, May 13, 1889, is the mother of three children, and resides in Adrian. Mrs. Eudotia M. (Sturgis) Wilcox was born June 6, 1826. Her father, Thaddeus Burr Sturgis, was a native of Connecticut, born October 22, 1800, died in California, July 31, 1850. He was the son of Lewis B. and Charlotte (Belden) Sturgis. Lewis B. Sturgis represented his district in Congress for twelve years, and was a prominent lawyer. Her mother, Eudotia (Beach) Sturgis, born in Marcellus, N. Y., October 16, 1806, was the mother of eight children, the daughter of Dr. Bildad and Hannah Beach of Marcellus, N. Y., and died at Utica, N. Y.. May 15, 1859. ORLANDO WESTGATE was born in Raisin, Lenawee County,. Mich., December 24, 1838. His father, Jeremiah Westgate, was born in Niagara County, N. Y., December 19, 1792. He was reared a farmer and lived with his parents, Jonathan Westgate, in Niagara County, N. Y., until 1834, when he came to Michigan and took up 160 acres of land on Section 27, in Raisin township, where he lived until his death, which occurred in May, 1871. He was born and reared a Quaker, and was always an active member of that denomination. He was one of the founders of the Raisin Centre Quaker church, was very active in the construction of the first building and was a constituent member. He was a good citizen, an honorable man, and thrifty farmer. In 1835 Jeremiah Westgate married Mrs. Dorcas Bowerman Kayner, and they had ten children, Orlando being the second child and son. Mrs. Dorcas Westgate was born in Niagara County, N. Y., October 15, 1812, and died in Raisin, this county, in December, 1853. Orlando Westgate is a native of Lenawee County, and has always lived in Raisin township. He was raised a farmer, and was educated in the country district schools, one term at Hillsdale College, one term at Aunt Laura Haviland's Raisin Institute, and finished at the Raisin Valley Seminary. His. home is on Section 33, in Raisin, opposite his father's homestead. He has a comfortable home and a desirable farm. In February, 1865, he enlisted in what was then known as the New 11th Michigan Infantry, and served in Major General Thomas' Division at Chattanooga and Knoxville. At the close of the great Rebellion, he re

Page  283 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 283 - turned home after a service of only seven months, with an honorable discharge. He has served his township as Treasurer, and Moderator of his school district, No. 7, for seventeen consecutive years. He is a member and one of the trustees of the Raisin Center Friends church, and is also a trustee of the Raisin Valley Seminary. November 25, 1869, Orlando Westgate married Miss Mary L. Moore, daughter of Samuel D. and Mary Moore, of Raisin, and they had five children, as follows: Estella M., born November 5, 1870, married Charles E. Gorton, November 15, 1894, and they have one child; Chester O., born March 25, 1872, married Miss Alice Haviland, March 22, 1894; Orpheus A., born August 29, 1873, married Miss Jane Bird, and they have one child; Lorena, born April 8, 1876, married George R. Miller, August 27, 1896, and they have three children; Mary Mable, born April 11, 1878, married William Kennedy, July 3, 1901, and they have one child. Mrs. Mary L. Westgate was born in Lancaster, Pa., and came to Michigan with her parents, who were pioneers in Washtenaw County. She died in Raisin, November 5, 1879. March 31, 1881, Orlando Westgate married Miss Ellen J. Bowerman, daughter of Moses and Zilpha Bowerman, of Raisin, and they have had five children, as follows: Fanny E., born July 16, 1882; Charles H., born July 30, 1885; Lewis A., born April 2, 1887; Millard C., born February 19, 1891; Lloyd G., born April 13, 1893. Mrs. Ellen J. Westgate was born in Raisin, this county, September 9, 1852. Her father, Moses Bowerman, born in Niagara County, N. Y., November 27, 1811, was a pioneer in Raisin, where he died December 18, 1896. Her mother, Mrs. Zilpha (Haviland) Bowerman, was born in Niagara County, N. Y., January 9, 1812, and died in Raisin, July 9, 1896. She was a minister of the Society of Friends, and descended from Quaker parentage of several generations standing. Moses Bowerman took up land on Section 33,. in Raisin. Soon after the railroad went through the farm, and the ridge road cutting through another way, he became dissatisfied and sold. In 1839 he bought the farm upon which he afterwards lived and died. Charles Haviland came to Michigan in 1832, and took up a half section of land, the west half of Section 34, donating about three acres of land for church purposes. Afterwards his son Daniel and daughter Martha obtained part of the land. Later the daughter sold her part and went West and the son traded with a brother. The brother died, and after several changes it has at last come to be the home of a granddaughter of the original owner, Mrs. Orlando Westgate. CHARLES C. WAKEFIELD was born in Morenci, Lenawee County, Mich., February 16, 1841, and has spent the most of his life in his native village. His father, Dennis Wakefield, was born in Thompson, Windham County, Conn., in November, 1809. He was, the son of Moses and Nancy (Kimball) Wakefield, of Thompson,.

Page  284 284 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Conn. Moses Wakefield was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, and his wife, Nancy, supported herself and family of three children while her husband was doing battle for liberty. Dennis Wakefield, after receiving a common school education, and working out for about three years, came to Michigan in 1834, and entered government land on Section 2, Town 9, Medina, this county. He afterwards entered additional land until he owned over four hundred acres in Medina. In July, 1839, he married Miss Abigail F. Crosby, daughter of Charles and Abigail Crosby, of Ypsilanti, Mich., and they had two children, Charles C. being the oldest. Mrs. Abigail F. Wakefield died in March, 1845. Mr. Wakefield was married to Miss Charity Scofield in 1847, who died in April, 1851. They had two children. He was next married to Miss Amanda Crover, of Worcester, Mass., who is still living in Morenci. Mr. Wakefield died in Morenci, June 1, 1886. He was an active and thrifty man, and as a pioneer and citizen was highly respected. He did his share in making all improvements and in helping to make a new country a pleasant abiding place. Charles C. Wakefield, subject of this sketch, was educated in the public schools of Morenci, and at Hills Residences of Charles C. Wakefield and his son, Cassius Wakefield, Morenci.

Page  285 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 285. dale College. He commenced an active- business career at Pioneer, Ohio, where, in 1862, he engaged in a general mercantile business, and continued there for six years. In the spring of 1868 he returned to Morenci, and purchased a plat of ground, erected a suitable building and established an exchange bank, then known as C. C. Wakefield & Co., and has continued in that business ever since. In 1898 the bank was reorganized under the State law, and is now known as the Wakefield State Bank, Mr. Wakefield being the President. Mr. Wakefield is also quite largely interested in farming, and owns some four hundred acres of good land in Ohio and Michigan. November 3, 1864, Charles C. Wakefield married Miss Josephine O. Rogers, daughter of James and Lucy H. Rogers, of Pioneer, Ohio, and they have had five children, as follows: Luella J., born November 17, 1865, and died in infancy; Dennis K., born in Morenci, this county, May 14, 1869, and died at the age of one year; Cassius E., born in Morenci, February 10, 1872, a licensed Methodist minister, married, June 25, 1896, Miss Bertha Rose, daughter of Dr. Rose, of Ann Arbor, Mich., has two children, and resides in Morenci; Abigail G., born October 9, 1875, married, October 20, 1898, William Hamilton, has one child and resides in Morenci; Eva L., born January 13, 1878, died June 11, 1901. Mrs. Josephine O. Dennis Wakefield, Morenci. Charles C. Wakefield, Morenci.

Page  286 286 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL (Rogers) Wakefield was born April 3, 1846. Her parents were natives of Massachusetts, and were pioneers of Lenawee County, having settled in Medina among the first white people. They afterward removed to Pioneer, Ohio, where they both died. EDWARD SERVICE was born in Fairfield, Lenawee County, Mich., March 29, 1841. His father, John Service, 1st, was born in Scotland. [For his family record see sketch of John Service, 2d, in this volume.] Edward Service has always lived in Fairfield, this county, and has followed farming. He owns a farm of 140 acres on Sections 35 and 26, and also owns a home in the village of Jasper, where he now resides. On the 11th day of August, 1862, he enlisted in Company I, Eighteenth Michigan Infantry, and served three years in the great Rebellion. He is a member of David Becker Post, G. A. R., of.Ogden Centre. He has served as Highway Commissioner for two years, Township Drain Commissioner two years, and Justice of the Peace twelve years. He is also engaged in selling Deering farm machinery. August 22, 1869, Edward Service married Miss Carrie Lane, daughter of Lyman and Nancy (Cost) Lane, and they are the parents of six children, as follows: Herbert L., born September 15, 1870, resides in San Francisco, Cal.; Edith L., born September 20, 1873, married, September 15, 1897, Carlton G. Arnold. and resides in Fairfield; Bertha May, born August 31, 1876, married Harry Van Marter, March 16, 1898, has one son, and resides in Ogden; Mildred F., born February 13, 1878, married George W. Taylor, April 9, 1902, and resides in Ogden; Carroll C., born October 19, 1879, married Miss Mary Hinckley, and resides in Fairfield; Alice L., born March 29, 1882, at home. All born in Fairfield. Mrs. Carrie (Lane) Service was born in Fairfield, this county, January 6, 1849. Her father, Lyman Lane, was born in New London, Conn., January 9, 1804, came to Michigan in 1835, and died in Fairfield, January 24, 1885. His ancestors came from the Isle of Man, William McLane being one of them. He changed his name to Lane, and his branch of the family has ever been known as Lane. Mrs. Nancy (Cost) Lane was born in Loudoun County, Va,, March 10, 1808. Her father was a native of Germany, who settled in Virginia. She died in Fairfield, January 21, 1877. JAMES W. WIGHTMAN was born in Lodi, Seneca County, N. Y., March 9, 1842, where he resided until the spring of 1882, when he came to Michigan and located in Morenci, Lenawee County. He was educated in the Starkey Seminary, in Yates County, N. Y. His father, John M. Wightman, was born in the town of Hector,

Page  287 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 287 Tompkins County, N. Y., and was the son of John and Ruth Wightman, who were pioneers of Tompkins County, and was the under sheriff that hung Guy C. Clark, the first murderer in Western New York. John M. Wightman was a shoemaker, and carried on the business in Hector for many years. He came to Michigan in 1873, and settled in Colon, St. Joe County, where he (ied in 1879. About 1834 he married Miss Elizabeth Nivison, daughter of John A. and Elizabeth Nivison, of Tompkins County, N. Y. They had five children, James W. being the only son. John A. Nivison was a soldier in the war of 1812, and then resided at Black Rock, on Niagara River, where all his property was destroyed. His titles were burned, and he was evicted by the British. He and his wife died in Tompkins County, N. Y. Mrs. John M. Wightman, died in Hector, N. Y., in October, 1859. James W. Wightman, the subject of this sketch, was first employed as a school teacher, and afterwards learned the paper hangers' trade, which he followed until 1861, when he enlisted in ame. Wig the 23d New York Infantry, where he served two yeas as musician. He then enlisted in the 50th New York Engineers as 3d sergeant, and remained there until the close of the great Rebellion, in June, 1865. After the war he followed different avocations until 1872, when he commenced the study of the law. He assumed practice in 1874, and in November, 1888, was admitted to practice in the Michigan courts at Adrian. In December of that year he opened an office in Tecumseh, this county, where he continued until he was made postmaster at Tecumseh on February 15, 1899. At that time he formed a partnership with G. R. Gillespie, and his law business is still being carried on. February 27, 1867, James W. Wightman married Miss Susan McDuffee, daughter of Nelson and Nancy McDuffee, of East Varick, N. Y., and they had two children, who died in infancy. Mrs. Susan Wightman died at Morenci, Mich., January 22, 1888. September 18, 1890, he married Mrs. Clara B. Boyce, who was born in Cherry Valley, N. Y., April 14, 1837. She was the widow of Isaac Boyce, of Raisin. She was the mother of three children, all of whom are dead.

Page  288 288 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL MAJOR SEYMOUR HOWELL was born in Buckinghamshire, England, August 12, 1841, and came to the United States with his parents in 1856. His father, Rev. James Howell, born January 9, 1810, was a native of Wales, and became an Independent Minister of some note in England, as well as a missionary to Jamaica. In the year 1836 he married Miss Amelia Franklin, born January 26, 1810, and four children were born to them, Seymour being the third child and son. Afseveral years and seeing considerable service as a missionary, they came to this country and first settled in Sharon, Washtenaw County, Mich. Here Mrs. Howell died in 1856, Mr. Howell afterwards going to Canada, where he died in Toronto, in 1881. Major Seymour Howell was 13 years old e when he came from England. jorHe was given the advantagest of a good common school education, since which time he has made his own way in the world. Hisfirst employment, when about 14 years old, was on a farm, which he followed Majoted in th e magemel until 1861, when he enlisted in Company F, 6th Michigan Infantry, and upon the organization of theIompany, was made second lieutenant. His first service was under General Butler at Ship Island, Miss., and he participated in the capture of Forts Jackson and St. Phillip, and Baton Rouge, La. He was with General Banks at Port Hudson, and at the reduction of Forts Gaines and Morgan in Mobile Bay. In 1862 he was promoted to First Lieutenant, and in July, 1863, to Captain. In August, 1864, he was commissioned Major of his regiment. He was mustered out of the service August 20, 1865. After his-discharge from the army and return home, he engaged in railroading, becoming a clerk in the freight office of the Jackson, Lansing & Saginaw Railroad, He was afterward in the employment of the Ft. Wayne & Jackson Railroad, in the freight department, and then became general freight agent of the Eel River Railroad for about eight years. He came to Adrian in March, 1881, with the Peninsular Car Company, where he had an interest, and assisted in the management. In 1884 he entered the banking firm of T. J. Tobey & Co., of Adrian. In 1885 the firm name was changed to Howell, Baker & Co., Mr. Tobey retiring. In 1898 Mr. Howell

Page  289 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 289 withdrew from the bank to accept the appointment of Additional Paymaster, with the rank of Major, in the U. S. Volunteer army, and served through the Spanish war. In 1899 he was ordered to the Philippines, where he remained for some time. In July, 1901, he was commissioned Paymaster in the Regular Army, with rank of Captain, and ordered back to the Philippines in May, 1902. In 1903, while in active service in the Philippines, he was promoted to the rank of Major, and ordered home for examination. April 6, 1864, Seymour Howell married Miss Eliza Kellogg, daughter of Hiram and Jane (Ward) Kellogg, of Genoa, Livingston County, Mich. They had two children, as follows: Maud A., born in Sharon, Washtenaw County, Mich., September 2, 1871, married Howard T. Taylor, May 27, 1885, has two children, Seymour H., born in Adrian, August 16, 1888, and Harriet K., born in Adrian, June 2, 1892, resides in Adrian. One child died in infancy. Mrs. Eliza (Kellogg) Howell, was born in York, Washtenaw County, Mich., April 24, 1845. Her father, Hiram Kellogg, was born in Geneseo, Livingston County, N. Y., January 28, 1820, married Miss Jane Eliza Ward, April 9, 1843, and died at Genoa, Livingston County, Mich., April 1, 1892. Mrs. Jane Eliza (Ward) Kellogg was born in Syracuse, N. Y., June 2, 1824, and (lied at Saline, Mich., March 24, 1852. GEORGE A. WILCOX was born in Adrian, Mich., and is the only surviving representative of the Hon. William S. and Sarah F. (Clay) Wilcox. [For his family record see sketch of the Hon. W. S. George A. Wilcox. 19 Mrs. Susette R. Wilcox.

Page  290 290 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Wilcox in this volume.] George A. Wilcox has always resided in Adrian, and is today one of the prominent, active, representative business men of the city. He was educated in Adrian, supplemented by a scientific course in Douglass University, of Chicago. He began his business career in his father's hardware store in 1865, and became a member of the firm of Wilcox Bros. & Co., in 1873. This is one of the oldest and most successful hardware stores in Southern Michigan, having been established by the Van Brunt Bros. about the year 1850, went into the hands of W. S. Wilcox in 1854, and has ever since been a most successful business enterprise. In 1889 the firm was reorganized and consisted of W. S. Wilcox, George A. Wilcox and W. A. Staniford, and is now known as the Wilcox Hardware Company, George A. Wilcox being the senior member and manager, W. A. Staniford being the only surviving partner. It is classed today among the largest, most reliable and complete hardware stores in Michigan. George A. Wilcox is Vice President and one of the largest stockholders and directors of the Adrian State Savings Bank, President of the Oakwood Cemetery Association, Treasurer of the Adrian Telephone Company, Vice President of the Citizens Light and Residence of George A. Wilcox, No. 42 South Main Street, Adrian.

Page  291 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 291 Power Company, Director in the Gibford Razor Strop and Gibford Automatic Pin Company, Treasurer of the Lenawee County Mutual Protection Association, and a stockholder in many other business enterprises in Adrian. His capacity for business seems to have no limit, as he is always foremost in any proposition or enterprise promising to promote the business volume or importance of his native city. July 15, 1874, George A. Wilcox married Miss Susette R. Berry, daughter of James Berry of Adrian, and they have had three children, as follows: S. Frances, born in Adrian, Sept. 24. 1875, married John Blaie KeatirngMay 15, 1901, and resides at Winthrop, California; William Seward, born in Adrian, February 10, 1878, and died in Tucson, Arizona, June 13u 1900; one child died in infancy Mrs. Susette R. Wilcox was born in Adrian, Mich. Her father, James Berry, was born in Manchester, England, in 1811, came to the United States with his father, George Berry, who was a silk weaver, and settled in Paterson, N. J. James Berry learned the car- James Berry penter's trade in the city of New York. He came to Adrian in 1836, and for nearly fifty years carried on business here. He was a prominent pushing, enterprising citizen, engaging in general building, construction, the lumber business, etc., etc., and platted Berry's addition to the city of Adrian when it was still a wilderness. He died in Adrian, March 12, 1886. JAMES NELSON CHAPPELL, son of James Gilmore and Eliza (Butts) Chappell, was born May 2, 1841, at Palmyra, New York, on the farm adjoining that on which lived the father of Admiral Sampson, and near where Joseph Smith dug up the stone tablets containing the Mormon Bible. He moved to Geauga County, Ohio, in 1851, and at the outbreak of the Civil War was attending Hiram College, of which James A. Garfield was principal. As he was not yet of age, and could not obtain his parents' permission to join Garfield's regiment, he joined the "Squirrel Hunters," (Home

Page  292 292 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Guards), and afterwards enlisted in Company I, 30th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and Company F, 182d Ohio Volunteer Infantry, serving through the war. He was at Franklin and Nashville, under General Thomas, and in the campaign around Petersburg and Richmond, under General Ben Butler. He moved to Morenci in 1865, and March 19, 1868, was married to Emma A. Baldwin, (born August 2, 1842), daughter of Hon. Elias Jones Baldwin, and Olive (Payne) Baldwin, of Morenci. Mr. Baldwin was a direct descendant of Henry Baldwin, of Woburn, Mass., who was prominent in early days. Since his marriage, Mr. Chappell has resided continuously in and around Morenci. He has been a Deacon in the Methodist church for many years, was Postmaster at Morenci during Benjamin Harrison's administration, and was afterward Township Supervisor for two. terms. Iis father, James G. Chappell, is still living at the age of 86. His family consists of two sons, Ralph Hubert, born July 3, 1871, and Claude Clark, born August 2, 1872. Ralph H. graduated from the Morenci High School, class of '89, and entered the U. S. Naval Academy in May, 1890, where he graduated in the Engineer Corps, class of '94. July 8, 1896, he was married to Jane Catherine Biays, daughter of James Philip and Rebecca (Daingerfield) Biays. Mr. Biays was a descendant of Col. Biays, of Maryland, and John Hanson, of Maryland, both prominent in Revolutionary days. They have two sons, Hubert Biays Chappell, and Kenneth Baldwin Chappell. October 12, 1900, he resigned from the navy to accept the position of Inspector of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, under the Treasury Department. Claude C. Chappell graduated also at the Morenci High School, class of '91, and after several years as agent and operator with the Wabash Railroad, returned to Morenci to take a position in the Wakefield State Bank. He was married September 8, 1897, to L. Luella Gardiner, daughter of Josiah and Hannah (Judge) Gardiner, of Adrian, and they have one daughter, Leo Bess Chappell. MARVIN A. PACKARD was born in Macedon, Wayne County,. N. Y., April 14, 1831, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1838. His father, Ira Packard, was born in Macedon, N. Y., February 15, 1799, and died in Madison, this county, February 24, 1845. His parents were Bartimeus and Abigail Packard, natives of Massachusetts, who removed to Wayne County, N. Y., when they were young. The ancestors of the Packard family in America were Samuel and his wife, Elizabeth Packard, who came from Wymondham, a parish in the southeastern part of England, and settled in the Massachusetts colony, August 10, 1638. They brought one daughter, Elizabeth, with them. They became the parents of twelve children, seven sons and five daughters. At this time there are in America two thousand families, direct descendants of Samuel andL

Page  293 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 293 Elizabeth Packard, of Massachusetts Colony. Bartimeus, born in 1769, and Abigail Packard, born in 1772, had a family of ten children, and died on the farm they took from the government in Wayne County, N. Y., aged respectively 85 and 80 years. Here Ira Packard was raised and lived until he came to Michigan in 1838. Ira and Amanda Packard were the parents of seven children. They were: -:::::::::::..:.:..:-t Residence of Marvin A. Packard, Seneca. married in Macedon, N. Y., in 1828. After the death of Ira Packard in 1848 Mrs. Amanda Packard married Gilbert Mann, and died December 7, 1877. She was the daughter of David and Lucretia Compton, of Bridport, Vt. Marvin A. Packard, the subject of this sketch, lived at home in Madison, this county, where he got his schooling, with the exception of two terms in the Medina Academy, until he was twenty years old. In 1851 he went to California, taking the Panama route. He landed at the Golden Gate on January 1, 1852. He remained in California for about two years, but was not satisfied with his success in the mines, and returned home and commenced farming on his own account. In 1864 he purchased a farm on Section 14, in Seneca, and still resides there. The accompanying picture of his home will convey a good idea of its beauty and comfort. His farm consists of 238 acres. Packard Station on the Detroit Southern Railroad, is located on this farm. For more than thirty years Mr. Packard has followed dairying and mixed farming, and his farm is among the best in the township. May 25, 1853,

Page  294 294 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Marvin A. Packard married Miss Elsie Phetteplace, daughter of Asa and Hannah (Waters) Phetteplace, of Madison, and they have had two children, as follows: Frank A., born in Madison, January 28, 1858, married Miss Lillie Montgomery in 1879. They have had three children, one of whom, Ira J., is living; Mary Edna, born in Seneca, December 7, 1868, married Horton C. Rorick, September 17,. 1891, has three children and resides in Toledo. Mrs. Elsie (Phetteplace) Packard was born in Hartland, Niagara County, N. Y., November 28, 1831, and came to Michigan with her parents in 1833. Her father was born in Queensbury, N. Y., January 30, 1788, and died in Madison, this county, November 19, 1865. Her mother, Hannah Waters, was born near Lake George, N. Y., March 24, 1793, and died in Madison, this county, September 9, 1885. Asa and Hannah Phetteplace were the parents of seven children. Mrs. Packard, who was the youngest, and her sister, Mrs. Rial Niles, are the only survivors. The ancestors came from England. AMBROSE B. PARK was born in Adrian, Mich., November 12, 1853. His father, Jonathan S. Park, was a native of Connecticut, and was born at Preston in 1803. He was the son of Shebuel Park, whose ancestors were Puritans, and came to America in 1630. Jonathan S. Park came to Michigan in 1836, and settled in AdrianHis first work for a livelihood was teaching school in Connecticut, but upon coming to Adrian he engaged in the Mercantile business. and soon opened a grocery store. He continued in that line of trade until 1865, when he retired from business. He was an early member of the First Presbyterian church, was a faithful worker, and did his, share in building up the strong and prosperous society. He died in Adrian, August 3, 1869. January 1, 1850, Jonathan S. Park married Emily Berry, daughter of Judge Jonathan and Bathsheba (Greene) Berry, of Adrian, and they had five children, Ambrose B. being the oldest son. Mrs. Emily (Berry) Park was born near Albany, N. Y., in 1819, and died in Adrian, in July, 1896. Her parents were natives of New England, and her father was a soldier in the war of 1812. Ambrose B. Park, the subject of this sketch, has always lived in Adrian, and was educated in the public schools. His first employment was in merchandizing, becoming a clerk in L. G. Berry's store in 1869. In 1870 he went with W. S. Carey, in the dry goods business, and in 1877 he opened a store on his own account, at 32' West Maumee street. The next year, 1878, he removed to the old W. S. Carey store, No. 4 East Maumee street, and remained there until 1885, when he erected his present store, No. 17 South Main street. His business has been a prosperous one from the commencement, and Mr. Park has long been considered one of the leading business men of Adrian. He is.

Page  295 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 295 identified with some of the largest manufacturing institutions of the city. November 19, 1879, Ambrose B. Park married Miss Emma M. Young, daughter of Charles and Rhoda Young, of Adrian, and they have three children, as follows: Robert C., born August 22, 1880; Frederick E., born July 2, 1883; Florence H., born March 25, 1892. Mrs. Emma M. Park was born in Adrian, April 26, 1857. Her father, Charles Young, was born in Ithaca, N. Y., April 5, 1824. He came to Michigan with his parents, Adam and Lana (Deafendorf) Young, in 1836, and settled in Clinton, this county, in 1837. Charles Young lived in Clinton until December, 1852, when he removed to Adrian, and at once engaged in the manufacture of sash and blinds, the firm being Aldrich & Young. About the year 1860 he engaged in the grocery business and remained in that trade until 1890. May 8, 1850, Charles Young married Miss Rhoda Aldrich, daughter of Gersham and Ambrose B. Park. Mary Aldrich, who lived on Section 36, in Adrian, and they had four children, Emma being the oldest daughter. Mrs. Rhoda (Aldrich) Young was born in Massachusetts, April 4, 1826, came to Michigan in 1834, and died in Adrian, December 12, 1897. Her parents were of Quaker origin. DELOS M. BAKER was born in Buffalo, N. Y., May 26, 1838. His father, Albert M. Baker, was born at Eden, Erie County, N. Y., February 17, 1817, and his ancestors came from New England. He was educated in Buffalo, and studied law in the office of Le Grande and George L. Marvin, at that time prominent attorneys of that city. Soon after completing his law studies, he was married, came to Michigan, and settled in Adrian, November 27, 1838. Immediately after his arrival in Adrian he opened a law office and formed a partnership with Peter R. Adams, of Tecumseh. Upon the arrival of

Page  296 296 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Delos M, Baker. A. L. Millard in Adrian, then a young lawyer, a partnership was formed which lasted many years, known as Baker & Millard. Early in the 50's Mr. Baker was appointed attorney of the Michigan Southern & Northern Indiana Railroad, (now the Lake Shore) which position he held until his death, July 20, 1860. Mr. Baker was an active citizen, always interested in the growth of Adrian. Coming here in an early day, he soon became prominent in all the contemplated improvements, and with all other early settlers, his idea of building

Page  297 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 297 up a commercial centre was uppermost. He was active in establishing churches, schools, and many social, moral, religious and educational institutions. He took an active part in politics, was a Whig in principle, and was elected Justice of the Peace in the town of Madison, although he resided on Maumee and Broad streets. The township line between Adrian and Madison ran through his house. His sleeping room being in Madison, made him a voter there. His justice office was in both townships, but he established the "court" on the Madison side and thus dispensed justice. In religion he was a Presbyterian, an active member of the Adrian church, and for several years previous to his death served as an Elder. August 3, 1837, Albert M. Baker married Miss Sarah Keeler, at Eden, N. Y. This marriage resulted in two children, as follows: Delos M., born in Buffalo, N. Y., May 26, 1838; Sarah J., born in Adrian, February 22, 1841, and died June 25, 1844. Mrs. Sarah Baker was born October 9, 1816, at Auburn, N. Y. Her parents were of New England origin. She was born and reared in the Presbyterian church, and was active in church work as long as she was able to attend to the duties. Delos M. Baker came to Adrian when he was about six months old, and it has been his home ever since. He was educated in the Adrian schools. He commenced his business career in the hardware store of Hon. W. S. Wilcox, in the spring of 1862. After about four years service there, in the spring of 1866 he formed a partnership with R. A. Bury in the lumber business. This partnership continued about seven years, when Mr. Bury retired, and Mr. Baker has carried on the business ever since. He now handles all kinds of building materials, and can supply everything needed in the construction of a building excepting hardware. He also, in connection, sells all kinds of coal used in this locality. Mr. Baker has never been active in politics, and never held an office, but has never failed to do a citizen's duty of attending primaries and voting. In early life he united with the Presbyterian church in Adrian, and for thirty years has been one of its trustees. Mr. Baker is President of the Lenawee County Savings Bank, succeeding the Hon. J. R. Bennett, and director of the Page Woven Wire Fence Company, President of the Adrian Building and Loan Association, President of the Adrian Telephone Company, and Vice President of the Y. M. C. A. He is also a stockholder in several other manufacturing concerns. January 27, 1863, at Milwaukee, Wis., he was married to Miss Julia E. Blount. There were no children by this marriage. After a long residence in Adrian, where she became well and favorably known, she died December 22, 1881. November 18, 1885, Mr. Baker married Miss Mary K. Goodman, of Glens Falls, N. Y., by whom he has had two children, as follows: Albert G., born September 24, 1886, and died February 23, 1889; Helen K., born April 7, 1890, and now at home. Mrs. Mary K. Baker was born in Bolton, N. Y., October 13, 1851. Her parents were natives of New York, and her father resides at Glens Falls, N. Y.

Page  298 298 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL SAMUEL YOUNG was born in Hopewell, Bedford County, Pa., January 2, 1848, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1852. His father, John Young, was also born in Hopewell, Pa., February 11, 1811, the son of a soldier in the Revolution who served through the war, and his stories of hardships and escapes are matters of history. John Young was reared a farmer, and always followed that vocation. He resided in Bedford County until about the year 1852, when he, with his wife and twelve children came to Michigan, and settled on Section 33, in Ogden, this county. He resided on this farm until 1884, when he disposed of it and removed to Weston, this county, where he died February 4, 1885. John Young was twice married, first to Miss Elizabeth Smith, of Bedford County, Pa. They were the parents of thirteen children, as follows, John, Jr., born October 18, 1833; Henry, born October 24, 1836; Mary Ann, born March 12, 1837; Alfred, born April 27, 1838; William, born July 13, 1839; Sarah M., born September 26, 1840; George, born December 15, 1841; Martha, born April 27, 1843; Samuel, born January 2, 1848; Simon, born August 26, 1849; Jennie E., born April 28, 1850; Susan, born March 20, 1852, all of whom were born in Bedford County, Pa. Alvina was born in Ogden, May 21, 1854. Mrs. Elizabeth (Smith) Young was born in Bedford County, Pa., March 12, 1810. Her parents were natives of Germany, and were early settlers in Bedford County. She was a woman of remarkable force and vitality, and died from a malignant attack of erysipelas, March 20, 1862. Samuel Young, the subject of this sketch, came to Michigan when he was about four years old, and has ever since called Ogden his home. He was educated in the schools of Ogden, and finished by a thorough business course in Evans' Business College, of Adrian. He was reared a farmer, and when he was about 25 years old he purchased a timber tract of 70 acres, on Section 19, in Ogden, and at once commenced to make a home. He afterwards purchased 30 acres on Section 29. In 1889 he purchased the Elisha Luke homestead of 70 acres, on Section 20, where he now resides. This is regarded as one of the most desirable and pleasant farm homes of the township. In 1887 he went to Los Angeles, Cal., where he purchased a home and engaged in the real estate business for two years. He was very successful in his efforts, and during the two years became treasurer and one of the directors of the Edgemont Land and Water Company. He held this position, which involved the handling of large amounts of money, until his interests in Michigan required his return, and he resigned and came back to his home in Ogden. In 1891 he went to Chicago and again conducted a successful real estate business for five years. In 1896 he once more returned to his home in Ogden to oversee his farming interests. Since that time he has remained in Ogden. Being public spirited and active in all matters of general interest, he has taken a prominent part in local and national affairs, and has served his township four years as Clerk, three years as Town Treasurer, and two years as

Page  299 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 299i School Inspector. He is a member and chairman of the High School Board at Ogden Center, and has always taken an earnest interest in education. He is an active politician, and affiliates with the Republican party. He is a man of genial and social traits, that make him very popular and in constant demand to serve his neighbors in many ways. He is full of enterprise and push, and was one of the first promoters of the present splendid telephone system of the township,. and is and has been for some time engaged in promoting an electric railroad across the township. To him all is success and victory. He is a prominent member of Ogden Grange, the County Pomona Grange and the State and National Granges. November 6, 1873, Samuel Young married Miss Rosetta C. Luke, only daughter of Elisha and Sarah Luke, of Ogden, and they have one son, Almon M., born in Ogden, September 5, 1874, married Miss Ruth M. Dunning, and resides in Chicago. Mrs. Rosetta C. Young was born in Ogden, March 19, 1856. Her father, Elisha Luke, born in Portage County, Ohio, June 20, 1830, was the son of Elijah and Elizabeth Luke, and now resides in Los Angeles, Cal. He was an early settler in Ogden, where he married Miss Sarah Wilcox, April 28, 1855. She was born July 18, 1833, and is still living. Mrs. Sarah Luke was the daughter of Aaron and Azubah Wilcox, of Palmyra, this county. Elijah Luke came to Ogden and took up government land on Section 20. His family consisted of ten children, all of whom settled around him, and it was for many years known as the"Luke neighborhood." JAMES FARRAR was born in Troy, N. H., June 29, 1820. His father, Daniel Farrar, was born, probably in Troy, N. H., in, 1782. In 1653 John and Jacob Farrar came to America from Lancashire, England. They established the town of Lancaster, Mass., and also founded the Farrar family in this country. James Farrar, the subject of this record, was a direct descendant of Jacob Farrar in the sixth generation. The early days of our subject were passed among the hills of New Hampshire, and under the shadow of Mount Monadnock, where he received a common school education. At the age of 18 years he went to Boston and engaged in the dry goods business, but soon becoming "homesick," a few months found him back in the old home. He then found employment nearby, and after one year's service in a country store, again went to Massachusetts and procured employment at Royalston. After about three years' active service in merchandizing, he finally purchased the interest of Capt. Howe, who was at that time a partner of L. R. Damon, in Fitzwilliam, N. H., the firm becoming Damon & Farrar. They remained at that place about two years, when the business was disposed of. In the fall of 1853 they came to Adrian, and established a dry goods

Page  300 -300 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL,store in the Jermain block, Maumee street. A good business was built up, and the firm of Damon & Farrar became well-known and popular among the people of Lenawee County. Mr. Farrar was an active business man and took an interest in all public affairs. He built a handsome home on the corner of South Main and Merrick -streets in 1855, and in 1868-9, together with Mr. Damon, erected the Mrs. Clara Farrar. James Farrar. large double house on East Maumee street, Adrian, where the families now reside. In 1860 the firm of Damon & Farrar was dissolved, and Mr. Farrar purchased a half interest in the F. J. Buck hardware store. After ten years in the hardware business, he purchased the Loomis machine shop on South Winter street, which was successfully carried on until 1883, when the shop and machinery were 4destroved by fire. He immediately associated with Messrs. Knapp,& McKenzie in building a large brick foundry for the manufacture of brick and tile machinery. The Armory block on South Winter street was built by Mr. Farrar and J. C. Rowley in 1884. About this time he sold out his interest in the foundry to Gen. William Humphrey, and retired from active business. He was for a long time an.ardent member of the Presbyterian church of Adrian, and served as trustee for many years, until his death, December 8, 1890. January 1, 1852, at Warwick, Mass., he married Miss Clara Brown, daughter of Russell and Clarissa (Waite) Brown, by whom he had three children, only one of whom is living, Ida Russell, born in Adrian, Mich., July 2, 1862, now the wife of T. M. McFarland, of Cambridge, Ohio. Russell Brown was born in Hubbardston, Mass., November 8, 1791, and died July 10, 1871, at Warwick, Mass. His wife, Clarissa

Page  301 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 30I (Waite) Brown, was born in the same place, June 25, 1797, and died in Adrian, Mich., May 26, 1888. Mr. and Mrs. Brown were descendants of the early Puritans of Massachusetts. The old homes and birthplaces of Mr. and Mrs. Brown are still standing in Hubbardston. They are remarkably well preserved, and present in these "modern days" fine specimens of the architecture and building skill of the Revolutionary era. DEACON ASAPH.K. PORTER was born in Covert, Seneca County, N. Y., March 26, 1812, and is the only man in Fairfield township that still resides on the land he took up from the government in 1833, his deed for 160 acres on Section 7 being signed by President Andrew Jackson. Mr. Porter has lived continuously on this farm for seventy years, and now in his ninety-second year, is in Asaph K. Porter. Mrs. Rachel Porter. good health and retains all his faculties to a remarkable degree. He sprung from hardy English stock. His great-grandfather, Joshua Porter, who came from England early in the 17th century, was a pioneer in Connecticut, where he raised a large family. In an Indian conflict he was killed, and his body burned by the savages. His son, John Porter, grandfather of our subject, afterwards emigrated to Tompkins County, N. Y., where he was a pioneer, and raised a

Page  302 .302 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL family of nine sons and three daughters. Lewis Porter, father of our subject, was a pioneer in Seneca County, N. Y., where he cleared up a farm, and had a family of twelve children. His oldest son, Asaph K., was a pioneer in Lenawee County, Mich., and had a family of nine children. This certainly shows a wonderful record of pioneer life, covering a period of over three centuries. Mr. Porter Residence of Asaph K. Porter, Fairfield. This Photo taken in 1902. Notice cherry tree in foreground, set out in 1836. has always been an active, energetic citizen, alive to the best interests of the community, and while he was always ready to do battle for the material welfare of the early settlers, he never neglected the religious, moral and ethical side of life. He was instrumental in organizing schools, churches and Sunday schools. A Baptist church was organized in 1838, and he gave an acre of land for the church building, besides assisting in its construction. The church is now known as the First Baptist church of Weston. It affords us great satisfaction to present the accompanying portraits of Mr. and Mrs. Porter, whose life work has been so much to descendants and many friends. We also show a fine picture of the comfortable home, erected in 1853, on the spot where the first log cabin stood. April 6, 1836, Mr. Porter was married to Miss Rachel Glazier, daughter of Walker and Cornelia Glazier, of Covert, Seneca County, N. Y., and nine children were born to them, as follows: Edwin C., born February 24, 1837, a farmer of Fairfield;

Page  303 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 303 Walker G., born October 19, 1839, farmer of Fairfield, was a member of the 18th Michigan In'fantry, and served for three years in the war of the Rebellion; James T., born December 12, 1841, died October 7, 1851; Sarah C., born June 24, 1844, died September 26, 1851; Lewis T., born September 27, 1846, a resident of Morenci; Emma L., born November 7, 1849, died February 3, 1850; Jane, born August 17, 1851, wife of M. L. Foster, of Frontier, Hillsdale County; Rosalia, born October 22, 1855, wife of E. C. Chandler, of Steubenville, Ohio; Ezra H., born January 31, 1859, always resided at the old home. Mrs. Rachel Porter was born in Peekskill, N. Y., May 10, 1818, and died at her home in Fairfield, January 29, 1894. Her father was born June 16, 1789, and died September 7, 1873. Her mother was born April 1, 1791, and died March 18, 1856. DR. JAMES HENRY REYNOLDS was the son of Madison and Augusta (Moon) Reynolds, of Avon, Lorain County, Ohio, having settled there in 1810. Mrs. Reynolds father was the first settler of the town of Avon. Her people were originally from the Green Mountain State, while Mr. Reynolds', Sr., parents were from the Empire State. Our subject was born in Amherst, Lorain County, May 14, 1845. At the age of 6 years his parents moved to Petersburg, Monroe County, where he resided until 1868. He was a student there in the public schools, and was prepared for college at the Ypsilanti Seminary. He served in the army about two years, and was mustered out May 7, 1865, before he was twenty years old. He was a member of Company G., Sixth Michigan Heavy Artillery, and performed the duties of hospital steward. On his return from the army Mr. Reynolds took up the study of medicine with Dr. D. W. Loree, of Ridgeway, this county. He attended medical lectures at the U. of M., and graduated from the Detroit Medical College in 1871. Dr. Reynolds practiced medicine in Palmyra for fifteen years, and removed to Adrian in 1883, where he remained in practice until 1895. On account of failing health he gave up his lucrative practice and assisted in the organization of the Bond Steel Post Company, and was made secretary and advertising agent, which he held for two and one-half years, when he disposed of his interests and accepted a position, October, 1897, with the Page Woven Wire Fence Company, as advertising manager, which he still retains, and it is an open secret that to him belongs no small share of the credit of the perfection to which this department has been brought. Dr. Reynolds is known as a man possessed of a large fund of information on this line, giving much study and care to the duties of his office. Dr. Reynolds makes all advertising contracts and supplies all the copy, sees to the novelties, and represents the company at the Na

Page  304 304 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL tional Manufacturers' Associations. He is an honorary member of the National Agricultural Press League, treasurer of the Farmers' National Congress, and one of the committee on transportation. He is a student every day of his life, and is quite a traveler, having visited nearly every large city in the United States. Dr. Reynolds has always voted the Republican ticket, because they could not raise Democrats near Oberlin, O., where he was brought up. He held the office of superintendent of schools of Palmyra township in the days when that officer had to examine teachers and visit the schools. He was twice elected Town Clerk and has. served as health officer many years. He was U. S. examining surgeon for pensions on the board at Adrian for six years, and for five years he was surgeon for the Lake Shore Railroad Company at this point. Dr. Reynolds dropped out of politics and had not attended a caucus for ten years, but in the spring of 1901 he was elected Mayor of the city of Adrian. It was mainly through his efforts that the city was bonded and given the start towards the improvements which are now taking place. Also the settlement with the Lake Shore road about the Centre street bridge was left almost entirely to him, which every citizen realized was very favorable to our city. It was under his administration that the work was laid out and estimates agreed upon for the paving of North and South Main streets, East Church, Michigan and West Maumee streets, and the city bonded for $50,000 to pay for these improvements. October 21, 1869, Dr. Reynolds was married to Miss Margaretta V. Steele, of Palmyra. This union was blessed with two children. Miss Bertha L., now the wife of J. H. Early, of Rockford, Ill., and Miss Florence L., who resides at the homestead. In the Masonic bodies Dr. Reynolds has been worshipful master of Palmyra lodge, high priest of Blissfield Chapter, R. A. M., T. I. M. of Adrian Council of Royal and Select Masters, and eminent commander of Adrian Commandery, No. 4, K. T. He is past commander of Woodbury Post, G. A. R., and has held the office of esteemed lecturing knight of the Adrian Lodge of Elks, No. 429, for three years. Dr. Reynolds has done much towards

Page  305 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 305 the advance and upbuilding of his adopted city, using his time and means. During the past few years he has erected one of the largest and finest business blocks in Adrian, situated on North Main street and known as the Reynolds Block. His home is pleasantly located at No. 7 Broad street. CHARLES HAHN was born Mecklenberg, Germany, March 7, 1853, and came to the United States in 1870, first settling at Liberty Centre, Ohio. He resided there until 1876, when he removed to Ogden, this county, and soon after purchased a farm on Section 16. In 1884 he sold his first purchase, and bought the farm where he Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hahn, of Ogden. now resides, on Section 10. Mr. Hahn came to this country when he was seventeen years old, with a brother and two sisters. The parents had died in Germany some years before. Since that time his remaining two sisters have come to this country. All his relatives reside in Ohio. He came to the United States penniless, and had 20

Page  306 306 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL agreed to pay for his passage after his arrival, which he did. He has been blessed with good health and a resolute purpose, and has succeeded remarkably well. After a struggle of thirty-three years he has reached a safe haven, and owns an Ogden farm of one hundred and sixty acres, with good buildings and comfortable surroundings. He is engaged in general farming, and is a successful feeder of cattle and hogs. December 23, 1875, Charles Hahn married Miss Catherine Huttenlocker, daughter of Andrew and Mary Huttenlocker, of Huron, Ohio, and they are the parents of four children, as follows: Joseph A., born January 1, 1877; William F., born June 8, 1879, died April 25, 1901; Ezra A., born October 11, 1883; Lydia L., born January 16, 1888; Mrs. Catherine Hahn was born in Sandusky, Ohio, March 3, 1855. Her parents are natives of Wirtemberg, Germany, came to America about the year 1850, first settling in Sandusky, Ohio, where they resided for about two years, when a farm was purchased in Huron, Ohio, where Mr. Huttenlocker still resides. His wife died there December 23, 1894. HUDSON W. CONKLING was born in Walkill, Orange County, N. Y., December 24, 1821, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1833. His father, Samuel G. Conkling, was born in Orange County, N. Y., April 11, 1797. [For his family record see Whitney & Bonner's History and Biographical Record of Lenawee County, Vol 1, page 111.] Hudson W. Conkling lived with his parents until he was about nineteen years old, when he went to learn the carpenter's trade with Alonzo Murray, one of the pioneer builders of Tecumseh. He followed carpentering and 4luilding for several years, when he went into the Anderson & Brewer foundry as pattern-maker. It was but a few years after this that he became a partner in the business, and continued there until 1889, when he disposed of his interest. Since that time he has devoted his time to his farming interests. Mr. Conkling well remembers the construction of the old horse railroad that run from Palmyra, where it connected with the Erie & Kalamazoo Railroad that then run from Toledo to Adrian. The road was built from Palmyra to Clinton, and was first operated by horse power about 1839. The track of this road was made of 2x4 hard maple strips, laid upon larger timbers or stringers. The road was operated on this track until about 1842, when the iron strap rail was used and a small locomotive took the place of horses. Joseph Tucker was the engineer who run the first locomotive into Tecumseh. The Globe mills were built in 1836-7 by Stillman Blanchard and Mr. Gardner, of Troy, N. Y. After the county seat was removed to Adrian in 1836, the court house was at once utilized as a school house, and was called a "branch" of the Michigan University. Mr. Conk

Page  307 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 307 ling's earliest recollection of the teachers in this school included Judge S. C. LeBaron, Perley Bills and Miss Brown, who afterwards became Mrs. Bills. Mr. Conkling remembers an oak tree that was cut on Section 12, in Raisin, that measured over eight feet in diameter, made many thousand staves of best cuts, besides three eleven foot rail cuts. December 31, 1842, Hudson W. Conkling married Miss Caroline Gray, daughter of Hugh and Mary (Sinclair) Gray, of Raisin, this county, and they have had four children, as follows: Frances Elmira, born in Tecumseh, July 23, 1843, married L. C. Blood, and resides in Lansing. She is the mother of four children, Dewitt C., born in Tecumseh, died at the age of five years; Henry C., died in infancy; Sarah Jane, born in Tecumseh, November 11, 1864, married Joseph B. VanNess, was the mother of two children,,Gertrude and Lester H. She died in Tecumseh, May 6, 1889. Mrs. Hudson W. Conkling was born in Livonia, Livingston County, N. Y., June 4, 1824, and came to Michigan with her parents in 1831. Her parents were natives of Ireland, and came to the United States with their parents when they were children, and settled in Northumberland County, Pa. DAVID METCALF was born in Davenport, Delaware County, N. Y., October, 21, 1827. His father, Ira Metcalf, was a native of Connecticut, and was born September 10, 1794. When a young man Ira Metcalf removed to Delaware County, N. Y., purchased a farm in Davenport township, and resided there until 1851. He then emigrated to Fox Lake, Dodge County, Wis., where he purchased a large farm in the township of Trenton, and resided there until his death, which occurred at Fox Lake, Wis., August 24, 1875. October 28, 1816, Ira Metcalf married Miss Sarah Goodrich, daughter of Seth Goodrich, and they had five children, David being the third son and fourth child. Mrs. Sarah Metcalf was born in Delaware County, February 15, 1796, and died at Fox Lake, Wis., September 30, 1866. Her father, Seth Goodrich, was a very early settler in Delaware County, N. Y., raised a family of eleven children, and resided there until his death. David Metcalf, the subject of this sketch, lived with his parents on the farm in Delaware County, N. Y., until 1849, when he removed to Wisconsin, and settled on Fox River Reservation, among the Indians. At that time the land had not been surveyed. He "squatted" on the land, where he built a log house, and other buildings. There were three families in the colony that Mr. Metcalf was a part of, but at the end of one year, Mr. Metcalf traded his chances on his claim for a surveyed tract near Fox Lake. After two years' hard work on this farm, his health failed him, and he engaged in merchandizingin Fox Lake village, where he remained until the spring of 1858. At that time he removed to Watertown, engaged in railroad

Page  308 308 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL ing on the great thoroughfare now known as the Milwaukee & St.. Paul Ralroad, and remained there until 1861, when he was appointed mail agent, his route being between Milwaukee & La Crosse. He remained in the mail service for over three years, but owing to ill-health, resigned in favor of a veteran in the Rebellion. He afterwards returned to railroading and besides filling many other positions,was made purchasing agent of the Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad, and remained in that capacity until 1871, when he was appointed by S. S. Mer — rill, General Manager, General Roadmaster of all the lines of the M. & S. P. Railroad, east of the Mississippi River. He laid the track now in use between Chicago and Milwaukee, and completed the work in 1873. He continued in the service of the company in various responsible and important positions until 1882, when he resigned and moved to Michigan. On coming to David Metcalf. Michigan he settled in Adrian, and purchased a home on the corner of Clinton and Toledo streets, known as the Ira Buck home. In 1883 he engaged in the dry goods business in Adrian, the firm being Metcalf & Co., and remained in trade until 1889. He was one of the organizers, and is a stockholder and director of the Commercial Savings Bank of Adrian, and has been connected with many other important business enterprises of the city. He built a fine residence on State street in 1889. For several years he was a trustee of the Bay View Camp Ground Association, and was its secretary for nine years. He is President of the NaMrs. Amelia Metcalf. tional Voting Machine Corn

Page  309 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 309 pany of Adrian. He was for six years the resident member and treasurer of the State Industrial Home for Girls, at Adrian, serving from 1893 to 1900, and is also President of the Board of Trustees of Adrian College. He has been for several years a trustee of the Residence of David Metcalf, No. 10 State Street, Adrian. Young Men's Christian Association. March 26, 1849. David Metcalf married Miss Amelia G. Gibbs, daughter of Benjamin F. Gibbs, of Harpersfield, Delaware County, N. Y. Mrs. David Metcalf was born in Harpersfield, November 12, 1828. DR. LUCIAN GREGORY NORTH was born in Tompkins County, N. Y., October 29, 1850. His father, John C. North, was born in Tompkins County, January 5, 1820, and was the son of Joshua and Jemima (Hedden) North, who were pioneers there, being natives of Pennsylvania. They were married January 5, 1808, and at once took up a new farm in Tompkins County. John C. North was always a farmer, and was an unassuming, honorable and sincere man. His life was passed in doing his duty as he saw it,

Page  310 310 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL and he was respected in his community. In 1860 he came to Michigan with his family, and after spending two years in Delhi, Ingham County, he removed to Parma, Jackson County, where he resided five years, when, owing to declining health, he gave up farming,. and removed to Tecumseh, where he died March 31, 1879. January 5, 1850, he married Miss Abbie Jane Gregory, daughter of Elijah and Amy (Ketchum) Gregory, of Tompkins County, and they had two children, Dr. Lucian G. being the oldest. The sec-r ond child was a daughter, Amy, who died near Lansing, Mich., in 1861. Mrs. Abby Jane North was born in Tompkins County, N. Y., September 27, 1824, and is still living7 in Tecumseh with her son. Dr. Lucian G. North followed farming until he was seventeen years old. On coming to Tecumseh, in 1867, he attended the high school for two years. The next five years were passed in a sash, door and blind factory. In 1874 he took up the study of medicine with the late Dr. I. S. Hamilton, and graduated from the medical department of Michigan Dr. L. G. North, Tecumseh. University in June, 1877. He then remained in Ann Arbor in post-graduate work for two years, during which time he was secretary of the Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery. In June, 1879, he came to Tecumseh and formed a partnership with the late Dr. Hamilton for the practice of medicine and surgery, which continued for two years. He has occupied his present office since that time. For the past nineteen years he has been a member of the Tecumseh School Board, and for eighteen years its secretary. He has been a member of the Baptist church for twenty-five years, and was superintendent of the Sunday school for upwards of twenty years. During the first two or three years of his practice it was a hard struggle, but at this time he occupies a prominent place in the community. He is a member of the Lenawee County Medical Society, the Michigan State Medical Society, and the American Medical Association. He is the local surgeon for the following railroads: Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, the Detroit, Toledo & Milwaukee, and the Detroit Southern. September 3, 1878, Dr. North married Miss Ida M. Stevens, daughter of Asahel and Lucia (Bowen) Stev

Page  311 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 311 ens, of Tecumseh, and they have two children, as follows: Naomi S., born December 7, 1879, is a graduate of Kalamazoo College, and is now a teacher in Kalamazoo High School. Cuyler S., born September 7, 1882, a student at Kalamazoo College. Killed by Michigan Central passenger train while on a visit to Albion, Mich., June 6, 1903. When they entered the first grade of the Tecumseh public schools their father was a member of the Board of Education, and at the close of a twelve years' course, representing the board, he had the satisfaction of presenting them with their diplomas., Mrs. Ida M. North was born at Cooperstown, N. Y., September 13, 1853. Her father, Asahel Stevens, was born in Springfield, N. Y., and he was the son of James and Rhoda (Parmelee) Stevens. Asahel Stevens was a seafaring man, and before his marriage had visited nearly every important seaport in the civilized world. COSPER RORICK was born in Seneca, Lenawee County, Mich., October 8, 1838. His father, Estell Rorick, was born in Deckertown, Sussex County, N. J., April 21, 1809, where he lived until 1834. He was the son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Wilson) Rorick, natives of Sussex County. The Rorick ancestors were German, and the Wilsons were Irish. Estell Rorick was brought up a farmer, and always followed that calling. In 1837 he came to Michigan and purchased land on Section 7, in Seneca, this county, but subsequently sold out and purchased land in Dover. After residing a few years in Dover he again removed to Seneca and purchased a farm on Sections 8 and 17, where he resided until his death, which occurred September 14, 1880. February 7, 1836, Estell Rorick married Miss Hannah Breese, daughter of Elias and Deborah (Bennett) Breese, of Horse Heads, N. Y., and they had four children: Cosper; Deborah Ann, who married Philetus Spear; Lovina A., who married Dr. C. F. Bennett; Mary Melissa, who married Sylvester K. Porter. Mrs. Hannah (Breese) Rorick was born in Horse Heads, N. Y., January 1, 1804, and died in Seneca, October 30, 1896. Cosper Rorick, subject of this sketch, has always lived in Lenawee County, and was educated in the district schools of his township, Barrows' Academy in Medina, and at Oak Grove Academy, in Medina village. He has always lived on a farm, and followed that business until 1894, when he located in the village of Morenci, where he now resides. While engaged in active farming he was largely interested in dairying, and for twenty-five years had a cheese factory on his farm. lie also handled considerable live stock (cattle and hogs) and fitted them for the market. At one time he owned seven hundred and sixty acres of land, nearly all in one body. He erected fine buildings, among the very best in the township, and has always

Page  312 312 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Cosper Rorick, Morenci. taken pride in keeping them in good repair. He erected a good residence in Morenci, where he lives and is now engaged in looking after his property interests. He is a Director and Vice President of the First National Bank of Morenci. He never took to politics, and never sought or held a political office. June 30, 1861, Cosper Rorick married Miss Alice Horton, daughter of Samuel and Lucina Horton, of Fairfield, and they have had four children, as follows: George Herbert, born June 28, 1864, married, September 17, 1885, Mary

Page  313 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 313 Edith Kennedy, has two children, and resides on the home farm in Seneca; Horton C., born December 6, 1866, married Mary Edna Packard, September 17, 1891, has three children, and resides in Toledo, Ohio; Eva May, born July 28, 1873, married George H. Crane, September 16, 1897. They have one child, and reside in Monessen, Pa.; Leila Estell, born June 5, 1880, married Albert V. Foster, September 16, 1903, and resides in Morenci. Mrs. Alice (Horton) Rorick, was born in Lafayette, Medina County, Ohio, March 26, 1842, and died May 19, 1891. [For her family history see Hon. George B. Horton's record, in this volume.] November 21, 1894, Mr. Rorick married Miss Amie C. Spaulding, daughter of Leonard L. and Cordelia (Jacobs) Spaulding, of Detroit, Mich. Her father, a native of Vermont, was born in 1809, and died in Jonesville, Mich., in 1884. Her mother was a native of London, Canada, born January 6, 1823, and died January 31, 1885. ISAAC H. MOSHER was born in Raisin, this county, August 31, 1835. His father, Thomas Mosher, was born in Stanford, Dutchess County, N. Y., December 26, 1806, and was the son of Joshua and Sarah (Hoag) Mosher, who were also natives of Stanford. They were married about the year 1800, Sarah being the daughter of Paul Hoag, a birth-right Quaker. Joshua and Sarah Mosher became the parents of eleven children. In 1808 they removed to Laurens, Otsego County, N. Y., where they lived for several years, but finally settled on a farm near Skaneateles, where Sarah died in 1860, and Joshua in 1863. The ancestors of the Moshers and the Hoags were Quakers, and originally came from New England to the State of New York. Hugh Mosher came from England some time in 1600. Thomas Mosher lived with his parents until he was twenty-one years old, and became both miller and farmer. In 1827 he left home, and in 1828 he went to Niagara County, N. Y., and purchased sixty acres of land of the Holland Purchase Company. Here he made a home and lived until 1832, when he came to Michigan, arriving in Adrian in May. He at once took up 160 acres of land in Madison, about six miles south of Adrian, where he resided until 1851, when he sold to Elisha Hinsdale, soon after purchasing a farm in Raisin, of Noah Tindall. January 15, 1834, Thomas Mosher married Miss Lucy Baker, daughter of Moses Baker, a Quaker pioneer. They had two children, as follows: Isaac H., born in Raisin, August 31, 1835; Sarah, born in Raisin, and married Moses Comfort. Mrs. Lucy (Baker) Mosher was born in Macedon, Wayne County, N. Y., November 25, 1809. She came to Michigan with her parents in the spring of 1832, and settled in Fairfield, this county. She died at the home of her son-in-law, Moses Comfort, in Raisin, in the 79th year

Page  314 314 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL of her age. Thomas Mosher died December 9, 1887. Isaac H. Mosher, the subject of this sketch, lived on the homestead in Raisin, until the spring of 1887, when he purchased his present fine farm home on Section 36, in Cambridge. Since his residence in Cambridge Mr. Mosher has engaged in special lines of farming, and his. Residence of Isaac H. Mosher, Cambridge. success establishes the fact that close attention and intelligent application to specific lines bring reward. For the past fifteen years Mr. Mosher has been engaged in raising young poultry for market, and annually ships many thousands of broiler chickens to New York. It is worth a visit to his farm to witness the process of producing "spring chickens" at all seasons. Mr. Mosher also makes a specialty of producing the finest quality of dairy butter, and is a breeder of choice Jersey stock. He now has a herd of twenty-four cows and heifers, from the best Jersey families in the country, the head of the herd being a choice specimen of the Rysland family. His butter finds ready sale in eastern markets at top prices. January 17, 1861, Isaac H. Mosher married Miss Elizabeth Hoag, daughter of Hazael and Sadie (Hallock) Hoag, and they have had four children, as follows: Lucy E., born January 23, 1862; William T., born March 15, 1867, married Miss Jessie Johnson, of Alpena, October 2, 1901; Arthur E., born February 21, 1870, on the home farm; Katherine M., born February 14, 1874, married Chauncey A. Graves, July 28, 1898, has one child, J. Russell, born March 31, 1903. Mrs. Elizabeth (Hoag) Mosher was born in Kalamazoo, Mich., July 20, 1833. Her father was born in Vermont, April 3, 1796. Her mother was born in Peru, New Jersey, April 27, 1802, and died June 17, 1888.

Page  315 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 315 NATHANIEL HENDERSON was born near the city of Armagh, North of Ireland, March 27, 1824. His father, John Henderson, and his grandfather, George Henderson, were born at the same place. His great-grandfather, John Henderson, was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, in the village of Kilmarnock. When he was about I. Mrs. Mary Henderson. Nathaniel Henderson. eight years old, during the reign of Charles II., he fled with his parents to the North of Ireland to escape the persecutions by the Presbyterians, of those known as the Dissenters. Before leaving Scotland his father was hunted by English soldiers, and was driven to some of the Highland fastnesses, where he was kept alive by his young son George secretly carrying him food and drink until the family could escape. All of these men, who lived to be very old, handed down their history and the story of their sufferings, from father to son. The home that was secured in Ireland, during the reign of Charles II., is still in the hands of the family, and is now occupied by Nathaniel Henderson's brother's family. The mother of Nathaniel Henderson, the subject of this sketch, was also of Scotch origin, and her ancestors settled in Ireland under the same circumstances as the Hendersons. She was a daughter of Samuel and Margaret (Simpson) Graham. Her brother, Samuel Graham, came to the United States in 1836, settled on Section 28, in Ogden, this county, and was one of the organizers of the township. In January, 1852, the subject of our sketch, wrote from his home in Ireland to his uncle for information regarding the advisability of his coming to America.

Page  316 -316 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Mr. Graham at once replied: '"I think it is the best thing you can do; by working hard you can get a good living here." On the 28th of the following June, Mr. Henderson arrived in Ogden. After a stay of a few weeks with his uncle, he went to Tecumseh, where he found employment, and resided for nearly seven years. He worked for Judge Stacy for three years of the time. During this period he purchased a farm on Sections 9 and 16, in Ogden, and paid for it. In the spring of 1859 he moved to his land in Ogden, and commenced clearing. It was covered with water and heavy timber, but Mr. Henderson succeeded in making a beautiful farm, and believes he has done as much as any other man to improve Lenawee County. He has a farm of 240 acres with fine buildings, fences, etc. The land is tiled and drained scientifically, and is as productive as land can be made. Mr. Henderson has reMiia itired from farming, and now resides in Madison, near Adrian, in the most comfortable manner. Two brothers il followed Mr. Henderson from Wtvlliam Henderson. Ireland, and settled in Ogden. One died the following year; John, who now resides on Section 28, Ogden, was a soldier in the great Rebellion. November 28, 1858. Mr. Henderson married Miss Mary Dunlap, daughter of William and Elizabeth (White) Dunlap, of Tecumseh. One son only has resulted from this marriage, as follows: William J., born in Tecumseh, October 20, 1859. Mrs. Henderson's parents were born near Belfast, County Antrim, Ireland. Their ancestors were Scotch Dissenters. Mrs. Henderson came to Michigan in 1835, with her parents, and settled in Tecumseh. She was born in Philadelphia, February 16, 1833. JOHN C. TOLFORD was born in Dover, Lenawee County, Mich., October 2, 1856. His father, John W. Tolford, was born in Haverhill, Mass., January 14, 1826, where he lived until he was about seven years of age, when he came to Michigan with his parents, Hugh and Hannah Tolford, and settled in Dover township, on

Page  317 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 317 Section 36, in 1833, where he resided until his death, which occurred January 12, 1900. Hugh Tolford died in January, 1861, and Hannah Tolford died March 20, 1866. John W. Tolford was first married to Miss Sally Ann Tenbrooke, by whom he had one son, Frank W. Mrs. Sally Ann (Tenbrooke) Tolford died in August, 1851. November 24, 1854, he married Miss Matilda Stumbaugh of Seneca,: X *056 Residence of John C. Tolford, Dover. daughter of John and Susan Stumbaugh, who were pioneers and settled on Section 2, in Seneca. By this marriage there were six children, four of whom are still living. Mrs. John W. Tolford was born in Southampton, Franklin County, Pa., and came to Michigan with her parents. She still resides on the old homestead in Dover. John C. Tolford, the subject of this sketch, has always lived in the township of Dover, and has always followed farming. He owns a farm on Section 36, in Dover, and as an evidence that he is a thrifty and progressive man, we show a fine engraving of his tasty and comfortable home. He is a member of Seneca Lodge, K. P., and an active member of Fruit Ridge Grange, having filled the prominent chairs of the Lodge. Mr. Tolford has been twice married. August 14, 1878, he married Miss Kate Ellis, daughter of Alvin and Mabel Ellis. She died from a malignant attack of erysipelas February 19, 1879, six months after her marriage. October 21, 1880, he married Miss Mary E. McCabe, of Seneca, daughter of Alexander and Harriet McCabe. By this marriage three children have been born, as follows: Fred A., born June 19, 1883; J. Forest, born August 29, 1888; Van R., born January 28, 1891. Mrs. Mary

Page  318 -318 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL E. Tolford was born in Monclova, Lucas County, Ohio, October 5, 1855, and came to Michigan in 1876. Her father was born in Cumberland County, Pa., March 3, 1827, and died in Morenci, September 20, 1900. Her mother was born in Bucks County, Pa., April 28, 1830, and now resides in Dover. MURRAY L. ROBINSON was born in Tyre, Seneca County, N. Y., May 6, 1839. His father, Morgan L. Robinson, born near:Springport, Cayuga County, N. Y., February 27, 1804, was raised a farmer, and afterwards maintained a saw mill in the town of Tyre, until his sudden death, March 21, 1840. He was the son of Giles Robinson, a surveyor and pioneer in Cayuga County, N. Y., and represented the seventh generation of the Robinson family. He was a descendant of John Robinson, who was born in England, in 1576, and Murray L. Robinson. Mrs. Carrie L. Robinson. died March 1st, 1625. John Robinson 1st was a minister in a Puritan church at Layton, England, and the records show that he was afterwards chosen pastor of the Puritan church in Nottingham County, in 1606, afterwards going to Amsterdam in the winter of 1607-8, and back to Layton in 1610, where he died. In 1629 John Robinson's widow and children came over to Plymouth colony in Massachusetts. The names of two sons are known: Isaac, who set

Page  319 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 319 tied in Scituate, and John, near Cape Ann. Isaac 2d removed to Barnstable in 1639, and was disfranchised by Governor Prince in 1659, because of his opposition to the laws against the Quakers. He was restored by Governor Winslow in 1673, having commenced the settlement of Falmouth in 1660. So far as is known Giles Robinson is the first of the family to leave New England. He emigrated to New York and settled in Cayuga County, about the year 1800. He visited Michigan in 1857, and died at his home in New York May 1, 1859. Murray L. Robinson, subject of this sketch, represents the ninth generation. He came to Michigan with his mother, Mrs. Amanda M. (Daboll) Robinson, and family of six children, and settled on Section 15, in Adrian township, where he now resides. The family consisted of five sons and one daughter. In 1865 a saw mill was built on the farm, and has always been know as the "Robinson Bros.' Mill." Mr. Robinson followed farming at home until 1862, when he enlisted in Company F, 4th Michigan Cavalry, and served throughout the great Rebellion. He enlisted under Col. R. B. Robbins, of Adrian, who went as Captain of Company F. Mr. Robinson was made Corporal, and served until July 1, 1865, when he was mustered out at Nashville, Tenn. His regiment was very efficient during the entire war, and participated in the historical event of the capture of Jeff Davis, near Hawkinsville, Ga., May 9, 1865. Mr. Robinson relates many hardships which his company and regiment encountered. In the spring of 1864, after recruiting the regiment at Nashville, it was ordered to join General Sherman on his historic march to Atlanta. On leaving Nashville the roll of his company showed 100 men, but after the surrender of Atlanta, only nine men were present or accounted for. Of course there were a number of men on detached service, and absent from other causes, besides the killed and wounded. Althoughl Mr. Robinson was in nearly all the battles the regiment was engaged in, he was never wounded or injured, and was only disabled from sickness about one week during his three years of service. No regiment did better or more valiant service than the 4th Michigan Cavalry, and the surviving members feel a just pride in its history and record. February 26, 1868, Murray L. Robinson married Miss Carrie L. Chambers, daughter of Thomas and Annie (Lyke) Chambers, and they are the parents of one child, Lilly M., born January 21, 1869, married George S. Russell, June 20, 1888. was the mother of one child, Roy P., born March 1, 1890. She died April 6th, 1890. Mrs. Carrie L. Robinson was born June 30, 1846, in Fairfield, this county. Her parents were natives of New York, came to Michigan in 1834, and settled on Section 8, in Fairfield, where they resided until 1861. At that time they disposed of their home in Fairfield and purchased a farm on Section 16, in Adrian township, where Mrs. Chambers died, February 21, 1880, and Mr. Chambers died August 21, 1894. Mrs. Amanda M. (Daboll) Robinson was born in Connecticut, April 13, 1806, and died in Adrian township, August 24, 1883.

Page  320 320 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL * BENJAMIN L. HICKS was born in Bristol, Ontario County, N. Y., June 14, 1820, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1835. His parents, Ephraim and Mercy Hicks, both natives of Massachusetts, were pioneers in Ontario County, N. Y., and also Lenawee County, Mich: Ephraim Hicks was a man of sterling qualities, having been reared among men who never faltered in time of need. His boyhood days were spent in a Puritan atmosphere, and his young manBenjamin L. Hicks. Mrs. Nancy J. Hicks. hood was passed among scenes of trial and triumph over the primitive in nature, and strife and war in human affairs. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and was at Buffalo when the British burned that city. He settled on Sections 6 and 7, in Ogden, this county, in 1835, where he took up two 80 acre lots from the government and purchased two from John T. Comstock. Here he resided until his death, which occurred May 12, 1879. He was the first supervisor elected from the township of Ogden, in 1837, and was again elected in 1841-2-3. He was a man highly respected by all, and enjoyed the confidence and esteem of the people of Ogden for more than forty years. In 1816 he married Mercy, daughter of Benjamin and Elizabeth Lincoln, of Taunton, Mass., and they were the parents of two children, Benjamin L., and Nancy M., who was born in Bristol, Ontario County, N. Y., May 9, 1818, became the wife of William B. Freeman, and died in Ogden. Mrs. Mercy Hicks was a woman of many virtues, and gladly shared with her husband all his trials and triumphs. She was a typical pioneer and devoted mother. She

Page  321 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 321 was born in Taunton, Mass., March 5, 1785, and died in Ogden, this county, August 26, 1844. Benjamin L. Hicks, the subject of this sketch, came to Michigan when he was about fifteen years old, and lived on the same place in Ogden for sixty-six years. No person in Ogden township was better or more favorably known. His life was active and his career an honorable one. He assisted his father in clearing up the large farm. It will be impossible for the present and future generations to realize what it meant to clear a farm out of the virgin forests of Ogden. Yet our subject never faltered, but rather struggled the harder when the great obstacles confronted him. To clear this land was not all, but it must be ditched and tiled to make it tillable. All this work he did, besides finding time to give attention to all public duties and questions that concerned the common welfare. He was a man of sterling qualities and unblemished character, and enjoyed the confidence of all who knew him. He served his township several times as supervisor, was also elected treasurer, and perhaps settled more estates than any man in Ogden. He lived to the good old age of eighty-two years, and died in Ogden, June 7, 1902. November 12, 1844, Benjamin L. Hicks married Miss Nancy J. Walker, daughter of Eliakim and Nancy Walker, of Salem, Washtenaw County, Mich., and they were the parents of one child, that died in infancy. Mrs. Nancy J. (Walker) Hicks was born in Bristol, Ontario County, N. Y., August 22, 1824, and died in Ogden, April 18, 1847. April 14, 1863, he married Miss Juliana B. Freeman, daughter of William and Betsy Freeman, of Ogden. She was born in Attleboro, Mass., June 28, 1822, came to Michigan with her parents in 1842, and died in Ogden, January 25. 1.890. J. WALLACE PAGE was born in Rollin, Lenawee County, Mich., November 17, 1843. His father, Olson Page, came to Michigan in 1834, and first located in Rome, this county, but remained there only about eighteen months, when he removed to Rollin and settled on Section 21, where J. Wallace was born and raised. It was in district schools that his rudimentary education was obtained, but later he attended Adrian High School, and also spent some time at Adrian College. At the breaking out of the Civil War, in 1861, the young man's patriotism was aroused and he considered it his duty to do what he could for liberty and country. He therefore enlisted before he was eighteen years old in the 17th Michigan Infantry, but his older friends prevented.his going into service until October, 1863, when he enlisted in Battery F, Michigan Light Artillery. under Captain Byron D. Paddock, then and now of Coldwater. The 21

Page  322 322 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL J. Wallace Page, President of the Company and Manager of Adrian plant. battery was with 'General Sherman to Atlanta. From Atlanta with the 23d Army Corps went back to Nashville, Tenn., to resist Hoods attempt to capture that city; from thence to Goldsboro, N. C., where it again joined Sherman's army. Mr. Page was discharged from the service July 3, 1865, and returned home. On the day of his arrivhl back at the farm he celebrated the event by running a mowing machine during the afternoon. From that time he has followed the peaceful pursuits of life, and gave his

Page  323 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 323 - --- - --- -—. Charles M. Lamb, General Superintendent and Manager of Monessen, Pa., plant, attention to farming for more than twenty years. Mr. Page's choice was to be a farmer, but during that period the fact was forced upon him that one of the greatest needs and growing necessities, owing to the scarcity of timber, was some kind of fencing that would be practical and efficient. He at once gave his attention to the subject. Wire was the material he experimented with in many different combinations, and finally adopted as a whole, and the

Page  324 324 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL initiatory work was begun. A rude wooden loom was made, by the assistance of a friend, Austin Fitts, a neighboring farmer, in the little village of Rollin, this county. After much work a section of woven wire fence was made, the business fairly launched, and Mr. Page put it up on his own farm. His neighbors talked about it, and many acquaintances said he was wasting his time and would lose his whole property in fooling and experimenting with the new fangled patent fence. But of course he persisted, and then another even younger farmer, a cousin, only a lad in years, Charles M. Lamb, came forward with certain improvements for the loom, which were adopted, and from that time on the two have worked hand in hand for the advancement and success of anything which promised improvement in fencing. The work was pushed until they developed a machine that made would stand the test and oet the approval of the puboflic. He put up more fence for himself and for his neighbors, who were now willing to admit and embrace "a good thing." Later Mr. Page, with a small kit of tools, but a big chest of hope and confidence, located at Adrian and started making his fence in a small brick shop on the site where now stands the largest woven Frank E. Harvey, Superilntendent of Adrian wire fence plant in the world. In 1889 a company was incorporated. After the organization of the company business still prospered and the merits of the fence became more generally recognized. It will be understood that Mr. Page was the pioneer in the woven wire fence idea, and had no precedents to go by, and when assisted by capital and the fertile brains and indomitable business courage of such men as Mr. Charles M. Lamb and Frank E. Harvey, the farmers soon came to see the practicability and importance of Mr. Page's conception of a fence. Since that time the business has steadily grown. When it is realized that it is yet less than twenty years (1885) that Mr. Page was experimenting with a rude wooden loom in an old wagon shop in Rollin, with his neighbors laughing at his "cranky" idea and foolish efforts, the result seems

Page  325 I I I Bird's Eye View of the Page Woven Wire Fence Company's Plant at Adrian, Mich., where six hundred workmen are employed. This great factory is exclusively devoted to the manufacture of woven wire and ornamental iron fence.

Page  326 326 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL marvelous. He is now the president of a prosperous company, which operates two great plants, one at Adrian, Mich., employing six hundred workmen, and one at Monessen, Pa., with seven hundred workmen. Add to this six thousand local agents, one hundred and fifty traveling men, with ninety-five office people, showing a business of $3,000,000 in 1902, and it will be seen what Mr. Page, in his quiet, unassuming way, has accomplished. His product has found a great demand, and there are many other companies following in in the wake. In 1898 it became necessary for the company to erect large mills in which to manufacture the special wire used by the company in its fencing. These mills were built at Monessen, 39 miles above Pittsburg, on the Monongahela river. April 2, 1902, the Page Woven Wire Fence Company was reincorporated under the laws of New Jersey, with a capital of $6,000,000. The officers and directors then elected are still in service, as follows: J. Wallace Page, Adrian, president; Austin Clement, Chicago, vice president; C. M. Lamb, Monessen, Pa., second vice president and manager of the Monessen plant; secretary, Arthur B. Cody, View of the Page Woven Wire Fence Company's Plant at Monessen, Pa., showing the furnaces, bloom, billet and rod mills, and also the mill manufacturing the specially spring-tempered, Page process wire.

Page  327 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 327 Chicago; treasurer, Leslie B. Robertson, Adrian; Charles E. Locke, J. Charles Davis, H. B. Parsons, New York; S. W. McMunn, D. N. Hansen, Chicago; D. M. Baker, John E. Carr, Adrian. In 1900 Mr. Page was one of the Michigan delegates appointed by the National Association of Manufacturers to attend the Reciprocity Congress at Washington; he has served several years as a member of the Adrian school board, and is also a trustee of the First Methodist church of Adrian. Mr. Page was married to Miss Alice Morehouse of Albion, Mich., March 14, 1867. Mr. and Mrs. Page have three children, two sons, Charles H., of Adrian, Homer, attending Cornell University, and one daughter, Miss Bertha, now the wife of Leslie B. Robertson, of Adrian, who is treasurer and assistant secretary of the company. WILLIAM H. SCOTT was born in Palmyra, Lenawee County, Mich., May 8, 1855, and has always resided in this county. His father, George L. Scott, was born near Cork, Ireland, in 1812. He came to the United States about 1830, and settled in Lima, N. Y. In 1837 he came to Michigan, and afterwards purchased land of George Crane, in Palmyra. He died in Blissfield, December 2, 1893. George L. Scott married Miss Roxie Miller, daughter of Benjamin F. Miller, of Lima, N. Y., and they had six children. Two sons died, soldiers in the great Rebellion, William H. being the fifth child and fourth son. Mrs. Roxie (Miller) Scott was born April 10, 1815, in the town of Lima, Livingston County, N. Y., and died in Blissfield, this county, December 28, 1886. William H. Scott, the subject of this sketch, has always been a farmer, and now owns a portion of the Norman B. Carter farm, on Section 8, in Ogden. His house was erected by Mr. Carter, and was the first frame house constructed in the township. Mr. Scott has greatly improved and modernized it, and is fast making a desirable home. He believes in nmodern methods of farming, and engages quite largely in feeding stock for market. He owns 100 acres of Ogden land, which is evidence of thrift and prosperity. April 26, 1879, William H. Scott married Miss Mary A. Cook, dlaughter of Paul and Ann Cook, of Palmyra, this county, and they have two children, as follows: Alice M., born in Ogrden, this county, July 16, 1887, student in Blissfield High School; Roscoe W., born in Og'den, June 11, 1893. Mrs. Mary A. (Cook) Scott was born in Palmyra, this county, September 19, 1861. Her parents, natives of Yorkshire, England, came to this country in 1850, and settled in Palmyra. Her father, born May 20, 1826, and her mother, born March 16, 1828, both reside in Palmyra.

Page  328 328 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL TOM S. APPLEGATE. For a period of nearly thirty years the subject of this sketch was a prominent figure in the political, social and commercial affairs of Adrian, Lenawee County, and the State. He was born in Blandford, Dorsetshire, England, June 8, 1838, and died of heart failure in the city of Adrian, Mich., December 27, 1891, being consequently in his 53d year. The senior Applegate, who was a sturdy specimen of upright English manhood, decided to come to America in 1849. He therefore sold out all his business interests, that of master baker, and landed inNew York with his wife and Tom S., the only son, January 2, 1849. After a brief experience in the metropolis, he moved to Utica, and later to Rome, Oneida County, N. Y., where he followed the business to which he had been trained for many years, accumulating a comfortable competence. The son, who attended school more or less in the old world, rounded out his education in the City Academy at Utica and the High School atRome. While yet a mere youth he manifested a predilection for the printer's craft and a liking for the lighter lines of literature. In furtherance of this special bent, he entered the office of the Rome Sentinel, then a potent power in Democratic politics in the center of the State. In a few yeatrs he moved to Brooklyn, N. Y., to profit by the greater Mrs. Harriet M. Applegate. scope afforded in such

Page  329 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 329 a much more comprehensive field. In October, 1863, Mr. Applegate came to Adrian and purchased an interest in the Daily and Weekly Watchtower, a paper founded by R. W. Ingalls, a pioneer in the craft of Faust and Franklin, and the accepted organ of Democracy in Southern Michigan. In 1865 Mr. Applegate bought out his associates, and subsequently sold his interest to General William Humphrey. Under the new regime, the sheet became Republican, and it has remained so ever since. It was rechristened The Times. Two years later the Expositor was absorbed, and the paper has since been known as the Times and Expositor. The paper experienced many changes in management and in proprietorship, during all of which Mr. Applegate continued the ruling and dominating spirit. In the fall of 1867 Captain J. H. Fee purchased an increased interest, and the firm was known as Applegate & Fee, until 1885, when Mr. Applegate secured the sole proprietorship, which he maintained up to the date of his untimely death. Mr. Applegate was a power in Republican politics. He served eight years as member of the state central committee, during six of which he was chairman of the executive board. He was also chairman of the congressional committee for the district six years. Governor Croswell appointed him a member of the board to locate the State School for the Blind, and he was for ten years a member of the board of control of that institution. He was a member of the Chicago Press Club, the Inland Press and various state associations. Mr. Applegate was married in 1870, to Miss Harriet Maria Sinclair, daughter of Hon. D. D. Sinclair. One child died in infancy. After his death in 1891, she assumed personal management of the Times and its incidental business interests. A woman of advanced education, fine culture, liberal reading and extended observation, she possessed all the qualifications essential to secure success in her novel as well as responsible self-assumed task. Her relations with her employes were almost ideal, and she herself often used to speak of the office organization as "The Times Family," and the high standard and irreproachable tone of the paper, as well as its commercial integrity and business interests, were more than maintained for the ten years during which she controlled its management. Her death, which occurred June 14, 1901, was a tragedy in which she was not alone. While taking a ride in the city of Flint, where she had gone to attend a meeting of the State Press Association, she, her sister, Mrs. William Humphrey, Major Buckingham and daughter, were run down by a train on the Flint & Pere Marquette Railway. Before they could fairly realize their fate, all four had probably perished. JOHN SERVICE, SR., was born in Lanarkshire, Parish of Bothwell, Scotland, April 14, 1813, and came to the United States with his mother in 1818. His father, James Service, was born in the

Page  330 330 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL same place, in 1784. He resided there until early in the year 1817,. when he came to Philadelphia, Pa. Thomas Leeper, a wealthy man of Philadelphia, had sent to Scotland for a gardener and farmer, and Mr. Service answered the call. On leaving his old home in Scotland, he was given a most commendable character, as follows: BOTHWELL, 19th Feby., 1817. James Service, the bearer, has, been employed from his infancy in the labours of husbandry, and is esteemed by all who are acquainted with him as a most excellent workman. He has also the character of' an honest and upright, as well as an, industrious man, and if he shall beengaged to overlook any farming: establishment, for which we under —: stand he is now making application,, we have no doubt, from what we know of his qualifications, that hewill give full satisfaction to his employer. JAMES CREECH, Farmer to the Right Honorable Lord Douglas. Mat. Baillie, St., Bothwell Castle. Mr. Service left Scotland ini February, and upon his arrival in Philadelphia, he at once en — James Service. gaged his services to Mr. Leeper, where he remained for about three years. In 1820 he purchased a new farm in Susquehanna County, Pa. He remained on his farm until 1825, when he sold out and removed to Canandaigua, N. Y., where he resided until 1840, when he came to Michigan. He at once purchased land in Hillsdale County, but resided in Fairfield, this county, until his death, which occurred in 1867. In the year 1803 James Service married Miss Janet Scott, and they were the parents of nine children. Here we insert the following certificate, to show the Scotch system of preserving family records: "These are to certify that James Service, farmer, roadmaker, hedger and laborer, &c., in the town of Bothwell, and Janet Scott, his spoulse. are the parents of the lawful children after mentioned, whose names, birth days, and days on which they were baptised. are all regularly entered in the register of the Parish of Bothwell, and stand as under, viz.: William Service, born 23d Febrtuary-baptised 5th July. 1807. Mannie Service. born 12th September-baptised 1st October, 1809. John Service, born 14th April-baptised 30th May, 1813. Isabel Service, born 24th December-baptised 10th September, 1815. BOTHWELL, 15th August, 1817. The above, extracted and certified by William Allan, Parish Clerk and in — structor of said parents and children."

Page  331 RECORD OP LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 331 Regarding the birth of Mrs. Janet Service, we give the Scotch certificate, as follows: "These are to certify that Janet Scott, lawful daughter of John Scott, shoemaker, in New Orbiston, and of Marian Crawford, his spouse, was born upon the 10th, and baptised upon the 17th April, 1785. Extracted from the register of the Parish of Bothwell. 15th August. 1817. By WILLIAM ALLAN. Parish Clerk. John Service, Sr., was the second son and third child of James and Janet Service. He was brought up a farmer and gardener, and came to Michigan in 1840 and settled on Section 31, in Fairfield. After about two years he became dissatisfied and traded for a farm on Section 29, where he resided until his death, which occurred in March, 1863. John Service, Sr.. married Miss Mary Carroll, of Canandaigua, N.Y., and they were the par-, ents of seven children, as follows: Sarah, married Harvey Hill, and resides in Grand Rapids, Mich.; John, Jr., a resident of Berkeley, California. He married Miss Julia Warner, and they are the par- John Service, Sr. ents of eleven children: Edward, resides in Jasper this county; Robert, resides in Fairfield; William, resides in Seneca, this county; Catherine, married Joshua Carpenter, and died in Fairfield; Isabella, married Clarence Hough, and resides in Morenci, this county. Mary (Carroll) Service died at her home, on Section 20, in Fairfield. John Service Jr., went to California in 1859, and is there a very successful farmer. He resides at Berkeley, near Oakland. He made the trip overland, from Warsaw, Ind., with ox teams. July 3, 1867, John Service, Jr., married Miss Julia Hall War- Mrs. Mary Service.

Page  332 332 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL ner, of Auburn, Placer County, California, and they have had eleven children, as follows: Walter Warner, born April 26, 1868, died November 22, 1878; Lewis Hall, born April 27, 1870; Wilber Pomeroy, born June 5, 1871, died November 17, 1878; Hubert E., born May 15, 1873; William Roscoe, born October 24, 1874; Ida Irene, born Mrs. Julia Service. John Service. Jr. March 24, 1877; Robert Roy, born at Weston, Mich., June 4, 1879; Lulu Karolena, born January 29, 1881; Lydia Rose, born December 16, 1883; John Henry, born in Auburn, Cal., August 31, 1888; Lawrence Edward, born in Auburn, August 31, 1890. All of the children except those noted were born in Ceres, Cal. Mrs. Julia (HallWarner) Service's parents died when she was an infant, and she is not certain of her age or birthplace. WILLIAM McCOMB, 2d, was born near Glasgow, Scotland, February 1, 1822, and came to the United States in 1835. His father, William McComb, 1st, was born in County Antrim, Ireland, August 15, 1796. When a boy he learned the linen weaver's trade in Ireland. About the year 1814 he went to Scotland as a linen bleacher, but in 1822 he returned to Ireland, on account of illness of his wife. In the spring of 1831 he landed in New York, settling near Mt. Morris, N. Y.

Page  333 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 333 In the spring of 1837 he came to Michigan, and for about one year lived near Adrian. In February, 1838, he moved to the township of Ogden and settled on land he had taken from the government, on Section 20. This land he cleared and improved, and that was his home until his death, which occurred January 27, 1864. He was twice married, first to Miss Betty McMurry, who was born in Antrim County, Ireland, about 1800, and died there in 1829. She was the mother of three children, William 2d being the youngest. In 1834 William McComb 1st married Mrs. Mary (Glasgow) Johnson, of Danville, N. Y., and they had five children. Mrs. Mary McComb died in Ogden, this county, June 11, 1894. She was born in Loch Gael, Antrim County, Ireland, December 25, 1803. William McComb came to Lenawee when he was 15 years old, and has resided here ever since. His father's land was in an Ogden Swamp, two miles from any habitation, and it was his lot to assist in making a home there. He worked with a will and a home was soon made in the dense woods. He lived with his parents until he was about 26 years old. In 1845 he purchased 40 acres of State school land, on Section 16, in Ogden, where he now resides. He cleared this up and has added 40 acres more, all of which he has cultivated and improved. He has built good buildings, tiled the land, (some of it the second time) and made a very desirable home. There were not over a dozen families in the township when Mr. McComb first came in, and land could be had for five dollars an acre, that now cannot be purchased for one hundred. Mr. McComb has been an active man in the township. He served as School Director and Township Treasurer two terms. He has assisted in building roads and bridges, and all necessary improvements for the betterment of the township. March 21, 1848, William McComb married Miss Elizabeth Luke, daughter of Elijah and Abigail Luke, of Ogden, and they had four children as follows: Reuben, born April 14, 1849, died October 22, 1851; Sarah A., born March 28, 1851, married Nel son Frazier, November 6, 1877, is the mother of six children, and resides in Hudson city, this county; Mary E., born March 16, 1854, married Andrew Comstock, February 14, 1894, has two children, and resides at Santa Monica, Cal.; William J., born February 17, 1856, married Miss Alice Wotring, February, 1877, has eight children and resides in Coleman, Midland County, Mich. Mrs. Elizabeth (Luke) McComb was born in Ohio in 1825, and died in Ogden February 17, 1856. Her parents were pioneers in Ogden. November 10, 1857, he married Mrs. Mary E. (Smith) Hampton, and they have nine children, as follows: Allen M., born August 31, 1858, married Miss Ida Crockett, November 25, 1886, has two children and resides at South Ogden. Robert, born July 28, 1860, died Sept. 16, 1874; Martha J., born September 9, 1862, married Charles Willbee, March 25, 1891, has five children and resides in Whiting, Indiana; Anna, born September 3, 1863, at home; Elijah S., born February 18, 1865, married Miss Louisa Jenkins, March 16, 1887, has six children, and resides in

Page  334 334 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Ogden; Carlos, born January 6, 1866, married Miss Ellen Savage, February 5, 1900, resides in Toledo; George R., born March 31, 1867, married Miss Esta M. Heckert, has four children, and resides in Ogden; Leonard A., born November 30, 1868, married Miss Naomi Stephens, June 15, 1893,'has two children, and resides in Ogden; Dana S., born October 14, 1870, married Miss Edna Houghtby, September 11, 1895, has two children, and resides in Ogden; May, born April 6, 1874, died September 16, 1874. Mrs. Mary E. (Smith) McComb was born in Bloom, Seneca County, Ohio, September 16, 1835. Was married to Tallman Hampton, of Delta, Ohio, in 1854, and they had one child, Alice, who married Oscar Fry in 1876, and died August 1, 1878, aged 24. She left one daughter. HON. MARSHALL REED was born in Richmond, Ontario County, N. Y., August 21, 1833. His father, Wheeler Reed, was born in Vermont, May 28, 1788, and went with his father, Phillip Reed, who was a revolutionary soldier under Gen. Stark, at Bennington, to OnWilliam Barrus, Sr., and Wife Mr. Barrus was a pioneer Methodist Minister in this county. tario County, N. Y., in 1795. Phillip Reed was born in 1756, and was the son of Jacob Reed, a seafaring man, of Saybrook, Conn. Wheeler Reed was one of the earliest settlers of Ontario County, N. Y., and always lived there, becoming a prosperous and wealthy farmer. He was twice married, and was the father of nineteen children, ten daughters and nine sons. By his first wife he had four children.

Page  335 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 335 His second marriage was about 1817, with Miss Hannah Risdon, sister of his first wife, who became the mother of fifteen children, Marshall and his twin sister being the eleventh and twelfth. Mrs. Hannah (Risdon) Reed was born at Richmond, N. Y., September 16, 1798, and died at her home, February 2, 1877. Wheeler Reed died May 12, 1867, at Richmond, N. Y. Marshall Reed lived with his parents on the farm until he was twenty-one years old,. In 1854 he came to Michigan and settled on Section 33, in Rome. Being an active, intelligent and public-spirited man, he soon became prominent among his fellows in all local affairs. IHe served eleven years William and Mary Ann Barrus. as Justice of the Peace, and held other township offices. He was a Republican in politics, and was elected to the State Legislature in 1874. He served on many of the important committees, and labored earnestly for his constituents. He was a prosperous farmer, and successful stock raiser. In 1866 he sold his farm in Rome and purchased another on Section 34, in Cambridge township, where he resided at the time of his death, which occurred December 16, 1891. November 22, 1855, Marshall Reed married Miss Julia A. Barrus, daughter of William and Mary A. (Allan) Barrus, of Rome, and three children were born to them as follows: Fred P., born September 1, 1857, married Miss Elsie Russell, November 12, 1878, has two children and resides in Cambridge; Alice C., born January 26, 1859, married Jackson B. Daniels, February 25, 1885, has one daughter, and resides in Cambridge, Byron L., born September 10, 1861, married Miss C. Maud Willetts, September 11, 1885, has one daughter, and is commissioned in the U. S. Revenue Service as First Lieutenant and executive officer on the Revenue Cutter Mackinac. Mrs.

Page  336 336 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Julia (Barrus) Reed was born in Rome, Lenawee County, Mich., August 22, 1839. Her father, William Barrus, Jr., was born in Villenova, Chautauqua County, N. Y., October 17, 1812. His early life was spent in New Hampshire. His father, William Barrus, Sr., was of New England parentage, his father being a revolutionary soldier. William Barrus, Sr., was a Wesleyan Methodist minister, came to Michigan in 1830, being one of the first ministers in the county. William Barrus, Jr., was about eighteen years old when he came to Michigan in 1830, with his parents. In 1835 he was a soldier in the "Toledo War." In 1836 he settled in Rome and followed farming as long as he did business. He died at the home of his daughter, in Cambridge, May 29, 1898. In 1836, William Barrus, Jr., married Mary Ann Allen, who was the first to teach a school west of Adrian, and they had two children, Julia A. being the youngest. Mrs. Mary Ann (Allen) Barrus was born in Richfield, Otsego County, N. Y., February 25, 1811, came to Michigan with her mother, Mrs. Rhoda (Brown) Allen, in 1830, and died in Cambridge, this county, February 26, 1894. ROBERT SERVICE was born in Fairfield, Lenawee County, Mich., January 29, 1843. [For his family record, see biography of John Service, in this volume.] Fairfield township, in the County of Lenawee, has always been the home of Robert Service, the subject of this sketch. He was born and raised on a farm, and was educated in the country schools of his township. August 11, 1862, he enlisted in Company I, Eighteenth Michigan Infantry, and served as a soldier in the great Rebellion until his discharge, the 26th day of June, 1865. He is a member of David Becker Post, No. 25, of Ogden, is a charter member of Jasper Lodge, I. 0. 0. F., 481, is a member of Fairfield Grange, No. 278, and also a member of Dora Rebecca Lodge, No. 369, of Jasper. Immediately upon his return from the army he went to work by the month on a farm, and continued in that employment for about five years, when he rented a farm for several years. In 1872 he purchased land on Section 20, where he resided until 1880, when he sold his home and purchased a farm on Section 36, where he now resides. He has served two years as commander of David Becker Post, G. A. R., one year as noble grand, I. 0. O. F., Jasper Lodge, No. 481. He has been twelve times elected Township Road Commissioner. December 4, 1870, Robert Service married Miss Aline R. Lane, daughter of Lyman and Nancy Lane, pioneers of Fairfield, and became the parents of two children, as follows: Maude E., born March 23, 1875, married, March 19, 1896, to Samuel C. Blain. She became the mother of one daughter, and resides in Fairfield; Vern, born September 13, 1880, at home. Mrs.

Page  337 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 337 Aline R. (Lane) Service was born in Fairfield, this county, March 23, 1847, and died in Fairfield, March 26, 1885. December 15, 1885, Robert Service married Miss Nellie Hubbard, daughter of Edwin F. and Lovina Hubbard, of Madison, and they have two children, as follows: Elsie M., born September 10, 1888; Freida E., born September 3, 1895. Mrs. Nellie (Hubbard) Service was born February 21, 1864. Her father, born May 3, 1812, was a native of Massachusetts. He came to Michigan in 1850, located in Palmyra, afterwards removing to Madison, where he died July 10, 1881. Her mother, also a native of Massachusetts, was born November 19, 1823, and resides in Fairfield. ELIAS B. RORICK was born in Horse Heads, Chemung County, N. Y., December 9, 1831, and came to Michigan with his parents in December, 1836. His father, William Rorick, was born in Deckertown, Sussex County, N. J., March 30, 1805, and was the son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Wilson) Rorick, who were natives of Sussex County. The ancestor of the Rorick family was a German, who settled in Sussex County, N. J., early in the 18th century. The ancestors of the Wilson family were Irish. William Rorick lived in Sussex County until 1826, when he went "West," and settled in the '"Lake Country" in the State of New York. He purchased land near Horse Heads, and lived there until the fall of 1836. In December, that year, he started for Michigan with a team of horses, coming through Canada, and crossed the Detroit River from Windsor on the ice. From Detroit he came to Adrian, and finally settled on Section 18, in Seneca township, this county. Here he was successful and continued to purchase land from time to time until he owned some 200 acres. He resided on this farm for about 35 years. He was a thrifty, successful business man, and was held in high esteem by all who came in contact with him. He became a victim of ill health, and about 1875 removed to the village of Morenci, where he died, January 15, 1898. May 22, 1830, William Rorick married Miss Phoebe Ann Breese, daughter of Elias and Deborah (Bennett) Breese, Horse Heads, N. Y., and they had five children, as follows: Elias B., John C., Jacob M., Estell H. and Lussetta. Mrs. Phoebe (Breese) Rorick, was born in Horse Heads, N. Y., October 27, 1811, and died in Seneca, this county, September 1, 1858. Elias B. Rorick was reared a farmer, and was educated in the primitive country school house, supplemented by a three months' course in the Medina Academy, J. M. Barrows, principal. At the age of seventeen years he went to Adrian, and for two years was engaged as clerk in the then large and prosperous hardware store of George L. Bidwell. In 1852 he went to Corning, N. Y., and for two years acted as clerk in a dry goods store. In the winter of 1854-5 he went to Cleveland, 22

Page  338 338 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Ohio, and spent three months in Fulsom's Commercial School. In the spring of 1854 he went to Green Bay, Wis., where he was engaged for six months in the fish business with a Cleveland, Ohio, firm. The next two years he spent at Ontonagon, as manager of the Evergreen Bluff copper mine. He returned home in the spring of 1856, making the trip from Ontonagon to Green Bay with dogs and Indians. In April, 1856, he went to Kansas in the height of the "Border Ruffian" troubles, and witnessed many thrilling scenes. He soon found employment in the government corps of topograpical engineers who were selecting a route for a future railroad to San Francisco. He remained in this service for about six months, and returned home in December. In the year 1857 he went back to agriculture, which he followed for about three years, when he went to Aurora, Ill., and farmed it for about seven years. In 1867 he went to Chillicothe, Mo., purchased a small farm, and remained there until 1869, when he returned and went on his father's farm. Elias B. Rorck. In April, 1873, he removed to the village of Morenci and went into the employ of J. P. Cawley & Co. in the general mercantile business. That fall he went to work for Rothrock, Cawley & Green, in the hardware business, and has been engaged in that trade ever since. In April, 1876, he purchased a half interest in the store, in company with Henry E. Green. He was for 27 years express agent and six years postmaster in Morenci. In 1896 he was made cashier of the Bank of Morenci. In 1900 a national bank was organized, and Mr. Rorick was elected president, which position he now holds. He has acted as Town Clerk for six years, and has served on the public school board for 25 years. He is a member of the Congregational church, and affiliates with the Republican party. August 25, 1857, Elias B. Rorick married Miss Mary A. Corwin, daughter of George E. Corwin, of Batavia, Ill., and they had three children, as follows: Luella, born in Seneca, this county, June 9, 1858, married Pearly Cawley, of Morenci, was the mother of three children, and died in Fayette, Ohio,

Page  339 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 339 November 27, 1899; William B., born in Aurora, Ill., August 12, 1861, resides in Morenci, and is engaged in the hardware business; George C., born same place, November 29, 1863, died July 11, 1889. Mrs. Mary A. (Corwin) Rorick was born in Watkins Glen, N. Y., March 14, 1835, and died in Morenci, March 23, 1895. September 21, 1899, Mr. Rorick married Miss Amelia Shepherd, of Morenci. She was born in Monroeville, Ohio, March 16, 1850. Her parents were English, and were early settlers in Huron County, Ohio. They afterwards removed to Fulton County, where they resided for many years. Her mother died in Morenci, June 9th, 1898. HENRY A. ANGELL was born in Newport, Herkimer County, N. Y., September 14, 1826. His father, Ezekiel Angell, was born in Providence, R. I., August 6, 1802. He always lived in Newport, and learned the trade of blacksmithing and edge tool maker with Silas Mrs. Adelia Angell. Henry A. Angell. T. Clark. He carried on a large shop for many years, and in 1848 disposed of his business to his oldest son, William W. In those days a blacksmith was expected to make anything that a person wanted in iron or steel, from a horse shoe to axes, scythes and butcher knives, and Mr. Angell was known the country round as an expert work

Page  340 340 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL man. March 30, 1823, he married Miss Cynthia Brown, daughter of Essuck and Ruth Brown, and they had nine children, eight of whom lived to maturity, Henry A. being the second child. Mrs. Cynthia (Brown) Angell was born in Cheshire, Mass., August 12, 1802, and died in Adrian, Mich., August 18, 1886. Her father, Essuck Brown, was born in Cheshire, Mass., and died in Newport, Herkimer County, N. Y., December 27, 1819. His ancestors came from England, and Residence of H. A. Angell, 96 East Maumee Street, Adrian. his father was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. Ezekiel Angell died in Newport, N. Y., February 24, 1868. His ancestors came from England in 1636, when two brothers named Angell settled on Block Island, opposite Providence, Rhode Island, and from these men the Angells in the United States spring. Henry A. Angell, the subject of this sketch, lived in his native town until he was about 17 years old. Here he received a common school education, and worked in a country store for some time. In 1844 he went to Springfield, Mass., and became an apprentice in the extensive foundry and car wheel works of T. and W. C. Wasson. He remained there for nine years, when, in the spring of 1853, he came to Adrian, Mich. He immediately made a contract with the Michigan Southern & Northern Indiana Railroad to provide car wheels for that company. He at once erected suitable buildings, put in the necessary

Page  341 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 341 equipment, and for many years continued the business very successfully. In 1869 Mr. Angell enlarged his capacity and commenced the building of railroad cars. In this enterprise Mr. Angell employed more men in his shops than were employed in all the other shops in Adrian. At one time 800 men were on his pay rolls, which amounted to $20,000 per month. Besides being so largely interested in manufacturing, he also made some profitable investments with Alger, Smith & Co., in the lumber interests of Michigan. He was elected Mayor of Adrian in 1877, and has always been greatly interested in the prosperity and growth of the city. October 4, 1849, Henry A. Angell married Miss Adelia Sizer. They had one child, Adeleta S., born in Adrian, April 9, 1855, and died July 10, 1864. In 1875 they adopted a bright little girl and conferred upon her the name of Maggie Angell." She was born in Boston, Mass., February 22, 1855, married September 19, 1883, Ebbert E. Russell, and now resides in Chicago. She is the mother of three children. Mrs. Adelia (Sizer) Angell was born in Sheffield, Mass., August 27, 1830. Her father, Amandas Sizer, was born in Chester, Mass., December 4, 1804. For many years he resided in Springfield, Mass., where he died, November 14, 1850. About the year 1829, Amandas Sizer married Miss Elizabeth M. Collins, daughter of Nathaniel and Mehitable Collins, of Chester, Mass., and they had four children, Mrs. Angell being the oldest. Mrs. Elizabeth M. (Collins) Sizer was born in Chester, Mass., October 21, 1810, and died in Adrian, Mich., February 22, 1902. LEONARD S. MANN was born in Rome, Lenawee County, Mich., September 7, 1853. His father, Daniel Mann, was born in Oxford, Grafton County, New Hampshire, March 3, 1812, and was the son of Captain Ira Mann and Fanny (Bailey) Mann of the same place. December 26, 1839, Daniel Mann married Miss Anna Stoddard, daughter of Whitman and Rhoda Stoddard, of Rome, by whom he had six children, as follows: Loretta, born April 4, 1842; Charles, born May 7, 1844; Daniel W., born July 24, 1846; George W., born September 11, 1848; Philip I., born February 13, 1851. Leonard S. Mann, the subject of this sketch, has resided in Rome, Lenawee County, Mich., since his birth. He lived with his parents on the farm in Rome until he married Miss Carrie Andrews, February 20, 1876. She was the daughter of Ami and Cordelia (Cotton) Andrews of Rome, Lenawee County, Mich. After marriage he worked his father's farm for five years, when he purchased a farm of 80 acres adjoining his father's. He kept this 80 acre farm one year, selling out and purchasing his present home of 80 acres, and has since added to it until he now owns in a body 260 acres. He was elected Supervisor of Rome township in the spring of 1898, and

Page  342 342 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL has been re-elected every year since, holding the office at the present time, 1903. Leonard and Carrie (Andrews) Mann have three children: Bertha, born April 19, 1877; Mable, born June 2, 1886, and Hazel, born February 10, 1892. Mrs. Carrie (Andrews) Mann was born in Darien township, Genesee County, N. Y., December 10, 1854. Her father, Ami Andrews, was born in Attica, Genesee County, N. Y., March 17, 1824, and came to Michigan, settling in Rome, Lenawee County, in 1861. He died in Rome, June 22, 1868. November 5, 1849, Ami Andrews married Miss Cordelia Cotton, and they had three children. Daniel Mann, father of Leonard, died in Rome, January 21, 1892. Anna, his wife, died in Rome, September 1, 1901. NELSON BALDWIN was born in Medina, Lenawee County, Mich., February 3, 1843. His father, Charles M. Baldwin, was born in Windsor, Berkshire County, Mass., February 28, 1806, where he lived and was reared on a farm. He remained there until 1833. when he came to Michigan, took up government land, it being the Nelson Baldwin. Mrs. Sarah A. Baldwin. w. X of the n. e. 4, Section 18, Fairfield, the deed being dated May 27, 1833. He made some improvements and lived there until 1835, when he traded his land for property in Genesee County, Mich., but never moved there. He at once purchased a farm on Sections 24 and 25, in Medina, this county, where he lived until he was fatally injured by a horse, and died April 3, 1852. He was the son of Ephraim and Triphena B. Baldwin. Ephraim, born in 1771, died

Page  343 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 343 in 1839, was the son of Samuel and Millicent (Cutter) Baldwin, of Massachusetts, where Samuel was born July 28, 1743. The Baldwin ancestors came from England and settled in Woburn, Mass., in the 17th century. July 29, 1834, Charles M. Baldwin married Miss Martha K. Mitchell, daughter of William and Clarissa Mitchell, of Palmyra, this county, and they were the parents of seven children, three of whom, Cyrus M., of Morenci, Ophelia, wife of Charles Blanchard, of Morenci, and Nelson, still survive. Mrs. Martha K. Baldwin was born in Massachusetts, February 1, 1810, and died in Medina, this county, August 27, 1864. Nelson Baldwin, subject of this sketch, lived for fifty-five years on the farm upon which he was born, and still owns a portion of it. In 1898 he removed to Morenci, where he now resides. He still gives his attention to his farm, and is living in the most comfortable manner. October 15, 1863, Nelson Baldwin married Miss Sarah A. Sims, daughter of Richard and Susan Sims of Seneca, this county, and are the parents of four children, as follows: Martha E., born October 26, 1864, married E. E. Spear, December 29, 1885, has four children, and resides in Morenci; Florence 0., born August 24, 1867, and died January 1, 1888; Theresa A., born December 22, 1870, died March 29, 1885; Earl Nelson, born November 3, 1878, married Miss Mertie Rorick, October 7, 1900, has two children, and resides in Fayette, Ohio. Mrs. Sarah A. (Sims) Baldwin was born near Rochester, N. Y., April 3, 1842, and came to Michigan with her parents in 1852. Her father and mother are both natives of Harwell, England. They came to the United States in 1837, and settled near Rochester, N. Y. Richard Sims was born May 18, 1790, and died May 17, 1865. His wife, Susan (Dandridge) Sims, was born June 27, 1800, and died September 27, 1865. ANDREW J. SUTTON was born in Morenci, Seneca township, Lenawee county, Mich., January 1, 1837. His father, William Sutton, was born in Junius, Seneca County, N. Y., May 24 1808, where he lived until he was about sixteen years old. at which time he went to Lyons, Wayne County, N. Y., and learned the carpenter's trade. He was the son of John Sutton, who was a revolutionary soldier, going into the Continental Army when he was sixteen years old, and taking part in many important battles in New Jersey and the Carolinas. He died at his home in Seneca County, N. Y., in 1825. William Sutton resided in Lyons, N. Y., until the spring of 1835, when he came to Michigan, first settling in Adrian, and took up 80 acres of Land on Section 34, in Adrian township (where Adrian College now stands). He soon after sold out, removed to Seneca, Section 6, Town 9, built a double log house, and kept the first public house in what is now the thriving village of Morenci. In 1838

Page  344 344 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL he purchased 160 acres of land in Gorham township, Fulton County, Ohio. He resided there until 1870, when he purchased 120 acres in Seneca township, this county, where he resided until his death, which occurred in October, 1892. June 29, 1829, William Sutton married Rebecca Burnett of Ontario County, N. Y., and they became the parents of fifteen children, nine of whom are still living. Mrs. Rebecca Sutton died in Seneca, this county, June 1, 1886. She was born in Phelps, Ontario County, N. Y., June 27, 1812. Andrew J. Sutton, the subject of this sketch, being a native of Lenawee County, is satisfied to make it his home. He lived with his parents until he was eighteen years old, when, in 1855, he went to Lansing, where, after a year or so, he purchased an interest in a livery stable, and remained until September, 1861-. At that time he enlisted in the 16th Michigan Infantry, Company G, Captain Meyers, and served a little over three years in the army of the Potomac, 1st Division, 5th Army Corps. He served two years as orderly for General Butterfield. He participated in forty-five engagements, including the siege of Yorktown, battles of Williamsburg, Malvern Hill, Gettysburg, Second Bull Run, Fredericksburg, the Wilderness and Petersburg. He was mustered out at Petersburg, Va., in October, 1864, and returned to Michigan. He at once purchased the east half of the old Simon D. Wilson farm, on Section 31, in Seneca township, where he now resides. Since that time he has lived a quiet life, and has been reasonably prosperous. April 29, 1859, Andrew J. Sutton married Miss Esther M. Webb, daughter of William and Jane (Wright) Webb, of Lansing, and they have had two children as follows: One child died in infancy; Archie W., born in Lansing, March 27, 1860, graduated from Michigan Agricultural College, class of 1884. He married, October 21, 1886, Miss Dora E. Russell, and they had two children, Glen and Vaughn. The mother died November 1, 1899. Mrs. Esther M. Sutton was born in Batavia, N. Y., July 19, 1841. Her parents were natives of Northamptonshire, England, and came to the United States in 1838. They moved to Michigan in 1841, and settled near Mason, Ingham County. Mr. Webb built the third log house in Lansing, and being a carpenter by trade, assisted in building up and establishing the present Capital City. He died there February 22, 1849. His wife, Mrs. Jane Webb, died in Morenci, April 24, 1899, aged 78 years. PROF. THOMAS 'WALLACE was born in Petersburg, Va., January 25, 1852, where he received a limited education. He followed different pursuits, and resided in Virginia until the spring of 1877, when he came to Adrian. Early in life he took to books, and for many years was a constant reader and close observer. He was

Page  345 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 345 always interested in anatomy and felt a sympathy for all suffering humanity. He was a good nurse and delighted in administering relief to the sick and unfortunate. He discovered that he possessed unusual powers, and carefully studied the effects of his treatment upon the afflicted. He continued to study, and whenever opportunity presented itself to relieve pain and suffering, he did so, but never called himself a doctor, or thought he was or ever would be. He persisted in the work and line of thought bearing upon his ability to relieve suffering. After some considerable time of close application, he believed he had discovered a new science, called it Myo-pathy, and commenced the treatment of diseases. During the past ten years he has been actively engaged in relieving the afflicted. He has performed some wonderful cures, and relieved much suffering, at the same time receiving the com- Professor Wallace. mendation of many of the best local and other physicians. He has scores of testimonials from persons who have been cured by him of the most stubborn and "incurable" troubles. The Professor's time is now entirely taken up with his numerous patients at his Physician's Auxiliary Retreat, 51 West Maumee street. He has a large correspondence and numerous invitations to visit other cities professionally. His fame has gfrown until it is not uncommon for him to receive calls to the city of New York, or Chicago, and intermediate points. The Professor gives no medicine, but imparts a life and vigor to his patients that astonishes the Mrs. Louise Wallace.

Page  346 346 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL wisest practitioners. There is abundant evidence of the good work the Professor has done, and Myo-pathy as practiced by him is worthy the attention of the afflicted. Prof. Thomas Wallace was married at London, Ontario, June 2, 1895, to Miss Louise Reid. Her parents were natives of Kentucky, and have resided in London for many years. There have been no children by this union, but Mrs. Wallace is a worthy helpmate to the Professor in his large and successful practice. REV. HOWARD B. TAFT was born in Van Buren, Onondaga County, N. Y., August 8, 1830, and removed with his parents to West Barre, Fulton County, Ohio, in 1844. His father, Deacon Amos Taft, was born in Barre, Vt., April 11, 1797, and was the son of Peter and Phoebe (Wheaton) Taft. In 1680 Robert Taft came from England, settled at Mendon, Mass., and founded the Taft fam Mrs. Harriet C. Taft. Rev. H. B. Taft. ily in America. Deacon Amos Taft left his native town, in Vermont, when he was a young man, and settled in Onondaga County, N. Y., November 12, 1820, he married at Camillus, Onondaga County, N. Y., Miss Sally IBailey, daughter of Ebenezer and Silvia Bailey, who were pioneers in Central New York. They had eight children, Howard B. being the fourth son and sixth child. Mrs. Sally (Bailey) Taft was born at Fort Ann, N. Y., February 11, 1799, and died at West Barre, Fulton County, Ohio, in April, 1871. Deacon

Page  347 RECORD OF LhNAWIE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 347 Amos Taft was a farmer, owned a large farm in Fulton County, Ohio, and was a prominent man there. He was postmaster at West Barre for many years, was Deacon in the Baptist church for fifty years, and was superintendent of the Sunday school for the same length of time. He died while on a visit to Elkport, Iowa, August 20, 1880, but is buried beside his wife at West Barre, Ohio. Rev. H. B. Taft, the subject of this sketch, was raised a farmer, assisted his father in clearing his new land in Ohio, and lived at home until 1851, when he went to Maumee City, Ohio, to attend school. He soon became an assistant teacher there. He remained there for some time, preparing for a college course. In the spring of 1855 he entered Kalamazoo College, where he remained for about six years, when, 1861, he graduated from the theological department, having graduated in 1859 from the classical course. In the fall of 1861 he accepted a call from the Baptist church at Perrysburg, Ohio, where he was ordained and remained for three years. In 1864 he was installed as pastor of the Baptist church at Salem, Mich., where he remained until 1870. That year he went to Otsego, Mich., where his health failed him. In 1871 he accepted a charge in Fairfield, now the Weston Baptist church. He preached here for eight years, when, in 1879, he went to White Pigeon, Mich., in charge of the church there, and remained until 1888. He then went to Paw Paw, Mich., remaining until 1891. Then to Tekonsha in 1891-93; Mt. Vernon, Mich., 1894-98; Medina, this county, 1899, since which time he has resided at Weston, this county. Owing to ill-health in 1899, he has not been active, and has only preached occasionally as a supply. June 30, 1861, Rev. H. B. Taft married Miss Harriet C. Cole, daughter of Rev. A. H. and Lydia Cole, of West Barre, Ohio, and they had two children, as follows: Miner C., born at Perrysburg, Ohio, July 19, 1862, married Miss Mary Jean Hoag, September 8, 1892, has four children and resides at Kalamazoo, Mich., where he is city civil engineer; George W., born in Salem, Mich., July 17, 1865, married Mary Boyden in 1889. Had two children, (twins) born in Japan, November 2, 1890. He was a Baptist missionary to Japan for eight years, and is now pastor of the Oakmont, Pa., Baptist church. Mary (Boyden) Taft died in Japan, November 2, 1890. He was married a second time to Miss Jessie R. Humpstone, and they have three children. Mrs. Harriet C. (Cole) Taft was born in Spencer, Ohio, December 20, 1835, and died at Salem, Mich., March 4, 1868. November 26, 1869, Rev. H. B. Taft married Miss Emma F. Brigham, daughter of Dexter and Deborah (Shaw) Brigham, and they have two children, as follows: Erwin B., born in Fairfield, this county, July 2, 1872, is a Baptist preacher, now located at Prescott, Arizona; Mary Alice, born in Fairfield, this county, October 7, 1878, a teacher in the public schools at Homer, Mich. Mrs. Emma F. (Brigham) Taft was born in Harrisville, Alcona County, November 10, 1842. All Mr. Taft's children were graduates of Kalamazoo College.

Page  348 348 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL MARTIN L. ROBERTSON was born in Preston County, West Virginia, March 15, 1840, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1854. [For his family record see James Robertson's sketch on another page in this volume.] Mr. Robertson was fourteen years old when he came to Ogden, this county, where he has made his home ever since. At that time Ogden was a wilderness of swamp and big timber. He assisted in clearing the land, ditching out the swamps and subduing the soil to its present stumpless condition and prairie-like appearance. There are no better or more productive Martin L. Robertson. Mrs. Rachel Robertson. farms in Michigan than are found in Ogden, and Mr. Robertson has 160 acres on Sections 22-3 that are equal to the best in fertility and improvements. During the past 30 years he has cleared and " stumped " more than 120 acres of the land, and besides ditching and tiling it he has put on the fine improvements now in evidence. He is one of the thrifty and prosperous men of Ogden, and his home is one of the most interesting and instructive in Lenawee County. The writer has visited many hundred homes of pioneers and prominent citizens, but in no other place have we found so many relics, valuable specimens of semi-tropical fossils, shells, quartz, minerals from sea and land, and samples of wood, tropical fruits, flowers, shrubs, etc. The home is also adorned with many pictures and decorations of friends, and scenes both north and south. In 1885 his health failed him, and that fall he went to Florida. Since that time he has passed sixteen winters there, besides three whole seasons. He knows about orange growing, and fully realizes what a killing frost will do for

Page  349 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 349 the luscius fruit. He invested largely in fruit land near Anthony, and was successful in the culture of oranges, lemons, pears, grapes, etc., until the big freeze in 1895. Since that time he has disposed of most of his interests there, still holding his home in the town. Mr. Robertson has spent some time in Cuba, and is of opinion the island is blessed with the finest and most equable climate, the richest and most fertile soil, and the most salubrious and charming winter home in the world. March 27, 1871, Martin L. Robertson married Miss Rachel Richardson, daughter of John and Lucy Richardson, of Ogden, and they are the parents of two children, as follows: George M., born in Ogden, October 12, 1874, married Miss Celia Sawyer, has one child, Irene Alouise, born November 29, 1899, and resides in Ogden; John H., born in the same place, March 23d, 1881, at home. Mrs. Rachel Robertson was born in Ogden, April 4, 1852. Her father, a native of the State of New York, was an early settler in Ogden, where he died February 16, 1887, aged 86 years. Her mother was born in Loraine County, Ohio, May 10, 1826, and resides in Adrian. ADOLPHUS A. SCHUYLER was born in Cicero, Onondaga County, N. Y., May 6, 1853, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1855. His father, James Schuyler, 2d, was born in the same place, April 29, 1823, and was the son of James Schuyler, 1st, who had a family of nine children, and was related to General Schuyler of revolutionary fame, whose ancestor, Philip Pieterson Schuyler, came from Germany in 1650. James Schuyler, 2d, was brought up on a farm, but learned the cooper's trade, which he followed for many years. When still a young man, he went to Racine, Wis., where he carried on a large cooperage business for several years, when, in 1852, he returned to the State of New York. In 1855 he came to Michigan and settled on Sectiou 36, in Raisin, this county. In 1881 he sold out and removed to Leoni, Jackson County, Mich., where he died, June 22, 1895. February 18, 1845, James Schuyler, 2d, married Miss Charlotte Wright, daughter of John R. and Luna (Williams) Wright, of Cicero, N. Y., and they were the parents of eight children, Adolphus A. being the second son and fourth child. Mrs. Charlotte Wright (Schuyler) was born in Camillus, Onondaga County, N. Y., July 9, 1829, and now resides in Leoni, Mich. Adolphus A. Schuyler, the subject of this sketch, was only about three years old when he came to Michigan, and has resided in this county ever since. He has always followed farming, and now lives on Section 25, in Rome, where his farm consists of 175 acres. He gives his attention to mixed farming, and keeps a superior herd of milch cows.

Page  350 350 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL He feeds cattle and sheep and crops his land with the best paying cereals. March 19, 1876, Adolphus A. Schuyler married Miss Ella A. Walworth, daughter of Cornelius and Paulina Walworth, of Rome, this county. They are the parents of six children, as follows: Maude E., born January 19, 1877, married John Yeutter, August 20, 1902, and resides in Ogden, this county; Perry W., born September 19, 1880; Pauline, born March 27, 1883; Marcus A., born June 18, 1886; Harry, born August 22, 1888; Alice M., born April 30, 1893; all born in Rome. Mrs. Ella A. (Walworth) Schuyler was born in Rome, this county, November 13, 1852. Her father was born in Ovid, Seneca County, N. Y., July 25, 1808, and was killed in a railroad accident near South Bend, Ind., June 28, 1859. He came to Michigan in 1829, and first settled in Wayne County. He was a solMr. and Mrs. Adolphus A. Schuyler. dier in the "Toledo War." In 1833 he came to this county and settled on Section 21, in Adrian township. He afterwards purchased a farm on Section 35, in Rome, where he lived at the time of his death. December 28, 1830, Cornelius Walworth married Miss Paulina Slocum, daughter of Benjamin and Lydia (Bennett) Slocum, of Plymouth, Wayne County, Mich.. and they were the parents of eight children, Mrs. Schuyler being the youngest. Mrs. Paulina (Slocum) Walworth was born in Perrington, Monroe County, N. Y., July 22, 1813, and came to Michigan with her parents in 1825. Her father, Benjamin Slocum, was in the war of 1812. His father, Benjamin Slocum, was a native of Rhode Island, moved to Adams, Berkshire County, Mass., and was a soldier in the Revolutionary War in Col. Benjamin Symond's regiment. Mrs. Paulina Walworth died in Rome, this county, September 16, 1900.

Page  351 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 351 HIRAM H. BLOOD was born in Dunstable, Hillsborough County, N. H., May 22, 1813. His father, Joseph Blood, was probably a native of New Hampshire, born July 28, 1781, and was a soldier in the war of 1812. He was the son of David Blood, also of New Hampshire, who was a soldier in the Revolutionary Army. His wife was Sally Putnam, a niece of General Israel Putnam. Jasper Blood moved from New Hampshire to Galway, Saratoga County, N. Y., in 1817, where he resided for about ten years. In 1826 he moved to Carlton, Orleans County, Western New York, where he died August 19, 1827. About the year 1806 Joseph Blood married Miss Mehitable Fallansbee, daughter of James and Sarah (Senter) Fallansbee, of lHillsborough County, N. H. Mrs. Mehitable Blood died in Seneca, this county, December 19, 1865, in the 81st year of her age. Her mother lived to be over 90 years old. One brother, Samuel Senter, died at the age of 97. Hiram H. Blood, subject of this sketch, was about fourteen years old when his father died, leaving his mother with a family of nine children. Hiram had the advantage of the country schools of Orleans County, and when he was about eighteen years old he commenced to teach school. This he followed for five or six years, and then went to farming. In 1842 he came to Michigan, first settling in Franklin township, this county, but in 1844 he purchased a farm on Section 26 in Seneca township, where he now resides. He has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal church for more than seventy three years. One of the first presiding elders that he remembers was Elder Fillmore, brother of Millard Fillmore, who afterwards became President of the United States. Elder Fillmore was on the scaffold at Buffalo when the three Thayers were hung. Mr. Blood, now in his ninety-first year, is in remarkably good health, and enjoys the confidence and esteem of the entire township of Seneca. January 14, 1837, Hiram H. Blood married Miss Emeline Kent, daughter of Robert and Julia (Swift) Kent, of Lyndon, Orleans County, N. Y., and they had six children, as follows: Horatio H., born in Carlton, Orleans County, N. Y., September 18, 1838, was a soldier in the great Rebellion, and died in the service, April 6, 1864; Elsie Louisa, born in the same place, December 26, 1840, married, January 19, 1860, to Thomas Turner, has four children, and resides at Lakeside, Berrien County, Mich.; Aristine, born in the same place, July 18, 1842, at home; Ellen Irene born in Seneca, this county, October 4, 1847, died September 10, 1888; Mary Elizabeth, born in the same place, December 19, 1851, married, April 1, 1873, Henry Roney, has two children, and resides in Seneca; Joseph Harlan, born same place, February 4, 1856, married, June 10, 1887, Miss Ollie Beecher, has three children, and resides at North Baltimore, Ohio. Mrs. Emeline (Kent) Blood was born in Vermont, March 27, 1814, and died in Seneca, this county, February 17, 1894.

Page  352 352 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL WILLIAM A. WHITNEY was one of the earliest settlers in Adrian. He came to Michigan with his parents in 1828, and after that date called Adrian his home. He was a man of honor, integrity and intelligence. His pioneer experience was always an interesting theme with him, and his recollections of the first events, the original settlers, etc., etc., were most vivid. In his later life he devoted much time to pioneer work. He called the first meeting to organize a County Pioneer Society, and was the first secretary of the society. He devoted two years of hard work in asWilliam A. Whitney. sisting in preparing and publishing the first history of Lenawee County. [For a history of his life see Whitney & Bonner's History and Biographical Record of Lenawee County, Vol. 1, pages 280 and 86. Also see Biographical Album of Lenawee County, page 183.] JOHN A. BENNETT was born in Scioto County, Ohio, March 17, 1830. His father, Rev. Moses Bennett, was born in the State of New York, September 6, 1787. [For further history look at Lenawee County Album, page 758.] John A. Bennett, the subject of this sketch, removed with his parents to Rollin township, Lenawee County, Mich., in October, 1835, where he lived until 1853, when he married Miss Rhoda M. Smith, daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth (Reed) Smith. He then moved to his present farm of 80 acres, on Section 32, in Cambridge township, Lenawee County, Mich., where he has resided ever since. They had born to them eight children, and have four now living named as follows: George E., born May 17, 1854; Eugene T., born October 20, 1855; Elizabeth M., born August 2, 1859; J. William, born January 2, 1870. George E. Bennett, March 9, 1882, in Cambridge, married Miss Helen Maxwell, daughter of John and Charlotte Maxwell, and they had four children, named as follows: Lynn M., Dewitt, Inez and Lotta. Mrs. Helen Bennett died August 3, 1894. Lynn M. Bennett died September

Page  353 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 353 6, 1888. Eugene T. Bennett, June 1, 1880, married Miss Frances Humphrey, of Rome, Mich., daughter of John and Rhoda (Bennett) Thompson. They had two children, as follows: David E., born April 21, 1889; Nettie, born September 12, 1892. Elizabeth Bennett, December 27, 1881, married Eugene C. Turner, of Woodstock. They had three children, named as follows: Roy J. and Ray G., twins, born September 24, 1887; Edward B., born April 30, 1890. J. William Bennett, June 3, 1896, married Mabel Church, of Wheatland township, Hillsdale County, Mich., daughter of Alonzo and Helen (Potter) Church. They had one child, named Elery LaVere Bennett, born July 22, 1897. Mrs. Rhoda M. (Smith) Bennett was born in Kent County, England, February 13, 1829. Her father, Joseph Smith, was born in Kent County, England, April 13, 1786. He married Elizabeth Reed who was born April 12, 1786, about the year 1810, in Kent County, England. They had nine children, Mrs. Rhoda (Smith) Bennett being the youngest. She emigrated to the United States in 1837, coming to Cambridge, Lenawee CountV, Mich. Joseph Smith died in Cambridge, Mich., April 20, 1861. Elizabeth (Reed) Smith died in Cambridge, September 22, 1865. JOHN E. CARR was born in Baltimore, Md., May 28, 1865. His father, James Carr, was also a native of Baltimore, where he was born, December 3, 1830. His parents, natives of Glasgow, Scotland, came to the United States about 1828, and settled in Baltimore, where they ever after resided. James Carr lived in Baltimore until 1868, when he removed to Chicago. While a boy he was 'bound out" in Baltimore to learn pattern-making. He was in the emplloyment of the government at Washington, and assisted in repairing' the Monitor after the famous encounter with the Merrimack in HaImpton Roads in 1862. On going to Chicago he became connected with the Illinois Manufacturing Company and came to Adrian in the winter of 1869 —70, when that institution established itself here. After the destruction of the company's works by fire, Mr. Carr went to Cincinnati, in the pattern and foundry department of a large railroad supply house, and remained there until 1883, when he returned to Adrian. Here he engaged in the manufacture of a fountain pen, and carried on business for some years. He was, at the time of his death, January 10, 1903, in the experiment department of the Page Woven Wire Fence Company. July 6. 1854, James Carr married Miss Annie E. Colton, daughter of William and Elizabeth Colton, and they became the parents of eleven sons, only two of whom are living, John E., born as above, and Charles H., born in Baltimore, June 17, 1867. Mrs. Annie E. 23

Page  354 354 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL (Colton) Carr was born in Leicester, England, May 3, 1836, and came to America in childhood with her parents. Her father, William Colton, was a native of London, and her mother, Elizabeth Cooper, a native of Leicester, England. Mrs. Carr still resides in Adrian. John E. Carr, subject of this sketch, came to Adrian when he was about four years old, and with the exception of a few years, he has spent his in the public schools of Adrian, and West Covington, Kv. He two years in a law office in Cincinnati, and then went to learn the trade of patternmaker, with his father. But the avocation was not congenial, and upon his return to Adrian, in 1883, he drifted into newspaper work, serving for several years with the Adria n Times a nd the Telegram as reporter. Then he went into merchandizing and book-keeping. In February, 1895, he became a clerk in the cashier's office of the Page Fence Company. In August, 1895, he was made cashier of the company, which position he still holds. In 1902 he beJohn E. Carr Adrian Mich. came a director of the company, and was re-elected in 1903. Mr. Carr has inaugurated a system of book-keeping for the company that is quite unique. It meets the peculiar necessities of the large and complicated business, and has proved very satisfactory. He is a charter member of Lenawee Tent, No. 452, K. 0. T. M., was the first Record Keeper, and subsequently Sir Knight Commander. He is the Grand Treasurer for Michigan, of the Fraternal Mystic Circle. He has been for many years an active member of the Baptist church, having united with it in Covington, Ky., March 5, 1882; He has been an earnest worker in all departments, and has served several years as trustee and clerk of the board. He has been three times president of the local B. Y. P. U., and twice president of the Associational Union, In 1898 he was elected secretary and treasurer of the State B. Y. P. U., and in 1902 treasurer. In 1903

Page  355 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 355 he was elected State President. For about nine years he was editor of a monthly publication called "Our Church." He was one of the foremost promotors of the building of Dorcas Chapel, and was secretary of the building committee. He has been active in Sunday school work, and has served as assistant superintendent for five years. At the National B. Y. P. U. at Baltimore, in 1895, he presented a paper, the subject being, "Our Conventions; How Can We Increase Their Efficiency." He was a candidate for Mayor of Adrian, on the Democratic ticket, in the spring of 1903. He has also been the candidate of his party for other important offices. September 6, 1888, John E. Carr married Miss Kate Decker, daughter of John and Kate (Miller) Decker, of Adrian, and they have two children, as follows: George Lee, born February 12, 1890; Ralph Lavere, born July 28, 1897. Mrs. Kate (Decker) Carr was born in Adrian July 23, 1869. Her father is a native of Germany, and came to the United States a child. Her mother is a native of Adrian, and was born, February 7, 1847. Her parents were natives of Germany. CLARK L. BURDICK was born in Fairfield, this county, January 29, 1839. His father, Arunah Burdick, was born in Connecticut, in June, 1801. When a young man he removed with his parents, Joshua and Sarah Burdick, and settled near Utica, N. Y. He resided there until 1833, when he came to Michigan and settled on Section 32, in Fairfield, this county, taking up 60 acres of government, land. He resided thenceforth on this farm, where he died in his 87th year, in November, 1887. In 1829 he married Miss Cornelia Crosby, of Brookfield, N. Y., and they had five children, Clark L. being the fourth child. Mrs. Cornelia (Crosby) Burdick was born October 9, 1810, and died in Fairfield, this county, February 25, 1901. Clark L. Burdick has always lived in Fairfield, and resides on Section 29. He also owns a portion of his father's homestead, on Section 32. He was educated in the schools of his district, and the High School at Lyons, Ohio. He taught school for eighteen successive winters, but always has considered he was a farmer. He has done his share of clearing up the country and improving it, and his home is a comfortable and happy one. June 17, 1866, Clark L. Burdick married Miss Angeline Jameson, daughter of Daniel and Harriet Jameson, of Fairfield, and they have two children, as follows: Harriet, born in Fairfield, April 13, 1870, married Lemuel M. Thompson, April 2, 1896, has two children, and resides at Lyons, Ohio; Helen, born in the same place, August 7, 1877, married John Paulson, January 5, 1899, and resides in Fairfield. Mrs. Angeline (Jameson) Burdick, born at Trumansburg, Tompkins County, N. Y., April 24, 1849, came to Michigan with her widowed mother in 1864. Her father,

Page  356 356 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Daniel Jameson, was born in Trumansburg, N. Y., May 24, 1812, was a merchant for many years, and died at Trumansburg, June 15, 1836. Her mother, Mrs. Harriet (Russell) Jameson, was born July 10, 1817, and died in Fairfield, this county, January 1, 1900. ALTON F. PRATT was born in Palmyra, Lenawee County, Mich., September 20, 1846. His father, Harvey Pratt, was born in Dryden, N. Y., July 8, 1816, and was the son of John and Eliza Pratt, who were farmers of Dryden, N. Y. Harvey Pratt was brought up a farmer, and when a boy worked for a farmer named Deacon Blossom on land now covered by the city of Rochester. He lived there until he was twenty-one. In 1836 he came to Michigan and settled in Palmyra, this county, having a sister, Mrs. Eliza Pierce, who had settled there Alton F. Pratt. some little time before. He afterwards purchased 80 acres of land on Section 16, in Blissfield, where he resided until his death, May 30, 1885. In 1845 Harvey Pratt married Miss Chloe Barrett, daughter of Benjamin and Chloe (Harrison) Barrett, of Williamston, Mass., and they had seven children, as follows: Alton F., born as above; Albert H., born in Blissfield, this county, Jan uary 22, 1848; Seymour B., born same place, May 4, 1850; Henry J., born same place, August 6, 1855; Ida Belle, born same place, February 22, 1857; John T., born same place, November 21, 1.858; Mrs. Mary E. Pratt. Minnie Arline, born same

Page  357 RECORD OF LENAWBEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 357 place, March 18, 1866. Mrs. Chloe (Barrett) Pratt was born in Manchester, Bennington County, Vt., June 22, 1826, came to Michigan with her mother and brother, Seymour Barrett, in the spring of 1832, and still (1903) resides in this county. Alton F. Pratt, subject of this sketch, was brought up on the banks of the Raisin river, in Blissfield township. Here he was educated in a log school house, with slab seats, where he graduated the spring he was ten years old. His services were then needed in the capacity of ox driver, etc. In 1861 he commenced work for the Monroe branch of the Michigan Southern Railroad. He was afterwards employed! on the survey of the Canada Southern Railroad, between Trenton, Mich., and Fayette,;t ift:X Ohio. In 1869 he went with the Elkhart Railroad shops, where he remained for ten years, mastering the trade of locomotive machinist. In 1880 he entered the employ of the N. Y. P. & O., now the Erie Railroad, and remained in the shops at Galion, Ohio, for twenty-two years. He is a member of Galion Lodge, F. and A. M., 414, and Crawford Chapter, 142, R. A. M. He is also a member of Eastern Star Lodge, No. 47, of Gallon. September 22, 1870, Alton F. Mrs. ChloePratt Pratt married Miss Mary E. Letter, daughter of Hugh and Mary Ann Letter. They became the parents of one child, Carrie, born in Elkhart, July 11, 1876, and died July 19, 1879. An adopted child, Edna A. Pratt, born near Akron, Ohio, April 8, 1885, now at home. Mrs. Mary E. (Letter) Pratt was born in Leicester, England, in 1840, came to this country with her parents in 1843, and settled in Concord, N. H. Her father was a native of Leicester, England, was born April 19, 1812, and died in Blissfield, this county, October 3, 1879. Her mother, a native of the same place, was born February 27, 1815, and died in Blissfield, May 5, 1895. Mrs. Mary E. (Letter) Pratt died in Galion, Ohio, May 20, 1899. November 12, 1902, Alton F. Pratt married Mrs. Joan (Mitchell) Letter. She was born in Dayton, Ohio, January 31, 1853. Her father was the Hon. Thomas D. Mitchell, and her mother was Rachel Clark, whose father, Amos Clark, was a pioneer of Montgomery County, Ohio.

Page  358 358 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL THOMAS G. MEAD was born in Macedon Center, Wayne County, N. Y., May 10, 1848. His father, Thomas W. Mead, born in Dutchess County, N. Y., August 23, 1814, was from a lineage of Friends. His ancestors were Friends, he was raised a Friend, and was a leading member of the society. He was a farmer all his life. He came to Michigan in 1870, and resided in Raisin township, on Section 16, where he died March 27, 1888. November 1, 1837, Thomas W. Mead married Miss Sarah S. Hoag, daughter of Benjamin and Anna Hoag, of Macedon, Wayne County, N. Y., and they had three children, as follows: Richard T., born in Macedon, Wayne County, N. Y., May 11, 1839; John H., born in the same place, September 29, 1844, and Thomas G. Mrs. Sarah S. (Hoag) Mead was born in Macedon, Wayne County, N. Y., November 13, 1819, and still resides in Raisin. Thomas G. Mead came to Michigan in 1869, and settled on Section 16, in Raisin, this county. His brother, Dr. Richard T. Mead, had come to Michigan in 1865, and settled in Adrian. The doctor was a graduate of the Albany, N. Y. Medical College, was a surgeon in the 79th New York Highlander regiment. during the Civil War, and after the discharge of the regiment he was in the Grant General Hospital of New York City until the close of the war. He became one of the most noted and successful surgeons in Michigan. He resided in Adrian until 1871, when he went to Manistee, Mich., where he ranked among the most prominent physicians in that part of the state. In 1866 he married Miss Jennie A. Young, of Adrian. She died in February, 1898. The doctor died October 10, 1900. The doctor's coming to Michigan and favorable impression of the country, was what induced Thomas G. to come. He has followed farming since his residence in the county, and is one of its prosperous and wide-awake citizens. September 9, 1875, Thomas G. Mead married Miss Elizabeth R. Sutton, daughter of Asa U. and Sarah A. Sutton, of Raisin, and they have two children, as follows: Olive S., born January 14, 1877, married January 14, 1897, James Hageman, has one child, and resides at Oxford, Mich.; Richard T., born March 8, 1882, married, May 27, 1903, Miss Anna McClure. Mrs. Elizabeth S. Mead was born in Raisin, this county, November 22, 1854. Her father was born in New York city, January 2, 1818. He was the son of Isaac and Sarah Sutton, who were very early settlers in Battle Creek, Mich. He died in Raisin, October 27, 1871. Her mother was Sarah A. Satterthwaite, daughter of Samuel and Hannah Satterthwaite, who were among the first settlers of Tecumseh. She was born in New Jersey, January 15, 1820, and died in Raisin, December 26, 1873. LORENZO DOW MEECH was born near Rochester, N. Y., September 24, 1824, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1836. His father, Peter Meech, was a native of Scotland, and came to

Page  359 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 359 America when a young man. He first settled in the State of New York. He lived several years in Monroe County, where he married Miss Catherine Wells, daughter of Andrew and Lettie Wells, and they raised a family of nine children. Peter Meech and his family came to Michigan in 1836, and for a short time stopped in Madison, but finally settled in Rollin, where they both died. Lorenzo D. Meech came to Michigan when he was twelve years old, and settled in Madison, this county. He was educated in the district schools of the township, and always followed agricultural pursuits. Coming her e as he did in the early settlement of Michigan, he grew up with i t an d became an active and thrifty citizen, tak ing a lively interest in the growth and development of the county. He always resided in Madison township, where he filled several public offices and positions. For nine years he was overseer of the county infirmary, and was efficient and Peter L. Meech. active during the construction of new buildings which were erected during his administration. He was a man of strong characteristics, and showed his Scotch ancestry in his tenacity to anything he believed, or any cause he espoused. During his active career he owned six different farms, and still owned three at the time of his death. He was a self-made man, having earned every dollar he ever possessed. He died at his home on Sections 19 and 30, in Madison, October 1, 1886. January 13, 1847, Lorenzo D. Meech married Miss Clara Robbins, daughter of Thomas and Catherine (Wilson) Robbins, of Madison, this county. Mrs. Carrie Meech.

Page  360 360 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL They had three children, as follows: Cyntha J., born August 20, 1847, married H. C. Cunningham in 1866, have one child, and reside in Madison; Peter L., born May 29, 1856; Emma A., born February 25, 1860, married John Cadoo, December 3, 1883, have three children, and reside in Madison. Mrs. Clara (Robbins) Meech was born in Portlandville, Otsego County, N. Y., February 12, 1824, and died in Madison, this county, December 11, 1902. Her parents, Thomas and Catherine (Wilson) Robbins, were natives of Hempstead, Rockland County, N. Y., came to Michigan in 1836, and settled in Madison, this county. They had nine children. Peter L. Meech, the subject of this sketch, is a native of Lenawee County, and now owns and resides on the farm where he was born. He was reared a farmer, and follows that avocation, together with the handling and feeding of cattle for the market. His home is on Section 30, Madison. He is a member of Madison Grange, the Gleaners and the Maccabees, Tent 145, Adrian. September 28, 1876, Peter L. Meech married Miss Catrrie Saunders, daughter of Charles F. and Mary (Nevin) Saunders, and they have six children, as follows: Clarence D., born December 10, 1878, died October 5, 1880; Nora May, born November 23, 1882; Forest L., born December 30, 1885; Florence Hazel, born April 19, 1887; Floyd L., born December 7, 1891; Blanche D., born April 7, 1894. Mrs. Carrie (Saunders) Meech was born in Adrian City, April 7, 1855. Her parents were early settlers of this county, and came from the State of New York. HENRY C. PRATT was born in Reading, Seneca County, N. Y., December 5, 1832, where he resided until 1838, when his parents removed to Peru, Huron County, Ohio. His father, Franklin Pratt, was a native of Connecticut, and was the son of Russell Pratt, who was also a native of Connecticut, but became a pioneer upon the shore of Cayuga Lake, in Seneca County, N. Y. He became a prosperous farmer, and owned several negro slaves. During the war of 1812-14 he was U. S. Quartermaster under General Knox. He was born and raised under Puritan influences, and traced his ancestry back to the Mayflower. Franklin Pratt was reared a farmer, but after his removal to Ohio, he engaged in the timber and lumber business, and became a successful dealer in ship timber. In 1855 he sold his interests in Ohio and came to Michigan, purchasing a farm on the n Y of s e '4, Section 33, in Fairfield. This became the family home, and is still owned by one of his sons. During his residence on the "Western Reserve" in Ohio, he was an active abolitionist and one of the "stockholders and directors of the underground railroad." As a resident of Fairfield he was highly respected, and was regarded as an honest, enterprising and exemplary

Page  361 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 361 man. He died in Fairfield, April 20, 1874. Franklin Pratt married Miss Hannah Holloway, daughter of Benjamin and Susan (Willson) Holloway, of Ovid, N. Y., and they were the parents or nine children. Mrs. Hannah Pratt was born in Ovid, N. Y., and died in Fairfield, this county. Her parents were natives of Pennsylvania. Her grandfather was a native of Valley Forge, Pa., and was very familiar with the scenes and sufferings of Washington's army during that memorable winter. Henry C Pratt, subject of this sketch, was educated in the district schools of his neighborhood, with the exception of nearly two years spent at the Academy at Norwalk, Ohio. He taught his first school when he was seventeen years old, following that occupation for six years in Ohio. He came to Michigan in 1856, and at once opened a select school in what is now known as District No. 7, Fairfield. During the following twenty years he followed teaching. In 1859 he purchased his father's farm in Fairfield, which he still owns. He has been elected Justice of the Peace, served two years as Supervisor, and has filled township school offices for many years. In January, 1882, he was admitted to the bar, and for several years he practiced law in Adrian. He has always been an ardent Republican in politics, and during the past thirty years has been employed by the Republican State Committee as a speaker during political campaigns. He is one of the oldest campaign speakers in Michigan. He was a candidate for the Legislature in 1880, but was defeated by only 92 votes by William Corbin, Democrat. He retired from active practice in 1890 and is now living a quiet life upon his farm in Fairfield. July 5, 1858, Henry C. Pratt married Miss Sarah M. Nash, daughter of Marvin and Abigail Nash, of Madison, this county, and they are the parents of six children, as follows: Orland F. and Orville L., (twins) born April 15, 1863; Arthur H., born October 13, 1871; Vinnie R., born April 20, 1874, married Dr. Sion H. Jurden, and resides in Clayton, this county. Two children died in infancy. Mrs. Sarah M. Pratt was born in Macedon, Wayne County, N. Y., September 13, 1835. She came to Michigan with her parents in 1840, and settled in Madison, this county. Her father, born in Hamilton, Madison County, N. Y., in 1804, died in Madison, in 1879. Her mother was born in Perrington, Monroe County, N. Y., March 4, 1813, and died in Madison, this county, in June, 1875. DAVID A. PRICE was born in Genoa, Cayuga County, N. Y., May 10, 1832, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1838. His father, Aaron Price, was born in Newark, N. J., August 19, 1799. He lived in Newark until he was about twenty-four years old, and learned the weaver's trade. About the year 1823 he went to Cayuga

Page  362 362 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL County, N. Y., where he purchased a farm and carried on the weaving business. He prospered there reasonably well, until 1837, when he emigrated to Michigan, but finally settled just over the line in the town of Gorham, Lucas County, Ohio. At this time the Indian chief Bawbeese was located in a temporary camp nearby, and many notable incidents occurred during the first winter. Just about the time cold weather set in, Chief Bawbeese had two deerskins tanned and ready for use, and was about to start for Canandaigua village, in the southwestern portion of Lenawee County, to sell the skins to Mr. and Mrs. David A. Price. Philo Wilson, who kept a general store there. The chief, who could talk English very well, told Mr. Price what he was about to do. Mr. Price said if he could make moccasins he would buy the skins. The chief said "you pay hard money and buy the skins, I send squaw to make moccasins." The trade was made, and in a few days the family was provided with moccasins for the winter. Bawbeese was a very friendly and intelligent Indian. In the spring of 1864 he came to Adrian, where he died July 12, 1889. In 1825 Aaron Price married Miss Jemima W. Barrows of New York city, and they had seven sons, three of whom are living. Mrs. Jemima (WiningsBarrows) Pricepwas born in New York city, November 15, 1800, and died in Adrian, February 19, 1889. The ancestors of the Price family came from Germany, while Mrs. Jemima W. Price's parents came from England. David A. Price, the subject of this sketch, was only six years old when he came to Michigan, and since that time he has resided in or near Lenawee County. He was educated in the district schools, and learned the carpenters' and builders' trade, which he followed in Adrian for many years. He was in the employ of the

Page  363 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 363 Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railroad for twenty-one years. He has been fairly prosperous in his business relations, notwithstanding many years of bad health. September 6, 1863, David A. Price married Miss Lucy A. Bailey, daughter of Ruggles and Lavantia H. Bailey, and they had one daughter, Alice G., born July 26, 1864, and died August 4, 1872. Mrs. Lucy A. (Bailey) Price was born in Palermo, Oswego County, N. Y., May 4, 1845, and went with her parents to Medina County, Ohio, in 1848, afterwards removing to Williams County. Her parents subsequently removed to Hillsdale County, Mich., where her father died November 5, 1890, aged 74 years. He was a native of Connecticut, and was born November 30, 1816. Her mother was born in Massachusetts in 1817, and is still living in Hillsdale County. THE BOND STEEL POST COMPANY, of Adrian, was organized January 19, 1895, with a capital stock of $40,000.00. The stockholders consisted of George W. Bond, A. M. and N. B. Keeney, J. H. Reynolds, David Metcalf, Major Seymour Howell, Col. W. F. Bradley, Robert H. Bradley, D. M. Baker, Dr. A. M. Stephenson, C. R. Miller, C. B. Pennbck and Howard T. Taylor. The first board of directors was composed of George W. Bond, C. R. Miller, A. M. Keeney, David Metcalf, J. H. Reynolds and Howard T. Taylor. The directors elected the following officers: George W. Bond, president; David Metcalf, vice president; J. H. Reynolds, secretary, and Seymour Howell, treasurer. The company was formed for the purpose of manufacturing a steel fence post, a most excellent article patented by Mr. George W. Bond. A steel fence post, however, was a new thing, and considerable effort was required to get it introduced. In 1897 the company was awarded a four years' contract by the United States Government to furnish steel letter box posts. This post was selected from a score or more of samples submitted by other competitors, on account of its superior qualities. The contract was renewed at the expiration of four years, and as a result many thousands of these posts are rendering Uncle Sam good service in all the large cities of the country. During the year 1898 the controlling interest of the company passed into new hands. A reorganization followed. The board of directors was reduced from seven to five and consisted of Walter Clement, Nathan L. Clement, Col. W. F. Bradley, Henry N. King and Myron H. Hoisington. The new board organized by electing Walter Clement, president; Col. W. F. Bradley, vice president; Myron H. Hoisington, secretary and treasurer. The development of the free rural delivery service created a demand for a metal receptacle for the farmers' mail. The Bond Steel Post Company, quick to seize the opportunity thus afforded, originated and produced a neat, strong, and serviceable rural mail box which

Page  364 364 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL has met with a very wide sale throughout the entire section of the country. The output has increased from 15,000 in 1900, to 200,000 in 1903. In order to more fully meet the demand made by this new departure it was necessary to purchase and equip with new and special machinery another factory, which also included a thoroughly modern galvanizing plant. Since the reorganization of the company, Captain Henry N. King, a mechanical engineer and an old pioneer of Lenawee County, has had the superintendency of the operating department. Much credit is due him from a mechanical standpoint for the high excellence of the company's products. For the great development of the business, and the high commercial standing that the company now enjoys, the credit is due to the executive officers, and especially to the president, Walter Clement, and the secretary, M. H. Hoisington. Their constant attention has been given to the business, and while they have found a market for the product, Mr. King has produced an article that met the demands in workmanship and quality. In January, 1903, the capital stock was increased from $40,000 to $100,000. The volume of business has also increased from $10,000 in 1896 to $200,000 in 1903. JAMES FRANCIS MILLER was born in Portland, Maine, June 29, 1868, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1870. His father, James Miller, was born in Glasgow, Scotland, in 1830. jHe came to America in 1862, settling at Portland, Maine, where he resided until 1870, when he came to Michigan and settled on Section 22, in Raisin township, where he died March 5, 1883. At Glasgow, May 18, 1851, James Miller married Miss Margaret Jane Francis, daughter of James and Sarah Francis, of Glasgow, Scotland, and they have had seven children, James F. being the sixth child and third son. Mrs. Margaret (Francis) Miller was born in Glasgow, Scotland, in January, 1834. James F. Miller, the subject of this sketch, was brought up on a farm, and James F. Miller. lived with his parents until

Page  365 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 365 he was twenty-three years old. He came to Lenawee County when he was two years old. He was educated in the district schools of his neighborhood, and graduated from Raisin Valley Seminary. In 1891 he came to Adrian and accepted the position of assistant superintendent of the Adrian Street Railway Company, under the late Joseph H. Blain. He remained in this service until 1893, when he became a salesman for Grinnell Bros., music dealers, No. 11 North Main street, Adrian. In this calling he was very successful, disposing on the most satisfactory terms to all concerned, pianos, organs and musical merchandise in Lenawee and surrounding counties, for this reliable firmn until 1896. In June of that year he was promoted to manager of the branch house at Adrian, which position he is still holding. His energy and business capacity have been placed favorably before the community. His management has established a first-class music house in Adrian, and he has accumulated for himself a desirable and comfortable home. May 17, 1892, James F. Miller married Miss Lulu West, daughter of Almond and Minerva (Haviland) West, of Raisin, and they have two children, as follows: Gertrude Ann, born in Adrian, Mich., June 15, 1894; Geraldine Lucile, born January 17, 1901. Mrs. Lulu (West) Miller was born December 28, 1869. SOLOMON FORCE. 2d, was born in Fairfield, June 1, 1847. His father, Solomon Force, 1st, was born at Tonawanda, N. Y., where his parents were pioneers, and where he resided until 1833, when he came to Michigan and settled in Adrian township, this county. He made several changes, but finally settled in Fairfield, where he resided until his death, which occurred in 1870. He was married three times and was the father of fourteen children, and stepfather to six others. He was a good mechanic, and was very useful to the settlers in making chairs, tables, etc., besides supplying them with grain cradles and many other necessary implements. July 12, 1846, he married Mrs. Catherine (Van Santford) Fer(guson, of Fairfield, and they had four sons, Solomon being the oldest. Mrs. Catherine Force was born in Middletown, N. Y., October 15, 1808, and died in Adrian, Mich., July 4, 1897. Solomon Force, 2d, has always resided in Fairfield, and was reared a farmer. He now owns a fine farm home on the s. e. ' of Section 29. He was educated in the district schools of his township. For many years he followed cheese making, but now gives his entire attention to farming. March 17, 1872, Solomon Force, 2d, married Miss Emma J. Service, daughter of James and Elizabeth Service, of Fairfield, and they are the parents of six children, as follows: Adelbert H., born June 20, 1873, and died September 6. 1875; Jane E., born August 13, 1876, a school teacher in Fairfield; Luke Harvey, born May 1, 1878,

Page  366 366 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL at home; Clarence A., born July 11, 1881, at home; Lela G., born August 13, 1885, at home; Bertha L., born August 2, 1889, at home. Mrs. Emma J. Force was born in Canandaigua, N. Y., November 27, 1849, and came to Michigan with her parents in 1852. Her father was born in Philadelphia, Pa., January 5, 1818, and still resides (1903) in Fairfield, this county. Her mother was born in Edinburg, Scotland, in 1817, came to America in 1836, alone, and was married in 1841. She died in Fairfield, this county, May 27, 1872. [For full account of Mrs. Force's ancestors, see John Service's record in this volume.] PETER L. BAILEY was born in Dover, Lenawee County, Mich., November 9, 1848. His father, Samuel A. Bailey, was born near Rome, N. Y., November 11, 1811, where he resided until he was about twenty-four years old. His father, Samuel Bailey, was a farmer, and was a pioneer in Rome, Oneida County, N. Y., where Mr. and Mrs. Samuel A. Bailey. he always resided. About the year 1800 Samuel Bailey married Miss Sally Black, and they raised a family of eleven children, Samuel A. being the oldest son and fourth child. Samuel A. Bailey was brought up on a farm. In 1835, he came to Michigan, and in 1837 took up 160 acres of land in Dover, on the north town line adjoining Rollin. He resided there a year or two, made some improvements, and traded for a farm near Dover Centre, where he resided

Page  367 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 367 until 1851. After a short residence in Rollin, where he carried on a blacksmith shop in connection with his farm, in 1854, he purchased a farm on Section 19, in Madison, where he resided until 1885, when his eyesight failed him, and he quit active business. In 1838 he married Miss Betsey Ann Meech, daughter of Peter and Catherine (Jackson) Meech, and they had eight children, as follows: Sally, born March 9, 1840, married Henry E. Crane, of Madison; Nancy, born November 14, 1844, married Lyman Fisk, of Dover; Catherine, died at the age of nine years; Peter L., born in Dover, November 9, 1848; Samuel J., born in Dover; Alexander, born in Rollin, and died in infancy; Daniel, born in Madison, and died in infancy; Truman E., born in Madison, married Elma Faultenburg, and has two sons. Mrs. Betsey Ann Bailey was born in Monroe County, N. Y., in 1820, and died in Seneca, in February, 1895. Samuel A. Bailey died in Adrian, May 2, 1902. Peter L. Bailey, the subject of this sketch, was raised a farmer, was educated in the schools of the county, and attended two terms at Adrian College. He was twice married, first to Miss Helen L. Clark, daughter of John R. and Emilie E. Clark, of Adrian, November 4, 1869, by whom he had three children, all of whom died in infancy. Mrs. Helen L. Bailey died October 31, 1873, in Madison. October 26, 1874, our subject married Miss Jennie Andrew, daughter of Tilgham and Christine Andrew, of East Newmarket, D6rchester County, Md., by whom he has had one child, Anna C., born September 3, 1875, married Charles S. Benedict, July 3, 1901. Mrs. Jennie Bailey was born in Baltimore, Md., July 9, 1863. Her father, Tilghman Andrew, was born near Federalsburg, Md., February 9, 1815, and died there November 3, 1892. Her mother, Christiana Andrew, was born on a farm near the Washington church, now Hurlock, Md., March 18, 1819, and died February 3, 1894. DAVID A. GALLOWAY was born in Toledo, Ohio, May 28, 1838. His father, Almond C. Galloway, was born in Palmyra, Wayne County, N. Y., February 2, 1816. His father, John Galloway, was born in Herkimer County, N. Y., December 2, 1786. He only lived in that county a few years, when his father. Captain James Galloway, moved to Wayne County, and settled in Palmyra, in company with two other pioneers, General Swift and General White. His son, James Galloway, now (1903) resides on the old farm. These three families were the first settlers of that town. John Galloway was then a small boy, and made the trip from Herkimer County to Palmyra in a bag, with an older sister. His parents took a large sack, and put his sister on one side and himself on the other, and hung them over the back of a horse, just as an old-fashioned doctor did his saddle bags. He lived in Palmyra, with his parents, until he

Page  368 368 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL was married, when he purchased a large farm, and lived on it until the spring of 1824, when he emigrated to Michigan, sailing from Buffalo to Detroit on the first steamboat on the lake, and the first trip ever made by the boat-the "Pioneer"-arriving in Detroit about the 1st of May. He left his family in Detroit until he went to Pontiac, purchased a new farm and a yoke of oxen, and returned to Detroit and moved his family upon the land. He lived there about eleven years, when he sold out, went to Toledo, and bought a large farm, where he lived several years, when he again sold out and purchased another large farm in Raisinville, Monroe County, where he lived until his death, October 14, 1851. About the year 1805 he mar-:: Miss Elizabeth Cornell, of Palmyra, N. Y., by whom he had four sons, Almon C. being the 4*.,.: j: y o u n g est. Mrs. Elizabeth;0 ~ Galloway was born in New ^:: York about the year 1787, and rev:i died in Palmyra, Wayne County, N. Y., March 17, 1818. Almon C. Galloway was brought up a farmer, and lived with his father until he was David A. Galloway. about nineteen years old. He received a limited education, and has always been a farmer. In 1834 he went to Palmyra, N. Y., and remained there until August 1837, when he came back, and lived near Toledo, about one frame bar. In August, 1838, he purchased one hundred and sixty acres of new land, on Sections 5 and 8, in Adrian township. He was obliged to cut a road for half a mile to get to the land. He lived there for sixteen years, and cleared up one hundred acres, and fenced the entire place. He first built a log house and log' barn, but afterwards built a good frame house and a large frame barn. He Mrs Emily H. Galloway. had a good orchard which he

Page  369 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 369 raised from seed brought by his wife from New York. In the spring of 1854 he sold the farm to John D. Kaiser and purchased one hundred and fifty acres on Section 13, in Adrian township, where he now lives. Since he purchased this farm he has erected a fine large brick house with several barns and sheds. This house burned March 19, 1893. Since that occurrence a good house has been erected on the same spot. March 16, 1837, he married Miss Calista A. Knowles daughter of Jonathan and Elizabeth Knowles, of Palmyra, N. Y., by whom he has had three children, as follows: David A., born as above; Elizabeth A., died in infancy. Duane C. Galloway was bprn in Adrian township, January 29, 1844, married Miss Maggie M. Chittenden, May 22, 1876. They have one daughter, Lucy E., born January 26, 1878. Mrs. Maggie Galloway died July 31, 1894. He resides on Section 6, in Palmyra, this county. Mrs. Calista A. Galloway was born in Orwell, Vt., January 11, 1816. Her parents were both born in New Hampshire, but were early settlers of Palmyra, N. Y., and came to Michigan in 1847. Mrs. Knowles died in February, and Mr. Knowles in August, 1851. David A. Galloway, subject of this sketch, lives on the homestead, on Section 13, in Adrian township. December 22, 1863, he married Miss Emily H. Rogers, daughter of Ira and Nancy (Tomer) Rogers, and they had two children, as follows: Almon D., born October 3, 1869, married Miss Flora Van Doren, daughter of Edmund and Elizabeth Van Doren, and they have one son, George R.; the second child was Calista E., born July 19, 1876, married William H. Small, and resides in Fenton, Mich. Mrs. Emily H. (Rogers) Galloway was born in Cambridge, this county, June 22, 1845, and died in Adrian township, June 12, 1892. David A. Galloway was married the second time, March 26, 1896, to Mrs. Eliza (Lanning) Jay, and there is no issue. HON. JOHN H. COMBS was born in Rome, Lenawee County, Mich., December 22, 1861, and has always resided there. His father, Dr. Henry P. Combs, was born in Onondaga County, N. Y., June 19, 1820, and was the son of John and Maria S. (Platt) Combs. John Combs was a native of New Hampshire, but removed to New York when a young man. He settled in Onondaga County, and in 1816 married Miss Maria S. Platt, daughter of Henry S. Platt, a pioneer of that part of the Empire State. He died there at the age of thirty-four years. Mrs. Combs afterwards married Joseph Rhoads, and came to Michigan in 1838, settling in this county, and died at the age of sixty-two. Dr. Combs lived with his mother until he was eighteen years old, attending the district schools of Adrian. About the year 1840 he commenced the study of medicine, and followed it closely, and after graduation at the Cleve24

Page  370 370 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Dr. H. P. Combs, of Rome. land, Ohio, Medical College, in 1845, he began the practice of medicine in Rome township, this county. He at once became very successful and popular in his profession, which he faithfully followed until 1865, when he retired from active practice. He became one of the best known and most popular men in his township. He took an active interest in public, religious and educational affairs. In politics he was first a Whig, but became a Republican after 1854. In 1857 he was elected to the Michigan Legislature, and in 1863 he was re-elected to the same body. He served as School Inspector and Township Clerk for several terms, and was County Superintendent of the Poor for thirteen years. He was a most faithful and honor

Page  371 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 371 able public officer, and to the end of his life commanded the respect and confidence of all classes. In the fall of 1857 Dr. Combs married Miss Lucy A. Sharrar, who was born in Clyde, Wayne County, N. Y., March 30, 1834, and they became the parents of two children, as follows: John H., born as above, and Alice E., born in 1872, died in infancy. Mrs. Dr. Combs came to Michigan when she was three years old, and passed through all the stages of pioneer life, but a happy marriage and a genial home made her a bright and much respected woman. She lived fifty-seven years in the house where she died, December 2, 1898. Her husband, Dr. Combs, died three years before, January 1, 1895. Her parents, David and Pamelia (Langdon) Sharrar, were pioneers of Wayne County, N. Y., and came to Michigan in 1835. David Sharrar was born in Maryland in 1807. Mrs. Pamelia Sharrar was born in Wayne County, N. Y., March 30, 1834, and died in Rome, this county, May 18, 1881. Hon. John H. Combs, subject of this sketch, was educated in the district schools of Rome until he was seventeen years old, afterwards spending the school years of 1877-8 at Adrian College. He gradu Farm home of Hon. John H. Combs, Section 23, in Rome. It is said the first log house in the township was built very near this site.

Page  372 372 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL ated from Goldsmith's Detroit Business College in 1881. After graduation he returned to his farm home. He served as School Inspector for five years, Township Clerk four years, and Supervisor four years. He was elected to the Michigan Legislature of 1901-2, on the Republican ticket, over W. H. Hayden, of Tecumseh, by a majority of 107, in a hardly-contested canvass. He was re-elected in 1902, over Don H. C. Bowen, of Tecumseh, by a majority of 224. He served as chairman of the committee on Education and member of the committee on College of Mines and the committee on Apportionment. He has always taken an active interest in public affairs, during political campaigns, and is a convincing speaker. June 11, 1884, John H. Combs married Miss Nellie E. Williams, daughter of John D. and Mary J. (Downer) Williams, of Detroit, Mich., and they have one daughter, Alice Elizabeth, born in Rome, this county, December 9, 1886. Mrs. Nellie E. (Williams) Combs was born in Utica, N. Y., November 1, 1863, and came to Michigan with her parents, who settled in Detroit in 1871. Her father, John D. Williams, was a native of New York, son of David and Joanna Williams, being born in Rotterdam, near Schenectady, December 18, 1807, and died April 18, 1893. His ancestors were from Holland. August 8, 1844, he married, at Utica, N. Y., Miss Mary J. Downer, who was born in New Lisbon, N. Y., August 9, 1823, and now resides in Philadelphia, Pa. Her ancestors were English, and settled in New England early in the country's history. WILLIAM S. G. MASON was born in Hector, Tompkins County, N. Y., December 9, 1821. His father, David Mason, was a native of Massachusetts, and was born about 1791. When a young man he went to Tompkins County, N. Y., where he lived a few years. He then removed to Chautauqua County, N. Y., where he purchased a farm in the wilderness, which he partially improved. March 4, 1821, David Mason married Miss Temperance Palmer, daughter of Japheth and Anna Palmer, of Tompkins County, N. Y., and they had five children, William S. G. being the oldest. Mrs. Anna (Palmer) Mason was a native of New York, and died in Medina, this county. David Mason died at North East, Pa., in 1836. William S. G. Mason, subject of this sketch, at an early age removed with his parents to Chautauqua County, N. Y., then a dense wilderness, inhabited largely by Indians and wild beasts. After enduring the hardships and privations incident to pioneer life, his father sold out and removed to North East, Erie County, Pa., where he died. This left our subject, at the age of fifteen, the eldest of five children, to struggle with poverty and care for an invalid mother. By the loss of his father he was deprived of all further op

Page  373 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 373 portunity for obtaining an education, besides losing a kind parent and wise and affectionate counselor, at a time when most needed. After a few years his mother married again, and he started for the West. He settled in Townsend, Sandusky County, Ohio, where he passed several years in working for farmers by the month. About the year 1843 he purchased eighty acres of land in Townsend. July 6, 1845, W. S. G. Mason married Miss Mary Ann May, daughter of Rev. Isaac and Rachael (McMillan) May, of Townsend, Ohio, and they have had five children, as follows: Angeletta R., born August 8, 1846, married December 30, 1866, Alfred A. Abbott, has three children, and resides in Morenci; Anna M., born August 13, 1848, married November 27, 1873, Charles Leonard, has two children, and resides in Manton, Rexford County, Mich.; Alice P., born July 25, 1850, married, December 9, 1880, George W. Woodworth, has two children, and resides in Medina, this county; Winfield S., born July 27, 1852, married March 28, 1874, Miss Abigail Densmore, has three children, and resides in Chicago; William F., born August 15, 1856, married, January 1, 1880, Miss Ella L. Abbott, has two children and resides in Chicago. All were born in Townsend, Sandusky County, Ohio. Mrs. Mary Ann Mason was born in Townsend, January 24, 1825. Her father, Rev. Isaac May, was a native of New Hampshire, and became a Free Will Baptist minister when he was about twenty years old. He married Rachel McMillan and emigrated to Ohio, settling in Sandusky County, where he was the only minister in his locality. He died there at the age of 78 years. Mrs. May died in the same county, in October, 1830. About the year 1857 W. S. G. Mason removed with his family to Fairfield, this county. Here he united with the Free Will Baptist church. He was elected Deacon of the church, which office he held until 1872, when he moved to Fulton, Ohio. Here he remained about twenty-five years. In 1897 he removed to Morenci, where he and his wife now reside. ALPHEUS J. ROBIERTSON was born in Preston County, West Virginia, January 28, 1837, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1854. [For his family record see sketch of James Robertson, in this volume.] Alpheus J. Robertson was sixteen years old when he came to Michigan, and assisted his father in making a home in Ogden township, this county. He lived at home until he was twentyone years old. In 1860 he purchased 40 acres of land on Section 15, in Ogden, where he lives at the present time. Since his first purchase he has added to his holdings until he is now the largest individual land owner in his township, and the heaviest taxpayer. His farm consists of 320 acres, 290 of which are under cultivation. This land was all in the woods and under water when he purchased it,

Page  374 374 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL and through his own labor and personal efforts he has cleared it, removed the stumps, ditched, tiled and subdued, until now it is among the most valuable farming land in Michigan. Nearly all the stumps are removed on 290 acres, and it is well fenced and improved. Very few men can show better or more satisfac A. J. Robertson. Mrs. Julia J. Robertson. tory results from personal effort. May 6, 1866, Alpheus J. Robertson married Miss Julia J. Wilcox, daughter of Abner P. and Statira (Varnum) Wilcox, of Fairfield, and they have two children as follows: Eugene H., born in Ogden, February 22, 1867, resides in Boulder, Colo.; Alonzo E., born same place, March 5, 1872, married Miss Bell Spencer. They have one daughter and reside at Mason City, Nebraska. Mrs. Julia J. (Wilcox) Robertson was born in Milan, Monroe County Michigan, March 6, 1845, Her father was a native of the State of New York, and died in Seneca, this county, in his 80th year. Her mother was born near Toronto, Canada, and is still living in Seneca, in her 85th year. EUGENE C. TURNER was born in Woodstock, Lenawee County, Mich., June 16, 1857. His father, George H. Turner was born in Seneca County, N. Y., December 9, 1823, and was the son of Caleb Sutton and Leah (Waldron) Turner, of the same place. Early in 1832 Caleb Sutton Turner and -family emigrated to the State of

Page  375 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 375 Michigan and settled in Ypsilanti, Washtenaw County. In 1837 he moved to Lenawee County and settled in Adrian township, living there until December 12, 1850, when he died. In February, 1854, George H. Turner married Mary J. Beers, daughter of Charles and Keziah (Wade) Beers, of Adrian township, Lenawee County, Mich., and they had three children, Dewitt C., Josephine G. and Eugene C. In December, 1855, George H. Turner and family moved to Section 31, Woodstock township, Lenawee County, where he had bought 228 acres of land, improving the same and erecting fine farm buildings. In 1874 Dewitt C. Tur George H. Turner. Mrs. Mary J. Turner. ner married Frances Shales, December 31. He lived on a portion of the 228 acres until his death, July 11, 1896. Josephine G. Turner married George L. Hickox, October 1, 1874, and died in Osseo, Hillsdale County, October 13, 1881. Eugene C. Turner, the subject of this sketch, has resided on this Section 31 farm in Woodstock, Lenawee County, since his birth. He lived with his parents until his marriage to Elizabeth M. Bennett, daughter of John A. and Miriam (Smith) Bennett, December 27, 1881. October, 1882, George H. Turner and wife, Mary J. Turner, moved from the farm to Adrian city, where, January 28, 1884, Mary J. Turner died. George H.

Page  376 376 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Turner lived in the city of Adrian until his death, September 18, 1888. George H. Turner's mother, Leah (Wolson) Turner, died on the Woodstock farm, aged 81 years, in the year 1877. Eugene C. and Elizabeth (Bennett) Turner had three children, Ray G, and Roy J., (twins) born September 24, 1887; Edward B. Turner, born April 30, 1890. Roy J. Turner died October 12, 1894. Eugene Turner and wife are still working the old Woodstock farm and educating their two remaining boys, Roy G. and Edward B. Although Mr. Turner is not a graduated veterinary, he is very successful among his neighbors in his treatment of all diseases that horses, cattle and other domestic animals are subject to. He makes no pretension as a professional, but assists his neighbors when called upon. [For Mrs. Elizabeth (Bennett) Turner's family history, see John A. Bennett's record, in this volume.] GEN. WILLIAM HUMPHREY was born in Canandaigua, N. Y., June 12, 1828, coming to Michigan with his parents in 1838. His father, John Humphrey, was born in Hopewell, Hunterdon County, N. J., May 21, 1798. When seventeen years old John Humphrey went to Geneva, N. Y., and commenced in 1815 to learn the blacksmith's trade with Moses Hall. In 1825 he married Miss Jane Hall, a daughter of Moses Hall. In the winter of 1828 he went to Canandaigua, N. Y., and established a foundry and machine shop, which he carried on for about ten years. He then sold his business in Canandaigua, and in 1838 came to Michigan, and settled in the township of Wheatland, Hillsdale County, where he had previously taken up 160 acres of land. With his family he located upon this land, occupying a shanty made of split logs, only sixteen feet square. With some improvements, the family occupied this abode for four years, before a better and larger log house could be built. He was a resolute man, with force and strength of character sufficient to overcome all the difficulties and vicissitudes of a pioneer life. He was well-informed and took a general interest in all public affairs, holding many positions of trust and honor. Besides serving several terms as Supervisor, in 1844 he was elected to the State Legislature. He died at his home in Wheatland, October 16, 1870. His wife, Miss Jane Hall, whom he married at Geneva, N. Y., January 1, 1825, was born at Geneva, N. Y., April 13, 1809, and died at Jackson, Mich., while visiting her son, July 20, 1879. She traced her ancestry back to John Hall, Sr., who was an Englishman, and the first settler of Basking Ridge, New Jersey, in the valley of the Passaic. William Humphrey, the subject of this sketch, spent his childhood and youth on a farm, and depended for his education on the district schools of Hillsdale County, until 1848, when he went to Geneva, N.

Page  377 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 377 Y., where he had the advantage of two school years, afterwards attending a commercial institute at Cleveland, Ohio. In the fall of 1857 he came to Adrian and engaged in the mercantile business as a clerk, where he remained, with the exception of one year, when he taught school at Williamsport, Pa., until the first call for troops in 1861, at the breaking out of the great Rebellion. May 25, 1861, he was mustered in at Ft. Wayne, Detroit, as captain of Company D., 2d Michigan Infantry, receiving his commission from Gov. Austin Blair, April 25, 1861. He took part in the first battle of Bull Run. In 1862 he served in the Peninsular campaign, in Gen. Phil. Kearney's division; and also engaged in the second battle of Bull Run. In the fall of 1862 he took part in the battle of Fredericksburg, under Gen. Burnside. In 1863 he accompanied Burnside to Kentucky, and the following May was commissioned as colonel of the 2d Michigan Infantry. In June he was ordered to Vicksburg, taking part in the siege, and also took part in Sherman's campaign against Jackson in Mississippi. In August his regiment returned to Kentucky, and in September started on the East Tennessee campaign. He took part in various skirmishes about Knoxville, and at Fort Saunders, where Longstreet Gen. William Humphrey. was repulsed with fearful loss, he had command of a brigade. In the spring of 1864 his regiment was ordered to the Potomac, and he served in Grant's campaign against Lee, participating in the battles of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania and all the engagements up to October, when he was discharged on account of expiration of service. During the summer of 1864 a part of the time he had command of a brigade and was breveted brigadier general to date from Jul, 30, 1864. The following is in brief the war record of Gen. Humphrey: Captain 2d Infantry, April 25, 1861. Colonel February 16, 1863. Wounded in action at Spottsylvania, Va., May 12, 1864. Brevet brigadier general United States Volunteers August 1, 1864, "for conspicuous and gallant service both as regimental and brigade commander throughout the campaign." Mustered out September 30, 1864, and honorably

Page  378 378 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL discharged. After his retirement from the army and return to Michigan, Gen. Humphrey purchased the Daily and Weekly Watchtower, of Adrian, taking possession Saturday, September 9, 1865, and on the following Monday, September 11, issued the Daily Times. He continued as one of its editors until 1866, when he was elected Auditor General of Michigan, and upon taking office abandoned all editorial work. He filled the office of Auditor General for four successive terms, and in 1875 was appointed Warden of the Michigan State Prison at Jackson, occupying this position for eight years. In 1883 he became interested as a partner in the Adrian Brick and Tile Machine Company. In 1890 he was appointed postmaster at Adrian by President Harrison, and held the office for four years. He died at his home in Adrian, January 12, 1898. October 9, 1867, Gen. William Humphrey married Miss Mary E. Sinclair, daughter of Daniel D. and Elizabeth Sinclair, of Adrian, Mich. One child was born to them, Kate, who was born in Lansing, Mich., December 31, 1872. Daniel D. Sinclair was born in Broadalbin, Montgomery County, N. Y., April 16, 1805, learned the tailor's trade and followed merchandizing for many years. He came to Michigan in 1834, and settled in Adrian in 1835. He held many political offices, and was a member of the first Legislature that convened at Lansing in 1848-9. In 1849 he was commissioned Brigadier General by Governor Ransom, and was afterwards in the service of the Michigan Southern railroad for many years. He was elected Supervisor of his ward in Adrian for seventeen successive years. His parents, Duncan and Christie Sinclair, were natives of Glenlion, Perthshire, Scotland, and came to America in 1798. In 1834 he married Miss Elizabeth Hyde, of Brockport, N. Y., and they had six children, as follows: Henry H., Mary Elizabeth, Harriet Maria, Edward W. and Daniel C. One child died in infancy. Mrs. Mary E. Humphrey was born in Adrian, Mich., June 18, 1844. Mrs. Humphrey was active in Grand Army and Relief Corps work, both locally and throughout the state, and at the encampment at Flint at the time of her death gave the greetings of the W. R. C. to the G. A. R., her efforts on that occasion being such as to make her friends proud of her. She was for seven years treasurer of the local Relief Corps, holding that office at the time of her death. She was also identified with the Adrian Woman's Club, and had taken a prominent part in educational and philanthropic work. She was a woman of rare accomplishments and high social standing. The city of Adrian never was more startled than on the morning of June 14, 1901, when the following dispatch was posted on the bulletin boards, and the citizens fully realized its import: FLINT, June 14.-One of the most appalling accidents that ever happened in this city took place at the Hamilton avenue crossing of the Pete Marquette railroad at 9 o'clock this morning, when the Detroit fast express, No. 2, due here at 9. struck a carriage which was driven by Major George W. Buckingham, and also occupied by his daughter Anna. Mrs. Tom S. Applegate and her sister, Mrs. William Humphrey, of Adrian, all of whom were instantly killed.

Page  379 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 379 No two ladies in Adrian were better known or more highly respected, and their death so shocked the community that it was not until after the funeral on the following Sunday that all could fully realize the terrible fact. JAMES ROBERTSON was born in Martinsburg, Berkeley County, W. Va., October 22, 1808. He was the son of John and Mary (Surgen) Robertson, of Martinsburg, W. Va. John Robertson was the son of Alexander Robertson, who was a native of the North of Ireland, and descended from the Scotch dissenters. James Robertson was brought up among the mountains and woods in Berkeley James Robertson. Mrs. Elizabeth Robertson. County, Va., and lived there until after his first marriage to Miss Barbara Pitzer, daughter of Andrew Pitzer, which occurred April 6, 1832. They had one son, John W., who was born February 26, 1833. Mrs. Barbara (Pitzer) Robertson was born in Berkeley County, W. Va., February 23, 1807, and died in Preston County in 1833. About the year 1810 he removed with his parents, when two years old, to Preston County, W. Va., and settled near Maple Run, now Aurora, where he resided until February, 1843, when he again sold his holdings, emigrated to Wayne County, Ohio, and settled on land near Wooster. After a residence there of about seven years, he purchased a farm of unimproved land near Medina, Ohio, which he cleared up, and within five years erected buildings, fences, etc. In 1854 he sold his farm in Medina and came to Michigan, settling in Ogden, this

Page  380 380 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL county. His first purchase here was the old Truman-Sheldon farm on Section 22, of 200 acres. He continued to purchase land in the township until at one time he owned nearly 1,700 acres. His family now owns about 1,200 acres of this land. At the time of his settlement in Ogden the township was an unbroken wilderness, almost impenetrable for man or beast. A large portion of the surface was covered with water, and thousands of acres of what is now the most valuable and productive land in Michigan was then traveled over with flatboats and cotton-wood "dugouts." Mr. Robertson, with his sons, succeeded in clearing, ditching and suduing over 1,000 acres, which is now the most desirable farm land in Lenawee County. He succeded in comfortably locating all of his large family in Ogden, and became one of the wealthiest and most prominent men of his township. For four years he did a successful mercantile business at Ogden Centre, where he was also postmaster. His home was the most hospitable place in the township, and his good wife was the best known and most highly respected woman in the community. In Fehruary, 1880, his health beginning to fail, he went south. He boarded the train at Blissfield, went as far south as the railroad would carry him, and finally, arriving at the end of the track, in Florida, purchased an orange grove near Ocala, in Marion County. He afterwards purchased a home in Anthony, in the same county, where he lived until his death, which occurred May 26, 1898. He was a man of much more than ordinary ability, with the requisite moral and physical courage to undertake large enterprises and carry on successful business ventures. On the 27th day of March, 1834, James Robertson married Miss Elizabeth Heckert, daughter of Peter and Maria Heckert, of Maple Run, now Aurora, Preston County, W. Va., and they became the parents of twelve children, as follows: George P., born in Preston County, W. Va., March 15, 1835; Alpheus J., born same place, January 28, 1837; Josephus M., born same place, September 20, 1838; Martin L., born same place, March 15, 1840; Isaiah W., born same place, April 11, 1842; Caroline L., born in Canaan, Wayne County, Ohio, August 29, 1844, married Nicholas V. Hile; Alexander F., born in Milton, Wayne County, Ohio, December 22, 1846; Emily V., born same place, December 4, 1848, married Edwin Lee; Sarah J., born in Medina, Ohio, May 9, 1851, married George W. Wilt; Alonzo P., born in Medina, Ohio, June 14, 1853. A pair of twin boys died in infancy. Mrs. Elizabeth (Heckert) Robertson was born in Preston County, Va., April 15, 1815, and died in Ogden, this county, December 23, 1882. FREDERICK JAMES BUCK was born on Washington street, New York City, June 21, 1847. In the summer of 1854, when only seven years of age, his parents came to Michigan, locating in Adrian. His father, George Henry Buck, was born in Bennington, Vt., Au

Page  381 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 381 gust 9, 1819, and when he reached his majority he left the parental roof to commence life's battles. In 1840 he landed in New York city, and in 1841 was united to Miss Ellen Cavanaugh, by whom he had ten children, all of whom are dead with the exception of Frederick J. Buck and Mrs. Rose Englehart, of Adrian. George Henry Buck died at Monroe, Mich., October 5, 1890. Mrs. Ellen (Cavanaugh) Buck was born in Ireland, December 4, 1830, and came to America with her parents when a child only two weeks old. She died at Adrian, Mich., July 2, 1863. In 1863 George H. Buck and three sons, Frank H., John D. and Charles E. Buck, entered the service of their country, the father and John D. enlisting in the Twenty-seventh Michigan Infantry, while Frank H. and Charles E. enlisted in the Eighteenth Michigan Infantry. At the breaking out of the war Frank H. enlisted in the Second Michigan Infantry, and after serving some months, was dis ft charged. All returned home at the close of the war with Fred J. Buck. the exception of Charles E., who died of typhoid fever at Decatur, Alabama, in 1864. Charles E. was the twin brother of Frederick J. Frederick J. Buck, the subject of this sketch, went with his parents to Rome Center in 1856, locating on the Bertram farm, where he lived for a few months, then went to "Coontown," (now Addison) where he resided until the spring of 1857, when he returned to Adrian. His boyhood days were taken up with hard work, there being a large family and he did his share towards their maintenance. He had but little schooling, and what knowledge he has acquired was learned in a printing office. From 1859 to 1863 his family, known as the Buck Family, toured Michigan and Ohio giving concerts. At the city of Detroit, October 13, 1863, Frederick J. Buck enlisted in Company I, Twentyseventh Michigan Volunteer Infantry as a private, being only 16 years of age, and served to the close of the war. He was detailed as a drummer boy, and it was his duty, as well as all musicians, during an engagement, to assist in carrying the wounded comrades from the field of action to the regimental hospital, and he has had some very narrow escapes. He took part in twenty battles, among them the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Bethesda Church, Cold Harbor,

Page  382 382 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Petersburg, siege and capture of Petersburg. He was mustered out of the service July 26, 1865, receiving an honorable discharge. At the close of the war Frederick J. Buck went to work on a farm near Bloomfield Center, Oakland County, Mich., where he learned to till the soil. February 22, 1869, he landed in Hudson and entered the Gazette office as "devil." The Gazette at that time was owned and edited by the late W. T. B. Schermerhorn. In the summer of 1873 Mr. Buck moved to Adrian and entered the Journal office, then run by the late Japheth Cross. That fall he entered the composing room of the Adrian Daily Press, located in the basement of the Masonic Temple. He was promoted to foreman of the composing room, which he held until July, 1880, when he went to Sault Ste. Marie, and took charge of The News of that place. August 24, 1884, Mr. Buck returned to Adrian and took cases in the composing room of The Adrian Daily Times and Expositor, on which paper he has been employed ever since. October 7, 1899, he was placed on the reportorial staff by the late Mrs. Harriet M. Applegate, who conducted the paper at that time, and under the new management of The Times was retained as such, which position he still holds. Mr. Buck is a member of Woodbury Post, No. 45, G. A. R., having held various offices from commander down. He belongs to Maple City Lodge, No. 39, K. P., and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church of Adrian. August 1, 1872, Frederick J. Buck married Miss Mary Elizabeth Pratt, of Hudson. This union was blessed with five children, as follows: Jennie May, born at Hudson, Mich., May 30, 1873. She was married to Francis Marion Drake, June 19, 1895. They have one daughter, Irene Moreland, born at Adrian, Mich., April 2, 1896; Lena Rose, born April 6, 1876, died September 29, 1876; Lizzie Ellen, (better known as Daisy) born July 2, 1879, married Arthur Vincent Cole, October 26, 1899. They have two sons, Francis Vincent, born March 25, 1901, and Frederic Lisle, born October 3, 1903; Joseph Fred, born January 24, 1888, at home; Dora Glendelle, born January 26, 1891, died July 22, 1891. Mrs. Mary Elizabeth (Pratt) Buck was the daughter of James B. and Dolly Reed (Lyons) Pratt, of Hudson, this county. She was born in Medina, Lenawee County, June 22, 1853. Her father, James B. Pratt, was born in the State of New York, November 6, 1824, and died at Hudson, Mich., December 13, 1875. Dolly Reed (Lyons) Pratt was a native of New York State, and was born in 1831, and died at Hudson, Mich., January 8, 1864. DARIUS CROSS was born in Rowe, Franklin County, Mass., June 5, 1814. His father, Jude Cross, was born in Bucklin, Franklin County, Mass., October 15, 1773. His father, Abel Cross, came from England and settled in Bucklin, early in 1700. He was a soldier in the French and Indian War, and was taken prisoner by the In

Page  383 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 383 dians and imprisoned in Detroit for two years, when he made his escape and returned to Massachusetts. He afterwards served through the Revolutionary War. Jude Cross was a farmer, and always lived in Franklin County, Mass. He was the father of fifteen children, and died in Rowe, December 26, 1852. He was married twice. First to Mary Ware, of Bucklin, February 7, 1793. She died in Rowe, September 11, 1819. He next married Susannah Wheeler, of Zoar, Mass., in 1820. She died March 30, 1859. Darius Cross lived in Bucklin until the fall of 1837, when he came to MichiMr. and Mrs. Darius Cross. gan and took up 80 acres of land in Medina township. He chopped off an acre or so, and sold out to a man named Perry. He afterwards purchased land near Madison Centre. He has resided in Madison ever since. Mr. Cross has always been an active man. He early in life learned to play the snare drum, and his father, being an expert fifer, he, with two brothers, composed a "martial band" that was in denmapd at every "general training" in his native country. Mr. Cross, when in his 89th year, challenged any man of his age in the county to a drumming contest. He had been drumming for more than 70 years, and is still expert with the sticks, always on hand when there was an opportunity to make music. August 15, 1837, he married Miss Lucretia Ranny, daughter of Jessie and Ruth Ann (Flowers) Ranny, of Ashfield, Franklin County. Mass., by whom he had six children: Edwin D., born in Madison, Lenawee County, Mich., July 20, 1840, married January 1, 1866, Susan A. Potter. She (lied January 24, 1892. They had one child, Japheth,

Page  384 384 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL born March 3, 1869; Ruth Ann, born in Madison, March 3, 1842, married George Cross, June 9, 1870. They have one child, Christopher, born May 30, 1872; Orpha Eulana, born in Madison, April 1, 1848, died March 17, 1849; Ella Amanda, born May 25, 1846, died September 16, 1851; Ella Adelle, born in Madison, August 1, 1851, married Edgar L. Dalton, November 15, 1876. She was the mother of four children. She died at Tyre, Mich., May 10, 1885; Cora Belle, born in Madison, January 29, 1859, and now resides in Madison. Mrs. Lucretia Cross, was born in Ashfield, Franklin County, Mass., February 24, 1819. Her parents raised a family of nine children, and Mrs. Cross is the only survivor. Since the above was written Mr. Cross has passed away, having died at his home in Madison, August 3, 1903. HOWARD M. HOPKINS was born in Clyde, N. Y., December 15, 1841, and came to Michigan with his parents in the fall of 1844. His father, Aaron Hopkins, was born in Nassau, N. Y., in 1794, where he resided until 1844, when he came to Michigan and settled on Section 16, in Rome, this county. After coming to Michigan, he only lived about three months, dying December 5, 1844. In March, 1836, he married Miss Phebe Marks, at Nassau, N. Y., and they had four children, as follows: Betsey Ann, who in 1861 married John Crandall, and died in Rome, November 5, 1865; Harriet, who married Darwin Markham in 1865, has two daughters, and resides in Rollin, this county; Howard M,, born as above; Frank, was a member of Company E., 3d Michigan Cavalry, served through the great Rebellion, and died in Chicago, Ill., December 29, 1871, aged 27 years. Mrs. Phebe (Marks) Hopkins was born in Nassau, N. Y., in 1806. After the death of her husband, Aaron Hopkins, she, in 1847, married Paul Spink, of Hanover, Jackson County, Mich. She resided in Hanover until 1872, when she came to Rome, this county, to visit her son Howard, and died at his home in November of that year. Howard M. Hopkins. the subject of this sketch, came to Michigan when he was three years old. He made the trip with his parents in a covered wagon and team of horses, from Nassau, N. Y. His father's death left his mother with four small children in almost a destitute condition. Our subject and his older sister were adopted by Jeremiah Ferouson, who brought them up and gave them a good home. The keenest gratitude is felt for Mr. and Mrs. Ferguson by both Mr. Hopkins and his sister, as no helpless children ever fell into kinder hands. Our subject had all the advantages of the district schools of Rome, and during the winter of 1860 he attended Adrian College. He was raised on the farm he now owns and lives upon, and has always followed farming. September 16, 1861, Howard M. Hopkins enlisted in Company E, 3d Michigan Cavalry,

Page  385 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 385 and served three years. He participated in sixteen engagements and skirmishes, and was constantly on scouting service. On his return from the army he at once engaged in farming on his homestead on Section 21, in Rome. He has served his township as Highway Commissioner, School Inspector, and was County Superintendent of the Poor for three years. He is a member of Woodbury Post, G. A. R., No. 45, of Adrian; also of Maple City Lodge, K. P., No. 39, and Adrian Lodge, No. 429, B. P. 0. E., and charter member of Rome Grange. January 1, 1866, Howard M. Hopkins married Miss Delia A. Teachout, daughter of Isaiah-and Mary (Howland) Teachout, of Rome, and they have had two children, as follows: Maud, born in Rome, March 16, 1867, married Eugene Hopkins, has three children, and resides in Lockport, Ill.; Eugene C., born in Rome, February 15, 1871, married Miss Millie Dowling, of Rome, and has two daughters. Mrs. Delia (Teachout) Hopkins was born in Rome, this county, August 22, 1846. Her father, Isaiah Teachout, is still living in Rome township, in his 81st year, having been born in Wayne County, N. Y., in 1822. Her mother, Mrs. Mary (Howland) Teachout, was born in Wayne county in 1822, and died in Rome, this county, September 27, 1872. THE MICHIGAN GRANITE COMPANY of Adrian, was organized twenty years ago, by Messrs. King & Connely. Its career has been a successful one from the beginning, until it is now one of the largest and most complete plants of the kind in Michigan, and one of the prominent and important industries of Adrian and Lenawee County. In riding over the county in doing our work, we have noticed most of the cemeteries are well kept and attended, showing due respect to the dead. Many of them contain beautiful marble and granite monuments to the memory of the pioneers, who have gone to their reward. This seemed so fitting, and at the same time so feeble a mark of love, honor and respect for the noble dead, who did so much, and died as they had lived, in the hope and faith of the great future and beneficent heritage they were leaving their loved ones in homes and productive soil. These pioneers came here, many of of them, from comfortable homes in the East, and braved the dangers of the forest, the pestilence of the swamps and the pitiless and inhospitable solitude of the forest. They have left beautiful homes and farms, cities and villages with all the comforts and opportunities of the best portion of the earth, as our heritage. The Great Infinite Power will fully reward them, we all believe, but it remains with us to mark their resting places with fitting tablets, wrought into beautiful shapes by the most skillful workmen. For this service to our beloved we can honestly recommend the Michigan Gran25

Page  386 386 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL 0.t 0 o PF4 O 0 c3.0 o~ Q _l, ca ct c3 5,

Page  387 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 387 ite Company. Mr. King is a native of Maine, and his familiarity with the rugged rocks of his native state fits him for his calling of working out beautiful and artistic designs from the imperishable granite. Mr. Connely is a native of Ireland, and his early life was passed among the bright green hills of the Emerald Isle, and his memory of the beautiful landscapes, the treacherous bogs and the Giant's Causeway, all wrought by Infinite hands, enables him to blend the ideal, the beautiful and material in.such fashion that it makes it possible to suit the most exacting and fastidious taste. Both Mr. King and Mr. Connely are practical granite workers, having learned their business with the largest and most successful firm in the United States at that time, the C. H. Harwick Company, of Quincy, Mass. They work both in granite and marble, and no monument is too large or imposing, or no Flab too small for them to produce with dispatch and satisfaction. JOSEPH H. BELL was born in Glastonbury, Hartford County, Conn., November 18, 1818. His father, Josiah Bell, was a native of Glastonbury, Conn., being born there about 1783. He was a farmer Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Bell, Rollin. and lived there until 1836, when he came to Michigan with his family of eight children. He settled on Section 28, in Rollin, this county. He lived on this farm until his death. About the year 1804 he married Sabina Norcut, of Chatham, Conn., and they had

Page  388 388 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL nine children, as follows: Norcut, Henry, Nelson, Josiah H., Franklin, Charlotte, Watson, James and Erastus. All came to Rollin except Norcut, who died when he was about fourteen years old. Joseph H. Bell, the subject of this sketch, lived with his parents until after he was twenty-one years old. In 1847 he settled on Section 28, in Rollin, where he now resides. His home is near the village of Rollin, and has been entirely cleared and improved by himself. June 6, 1847, Joseph H. Bell married Miss Ann Eliza Brownell, of Rollin, and they had five children, as follows: Nathan, born March 9, 1848; Alice E., born September 22, 1849; Cleora, born November 19, 1854; Irwin J., born September 27, 1862 Elmira R., born December 31, 1864. Mrs. Ann Eliza (Brownell) Bell was born in Ann Arbor, Mich., February 14, 1829, and died in Rollin, January 8, 1866. Since the death of his wife, Mr. Bell has resided at his home in Rollin, always having some of his children with him. His home farm contains 160 acres, the Cincinnati Northern Railroad passing through it. He has two other farms, one being in Rollin, and the other in Hudson township, besides a tract of land containing over 600 acres in Texas. During his long residence in Rollin, Mr. Bell has endeavored to do his full share for all public improvements and assist in the general welfare of the township. HON. GEORGE B. HORTON was born in Lafayette, Medina County, Ohio, April 17, 1845. His father, Samuel Horton, was born in Lincolnshire, near Boston, England, December 9, 1818. Mr. Horton lived in England until he was about seventeen years old, when with a schoolmate he emigrated to the United States. The voyage from London to New York was most distressing and unfortunate, seventeen passengers perishing from starvation and exposure, while all on board suffered nearly to the point of death from lack of necessaries of life. The vessel was one hundred and four days at sea, finally landing at Castle Garden, N. Y., where Mr. Horton passed six weeks in recovering strength sufficient to leave the place. During this confinement he was robbed of nearly all the money he had, but finally managed to get as far as Troy, N. Y., where he found employment in the lumber woods of Herkimer County. He remained in Herkimer County for three years, where he prospered reasonably well, and found his future wife. In 1839 he went back to England and took possession of a little property his father had left him. He returned in 1840, was married in 1841, and that fall removed to Medina County, Ohio, purchased a farm in Lafayette township, and resided there six years. In the fall of 1847 he sold out and returned to the State of New York, residing for three years in Niagara County. A resolute, thrifty man, he was not satisfied; the oppor

Page  389 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 389 tunity and the ideal home he was seeking were not to be found there, and in 1851 he emigrated to Michigan and purchased a farm on Section 6, in Fairfield, this county. In 1853 he commenced the manufacture of cheese, and with a dairy of ten cows, he was the first man in Michigan to manufacture that desirable edible for the general market. He met with special success at once, as his product was good, and it soon became sought after by merchants. He steadily increased his dairy, and in the spring of 1866, erected the first cheese factory in the State. He was an enterprising, honorable, unassuming man, and by his probity, honest dealing and the quality of his product soon became a leading farmer and dairyman in the West. More e than a score of other cheese factories were afterwards operated in the county, and the business soon grew to large proportions. At the time of his death, April 25, 1872, he owned 469 acres of Samuel Horton. land and about fifty cows. It was February 14, 1841, that Samuel Horton and Miss Lucina A. Perkins, daughter of Joseph and Harriet Perkins,: of Salisbury, Herkimer County, N. Y., were married. By this marriage there were three children, George B. being the only son. Mrs. Lucina A. Horton was really the first cheese maker in Michigan from a commercial point of view. She learned the business in Herkimer County, before her marriage, and superintended her husband's cheese making from the very commencement and for eight years thereafter. Mrs. Lucina A. Horton was born in Salisbury, H e r k i m e r C o u n t y, N. Y., Mrs. Lucina A. Horton.

Page  390 390 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL April 14, 1822, and now resides in the village of Morenci, this county. George B. Horton always followed farming and remained at home with his parents. At the death of his father he assumed all the responsibilities of the farm and the cheese business, and has carried it on ever since. He purchased the interests of the heirs in the estate, and has added to it until he now owns seven hundred acres of cleared land and one hundred acres of virgin forest. His residence, built in 1888, is one of the finest and most complete farm Hon. George B. Horton and wife, Mrs. Amanda Horton. homes in Michigan, and Mr. Horton is one of the most prosperous and thorough-going farmers in Lenawee County. His cheese business has grown into something enormous. During the year 1901 his product amounted to 1,500,000 pounds, and the business is still growing. He is a great lover of rural life, and is prominently identified with all movements and societies pertaining to farming. He was a charter member of Weston Grange, now known as Fruit Ridge Grange, and served as master twenty years. The Fruit Ridge Grange hall, which stands on Mr. Horton's farm, is one of the most complete buildings of the kind in the United States. It is equipped with a large library, museum, stage and fixtures, together with every convenience. He assisted in organizing the Lenawee County Grange, and was its master six years. He has always been active and prom

Page  391 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 391 inent in State Grange work, was on the executive committee six years, was elected Master of the State Grange in 1892, and has occupied that position continuously up to the present time. Mr. Horton assisted in organizing the present Lenawee County Agricultural Society, and has served as its president during the past twenty-five years. He was president of the State Dairymens' Association, and has been for ten years the Michigan delegate to the National Grange. Always a Republican in politics, he was elected to the State Senate of 1890-1, and served sixty days, but was unseated on a charge of ineligibility, because of holding a commission as postmaster at Fruit Ridge, notwithstanding the fact that his resignation as postmaster was sent in before the election. In March, 1902, the representative members and leading men in the Republican party of Lenawee County met in Adrian, and after a thorough conference, resolved that Mr. Horton was the unanimous first choice for candidate for Governor, and pledged a solid county delegation to the State Convention in his behalf. Later, in April, Mr. Horton, after giving the matter due deliberation, announced himself a candidate. He would ol I Al I Farm Home of the Hon. George B. Horton, Fruit Ridge, in Fairfield.

Page  392 392 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL make no fight for it, but abide the best judgment of the convention. The point in his life that he takes especial interest in, is the success that has followed his efforts in all special lines. His record as a farmer stands foremost in his county. He has found time beside looking after personal matters to do what good he could, as he saw the good, in benefiting his fellow man. When he was made Master of the State Grange there were 210 subordinate Granges; now there are 650, and the membership has more than trebled. He was made president of the Lenawee County fair when it was bankrupt. He at once reorganized the society, and under his careful management it has grown to be the largest permanently located fair in Michigan. January 3, 1878, George B. Horton married Miss M. Amanda Bradish, daughter of Norman F. and Caroline Bradish, of Madison, this county, four children resulting as follows: Alice L., born September 27, 1878, married Sidney Spitzer, April 22, 1903, and resides in Toledo; Norman B., born July 18, 1881; Samuel W., born May 3, 1884; Carrie L., born April 17, 1887. All were born in Fairfield. Mrs. Horton was born in Madison, this county, June 18, 1854. [For her family annals see History and Biographical Record of Lenawee County, Vol. 1, page 455.] JOHN W. SELL was born in Preston County, W. Va., November 23, 1844. His father, Enos Sell, was born April 11, 1820. He was always a farmer, became a large land owner, and was one of the prosperous and prominent citizens of Preston County, W. Va. He was an active and earnest adherent of the Methodist Protestant church, was a class leader and devout member up to the time of his death, which occurred March 3, 1900. He was a pioneer in West Virginia, residing there for more than 60 years. Enos Sell married Miss Elizabeth Smith, daughter of Eli and Margaret Smith, of Preston County, W. Va. They were the parents of nine children, John W. being third child and second son. Mrs. Elizabeth (Smith) Sell was born in Preston County, Va., July 24, 1817, and died there in 1870. John W. Sell was raised a farmer, and was educated in the district schools of his neighborhood, which were poor indeed. His time was principally passed in work, as become the ideas of his sturdy Pennsylvania-Dutch Ancestors. He followed farming in West Virginia until 1872, when he came to Michigan and settled in Ogden, this county. In 1876 he purchased 40 acres of heavy timbered land on Section 23, cleared it up and ditched it. Since that time he has added to it until he now owns 126 acres of the very best of land, under cultivation, free from stumps and tile-drained. He has good farm buildings, and a very desirable home. He has served his township as Treasurer for two terms, and for many years has been

Page  393 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 393 Overseer of Highways. He is a prominent Granger, and has filled the office of Overseer for three successive years, being now Master of Ogden Grange, 660. He has taken the 7th degree of the order, which is the highest degree in the Grange. He is a member of Fairfield Lodge, I. O. O. F., No. 260, and has passed the chairs. He has been twelve years a director of the Lenawee County Agricultural Society, from Ogden, and a member of the executive committee for three successive years. For many years he has taken an active interest in the Lenawee County Pioneer Society, and served as vice president in 1902. Mr. Sell has a taste and tact for stock raising, and is a successful breeder of Holstein cattle, Poland China hogs, Mammoth bronzed turkeys, and barred Plymouth Rock fowls. He has for many years taken great interest in breeding Holsteins, and believes he has as pure bred and desirable a herd as can be found in Southern Michigan, having taken many premiums at the various county fairs within his reach. lie has been quite successful in his experiments in producing new varieties of seeds and grains. March 23, 1865, John W. Sell married Miss Margaret A. Roth, daughter of John and Maria Roth, of Allegany County, Md., and they are the parents of nine children, as follows: Henry E., born in Preston County, W. Va., December 18, 1865, married Miss Lena Sigert. They had four sons; Henry E., died July 19, 1896; Emma E., born same place, June 13, 1868, married John H. Heckert. They had two children; Luther H., born same place, August 24, 1870, died February 18, 1871; Walter A., born in the same place, February 21, 1872, married Miss Bertha Brown, and they have had two children; William D., born in Ogden, July 31, 1874, married Miss Florence Sebring. They have three children; Alpheus J., born in Ogden, September 22, 1877, married Miss Maggie Sebring, and they have one child; Meta L., born in Ogden, September 21, 1881; Hervey L., born in Ogden, April 15, 1884, both at home. Mrs. Margaret A. (Roth) Sell was born in Allegany County, Md., August 15, 1843. Her parents were natives of Hanover, Germany. They came to America and settled in Maryland when they were children. John Roth was born September 23, 1819, and died in Tucker County, W. Va., in 1896. His wife, Maria (Fredlock) Roth, was born May 10, 1821, and died in Maryland, in December, 1878. EDWIN L. BAKER was born in Madison, this county, January 5, 1847, in a small log house on the s. w. 4 of Section 35, about onehalf mile north of Fairfield village. He has no recollection of ever seeing the house of his nativity, but is very familiar with the locality. [For his father, Rufus Baker's history, see record in this volume, page 142-3-4.] Edwin L. Baker has always resided in

Page  394 394 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Lenawee County, and was educated in the schools of his township until about the year 1859, when he attended one term at D. A. Dodge's select school at Canandaigua. He afterwards went one winter to Isaac 0. Savage's select school at the Round School house in Fairfield township. In the years 1861-2 he attended four fall and winter terms at Raisin Valley Seminary, Daniel Satterthwaite, principal. In the winter of 1867-8 he entered Eastman's Commercial College at Poughkeepsie, N. Y., where he graduated in the spring of 1868. In the winter of 1869 he attended a select school in Fairfield village taught by C. M. C. Cook. During vacations he was employed at his father's farm and cheese factory, and considered himself a full hand. At the age of twentyone he became a partner with his father, the firm being known as Rufus Baker & Son. The business consisted of the manufacture of cheese, general dairy farming and the.Edwin L. Baker. handling of live stock. In 1872 the firm opened a wholesale cheese house in Adrian, and carried on a successful business under the personal management of E. L. Baker until 1878, when the firm was dissolved. The business was then consolidated with Clark, Shattuck & Ladd, and the new firm name was Clark, Baker & Co., the business being that of wholesale cheese factors and pork packers. In 1887 the firm built the Riverside Canning Works, and engaged in canning apples, tomatoes, pumpkin and squash. About 1890 Mr. J. R. Clark withdrew, when the firm became Baker & Shattuck. In 1893 the busiMr. Clara E. Baker. ness was incorporated as,IA*O. vae --.

Page  395 RECORD OF LENAWER COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 395 Baker, Shattuck & Co. In about two years Mr. Baker purchased Mr. Shattuck's interest, and in 1897 the business was incorporated as Riverside Company, Mr. C. N. Turner taking an active interest therein, becoming the manager, Mr. Baker retiring from active participation. Since that time Mr. Baker has been engaged in real estate and insurance business, besides conserving the interests of his cheese factory, farm property, etc. Mr. Baker is an active adherent of the First Baptist church of Adrian, being a member of its Board of Trustees for over twenty years, and since the death of Hon. W. S. Wilcox has been president of the board. He is also Treasurer of the Board of Trustees. He is a member of Adrian Lodge, No. 19, F. & A. M., a director in the Adrian Building and Loan Association, and a director in the Commercial Savings Bank and the National Voting Machine Company# In 1885 Mr. Baker purchased the interest of Thomas J. Tobey in the banking firm of T. J. Tobey & Co., the new firm consisting of Seymour Howell, E. L. Baker and W. B. Thompson, under the firm namne of Howell, Baker & Co. In 1888 this bank was reorganized as the Commercial Savings Bank of Adrian, Howell, Baker & Co.'s interest being transferred for stock in the new organization. Mr. Baker is a stockholder in many of the important manufacturing industries of Adrian. March 23, 1871, Edwin L. Baker married Miss Clara E. Bates, daughter of Talcott and Elvira H. S. Bates, of Fairfield, this county, and they have had six children, as follows: Mabel Irene, born in Fairfield, January 24, 1872, married September 18, 1889, to Carlton N. Turner, has two children and resides in Adrian; Dora Estelle, born in Adrian, July Residence of Edwin L. Baker, No. 30 Dennis Street, Adrian.

Page  396 396 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL 10, 1874, married October 19, 1898, Lucien N. Culver, and died April 14, 1899; Clara Marie, born March 1, 1876, married January 1, 1900, Elwyn C. Fisher, has two children and resides in Battle Creek, Mich.; Bertha Louise, born December 24, 1882, a student at Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Edwin L., Jr., born March 2, 1886, at home; Kathryn Mar, born August 4, 1888, at home. Mrs. Clara E. (Bates) Baker was born in Norton, Summit County, Ohio, January, 6, 1855. Her father was a native of Summit County, was born December 21, 1826, and came to Michigan in 1856 and settled on Section 1, in Fairfield, this county. He was elected Supervisor of Fairfield for one or two terms. He afterwards sold his farm in Fairfield, and removed to Fayette, Ohio. In 1859 he took the overland route to Pike's Peak. going from there to California, returning in 1866. He died at his home in Fayette, Ohio, December 23, 1901. November 28, 1850, he married Miss Elvira H. Sparhawk, of Summit County, Ohio, and they had four children, Mrs. Baker being the second. The first child died in infancy. The other children are Arthur Bates, a farmer of Fayette, Ohio, and Miner L. Bates, now pastor of the Warren, Ohio, Christian church. January 1, 1904, he becomes the pastor of Christian church, at Orange, New Jersey. Her mother, Elvira H. Sparhawk, was born in Summit County, Ohio, April 16, 1827, of New England ancestry, and died in Fayette, Ohio, July 28, 1893. LADD JOHN LEWIS was born in the township of Orangeville, Wyoming County, N. Y., December 22, 1845. He was third child of John Ladd and Lois (Squier) Lewis. The Lewis family was prominent in 'Rhode Island, and in the Revolutionary War, one of the members serving on General Washington's staff. The line dates back to 1661, when John Lewis, who came from Wales, settled in Westerly. The homstead, built by Jonathan Lewis of the fourth generation, in 1740, is still standing and occupied. The father of our subject, John Ladd Lewis, was born at Exeter, R. I., May 1, 1811, went to Orangeville, Wyoming County, N. Y., in 1818, and died in Johnsonburg, the same township, January 24, 1889. His wife, Lois (Squier) Lewis, the daughter of Gurdon and Dolly (Foster) Squier, was born near Fosterville, Cayuga County, N. Y., August 27, 1819. She died at Johnsonburg, November 5, 1900. Her grandfather, Jonathan Foster, fought at Bunker Hill, and her father was in the war of 1812. Ladd John Lewis, subject of this sketch, was brought up a farmer, and was educated in the district schools of his neighborhood. At the age of fifteen he commenced working by the month, and subsequently spent one winter at Genesee Seminary, in Alexander, N. Y. He taught school for three winter terms, and graduated from Eastman's Business College, at Poughkeepsie, in

Page  397 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 397 1865. In 1869 he removed to Grand Rapids, Mich., where he became interested in the manufacture of agricultural implements, the firm being Henry S. Smith & Co. During his residence in Grand Rapids he was quite active in public affairs, served six years on the school board, and was two years its president. He twice declined the nomination for Mayor on the Republican ticket and refused to become a legislative candidate. In 1884 Mr. Lewis sold his interest in Grand Rapids and removed to N ew Hartford, k Oneida County, N.Y. Hered a he purchased an interest in the Utica Tool Co. The Company was located at Washington Mills. He remained here some time, when he became associated with his son in the ownership and management of a knitting mill at Sauquoit. In 1900 he came to Adrian with his brother, George H. Lewis, and purchased the property now so favorably known as the Adrian Knitting Mills. An incorporated company was organized The Adrian Knitting Works. to be known as the Adrian Knitting Company, officered as follows: President and Manager, Ladd J. Lewis; Vice President, Benjamin F. Graves; Secretary and Treasurer, George H. Lewis. The product of the mill consists entirely of one line of underwear, that of children's cotton, heavy weight. No wool garments are made, and the output is rapidly increasing. Within the three years this mill has been in operation, the business has grown to an annual aggregate of about $200,000. About one hundred people are employed, and the product is absorbed by jobbing houses in the larger cities between Boston and San Francisco, and St. Paul and New Orleans. The mill is equipped with the most im.proved machinery, with every convenience and comfort for employes, and is the only one of its kind in Michigan. The Messrs. Lewis, who give their entire attention to the management of the mill, are already well known in Adrian as solid, enterprising and honorable business men, of sagacity and integrity. The Adrian Knitting Mills compose one of the leading industries of Adrian. During the year 1903 Mr. Ladd J. Lewis purchased the fine residence property, No. 4 Division St., the former home of Rial Clay, a picture of which can be seen on page 260 of this volume. The domestic relations of the gentlemen are as follows: September 22, 1870, Ladd John Lewis married Miss Alice M. Eldridge, daughter of Sam

Page  398 398 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL uel S. and Samantha (Gill) Bailey Eldridge, of Warsaw, N. Y., and they have had six children, as follows: Ladd J., Jr., born July 5, 1871, married Miss Frances E. Campbell, 1898, has one son, Myron C., and resides at Sauquoit, N. Y.; Nellie Lois, born August 5, 1876, married Frank IH. Williams in 1898, has three children and resides in Adrian; Alice Louise, born December 15, 1878; Francis E., born June 22, 1893; Two children died in infancy. Mrs. Alice M. (Eldridge) Lewis was born in Gainsville, Wyoming County, N. Y., January 8, 1848.. George Hawkins Lewis was born July 4, 1862, in Orangeville, N. Y. He resided with his parents on the farm until 1879, when he went to Grand Rapids, Mich., and attended school until 1881, when he returned home and engaged in merchandizing in Johnsonburg. In 1888 he went to Warsaw in the dry goods trade, where he served as Village Clerk for four years, remaining there until 1900, Vhen he came to Adrian. February 11, 1885, George H. Lewis married Miss Ella M. Hoy, daughter of George and Lucy C. (Stone) Hoy, of Johnsonburg, N. Y., and they have had five children, as follows: Vera Mabel, born November 27, 1887; Carroll Hoy, born August 21, 1890; Raymond McKinley, born February 24, 1896. Two children died in infancy. Mrs. Ella M. (Hoy) Lewis was born in Orangeville, Wyoming County, N. Y., April 11. 1863. CHARLES W. GREGG was born in Pekin, Niagara County, N. Y., December 12, 1852, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1858, settled in Dansville, Ingham County. He was educated in the schools at...CharDansville, and graduated from Devlin's Business ColI lege at Bay City. He then went to Jackson, and in 1873 engaged with the Bortree Manufacturing Company and remained in their employment for eighteen years. He started in as office boy and worked along until he became manager of the concern. In 1890 he purchased the Stowell House, at that time a new Charles W. Gregg. hotel in Jackson, which he vY

Page  399 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 399 made very successful and popular. In 1898 he became the proprietor of the Bailey House, in Ionia, and in 1901 he came to Adrian and purchased the Lawrence House. Mr. Gregg has proved to be a very popular landlord and successful business man. In coming to Adrian the name of the hotel was changed, after being known for nearly forty year as the Lawrence House, to the Hotel Gregg, and the patronage has been phenomenally good under Mr. Gregg's management. He is a careful and conservative business man, a failure in his business career. Mr. gan in 1858. William Gregg was ae soldier in the great Rebellion, enlisting in Company E. 26th Michigan Infantry, The Hotel Gregg. three years and seventy days. He died in Mason, Mich., September 14, 1900, aged 72 years. Mrs. Judy Gregg still lives (1903) in Mason. October 21, 1875, Charles W. Gregg married Miss Alpha Higgins, daughter of Nelson and Lucy A. Higgins, of Charlotte, Mich., and they have one son, Walter Charles, born in Jackson, Mich., September 26, 1878, married Miss Luella Hennessey, of Jackson, Mich., October 25, 1898. He is interested in the hotel business with his father, and gives his entire attention to it. Mrs. Alpha Gregg's father, Nelson Higgins, was born in London, England, in 1818, came to America when he was sixteen years old, and settled in London, Canada. In 1844 he married Miss Lucy A. Harrington, and six children were born. Mr. Higgins died in Charlotte, Mich., November 14, 1901. Mrs. Lucy A. Higgins was born in Ann Arbor, Mich., in 1829, and was the daughter of Joseph and Mary (Gee) Harrington, who were among the first settlers of Ann Arbor. Mrs. Higgins is still living (1903) in Charlotte, Mich. The fine hotel property located on the corner of Maumee and Winter streets, in Adrian, now known as Hotel Gregg, is the legal and natural descendant of the old Michigan Exchange, the first public house and the first frame building erected in Adrian. In the summer of 1828 Isaac Dean, who was the father-in-law of Addison J. Comstock, the first settler and founder of Adrian, built a good-sized frame building on the present site of the Hotel Gregg, and chris

Page  400 400 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL tened it the Michigan Exchange. The house was formally opened July 4, 1828, with a dance in the ball room of the second story. Mr. Dean kept the house for about ten years, when he rented it, and afterwards sold it to George C. Knight. August 28, 1848, he sold the property to Eber Adams, of Rochester, N. Y., the consideration being $5,500. Mr. Adams took immediate possession of the house, and became one of the most popular and widely known landlords in Southern Michigan. That was in the days of the old stage coach and it was no uncommon occurrence to witness the arrival of ten or fifteen stages in one day. Mr. Adams continued to keep the house until February 19, 1856, when he sold it to James Brackett, of Rochester, N. Y., consideration, $9,000. Mr. Brackett was well off and a man of enterprise, having faith enough in the future of Adrian to make a proposition to the citizens that seemed to meet with general approval. There was a feeling that the old hotel did not meet the requirements of the town, and that it was time to have a new and modern hostlery in Adrian. It was proposed to give a bonus to Mr. Brackett, and at a meeting a paper was drawn by the late Judge F. C. Beaman. The paper was dated Adrian, February 17, 1859, and following are the subscriptions to the bonus: J. J. Newell- - $200 00 G. L. Bidwell- 200 00 John V. Lyon -— 50 00 W. S. Wilcox --- —------ 100 00 James Berry — 100 00 L. G. Berry --- —-------- 200 00 Rogers & Hurlbut -----— 50 00 W. E. Kimball- - -75 00 M. H. Roberts --- —---- 25 00 C. M. Croswell --- —---- 20 00 W. J. Schloss- 75 00 A. J. Chappell- 25 00 T. D. Ramsdell & Co -— 50 00 D. K. Underwood --- 100 00 A. Clement- - E. C. Winter. I. N. Wells W. H. Stone- -- R. R. Beecher --- —----- P. Stone --- —----------- E. L. Clark --- ——. A. S. Berry A. HowellF. C. BeamanLivingston & Holberg - E. C. Perkins ---------- H. A. Angell --- 50 00 50 00 25 00 25 00 20 00 100 00 100 00 100 00 5 00 25 00 25 00 50 00 50 00 There was also another condition to the agreement, of which there is only a portion in existence, but there is enough to show what it was, it seems to be a resolution passed by a meeting, as follows: "Resolved, That we the undersigned agree and hereby bind ourselves to sell 130 tickets at ten dollars each for a festival to be given on the opening of the new Exchange, to be built by James Brackett within the present year on the site of the old Exchange, the money arising from the sale of tickets as above to be paid to said Brackett and the keeper of the new house." The opening took place in the winter of 1859-60 and it was a red letter day in Adrian. The banquet and dancing party was a

Page  401 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 401 grand affair, the elite of the city being in attendance. The late Colonel Dwight A. Woodbury was the first landlord of this new house, and continued as such until 1862, when he entered the army as Colonel of the Fourth Michigan Infantry. Upon Colonel Woodbury's departure Mr. Brackett brought his family to Adrian, and remained until the following spring. April 1, 1863, Willis T. Lawrence purchased the property of Mr. Brackett and immediately took possession. During the next thirty-seven years he owned the house, naming it the Lawrence House, making many changes and improvements and building the large addition on the north. In November, 1890, Mr. Lawrence sold to Col. O. H. Green, of Boston, Mass. April 30, 1891, Col. Green sold to Charles J. Patch, of Boston, and May 30. 1893, Mr. Patch sold to Horace F. Wyatt. June 1, 1901, Mr. Wyatt sold the entire property to the present owner and popular landlord, Charles W. Gregg, who has thoroughly overhauled and refurnished the building, and it is now one of the very best two dollar a day houses in Michigan. It is supplied with all modern conveniences, with steam heat and electric lights in all of its one hundred rooms. The above engraving shows the old Michigan Exchange, erected in 1828 by Isaac Dean. This was the first framed building erected in Adrian, and also the first hotel, standing on the site of the present Hotel Gregg. This house became a popular public resort, and for over thirty years stood as a land-mark of pioneer days. It sheltered many men of note, among the most prominent, perhaps, was the Hon. Daniel Webster, of Massachusetts, in 1838, the Hon. Lewis Cass; and Horace Greeley greeted his admirers from the balcony in 1857. The fine pair of horses in the foreground shows a team owned by Eber Adams, who had an admiration for good horses. 26

Page  402 402 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL THOMAS MEASURES, 2d, was born in Deeping, St. James, Lincolnshire, England, January 4, 1840. His father, Thomas Measures, 1st, was born in the same place, in 1794. He always lived there, and raised a family of thirteen children. He married Miss Mary Tansley, who was also born in Deeping, St. James, in 1796, and died there in 1868. Thomas Measures, 2d, subject of this sketch, lived with his parents until he was fourteen years old, when he was indentured to the trade of blacksmith and machinist. He served seven years to learn the trade, and after following it for a few years, in 1861 he started in business for himself in Deeping, St. James. He was quite successful in his business venture, and carried it on until 1871, when he sold out, came to the United States, and settled at Lyons, Ohio. He remained in Lyons four years, when, after making a tour of Texas, he returned and started in business at Seward, Ohio. In 1884 he purchased a farm on Section 29, in Ogden. This was then a new farm and was most of the year covered with water, but at this time there is not a better or more productive piece of land in Michigan. He has erected good buildings and has it under perfect subjection. He has twice been a candidate for member of the Legislature. November 3, 1862, Thomas Measures. 2d, married Miss Sophia Langley, daughter of William and Ann (Ball) Langley, of Wadenhoe, Northamptonshire, England, and they have five children, as follows: Henry, born in Deeping, St. James, England, January 29, 1864, married Emma Blair, and resides at Ai, Fulton County, Ohio; William, born same place, August 12, 1865, married Rosa Young, of Ogden, and resides at Coleman, Mich.; Mary Ann, born same place, May 6, 1867, married A. J. Pence, of Ogden Centre; George, born same place, May 29, 1869, married Ida Ross, of Ogden, and resides in Ogden; John Thomas, born at Lyons, Ohio, November 29, 1871, married Miss Blanche Locke, and resides in Ogden. Mrs. Sophia (Langley) Measures, was born at Wadenhoe, England, May 14, 1844. Her father always followed farming, and was on one farm all his life as child, boy and overseer. He died at the age of 76 years. Her mother was a native of Winnick, Huntingtonshire, and died at the age of 74 years. Mr. Measures has a bit of history relating to his christening and the church where it occurred. The church has stood for about 700 years, and there is much interesting history connected with it: DEEPING, ST. JAMES, LINCOLNSHIRE, ENGLAND. In an old county paper, an interesting document, a Terrier, bearing date June 18, 1724, has been found at the Vicarage. We give the following extracts: Deeping, St. James Vicarage: One vicaridge house consisting of tow Bayes of Buildings, the walls built with studd and mortar and covered with Thack, one floore of ston and the other of cordes, two chambers the floores both of them of Cordes. One outhouse con

Page  403 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 403 sisting of one baye of Buildings the walls of studd and mortar and covered with Thack. CUSTOMS DUE FROM PARISHONERS TO IMPROPRIATOR.-The several customs from parishoners are as followeth: Sir Francis Whichcote receiveth all the com tithe, Hemp and Flax and touching of Easter offerings, hee receiveth for a mare and foale one peney, for a cow and calf tow peneys and for a strap milch cow one peney. He receiveth of every seven piggs one and giveth the parishoners three half peneys and under seven piggs the parishoners payeth a half peney a pigg; hee receiveth likewise of seven lambs one and payeth the parishoners three half peneys and under seven he receiveth a half peney a lamb; and for wool he receiveth the tenth fleece or tenth pound; and for grass hee have in some of our meadows-and pastures tithe acres, and where none he receiveth tow pounds an acre for grass. FURNITURE OF CHURCH.-The furniture belonging to the church is one surplice and hudd, tow communion clothes, one wooling one linning, one pewter flagon and pewter cupp, likewise one silver cupp containing in weight ten ounces and a half, with this inscription on itt, R. L. and R. B. Churchwardens of St. James, Deeping, in the year 1632. As to bookes there is tow Comon Praire bookes, a large bible, a booke of homileyes and a large register booke. In the steeple five bells and a clocke. THOMAS BAMFIELD, Vicar. THOMAS MEASURES, Churchwardens. THOMAS WATSON, GEORGE P. ROBERTSON was born in Preston County, W. Va., March 15, 1835. His father, James Robertson, was born October 22, 1808. [For the history of the Robertson family, see James Robertson's record in this volume.] George P. Robertson, subject of this sketch, lived in West Virginia until the spring of 1844, when he removed with his parents to Canaan, Wayne County, Ohio. The family lived there for some time, when a removal was made to Milton township, in the same county. After a residence there of about three years, Mr. Robertson purchased a piece of wood land in Lafayette, Medina County. Here the family resided until 1854, when still another move was made, this time to Ogden, this county, where a large tract of land was purchased on Sections 15 and 22. Some of this land was chopped over and quite a clearing been made. But with a family of seven boys a good farm was soon worked out. Our subject stayed at home until he was twenty-one. In 1855, immediately after gaining his majority, he purchased forty acres on Section 16, in Ogden. In fourteen years from that time he owned one hundred and twenty acres of finely cleared and well-drained land, with good house and two barns, fully stocked and out of debt. Since that time he has enjoyed life and exerted a wholesome influence in the neighborhood. His enjoyment was in improving his

Page  404 404 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL home and making it comfortable and attractive for his family and friends. He still owns this farm in Ogden, but resides in the city of Adrian, where he fills an important position with the Page Woven Wire Fence Company. In politics Mr. Robertson has always been a Republican and a zealous supporter of all party measures. He is liberal in his religious views and defends and supports all good endeavors. June 12, 1865, George P. Robertson married Miss Mary F. Richardson, daughter of John and Lucy (Rice) Richardson, of Ogden, and they have had four children, as follows: Pearlett A., born May 27, 1866, married Dr. W. E. Scriber, has three children and resides in Detroit; Alice E., born November 14, 1868, married W. B. Sheffield, who was killed in a railroad accident in March, 1899. She has four children, and lives in Adrian; Cora B., born April 22, 1870, married John W. Rohloff, and resides in Ogden; Leslie B., born George P. Robertson. June 18, 1872, married Miss Bertha Page and resides in Adrian. Mrs. Mary (Richardson) Robertson was born in Loraine County, Ohio, June 20, 1847. Her father, was a native of New York, and was born in Oswego, May 15, 1801. He came to Michigan and settled in Ogden, this county, in 1850, where he died February 16, 1887. He was twice married, his first wife being Mary Marion, who died in Richland County, Ohio. He afterwards married Miss Lucy Rice, and they had nine children, Mrs. Robertson being the oldest. Mrs. Lucy (Rice) Richardson was born in Loraine, Ohio, in May, 1826, and now resides in Mrs. Marv I. Robertsnn. Adrian.... —. as r.............

Page  405 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 405 HON. ALVAH G. STONE was born in Charlton, Worcester County, Mass., March 2, 1852. Mr. Stone came of Revolutionary stock on the paternal side, his great-grandfather being one of the famous minute men, and afterward a captain in the Continental Army. Mr. Stone's mother, whose maiden name was Sarah Ward, was a direct descendant of General Artemus Ward, the first commander of the American army. Mr. Stone's early boyhood was spent among the Massachusetts hills and in the township of MeHon. Alvah G. Stone. Mrs. Lucy J. Stone. dina, this county, where his grandfather, Captain N. S. Stone, and his sons, Nahum and Charles, and his daughter Nancy, came at an early date, they being among the first settlers in the Bean Creek Valley. Of this family, Nahum and Charles, after clearing up farms and raising families in Medina, removed to Olivet, in this State, where Charles died in 1887, and Nahum, following his children ever westward, still lives at the advanced age of 93 in Tacoma, State of Washington. The daughter, Nancy, married Clark Perkins, also a New England man, and resided in Adrian until the death of Mr. Perkins in 1866. His widow, now Mrs. Collins, resides with Mr. Stone in Medina. Mr. Perkins will be remembered by the more elderly citizens of Adrian as a prominent building contractor and mason of the early sixties. The masonic temple, the Brackett House, now Hotel Gregg, the Methodist Protestant church, and

Page  406 406 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL many other buildings being monuments of his skill as a builder. Gardner, the third son, father of the subject of this sketch, was the only one to remain in the East. In 1876, Mr. Stone was united in marriage to Miss Lucy J. Clark, of Millis, Norfolk County, Mass. Miss Clark was a member of one of the oldest families in New England, eight generations of her family residing on one farm about 17 miles from Boston, the original deed of which came from a king of England, and recites in its bounds that on the west it "borders on the wilderness." Soon after this marriage Mr. and Mrs. Stone came to Michigan, locating at Medina, and began the avocation of farming, first renting a farm and afterward purchasing the farm just south of Medina village. This family is composed of three sons: E. Stacey, who resides on the farm; Stanley C., who is with the Thompson Banking Company, of Hudson, and Harry G., who is a student at the Michigan Agricultural College. Mr. Stone has always been a Republican in politics, and has for many years taken an active part in \public affairs, holding numerous offices of public trust, among which are School Inspector, Justice of the Peace and Member of the Legislature from the Second District of Lenawee, which office he now holds. Among the more important of Mr. Stone's official acts is the joint authorship of the famous "ColbyStone Primary Election Bill," and the "County Normal Training Bill," of which much is expected in the future. Mr. Stone is also prominently mentioned as a candidate for the office of State Land Commissioner. Mr. and Mrs. Stone are members of the Baptist church at Medina, and in common with many other families of the county, have done their little part religiously, socially and financially, of making Lenawee one of the grandest counties in the State. LEONARD BECK was born in Feichtwangen, Bavaria, Germany, February 2, 1840. His father and mother, Michael and Barbara Beck, were born in the same place about the year 1800. They came to America in 1847, bringing a family of four children. They bought a piece of land about three miles south of Monroe, Mich., where the family settled. Mr. Beck died in March, 1848. Here the family was raised by Mrs. Beck, and kept together until they were able to take care of themselves. Mrs. Barbara Beck lived in Monroe until her death in February, 188k9. Leonard Beck was seven years old when he came to the United States. He was educated in the German school in Monroe and was confirmed in Trinity German Lutheran church there. When seventeen years old he went to learn the trade of carpenter and builder. In 1861 he came to Adrian with Christian Kaumier, to build St. John's German Lutheran church, corner of Church and Locust streets. August 7, 1862, he enlisted in

Page  407 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 407 Company F, 4th Michigan Cavalry. During his service Mr. Beck was made Commissary Sergeant of his company, and although he was not detailed in the squad which captured, he was a witness of the triumphal return to Macon, Ga., of the party with its celebrated and notorious captive, Jeff Davis, on the morning of May 10th, 1865. Mr. Beck served three years, and his first experience in a real battle was at Stone River, Tennessee. He was also at Chickamauga, and went with Sherman to Atlanta. Mr. Beck was discharged from the army in July, 1865, and returned to Adrian. He at once went to work again for Mr. Kaumier, and remained with him until 1873, Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Beck. when the firm of Beck & Vogt was organized. This firm is still doing business, and is the oldest firm of builders in Southern Michigan. They built the German Catholic church, the city hall, the Wheeler block, the three Dr. Reynolds stores, Odd Fellows' hall, seven buildings at the State Industrial Home, the elegant farm home of Hon. Geo. B. Horton, at Fruit Ridge, besides many fine dwellings and business buildings in Adrian. October 31, 1866, Leonard Beck married Miss Augusta Knab, daughter of Charles Knab, of LaSalle, Monroe County, Mich., and they are the parents of seven children, as follows: Amelia W., born August 10, 1867, married Charles Egan, has one child and resides in Adrian; Louisa J. R., born July 13, 1870, married Frank Stage, has four children and resides in Zanesville, Ohio; Frederick C., born September 6, 1873, resides in Adrian; William A., born August 6, 1875, resides in Adrian; Ida M., born May 3, 1879; Augusta L., born November 15, 1881; Emma M., born October 13, 1884. Mrs. Augusta

Page  408 408 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL (Knab) Beck was born in LaSalle, Mich., October 3, 1844, and died in Adrian, February 19, 1890. October 20, 1892, Leonard Beck married Miss Louisa Stibor, daughter of Frederick and Resena Stibor, of LaSalle, Mich., and they have one son, Norman F. L., born July 18, 1894. Mrs. Louisa (Stibor) Beck was born in LaSalle, Monroe County, Mich., December 5, 1859. Her parents, natives of Bavaria, Germany, were farmers, and settled in LaSalle, Monroe County, in 1847. DARWIN H. WARREN was born in Dover township, Lenawee County, Mich., May 21, 1839. His father, Isaac Warren, was born in Farmington, Ontario County, N. Y., September 11, 1812, and came to Michigan with his parents, Samuel and Lucinda Warren, who settled on Section 24, in Dover, this county, in May, 1834. Samuel was a native of New Jersey, and a descendant of Gen. Joseph Warren, of Revolutionary fame. His wife was Lucinda Dewey, a native of Massachusetts, of Scotch descent. Samuel and Lucinda Warren had a family of seven children, and when they settled in Dover, 400 acres of land was purchased. Mr. Warren died on this homestead in January, 1858. His wife died May 11, 1880. Isaac Warren was the oldest of his father's family, and was about twenty-two years old when he came to Michigan. March 7, 1838, he married Miss Delia A. Vail, of Madison, this county, and that year settled on Section 32, in Dover, where they lived the remainder of their lives. Mr. Warren died there February 11, 1883, and Mrs. Warren died March 6, 1887. Isaac Warren was of Quaker antecedents, but became a Methodist, and from 1843 to the end of his life, was a prominent member and active worker in that church. He was Sunday school superintendent and class leader for many years. He also served as Supervisor of his township, besides filling other township offices. Mrs. Delia A. Warren was also an active Christian worker, and for eight years she filled the important position of President of the South Dover Woman's Foreign Mission Society, and was a woman of rare qualities of character. She was the mother of five children, two of whom were soldiers in the great Rebellion: Darwin H., as above; Homer, a member of Company I, 18th Michigan Infantry, was taken prisoner March 24, 1863, at Danville, Ky. He was paroled and sent to Camp Chase, Ohio, where he died April 7, 1863; Harriet L., married Milo Bovee, of Dover; Isaac N., married Nancy Halstead, of Dover; Melvin, was a teacher in Seneca, and died there December 26, 1871. Darwin H. Warren, subject of this sketch, has always lived in Dover, and was educated in the district schools and at the Oak Grove Academy at Medina. He was brought up a farmer, taught school two terms, and August 11, 1862, enlisted in Company I., 18th Michigan Infantry, serving throughout the

Page  409 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 409 great Rebellion, being honorably discharged at Nashville, Tenn., July 26, 1865. He immediately returned home and purchased his present farm on Section 31, in Dover. He has greatly improved his farm, built a fine brick house, together with other necessary buildings, all of which are models of modern farm conveniences and comforts. We are pleased to be enabled to show a fine engraving of this comfortable and hospitable home, typical of Lenawee's intelligence and progress. For eighteen years Mr. Warren has been secretary of the 18th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Association, and August 26, 1903, was elected president for the ensuing two years. He has filled the offices of School Inspector, and Director and Drain Commissioner. He is a member of Rowley Post, No, 358, G. A. R., and has filled some of the most important chairs. In politics he is a Prohibitionist, is a member of the M. E. church, and has been superintendent of the Sunday school, and class leader, for many years, since the death of his father. September 5, 1865. Darwin H. Warren married Miss Ann M. Austin, daughter of Jonathan W. and Lydia (Moore) Austin, of Dover, this county, and theN have had three children, as follows: Eva E., married Levi J. Deline, of Do I- / ': *:: '.,. if0 >vfiVkt Residence of D. H. Warren, Dover.

Page  410 410 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL ver; Harriet E.; Delia L. Mrs. Ann M. Warren was born in Dover, this county, August 18, 1840. She taught school for five years previous to her marriage. Her father was a native of Salem, Mass., and her mother was born in Bradford, Vt. They were married in Bradford, and in 1830 came to Michigan and were among the very first to take up land in the present town of Fairfield, this county. They afterwards removed to Seneca, and then to Dover, where Mr. Austin died September 9, 1864, and his wife passed away July 30, 1871. HON. WILLIAM H. WIGGINS was born in the town of Floyd, Oneida Couny, N. Y., April 8, 1839. His parents were Annin and Sarah (Tennent) Wiggins, who afterwards removed to Wyoming County. where they lived for about fifty years. Annin Wiggins was born in New York city, October 9, 1805. Sarah (Tennent) Wiggins was born in Rhode Island, October 6, 1807. Annin Wiggins died at Lagrange, N. Y., January 13, 1892. His wife, Sarah A. Wiggins, died February 9, 1902. William H. Wiggins was one of a family of ten children, and only lived enough to earn wages. His schooling consisted of attending the district schools and one term at the Middlebury Academy. His first work was 1861 he came to Michigan, locating in Washtenaw County, and at once engaged in peddling patent medicines. After about six months of peddling, he again turned his attention to farming, and rented 320 acres of land near Manchester, and in four years he saved Hon. illiam H. iggins. enough to purchase a farm of sixty acres in Bridgewater township. Here he resided until 1873, when he sold out and came to Lenawee County, and purchased a farm of the late Judge Beaman, near the centre of Adrian township. Here he resided for a number of years and succeeded well in farming, and made a choice and at

Page  411 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. - 411 tractive home. In 1874 he was elected Township Clerk, and so satisfied his constituents that he served in that capacity for seventeen successive years, or until 1890, when he was elected County Treasurer. During his service as Township Clerk he also served as School Inspector and settled several important estates. In 1884 he.was elected a member of the Legislature on the Democratic ticket over the late John G. Mason. In 1890 he was elected County Treasurer over Thomas Temple, a popular Republican candidate, and was reelected treasurer in 1902 over Art. Retan. He resided in Adrian during his service as treasurer, and soon after sold his farm in Adrian and purchased the Cheselton Baker farm on Section 9, in Madison, where he resided until 1903. He then retired from active farming, and is now living a more leisurely life on a small homestead on Section 10, in Madison. Mr. Wiggins was for ten years treasurer of the Lenawee County Agricultural Society, and also treasurer of the Lenawee and Hillsdale Farmers' Picnic Society, and has twice served as president of the picnic association that meets annually on the shores of Devil's Lake. He is a member of Adrian Lodge, F. and A. M., and is a prominent Granger. January 3, 1865, William H. Wiggins married Miss Ellen M. Shipman, and three children were born to them: Mary O., born April 4, 1867, Agnes Irene, born August 12, 1868, and died September 27, 1869; William S., born August 14, 1870. Mrs. Ellen M. Wiggins was born in Warsaw, N. Y., October 29, 1841, and died November 9, 1870. August 16, 1871, Mr. Wiggins married Clarissa A. Russ, of Cambridge, this county, and two children were born of this marriage: Arminnie B., born July 4, 1875; Laverna May, born October 29, 1880. Mrs. Clarissa A. Wiggins was born February 19, 1845, and died December 29, 1885. September 21, 1887, Mr. Wiggins married Mrs. E. J. Stevenson, daughter of the late A. D. Hall, of Tecumseh, three children being born to this union: Bessie, born August 23, 1888, and died June 22, 1891; Milford Clare, born June 15, 1890; Harriet H., born September 18, 1894. Mrs. E. J. Wiggins died December 23, 1897. OREN E. GREEN was born in Medina, Lenawee County, Mich., November 14, 1835, being the second child born in the township. His father, Noah K. Green, was born in Windsor, Berkshire County, Mass., December 24, 1808, and was the son of Noah and Sarah (Davis) Green, natives of Windham County, Conn. Noah Green was born August 20, 1761, but went to Windsor, Mass., where he became a farmer and resided until his death, December 31, 1833. He was three times married, and was the father of fourteen children. He descended from Henry Green, who, with his wife,

Page  412 412 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL came from Greenwich, England, in 1629, and assisted in founding the Salem Colony in Massachusetts. Noah Green was a soldier in the continental army, and remained to the end of the Revolutionary struggle. He was a cousin of General Nathaniel Green, of Rhode Island, also of Revolutionary fame. After the war he became prominent in political affairs, and held many important offices. He was a man of honor and probity, and his large family became prominent members of society. Noah K. Green, father of our subject, was reared and educated in his native county, where he lived until June, 1835, when he came to Michigan. He settled in Medina, this county, purchasing 280 acres of land on Sections 25 and 36. He assisted in organizing the township of Medina in 1837, and in 1842 he was elected Supervisor, and served in that capacity for seven years. He was again elected in 1852, serving one year, and in 1859 he was elected and served two years. In 1849 he was elected to the Michigan Legislature, and was re-elected in 1861 and 1863. He died at his home in Medina, May 8, 1886. November 5, 1834, Noah K. Green married Miss Esther E. Baldwin, daughter of Ephraim and Tryphena Baldwin of Windsor, Mass., and they had four sons, as follows: Oren E., born as above; Noah T., born October 13, 1837; George D., born February 28, 1841; Henry, born November 7, 1849. Mrs. Esther E. Green was born in Windsor, Mass., August 14, 1807. Oren E. Green, subject of this sketch, was born and has always resided on the farm he now owns. He attended the first school opened in Medina township, Miss Amorette Belden being the teacher. Mr. Green is a prominent farmer of his township, is a thrifty and honorable business man, being a most worthy descendant of the Green family, and representative of the sturdy pioneers of Lenawee County. He is a member of the Congregational church of Morenci, is a Republican in politics and a farmer of excellent taste and discretion. April 29, 1859, Oren E. Green married Miss Lucy M. Rogers, daughter of James and Lucy (Cottrell) Rogers, of Hillsdale, Mich., and they have had five children, as follows: Alice F. and Agnes L., (twins), born November 7, 1862. Alice married Prof. E. A. Conditt, April 23, 1884, had one daughter. Louise, born December 28, 1889. Prof. Conditt died in Chicago, May 11, 1893. Agnes L. married W. F. Smith, July 28, 1887, and has four children, as follows: Stanley J., born November 20, 1888; Charles O., born April 7, 1890; Willard F., born March 10, 1892; Agnes L., born May 17, 1894, died, in St. Paul, December 20, 1897. George R. Green, born March 5, 1865, died March 27, 1876; Lura M., born November 22, 1880, married Dr. M. Sutton September 9, 1903; George W., born September 12, 1882. Mrs. O. E. Green is a native of Medina, where her parents settled in 1837. Her father and mother were natives of Massachusetts. Mr. Rogers died in 1846, and Mrs. Rogers died January 28, 1897.

Page  413 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 413 JAMES WILLIAM KIRK was born in Adrian, Mich., March 28, 1859. His father, James L. Kirk, was born in Walsoken, Norfolk, England, August 12, 1832, and came to the United States in 1852. He was the son of Gabriel and Mary Ann (Lowis) Kirk, who were natives respectively of Norfolk and Cambridgeshire, and were farmers. James L. Kirk came to America when he was about twenty years old, and first settled in Buffalo, N. Y. In the fall of 1854, he came to Adrian and found employment with Martin Holloway in carpenter and joiner work. He afterwards went to work for the late Daniel A. Loomis, and assisted in the construction of many of the first large brick buildings and fine residences in Adrian, among them the Underwood block, the central school building, etc. In 1855 he purchased a lot that was surrounded by a rail fence and wholly unimproved, and that:,:.19 fall put up a house 12x20. The lot is now situated on Spring street, and has been l - -a_ his home from that time. In l: the spring of 1887 he was elected Street Commissioner of Adrian on the Republican ticket and served one year. In the spring of 1894 he was appointed overseer of the city poor and served in that capacity for nine years. April 8, 1856, James L. Kirk married Miss Hannah Judge, daughter of Moses and Hannah Judge, of Wisbech, Cam- James W Kirk bridgeshire, England, a n d they have had three children, as follows: J. Will, born as above; Eva E., born June 24, 1860, married Oscar M. Baker August 4, 1890, and resides in Adrian. The first child died in infancy. Mrs. Hannah (Judge) Kirk was born in South Brink, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, England, September 22, 1831, and came to the United States with her sister, Rachel, in 1855, coming direct to Adrian, where her brother, Isaac Judge, lived, on Budlong street. Her parents never left England, and died at their home in Wisbech. J. Will Kirk, subject of this sketch, was educated in the public schools of his native city. When he was still quite a lad he expressed a desire to learn the jeweler's trade. In the fall of 1873 he entered the employ of Wm. F. King, and while learning the technical part of watchmaking and patiently mastering the mysteries of repairing and adjusting a

Page  414 414 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL delicate timepiece he also found time and opportunity to develop his taste for music and harmony. Mr. Kirk remained with Mr. King for about nine years, and April 1, 1882, embarked in business for himself, at No. 3 South Main street, where for nearly twenty-two years he successfully served the public. He removed to his present quarters August 10, 1903. While in Mr. King's employ he developed a taste and mastered music, becoming a member of the old Knights Templar band, the Light Guard band, and the Adrian City band, the latter under the leadership of Elwood Irish. This band went to New Orleans in 1884, as the brigade band to the Supreme Lodge of Knights of Pythias, and in competition with many other organizations, carried off the first prize, $150 in gold. Mr. Kirk was also for ten years identified with Hunt's orchestra of Adrian. He is a member of the Masonic Blue Lodge, Chapter, Knights Templar No. 4, Shriners, Knights of Pythias, Elks, Maccabees and National Union. He is a director in Waldby & Clay's State bank. He was elected Mayor of Adrian in 1897, and was re-elected the following year. He is a public-spirited man, and has done his full share in promoting the commercial, moral and social interests of Adrian. September 20, 1881, J. Will Kirk married Miss Mary Annie Page, daughter of James and Frances Page of Grand Rapids, and they have four children, as follows: James Ralph, born October 2, 1883; Hazel Frances, born October 14, 1887; Blanche Hannah, born October 9, 1889; Ruth, born March 15, 1894. Mrs. Mary Annie (Page) Kirk was born in DesMoines, Iowa, April 28, 1859. Her parents were natives of England, her father being born in Huntingtonshire, September 4, 1833, and died in Eaton Rapids, Mich. Her mother was born in Gloucestershire, March 18, 1833, and still resides in Eaton Rapids, Mich. JOHN W. BALDWIN was born in Oxford, Ontario, Canada, January 28, 1831, and came to Michigan in 1837. His father, John Baldwin, was born in Fredericksburg, N. Y., April 22, 1786. He was a farmer and about the year 1818 he removed to Canada and settled at Oxford, where he purchased a farm with a grist mill and saw mill upon it. He remained there until 1837, when he came to Michigan and settled in Madison, this county. He was twice married, first to Miss Lydia Torry of Cazenovia, N. Y., and they had seven children, John W. being the youngest. She died in Oxford, June 17, 1833. His second marriage occurred August 5, 1841, to Miss Abigail Shumway, of Madison, this county, and they had one child, now Mrs. Matilda Cheney, of Jasper. Mrs. Abigail Baldwin died in 1873. John Baldwin died August 7, 1858. John W. Bald

Page  415 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 415 win, subject of this sketch, was only six years old when he came to Michigan. He was raised a farmer, and was educated in the district schools of Madison. He remained with his father as long as he lived, working on the farm summers and teaching school winters. November 15, 1854, John W. Baldwin married Miss Ann Eliza Bradish, daughter of Nelson and Phoebe (Wilson) Bradish, and they had eight children, as follows: Nelson J., born August 26, 1855; William H., born February 7, 1857, married Miss Orlena J. Inglehart, August 28, 1886, has five children and resides on Section 15, in Madison; Riley M., born October 11, 1859, died in May, 1869; Florence E., born June 5, 1861, married William O. Maynard, November 15, 1883, has three children and resides in Adrian; Julia Amina, born May 26, 1864, married Daniel F. Schwab, December 10, 1889, has one child and resides in Herndon, Kansas; Nettie G., born July 31, 1868, married Jacob M. Smith, August 28, 1896, has one child and resides in Sherlock, Thurston County, Washington; Olive G., born July 5, 1876, married John A. Osborn, December 20, 1898, has one child and resides in Madison. One child died in infancy. Mrs. Ann Eliza Baldwin was born in Madison, this county, January 16, 1835. Her parents came to Michigan in 1828, two weeks after their marriage. They located in Madison, and it was three months after the bride arrived in the woods before she saw any white person except her husband. Their first child was the first to be born in the present township of Madison. Nelson B1radish was born in Wayne County, N. Y., in 1803, and died in Madison, May 9, 1875. His wife, Phoebe, who was born in Rockland County, N. Y., in 1803, died in Madison, April 11, 1879. October 25, 1887, Nelson J. Baldwin, who resides on Section 15, in Madison, married Miss Mary J. Wilmot, daughter of William and Celina Wilmot, of Holdridge, Neb., and they have five children, as follows: Lois J., born April 17, 1890; John W., Jr., born May 18, 1892; Ruth M., born December 9, 1893; Bessie E., born August 2, 1897; Laura G., born April 15, 1899. Mrs. Mary J. Wilmot Baldwin was born in Glamorganshire, England, December 6, 1868, and came to the United States with her parents in 1870, first settling in Illinois, but afterwards located in Nebraska. ANDREW VOGT was born in Amherst, Erie County, N. Y., September 28, 1848. His father, Michael Vogt, was born in Auchausen, Bavaria, Germany, in 1811. He learned the linen weaver's trade, and followed that business until he came to the United States and settled near Buffalo, N. Y., in 1847. He purchased a small farm in Amherst, Erie County, and resided there until the spring of

Page  416 416 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL 1866. At that time he came to Michigan, and settled in the city of Adrian, where he died September 14, 1893. Under the laws of Germany at that time a couple could not get married without the possession of a certain amount of money. Mr. Vogt and his intended wife had the requisite amount of money, but decided to expend it in another way, and paid their passage to America. Upon arriving at Buffalo, Michael Vogt and Miss Margaretha Colthouse were married in the spring of 1847. She was born in Auchausen, Bavaria, November 23, 1809, and died in Adrian, July 4, 1885. Andrew Vogt, the subject of this sketch, came to Adrian when he was about eighteen years old. He learned the carpenter's trade with Christian Kaumier, and has followed that business ever since. He remained with Mr. Kaumier for about seven years, when in the spring of 1873, the firm of Beck & Vogt was organized and has continued successfully ever since. During this time this firm has built many of the very best buildings in Adrian and Lenawee County. Several of the finest cottages at the State Industrial Home were also constructed by them. This is one of the oldest firms in Adrian, and is regarded as among the successful busiAndrew Vogt. ness enterprises of the city. He was six years Alderman of the Second ward. October 24, 1873, Andrew Vogt married Miss Louise Ruppert of Hudson, and they were the parents of seven children as follows: Henry G., born in Adrian May 7, 1875, married Miss Edna Weaver. They have one daughter and reside in Jackson, Mich.; Edna M., born in the same place, December 10, 1883; Alma M., born same place, January 3, 1887. Four children died in infancy. Mrs. Louise (Ruppert) Vogt was born in Hudson, Mich., October 17, 1850, and died in Adrian, September 18, 1887. February 17, 1892, Andrew Vogt married Miss Margaret Schatzberger, daughter of George P. and Margaret M. (Eich) Schatzberger, of Adrian. She was born in Adrian, November 4, 1857. Her parents were natives of Wirtemberg, Germany, but were married in Adrian about fifty years ago.

Page  417 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 417 HON. WILLARD STEARNS. Since 1867 the subject of this sketch has been a resident of the city of Adrian, coming to Lenawee County in 1851 from Cherry Valley, N. Y., where he was born October 3, 1838, the second son born to Willard and Lucinda Stearns. His father died July preceding, leaving the young wife to battle alone along life's journey, and to a loving mother's devoted care and training, was due his education and much of his success in life. In 1851 his mother married Henry Bowen, Sr., and at once came with him to his home in Franklin, where Mr. Stearns passed his boyhood days upon a farm, till he was eighteen, when he taught his first school in the Sebring district in Ogden. He had attended district school in the spring of 1858 entered the State Normal School, graduating in 1862. He entered the army in July, 1863, enlisting in Company H., 11th mustered in as First Lieutenant of the company, serving till the winter of 1864, when he resigned and shortly after his return was secured to teach the district school in the Payne district, two miles north of Rome Center. He graduated from the law department of the University in 1867, and at once formed a partnership Hn. illard Steas. with Gov. W. L. Greenly, which continued until the latter's death. He was elected in 1871 County Superintendent of Schools for Lenawee County, over Mr. Drake, of Medina, by 10 majority, in a vote of over 8,000, being the first Democrat elected in the county for 20 years. In 1872 he was the Democratic nominee for Superintendent of Public Instruction, and in 1876 was on the\ ticket as a candidate for Secretary of State. He was elected Justice in 1875, and has served ten or twelve years as an alderman in the council. He was postmaster of Adrian under Cleveland for five years, and in 1888 was the Democratic nominee for Congress, making the most vigorous personal campaign ever waged in the district, and while he received more votes than had ever before been cast for Congress by either party, he was defeated by Captain Allen. In 1898 he made the race for Circuit Judge, and the next spring was elected 27

Page  418 418 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Mayor of Adrian, and re-elected itf 1900, and defeated in the third nomination in 1901 by Dr. J. H. Reynolds by 83 votes. The nominal Republican majority in the city was during this time, about 300. Mr. Stearns took charge of the Press in 1878, and has since conducted one of the most vigorous Democratic papers in the State, and can daily be found at his office looking after the liveliest weekly in Michigan. He was married May 5, 1868, to Martha E. Porter, in Batavia, Mich., and to them were born four children, Harry P., Frances L. and Virginia, now of Adrian, and Jennie, wife of George B. Kimball, of Chicago. Mr. Stearns has been Master of Greenly Lodge, F. & A. M., Noble Grand of Adrian Lodge, No. 8, I. 0. 0. F., Commander of Woodbury Post, G. A. R., and Chancellor Commander of Maple City Lodge, 39, K. of P. At present he is a member of the Board of Education, having been chosen in July, 1903. CHARLES W. SUTTON was born in Medina, Lenawee County, Mich., Oqtober 25, 1861. He was educated in Medina, and resided there until about 1893, when he went to Mercer, Penn., and engaged in the dairy business. In 1898 he went to California, and now resides at Pasadena, where he owns a fruit ranch, and is engaged in other lines of business. September 10, 1896, he married Miss Mary E. Shannon, of Mercer, Pa., where she was Charles W. and Mary E. Sutton. born March 25, 1859.

Page  419 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 419 DAVID W. GRANDON was born at Graysville, Greene County, Pa., January 19, 1859. He was the oldest son of Isaac M. and Eliza M. Grandon. He attended district school until 14 years of age, when he was apprenticed to the printing trade in the Republican office at Waynesburg, the county seat of Greene County. Here was hard work, plenty of it, and small pay, $1.00 a week and board. Following the bent of printers in those days, after serving two or three years in the Republican office, he started out into the world to secure new experiences and new ideas concerning the business. He held various positions in numerous offices, working at Cameron, Philippi, Cairo, W. Va., and at McArthur and other points in Ohio. Then he returned to Greene County and taught school one winter just to keep up the family reputation, making the fifth generation who had taught in the district schools. T ainued... Later Mr. Grandon took entire charge of the mechanical deWeston, W. Va. He also worked on the Republican at the same place. He then went to Kentucky, where he was employed for some time at Lexington, Versailles and Williamston. Returning again to Weston, W. Va., in 1885, in company with the Hon. Andrew Edminston, he started the Weston World, and in a few months had made it the leading local paper of the David W Grandon. county. Considering the field too small, after conducting the paper for about two years, he sold the business and went to Charleston, W. Va., where he accepted the foremanship of the Charleston Daily Star, and in order to keep fairly busy started Grandon's Grapic, devoted to the interests of temperance in West Virginia. This was continued about two years. Then Mr. Grandon came to Michigan on the invitation of the Prohibitionists of Lenawee County, arriving at Adrian, May 30, 1888. Next day in company with Hon. G. P. Waring and M. P. Brown, the plant of the defunct Lance was purchased at Hillsdale. The first issue of the revived Lance was printed at Hillsdale and appeared June 9, 1888. The office was then moved to the third story of the Metcalf block in Adrian. Having but a small outfit of type, sufficient only to print four pages, five columns to the page, and no newspaper

Page  420 420 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL press, it was found impossible to secure the press work done in any Adrian printing office. The forms were taken to Tecumseh and printed in the Herald office in that town. This was continued about three months when a Prouty hand power press was installed and the paper printed at home. In 1890, the Center, which was the Prohibition party paper for the State of Michigan, was consolidated with the Lance and the name of the Michigan Messenger adopted for the new enterprise. Two editions were issued, one for the State with a circulation running from 5,000 to 7,000 each week, and the second devoted to the local interests of Adrian and Lenawee County. The local edition of the Michigan Messenger proved so popular with the home people that it soon became necessary to make it a semi-weekly, making it the first semi-weekly to be published in the county of Lenawee. The paper continued to grow and prosper and soon became a recognized factor in the newspaper field. Feeling that the field in Adrian was large enough for two daily papers, on December 3, 1892, M. W. Redfield, an old newspaper man, and Elmer E. Putnam put out the first issue of the Adrian Daily Telegram. The Messenger office had the contract for printing the paper, and it was issued in this way for several months. Early in 1893 the State edition of the Michigan Messenger was sold to Dr. Henry A. Reynolds, of Pontiac. The business was moved away and the name changed to Living Issues. The Daily Telegram had won many friends in Adrian and the management not being in a position to continue it, Mr. Grandon and B. J. Kingston, of Jackson, purchased the paper on June 5, 1893, and succeeded in bringing the little paper rapidly to the front, the partnership continuing until the spring of 1898, when Mr. Grandon became sole owner. The Semi-Weekly Michigan Messenger was issued during this period by Mr. Grandon, and was a winning paper with the county people. In August, 1898, a Thorne typesetting machine, the first one in Lenawee County, was installed in the office, the operator being Miss Fanny Smith, the justifier, 0. E. Cummer, and the distributor boy, Charles Ihrke. The combined output the first day was only 15,000 ems, but this team soon became proficient, and made a record of over 50,000 ems in one day. On November 4, 1899, The Semi-Weekly Michigan Messenger was changed into The Tri-Weekly Telegram and the business continued to grow until it became necessary to add a more modern typesetting machine and a Mergenthaler Linotype, a line-casting machine, with but one operator, was installed in September, 1902. This was the first linotype ever brought to Lenawee County, and proved as much superior to the Thorne typesettirng machine as that machine was to hand composition. On January 5, 1903, The TriWeekly Telegram was merged into The Adrian Daily Telegram, which has since been supplied to the people of the villages and rural routes in lieu of the weekly, semi-weekly and tri-weekly. The daily paper proved so gratifying to the patrons and the circulation increased so that the capacity of the cylinder press was passed and it

Page  421 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 421 became necessary to install a faster press. So on June 10, 1903, The Telegram was printed on a new Duplex Perfecting press, printing from a roll, and capable of printing both sides, cutting, pasting and folding as high as 6,000 perfect four, six or eight page papers per hour, as the occasion demanded. As The Telegram had been the first to install nearly all new features in the printing business in Lenawee County, it was fitting that it should be the first to establish an up-to-date press of this character. Mr. Grandon is a man of honor and strong principles, and has won many friends by his straightforward expressions of affairs as he sees them. Throughout his whole course he has held to his belief that temperance was the best thing for the people and has aided the cause in many ways. He has associated himself with numerous fraternal orders, being a member of Adrian Lodge, No. 19, F. & A. M., Maple City Lodge, No. 39, Knights of Pythias, Adrian Lodge, No. 429, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Adrian Tent, No. 145, K. 0. T. M M., Court Adrian, 1078, I. O. F., Adrian Lodge, No. 137, A. O. U. W., and Adrian Temple, No. 26, Rathbone Sisters. At Weston, W. Va., March 5, 1882, Mr. Grandon was united in marriage with Miss Elizabeth Dakan. Six children were born of this union, all of whom are living. The children are George Gordon, born at Weston, W. Va., July 12, 1883; Eliza Delphia, at Weston, W. Va., December 1, 1885; Preston Finch, at Charleston, W. Va., February 6, 1888; Jennie Lind, at Adrian, January 4, 1890; Lizzie May, at Adrian, October 21, 1891, and Dessa Marguerite, at Adrian, June 21, 1894. WILLIAM PAYNE was born in Adrian, Mich., June 2, 1848. His father, George F. Payne, was born in Knook, County of Wiltshire, England, November 3, 1821. He was the son of Robert K. Payne, who was born at Crockerton, in the Parish of Long Bridge, Deverill, England, in 1796. All of the family back to 1680 lie buried in Long Bridge church yard. R. K. Payne emigrated with his family to America in 1831. They settled in Little York (now Toronto), where his wife Mrs. Ann Payne, mother of George F. Payne, died September 4, 1834. He married Mrs. Sarah Crown and removed' to Toledo in 1836. In 1838 he removed to Chatham, County of Kent, Ontario. He was the first governor of Kent County Jail, and held that office for seventeen years, when he retired to private life. He was also a member of the school board of the town of Chatham for twenty-five years. The Payne School of Chatham is named after him. George F. Payne, when his father left Toronto, was learning the book-binding and blank book business. He lived in that place until 1847, when he removed to Detroit and formed a co-partnership with A. Richmond. In 1848 he sold his interest to Mr. Richmond

Page  422 422 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL and removed to Adrian. In 1848 he established the Adrian Blank Book manufactory and book-bindery. October 25, 1842, he married Caroline Bartley, daughter of William and Mary Ann Bartley, by whom he had eight children. He died in Adrian, April 14, 1887. Mrs. Caroline (Bartley) Payne, who still resides in Adrian, (1904), was born in Newport, Isle of Wight, October 25, 1826. Her father, William Bartley, was born in Motcomb, County of Dorset, England, July 6, 1794. Her mother, Mary Ann Bartley, was born in Newport, Isle of Wight, February 4, 1799, and died at her son's, in Butler, Mo., January 9, 1873. William Payne, subject of this sketch, was reared and educated in Adrian, and after learning the trade of book-binder and blank book maker with his father, he went to Cleveland, Ohio, where he resided, following his trade for nearly nineteen years. In 1882 he sold out his business in Cleveland, and soon after entered the U. S. postal service as postal clerk between Chicago and Syracuse, N. Y., but when President Cleveland came in, being a busy Republican worker, he was asked to step down and out. He then went to Youngstown, Ohio, and took charge of the bookbinding department of the Youngstown publishing company. He remained there until 1887, when, upon his resignation, he was presented with numerous tokens of regard. William Payne. Mr. Payne returned to his old home in Adrian at the death of his father in 1887, and purchased the book bindery and business so long and successfully operated by him, and has proved himself a competent business man and good citizen. During his residence in Cleveland Mr. Payne became a member of the gallant and popular military company so long and favorably known as the Cleveland Greys. At the inauguration of President Garfield this company went to Washington as his body guard, Mr. Payne being present. He was also one of the four men detailed as the special guard over the remains during the funeral at Cleveland. Mr. Payne is an active, energetic citizen, and is interested in the growth and progress of his native city. He has been elected four successive times a member of the common council of

Page  423 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 423 Adrian. For two years he has served as chairman of the claims and finance committee, and also championed the proposition to bond the city for $50,000 for sewers and paving. The measure was carried at a special election. Mr. Payne is also the originator and promoter of the resolution passed by the Adrian city common council to curb and boulevard the streets of the city. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and several societies, among which are the following: Adrian Commandery, Knights Templar; Adrian Chapter, R. A. M.; Adrian Lodge, F. & A. M.; Adrian Chapter, Order of the Eastern Star; Adrian Tent, Knights of Maccabees, of which he is a past commander, and upon retiring from the office he was presented with a past commander's jewel by the Tent. He is also a member of the Knights and Ladies of Security. February 24, 1868, William Payne married Miss Emily Bowen Oles, of Morenci, Mich., and three chilren were born to them, as follows: Cora Adelaide, born at Cleveland, Ohio, August 12, 1872, married Carl J. Parish, of Adrian, May 16, 1899, and resides in Toledo; Willie Colgate, born same place, September 16, 1874, and died July 6, 1875; Minnie Emily, born same place, July 8, 1877, married Ozro Lee Curtis, September 22, 1897, has one child, Kenneth J., born November 8, 1898. Mr Curtis was killed by lightning at his home in Rome, this county, July 13, 1899. Mrs. Curtis is a teacher in the Adrian public schools. Mrs. Emily B. (Oles) Payne was born in Toledo, Ohio, January 18, 1847, and died at Cleveland, Ohio, February, 6, 1879. August 15, 1881, William Payne married Miss Ella I. Shorten, of Cleveland, Ohio, and they became the parents of three sons, all of whom died in infancy. Mrs. Ella I. Payne was born at Saratoga, N. Y., January 15, 1855. JAMES H. MAY was born in York, Sandusky County, Ohio, April 19, 1827. His father, Rev. Isaac May, was born in Strafford, Vermont, in October, 1796, and when a boy moved with his parents to Livingston County, N. Y., where a farm was purchased, and a hotel was kept for many years. In 1824 Isaac May removed to Sandusky County, Ohio, and soon after purchased a farm. He became converted and for many years preached for the new settlers, first in the Christian denomination, then becoming a Methodist, but finally became a Free Will Baptist, and until the end of his life affiliated with that church. He took up 80 acres of government land in Townsend township, Sandusky County, which he improved and lived upon for fifty years. He added 80 acres to his first purchase, which he improved and never encumbered. At his death December 5, 1874, it was found the deed had never been recorded in the county. In 1815 he married Miss Rachel McMillan, and five children were born to

Page  424 424 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL to them, James H. being the fourth. In 1829 Rachel May died, and the following year he married Nancy McMillan, a sister of Rachel, and they had seven children. James H. May, subject of this sketch, lived with his father until he was about nineteen years old, when he purchased his time and went for himself. He then went to the Geauga Seminary for two years, being a student at the same time with James A. Garfield and his wife. During the next three years Mr. May taught school in Sandusky County. In 1848 his health failed him, caused by over study, and he went West in hope of recovering and returning to school. He went to Chicago, and from thence to Green Bay and into the Wisconsin lumber woods. He made several trips down the Mississippi river as far as St. Louis with lumber rafts, and was quite successful financially. He was taken ill with fever and returned home, where, after some six months, he recovered, and purchased a small farm in Sandusky County, where he resided until 1861. That spring he came to Michigan and purchased a farm on Section 3 in Fairfield, this county. When the first call for troops came in 1861, Mr. May assisted in raising a company of three months' men, but did not succeed in getting them accepted by the Governor, as the quota was filled before his company was reported. Afterwards most of the men went into the army under the first three years call. Since 1861 Mr. May has resided on his farm in Fairfield. He was active in filling Fairfield's quota of soldiers in the great Residence of James H. May, Fairfield.

Page  425 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 425 Rebellion, and has been active in all public matters ever since. He was for ten years the Fairfield Director of the Lenawee County Agricultural Society, and has been a strong church adherent. For many years he was superintendent of the Free Will Baptist Sunday school. July 21, 1853, James H. May married Miss Olive W. George, daughter of Joseph and Sarah George, of Townsend, Sandusky County, Ohio, and they became the parents of three children, as follows: Lois A., born September 10, 1855, married James Crego, March 4, 1888; Cora E., born June 29, 1868, died in infancy; William F., born September 23, 1858, married Miss Minnie White, October 18, 1876, and they had one son, Carlton W., born December 7, 1878, resides in Hudson. Mrs. Olive W. (George) May was born in Townsend, Ohio, May 4, 1834, and died April 1, 1893. Her father, Joseph George, was a native of Vermont, born in 1795, was a soldier in the war of 1812, and was the son of a revolutionary soldier. Her mother was Sarah McMillan, a native of New Hampshire. THE LESH & YOUNG COMPANY, engaged in the manufacture of hardwood lumber, located in Adrian in January, 1899. The members of this company have been engaged in this line of business for about twenty years, and are familiar with all the markets and the probable demand for their product throughout the country. Joseph H. Lesh, president of the company, is a in the lumber business at Goshen, Ind., for a quarter of a century, and was one of the largest manufacturers of hardwood lumber in the United States, having mills throughout Indiana and Illinois, and handled the product of other mills. The mill at Adrian is up-to-date in all its details, being supplied with band saws and all the best modern machinery. It is under the immediate charge of Mr. J. F. Young, treasurer and general manager, who resides in Adrian and is Joseph H. Lesh, President. fully identified with the city's interests and business prosperity. For many years Mr. Young was identified with John H. Lesh, as timber buyer in Indiana, and afterwards operated a band mill at Milford, Ind., until 1899 when he removed to Adrian. Mr. H. G. Young is

Page  426 426 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL the secretary of the Lesh & Young Company, and also resides in Adrian, devoting all his time to the lumber business. He is a son of the general manager, and divides his time in looking after other mills and in traveling in the company's interest. The Adrian mill J. F. Young, Treasurer and Manager. H. G. Young, Secretary. is operated to its full capacity, the logs being gcathered from the surrounding country, within a radius of fifteen miles. The product of the mill is about 3,000,000 feet per year, and a ready market is found both East and West. HON. LEWIS C. BAKER was born in the township of Adrian, Lenawee County, Mich., February 18, 1844, and has always lived on the farm he now owns. His father, Norton Baker, was born in Manchester, Ontario County, N. Y., December 9, 1802. He was the son of Joseph M. Baker, who was born in Massachusetts, February 19, 1780, but soon after his parents moved to Rutland, Vt. He lived in Rutland until he was about nineteen years old, when he. went to Ontario County, N. Y., and soon after purchased a new farm in what was then the town of Farmingtotl. He lived there until the spring of 1833, when he emigrated to Michigan and finally purchased land from the government in the town of Rome, this county, where he settled. He cleared the farm and lived upon it until the last few years of his life, and died in Rome, May 27, 1872. About the year 1800, he married Miss Sally Cruthers, of Phelps, Ontario County, N.

Page  427 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 427 Y., by whom he had eleven children, six sons and five daughters, Norton being the oldest. Mrs. Sally Baker was born in Half Moon, New York, in 1778, and died in Rome, this county, September 15, 1851. Norton Baker never had much school advantages, his father being a pioneer in Ontario County, N. Y., where schools were very "few and far between" in those days. He spent most of his time on his father's farm and in a distillery, until he was about twenty-eight years old. He came to Michigan in the spring of 1833, with his father, and took up the w 5' of the s.w. 2, and e. part of the s. w. frac'l J/4 of section 7, in Adrian (then Logan). September 12, 1830, he married Miss Almeda Howland, daughter of Jonathan and Mary Howland, of Manchester, Ontario County, N. Y., by whom he has had ten children, as follows: Sarah M., born in Manchester, N. Y., July 10, 1831, now the wife of Dr. Willard Perkins, of Franklin, this county; Isaac H., born in Manchester, N. Y., September 20, 1833, died in Adrian, April 3, Hon. Lewis C. Baker. Mrs. Mary Jane Baker.

Page  428 428 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL 1852; Ellen L., born in Adrian, October 2, 1835, now the wife of George Gambee, of Adrian; Lois A., born in Adrian, October 24, 1837, died March 12, 1852; Mary E., born in Adrian, October 23, 1839, now the wife of George Hunt, of Rome, this county; Roxanna I., born in Adrian, June, 8, 1841, died April 2, 1852; Lewis C., born in Adrian, February 18, 1844, a farmer, and owns the home farm; Frank I., born in Adrian, October 29, 1845, died June 2, 1862; Almeda A., born in Adrian, January 3, 1848, died February 16, 1852; Ava E., born in Adrian, October 25, 1854. Norton Baker died March 15, 1880. Mrs. Almeda Baker was born December 6, 1812, and came to Michigan with her husband in 1833. Her father was born in Adams, Massachusetts, in 1789, and was a pioneer of Ontario County, New York. He came to Michigan in 1846, and purchased a farm in Adrian township, where he died in 1871. Her mother was born in Gloucester, Rhode Island, in 1786, and died in Adrian, in September, 1846. Mrs. Baker died February 26, 1897, in Adrian. Lewis C. Baker, subject of this sketch, was born in the house where he now resides, on Section 7, in Adrian township. He was educated in the district schools and about two school years in Adrian College. He was brought up a farmer and has always followed it. He commenced for himself when about twenty years old, and carried on his father's farm for several years, or until the death of his father, March 15, 1880. He then rented the place of his mother, and paid his four sisters for their interest in the homestead, which consisted of 160 acres on Section 7, in Adrian. At the time of his mother's death, February 26, 1897, he had paid all claims and came into possession. His farm now consists of 340 acres, with two sets of buildings. Many of the best buildings he has erected during the past few years. Mr. Baker was elected Justice of the Peace in 1878, Supervisor of the township in 1880, and served seven successive years. In 1890 he was elected to the House of Representatives in the Michigan Legislature. In 1893 he was elected a director in the Farmers' Mutual Insurance Company of Lenawee County, serving nine years, and was elected president in October, 1892, which office holds two years. January 9, 1868, Lewis C. Baker married Miss Mary Jane Thomas, daughter of Henry and Louisa Thomas, of Adrian, and three children have been born to them, as follows: Kate I., born February 7, 1874, a teacher in Chicago public schools; Norton, born April 23, 1877, married Miss Mattie Starin, November 12, 1896, has one child, Ruth, born June 26, 1898, and resides on the farm; Maude Ione, born May 18, 1879, married Edward Kohler, August 22, 1901, has one child, Lewis E., born April 21, 1903. Mrs. Mary Jane (Thomas) Baker was born in Adrian township, February 20, 1850. Her parents were natives of Orleans County, N. Y., and came to Michigan when children. Her father was born March 24, 1825, came to Michigan when he was eight years old. Her mother was born March 30, 1827. and died September 28, 1895.

Page  429 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 429 MAJOR JAMES M. HOLLOWAY was born in Adrian, Mich., March 20, 1867. His father, Martin Holloway, a native of England, was born near Bristol, August 25, 1810. He learned the carpenter's trade in his native place, and followed that business until 1840, when he came to the United States and settled in Adrian. He resided there the balance his life, and was an active, honorable and enterprising citizen. He died August 21, 1895. He was three times married, and was the fatherd of six children. His first marriages were in England, but the last occurred in Tecumseh, this county, in 1857, when he married Margaret Stevens, who became the mother of two sons, Charles M. and James M. Mrs. Margaret (Stevens) Holloway was a native of the State of New York, was born in 1826, and came to Michigan with her parents, Charles D. and Theodocia Stevens, in 1828. They settled in the present township of Franklin, this county. She died in Maajor James M. Holloway. Adrian, June 9, 1885. Major James M. Holloway, subject of this sketch, was educated in the public schools and Brown's Business College of Adrian. At the age of about seventeen years he went to learn the iron moulders trade at the Adrian Brick and Tile Machine Company's foundry. He remained with this company until 1895, when he was elected collector of taxes for the city of Adrian, and served as collector and treasurer for three years, refusing to continue in the office longer. In the spring of 1898 he was in the employ of the Page Fence Company, when the call for troops for the Spanish-American War came out. He had been captain of of the Adrian Light Guard, known as Company B., First Michigan Infantry, for some years. The company at once responded to the call for troops. On the 26th day of April it left Adrian and was mustered in at Island Lake, as Company B, 31st Michigan Infantry. The command was immediately sent forward to Chickamauga Park,

Page  430 430 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Ga. After remaining there four or five months they were ordered to Knoxville, remaining about three months. They were then ordered to Savannah, Ga., where the regiment sailed for Cuba about January 1, 1899. The regiment remained in Cuba until the end of the war, and returned home in May, 1899, after a service of some thirteen months. During his career in Cuba Captain Holloway was promoted to Major of the 31st Michigan Infantry. Soon after his return from Cuba Major Holloway was engaged as superintendent of construction of the Coldwater Cement Works. In July he received a dispatch from the Adjutant General of Michigan that he had been recommended as Captain in the 30th U. S. Infantry, for foreign service, which was declined "with thanks." In the fall of 1900 he became a salesman for the Page Fence Company, where he remained until January 1, 1902, when he engaged with the American Steel and Wire Company, of Chicago, with headquarters in Chicago. July 24, 1889, James M. Holloway married Miss Jennie Garrity, daughter of Patrick Garrity, of Ann Arbor, and they have three children, as follows: May, born April 24, 1890; Clarabelle, born March 14, 1892; Genevieve, born January 10, 1895. Mrs. Jennie Holloway was born July 24, 1865. Her mother died in her infancy and she has very little knowledge of her ancestry. CAPTAIN HENRY N. KING was born in Bridgewater, Washtenaw County, Mich., March 26, 1839. His father, Rufus S. King, was a native of the State of New York, and was born in the town of Augusta, Rockland County, where he was married to Miss Mary E. Nichols, daughter of Solomon Nichols, in 1830. Shortly after his marriage he came to Michigan and located in Adrian township, this county. After a short residence here they returned to their old home in New York, but subsequently returned and located on a farm in Bridgewater, Washtenaw County. They became the parents of ten children, five sons and five daughters, our subject being the second. Here the family resided and the parents died. Henry N. King, subject of this sketch, was educated in his native township, in a log school house, with common slabs for seats. When he was sixteen years old he left home and went to work on the construction of the Jackson branch of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad. In 1855 he went to Clinton, this county, where he learned the trade of millwright, including that of pattern-making and carpenter and joiner work. After completing his apprenticeship, he engaged in business on his own account in Washtenaw County. In 1859 he went to Adrian, where he followed his trade until 1861. June 15, 1861, he enlisted as a volunteer soldier and assisted in raising a company for the Union Army. He was assigned to Company F, 47th Ohio Infantry, and was commissioned First Lieutenant, first rendezvouing at Camp Clay, and then at Camp Dennison, Ohio, being ordered to

Page  431 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 431 the field in West Virginia, August 28, 1861, under general Rosecrans. The war record of the 47th 0. V. V. I. is a most honorable one, and Captain King participated in nearly every action in which the regiment was engaged during its nearly four years' service. He was badly wounded at Resaca, Ga., on May 14, 1864. Following is a fairly correct list of the battles, skirmishes and incidents the 47th engaged in from 1861 to 1865: Battle of Carnifex Ferry, W. Va., Sept. 10, 1861. Skirmish at Sewall Mountain, W. Va. Skirmish at Miller's Ferry, W. Va. Battle of Louisburg, W. Va., May 12, 1862. Skirmish at Cotton Mountain, Sept. 11, 1862. Skirmish at Camp Piatt, W. Va., Sept. 12, 1862. Battle of Charleston, W. Va., Sept. 13, 1862. Skirmish at Steel's Bayou, Miss., March 24, 1863. Siege of Vicksburg, May 18, 1863, to July 4, 1863. Siege of Vicksburg, assault of May 19, 1863. Siege of Vicksburg, assault of May 22, 1863. Siege of Jackson, Miss., July 9-16, 1863. Battle of Mission Ridge, Tenn., Nov. 24-25, 1863. Skirmish at Snake Creek Gap, Ga., May 10, 1864. Battle of Resaca, Ga., May 13-16, 1864. Assault of Resaca, Ga., May 15, 1864. Skirmish of Pumpkin Vine Creek, May 26, 1864. Battle of Dallas, Ga., May 27-29, 1864. Skirmish at New Hope Church, Ga., June 1-3, 1864. Skirmish at Big Shanty, Ga., June 7-8, 1864. Battle of Kennesaw Mountain, Ga., June 9-26, 1864. Assault of Kennesaw Mountain, Ga., June 27, 1864. Battle of Nickajack Creek, July 3-4, 1864. Skirmishing at Chattahoochee River, July 5-10, 1864. Skirmish at Decatur, Ga., July 18-21, 1864. Battle of Atlanta-Gen. Hood's first sortie, July 22, 1864. Battle of Atlanta-(Ezra Chapel) Gen. Hood's second sortie, July 28, 1864. Siege of Atlanta, July 29 to August 30, 1864. *Battle of Jonesboro, Ga., August 31 to Sept. 2, 1864. *September 1st, 1864, Capt. King had command of the regiment, and continued in command until after the battle of Jonesboro. After a service of three years and nine months in the army, he returned to Adrian, November 8, 1864, and at once engaged in contracting and building, which he followed until 1868, when he devoted his entire time to stair-building and wood carving, being very successful in that line of work, and finding ready employment in Michigan, Ohio, and as far west as Omaha, Nebraska, where he executed the carved work in the court house. He followed this work until 1888, when he accepted the proffered position of superintendent of construction by the American Water Works Company.

Page  432 432 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL He went to Omaha December 24, 1888, and took charge of the construction of the water works system there under contract, and built the pumping station at Florence, six miles north of the city. He also erected nearly four thousand feet of river work on the Old Muddy, which stands today as a monument to his skill in engineering. This entire plant cost $4,000,000. He superintended the construction of the Alton, Ill., water works, and the Denver, Colorado, works, which cost $2,000,000. Captain King made the plans for the Fort Worth, Texas, water works, and was consulting engineer during the construction, and the American Water Works Company received $5,000 for his services. Mr. King rerained with this company for four years, or until 1891, when, owing to the financial depression, the business was suspended and Mr. King returned to Adrian. Soon after his return home he again engaged in architecture, contracting and building. He erected the first steel building put up in Adrian, for the Lamb Fence Company. February 26, 1899, he accepted the position of superintendent and mechanical engineer of the Bond Steel Post Company, of Adrian, which position he still occupies. He is the inventor and patentee of the Rural Mail Box that is manufactured Capt. Henry N. King. by the company, and which has met with such a large sale throughout the United States. He is also the originator and patentee of the street signs and United States city letter box and letter box fastener, for attaching the letter box to the Bond post. April 4, 1864, while at home on a veteran furlough, Captain H. N. King married Miss Frances E. Bolles, daughter of Frederick E. and Sarah A. Bolles, of Chelsea, Washtenaw County, Mich., and they have had four children, as follows: Frederick E., born September 20, 1868, died February 13, 1896; Mary Adelaide, born March 27, 1871, died August 5, 1871; Harry R., born May 2, 1872, and resides in Chicago Florence B., born February 8, 1880, at home. Mrs. Frances E. (Bolles) King was born in Chelsea, Mich., August 27, 1839. Her parents were pioneers of Washtenaw County, settling in the town of Sylvan in 1837.

Page  433 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 433 DEACON OLIVER C. HOTCHKISS was among the first settlers of the Bean Creek Valley, settling in Medina with his parents in 1834. We are pleased to be able to show good portraits of Mrs. Mary Hotchkiss. Oliver C. Hotchkiss. Mr. Hotchkiss and his worthy wife. For a full family history see Whitney & Bonner's History and Biographical Record of Lenawee County, Vol. 2, page 470. WELLINGTON C. SMITH was born in Fairfield, Lenawee County, Mich., January 1, 1845. His father, Nelson Smith, was born in Macedon, Wayne County, N. Y., March 21,1815. His father, Ezekiel Smith, a native of Acton, Mass., was born in 1779, being the son of Ezekiel Smith, who was born in 1756, and was an active patriot all through the Revolutionary period of the nation's struggle for liberty. October 5, 1841, Nelson Smith married Mrs. Delia (Morris) Dunn, widow of Jefferson Dunn, and they had three children, as follows: Mary E., born August 28, 1842, married Samuel D. McKenzie, of Adrian; Wellington C.; Fanny, born October 23, 1846, died October 3, 1865. [For full particulars of Mrs. Delia (Morris) Smith, who died July 26, 1895, at the home of her daughter, in Adrian, at the age of 91 years, see Whitney & Bonner's History and Biographical Record of Lenawee County, Vol. 2, pages 28

Page  434 434 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL 170-1-2, and Vol. 1, pages 472-3.] Wellington C. Smith has always resided in Fairfield township and now lives in the village of Weston. He was brought up a farmer, and still owns the farm he was born on in Section 6, now known as Fruit Ridge. His father being interested in horticulture and engaged to some extent in the nursery business, he early developed a taste for fruit and flower development. For many years he gave his attention largely to farmMr. and Mrs. Wellington Smith, Weston. ing, but in 1890 he moved to Weston, having in 1883 erected a cold storage building there for the purpose of handling and shipping fruit. In good fruit years he has shipped as many as 18,000 barrels. In years when the crop was short at home he has shipped in, either from New York or Missouri, as many as 10,000 barrels, to supply the home market. He has an orchard in Weston containing 800 apple trees, and 2,000 peach trees of the choicest varieties. In 1888 he erected at Weston a first-class fruit evaporator, which has been successfully carried on ever since. In 1891 he became interested in the manufacture of the Weston Windmill, which has proved eminently satisfactory to all patrons, and is still engaged in its manufacture. January 1, 1874, Wellington C. Smith married Miss Elizabeth A. Poucher, daughter of Abram and Laura A. (McKenzie) Poucher, and they have five children, as follows: Fanny E., born May 26, 1877, married, August 27, 1894, William Younglove, and resides in Adrian, but are both engaged as teachers in the Industrial School at Lansing; Mary E., born February 27, 1879, married, June 29, 1898, Rev. Walter E. Burnett, of Detroit Conference M. E. church, and has one son; Laura D., born January 5, 1881, at home; Nelson,

Page  435 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 435 born February 10, 1891, at home; Morris A., born April 19, 1893, at home. Mrs. Elizabeth A. (Poucher) Smith was born in Seneca, Lenawee County, Mich., November 25, 1857. Her father was a native of Claverock, Columbia County, N. Y., and was the son of Andrew and Elizabeth (Miller) Poucher. They came to Michigan in 1846 and settled in Adrian. [See Anthony Poucher's record in Vol. 2, Whitney & Bonner's History and Biographical Record of Lenawee County.] GEORGE WASHINGTON LARWILL, son of Jeremiah and Susanna Langdon Larwill, was born January 2, 1840, at Brixham-onTor-Bay, on the coast of Devonshire, England, one of the most beautiful and historic spots on the shores of the United Kingdom. On the jetty of the port today stands a massive lime-stone shaft bearing the words: "On or near this spot William, Prince of Orange, first put foot on English soil." The brief but bloody warfare that followed the debut of the Dutch adventurer is embalmed in history. The mother came of good old South of England ancestry. The paternal predecessors were among the Huguenot refugees who flocked to England with the remnant of their fortunes, following the attempted massacres. The name will be recognized as an anglicized corruption of a prominent French Patronymic. Larwill Pere was a great admirer of American institutions, as the selection of our subject's name will indicate. In 1850, after several previous visits, he emigrated with his family and settled in Brooklyn, N. Y. There were five children: John Clark, now of Cleveland; Susie M. Southgate, San Francisco; George W., Adrian; Alfred Langdon, Brooklyn, N. Y., and Clara A., now of Cleveland. George received such limited educational advantages as could be expected at his age, after a brief period spent in the common schools of two countries. At the age of 12 he absented himself one day without leave and took a position as boy in the press room of the Brooklyn Times. Here he remained eleven years, gradually advancing to the position of city editor. During this interval he mastered the art of short-hand, and by diligent use of the "midnight oil" remedied some of the deficiencies of his earlier education. From '61 to '63, he was associated with William Wood, a brilliant young English journalist, in the publication of the Rome, N. Y., Sentinel, a paper which had been founded by Mr. Ralph Waldby. Here he formed a friendship with the late T. S. Applegate, which continued 30 years without interruption. In the fall of '63 the young men mentioned came to Adrian and associated themselves with the pioneer printer and publisher, R. W. Ingalls, in the issuance of the daily and weekly Watchtower, under the firm name of Larwill, Applegate & Co. A year later he sold out to his associates, to accept a responsible situation in St. Louis.

Page  436 436 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL His profound and practical knowledge of the printing art and all the details of journalism made him too desirable a man to spare and he was induced to remain. This he has done through various rotations of management, and as he has jocularly expressed it, after continuous service of forty years, he "expects to die in the harness." While making no sort of personal pretentions, Mr. Larwill is a man of more than average versatility. Besides being an expert in the printing art, he is a ready and graceful writer, a reliable reporter, a clever mechanician, a poet, composer and musician. Although possessing no ambition for personal prominence, he has filled one or two local offices, and for a quarter of a century been an active figure in public affairs. In 1860, November 14, he was married in Brooklyn, N. Y., to Annie I. Pickard, a native of Bedworth, Warwickshire, England. Her father was an extensive ribbon manufacturer, the first to utilize the Jacquard loom in Great Britain, in the face of bitter social and trade opposition. He conceived the idea of bringing that important industry to America. In 1850, with his family, a fine complement of machinery and a little company of his most expert workers, he embarked for New York, on the sailing ship Roscius. The voyage was one of the most tragic in trans-Atlantic history. Beset by storms, the vessel made very little headway. Ship fever broke out in the over-crowded craft, and for days in succession each setting sun saw the burial of the dead at sea. Mr. and Mrs. Pickard and other members of the little industrial colony succumbed. Residence of George W. Larwill, No. 11 Front Street, Adrian.

Page  437 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 437 The captain, first and second mates, and ship's doctor followed their unfortunate charges. Water and provisions became short, and finally, after three months' struggle for preservation in the face of the most hopeless odds, the ill-starred ship was taken into New York by the third mate, a mere boy, aided by a passenger with some knowledge of navigation, and the survivors of the ship's crew. Cannon were fired and flags displayed when the weather-beaten barque sailed up New York bay. And this divergence marked the first practical attempt at ribbon-making in America. Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Larwill: Minnie S., at Rome, N. Y., September 24, 1861; Harry L., at the same place, September 28, 1863; Isabel, at Adrian, February 13, 1868. Minnie became the wife of Maurice S. Knapp, September 17, 1890, and passed away one year later. Harry L. was elected Judge of Probate for the County of Lenawee, and assumed the responsibilities of his office January 1, 1901. On the third day of September, 1889, he was united in marriage to Miss Josephine Hardy. Two sons have come to complement the family circle, Langdon H. and George R. Isabel performs the duties incident to the office of Probate Register. All three were graduates of Adrian High School. ALFRED EDWARDS was born in the city of Adrian, October 19, 1843. His father, Daniel S. Edwards, was born in Glenville, Schenectady County, N. Y., February 8, 1807, being the son of Henry, born April 24, 1768, and Sally (Baker) Edwards, born August 22, 1769, at East Hampton, Long Island, N. Y. The ancestors of the Edwards family were Welch. The ancestors of Sarah (Baker) Edwards came from England and settled on Long Island, New York. Daniel S. Edwards came to Michigan in 1837 and settled in Adrian. In his youth he learned the carpenter's trade in Ballston, N. Y., and followed that business in Adrian until 1850, when he purchased a farm on Section 30, in Adrian township, where he resided until 1872, when he went to Rome Center. He resided there for a few years, and removed to Adrian, where he lived until his death, May 14, 1885. He was a prominent citizen of his township, and filled many positions of trust. He served many years as Justice of the Peace and Notary Public. October 20, 1836, Daniel S. Edwards at Gorham, Ontario County, N. Y., married Miss Caroline A. Foskett, and they had five childen, Alfred being the third. Mrs. Caroline A. (Foskett) Edwards was born in Pompey, Onondaga' County, N. Y., September 2, 1807, and died in Adrian, November 22, 1850. Her father, James Foskett, was a native of Connecticut, and was a soldier in the war of 1812. He married Miss McClure, who was a native of Scotland, and became the mother of seven

Page  438 438 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL children. Alfred Edwards, subject of this sketch, was about six years old when his father purchased the farm in Adrian township. He was educated in the country schools and about two terms at the Normal School at Ypsilanti. He has always been a farmer and now owns his father's homestead on Section 30, in Adrian. His residence is a stone house, built by his father in 1857, and he has the most vivid recollection of picking up stone all over the farm and piling them up ready for use in the structure. Since Mr. Edwards arrived at manhood he has been active in public affairs, and has been a candidate for public office many times. He is a prominent Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Edwards, Adrian township. Granger and was the first master of Adrian Grange. In 1897 the Patrons' Mutual Fire Insurance Company of Lenawee County was organized, and Mr. Edwards was elected president, which position he still holds. He has been a successful farmer, and now owns 260 acres of land, having sold one farm in 1903. February 29, 1872, Alfred Edwards married Miss Julia Elizabeth Knight, daughter of William and Anna (Smead) Knight, of Adrian township, and six children, the first of whom died in infancy, have been born to them as follows: Gertrude Agnes, born August 13, 1876, graduated from Michigan University in June, 1901, and married, December 25, 1902, Lee Mighell, a lawyer of Aurora, Ill.; Merrick Knight, born June 25, 1880, just graduated from the Michigan University; Sarah Elizabeth, born December 21, 1881, just graduated from the Michigan University; Mary Sophia, born September 23, 1884, student at Michigan University; Julia Caroline, born February 13, 1887, student at Adrian High School. Mrs. Julia Elizabeth (Knight) Edwards was born in Adrian

Page  439 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 439 township, Lenawee County, January 2, 1845. She was a graduate under Prof. Estabrook, at Ypsilanti, and was a student at the Michigan University, she being the first lady freshman to be admitted. Her father, William Knight, was an early settler of Adrian township, locating there in 1834. He first took up land in Rome, but afterwards exchanged for land on Section 18, in Adrian, which he owned until his death in November, 1901. He was a native of Massachusetts, and was born at Northampton, January 17, 1807. He was the son of Erastus Knight, whose father, Joshua Knight, came from England and settled in Connecticut. William Knight was a prominent resident of Adrian township for over 67 years. December 24, 1834, William Knight married Miss Anna Smead, daughter of Rufus and Anna (Hawks) Smead, and they had seven children, Mrs. Edwards being the fourth child. Mrs. Anna (Smead) Knight was born September 14, 1810, and died July 4, 1885. She came to Michigan with her parents, from Massachusetts, in 1834. She was a pupil of Miss Mary Lyon before the founding of Mt. Holyoke College, at South Hadley, Mass. JOHN I. KNAPP was born in Ridgeway, Orleans County, N. Y., November 24, 1825, and was the first white child to be born within the present limits of the village of Medina, N. Y. His father, John Knapp, was born in Mamaroneck, Westchester County, N. Y., August 22, 1785. He was the son of Peter and Dina (Guyon) Knapp, who were natives of Westchester County. Peter Knapp was born February 25, 1755, and married Dina Guyon, May 18, 1775. He was the direct descendant of Nicholas Knapp, an Englishman, who settled in Westchester County, N. Y., in 1630, and died there in April, 1670. Peter Knapp was a revolutionary soldier, and served in Captain Abram Mead's company, and marched to John and Mamre Knapp.

Page  440 440 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL the relief of Boston, being in the battle of Lexington. He was discharged from the service as Corporal, June 23, 1777. He afterwards became a private in the Westchester County Militia, Third Regiment, Captain Samuel Haight, becoming a "Minute Man," which carried with it land bounty rights, as shown in "New York in the War of the Revolution." About the year 1806 he removed to Onondaga County and took up land in Spafford township on his land warrant. Here his family grew up, and he died there April 13, 1839. His wife, Dina Guyon bore him twelve children, John Knapp being the fifth child. She was born May 7, 1757, and died October 17, 1835. John Knapp was raised a farmer, and first commenced in Onondaga County, but finally went to Ridgeway in Orleans County and purchased a farm. He resided there until May, 1834, when he came to Michigan, bringing his family of wife and three children, and all his possessions with his own horse team, and finally settled on the w 2 n e ' of Section 2, in Medina, this county. He came in company with Cook Hotchkiss, his brother-in-law, and I I h ~ John I. Knapp's Family: No. 1, Mrs. Ellen (Willey) Knapp; No. 2, her daughter, M. Adella, nee Kedzie; No. 3, Hattie E., nee Lambie; No. 4, Frank W. Knapp.

Page  441 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 441 they took up the n e Y of Sec. 2. Mr. Knapp cleared up his farm, and lived there until 1841, when he sold out to the Medina Milling Company, and removed to Fairfield, purchasing two hundred acres on Sections 19 and 20, where the village of Weston now stands. He resided there until 1870, when he became feeble in health, and went to Adrian to reside with his son, John I., where he died January 17, 1874. February 13, 1806, John Knapp married Miss Mamre Hotchkiss, daughter of John C. and Mary (Chittenden) Hotchkiss, of Delhi, Delaware County, N. Y., and they were the parents of eight children, as follows: Mary C., born October 25, 1807, died August 13, 1826; Hannah I., born December 6, 1809. Still living, (1903) in Yates, Orleans County, N. Y., married John Gambel, and is the mother of nine children; Amos S., born February 24, 1812, died in Napa, Cal., January 15, 1898; Nancy C., born February 3, 1815, died October 11, 1830; Abigail, born April 18, 1817, married John D. Sutton, was the mother of nine children, and died May 9, 1896; Lauren H., born April 7, 1820, died August 2, 1822; Lauren H., Second, born February 26. 1823, died April 7, 1836, being the first death in the township of Medina; John I:, as above. Mrs. Mamre (Hotchkiss) Knapp was born in Cheshire, Conn., May 30, 1786, and died in Adrian, July 27, 1877. John I. Knapp, subject of this sketch, lived with his parents on the farm in Fairfield, assisted in clearing up the land, and followed farming. In November, 1860, he was elected Treasurer of Lenawee County, and removed to the City of Adrian in January, 1861, to assume the duties of his office. He was re-elected in the campaigns of 1862 and 1864, serving six years in all. He followed different lines of business after retiring from office until 1870, when he entered the U. S. mail service, and for two years served as railway mail clerk. In 1873 he was promoted to the office of Postoffice Inspector at large, succeeding Charles Redfield, removed, no special field being assigned to him, and holding the office four years. During Mr. Knapp's service as special agent many important cases were entrusted to him. One in particular, where two postal clerks were dismissed from the service, being suspected of robbing the mail of registered letters. After a thorough investigation it was found that the thefts had been made in a certain important postoffice, and that the postmaster was the guilty party, who had at the same time robbed his office clerks of their stipend by false reports to the government. Through Mr. Knapp's efforts the suspected postal clerks were exonerated and reinstated, one of whom traveled several hundred miles to come to Adrian to thank Mr. Knapp for his efficient work on the case. Mr. Knapp's official career was one of fidelity and hard work, and was the means of breaking up many bad features in the mail service. The department at Washington recognized his salutary labors, and in acknowledgment of his services on one occasion he received the following letter:

Page  442 442 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL POSTOFFICE DEPARTMENT, OFFICE CHIEF OF DIVISION, SPECIAL AGENTS AND MAIL DEPREDATIONS. WASHINGTON, August 5, 1873. * * * * * * * I have also received the copy of "Doctor Young's Marriage Guide," which I shall place in the hands of Special Agent Comstock, of New York, whose especial business it is to attend to cases of that kind. You and he have rendered more efficient service in breaking up this kind of traffic than all the other agents for a few years past, and I trust your success will encourage you to persevere in breaking up the establishments of all who are engaged in this immoral and debasing business. Very respectfully your obedient servant, C. COCHRAN, JR., Chief Division. In 1880 Mr. Knapp engaged in the mannfacture of brick and tile machinery with the late James Farrar and J. C. McKenzie. In 1883, March 9, the factory then located on Winter street, Adrian, was en John I. Knapp. Mrs. S. Viola (Wood) Knapp. tirely destroyed by fire, the firm sustaining a loss of about $20,000. Immediately after this disastrous fire, which destroyed all patterns and machinery, steps were taken to rebuild, and during the summer of 1883 the large structure now known as the Brick and Tile Machine Works, was built and supplied with new machinery and appointments. This is one of the largest foundery and machine shops in Southern Michigan, being 304x60 feet, two stories higch, and 1,250,000

Page  443 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 443 brick were used. Mr. Knapp remained in the business about eighteen years. Since 1897 Mr. Knapp has not been engaged in any line of business. In March, 1902, he commenced the arduous work, in connection with Mr. R. I. Bonner, of soliciting, compiling and publishing this volume, in commemoration of his long life as a citizen and pioneer of Lenawee County. He came to the county before he was nine years old, and has resided here, boy and man, ever since. He has outlived all of his business associates, and now, in his 79th year, is as rugged and ambitious as he was thirty years before. Mr. Knapp has been a member of the Lenawee County Pioneer Society since its organization, and has been the president of the society during the past four years. He is also a vice president of the State Pioneer Society. April 24, 1851, John I. Knapp married Miss Ellen Willey, daughter of Henrick and Lois (Harrison) Willey, of Blissfield, and they became the parents of five children, as follows: Mary C., born in Fairfield, March 10, 1852, and died July 29, 1856; M. Adella, born February 9, 1855, married George E. Kedzie April 12, 1881, and four children were born to them, as follows: Rosemond H., born in Denver, Colorado, June 15, 1884; Malcolm K., Residence of John I. Knapp, No. 41 Maumee Street, Adrian.

Page  444 444 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL born in Ouray, Col., August 26, 1888; Margaret A., born same place, September 21, 1889; Robert S., born in Durango; Mex., April 8, 1898, and resides in Lansing, Mich. Harriet E., born in same place, January 1, 1858, married John C. Lambie, January 10, 1883, and they had three children, as follows: Ellen J., born in Adrian, Mich., October 27, 1883; John K., born July 12, 1886; Josephine W., born May 3, 1889. John C. Lambie died in Adrian, March 25, 1893; Herbert, born December 29, 1860, and died December 30, 1863; Frank W., born in Adrian, August 8, 1865,' married Miss Maud Hotchkiss, has one daughter and resides in Denver, Colorado. Mrs. Ellen (Willey) Knapp was born at Potsdam, N. Y., July 30, 1829. She came to Michigan with her parents in 1836, settling in Blissfield, this county She died while on a visit to her daughter, Mrs. Kedzie, in Chihuahua, Colo. Her father, Henrick Willey, was born in 1788, and January 12, 1812, married Miss Lois Harrison, at North Adams, Mass., where she was born. They had nine children, as follows: Richard H., born November 26, 1812, died in infancy; Catherine D., born January 22, 1814, married Obed F. Worth, November 28, 1841, and died in Blissfield, November 30, 1845; Cornelia Maria, born November 27, 1815, married Ormal Sackett, January 8, 1837, died in Blissfield, July 20, 1848; George H., born December 31, 1817, married Maria Valentine in November, 1845, and died in Blissfield February 20, 1848; Job, born February 5, 1821, married Miss Rachel Worth, December 24, 1845, and died in Blissfield; Almond, born October 28, 1823; died October 21, 1825; Jerusha, born September 11, 1827, died October 6, 1841, in Blissfield; Ellen, as above; Mary, born December 22, 1831, died February 25, 1835. Mrs. Lois (Harrison) Willey died in Blissfield, June 9, 1871. Henrick Willey died in Royalton, Ohio, in August, 1859. Job Willey was a merchant all his life, and was successful, amassing a large property, but in the latter part of his life met with heavy losses. He was an upright, exemplary man, be The Kedzie Family: Rosamond H., Malcolm K., Margaret A. and Robert S., grandchildren of John I. and Ellen Knapp.

Page  445 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 445 ing highly esteemed by all who knew him. June 18, 1885, John I. Knapp married Miss S. Viola Wood, daughter of Zebina and Huldah Wood, of Adrian. She was born in Columbia, Loraine County, Ohio, May 3, 1838, and came to Michigan in 1840 with her parents, settling in Wheatland, Hillsdale County. Her father, Zebina Wood, was born in Macedon, Wayne County, N. Y., August 14, 1805, and married Miss Huldah Church in 1831. They had three daughters, as follows: Mrs. S. Viola Knapp, as above; Mrs. Sarah V. Stowell, born in Wheatland, Hillsdale County, December 29, 1840, resides in New York City; Emma C., born same place, July 7, 1848, now Mrs. A. M. Clark. Zebina Wood died in Adrian, Mich., May 18, 1875, and his wife, born in Ontario, N. Y., July 19, 1806, died in Adrian August 10, 1895. At the opening of the State Industrial Home for Girls at Adrian, in 1881, Mrs. John I. Knapp, then Miss S. Viola Wood, was the first officer appointed by the Board of Control. After serving four years as Matron, she received the following upon her resignation: INDUSTRIAL HOME, May 7, 1885. MY DEAR MISS WOOD: I am requested by the Board of Control to send you this expression of their friendship. The resolution was adopted upon receiving your resignation as Matron of Central Cottage: Resolved, That the Board of Control in accepting the resignation of Miss Viola Wood desire to express their appreciation of the faithfulness with which for four years she has discharged the onerous duties pertaining to her position here. Coming into the service as she did, with the opening of the institution, we cannot but feel that the degree of success which has been attained in carrying out the charitable intention of the State is, in a large measure, due to her wise counsels and efficient labors. The Members of the Board of Control of " The State Industrial Home for Girls." Ever your friend, ELIZA S. STEBBINS, Clerk of Board. The Lambie Family: Ellen, John K. and Josephine, grandchildren of John I. and Ellen Knapp.

Page  446 446 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL WILLIS E. ALCHIN was born in Rollin, Lenawee County, Mich., November 22, 1855, and has always lived on the shore of Round Lake. His father, Thomas Alchin, was born in Maidstone, Kent, England, October 29, 1823. He was the son of Charles and Mary Alchin, who were the parents of eleven children, Thomas being the seventh child. Charles Alchin was a farmer in England, but came to the United States in 1830 with his family, first settling in Western New York. They resided there until 1844, when another move was made, and the family came to Michigan and settled on Section 14, in Rollin, this county After several years' residence he finally sold out and moved to Bushnell, Montcalm County, where he died in 1879. He was twice married, his first wife dying of paralysis in 1848. Thomas Alchin was about twenty-one years old when he came to Michigan, and soon after purchased land on Section 14, and settled on the bank of Round Lake. He was always a farmer, and a thrifty, honorable man. In 1854 he united with the Methodist Episcopal church, being ever after an active, earnest and consistent Christian worker. Before coming to Michigan, he met with an accident by falling from a load of wheat. In falling he struck upon his head, dislocating his neck in such a manner as to turn his face over onto his left shoulder. He lay in that condition for about twenty-four hours before a physician could be found who could perform the operation of setting his neck back in place. Strange to say, he survived the shock, and lived to a good old age, dying at his home in Rollin, July 23, 1901. October 21, 1847, Thomas Alchin married Miss Mary S. Town, daughter of Nathan and Irene (Tompkins) Town, of Rollin, and they had two children, as follows: Cornelia G., born March 18, 1849, married F. M. Griswold, October 21, 1878, has eight children, and resides in Hudson, this county; Willis E., as above. Mrs. Mary S. (Town) Alchin was born in Norwich, Ontario, Canada, October 29, 1828. Her father, Dr. Nathan Town, was born in Berkshire County, Mass., July 15, 1792. His father was of Irish extraction and always lived in Massachusetts. His mother was of Scotch extraction and always lived in Massachusetts. Nathan Town lived in Massachusetts until he was a young man, when he went to the State of New York. He only lived there a short time when he went to Norwich, London district, (now Oxford County,) Canada, where he settled and lived until 1838. When he was a young man he studied medicine, and after his location in Canada, commenced to practice and was a successful physician. In 1836, what is familiarly known as the "Patriot War," broke out, and the doctor was in sympathy with the patriots. In 1837 he was arrested on a charge of treason and imprisoned in the Hamilton jail for nine months, when he, with others, was sentenced to be hung. A short time before the day set for the hanging a reprieve came from Queen Victoria,,and he was banished from the Province. He was compelled to leave before he could settle his affairs or get his family ready to move. He immediately went to Detroit, arriving

Page  447 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 447 there in November, 1838, where he remained until his family came. He then went to Hanover, Jackson County, where he lived until the following spring, and in May, 1839, located government land on the shore of Round Lake, in Rollin, this county, on Section 11, where he lived until his death, which occurred October 28, 1854. The doctor did very little at farming, but devoted his entire attention to the practice of medicine, which he followed up to the time of his last sickness. He was the second physician to locate in Rollin, Dr. Hall being the first. March 25, 1813, he married Miss Irene Tompkins, of Herkimer County, New York, who when young associated with the renowned Beecher family, by whom he had six children, as follows: Eliza, born January 23, 1817, was the wife of Orin Avery. She died in Norwich, Canada, July 9, 1838; Julia, born August 31, 1819, was the wife of Abram Swartout, and died in Denham, Canada, October 3, 1876; Cornelia, born December 10, 1821, married W. B. DeLong of Norwich, Canada, and died October 5, 1889; George F., born April 5, 1825, a farmer of Rollin, died February 5, 1890; Mary, S., as above; William B., born July 23, 1830, was a graduate of Michigan University and became a prominent physician. At the death of his father he took up his practice in Rollin, occupied the old homestead, and for about fifty years was engaged as an active physician. He died at his home in Rollin, March 31, 1903. All of the children were born in Norwich, Canada. Mrs. Irene Town was born in Waterbury, Connecticut, May 11, 1793, and died in Rollin, July, 1859. October 27, 1853, Dr. William B. Town married Miss Elmina C. Smith, daughter of Americus and Martha (Beal) Smith, pioneers of Lenawee County. Mrs. Elmina Town was born in Fairfield, this county, August 29, 1835, and now, 1904, resides in Hudson. August 13, 1879, Willis E. Alchin married Miss Alice D. Briggs, born April 13, 1860, daughter of Oris and Adelia (Field) Briggs, of Mottville, Mich. Mr. Alchin has always been a farmer, but has found time to give attention to public duties. When a young man he taught school for several terms. In politics he has always been a Democrat, and from 1884 to 1888 he was Deputy Sheriff under A. K. Whitmore, and from 1898 to 1900, under John C. Iffland. He now resides on the homestead on the bank of Round Lake, so long occupied by his grandfather, Dr. Nathan Town, and his uncle, Dr. William B. Town. GRANT FELLOWS was born in Hudson township, Lenawee County, Mich., April 13, 1865. His father, Nelson H. Fellows, and his mother, Sarah M. Perry, were both natives of New York, and early settlers in Medina, this county. Grant Fellows was educated in the public schools of Hudson, and read law in the office of L. R. Pierson of that city. He was admitted to the bar December 11,

Page  448 448 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL Grant Fellows. 1886, and opened a law office in the city of Hudson, January 1, 1887, where he is now practicing his profession. He formed a co-partnership with B. D. Chandler in the spring of 1890, which partnership continues to the present time. This is one of the prominent law

Page  449 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 449 firms of Southern Michigan, and especially of Hudson and Lenawee County. Mr. Fellows is a strong advocate and able pleader at the bar, and is acknowledged to be among the most eloquent public speakers in Michigan. He is an active and energetic Republican politician, and has for many years taken a prominent part in State and National political campaigns. On the hustings he is sought after by his party leaders, and has devoted much time and energy to public speaking in this and other States. He is a Mason, a Knight of Pythias and an Elk, and has never held or sought public office. JOHN D. SUTTON was born in Brutus, Cayuga County, N. Y., April 13, 1803. He was the son of Jeremiah and Hannah (Smally) Sutton, of Sussex County, N. J. Jeremiah Sutton was born in. Sussex, August 8, 1774, and died May 8, 1848. His wife, Hannah, was born in the same county, July 6, 1780, and died Mr. and Mrs. John D. Sutton. June 23, 1855. John D. Sutton came to Michigan in the winter of 1835-6, and took up 160 acres of land on Section 11, in Medina, where he resided until his death, which occurred July 25, 1877. He cleared up and improved 140 acres, built good buildings and raised a large family. He was a thorough farmer, an honor29

Page  450 450 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL able and enterprising man, and a highly respected citizen. In the early days of the settlement he never shirked a duty or responsibility, and was progressive and ready for any service. September 18, 1836, John D. Sutton married Miss Abigail Knapp, daughter of John and Mamre (Hotchkiss) Knapp, of Medina, this county. This was the first wedding to take place in the township. There was not a minister in that portion of the county at that time, and the ceremony was performed by Deacon Cook Hotchkiss, the first Justice of the Peace elected in the township. They became the parents of nine children, as follows: Mamre A., born May 10, 1839, and died in Harvey, Ill., in October, 1891; William M., born July 2, 1841, enlisted in Company I, 11th Michigan Infantry, in 1862, and died at Bardstown, Ky., of measles, January 21, 1863; Martha J., born October 13, 1843, married S. W. Curtis, Lewis I. Sutton. and resides in Hudson, this county; Lewis I., born July 26, 1846; Millard F., born September 13, 1849; Hannah, born January 6, 1852, died at the age of four years; Ellen S., married Abram Luyster, and resides at Pasadena, Cal.; Mary, born September 6, 1858, died in infancy; Charles W., born October 25, 1861. Lewis i. Sutton, who now owns the old homestead on Section 11, in Medina, has retired from active business and now resides in Clayton Village. November 11, 1868, Mr. Sutton married Miss Alice Camburn, daughter of John and Margaret Camburn, of Seneca, this county. Two children were born to them as follows: HatMrs. Alice Sutton. tie, born September 19, 1869,

Page  451 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 451 married A. S. Baker, November 28, 1895, resided in Clayton, had one daughter, born April 5, 1902. Mrs. Baker died November 14, 1902; Fred, born August 15, 1878, and resides in Clayton. Mrs. Alice (Camburn) Sutton was born in Seneca, this county, April 26, 1846. Her parents were among the very first settlers in Medina township, and her father outlived all the original pioneers of the township. [Since the above was written Mr. Lewis I. Sutton has died, passing away at his home January 12, 1904.] A PIONEER MILL. The engraving here presented shows the old "Red Mill," which was erected by Addison J. Comstock and his brother-in-law, Isaac Dean, in 1829. It was the second flouring mill to be put in operation west of Monroe or Toledo. The first mill in Lenawee County was built by Wing, Evans & Brown, in Tecumseh, in 1826. It is truthfully related that a rock was found about a mile and a half from the mill site, which was worked into a mill-stone and used for several years, being capable of grinding ten bushels of grain per hour. This mill at Tecumseh was one of the very first in the interior of Michigan Territory. The old "Red Mill" at Adrian, was the second, and proved a great advantage to all the incoming settlers. For some years after Old Red Mill, erected in 1829.

Page  452 452 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL its successful operation, it became a source of flour supply for the first settlers who located in this region, and as far west as Coldwater, and in some instances, White Pigeon Prairie and Goshen, Ind. The original structure was quite small. By reference to the engraving it can be easily seen where a large addition was later built on. It was for many years operated by water, but as the water supply became inadequate and unreliable, steam power was added. The building was destroyed by fire November 25, 1884, but the original stone foundation of one of the oldest "land marks" in Lenawee County can still be seen. RICHARD I. BONNER was born in Pembroke, Genesee County, N. Y., March 7, 1838. His father, Thomas E. Bonner, was born in London, England, in 1804, where he lived until he was old enough to be put to a trade, when he was sent to Bath and apprenticed to a locksmith and brass-worker. He served seven years apprenticeship, and returned to London, where he was engaged in his business until 1830. He received three valuable medals from different industrial societies, and the highest commendations from the industrial journals of London, for his workmanship and improvements in locks. He was also a designer and engraver on wood or metal, and taught drawing at one time in London. He came to America in 1830, and settled in the city of New York, where he opened a business place and manufactured locks and brass work, and followed designing and engraving. There were only three other engravers in the city at that time. He subsequently went to Newark, N. J., and carried on an extensive business until 1834, when he moved to Buffalo, and in company with John W. Davock, did a large business until 1839, when, owing to ill-health, he sold out and came to Michigan, settling in Livingston County, where he purchased a farm. He afterwards disposed of his farm and went to Ypsilanti and engaged in business. In 1845 he moved to Tecumseh. In 1846 he came to Adrian, and moved his family there April 1, 1847. He carried on a brass foundry and general jobbing shop in Adrian until the spring of 1851, when, owing to ill-health he again sold out and started for Oregon, but died at Vevay, Ind., at the home of his brother-in-law, John Henry, May 17, 1851. He was one of the first in Adrian to have his life insured, and the policy was one of the first paid. He had many warm friends wherever he was known; was social, companionable and generous, with a fund of knowledge on all subjects that interested or agitated the people during his lifetime, that made his society sought after, and his opinions and judgment valuable. He was, undoubtedly, the most skillful and best mechanic, in every sense of the term, that could be found in the West,

Page  453 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 453 at the time of his death. He was an expert in all branches of metal working, a great lover of art, and was possessed of a peculiar genius for engraving, drafting and inventing new designs and models. December 25, 1828, he married, at St. Luke's church, in the Parish of St. Luke, London, Miss Mary Wynn, by whom he had four children, as follows: Mary A., born in the Parish of Shoreditch, London, December 1, 1829, married John Armstrong; Elizabeth, born in Richard I. Bonner. Mrs. Margaret M. Bonner. Newark, N. J., July 22, 1831, married Samuel Mandeville; Thomas E., born in Newark, N. J., October 8, 1832, resides in California; Samuel George, died an infant. Mrs. Mary Bonner was born in London, and died in Buffalo, N. Y., November 20, 1835. May 23, 1837, he married Miss Grace W. Illenden, daughter of Richard and Sarah Illenden, by whom he had five children, as follows: Richard Illenden, born March 7, 1838; Sarah Maria, born at Pembroke, Genesee County, N. Y., May 9, 1839, now the widow of Franklin B. Nixon, of Adrian; Mary Jane, died in infancy; John Davock, born in Ypsilanti, Mich., April 7, 1842, now of Washington State; Walter George, born in Ypsilanti, June 16, 1844, now of Eureka, Humboldt County, California. Mrs. Grace W. Bonner was born at Woodchurch, Kent, England, May 7, 1816, and died in Adrian, December 26, 1860. [For her family connection see Richard Illenden's record

Page  454 454 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL in this volume.] Richard I. Bonner commenced to learn the art of printing January 2, 1854, in Adrian, in the old Expositor office, with those thorough and practical printers and publishers, S. P. and T. D. Jermain. He served an apprenticeship of four years, and has followed the business in some capacity, with the exception of a few years, ever since. In 1860 he became a partner in the Expositor office with S. P. Jermain and Marcus Knight. In 1865 Page & Bonner leased the office and run the Daily and Weekly Expositor one year. In January, 1867, Mr. Bonner established the Adrian Journal, a Democratic paper, and was its editor for several years. In 1873 he John S. Brown. Mrs. Sally Brown. engaged with Wm. A. Whitney, and went with him to Philadelphia and New York, to purchase the presses and material for the Daily and Weekly Press office. He selected all the material, which cost about $8,000, superintended the arrangement of the office, stt up the presses, started them, putting them all in full and perfect operation, wrote the salutatory of the paper, and was superintendent and one of its editors for over five years. He commenced the publication of the "History and Biographical Sketches of Lenawee County," in company with Wm. A. Whitney July 7, 1879, and published two volumes. In the early spring of 1881 Mr. Bonner commenced the publication of the Evening Record, the first two cent daily paper in Adrian. This enterprise was successful, but owing to ill-health he sold the plant to S. W. Beakes in the fall of 1884. He then engaged in an out door calling for some years and in the spring of 1894, went to Virginia, where he purchased a farm and engaged in oyster

Page  455 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 455 growing in the York river. He afterwards sold his Virginia property and went to Washington, D. C., where for about one year and a half he was editor of the old National Intelligencer. In 1900 he went to Philadelphia and engaged in journalistic work. He returned to Adrian in the spring of 1902, and in company with Mr. John I. Knapp commenced work on this volume, The Illustrated History and Biographical Record of Lenawee County. March 24, 1863, Mr. Bonner married Miss Margaret M. Brown, daughter of John S. and Sally Brown, of Adrian, and they have one son, John S., born in Adrian, Mich., November 11, 1864. Mrs. Margaret M. (Brown) Bonner, was born in Adrian, Mich., March 4, 1842. Her father was a pioneer in Lenawee County, coming to Michigan in 1833, first settling in Rome. He was born in Canada in 1815, and died in Adrian October 29, 1877. Her mother was born in Clarence, Erie County, N. Y., March 2, 1818, and died in Adrian, July 24, 1872. John S. Bonner and Family. John S. Bonner, the son of' Mr. and Mrs. R. I. Bonner, was educated in the public schools of Adrian, and early became a journalist, which calling he has always followed, with the exception of about two and one-half years. In 1901 he went to Para, Brazil, South America, as Vice and Deputy U. S. Consul, at that important station at the mouth of the Amazon river. During his residence there he mastered the Portuguese or Spanish language, and profited by a valuable experience. He has had a good newspaper training, having been employed on many of the largest newspapers, both East and West. December 23, 1897, John S. Bonner married Miss Mabel Clayton, of Washington, D. C., and they became the parents of three children, as follows: Priscilla, born in Washington, D. C., February

Page  456 456 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL 17, 1899. Two sons, Albert and Perry, (twins) died in infancy. Mrs. Mabel (Clayton) Bonner was born in New York city, December 23, 1870. Her father is a native of Maine, of English and Dutch ancestry, his mother being a Stuyvesant. He served all through the great Rebellion, was severely wounded at the battle of Antietam, was in Libby Prison, was brevetted Colonel and commanded a regiment at Gettysburg. He was for many years in the War Department at Washington, and is now engaged in business in Cuba. Mrs. Clayton is a native of Pennsylvania, of English ancestry. The Adrian Brick and Tile Company's plant. The above engraving shows the Adrian Brick and Tile Machine Company's plant, situated on Water street, between College and Michigan avenues. It is the largest foundry and machine shop plant in Southern Michigan. It was built in 1883, the company then consisting of James Farrar, John I. Knapp and Joseph C. McKenzie. The size of the building is 304 feet long and 60 feet deep, and required 1,250,000 brick in its construction.

Page  457 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 457 EDWARD FRENSDORF was born in Hudson, Mich., November 28, 1863, and has always lived in Hudson. His father. Louis Frensdorf, was born in Beuern, near Frankfort, Germany, April 15, 1833, and was the son of Edward and Bertha Frensdorf, of Beuern, where Mr. Frensdorf was a merchant. Louis lived in his native city until he was about twenty years old, when he was drafted for service Louis Frensdorf, Hudson. in the German army. Not liking a soldier's life he managed to avoid the conscripting officers, and came to the United States, landing in New York in 1853, soon after going to Cincinnati, but being an unsophisticated German boy he drifted about some, finally coming to Michigan, first stopping in Jonesville for a short time, then at Hillsdale, and finally settling in Hudson in 1857. In 1858 he opened a grocery and provision store on the south side of Main:street and commenced buying farmers' produce. He was quite suc

Page  458 458 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL cessful in his business and soon became a prominent citizen. He was a young man of good attainments, but wholly unacquainted with the language and business methods of his adopted country. In order to equip himself for the work he had undertaken, he applied his spare time to the study and understanding of his surroundings. He commenced with a very limited capital, but his courage and perseverance soon assured his success. He ultimately became the most prominent buyer of grain, wool, pork, hides and general produce in Hudson, and in fact Lenawee County. He soon took an active interest in public affairs, espousing the Democratic side of politics, iand in his later life filled many offices of honor and importance. He was much interested in his home city, and heartily endorsed all public improvements inuring to the city's welfare. He was a member of the public school board, served several years as Alder1890. In 1891 he was appointed a member of the State Board of Railroad Commissioners, by Governor Winans. This appointment came unsought, and was filled with credit to himself and the State. He was a stockholder in nearly all of the manufacturing companies of Hudson, and a stockholder and director in the Boies State Savings Bank. He largely assisted in the locating and building of the Cincinnati Northern Railroad. He became a leader among his fellows. He was thrifty, generous and honorable, and for forty years was an influential factor in tWe commercial, political and social affairs of Hudson. He died at his home May 10, 1896. February 21, 1857, Louis Frensdorf married Miss Caroline Rosenfield, of Baltimore, Md., and they had six children. Edward Frensdorf was the only son, and became a business partner with his father in 1888. Since that time he has been actively engaged. At the death of his father he continued the business, and is now, as was his father, the leading wool and grain buyer in Southern Michigan. His business interests are quite large and his career is very successful. He is President of the Globe Fence Company of Hudson, Vice President

Page  459 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 459 of the Detroit Times Company, Director of the First State Bank of Hillsdale, Director of the Boies State Bank of Hudson, Director of the Western Shoe Company of Toledo, and is a stockholder in many other important industries. He has served his city as Alderman, and was elected Mayor of Hudson, on the People's ticket, in 1903, by the largest majority in the history of the city. In politics he is a Democrat, and is earnest in his advocacy of progress with economy. Residence of Edward Frensdorf, Hudson, Mich. ABRAM LUYSTER, JR., was born at Warsaw, Rensselaer County, N. Y., October 18, 1854. His father, Abram Van Black Luyster, was born at Fishkill, Dutchess County, N. Y., February 14, 1812, and died at Port Ewen, Ulster County, N. Y., August 25, 1895. October 11, 1840, he married Miss Jane Osborn, who was born at Fishkill, July 25, 1826, and died at Prattville, Mich., February 25, 1885. They were the parents of six children, all born in Warsaw, N. Y., as follows: Clarissa Jane, nee Vine, born April 12, 1843, resides in Grand Rapids, Mich.; Charles E., born February 28, 1845,

Page  460 460 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL was a soldier in the great Rebellion, enlisted in the 16th New York Heavy Artillery, in February, 1862, was mustered out in April, 1865, and died at Eastmanville, Mich., February 16, 1867; Alice A., born November 15, 1848, died January 21, 1852; Henrietta, nee Ellsworth, born September 3, 1851, resides at Port Ewen, N. Y.; Abram, as Mrs. Sarah Ellen Luyster. Abram Luyster. above; Polhemus, born January 26, 1858, and died October 13, 1862. Abram Luyster, subject of this sketch, came to Michigan and settled in Medina, this county, June 27, 1877. March 1, 1882, he married Sarah Ellen Sutton, born August 13, 1856. They removed to Pasadena, Cal., January 25, 1900, where they now reside. STEPHEN W. CURTIS was born in Ira, Cayuga County, N. Y., March 17, 1831. His father, David Curtis, was born in Cambridge, Washington County, N. Y., February 9, 1802. He was reared a farmer and always followed it. When a young man he joined the State Militia and rose in rank to the office of Colonel. He remained in the militia until 1840, when he came to Michigan. Upon his departure for his new home in the then Western wilderness, he sold his uniform and military trappings for more than one hundred dollars. In the fall of 1840 he sold his farm in Otsego County, came to Michigan with his family, and settled on land on

Page  461 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 461 Section 11, in Hudson, this county, that he had purchased in 1833. He was an active, thoroughgoing man, and soon made a comfortable home. He died at his home in Hudson, May 15, 1877. David Curtis was a son of the Rev. Stephen Curtis, who was a native of New England, a Baptist minister, and first married Elizabeth Sawin. Mrs. Charlotte Curtis. David Curtis. He was the father of eleven children, as follows: Benjamin, born April 17, 1800. David, born February 9, 1802; Stephen, born February 22, 1804; Eliza, born July 4, 1806, married Peabody Cook; Sylvester, born July 15, 1808; Delonson, born May 28, 1811; Leroy, born May 6, 1813; Ethan W., born August 18, 1815; George, born September 6, 1817; Anna Maria, born November 11, 1820; Leonard, born April 20, 1822; Solomon, born in 1825; Loomis, born in 1829. Rev. Stephen Curtis was married three times. For his second wife he married Edna Sawin, sister of Elizabeth. His third wife was Polly (Loomis) St. John, who died in 1858. He died in 1837. Polly Loomis became the mother of seven children by her first marriage to William St. John, as follows: Frederick, Samuel, John, Orton, Charlotte, Sophronia and Mary Ann. The ancestors of the Curtis and Loomis families were English and settled in New England. February 7, 1830, David Curtis married Miss Charlotte St. John, daughter of William and Polly (Loomis) St. John, and they became the parents of ten children, as follows: Stephen W., as above; David C., born in Ira, Cayuga County, N. Y., May 31, 1832; Charlotte E., born in the same place, October 12, 1833, married Dr. Newcomb, and resided in Oakville, Mich.; Mary Ann, born in Ot

Page  462 462 ILLUSTRATED HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHICAL sego County, N. Y., May 20, 1835, married Wesley Terpening, and resides in Findlay, Ohio; David C., 2d, born same place, October 16, 1836; Eveline, born same place, July 10, 1838, married William Wirt, and resides in Wheatland, Hillsdale County; Cornelia and Cordelia, (twins) born same place, July 16, 1840. Cornelia married B. L. Phelps. She died March 10, 1896. Cordelia married Isaac Benedict, and resides in Culbertson, Neb.; Elizabeth, born same place, September 13, 1842, married Curtis Garrison, and resides in HillsMrs. Martha J. Curtis. Stephen W. Curtis. dale; Julia, born in Hudson, Mich., March 22, 1844, married H. B. Mosher, and resides in Buda, Ill. Mrs. Charlotte (St. John) Curtis was born in Chagrin village, Ohio, October 17, 1807, and died in Hudson, this county, January 10, 1876. Stephen W. Curtis, the subject of this sketch, was nine years old when he came to Michigan, and has resided in Hudson township, this county, ever since. He has always followed farming and handling and shipping stock. For thirty years he shipped stock to Buffalo and New York. His farm consists of two hundred acres, on Section 10, in Hudson township, with good buildings and other improvements. He has always been an active citizen, and much interested in the prosperity and growth of county and state. He served for two years as President of the Lenawee and Hillsdale Farmers' Picnic at Devil's Lake. He has always been interested in politics, but never been an officeseeker. September 14, 1857, Stephen W. Curtis married Miss Jennette Ladd, daughter of John and Betsy Ladd, of Victor, Ontario

Page  463 RECORD OF LENAWEE COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 463 County, N. Y., and they had two children, as follows: Adeline, born in Hudson, September 9, 1861, marr