A history of the northern peninsula of Michigan and its people;. [Vol. 2]
Sawyer, Alvah L. (Alvah Littlefield), 1854-1925.

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Page  627 A HISTORY OF THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN AND ITS PEOPLE ITS MINING, LUMBER AND AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRIES By ALVAH L. SAWYER ILLUSTRATED VOLUME II, 1911 THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY CHICAGO

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Page  631 a History of The Northern Peninsula of Michigan HON. RICHARD C. FLANNIGAN.-To say that one has the confidence and esteem of the people among whom he lives is to pay him a distinct compliment, and this can truthfully be said of Hon. Richard C. Flannigan, of Norway. Keen and accurate in his preceptions, possessing the judicial ability which implies intuitive wisdom, he has steadily worked his way upward from the poor country lad, dependent upon his own resources, to a high position in the legal fraternity, in the meantime, by close application to his work and to the opportunities afforded him, has acquired well deserved wealth and fame. A son of the late Captain James Flannigan, he was born, December 12th, 1857, at Ontonagon, Ontonagon county, Michigan. Born and reared in County Waterford, Ireland, Captain James Flannigan was for many years engaged in mining in the old country. Emigrating to the United States in the "forties," he located at Ontonagon, becoming one of the pioneers of the Upper Peninsula, and one of the very first to mine copper in this region. He was subsequently joined by his wife and their four children, who came over from Ireland in a sailing vessel. After a few years he was made captain of the Forest, now the Victoria Mine, and retained that position as long as he was able to work. On retiring from active pursuits, he removed with his family to Marquette, and there resided until his death, at the age of seventy-six years. He married Ellen Sullivan, who was born in County Waterford, Ireland, and died in Michigan at the age of sixty years. To them thirteen children were born, ten sons and three daughters. Richard C. Flannigan acquired his knowledge of the three "r's" in the pioneer log schoolhouse in Ontonagon county. Removing with his parents to Marquette when eleven years old, he soon found employment as checking clerk and bell boy at the scales of the Marquette, Houghton and Ontonagon Railroad, subsequently being transferred to the ore docks. Work there being discontinued every Fall, he attended the ward school three winters, making substantial advancement in his education. Desirous, however, of earning wages every month in the year, Richard applied to the company for such a position, but the only place it could offer him was that of assistant, 631

Page  632 632 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN to the agent at Humboldt, which would give him twenty dollars each month. While considering the Company's proposition, he was offered a situation in a lawyer's office at the same salary, and accepted it, as it enabled him to live at home. Becoming interested in legal subjects, he eagerly availed himself of the opportunity afforded him for study, and began reading law in the office of his employers, Parkes and Hayden. At the end of four years Mr. Flannigan entered the law department of the University of Michigan, and continued his studies there for a year. His funds being then exhausted, he returned to Marquette, entered the law office of M. E. Maynard, and at the age of twenty-one years applied to the Circuit Court at Marquette, for admission to the bar, his plea being granted. Immediately beginning the practice of his profession at Marquette, Mr. Flannigan remained there until 1881, when he located in Norway. Successful from the first, he was ere long doing business for various corporations, eventually being retained by the more important mining corporations of the Range. As an attorney he gained a wide reputation in criminal practice, being especially strong in jury trials. Since abandoning that branch of practice, he has been very active and prominent as a business lawyer, handling extensive business transactions, representing organizations that have large and important financial interests. About 1890 Mr. Flannigan was appointed attorney for the Chicago & Northwestern Railway Company, and filled the position most ably and successfully until January, 1910, when he was appointed to his present high position as Judge of the Circuit Court, an office for which he is eminently qualified, as well by natural gifts and temperanent as by professional knowledge, untiring industry and great integrity. Judge Flannigan married in 1884. The Judge and Mrs. Flannigan have one child, Clement Flannigan, now a student in the University of Michigan. Until 1896 Judge Flannigan was a Democrat in politics, but being opposed to the coinage of free silver he then joined the Republican party, with which he has since been affiliated. He has the distinction of having served as the first mayor of Norway, and was for eighteen years a member of the Norway School Board, serving as president until appointed Judge. When, on the election of Judge Stone to the Supreme Bench, he was tendered the position of Circuit Judge, he accepted, having been unanimously nominated as candidate in both the Republican and Democratic caucus. CHARLES I. COOK.-In this age of colossal enterprise and marked intellectual energy the prominent and successful men are those whose abilities lead them into large undertakings and to assume the responsibilities and labors of leaders in their respective fields of endeavor. Success is methodical and conservative and however much we may indulge in fantastic theorization as to the elements and causation in any isolated instance, in the light of sober investigation we shall find such success to be the result of the determined application of one's abilities and powers along the rigidly defined lines of labor-whether mental or manual. He whose name introduces this article has undoubtedly done more than any other one man to further the industrial and commercial prestige, as well as the material attractiveness, of the city of Menominee, where his hand has guided, with all of discrimination and admirable initiative and administrative power, industrial enterprises of great scope and magnitude. While this brief sketch, whose limitations are necessarily circumscribed, cannot enter into details as to the various

Page  633 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 633 stages of his career, it is incumbent that there be incorporated within the pages of the publication at hand at least a short resume of his life and labors. He is one of the most progressive and public-spirited citizens that the Upper Peninsula can claim and his name represents a power in connection with business and civic affairs, besides which he has so ordered his course as to command at all times the unqualified confidence and esteem of his fellow-men. Charles I. Cook finds no small meed of satisfaction in reverting to the great western metropolis of Chicago as the place of his nativity. There he was born on the 21st of August, 1862, and he is a son of Charles W. and Sarah A. (Coonley) Cook. Charles Willard Cook was born at Haddam, Connecticut, in 1834, and was a scion of the sterling family founded in New England in the Colonial epoch of our national history. He passed the closing years of his life at Odebolt, Sac county, Iowa, dying in 1902, at which time he was sixty-eight years of age. The cherished and devoted wife was born in Albany, New York, in which city their marriage was solemnized, and she was thirty-three years of age at the time of her demise. Of the five children of this union, three are now living, of whom the eldest is Charles I., the immediate subject of this review; Albert E. is engaged in the real-estate business at Odebolt, Iowa, and there conducts an extensive enterprise in the handling of farm lands, besides which he has the distinction of owning and operating the largest farm in that state; Emma E. is the wife of F. I. Carpenter, who resides in the city of Chicago. Charles Willard Cook, father of the subject of this sketch, was a son of Willard and Abigail Cook, and was thirteen years of age at the time of the family removal from Connecticut to the west, in 1847. They first located at Libertyville, Illinois, and about three years later removed to Chicago, where Willard Cook erected the first brick house on what is now the West side of the great metropolis. IIe became a citizen of much prominence and influence and was one of the representative pioneer business men of Chicago. His son, Charles Willard Cook, received his educational training in the schools of Chicago and as a young man identified himself closely with business interests in that city. IHe was the first to establish there a real-estate loan business and also conducted large operations in the handling of city and farm property, becoming one of the most important factors in connection with these lines of enterprise, through which he gained a substantial fortune. He retired from active business in the early seventies and thereafter gave his attention principally to the supervision of his extensive capitalistic interests. fHe identified himself with the Republican party at the time of its organization but was never an aspirant for a public office of any order. Both he and his wife are devoted members of the Congregational church. Charles I. Cook is indebted to the public schools of Chicago for his early educational discipline, which included a course in the high school, and at the age of seventeen years he went to Iowa, where his father had secured large tracts of land, and turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, finding due measure of satisfaction in the radical change from metropolitan to rural life. Later he became an extensive dealer in farm lands, and in this connection handled properties in all sections of the state of Iowa, meanwhile maintaining his home in Odebolt, Sac county, where occurred the death of his father, as already noted in this context. While a resident of the Hawkeye state Mr. Cook gained the same worthy precedence now enjoyed by his brother in that he owned and conducted the largest farm in the state, devoting same to diversi

Page  634 634 THE NORTIERN PENINSULA OF MICIIIGAN fled agriculture and the breeding of high grade stock. There he continued to be actively and successfully identified with these lines of enterprise until 1891, when he removed to Menominee, Michigan, and engaged in the wholesale grocery business as a member of the firm of Somerville, Penberthy & Cook, which later became Penberthy & Cook. Finally the business was incorporated under the title of the CarpenterCook Company and of the same Mr. Cook has been the executive head, besides which he practically owns the controlling stock. This is one of the most important commercial concerns of the Upper Peninsula and its facilities and equipment are of the best metropolitan type. The company controls an extensive trade throughout northern Michigan and Wisconsin, and its annual transactions represent a large aggregate. In 1906 Mr. Cook effected the organization and incorporation of the Michigan Refining & Preserving Company, of which he is president and the virtual owner of all the stock. This company has developed its business to a point which makes it one of the leading industries of Menominee and one that has a most beneficent influence in conserving the prosperity of the community, owing alike to the large number of employes retained and to the large amount of cash paid out to farmers. The factory has unexcelled facilities for the preserving and canning of fruits and vegetables and its products have been introduced and found ready demand in the most diverse sections of the Union. The concern controls an especially large trade throughout the northwest and its business permeates through the Pacific coast states. The initiative power and enterprising spirit of Mr. Cook have led him to identify himself with many industrial undertakings in Menominee and his interposition has invariably begotten definite success. Thus it may be noted that he is president of the Menominee River Sugar Company, engaged in the manufacture of beet sugar upon an extensive scale; that he is president of the Menominee Pickle Company and that he is also the executive head of the Menominee Land & Iron Company, an organization which controls much holdings of real-estate and vast tracts of mineral and agricultural land in the Upper Peninsula. Mr. Cook is also owner of the Menominee Opera House, a fine place of entertainment, and through his personal efforts have been secured many of the best attractions that customarily are to be seen only in metropolitan centres. He is a member of the directorate of the First National Bank of Menominee and he is owner of the Pine Hill farm, one of the best improved and most valuable landed estates of the kind in this section of Michigan. On this place, which is about three miles distant from Menominee, he has a most attractive summer home which, like his city residence, is the centre of gracious hospitality. He also owns what is known as the Nine-mile farm and he finds much of pleasure and satisfaction in supervising this fine landed estate, which has an aggregate area of fully thirty-five hundred acres. This property he purchased of the late Samuel MI. Stephenson. On his farms he devotes special attention to the raising of peas and beans, which are utilized in the plant of the Michigan Refining & Preserving Company, of which he is president. In politics Mr. Cook is a firm believer in the generic principles of the Republican party, although in local affairs he maintains an independent attitude and gives his support to men and measures meeting the approval of his judgment, irrespective of partisan lines. His political independence was further shown in the fact that he cast his first presidential vote for the Honorable Grover Cleveland, of whom he was a great admirer.

Page  635 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICIIIGAN On the 16th of May, 1890, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Cook to Miss Elizabeth Patterson Carpenter, who was born in the village of Pike, Wyoming county, New York, and who was an infant at the time of her mother's death. She was adopted by the late William O. Carpenter, who became a prominent and influential citizen of Chicago and later of Menominee, and who was extensively concerned in the great lumber industry in northern Michigan for many years. Mr. Carpenter was born in the old Empire state of the Union, where he was reared and educated, and as a young man he located in Chicago, whence he later removed to Menominee, where he had large real-estate and capitalistic interests and where he continued to reside until his death. Mrs. Cook is a popular figure in connection with the best social activities of her home city and is a woman of most gracious personality. Mlr. and Mrs. Cook have two fine sons,-Charles I., Junior, who was born on the 30th of November, 1892, and William Carpenter, who was born on the 10th of December, 1896. In conclusion of the sketch is consistently entered the following appreciative estimate that appeared in the Daily HeraldLeader of Menominee and which affords an idea of the status which Mr. Cook holds in the city to whose advancement he has contributed in a liberal measure. Mr. Cook has certainly been the largest individual factor in the creation of new enterprises for the city of Menominee and vicinity. It is said that the factories and other industries under his supervision have a weekly pay roll of at least fifteen hundred names. Besides those employed at the wholesale house, his factories and his farms, Mr. Cook has in his employ, year in and year out, regular crews of carpenters, paper-hangers, painters, plumbers and other workmen. Personally Mrr. Cook is a man whom it is at all times a pleasure to meet, broad in his ideas, conservative in his views, and public-spirited in the largest sense of the word. His business genius has been a persistent factor in the upbuilding of Menominee and the Upper Peninsula, and the hundreds of men and women who have been given their first chance in the splendid concerns with which he is identified have been able to start in the right way and have acquired experience in business and industrial pursuits which will be of lasting benefit to them and assures them of successful careers. The influence of Mr. Cook is conspicuous in Menominee not only in business and industrial circles but also from social and artistic standpoints. He occupies one of the most beautiful homes in Menominee and in a man of large hearted but most unostentatious charity. The Menominee Opera House is his personal property, and under his direction many of America's most eminent actors are secured for this city. Whenever there is an enterprise on foot which has as its object the benefit of this city, Charles I. Cook is sure to be counted among those present, and, more than this, he is one of the men who will stay with it, and whose ability and shrewdness will contribute in no small degree to making it a success. DANIEL VAUGHAN.-Occupying a position of prominence among the leading citizens of Marquette, being now mayor of the city, Daniel Vaughan is widely known to the traveling public as the conductor of a passenger train on the Duluth, South Shore and Atlantic Railway. A native of Michigan, he was born, November 28, 1869, in Ishpeming, a son of the late John Vaughan. John Vaughan was born, in 1826, in County Kerry, Ireland, where he spent the first few years of his life. Emigrating to this country, he

Page  636 636 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN crossed the ocean in a sailing vessel, landing in New York city. He subsequently lived for a time in the east, first in the Empire state and later in Massachusetts. Coming then to Michigan, he located first in Ishpeming and later at Negaunee, where he worked in the iron mines until 1884. Changing his occupation, he dealt extensively in live stock until 1900, and from that time until his death, May 18, 1906, lived retired from active business. He married, in New York state, Johanna Nolan, who was born, in 1834, in County Kerry, Ireland, and they became the parents of ten children, five of whom survive, as follows: John, of Butte, Montana; Patrick, of Marquette; Anna, wife of F. Sullivan; Daniel: and Mary. The father was a Republican in politics, a member of the Roman Catholic church, and belonged to the Ancient Order of Hibernians. But six months old when his parents removed to Negaunee, Michigan, Daniel Vaughan was there reared and educated. Brought up to habits of industry and thrift, he began his railway work when but thirteen years old by carrying water for a construction crew. He afterward worked as an errand boy at the Lillie Mine, where later he became what is called a lander. He was subsequently put to firing an engine, and later given charge of a stationary engine at the same mine. In 1889 Mr. Vaughan secured a position as lander at the Cambray Mine, where he was later engineer until August 20, 1890. Entering then the employ of the Duluth, South Shore and Atlantic Railway Company, he was first switchman at the Ishpeming yards, later being made engine foreman and afterward a freight brakeman. In May, 1898, Mr. Vaughan was promoted to freight conductor, and served with such ability, fidelity and judgment that in June, 1903, he was given charge of a passenger train as its conductor, and has since held the position, his willing, faithful and accommodating spirit making him a most popular and acceptable official. On April 4, 1909, Mr. Vaughan was elected mayor of Marquette, and is filling the place with characteristic fidelity. He is a sound Republican in his political affiliations, and a valued member of the Knights of Columbus, of the Ancient Order of Hibernians, and of the Order of Railroad Conductors. On lSay 22, 1895, Mr. Vaughan was united in marriage with Amelia Murry, who was born in Negaunee, Michigan. Her father, August Murry, was born in Canada, where he learned the carpenter's trade. Since 1877 he has been in the employ of the Lake Superior Iron Company, being one of its oldest and most trusted employees, his home being in Ishpeming. His wife, whose maiden name was Amelia Bissar, was born in New York state. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Murry, as follows: Mary, Mrs. Vaughan, Lena and Excilda. Mr. and Mrs. Vaughan have six children, namely: Daniel J., John E., Clarence J., Thomas C., Florence M. and Leo Patrick. ANSON B. MINER.-A man of rare financial ability and worth, Anson B. Miner, cashier of the Miners' National Bank of Ishpeming, occupies a position of prominence among the foremost bankers of the state of Michigan, and is identified with a number of leading banking institutions in the Upper Peninsula. A native of Illinois, he was born ou the 23d of September, 1845, in Toulon, Stark county, and received his education in Galesburg, Illinois, attending first the public schools and completing his early education at Knox College. Beginning his career in early manhood Mr. Miner held various positions in the old City National Bank of Chicago, being promoted from time to time. Subsequently, on account of ill health, he was sent

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Page  637 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF AIICITIGAN 637 to Colorado to recuperate and spent four or five years in other parts of the west. Returning east, he came to Ishpeming, Michigan, in 1884, as cashier of the Ishpeming National Bank. In 1901 Mr. Miner organized the Miners' National Bank of Ishpeming, of which he has since been cashier. Ile is thoroughly conversant with the various branches of banking, to which he devotes the greater part of his time and attention, and he is now a stockholder and a director of the First National Bank of Negaunee, Michigan, and a stockholder in the State Bank of Negaunee. Mr. Miner married, on the 17th of August, 1886, Josephine Coulter, a native of Miichigan, and they have one daughter, Mary Miner. Politically Mr. Miner is an earnest supporter of the principles of the Republican party. Fraternally he was made a Mason in Chicago and belongs to various Masonic organizations of that city, including Ashlar Lodge. No. 308, Free & Accepted Masons, with which he united in 1868; Washington Chapter, No. 45, Royal Arch Masons; Apollo Commandery. No. 1, Knights Templar; and Oriental Consistory. Ile is prominent in this order and has attained to the thirty-second degree. GEORGE A. NEWETT has been an influential factor in connection with the industrial and social development of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and has long held prestige as one of the able and successful newspaper publishers of the state, being editor and proprietor of the Ishpeming Iron Ore, and maintaining his residence in the city of Ishpeming. IHe has been an influential factor also in political affairs and throughout his career has exemplified the utmost civic loyalty and public spirit. George A. Newett was born at Janesville, Rock county, Wisconsin, on the 8th of October, 1856, and is a son of William H. and Anna (McCullough) Newett, the former of whom was born in Scotland, whence he came to America at the age of eighteen years, and the latter was born in England, coming with her parents to the United States when she was a girl. William H. Newett located in the state of Connecticut soon after his arrival in America, and was there identified in mercantile pursuits until about 1847, when he came to the west and established his home in Janesville, Wisconsin, where he engaged in the milling business. He was one of the sterling pioneers of that now thriving city and was prominently identified with its development and upbuilding. In 1873 he came to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and located at Ishpeming, where he conducted a hotel and where he continued to reside until his death, which occurred in 1876. Both he and his wife were communicants of the Protestant Episcopal church. They are survived by two children,-Frank T. who is a resident of Hurley, Wisconsin; and George A., who is the subject of this review. George A. Newett gained his early education, in the public schools of his native city. He initiated his practical business career by entering upon an apprenticeship to the printer's trade in the office of the Ishpeming Iron Home, the first newspaper published in Ishpeming. He familiarized himself with the intricacies and mysteries of the "art preservative of all arts," and in 1879 he established the Iron Agitator, a weekly newspaper which was conducted under that nanme for two years, at the expiration of which the title was changed to the present form, the Ishpeming Iron Ore. This paper has been a potent factor as an exponent of local interests and also as a vehicle for the promotion of the Republican party, to which Mr. Newett has ever

Page  638 638 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN given an uncompromising support. Special attention has been given to the consideration and exploiting of the mining interests of the Upper Peninsula and in letter press and subject matter the paper has been maintained at the highest modern standard, with excellent facilities in all departments. Mr. Neweltt has frequently served as a delegate to the state conventions of his party, has served as a member of the Republican state central committee and as secretary of the central committee of Marquette county, in 1892. He was appointed sta'e commissioner of mineral statistics and of this office he remained incumbent until 1896. In his home city he has served as a member of the board of education and also as a member of the board of public works. He was appointed postmaster in 1906, and served in this office, of whose affairs he gave an able administration for four years when he voluntarily resigned it. In 1876 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Newett to Miss Mary E. Nichols, who was born in the city of Cleveland, Ohio, in 1857, and who died in 1896. Mr. and Mrs. Newett have five children,Edna M., Rhea A., William H., George A., Jr., and Marie A. In 1904 Mr. Newett remarried, his wife being Miss Edel A. Windsand, of Ishpeming. By this union there is one son, John W. JUDGE JOHN W. STONE has long held precedence as one of the representative legists and jurists of the Upper Peninsula and has served nearly twenty years as judge of the Twenty-fifth judicial circuit. He was born at Wadsworth, Medina county, Ohio, on the 18th of July, 1838, and is a son of Rev. Chauncey and Sarah (Bird) Stone, both of whom were natives of Vermont and of English descent, the respective families having been founded in New England in the colonial days. Benjamin Stone, grandfather of the subject of this review, served as a member of the Vermont regiment in the war of 1812 and later he removed with his family to MIedina county, Ohio, where he ppssed the residue of his life, having been one of the sterling pioneers of the Buckeye state. Rev. Chauncey Stone was reared and educated in the old Green Mountain state, where his marriage was solemnized. In 1836 he removed to Medina county, Ohio, where he reclaimed a farm from the wilderness and where he continued to reside until 1856, when he removed to Allegan county, Micihigan, where he resided until his death, which occurred in 1881. Concerning him the following statement has been made: "He was a local minister of the MIethodist Episcopal church and as such traveled to a limited extent, preaching and building up churches. He led the life of a noble Christian man and won the respect and confidence of all with whom he. came in contact." The mother of Judge Stone was summoned to the life eternal in 1897 at the venerable age of eighty-two years. Of the children four sons and three daughters attained to years of maturity, namely: Dr. Benjamin V., who was hospital steward and acting assistant surgeon of the Twenty-eighth Michigan Volunteer Infantry, in the Civil war, and who died at Alexandria, Virginia, in March, 1865; John W.. who is the immediate subject of this review; Maria, who is the wife of II. N. Averhill, of Grand Rapids, Michigan; Cynthia L., who (lied in California, in 1880; Chauncey C., who is a resident of California; Charles W., who resides in Allegan county; and AMelissa, who is the wife of Joseph McConnell, of Allegan county. Judge John W. Stone received his early educational training in the schools of his native state and was eighteen years of age at the time of

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Page  639 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICIIIGAN 639 the family removal to MIichigan. Ile assisted his father in the reclamation of the home farm in Allegan county and during the winter seasons he was engaged in teaching in the district schools. In 1859 he began reading law:under the preceptorship of Silas St.ffordl one of the leading members of the bar of Allegan county, and in 1860 he was elected county clerk of that county. an office to which he was re-elected as his own succ(ssor in 1862. In January of the year last mentioned Judge Stone was admitted to the bar of the state and at the close of the second term as. county clerk. in 1864, he was elected pIrosecuting attorney of Allegan county, of which office, by successive re-elections he continued incumbent for six years. Concerning his professional career the following record was given in a history of the bench and bar of Michigan, published in 1897, and but slight paraphrase is made in the statements. When he first began active practice Judge Stone entered partnership with Judge Dan J. Arnold. During these years of public practice he had demonstrated that he could be relied upon both for ability and integrity and he was called by the people to a higher grade of official service. In the spring of 1873 he was elected judge of the Twentieth judicial circuit, composed of the counties of Allegan and Ottawa. He resigned the judgeship the next year to accept a place in the firm of Norris & Blair, Grand Rapids, the title of which was changed to Norris, Blair & Stone. During the continuance of this partnership the firm was said to be one of the strongest in western 5Michigan. In the fall of 1875 Mr. Norris retired from the firm and Willard Kingsley became a member, under the style of Blair, Stone & Kingsley. In 1876 Judge Stone was elected to represent the Grand Rapids district, composed of the counties of Allegan, Kent, Ottawa, Ionia and 5Muskegon, in the Forty-fifth Congress and re-elected in 1878. While in Congress in 1878, having retired from the firm of Blair, Stone & Kingsley on account of his absence from the city, he formed a co-partnership with Edward Taggart, and N. A. Earle. under the firm name of Taggart, Stone & Earle, which partnership continued until 1882. After retiring from Congress, he was in 1882 appointed by President Arthur, United States attorney for the western district of Michigan. TIe discharged the duties of this office for four years, retaining in the meantime his business in Grand Rapids in connection with Wesley W. Hyde, under the firm name of Stone & Hyde. In the perforimance of his duties as district attorney he was called frequently to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, which formed a part of his district, and during these business visits he became thoroughly acquainted with the vast resources of that section of the state. So impressed was he with its possibilities, and the.promise of development in the future, that he determined to locate and establish his home in the Upper Peninsula. In May, 1887, he removed to Houghton, and entered into partnership with A. R. Gray, under the firm name of Stone & Gray. The junior melmber had a fine local reputation and as Judge Stone's reputation as a lawyer was state wide, it is not surprising that the new firm immediately came into prominence and a large practice. In the spring of 1889, Judge Grant, of the Twenty-fifth judicial circuit, was elected to the bench of the supreme court, which left a vacancy on the circuit. bench of that circuit. The property interests of the circuit are immense, and, as many of the property owners are nonresidents scattered over the entire country, many intricate questions come before the court for adjudication, and a successor was wanted who could entirely meet the requirements. Judge Stone seemed to measure up to the required standard. Lie was a resident of another circuit, but

Page  640 640 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN at the earnest solicitation of the bar and men engaged in commerce and manufacturing in the different counties of the circuit, he consented to be a candidate, and in 1890 was elected to fill the vacancy. He removed to Marquette in 1891. His course on the bench completely satisfied the popular expectation and justified the extraordinary action requisite to his elegibility. When the Republican and Democratic conventions, composed of delegates from the several counties, assembled in Escanaba in the spring of 1893, Judge Stone was renominated by acclamation and re-elected unanimously and by successive re-elections he continued on the bench of this circuit until December 31, 1909, having in April, 1909, been elected a justice of the supreme court of the state, taking his seat January 1, 1910, in which distinguished office he has since served. In politics Judge Stone accords a stanch allegiance to the Republican party and is a communicant of the Protestant Episcopal church, in which he is a member of the vestry of St. Paul's church in M'arquette. He is identified with various social and fraternal organizations and is a man whose fine intellectual and professional attainments and genial traits of character have gained to him unalloyed popularity. In the high office of which he is now incumbent he has proved himself well worthy of the honor conferred upon him and has added dignity and distinction to the bench and bar of the state. In the village of Allegan, Michigan, in 1861, was solemnized the marriage of Judge Stone to Miss Delia M. Grover, daughter of Andrew P. Grover, who was at that time sheriff of Allegan county. Mrs. Stone died at Mlarquette, January 25, 1902. Judge Stone has one son and three daughters living, concerning whom the following brief record is given: Carrie M. is the wife of Fred M. Champlin of Grand Rapids, Michigan; Nina and Edith M. reside with their father; John G. Stone is a member of the firm of Ball & Stone of Houghton, Michigan, and Frank B. Stone, the youngest, died at Redlands, California, September 15, 1896, at the age of seventeen years. CHARLES C. HANSEN, a well known citizen of Menominee, where he is now incumbent of the office of county clerk and register of deeds, and where he formerly served as county treasurer, is numbered among the sterling sons of the far Norseland who have identified themselves with the business and civic interests of the Upper Peninsula. These preferments well indicate the high regard in which he is held in the community and no further voucher therefore need be asked. Charles Christian Hansen was born in the beautiful city of Christiania, Norway, on the 28th of January, 1861, and is the son of Mads and Gurine (Christensen) Hansen, both of whom were likewise natives of that same city, where the former was born in 1826 and the latter in 1825. The venerable father still retains his residence in his native land, and the mother was summoned to the life eternal in 1904. Of the three children of this union, it may be noted that Theodore is now a resident of Boston, Massachusetts; Charles C. is the immediate subject of this sketch, and Matilda remains in her native land. The father was long prominently identified with the lumber industry in Norway and has lived virtually retired since 1899. He is a devout member of the Lutheran church, as was also his wife. Charles C. Hansen is indebted to the excellent schools of his native city for his early educational training, and in 1880, at the age of nineteen years, he severed the ties that bound him to home and fatherland and set forth to seek his fortunes in America. He landed in New York city and forthwith came westward to Chicago,

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Page  641 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 641 where he remained only a few weeks, after which he traveled throughout various sections of the United States. In the summer of 1881 he came to Menominee, and for the ensuing period of five or six years he found employment in connection with the lumbering industry, being engaged in the logging camps during the winter seasons and assisting in log driving operations on the river during the suminers. He next secured the position of fireman on a lake tug and he followed this line of occupation for four seasons. In 1892 he secured a license as a steamboat engineer and he held that position up to the close of the navigation season in 1896. He then engaged in the retail grocery business in Menominee, under the firm name of Hansen & Company. He built up a prosperous enterprise and continued to be identified with the same until the spring of 1900, when he disposed of his interest in the grocery business and entered upon an official career that has been marked by definite success and that has gained to him unqualified public commendation. In November, 1900, Mr. Hansen was elected county treasurer of Menominee county, for a term of two years, at the expiration of which, in 1902, he was chosen as his own successor. He gave a most able and careful administration of the fiscal affairs of the county, and the popular esteem placed upon his services was shown in the election of 1904, when he was chosen for his present responsible and exacting office of county clerk and register of deeds, of which he has continued incumbent by successive re-election. In politics Mr. Hansen is a stalwart advocate of the principles and policies of the Republican party, and he and his wife hold membershp in the Lutheran church. In the Masonic fraternity he is affiliated with the Menominee Lodge, No. 269, Free & Accepted Masons; Menominee Chapter, No. 107, Royal Arch Masons; Menominee Commandery, No. 35, Knights Templars; and Ahmed Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, in the city of Marquette. He is also identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the Sons of the North, the Modern Woodmen of America, and the Marine Engineers' Benevolent Association. On the 5th of September, 1892, Mr. Hansen was united in marriage to Miss Anna Matilda Christensen, who was born and reared in Menominee and who is a daughter of Ole C. and Olena (Ericksen) Christensen, concerning whom more definite mention is made in the sketch of the career of Theodore C. Christensen, on other pages of this work. Mr. and Mrs. Hansen have one child, Myrtle Gertrude. EUGENE D. MOSHER.-He to whom this sketch is dedicated is a scion of one of the honored pioneer families of Michigan and one that was founded in America in the early colonial days. He is at the present time incumbent of the responsible office of United States marshal for the western district of Michigan, northern division, and he is one of the well known and highly esteemed citizens of Marquette. Eugene D. Mosher was born at Ann Arbor, Michigan, on the 28th of March, 1864, and was there afforded the advantages of the public schools, including high school, besides which he attended a business college. At the age of twenty-one years he was appointed guard at the Michigan state prison in the city of Jackson, where he remained ten years. He then went to the city of Chicago and identified himself with the detective agency conducted by Captain Bonfield. In this connection he did a large and important work and traveled extensively throughout the west. Finally he returned to Jackson, Michigan, where he served as assistant postmaster for some time, after which he held a position of hall master and deputy warden of the state prison in that

Page  642 642 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN city. In 1883 he was appointed deputy warden of the branch state penitentiary at Marquette and he retained this office about eight years, at the expiration of which, in 1904, he received his appointment to his present responsible position, that of deputy United States marshal. His services in this office have been marked by great discrimination and ability and his administration has been effective and altogether admirable. He is Republican in his political proclivities and he is identified with various social and fraternal organizations. Eugene D. Mosher is a son of Horton and Sarah (McLean) Mosher, both of whom were born in the state of New York, the former in 1840 and the latter in 1844. The father now resides at Jackson, Michigan, and the mother was summoned to eternal rest on the 29th of April, 1909. Of their three children two are living, of whom the subject of this sketch is the elder, and George N. is a resident of Denver, Colorado. Horton G. Mosher was engaged in the real-estate business in the state of New York, where he continued to reside until the early '60s, when he removed to Ann Arbor, Michigan. He was a civil engineer by profession and as such he enlisted in the Union army at the time of the Civil war, being assigned to duty in connection with the construction of military bridges, roads, etc., at various points in the south. While thus engaged he became ill and for some time was confined in a hospital at Chattanooga, Tennessee. He continued in the service of the government for three years and then returned to his home in Ann Arbor, where he was engaged in the real-estate business for many years and where he is now living virtually retired. Nelson Mosher, grandfather of the subject of this review, was born in Dutchess county, New York, and his death occurred in 1875. He became one of the distinguished members of the bar of Michigan and was one of the pioneer representatives in this state. He studied law under the preceptorship of Judge Knickerbocker, a leading member of the New York bar, and his license to practice in the supreme court of the United States was signed by the Hon. William H. Seward, clerk of the court. Upon coming to Michigan he first located in the village of Dexter, Washtenaw county, which place was then in the midst of a forest wilderness. He was one of the first postmasters of Dexter, holding this office under the administration of President Jackson. Later he established his home in Ann Arbor, where he became associated in practice with Judge Crane, under the firm name of Mosher & Crane. Wirt Dexter, who became one of the most distinguished members of the Michigan bar, was a student in the law office of this firm. Finally Nelson Mosher removed with his family to Isabella county, this state, and he was the first lawyer to establish his residence in that county. He was a practical surveyor and he laid out the village of Mount Pleasant, the county seat of that county. He was the first county attorney of Isabella county and later served on the bench of the circuit court. On the 24th of November, 1902, a portrait of Judge Mosher was presented to the court and the people of Isabella county by the Isabella County Bar Association and the same was placed on the walls of the court house. The presentation address was made by Hon. Isaac A. Fancher, president of the bar association and its eldest member, both in point of years and continuous service at the bar. Addresses were also made by other representative members of the bar of the county. Judge Mosher married Catherine Tice, a descendant of the Hudson River Knickerbockers, and who died in 1877. Of their four sons and one daughter, two sons are now living,-Cass, who resides at Rosebush, this state, and Horton G., father of the subject of this sketch.

Page  643 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 643 The Mosher ancestry is traced back to Hugh Mosher, who was born in England in 1633 and who died at Dartmouth, Massachusetts, in 1713. He arrived in America on the 29th of January, 1660. He and five others purchased at Newport, Rhode Island, a certain tract of land at Misquamicut, now Westerly. This property was secured from the Indian, Schem Socho, who had received the same for compensation for his services in driving off the Pequot Indians in 1637. On the 9th of September, 1661, Hugh Mosher had a share of Westerly apportioned to him, but it is probable that he never resided there. He was made a freeman in 1664. On the 8th of July, 1668, he purchased of Thomas Lawton a farm near Hunting Swamps, Rhode Island, and in August, 1674, he was a member of the court martial held at Newport, Rhode Island, for the trial of certain Indians, charged with complicity in King Philip's war. Several of the number were sentenced to death. In 1684, at Dartmouth, Massachusetts, Hugh Mosher was ordained as pastor of the First Baptist church, at the time of its organization. He continued to reside at Dartmouth until his death, which occurred on the 7th of December, 1713, and he was an extensive land holder in both Massachusetts and Rhode Island. He married Rebecca Harndel and they became the parents of three children, -John, James and Sarah. Eugene D. Mosher, whose name initiates this review, was united in marriage on the 18th of July, 1883, to Miss Tillia Hangsterfer, who was born at Ann Arbor, Michigan, and who is the daughter of Michael J. and Teresa (Staub) Hangsterfer, both of whom were born at Frankfort on the Rhine, Germany. The father came to America when a young man and located at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, whence he later removed to Ann Arbor, Michigan, where he was engaged in the manufacture of candies until the time of his death and where his widow still maintains her home. Of their large family of children only four are now living. Mr. and Mrs. Mosher have two daughters, Kathryn and Salome. WILLIAM ANDREWS.-In the picturesque parish of St. Just, in the extreme western section of the county of Cornwall, England, was born this honored and representative citizen of Ishpeming, where he is now serving on the bench of the municipal court. He has long been a resident of the Upper Peninsula, has served in various offices of distinctive public trust and honor, including that of mayor of Ishpeming, and no citizen commands a higher degree of popular confidence and esteem. In the Cornish parish just noted Judge Andrews was born on the 3rd of October, 1849, and he is a son of John and Elizabeth (Allis) Andrews, both of whom were born in the same parish, representatives of old and honored families of Cornwall, where they maintained their home until the close of their lives. The father died at the age of seventy-three years and the mother was seventy-seven years of age when she was summoned to the life eternal. Both were most zealous and devout members of the Reformed Wesleyan church, in which the father was a local preacher and in which he long served as Sunday-school superintendent. IIe was of the sturdy and sterling stock that has made the Cornish type hold such high reputation as one generation has followed another on the stage of life, and his career was one of earnest and honest toil and endeavor. In his younger days he was identified with the great mining industry in his native county, and afterward engaged in agricultural pursuits, which enlisted his attention during the closing years of his active career. Of

Page  644 644 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN the family of four sons and six daughters, one son, the subject of this review, and three daughters are now living, and of this number two are residents of the United States, to which country the honored father made a visit in the year 1873. Of the children the subject of this review was the third in order of birth. Judge Andrews gained his rudimetary education in the schools of his native parish, but his training has been largely that of self-discipline through well directed study and reading, which has made him a man of broad information and mature judgment. For a period of about eleven years he was employed in the tin mines of his native county, where he remained until 1871, when he severed the home ties and came to America. Within a few months after his arrival in the United States he came to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and located at Negaunee. On the 1st of June, 1871, he there found employment in the McCumber mine, which is now known as the Lucy mine, and he continued to be engaged in mining work until 1874, after which he was employed for an interval as a traveling salesman in this section of the country. In the spring of 1875 he established a meat market at Champion mine, Marquette county, where he conducted a prosperous business in this line until March, 1880, when he removed to Ishpeming, where he was thereafter successfully engaged in the meat and grocery business until 1896. Within this long period he gained a secure hold upon popular confidence and regard and became one of the representative business men of the city. The year last mentioned gave unmistakable evidence of the esteem in which he is held in the community, since he was then elected mayor- of the city. He gave a most careful and businesslike administration and was chosen as his own successor in 1899, so that he remained incumbent of the mayoralty until 1900. In the spring of 1903 he was elected judge of the municipal court, for a term of four years, and at the expiration of the same in 1907, he was re-elected. He has shown marked discrimination and judicial acumen in the handling of the affairs of this office, and his rulings have been signally fair and impartial, based upon justice and equity and upon the law, of which he has acquired a broad and practical knowledge. His present term of office will expire in May, 1911, but there is all of assurance that he will be continued in the position through the appreciative support of the voters of the city until such time as he deems it advisable to retire. Judge Andrews also served one term as supervisor of the Eighth ward of the city. In politics he gives his support to what is locally known as the Labor party, and on its ticket he has been elected to the various municipal offices noted. Judge Andrews is one of the most prominent and influential members of the fraternal order of the Sons of St. George in this section of the state, and his affiliation therein is with Trelawney Lodge No. 399, of Ishpeming, in which he has passed all of the official chairs and of which he has served continuously as supreme chancellor since 1898. In 1889 he was a delegate to the Supreme Lodge of the order, at its meeting held in the city of Chicago; and in 1907 he was elected to attend the meeting of the Grand Lodge in the city of Marquette. In Michigan, on the 7th of June, 1873, was solemnized the marriage of Judge Andrews to Miss Louise Wesley, who was likewise born in Cornwall, England, as were also her parents, Francis and Louise (Blight) Wesley, both of whom passed the closing years of their lives in Ishpeming, Michigan. Of their five children, two sons and three daughters, one son is deceased. Mr. Wesley came with his family to America in the '60s, and located in the copper-mining district of the

Page  645 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 645 Upper Peninsula of Michigan, and in this section of the state he continued to be identified with mining operations during the residue of his active career. He was a Republican in politics and both he and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Judge and Mrs. Andrews have three children,-Elizabeth J., who married William Ripper; William J., who married Ethel Ditleson; and Albert W., a wholesale meat dealer at Ishpeming, for Nelson Morris & Company. REV. ACHILLE POULIN.-One of the able and honored members of the priesthood of the Catholic church in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan is Father Achille Poulin, who is pastor of St. Anne's church and who assumed this charge on the 12th of November, 1902. He is a man of most scholarly attainments, of distinctive administrative ability and most gracious personality, so that under his able direction both the spiritual and temporal affairs of his important parish have been signally prospered. Under his direction the interior of the church has been remodeled and a fine new pipe organ has been installed, these improvements representing an expenditure of seven thousand dollars. Besides this a $3,500 debt has been incurred for the improvement of the parish school. Father Poulin is director of the school and under his supervision the same has been brought up to an exceptionally high standard. In the same he has secured the services of devoted and earnest sisters from the Dominion of Canada and it has been conclusively proven that students in this school receive more thorough preparation and are better fitted to enter the eighth grade of the public schools than are those previously trained in the city schools. Father Poulin is now putting forth most earnest efforts to secure the erection of a new school building, to be erected at a cost of not less than twenty-five thousand dollars, and there is every evidence that he will soon be able to realize his ambitions in this important work. Father Achille Poulin was born in St. Joachim of Montmorency, province of Quebec, Canada, on the 14th of June, 1861. He gained his early educational training in the parochial schools of his native town and at the age of fourteen years he entered the seminary of Quebec for the prosecution of his classical course. There he continued his studies for a period of four years and after having passed the regular baccalaureate examination, he was admitted to the two years' course of philosophy in Laval University, in Quebec. Upon attaining his legal majority he engaged in teaching in St. Lawrence College, near Montreal, and later he held a similar position at Notre Dame de Lourdes College, at Fall River, Massachusetts. In connection with pedagogical work of the institutions of the great mother church he was particularly successful and popular and in the meanwhile he had determined to fit himself for the priesthood of the church. With this end in view he entered St. Joseph's College, at Memramcook, New Brunswick, in which institution he prosecuted his theological studies. In the following year the late Bishop Vertin, who had admitted him to his diocese, sent Father Poulin to St. Jerome's College, at Berlin, Ontario, and at St. Peter's cathedral, in the city of Marquette, Father Poulin was ordained to the priesthood at the episcopal hands of Bishop Vertin, on the 2nd of July, 1891. He celebrated his first mass in the old church in his native town and after a few days of vacation he became assistant priest at St. Joseph's church, in Hancock, Michigan, on the 26th of July, 1891. He was made administrator of St. Ignatius' church, in Houghton, Michigan, on the 10th of September of the same year and held this Vol. II-2

Page  646 646 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN position during the absence of the pastor, Rev. Father Francis X. Bechr, in Rome. After leaving Houghton, Father Poulin spent two years as pastor of St. Jean Baptiste church, at Garden, Michigan; twenty months at St. Bruno's church, of Nadeau, this state; two years at St. Louis' church, at Calumet; four years at St. Joseph's church, at Iron Mountain; sixteen months at St. Joseph's church, at Ishpeming, and from the last named pastorate, he was sent to his present charge in Menominee. His labors in each of these pastorates in the Upper Peninsula have been fruitful in goodly results and he is one of the honored and valued representatives of the Holy Catholic church in this section of the state. THOMAS CONNORS.-Bright and ambitious from his earliest childhood, filled with the American spirit of restlessness and the true Irish love of adventure, Thomas Connors, the popular postmaster at Negaunee, Marquette county, has a familiar acquaintance with much of our country, his wanderings in the days of his boyhood and youth having taken him into many parts of our Union, and even beyond its confines. A son of William Connors, he was born, February 14, 1868, in Sheboygan county, Wisconsin, of Irish ancestry. A native of county Cork, Ireland, William Connors came to this country by sailing vessel when eighteen years old, disembarking in New York city. He made his way to New Orleans, where he worked a brief time, from there going to Akron, Ohio. After his marriage he moved with his young wife to Sheboygan county, Wisconsin, bought wild land, and was there employed in tilling the soil for nine or ten years. Coming from there to northern Michigan, he located in Negaunee, where he spent his remaining days, dying in 1905. He was a faithful member of the Roman Catholic church, and in politics was independent, voting according to the dictates of his conscience. He married, in Akron, Ohio, Mary Flinn, who was born in county Cork, Ireland, in 1840, and died in 1896. Seven sons and five daughters were born to them, and of these five children are living, as follows: Mary, wife of James Gleason; Stephen J., of Escanaba, Michigan; William, of Marinette, Wisconsin; Michael Mr.; and Thomas, the special subject of this sketch. But two years old when he came with his parents to Negaunee, Thomas Connors obtained a limited education in the public schools, attending the winter terms and working through the summer seasons. At the age of eleven years he ran a fan pump for the Cambria Mining Company, later being employed in picking and sorting rock from the iron ore for the South Jackson Mining Company. He afterwards worked for the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad Company as track hand at Goose Lake and at Escanaba, afterwards loading cars at Iron Mountain with iron ore, and subsequently being put to road grading at Hermansville in Menominee county. He was then a boy of but thirteen years. The flies nearly ate him up, and he gave up the job and spent a year and a half in seeing the country, paying his way as he went by doing odd jobs. He drifted to New York city, from there crossing the country to the Mississippi river, where he found work on the steamer Josephine, plying between Saint Paul, Minnesota, and Saint Louis, Missouri. His next move took him into North Dakota, and from there he went up to Winnipeg, Canada. Returning to Michigan, Mr. Connors, then in the seventeenth year of his age, found employment at Ironwood, Gogebic county, helping sink a shaft at the Iron King Mine, of which Mat Fitz, simmons was the superintendent. Making his way from there to his home in Negaunee, he entered the employ of the Chicago and North

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Page  647 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 647 western Railroad Company, serving as switchman two years, afterwards being yardmaster until 1900. He then embarked in the timber and lumber business, with which he has since been actively identified, having a number of camps along the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic Railway, north of Ishpeming. A straightforward Republican in his political views, Mr. Connors l:as ever taken a genuine interest in local affairs, and as a good and loyal citizen has never shirked the responsibilities of office. He served as alderman from the Fifth Ward from 1893 until 1898, and is now a member of the local school board, being one of its trustees. In 1902 he was appointed postmaster at Negaunee, and filled the position so efficiently for four years that on Febuary 12, 1906, he received his second commission for this office, and in 1910 received his third appointment. Mr. Connors married, November 25, 1889, Louisa Kirschner, who was born in Munising, Michigan, a daughter of Thomas and Katherine Kirschner, who were born in Germany and are now residing in Ishpeming, Michigan. Her father is a machinist by trade. He is a Republican in politics and a member of the Roman Catholic church, to which his wife also belongs. Of the five sons and five daughters born to Mr. and Mrs. Kirschner, Mrs. Connors is the third child. AIr. and Mrs. Connors are the parents of ten children, of whom one, John, died at the age of fifteen months, and nine are living, namely: Raymond T., Viola, Howard, Loraine, Cecil, Charles, Ruth, Elizabeth and Ward. JOSEPH H. STEERE.-Ahmong those who have lent distinction and honor to the bench and bar of the section of Michigan to which this publication is devoted, Judge Steere occupies a position of much prominence. He has served for nearly twenly-six consecutive years upon the bench of the Eleventh judicial circuit of Michigan and is one of the best known and most highly esteemed citizens of Sault Ste. Marie. Judge Steere finds a due measure of satisfaction in reverting to the state of Michigan as the place of his nativity and also in the fact that he is a scion of one of its pioneer families. He was born at Addison, Lenawee county, Michigan, on the 19th of May, 1852, and is a son of Isaac and Elizabeth (Comstock) Steere, the former of whom was born in Ohio, whither the family removed from Virginia, the name having become identified with the annals of the historic Old Dominion in the early colonial epoch. Isaac Steere, whose vocation was that of farming and milling, settled at Adrian, Michigan, in 1834, about three years before the admission of the state to the Union. He later removed to Addison, in the same county, where he maintained his home for many years. He finally returned to the city of Adrian, where he lived retired until his death, in 1897, at the venerable age of eighty-two years. His cherished and devoted wife, who was ever his true helpmeet and loving companion, was born in the state of New York and was of English descent. She died in 1908 in the city of Adrian and was eighty-four years of age at the time of her death. Of the four children, Judge Steere is the only son, and concerning the three daughters the following brief data are given: The two older sisters, Catherine and Jennie, died years ago when comparatively young, unmarried, being teachers by profession. A younger sister, Mary M. Walker, a widow now lives Ft Adrian. Isaac Steere was a man of remarkable energy and industry, of strong and vigorous mentality and of impregnable integrity of character. He was one of the honored and esteemed citizens of Lenawee county for three-score and ten years, and his name merits an enduring

Page  648 648 TIlE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN place on the roster of the sterling pioneers of the Wolverine commonwealth. He was originally a Whig and later a Republican in his political allegiance and his religious faith was that of the Friends or Quaker church, of which his wife was also a devout adherent. The boyhood and early youth of Judge Joseph H. Steere were passed on the homestead farm, in Addison township, Lenawee county. After availing himself of the privileges of the public schools he continued his studies in the Raisin Valley Seminary, a school conducted under the auspices of the Society of Friends, and in this well conducted institution he was graduated as a member of the class of 1871. Thereafter he completed the curriculum of the high school in the city of Adrian in the brief period of six months, thus showing his ambition and prowess as a student. In the autumn of 1872 Judge Steere entered the literary department of the University of Michigan, in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1876 and from which he received the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Soon afterward he began the study of law in the office of Geddes & Miller, at Adrian, and after two years of assiduous study by which he rapidly absorbed and assimilated the science of jurisprudence, he was admitted to the bar in 1878. While a student in the University of Michigan he had taken law lectures, though he did not formally matriculate in the law department of that institution. In the spring of 1878 Judge Steere came to Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, which was then a small village, and here began the practice of his chosen profession. Within the same year he was appointed prosecuting attorney of Chippewa county, and a year later he was formally elected to this office, of which he continued incumbent until the year 1881. His service as public prosecutor, given with much of resourcefulness and versatility, did much to enhance his professional reputation, and by this time he had gained prestige as one of the admirably fortified members of the bar of the Upper Peninsula. In the year last mentioned he was made the nominee on the Republican ticket for judge of the circuit court of the Eleventh judicial circuit, and in the ensuing election he received a gratifying majority at the polls. Through successive re-elections he has continued on the bench of this circuit during the long intervening years, and it is maintained by leading members of the bar of his circuit, without regard to political affiliations, that his tenure of the office is certain to be continued as long as he shall consent to retain the position. Judge Steere was only twenty-eight years of age when he was then elevated to the bench, and his judicial record has been one worthy of note, as from the very beginning he evinced the strong judicial acumen, as well as the thorough knowledge of the law, that ever makes the ideal judge. Concerning his career the following interesting statements from a history of the bench and bar of Michigan, published in 1897, are worthy of reproduction in this connection. "In 1889 he traveled in Europe and he has since traveled extensively in America, making a canoe voyage one summer of over one thousand miles, in visiting Hudson's Bay. When he became judge the circuit comprised the large area of what is now Chippewa, Schoolcraft, Luce, Alger, Mackinac and Manitou counties. There were no court houses in the entire circuit except in Chippewa and Mackinac. In Manitou county, composed of islands in Lake Michigan, the entire population was Irish and was governed by Father Gallagher, their priest, and they ironically addressed Judge Steere as 'Your Lordship.' In the winter he could reach some of his counties only on snow shoes and in the

Page  649 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 649 summer in sailing boats. He has held court in stores, hotel offices and in other convenient places of assembly. The judge is a great lover of hunting and fishing. He is a profound student, and has made a thorough study of the history of the Lake Superior region. He has accumulated the finest library of hooks relating to the early history of this region to be forund anywhere in private hands. Sault Ste. Marie, where he resides, is the oldest white settlement in Michigan, having a history running back to 1668. He has received many volumes pertaining to its history and that of the Superior region generally, from dealers in Europe, and many of the volumes are printed in French. He has never married. He spends his vacations hunting and fishing and his evenings in his study. He has been elected to succeed himself wihout opposition. He knows no friend while on the bench. A strange attorney is treated with the same courtesy in his court that his best friends would receive. He is often called to Detroit and other places in southern Michigan to preside in the courts, and is known throughout the state as a just and upright judge. He is not a politican and believes that politics should have no part or lot in court work. He has done much to elevate the bench and bar since he became judge. He is kind-hearted and charitable and has helped many unfortunate men and women to a larger and better life. He is a genial and companionable character and has a wide circle of admiring friends, who love him not only for his sterling qualities as a judge and public official but also for his warm heart and sympathetic disposition. He is a Mason of high rank, having attained the thirty-third and maximum degree in the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite." JESSE HUBBARD.-The present county commissioner of schools for Menominee county has maintained his home in the city of Menominee for more than a score of years and has been prominently identified with educational affairs in this county, where he commands a secure place in popular confidence and esteem. Mr. Hubbard has accomplished much in furtherance of the educational interests of the county, was for a number of years superintendent of the city schools of Menominee and has held his present office since 1897. He is a man of fine scholarship and marked executive ability, and the estimate placed upon him in the community is best indicated by his long tenure of the office of which he is now incumbent. Jesse Hubbard finds a due meed of satisfaction in reverting to the fine old Buckeye state as the place of his nativity. He was born on a farm in Ross county, Ohio, on the 15th of March, 1848, and is a son of Willis and Caroline (Funston) Ilubbard, both likewise natives of Ross county and members of honored pioneer families of that section of the state. The father was born on the 29th of February, 1824, and he died at Alva, Oklahoma, on the 16th of January, 1909, venerable in years and honored by all who knew him. The mother was born on the 7th of February, 1828, and her death occurred at Mahomet, Illinois, on the 16th of August, 1869. Their marriage was solemnized in Ross county, Ohio, in the year 1847, and they became the parents of five children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the first born. All of the children are living except one. Willis Hubbard learned the blacksmith trade in his youth and he continued to follow the same to a greater or less extent for many years, though his principal vocation in life was that of farming, in connection with which he won a due measure of success through his well directed energies. In 1860 he removed with his family to Champaign county, Illinois,

Page  650 650 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN and purchased a home in Mahomet, Illinois. There he continued to be actively identified with the great basic industry of agriculture for many years, and he was a citizen of prominence and influence in his community. In politics he was originally aligned as a supporter of the cause of the Whig party, but he joined the Republican party at the time of its organization and thereafter continued a staunch advocate of its principles and policies. He served a number of years as school trustee and held other local offices. He was affiliated with the Masonic fraternity and both he and his wife held membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. Jesse Hubbard, the immediate subject of this review, was about twelve years of age at the time of the family removal to Champaign county, Illinois, and after completing the curriculum of the district schools he continued his studies in the schools of the village of Mahomet, that county, after which he took a preparatory course in the Northwestern University, at Evanston, Illinois, in 1870. In the following year he was matriculated in the Illinois Western University, at Bloomington, Illinois. After his graduation Mr. Hubbard put his scholastic acquirements to practical test and utilization by turning his attention to the work of the pedagogic profession, in which he was destined to achieve much of success and prestige. For three years he was principal of the schools of Gibson, Illinois; for the ensuing five years he taught at Dwight, that state, where he held the position of superintendent, as did he later at Washington and Pontiac, Illinois, in which latter city he was superintendent of schools for a period of four years. Prior to his collegiate work it had been given Mr. Hubbard to render loyal service as a soldier of the Union in the Civil war. On the 6th of May, 1864, when but sixteen years of age, he enlisted as a pri. vate in Company D, Sixth Illinois Volunteer Cavalry, which was assigned to lHatche's division of cavalry, commanded by General Thomas, in the Department of West Tennessee. He was with his command at Nashville during the major portion of his term of service and took part in the various engagements in which his regiment was involved. He continued in the ranks of the gallant soldiers of the Union until the close of the war, and was mustered out at Selma, Alabama, on the 5th of November, 1865. He received his honorable discharge, in the city of Springfield, Illinois, on the 27th of the same month. Mr. Hubbard continued his effective labors in connection with the public schools of Illinois until 1888, in the autumn of which year he came to Menominee, Michigan, to enter upon his duties as superintendent of the city schools, a position of which he continued incumbent until 1894. Within this interval he did much to bring the schools of the city up to their present high standard of efficiency, and a perpetual debt shall the city owe to him for the work accomplished by him in the position noted, as well as in that of county commissioner of schools. After his retirement from the office of superintendent of the city schools Mr. Hubbard here engaged in the lumber business, to which he gave his undivided attention until 1897, when he was elected to his present responsible office, in which his services have inured greatly to the benefit of the schools throughout the county. He has thoroughly systematized their work, has gained the earnest co-operations of the teachers employed from year to year, and his course has won to him unqualified popular support and commendation, as is evidenced by his protracted incumbency of office. Mr. Hubbard is a broad-minded, liberal and public spirited citizen,

Page  651 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 651 and no measure projected for the general good of the community is denied his earnest support. In politics he has ever accorded a stalwart allegiance to the principles and policies for which the Republican party stands sponsor; he and his wife are zealous members of the Methodist Episcopal church; and he is affiliated with Menominee Lodge, No. 269, Free & Accepted Masons; Goodtown Tent, No. 714, Knights of the Maccabees; and Lyon Post, No. 266, Grand Army of the Republic. On the 10th of November, 1875, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Hubbard to Miss Belle Hume, who was born at Sidney, Shelby county, Ohio, on the 6th of May, 1851, and who is a daughter of John and Martha (Reed) Hume, the former of whom was born in West Virginia, in 1830, and the latter of whom was born in Noble county, Ohio, in 1826; their marriage was solemnized at Bellefontaine, Shelby county, Ohio, and they finally removed to Champaign bounty, Illinois. where Mr. Hume turned his attention to agricultural pursuits and where he passed the residue of his life, having been summoned to eternal rest in 1875, at the age of forty-five years. Mrs. Hume long survived her honored husband and passed the closing years of her life in Seymour, Illinois, where she died in 1905, at the venerable age of seventy-nine years. Both were devout members of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Hume was a Democrat in his political proclivities, and in Champaign county, Illinois, he served as township supervisor and school trustee. He was affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Of the ten children seven are living, and Mrs. Hubbard is the eldest of the number. Mr. and Mrs. Hubbard have two children, -William J. and Wiley K., who are twins and who were born on the 12th of March, 1879. C. HORATIO SCOTT.-With the representative business and active men of the pretty "Soo" we present a brief review of C. Horatio Scott, the efficient postmaster of Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. He is a native of Barrie, Canada, and was born February 1, 1872, and is the fourth in a family of five children, four sons and one daughter, born to Christopher and Margaret (Dickie) Scott. All of the children are living at present, two being residents of the States and three of Canada. Christopher Scott was a native of Barrie, Canada, and he was reared to the life of an agriculturist and educated in the common schools. He is deceased. His wife was a native of the same locality and she is also deceased. Their son, Mr. Scott of this review, was reared in his native country till the age of sixteen, and received only a common school education, in fact he may be styled self educated, since his chances were limited for an extended course of instructions. He began life as a wage earner in a saw mill at the age of thirteen. So it is seen that he began at the bottom and has attained his present high position in life through honest effort and aggressive ambition. At the age of sixteen he came to Michigan and located first in Manistique, going to work in a sash and door factory, where he remained about four years and from there he went to Bay Mills, Chippewa county, Michigan, where as foreman in a lumber plant, he was located there about ten years, being with the well known firm of Hall & Munson. About the year of 1900 Mr. Scott came to Sault Ste. Marie and has been a resident of this pretty city since. He entered the insurance business for about one year and was then elected register of deeds of Chippewa county and held this office by re-election for three terms,

Page  652 652 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN during the last term resigning to accept the office of postmaster of "The Soo" and is the present incumbent. Mr. Scott has recently moved into the beautiful postoffice building which cost $150,000, and this elegant building is a credit to not only the city of "The Soo" but the North Peninsula of Michigan. Politically he is a stalwart Republican and a great admirer of President Taft's policies. Mr. Scott cast his maiden presidential vote for McKinley. Fraternally Mr. Scott is a high Mason. He is a member of "The Soo" Masonic Blue Lodge F. & A. M., the Chapter, the Council, the Sault Ste. Marie Commandery and the Shrine. In 1892 Mr. Scott wedded Miss Minnie McCullough, a native of Manistique, Michigan, and one daughter was born to them, Flecta U. She is a member of The Soo High School class of 1912. Mrs. Scott is a member of the Presbyterian church. REV. JOSEPH M. LANGAN.-Numbered among the essentially representative and honored members of the priesthood of the Catholic church in the Northern Peninsula of Michigan, where he has labored long and effectively, is Father Langan, who was formerly pastor of the Church of St. John the Evangelist, in the city of Ishpeming, and who now has pastoral charge of St. Patrick's church in Escanaba, one of the important parishes of this section of the state. He has labored with all of consecrated zeal and devotion in his high calling and under his effective administration have been furthered both the spiritual and temporal affairs of the parishes in which he has labored. Father Langan is a native of the city of Baine, Ontario, Canada, where he was born on the 30th of November, 1865, and he is a son of James N. and Ann Langan, who were numbered among the pioneers of that beautiful city where they long maintained their home. There the father died in 1894. Of the children three sons and four daughters are now living. After due preliminary discipline in a parochial school of Minneapolis, Father Langan continued his studies in St. John's University, Collegeville, Minnesota, and his ecclesiastical course was completed in St. Paul's Seminary and in St. Francis Seminary, in the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where he was graduated as a member of the class of 1888. His ordination to the priesthood was received at the episcopal hands of Bishop Vertin, at Marquette, Michigan, on the 23d of May, 1888. Father Langan initiated the work of his chosen calling by becoming assistant to the late Rev. H. J. Rousseau, who was at that time pastor of St. John's church in Ishpeming, and who was the founder of the fine parochial school in connection therewith. After a period of four months' service in Ishpeming Father Langan was transferred to the Cathedral at Marquette, where he retained a pastoral charge for the ensuing six years. At the expiration of this period he was assigned to the pastorate of the Church of St. John the Evangelist at Ishpeming, where he entered upon his duties on the 25th of October, 1894. He continued in charge of this parish until August 1st, 1901, when he accepted his present charge as pastor of St. Patrick's church at Escanaba, which has since continued the field of his earnnest and effective labors. The parish has a membership of 2,250 souls and the church is in a most flourishing condition, and in a few years a parochial school will be established. As has been well said concerning Father Langan: "His life is given to his work and he labors earnestly among his people for their welfare, ever faithfully and unwearying as a servant in the vineyard of the Divine Master." Father Langan is liberal and popular as a citizen and his genial personality

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Page  653 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 653 has gained and retained to him warm friends among all classes of citizens. JOHN W. STILES.-It may be said without fear of legitimate contradiction that no citizen of Menominee county is better known or is held in higher esteem than Judge John W. Stiles, who has maintained his residence in Menominee county for more than thirty years, who has held various positions of distinctive public trust, and who has been a prominent factor in connection with the business and civic development and progress of the city of Menominee, where he is now presiding on the bench of the probate court,-one of the able and honored officials of the county. The old Empire state of the Union figures as the native heath of Judge Stiles, as he was born in Plattsburg, Clinton county, New York, on the 2d of October, 1854. He is a son of William and Catherine (Brennan) Stiles, both of whom were born and reared in Ireland, whence they came to America in the early '40s. They established their home in Plattsburg, New York. There he died on the 28th of July, 1873, and his wife, long surviving him, passed the closing years of her life in the home of her son, John W., subject of this review. Of their thirteen children only two are now living: Judge John W. and William, the latter of whom is likewise a resident of Menominee. Judge Stiles was reared to maturity in his native town, to whose public schools he is indebted for his early educational training, and there he continued to reside until he had attained to the age of twentyfour years, when, in 1879, he severed the home ties and set forth to seek his fortunes in Michigan. He came to Menominee county and established his home in the village of Norway, where for the first year he was employed in the iron mines. He then became associated with his brother Daniel in the manufacturing of cigars in that village, where they continued operations until the 1st of January, 1887, when they removed to Menominee and continued in the same line of enterprise under the firm name of Stiles Brothers until October, 1888, when the business alliance was severed by the death of the elder brother, Daniel. Thereafter Judge Stiles continued the business in an individual way and he built up a large and prosperous enterprise. From the time of taking up his abode in Menominee Judge Stiles has shown a lively interest in all that has touched the welfare of the community, and he has been a leader in the councils of the Democratic party in this section of the state for many years, the while he has been called upon to serve in various offices of public trust.and responsibility, the incumbency of which has emphatically testified to the unqualified confidence and esteem accorded to him in his home county. He has been a frequent delegate to the state, congressional, senatorial and county conventions of his party, and he is recognized as an influential figure in political affairs in the Upper Peninsula. He served as county highway commissioner, and he was elected sheriff of the county, in which office he served four consecutive terms of two years each. In 1900 he was again chosen sheriff, and at the polls he received a most flattering mark of popular appreciation of his integrity and executive ability, as he ran two thousand votes ahead of the party ticket. He was chosen as his own successor in 1902, and to his credit is the record of having held the office of sheriff of the county for a longer period than any other official ever called to the position. Judge Stiles has not long been permitted to withhold himself from public service, as the brief statements of this sketch will amply indicate. In 1890 he was elected

Page  654 654 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN register of deeds, of which position he remained incumbent for one term, of two years. On the 10th of October, 1892, Judge Stiles was appointed postmaster of Menominee, and he held this incumbency four years and two months, under the administration of President Cleveland. He did much to improve the postal service in Menominee, and under his regime the carrier system was amplified in scope and efficiency. His administration of the affairs of this office met with distinctive popular approval, and this has also been true in connection with every office to which he has been called during the long years of his residence in Menominee. In 1904 he was elected judge of the probate court, and in this election he ran twenty-four hundred votes ahead of his ticket. This statement bears its own significance, and no further voucher is demanded as indicating the character of the man, for such popular confidence and esteem invariably have substantial basis. He was reelected in 1908. Judge Stiles is a man of most cordial and gracious manners, and his strong mentality, his toleration and kindliness, and his deep-seated public spirit have made him a marked personality in his home city. He and his wife are communicants of the Catholic church, and in the various departments of work in their parish they take an active part. The judge is affiliated with the Catholic Order of Foresters, in which he has long served as a trustee and of which he is one of the most valued and influential members. In November, 1878, was solemnized the marriage of Judge Stiles to Miss Ellen Geary, who was born at Peru, Clinton county, New York, in September, 1853. She is a daughter of the late Mr. Geary, and was a child at the time of the family removal to Keeseville, Essex county, that state, where she was reared and educated. She is a woman of most gracious personality and. has been prominent in connection with the best social activities of Menominee. Judge and Mrs. Stiles became the parents of eight children, of whom three sons and two daughters are deceased. The three surviving children are: Katherine, Harry, and John W., Jr. HENRY W. COBURN.-The present postmaster of Escanaba, Henry W. Coburn, was born in Clinton county, Michigan, March 23, 1848. His father, Lewis Coburn, was a native of the state of New York, of ScotchIrish descent, and settled on a farm in Michigan, Clinton county, about 1838. He cleared and improved a farm in Dewitt township, Clinton county. He was a local preacher of the Methodist Episcopal church, being at one time circuit rider. He died in the Northern Peninsula of Michigan, in 1893, at the age of eighty-seven years. Mr. Coburn married Lucinda Hayes, also a native of New York, who was born in 1813, and died in 1894. They had five children, of whom Henry W. is the fourth child and now the only living representative of the family. The early life of Henry W. Coburn was spent in Clinton county, Michigan, and there he received his primary education. When he was twelve years of age he began attending the city schools of Lansing and he also attended the academy there and spent four years at the agricultural college. In 1870 Mr. Coburn removed to Detroit, where he studied pharmacy, and in 1877 went to Marquette, Michigan, where he remained ten years. In 1887 he came to Delta county, locating at Schaffer, where for thirteen years he was engaged in mercantile business, and in 1900 he came to Escanaba, where he engaged in drug business until his appointment in 1906 to the office of postmaster, which he now

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Page  [unnumbered] THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN holds. Mr. Coburn is a life-long Republican, having cast his first vote in 1869, and voting the same ever since. Mr. Coburn is a pioneer of the Northern Peninsula, and has identified himself with its progress and interests. He is a public-spirited, enterprising citizen, well known and highly esteemed. He is a member of the Masonic Blue Lodge and Chapter and a charter member of Lodge No. 354 Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, of Escanaba. In 1885 Mr. Coburn married Catherine Schaffer, daughter of Henry Schaffer and Eva Elizabeth Schaffer, of Grand Rapids, Michigan. JOHN M. LONGYEAR.-In this age of colossal enterprise and marked intellectual energy the prominent and successful men are those whose abilities lead them into large undertakings and to assume the responsibilities and labors of leaders in their respective fields of endeavor. He whose name initiates this review has been one of the most prominent and influential figures in connection with the industrial and civic development and upbuilding of the Upper Peninsula, where his capitalistic interests are of broad scope and varied order. He is; the owner of a large tract of land in this section of the state and has been prominently identified with the exploiting and developing of the iron and copper mining industry, as well as with lumbering operations, in connection with which he has become one of the substantial capitalists of the state. He maintains his home on his farm in Marquette, Michigan, a part of the year and the remainder at his fine farm at Brookline, Massachusetts. Mr. Longyear's extensive interests in northern Michigan and his close association with this section renders it most consistent to incorporate in this volume a brief review of his career. John Munro Longyear was born at Lansing, Michigan, on the 15th of April, 1850, and is a son of one of the old and honored families of this commonwealth. He is a son of John W. and Harriet (Mlunro) Longyear, both of whom were born in the state of New York, being representative of families that were founded in America in the early colonial days. The ancestry in the agnatic line is traced back to staunch Alsatian origin and the maternal lineage is of Scottish extraction. Representatives of the Longyear family were found enrolled as valiant soldiers in the Continental line of the war of the Revolution, in which the maternal great-grandfather of Mr. Longyear also participated. The Longyear family was established in Ulster county, New York, about 1730, and from that county Peter Longyear, grandfather of him whose name initiates this sketch, was the founder of the family in the state of Michigan, where he took up his residence about the year 1847. His son, Judge John W. Longyear, was long numbered among the representative members of the bar of Michigan and was one of the distinguished and influential citizens of this state. He represented Michigan in Congress, having been elected in 1862 and having been chosen as his own successor in 1864. He was a delegate to the Loyalist Convention in 1866, in the city of Philadelphia, and was a member of the Michigan Constitutional Convention in 1867. In 1869 he was appointed judge of the United States district court of the eastern district of Michigan and of this office he remained incumbent until his death, which occurred in 1875. His widow is living in Lansing with her daughter, Ida S. Longyear. Of the four children, three are living and John M. is the eldest of the number. Dr. Howard W. is one of the representative physicians and surgeons of the city of Detroit, and Ida S. resides in Lansing. John M. Longyear secured his early education in the public schools

Page  656 656 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN of his native city and supplemented this by attending Olivet College, at Olivet, this state, and Georgetown College, in the District of Columbia. His health became seriously impaired and he was compelled to abandon his studies when but fifteen years of age and for a number of years he was unable to engage in any active work. In 1872 Mr. Longyear became identified with the lumbering industry, in connection with which he did a large amount of exploring work in both the lower and upper peninsulas of Michigan. In 1873 he established his home in Marquette and, with great practical judgment he gradually made extensive investments in timber and mineral lands, from whose rise in value he gained a large fortune. He is at the present time owner of many acres of valuable land in the Upper Peninsulas, besides which he has large real estate interests in the city of Marquette, to whose development and upbuilding he contributed in most generous measure. In January, 1878, Mr. Longyear was appointed agent of the Lake Superior Ship Canal, Railway and Iron Company, which was later succeeded by the Keweenaw Association. He is owner of some of the best iron mining properties in the Upper Peninsula, is stockholder in the Lake Shore Iron Works, of which he is a director, is president of the First National Bank, of Marquette, and is an instituted principal in various other important corporations. He served two terms as mayor of Marquette, to which office he was elected in 1890 and again in 1891 and he also is a. member of the board of control of the Michigan School of Mines, at Houghton, a position to which he was appointed in 1893. In 1881 he published the first map of the Gogebic Iron Range. He is Republican in his political allegiance and is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity. In 1904 Mr. Longyear organized the Arctic Coal Company, which is incorporated under the laws of the state of West Virginia. This company operates coal mines in Spitzbergen, at a point seven hundred miles distant from the North Pole and near the shore of the Arctic ocean. An office is maintained at Trondhjem, Norway, and the headquarters of the company is in the city of Boston, Massachusetts. One mine is equipped with modern machinery and operations are being carried on with much success. Other mines are being developed. The coal is of a very fine quality and is utilized largely by the steamships that traverse the northern waters. Mr. Longyear is president of this company. In 1892 Mr. Longyear completed the erection of one of the most beautiful and costly homes in the state of Michigan, the same having been located in Marquette, and having been constructed of stone, lined with brick. This magnificent residence, on the shore of Lake Superior, continued to be the family home until 1903, when the same was taken down and the material transported to Brookline, Massachusetts, where the building was re-erected in different form. This transfer was made at a cost of many thousands of dollars. Mr. Longyear passes a considerable portion of each year in Marquette, though the family spends much time at the home in Brookline, Massachusetts, as already stated. On the 4th of January, 1879, Mr. Longyear was united in marriage to Miss Mary H. Beecher, who was born at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and who is a daughter of the late Samuel P. Beecher, one of the representative citizens of Battle Creek, Michigan. Seven children were born to this union and one of the number died in infancy. Howard was drowned in Lake Superior in 1900 and was nineteen years of age at the time; Abby is the wife of Alton T. Roberts, of Marquette and they have one son, Horace N. The four younger children, Helen, Judith, Jack M. and Robert remain at the parental home.

Page  657 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN JOHN D. MANGUM.-Standing prominent among the leading citizens of Marquette, Michigan, is John D. Mangum, a well known and successful merchant, who is now serving his second term as postmaster of this city. He is a native of Michigan, his birth having occurred in Jackson, this state, October 27, 1859. Completing his early studies in the high school at Jackson, John D. Mangum subsequently worked a while as clerk in a grocery store, after which he was traveling salesman for men's furnishing goods. In 1895 Mr. Mangum established himself in the retail clothing business at Marquette, and has here built up a fine trade, his business energy, tact and integrity winning him an excellent patronage. He is active in municipal affairs, and in 1901 was elected mayor of the city, and held the office one term. The following spring, in 1902, he was appointed postmaster, and in 1906 had the honor of being re-appointed to the position, which he still holds, having rendered appreciated service to the many patrons of the office. Mr. Mangum married, in 1893, Helen M. Welbasky, who was born at Traverse City, Michigan. Politically Mr. Mangum is one of the leading Republicans of Marquette county, and fraternally he belongs to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. EMIL GLASER.-Noteworthy among the earlier settlers of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan is Emil Glaser, who has been a resident of Escanaba, Delta county, for upwards of forty-four years, and during that time has been prominent in the administration of the public affairs of town and county, at the present writing, in 1910, being justice of the peace and notary public. Born September 23, 1841, in Saxony, Germany, he was reared and educated in the Fatherland. Emiigrating to the United States in 1860, Mr. Glaser located in Cleveland, Ohio, where, in April, 1861, he enlisted as a private in Company K, Seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry, for a term of three years. On July 3, 1863, at the battle of Gettysburg, he was severely wounded, a minie ball passing through his stomach, and was confined in a hospital until the following November. Rejoining his regiment when released, he took part in the battle of Lookout Mountain, on the twenty-fifth of that month. In 1864, at the expiration of his term of enlistment, he received his honorable discharge from the service in Cleveland, having taken part in many of the more decisive engagements of the war. Engaging then in the barber business, Mr. Glaser remained in Cleveland until 1866, when he migrated to Michigan, taking up his residence in Escanaba, where he continued as a barber for three years, being the first to ply that trade in this city. In 1869 Mr. Glaser was made magistrate, and was elected probate judge and served in that capacity for twenty-seven years, a record of service that bespeaks his ability and trustworthiness. He is now magistrate and notary public, and has the distinction of having held public office longer than any other one man in the Northern Peninsula. He is well known throughout the county, and has been actively identified with its past history, having been especially prominent in the Republican party. In 1874 Mr. Glaser erected the first planing mill factory in Escanaba. and he has since been more or less interested in residential property in the city. He bought twenty acres of land, now known as the Glaser Addition to the city of Escanaba, and platted it. This addition lies along the lake shore, and contains the choicest of city lots, the popular residential part of Escanaba being in the immediate vicinity of the Glaser addition.

Page  658 658 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN Mr. Glaser has been three times married. He married first, in 1863, Catherine, Walker, by whom he had six children, of whom three are living, namely: Henry J., of Chicago, Illinois; Lucy, of Escanaba; and John, of Escanaba. Mr. Glaser married second, December, 1887, Catherine Ramspech, who died in 1896, leaving one daughter, Ida Glaser. He subsequently married Jennie A. Briggs. Mr. Glaser is an active member of the C. F. Smith Post, No. 175, G. A. R., of Escanaba, in which he has filled all of the offices, and of which he has been commander for many years. He is likewise a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows; of the Sons of Hermann; and of the German Aid Society. JOHN LEHMAN.-As sheriff of Marquette county, John Lehman is widely and favorably known throughout this section of the Upper Peninsula as a man eminently worthy of the respect and confidence so generously accorded him by his fellow-men. Active and energetic, performing the duties devolving upon him with ability and fidelity, he is rendering excellent service in his official capacity, and is popular with all classes of the people. He was born April 13, 1862, in Sweden, which has given to this country so many of its most able and faithful citizens. His father, Carl Lehman, emigrated with his family to Michigan in 1873. He located in Marquette county, and was here a resident until his death, in 1887, while yet in manhood's prime. His widow is now living at Ishpeming, Michigan. To them seven children were born, four of whom survive, John being the second child in succession of birth. John Lehman obtained the rudiments of his education in his native land, completing his studies in the public schools of Ishpeming. During his boyhood days he began his active career at the Nelson mine, driving a horse used in hoisting deal. At the age of seventeen years he began loading ore on the stock piles for the Pioneer Iron Company, afterwards being promoted, first to assistant master mechanic. In 1905 Mr. Lehman was elected chief of police at Ishpeming, and in 1908 was elected to his present position as sheriff of Marquette county, with headquarters at the Court House in Marquette. Mr. Lehman married, August 28, 1901, Ida Swahn, a native of Sweden, and into their household three children have made their advent, namely: Eugene, Marie, and Eva. Politically Mr. Lehman is a firm supporter of the principles of the Republican party, and fraternally he is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks; of the Modern Woodmen of America; and of the Knights of Pythias. DONALD CAMPBELL MACKINNON.-Prominent among the very early settlers of the western part of the Upper Peninsula was Donald Campbell MacKinnon, who, with his brother Alexander, was the founder of the town of Iron River. He was born, April 5, 1846, near Toronto, province of Ontario, Canada, on a farm, coming, as his name plainly indicates, from honored Scotch ancestry. Hugh MacKinnon, Mr. MacKinnon's father, was born at Morbin, Argyleshire, Scotland, where he received excellent educational advantages, and as a young man taught school. He also learned the trade of ship builder in his native land, and followed it for a time. In 1844, accompanied by his family, he embarked on a sailing vessel, and after a tedious sea voyage of two months landed in New York.

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Page  659 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 659 After spending a short time in that city he proceeded to Canada, locating near Toronto. About a year later he and his brother-in-law, Donald Campbell, went to Owen Sound, Sidney county, Province of Ontario, where each selected a tract of government land, and having erected log cabins sent for their families. After becoming well settled in his new home, Hugh MacKinnon built a number of boats that were subsequently used for many years on the waters of the Georgian Bay, and while thus engaged superintended the improvement of his land. There, on his farm, he spent his remaining days, passing away at the venerable age of ninety-four years. Hugh MacKinnon married Sarah Campbell, who was born at Mull, Argyleshire, Scotland, and she attained the age of ninety-six years. Both were people of devout faith and active members of the Presbyterian church. Nine children were born of their union, as follows: Ann, who married Archibald MacInnes, lives on a fifth concession of Suydenham, in the Province of Ontario; Hugh, of Thessalon, Ontario; Alexander, of Iron River, Michigan; Donald C., the subject of this sketch; Katherine, of Owen Sound, Ontario; Archibald, deceased, formerly resided at Seattle, Washington; John, living in Vancouver, British Columbia; Mary lives with her brother Alexander, presiding over his household; and Sarah, who lives with her sister Katherine. Leaving school at the age of fourteen years, Donald C. MacKinnon began working at the carpenter's trade, becoming quite proficient as a mechanic. In 1864 he came to Michigan, locating at Marquette. Much of the Upper Peninsula was then unexplored, its wealth of ore sleeping undisturbed in the ground. After doing journeyman work for a time, Mr. MacKinnon became a contractor and builder, operating in villages, cities and towns and at the Iron Range mines. In 1878, while exploring in Iron county, he discovered several different mines and filed claims to the "Nanimo" and to the "Beta." He also explored the "Dober," which was pre-empted by Mr. Dober and located five forty-acre tracts in section two, townships forty-two and thirty-five, and in section thirty-six, of the same township, in which the Lenox mine is located. He also located the east half of the east half of section twelve, townships forty-two and thirty-five, on which the Young mine, now owned by the Huron Mining Company is located. He likewise located the present site of the Battle mine, which was pre-empted by William R. Murphy, and is located in the west half of the west half of section seven, townships forty-two and thirtyfour, and located the Kenney property, which was pre-empted by John S. Kenney, and is located in the east half of the west half of section seven, townships forty-two and thirty-four. Subsequently Mr. MacKinnon leased this mine, which he sub leased to the Spring Valley Mining Company, and he still retains an interest in a royalty. He likewise located the south half of the northwest quarter of section eight, and the north half of the southwest quarter of the same section, in townships forty-two and thirty-four. In 1881 Mr. MacKinnon and his brother, Alexander MacKinnon, platted the town of Iron River, and when the raiilroad was surveyed it passed through the heart of the town site. Not wanting the railroad in that place, Mr. MacKinnon made another survey, took it to Chicago, placed it before the officials of the railway company, and they adopted his route in preference to the other and built the road according to his proposition. Mr. MacKinnon has met with eminent success as a business man, and in addition to his extensive mining interests is a large real estate owner.

Page  660 660 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN On December 17, 1884, Mr. MacKinnon was united in marriage with Belle M. Steele, who was born in Saginaw, Michigan, a daughter of Samuel H. Steele, a native of Glasgow, Scotland, and the only member of his family to come to this country to live. Mr. Steele received a good education in the public schools of Glasgow, and subsequently made a special study of architecture. Coining as a young man to the United States, he lived for a while in New York city, going thence to Quebec, Canada, and from there to Saginaw, Michigan, where he was engaged in business as a builder and contractor for a number of years. Disposing then of his property in that locality, he removed to Marquette, Michigan, and at the end of ten years took us his residence at Negaunee, where he remained until his death, when seventy-four years of age. Mr. Steele married Isabella Cummins, who was born in Lowell, Massachusetts. Her father came from Scotland, his native land, to Lowell, Massachusetts, with his parents, and lived there for some time. He afterwards moved with his family to Ontario, Canada, and spent his last years in the city of Hamilton. Mrs. Steele died when seventy-two years of age. Mr. and Mrs. MacKinnon are the parents of four children, namely: Donald C., Samuel J., Sarah and Isabelle. Politically Mr. MacKinnon is an earnest supporter of the principles of the Republican party, and has held various offices of trust, having served as president of the village board and as a member of the board of education. Fraternally he is a member of Negaunee Lodge, F. & A. M., of Marquette Commandery, K. T.; and of the Grand Rapids Consistory. FRA.NK H. VAN CLEVE.-During the greater part of his active career, Frank H. Van Cleve, president of the First National Bank of Escanaba, has been prominently identified with the land and timber interests of the Northern Peninsula, and has contributed his full share towards the advancement and growth of this part of the state. He was born June 12, 1850, at Ypsilanti, Michigan. Having completed the course of study in the common schools of Ypsilanti, Frank H. Van Cleve attended Yale College two years, afterwards taking a course in civil engineering at the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor. He subsequently followed his chosen profession on various railways; in 1871 going to Green Bay, he was engineer on that part of the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad extending from that place to Escanaba, Michigan, continuing thus employed until late in 1874. Mr. Van Cleve then became connected with the land department of the Chicago and Northwestern Railway Company, and was for awhile in its Chicago office. In 1876 he came to Escanaba as general land agent of that company, and has since been a resident of this city, and one of its most esteemed and valued citizens. He is identified with many of its best and most important interests, being president of the First National Bank, and president and a trustee of the Public Library Company. He is largely interested in the land and timber of the Northern Peninsula, at one time being extensively engaged in shipping lumber by boat to the principal marketing points. He is a staunch Republican in politics, and a member of the Masonic Order, belonging to lodge, chapter and commandery. CHARLES J. WICKSTROM.-Calumet's strength and prosperity is doubtless due in part to the cosmopolitan character of its population, an infusion of the foreign element usually proving beneficial to any community. The grand duchy of Finland has excellent representa

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Page  661 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 661 tion in the person of Charles J. Wickstrom, postmaster and general manager of that thriving concern, the general merchandise firm of Wickstrom & Company. He was born in the province of Uleaborg, Finland, July 28, 1868, and has been a resident of Calumet since 1885. He spent his boyhood in his native country, and there received such education as falls to the share of the Finnish youth. When he was approaching young manhood he followed the example set by some other members of his family and came to America. Upon the advice of friends he decided upon Calumet as his destination in the new country, and came by boat, taking the water route on the Great Lakes from Erie, Pennsylvania. He experienced little difficulty in securing employment in connection with the mining industry, and he worked first in the old Copper Falls Mine, and later in the Tamarack, the Centennial and others. September 14, 1890, is doubtless an important date in the business career of Mr. Wickstrom, for it was then that he began upon that line of occupation which was to prove congenial and with which he was later to identify himself in a more important capacity. He entered the employ of the mercantile firm of Hosking & Company at Calumet, and continued with them for the next seven years, giving the most efficient and satisfactory service. Following this he became an employe of Isaac Frederickson, one of Calumet's pioneer merchants, and on June 26, 1899, after some nine years' practical experience as an employe, Mr. Wickstrom became a member of the firm of Wickstrom, Neimi & Company, the business of Mr. Frederickson being purchased. Through the splendid management of the gentlemen who control it this business has grown to be one of the leading ones of its kind in the locality and employs a good sized force of assistants. The business is located at 444-446-448 Pine street. Mr. Wickstrom has likewise given the most satisfactory service in the responsible office of postmaster. He was appointed in February, 1906, and was reappointed April 13, 1910. He is an uncompromising Republican, is interested in all those questions which effect the community as a whole rather than the individual, and is always ready to support those measures likely to prove conducive to the general good. He is now serving his third term as a member of the village council of Red Jacket. Mr. Wickstrom's fraternal affiliations are a source of great pleasure to him and have given him prominence throughout this part of the state. He is connected with Calumet Lodge No. 134, I. O. O. F.; with the Modern Woodmen of America; Sampo Tent, Finnish K. O. T. M.; and B. P. 0. E. No. 404. Both he and his wife at. tend the Finnish Lutheran church of Calumet. In 1893 Mr. Wickstrom was united in marriage to Miss Amanda Frederickson, daughter of Isaac Frederickson, a prominent mining and lumber man, and a merchant as well, for whom Mr. Wickstrom had at one time been an employe. To this union have been born five children: Carl Raymond, Ruth, Milma, Paul Lorimer and Martha. The subject of this biography may be counted among the self-made men who are to be congratulated upon the excellence of their work, for he has come from small beginnings and obscurity to possess substance and the esteem of his associates. RUDOLPH T. MILLER.-Recognized throughout the community as a man of sterling integrity and worth, Rudolph T. Miller holds a place of prominence and influence among the foremost citizens of the Upper Peninsula, at the present time filling not only the office of mayor of Iron Mountain, but that of probate judge for Dickinson county. A native of Vol. I-8

Page  662 662 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN Sweden, he was born, January 12, 1864, near the city of Lund, a son of Hans Miller. Hans Miller was born in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, where he was reared and educated. Becoming an expert butter and cheese maker, he was employed as a young man to go to Sweden to teach the natives of that country the art of manufacturing those dairy products. Marrying a Swedish lassie, he spent the remainder of his life in Sweden. He reared five children, of whom three, Fritz, Augusta and Helma, remained in their native land, R. T. and his brother George coming to the United States. Obtaining his early education in the public schools of Sweden, Rudolph T. Miller prepared for college at the Gymnasium, from which he was graduated in 1884. He then entered the University at Lund, but had not the means to take a full course, and, as it was exceedingly necessary that he should make his own way in the world, he emigrated to this country in 1886, and the following year and a half lived in Minneapolis. Coming then to Michigan, he was a resident of Ishpeming until December, 1889, when he located at Iron Mountain. Here he commenced his career by soliciting accident insurance, and at the end of a few months he secured the agency for different accident and fire insurance companies, opened an office, and has since been successfully engaged in the insurance and real estate business. Mr. Miller is a straightforward Republican in politics, and since casting his first presidential vote, in 1888, for Benjamin Harrison, has been an active worker in the party, and has served as a delegate to numerous city and district conventions. Elected justice of the peace in 1892, he filled the office continuously until 1906, while from 1892 until 1895 he was city clerk. In 1904 he was elected probate judge, re-elected in 1908, and in 1909 was elected to the highest office of the municipality, becoming mayor of the city. Fraternally Mr. Miller is a member of Iron Mountain Lodge, No. 388, F. & A. M.; of Iron Mountain Chapter, No. 121, R. A. M.; of Darius Council, No. 75, R. & S. M.; of Hugh McCurdy Commandery, No. 43, K. T.; of Ahmed Temple, Mystic Shrine; of Iron Mountain Lodge, No. 700, B. P. 0. E.; of Oak Leaf Camp, No. 2885, M. W. A.; of Norsjenan Lodge, No. 15, S. H. & E. T.; and of the Order of Vasa. M:r. Miller married on March 1, 1890, Hilda T. Van Narmann, born in Sweden, a daughter of C. Van Narmann. They have five children, Henry R., F. Narmann, Carl, Martha and Elsa. WILLIAM F. CRANE, postmaster at Manistique, and extensively engaged in lumber business in that town, was born in Canada, April 8, 1864. His father, William Crane, was born in England, and there received his education; he came to Canada when a young man and there married Mary Townsend, who was born and reared in Rochester, New York. They removed to Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, with their family, in 1866, and a few years later located in Cheboygan. William F. Crane was an infant when his parents removed to Sault Ste. Marie, and seven years when they located in Cheboygan, where he received his early education. When fifteen years old he attended business college, from which he was graduated. He engaged in the lumber business on his own account at Alpena, Michigan, in 1889. He was an enterprising, ambitious youth, and by close application to his business interests and attention to details, met with good success from the start. He transferred his interests from Alpena to Cheboygan, Michigan, where he carried on business until 1892, and in that year located in Manistique, where he has since been actively engaged in business. He

Page  663 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 663 deals in all kinds of lumber to be found in the Northern Peninsula, and his business judgment and acumen are generally recognized. Politically Mr. Crane is a stanch Republican, and has always been closely identified with the public interests since becoming a resident of Manistique; he was formerly president of the village board, and was the first mayor of the city, serving three terms. He is one of the best known and most popular men in the region, and has a host of friends. He was appointed postmaster by President Roosevelt in 1906, and still holds the office. He has been a resident of the Northern Peninsula thirty years and has been greatly interested in the progress and development of the state. Mr. Crane has taken an active part in the order of Ancient Free & Accepted Masons, and has taken thirty-two degrees in same. Mr. Crane married, in 1892, Ella T., daughter of William Johns, and they are parents of two daughters, Marian and Helen. JOHN DONNELL CUDDIHY.-Among the earnest men whose depth of character and strict adherence to principle have gained them recognition in northern Michigan, John D. Cuddihy is prominent. As a banker, citizen and man of large affairs, as well as a local Democratic leader, he has been an important factor in the development of his community, and is a man of sterling business character. He is the president of the First National Bank of Calumet, a director of the Citizens National Bank of Houghton, a director in the Northern Michigan Building and Loan Association of Hancock, director of the Superior Trust Company of Hancock, the manager of the Calumet Theater and the manager of the Edward Ryan estate, these representing in part the life achievements of John D. Cuddihy. He is president and organizer of the Hancock Consolidated Mining Company organized in 1906, and he was associated with Mr. Edward Ryan in the organization of the First National Bank of Calumet in 1886. He is also the president of the Lake Superior and Arizona Mining and Smelting Company. A local Democratic leader as well as a business man, Mr. Cuddihy has served in a few political offices, from 1882 to 1884, being a recorder and from 1886 until 1892 he was president of Red Jacket. He was a member of the Democratic State Central Committee from 1894 until 1898. As a fraternalist he is associated with the Order of Elks, with the Ancient Order of United Workmen, the Ancient Order of Hibernians and the Woodmen of the World. He is a member of the Catholic church. Mr. Cuddihy is a Michigan man by birth, training and association, and his father, Captain Michael Cuddihy, was one of the first settlers of the copper country, coming to Michigan from Tipperary, Ireland, in 1854. Ile was also one of the first mining captains in the copper country. His widow, Anastatia Donnell before her marriage, is yet living, and resides in Calumet. The son was born in Houghton county, at the Isle Royal mine, where his father was employed at the time, but as the family later moved to Hancock, Michigan, he attended the public schools there, until another move of the family took him to the town of Calumet, which was at that time only a little mining camp. But as the place increased in size a public school was built and young Cuddihy was the first scholar enrolled and one of the eight that stood for honors at the end of the first term. At the age of fifteen he began work in the Mineral Range Telegraph office as a messenger boy for the purpose of learning telegraphy. He was not paid for his services in delivering messages unless the message had to be carried over a mile from the office,

Page  664 664 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN and in that instance he received twenty-five cents a message. The largest amount he received at one month's work at that rate was two dollars and seventy-five cents, but in less than nine months he had mastered the dots and dashes of the Morse system and was assigned as an operator to Eagle River, Michigan, where he received a salary of fifteen dollars a month and board. He continued in that position until April, 1874, and then in company with Captain Bendery went to Baraga, Michigan, where the Captain intended to establish a telegraph office, but the arrangement in some way fell through and young Cuddihy during the two months of waiting for the office to become a reality secured work loading lumber in scows. When the office was finally established he learned that he was only to receive his board for his services, and receiving an offer from. Edward Ryan he returned to Calumet and began work for the latter as a clerk in a general store. He was promoted to the position of head bookkeeper in 1879 and was made the manager in 1887, a position he continued to fill until the business was discontinued. This store was one of the largest of its kind in Calumet at that time. Calumet has long numbered John Donnell Cuddihy among her representative business men and citizens. JUDGE EDMUND ASHFORD was born in England, in Warwickshire, March 25, 1853, but nearly his entire business life has been spent in this country, and for thirty years or more he has lived in Manistique, Michigan. During all these years he has been prominently identified with the city's affairs, and he is now serving as a probate judge. His boyhood days were spent in the place of his birth, receiving there also his public school training, and during about six years of his early life he was in the government service in Australia. Returning from there to England he was married in the mother country in 1878 to Caroline Davis, a native daughter of that country. Together they made the journey to Canada in 1879, and in 1880 they came to Manistique, Mr. Ashford during the first ten years of his residence here filling the position of lumber inspector for the Chicago Lumber Company. In 1892 he was elected the county clerk and register of deeds, filling those offices for ten years, and during the previous five years he was the clerk, treasurer and supervisor of his township. Since 1903 he has been identified with the real estate, abstract and insurance business, and in 1908 he was elected a probate judge and is the present incumbent of that office. He has gained the respect and confidence of men, and he deserves the high place he has attained in the history of Manistique and of Schoolcraft county. Four children have been born to Judge and Mrs. Ashford, and the eldest, Harry Ashford, is living on the Neopit Indian reservation and is employed as a bookkeeper. Adelaide, the elder daughter, is at home with her parents and is her father's assistant, while Frank is in Duluth, and Edith is also at home. Judge Ashford is a prominent Republican worker, and he is a Mason and also a member of the fraternal order of Elks, Lodge No. 632. WILLIAM HOLMES.-One of the honored pioneer citizens of Menominee, of which city he has served as mayor, Mr. Holmes is one of those sturdy and progressive men who became identified with the great lumber industry in this section of Michigan nearly half a century ago. Through his connection therewith, prolonged over a long term of years, he achieved a large measure of success and at all stages of his career he has retained the inviolable confidence and esteem of those with whom he has come in contact. He has been dependent upon his

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Page  665 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 665 own exertions from his boyhood days, his life has been eventful and he is in the most significant sense the architect of his own fortunes. Denied educational and other advantages as a boy and youth, he put his shoulder to the wheel and courageously pressed forward to the port of definite independence and prosperity. As a man of affairs and as a citizen he is broad minded and public spirited, and in the stern school of experience he has ably overcome the handicap of earlier years. No citizen of the Upper Peninsula is more deserving of specific mention in this compilation. William Holmes was born at Miramichi province, New Brunswick, Canada, on the 16th of April, 1830, and is a son of James Holmes, who was a native of Scotland and who came from Port Glasgow to America in 1804, establishing his home in New Brunswick, where he engaged in farming and lumbering and where both he and his wife continued to reside until their death. The early educational training of the subject of this sketch was limited to about eighteen months' attendance in the district schools of his native province, and when but ten years of age, he began work as a driver of the supply team for the lumber camps in that section. At the age of sixteen years he left the parental home, and his financial reinforcement at this time was summed up in four dollars, which had been loaned to him by his sister. He set forth to make his way on foot to Bangor, Maine,-a distance of more than three hundred and fifty miles. On the way he secured employment for four days in the hay field and received in compensation for his services fifty cents a day, less the amount of one dollar which his employer charged him for the service of driving twenty miles to Frederickstown in order to get the money to pay the boy. Young Holmes resumed his tramp and arrived in Old Town, Maine, where he passed the first night on a bench in a hotel office. IHe proceeded to Stillwater, that state, where he earned a little money by digging a cellar, and upon his arrival in the city of Bangor, he borrowed three dollars from a friend and thence proceeded into the woods, where he passed the winter in chopping timber for a firm operating on the Fish river in Aroostook county. He continued for two years in the employ of the firm of Jewett & March and then returned to his home in New Brunswick, where he was employed for one year. He then, at the age of twenty-one years, returned to Maine, where he was engaged with the same firm for the ensuing two years, during most of which he had charge of a lumber camp. In 1853 Mr. Holmes came to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and in the winter of that year he ran a logging camp at Escanaba, in the employ of N. Ludington & Company. Later he had charge of a camp at Run River, Minnesota, in the employ of Jonathan Chase. Upon his return to Escanaba he was employed at Upper Mill and at Flat Rock. In February, 1856, he was summoned to Taylors Falls, Minnesota, by reason of the death of a relative at that place. This was before the construction of any railroads in this section of the state and he made the entire journey on foot, accompanied by an Indian mail train of dogs. The trip to Menominee was made over the ice of the lake and from the latter point he proceeded to Green Bay and afterward onward to his destination. He paid the Indian five dollars for his services as guide. Mr. Holmes remained for a time in Minnesota, where he was employed in connection with lumbering operations, and in 1857 he associated himself with Samuel M. Stephenson, of Menominee, and assumed a contract for getting out logs for N. Ludington & Company. There were only two camps in operation that winter and Mr. Stephenson drove the ox team by which supplies were

Page  666 666 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN taken to the camps; in the meanwhile Mr. Holmes had the supervision of the work of the men. The next year the firm of Stephenson & Holmes continued operations at Menominee and here Mr. Stephenson finally bought an interest in the lumber business of Abner Kirby, who later became one of the interested principals in the Kirby-Carpenter Company, one of the well known lumber manufacturing concerns of the early days. In the following year Mr. Holmes was assigned charge of the logging operations of the company, and for thirty-eight years thereafter he was retained as superintendent of logging operations in this section of the state. In January, 1897, he built a logging railroad seventy-five miles in length, and thereafter he continued to be occupied with logging contracts, with distinctive success, until 1905, since which time he has lived virtually retired. His career has been one of great industry and consecutive application, and through his earnest toil and endeavor he has accumulated a competency. He has maintained his home and business headquarters in the city of Menominee since 1857, and has long been one of the most prominent and influential citizens of this place. He is a member of the directorate of the Lumbermen's National Bank of Menominee and was one of the organizers and incorporators of the Menominee Electric Railroad & Power Company, in which he is still a large stockholder. In politics Mr. Holmes is a staunch advocate of the principles and policies of the Republican party, and in 1897 he was given an unmistakable token of popular confidence and esteem in his home city, in that he was then elected its mayor. He continued incumbent of this office during 1898-9, and his administration is regarded as one of the best ever given a city by its chief municipal executive. In 1896 he served as supervisor of Menominee township. Mr. Holmes is an appreciative member of the Masonic fraternity, in which he is affiliated with the local bodies of the York Rite, including Menominee Commandery, Knights Templars. He also holds membership in the adjunct body, Ahmed Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, in the city of Marquette, Michigan. On the 12th of July, 1869, at Escanaba, Michigan, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Holmes to Miss Augusta J. Chandler, daughter of Alden Chandler, one of the worthy pioneers of the Upper Peninsula. Concerning the children of this happy union, the following brief record is given: William A., who resides at Crystal Falls, Michigan, married Caroline Sakerson; Guy W., who resides at Marinette, Wisconsin, married Miss Annie L. Bentley; Arthur K., a resident of Waucedah, Michigan, married Miss Margaret Condie; Ray W., who resides at Winthrop, Maine, married Miss Minnie Martin; Helen J. died at the age of eight years; and Charlotte L. is the wife of Herbert A. Bowdish of Menominee. Mr. and Mrs. Holmes find that in the gracious evening of their lives their lines are "cast in pleasant places," and they have great pride in their children and their ten grandchildren, while Mnr. Holmes himself is to be congratulated on the marked success which he has achieved through his worthy endeavors as one of the world's honorable army of workers. HERMAN HOLMES.-Prominent in social and political circles, Herman Holmes, of Crystal Falls, is an excellent representative of the Swedish-born citizens who have contributed their full share towards the advancement of the material interests of the Upper Peninsula. A son of Nels A. Holmes, he was born, October 3, 1872, in the western part of Sweden.

Page  667 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 667 Reared, educated and married in Sweden, Nels A. Holmes left his native country in 1882, America being his objective point of destination. He spent a short time in the busy city of Chicago, from there going to Wisconsin. Not being entirely pleased with his prospects in either place, he came to the Upper Peninsula, locating in the new town of Iron River. Iron county was then a veritable wilderness, in which very few mines had been opened. Soon taking up a homestead claim in Stambaugh township, three miles from Iron River, he built a log cabin in the woods, and there, in 1884, he was joined by his family. He has been a resident of Iron county continuously ever since, living a part of the time in Iron River, at the present time, in 1910, occupying his home farm. He has three children,.Herman, Gust A. and Annie Elizabeth. Receiving his elementary education in Sweden, Herman Holmes attended the Stambaugh schools after coming to Michigan for awhile He was reared to habits of industry and thrift, and when but a boy worked in the mines and assisted his father in clearing the land. When ready to begin life for himself, he embarked in the logging and lumber business, operating in Iron county and in adjacent territories, being uniformly successful in his ventures. An active and worthy member of the Republican party, Mr. Holmes was elected sheriff of Iron county in 1900, was re-elected in 1902, and in 1908 was again honored with an election to the same office. Mr. Holmes married in November, 1898, Christina Sackerson, who was born in Sweden, and came with her parents to Michigan, where her father, a resident of Stambaugh township, is now engaged in farming. Mr. and Mrs. Holmes have an adopted daughter, Esther Holmes, nine years old, who has lived with them the past eight years, receiving from them loving care and gentle training. Fraternally Mr. Holmes is a member of Crystal Falls Lodge, No. 385, F. & A. M.; of Crystal Falls Chapter, No. 129, R. A. M.; of Hugh McCurdy Commandery, No. 43, K. T.; of Ahmed Temple, Mystic Shrine, and of the Consistory, at Grand Rapids; of Crystal Falls Lodge, I. O. O. F.; of Iron River Lodge, K. of P.; and of Iron River Camp, M. W. A. CHARLES F. ROGERS.-One of the large-minded and enterprising men of Hancock, Michigan, Charles F. Rogers was for many years employed as a journalist in the Upper Peninsula, being connected with different papers, but is now rendering satisfactory service to his fellow-citizens as postmaster at Hancock. A native of Marquette county, he was born November 15, 1869, at Negaunee, a son of William F. Rogers. He is of English descent, his grandfather, Henry Rogers, having been a life-long resident of county Cornwall, England. Born in the parish of Camborne, county Cornwall, England, William F. Rogers was employed in his boyhood days on a farm, but was afterward employed in mining until 1849. Embarking then, with his wife, on the stanch sailing vessel "Roger Sherman," he crossed the ocean in five weeks, landing in New York city. He settled first in Dodgeville, Wisconsin, but a few months later came to the Northern Peninsula, locating in Keweenaw county. He worked in different mines in that vicinity for a number of years, and then located in Houghton county. Buying a lot in the new town of Hancock, he built a house and worked in the Franklin Mine, getting along well. His house being burned in the great conflagration of 1869, he moved with his family to Marquette county, and the following four years worked in the mines near Negaunee and Ishpeming. Returning then to

Page  668 668 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN Hancock, he built another home, resumed work at the Franklin Mine, and was here a resident until his death in 1889. The maiden name of his wife was Ann Littlejohn. She was born June 20, 1829, in Camborne, county Cornwall, England, a daughter of James and Elizabeth (Trevilion) Littlejohn, life-long residents of that parish, where her father was engineer at the mines. She still resides in Hancock, a bright and active woman for one of her age, bearing the burden of her years with grace and dignity. She has reared four children, namely: William H., Francis J., Albert and Charles F. Receiving his early education in the public schools of Hancock, Charles F. Rogers began as a boy of fourteen years to learn the "art preservative," entering the office of the "Northwestern Mining Journal," of which E. P. Kibbee was the proprietor. At the end of three years, during which time he had gained valuable knowledge and experience, he entered the employ of Prince & Shields, proprietors of the Portage Lake Herald, now the Evening Journal, and continued with this paper eleven years. Mr. Rogers was subsequently associated with the Mining Gazette at Houghton, until February, 1909, when he was appointed to his present position as postmaster at Hancock, an office which he is filling ably and faithfully. Mr. Rogers married in 1894, on the 8th of June, Frances Harris, who was born in Houghton, Michigan, July 19, 1874. Her father, Frank Harris, was a native of Cleveland, Ohio, while her mother was born in Germany. Mr. and Mrs. Rogers are the parents of five children, namely: Myrtle J., Lester, Roland, Arville and Harris. Fraternally Mr. Rogers is a member of Hancock Lodge No. 381, B. P. O. E.; of Portage Camp No. 2596, M. W. A.; and of Mistletoe Lodge No. 274, Order of the Sons of Saint George. JUDGE MARTIN S. MCDONOUGH, who is well known throughout Iron county, Michigan, and who is now giving most efficient service as a prosecuting attorney of the county, is a young man who is rapidly achieving success, not only as a lawyer of recognized ability and as a judge of strict integrity and sound judgment but also as a citizen whose loyalty and public spirit have ever been of the most insistent order. Martin Sylvester McDonough was born at Oconto, Wisconsin, the date of his nativity being February 21, 1885. He is a son of John McDonough, who was born in Brown county, Wisconsin, in the year 1858, and died at Everett, Washington, September 18, 1910. The paternal grandparents of him whose name initiates this review were of Irish descent and they were natives of Lynn, Massachusetts, whence they emigrated westward to Wisconsin in the early pioneer days. Mrs. McDonough, whose maiden name was Mary E. Murphey, was born at Stevens Point, Wisconsin, her parents having been originally natives of the state of Maine. She, too, traces her ancestry back to staunch Irish extraction and she and her husband were devout communicants of the Roman Catholic church, in whose faith they were reared. She died December 20, 1901. Judge McDonough was the second in order of birth in a family of six children. His early education was obtained in the Michigan public schools and studied law in the office of Judge R. C. Flannigan at Norway, Michigan, in 1903-1905. He matriculated in Washington & Lee University, at Lexington, Virginia, in the law department of which excellent institution he was graduated as a member of the class of 1907, duly receiving the degree of Bachelor of Laws. Immediately after graduation he initiated the active practice of his profession at Iron River, Michigan, where he has built up a large and representative

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Page  669 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 669 clientage and where he is recognized as one of the leading young attorneys in the county. In politics he endorses the cause of the Republican party, in the local councils of which he is an active leader. In November, 1908, he was elected judge of the Iron county probate court, continuing incumbent of that office until December, 1910, at which time he resigned in order to devote more time to his duties as prosecuting attorney of Iron county, to which office he had been elected in November of that year. In every position of honor or trust to which Judge McDonough has been called he has given his time, his energy, his unceasing zeal and almost unerring judgment to the work incident to the office. He is a young man of keen business acumen and unusual foresight and although he has been a legal practitioner for less than four years he has already won prestige as a skilled trial lawyer and as a well fortified counselor. His religious faith is in accordance with the teachings of the Catholic church and he is affiliated with the Knights of Columbus and with the Sigma Chi college fraternity. He is unmarried. ALFRED CRUSE.-Numbered among the highly esteemed and valued citizens of Dickinson county is Alfred Cruse, who, during the fourteen and more years that he has served as postmaster at Iron Mountain, has proved himself a capable, faithful and popular public official, and has won the approbation and friendship of the people. A son of William Cruse, he was born in the village of Holmbush, near Callington, county Cornwall, England, which was likewise the birthplace of his parents. Brought up and educated in county Cornwall, England, William Cruse became an engineer, and for many years operated a stationary engine in Cornwall. The only one of his immediate family to cross the ocean, he emigrated to this country with his wife and children in 1876, locating in the Upper Peninsula. He spent his last days retired from active work in Calumet, Michigan, passing away at the advanced age of eighty-seven years. HIe married Mary Ann Foley, whose father, John Foley, a soldier in the British army, served in the cavalry and fought under Wellington at Waterloo. He was a lifelong resident of county Cornwall, spending his last days at StokeClymesland. Mrs. William Cruse died at the comparatively early age of fifty-eight years. To her and her husband seven children were born, namely: James H.; William M.; John; Edwin T.; Alfred, the subject of this sketch; Anna H., now Mrs. Thomas; and Mary, who died at the age of twelve years. Until ten years of age Alfred Cruse attended the day sessions of the public schools of his native village, afterwards pursuing his studies in the night schools of Cornwall. As a boy he worked on the farm, but at the age of thirteen years found employment in the Kit Hil tin mines. Coming with the family to Michigan when eighteen years of age, he was employed for a few months at the Ridge mine, in Ontonagon, after which he worked one winter in the Delaware mine in Keweenaw county. Going then to Copper Falls, he operated, at the Central mine, the first drilling machine ever used in the copper country. In 1871 Mr. Cruse became clerk in a general store at Eagle River, but after a short time entered the employ of the firm composed of G. K. Kloeckner, Charles Briggs and D. W. Sutter, clerking in their store at the Phoenix mine for four years. He was then placed in charge of their fresh meat department and given an interest in the business. In 1882 the firm bought a market at the Central mine,

Page  670 670 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN established another at the Delaware mine, and conducted the business under the firm name of A. Cruse & Company, with Mr. Cruse as manager. In 1884 Mr. Briggs bought the interest of Messrs. Kloeckner and Sutter, and Mr. Cruse continued as manager until 1887, when he sold out his entire interest in the business. Coming then to Iron Mountain, Mr. Cruse formed a partnership with Robert C. Faucett, and conducted a market on the Chapin property for several years. In 1897 he was appointed postmaster at Iron Mountain, and since June of that year has held the office, to which he has recently been re-appointed for another term of four years. Mr. Cruse married, December 24, 1868, Mary S. Jackson, who was born in England, which was the birthplace of her parents, Richard and Mary Jackson, who, after coming to this country, lived first at Hazel Green, Wisconsin, from there coming to the Upper Peninsula and spending their last days in Iron Mountain. Mr. and Mrs. Cruse have four children, namely: S. Edwin, Bertha, William G. and Roy J. S. Edwin, a practising physician at Iron Mountain, married Catherine Shuey. Bertha, wife of Samuel Cudlip, has three children, Phyllis, Merlin and Genevieve. William G., a bank commissioner in Idaho, married Nettie Thompson. Roy J., a dentist at Pocatello, Idaho, married Ann Esterbrooks. Fraternally Mr. Cruse is a member of Iron Mountain Lodge, No. 388, F. & A. M.; of Iron Mountain Chapter, No. 121, R. A. M.; of Darius Council, R. & S. M.; of Hugh McCurdy Commandery at Crystal Falls, No. 43, K. T.; of Ahmed Temple, Mystic Shrine, Grand Rapids; and of Iron Mountain Lodge, K. of P. W. FRANK JAMES.-A man of strong personality, energetic and progressive, ever ready to lend his assistance in advancing the material welfare of the community in which he lives, W. Frank James occupies a place of prominence among the leading citizens of Hancock, standing high in business, social, political and fraternal circles. He was born at Port Oram, New Jersey, May 23, 1873, being the third in direct line of descent to bear this name. His father, W. Frank James, Jr., and his grandfather, W. Frank James, Sr., were both born in County Cornwall, England. W. Frank James, Sr., followed mining pursuits in his native land until 1871, when he emigrated with his family to the United States. Settling at Port Oram, New Jersey, he continued work as a miner until his death, in 1877. W. Frank James, Jr., was born in the parish of Saint Ives, County Cornwall, England, and was there brought up and educated. Coming with the family to this country in 1871, he was employed at the mines in or near Port Oram, New Jersey, until 1876, when he migrated to the Upper Peninsula, settling in Hancock and being employed at the Franklin Mine until his death, two years later, while yet in manhood's prime. The maiden name of his wife was Elizabeth A. Williams, who was born in County Cornwall, England, the birthplace of her parents, Samuel and Jane Williams. Coming with his family to the United States, Samuel Williams was for a time engaged in mining at Port Oram, New Jersey, from there coming to Houghton county, Michigan, where he spent his remaining years. Surviving her first husband, Mrs. W. Frank James, Jr., married Charles Tresice and now resides in Hancock, Houghton county. Her only daughter, Annie James, lived but three years, and W. Frank James, her only son, is the special subject of this sketch. Being graduated from the Hancock high school with the class of

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Page  671 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 671 1890, W. Frank James entered Albion College, in Albion, Michigan, and was graduated from its business department in 1891. Accepting a position then with the Mineral Range Railroad Company, he made himself generally useful in the office for awhile, and was afterward in the office of Fredericks, Stringer & Harris. On April 26, 1898, Mr. James enlisted in Company F, Thirty-fourth Michigan Volunteer Infantry, and after spending a short time at John Eaton camp and at Camp Alger, he went with his regiment to Cuba. He was there on detached duty as clerk, first for General Wheeler and later for Colonel John P. Peterman. Returning north with his command, he was first located at Montauk Point, from there coming to Hancock, Michigan, where he was honorably discharged from the service in November, 1898. Embarking then in the insurance business, Mr. James has since become interested in real estate, in these two lines of business carrying on extensive and lucrative operations. One of the leading Republicans of Hancock, he has taken an active part in public affairs, serving four years as county treasurer, two years as a member of the city council, as mayor of the city, a position to which he was elected in 1909, and was nominated on the Republican ticket for state senator on September 6, 1910. Mr. James married, in 1905, Jennie Mingay, who was born in Canada, a daughter of Charles G. and Annie MIingay, natives respectively of England and Ireland. Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. James, Annie and W. Frank, Jr. Fraternally Mr. James is a member of Hancock Lodge, No. 235, F. & A. M.; Gate of the Temple Chapter, No. 25, R. A. M.; of Primrose Commandery, K. T.; of Ahmed Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S.; of Detroit Consistory; of Lake Linden Chapter, O. E. S.; of the K. O. T. M. M.; of the Modern Samaritans; of Hancock Lodge, No. 381, B. P. 0. E.; of Hancock Aerie, F. O. E.; of Mistletoe Lodge, Sons of St. George, and grand president of the State Lodge; and a member of the I. 0. O. F. and of Foster Encampment. He is also a member of the United Spanish War Veterans and of the Society of the Army of Santiago de Cuba. CLAUDIUS B. GRANT is one of Michigan's jurists that has risen by virtue of his own merit and energy to the highest judicial office in the state. He was born in Lebanon, York county, Maine, October 25, 1835; his parents being Joseph Grant and Mary Merrill, of Scotch and English descent. His parents were unable to give him more than a common school education and therefore, by his own earnings, he provided for himself a university education, entering the Michigan University in 1855. He graduated therefrom in 1859 upon completion of the classical course. For the next year he was assistant teacher of classics and for the following two years principal of the Ann Arbor High School. In the summer of 1862 he responded to the call of President Lincoln, resigned his position, raised a company which was assigned to the Twentieth Michigan Infantry as Company D; was commissioned captain July 29, 1862, and soon after left for the seat of war. On November 21, 1863, he was promoted to the rank of major in the Twentieth Regiment, December 20, 1864, he was made lieutenant colonel, and on the same day commissioned colonel. With his regiment he participated in numerous engagements in Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi and Virginia, including the battle of Horse-Shoe Bend, the sieges of Vicksburg and Jackson, the battles of Blue Springs and Campbell Station, the siege of Knoxville, the defense of Fort Sanders, the battles of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania Court House, Cold Harbor, the assault upon Petersburg (June 17 and 18, 1864) and all operations before the Confederate stronghold.

Page  672 672 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN The day following the surrender of General Lee, Colonel Grant resigned his command and returned to Ann Arbor where he entered upon the study of law in the University of Michigan. In June, 1866, he was admitted to the bar, and immediately began practice; entering into partnership with ex-Governor Alpheus Felch. The same year he was elected recorder at Ann Arbor, and was also made a member of the Board of Education for four years. In April, 1867, he received the appointment of postmaster at Ann Arbor and held that office for three years. In 1870, and again in 1872, he was elected as representative in the state legslature, and served two terms. During the legislative session of 1871, he was chairman of the committee on public instruction; in 1873 he was speaker pro tem of the house, and was chairman of the committee on ways and means. In 1871 he was elected regent of the university and he served as such for eight years. In 1872 he was appointed by President Grant alternate commissioner for the state of Michigan, under the law organizing the Centennial Commission, and he served until the close of the exposition in 1876. In 1873 Judge Grant moved from Ann Arbor to Houghton, where he and Joseph H. Chandler formed a partnership for the practice of law. In 1876 he was elected prosecuting attorney for Houghton county, which position he filled for two years with a degree of justness and courage befitting that important office, which has to do with the liberty of fellow citizens on the one hand and the protection of society upon the other. In 1882, upon the organization of the twenty-fifth judicial circuit, he was elected circuit judge, and in 1886 removed to Marquette so as to live within the circuit over which he presided. He was reelected to the same office in 1887 by an overwhelming majority, showing the appreciation of the people for his sterling worth as a judge. Judge Grant has always been a Republican, and in February, 1889, he was nominated by that party as its candidate for the office of justice of the supreme court, to which office he was elected at the ensuing election, receiving an exceeding flattering vote, especially throughout the Upper Peninsula, attesting his great popularity, though, further to his credit, it was said that some of the votes in his favor were from the criminally inclined who did not relish his occupancy of the circuit bench. Before his departure for Lansing, where he entered upon the duties of his high office, he was generously and justly toasted by many of his friends who tendered him departing banquets at his home city of Marquette, and the neighboring city of the Sault. Speaking of his service upon the bench of the circuit it is but just to say that his vigilance in insisting that criminals be arrested and brought to trial, and his dealing out of rigorous justice to such as were brought before him, served as a serious check upon the looseness of methods with which the liquor traffic was wont to be carried on in the mining and lumbering settlements of his circuit, and to almost literally stamp out of existence the vile dens of infamy that most invariably haunt the neighborhoods of new mining and lumbering communities. In public addresses he warned the offenders of the provisions of the law and the duties of the courts, and he demanded of the officers the fulfillment of their duties. His was the stability, energy, force of purpose, and yet the sense of justice for the work at hand, and to his work the people of the whole Upper Peninsula owe a debt of gratitude they can never fully repay. When he left the circuit to assume his duties in the higher court he carried with him a state-wide reputation for his fearless and conscientious fulfillment of the hazardous duties of his office; and truly they were hazardous, for many of the characters in the occupa

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Page  673 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 673 tions he antagonized were desperate characters. The courage displayed in his many battles in the Civil war was again brought to bear in his successful battle upon the worst enemies of society and civilization. Upon the supreme bench of the state, he served by virtue of election after election until January 1, 1910, making twenty years of service upon the bench of the highest judicial tribunal in the state; no more important than which is the federal supreme court, because of the state court having to do more extensively and directly with the rights of the common people. In this service he has displayed legal ability and that sense of justice and equity that has placed him in the front rank of the jurists of the state. He retired from the bench voluntarily January 1, 1910, and after a trip abroad settled in the city of Detroit, where his able counsel is often sought in momentous business matters; a fitting recompense for a life that has been largely devoted to matters of great moment to both state and nation. Judge Grant was married June 13, 1863, to Caroline L. Felch, eldest daughter of ex-Governor Alpheus Felch, of Ann Arbor, and the marriage was blessed with four daughters, Mary Florence, wife of James Pendhill of Marquette. HON. SAMUEL M. STEPHENSON.-It seems to be a law of humanity to which there are few exceptions that men whose daily business life brings them close to nature imbibe a certain freedom and breadth of character, a directness, a warmth and a sympathy for human-kind, which are so often denied the habitue of the city streets and counting room. The typical lumberman, whether employee or employer, is cast in the rugged, generous mould, and God never created a set of men larger, braver and more sympathetic than the pioneers who came from the eastern forests in the early fifties, penetrated the dark and dense pineries of the northwest and there sawed out their fortunes and helped their fellows to get the most good out of life. A grand leader in this splendid phalanx of business men, pioneer fraternalists and builders of a new civilization, was the late Hon. Samuel Merritt Stephenson, who passed away on the 31st of July, 1907, at his home in Menominee, after having permanently resided in that place for nearly half a century and become one of the most prominent and best beloved citizens of the Upper Peninsula. There were somewhat wide diversities of opinion as to the extent of his wealth in dollars, but no disagreement whatever as to his wealth in generous acts of friendship, in public beneficences, in useful works of practical statesmanship, and in all those traits of manhood which indicated a consecration of his abundant means to high purposes. Mr. Stephenson was born in New Brunswick, just over the international boundary, in 1831. When but six years of age his parents brought him into the woods of Maine, near Machias, and there he soon commenced to support himself; at ten he was earning seven dollars a month as a son of the forest, and at fifteen he was prepared to enter the seemingly inexhaustible pineries of the great northwest. In 1846 he found himself in Delta county, Michigan, with three silver ten cent pieces in his pocket and an ambition in his young breast to become as good a logger and saw mill hand as could be found around Bay de Noquet and the country adjacent to northern Lake Michigan; and this aim he had fairly accomplished at his first visit to Menominee in 1853. Soon afterward he associated himself in logging with his brother, Isaac (now United States senator from Wisconsin) and William Holmes, both of whom were also for years great figures in the

Page  674 674 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN lumbering operations which centered around Escanaba and Menominee. The headquarters of the young trio of 1853 were at the latter point, and one of their chief contracts was to supply timbers for the Illinois Central breakwater then being constructed on the Chicago lake front. As mentioned, Mr. Stephenson commenced his permanent residence in Menominee in 1858, forming a partnership with Abner Kirby of Milwaukee in the operation of a single saw and siding machine, which first cut the logs into suitable lengths and then made them into lumber. The combined mechanism was termed a "mill" and, crude though it was, proved the foundation of the vast business of the Kirby-Carpenter Company. Mr. Stephenson retained an active connection with the business until the company, a few years ago, abandoned the manufacture of white pine. The original mill had a capacity of about 3,000,000 feet a season; the plant of recent years turned out 120,000,000 feet of lumber, with 250,000 feet of shingle and lath daily. For many years Mr. Stephenson was in charge of the logging and manufacturing of the great concern; in 1872 was elected vice-president, and retained that office to the time of his death, when the pine lands of the company had been depleted and there remained great tracts of land which were being utilized for agriculture and minor timber investments. Individually, he secured heavy timber holdings in both the south and west and was, to the last, a lumber king and a prince among men. Like others in his broad class Mr. Stephenson perceived the advantage of being in close touch with the leading financial institutions of the region in which his extensive lumbering operations were conducted. He was long president of the First National Bank of Menominee and a leading stockholder in the National Bank of Marinette, of which he was one of the founders. Another evidence of his far-sightedness was the erection of the elegant hotel in his home city, which became the recognized headquarters of the numerous lumbermen who came to the Menominee region, as well as the most fastidious of the traveling public. Both his bank and his hotel were important adjuncts to his business and at the same time institutions which greatly benefited MIenominee as a city. But there is another and a nobler side of Mr. Stephenson's nature, in its relation to his home city, to which brief reference has been made, but which is developed more in detail by an appreciative journalistic friend, who wrote several years before his death. "A good many of the pioneers," he says, "have gone with their wealth to other sections, but Mr. Stephenson has preferred to continue in the country which he made and which has made him. As the timber has disappeared he has sought to assist everything that would take its place as a means of support for the people. Many a now prosperous business and prosperous young business man owes its or his start to Mr. Stephenson's assistance. He has sought in every way to promote the interest of the city in which he lives. If there is anything of a public nature to be done a call is of course made upon Mr. Stephenson. It makes no difference whether it is a poor family that needs relief, a stray woodsman who needs hospital care, a school that wants a library, a church that wants an organ, or some project for a hotel or an opera house; Samuel M. Stephenson's money and often his time are drawn upon. There are many interesting and pathetic tales which might be told of things he has done. The best of them all have been without ostentation and secretly performed, like the relief of a hundred or more families in a hard-times winter." Going afield from Menominee, it is evident that one of the greatest

Page  675 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 675 services which Mr. Stephenson rendered the state was his practical demonstration during the later years of his life that the vast tracts of land in the Upper Peninsula which had been cleared of timber could be made as productive for agricultural purposes as those further south. He really began the demonstration quite early in his lumbering career, when he cleared tracts of land adjoining his camps and raised hay and potatoes in abundance. With his gradual withdrawal from the more active work of lumbering he entered more extensively into these experiments, and conclusively proved his early contention brought incalculable material benefits to the state. As an agriculturist in his own interest, Mr. Stephenson was most successful. Taking up farming as a diversion, he fell earnestly in love with it, and his "Pine Hill Stock Farm," just outside of Menominee, was developed into one of the model country estates of the country for the raising of live stock and the output of dairy products. "Pine Hill Farm" is really a grand standing demonstration of Mr. Stephenson's claim that ex-timber lands were strong producers, agriculturally speaking. When he took hold of the place it was virtually a hill of pines covering one hundred and fifty acres, but he cleared and added "forty" after "forty" until he had fifteen hundred acres mostly devoted to the profitable production of hay, grain and potatoes, as well as a great orchard bearing fifteen hundred apple trees. The land supported a herd of four hundred and sixty of first-class Jerseys, Shorthorns, Guernseys and Holsteins, as well as standard horses, sheep and hogs and a fine collection of poultry. The output of his dairy amounted to about four hundred quarts of milk daily and six hundred pounds of butter weekly; and his dairy barn is believed to have no counterpart in the world. It is an amphitheatre of stone, one hundred and twenty feet in diameter and sixty feet high, with a silo in the center thirty feet in diameter. The dairy is heated by steam, lighted by electricity and its machinery driven by steam power. These; are only the main features of "Pine Hill Farm" and only one illustration of the scale on which Mr. Stephenson "did things." As a man of public affairs Mr. Stephenson was the same undemonstrative, somewhat brusque and practical man who made few promises, no flourishes, and yet accomplished what was really for the permanent benefit of those who looked to him for assistance. He served as the first supervisor of Menominee township and was the first mayor of the city. An early member of the county board of education, he was for many years its chairman; in 1877-8 represented his district in the lower house of the state legislature and in 1879-80 and 1885-6 was a member of the state senate. In 1880 he was a presidential elector and served as a delegate to the Republican national conventions of 1884 and 1888. The next noteworthy evidence of the place which he held in public confidence and respect was his election to congress from the Twelfth Michigan district and his faithful service in the Fifty-first, Fifty-second, Fifty-third and Fifty-fourth congresses. He was ever alert and effective in advancing the interests of the lake region, and as a member of the committee on rivers and harbors was a leading and a working advocate of the Itennepin canal project, designed to connect the great lakes with the Mississippi river. Mr. Stephenson was one of the most eminent Masons in the country, having received the thirty-third degree at Providence, Rhode Island, September 20, 1892. Initiated June 21, 1870, and duly passed and raised, he was exalted to a Royal Arch Mason, November 3, 1882, in Menominee Chapter, No. 107; received his Knight Templar degree

Page  676 676 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN in Lake Superior Commandery, No. 30, at Marquette, Michigan, December 12, 1882; and was eminent commander of Menominee Commandery, No. 35, from October 9, 1883, until April 5, 1886. He was a personification of Masonry and of practical Christianity in all the essentials of life, and the influence of his good works and manly spirit is not to be calculated by the finite mind. In 1859 the deceased married Miss Jane Harris, a native of Wales, and of their nine children five daughters survive. These members of a once unbroken household best know what manner of man he was, but their testimony would be so colored with filial and wifely love that it would be pronounced as touchingly prejudiced. ANDREW C. STEPHENSON.-One of the best known as well as one of the most influential residents of Menominee is Andrew C. Stephenson, one of the city's real builders. He was born on the banks of the St. Johns river in New Brunswick on the 10th of April, 1843, whither his father Robert Stephenson, who was born in the north of Ireland, had gone when a young man. The young voyager located on the St. Johns river, ten miles above Woodstock, during an early period in that community's history, and there he worked at farming and lumbering and there also he spent the remainder of his life, dying at the age of sixty-eight years. He married a native daughter of New Brunswick, Sarah Stephenson, her maiden name being the same as her husband's, and she lived to the age of seventy-three years. Of the nine children which blessed their union only the following three are now living: Andrew C., the immediate subject of this review; Catherine, the wife of Thomas Boyer, proprietor of a hotel at Woodstock, New Brunswick; and Mary, the wife of C. S. Nevers, living at Stephenson, Michigan. After completing his common school training in New Brunswick Andrew C. Stephenson came to Menominee, Michigan, in 1865, and for three years was employed in the woods in logging. He was then made the superintendent of the logging business of Ludington, Wells and Van Schaick and held the position for thirty years. At the close of that period, in 1901, he became identified in the same capacity with the Hon. Samuel M. Stephenson, superintending his nine mile farm until in 1907 he retired from an active business life. He has served Menominee for two terms in its highest office, that of Mayor, was for several terms a member of its board of aldermen, was serving as the county road commissioner when the first roads were established in Menominee county and built the first road across the county, and for three years was a supervisor. His services have been of inestimable value to both his chosen city and county, and in turn he has been highly honored. He is a Republican in politics, a Chapter and Commandery Mason and a member of various other orders and societies here. Mr. Stephenson married in 1867 Rhoda Parint, who died in 1872, and the two children that graced their union are also deceased. In 1874 he was united in marriage with Mrs. Philena (Armstrong) Morris, and the following three of their four children are living: Sarah, the wife of John Stevens Mary, wife of E. P. Smith; and Ferdinand, who remains at home. ROBERT M. WEIDEMANN.-The "twin cities" of Menominee, Michigan, and Marinette, Wisconsin, can claim no more progressive, enterprising and aggressive business man than is Mr. Weidemann, who maintains his home in Menominee and who is secretary and treasurer of the Weidemann & Lindem Manufacturing Company, one of the

Page  677 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 677 important industrial concerns of this section and one that controls an extensive and substantial business in the manufacturing of sash, doors, blinds, mouldings and interior finishings, as well as kitchen cabinets, kitchen tables and other specialties of high grade. The company also deals in all kinds of lumber at wholesale and retail. Mr. Weidemann has been identified with the lumber business from his early youth and is familiar with all its details, so that his interposition in connection with the enterprise with which he is now associated has inured greatly to its success. He is a reliable and wideawake business man and a citizen to whom is accorded unqualified popular confidence and esteem. Robert M. Weidemann was born in the historic old city of Dresden, Germany, on the 28th of September, 1871, and is a son of Robert H. and Elizabeth (Barrett) Weidemann, the former of whom was born in Christiania, Norway, in the year 1827, and the latter of whom was born in the state of Ohio. The marriage of the parents was solemnized in the city of Saginaw, Michigan, and the father died in 1883, at Albany, New York, since which time his widow has made her home with her children, who accord to her the utmost filial love and solicitude. Of the eight children three sons and four daughters are now living, and the subject of this review was the third in order of birth. Robert H. Weidemann was reared and educated in his native land, whence he immigrated to America when a young man, and he eventually became one of the extensive lumber men of Michigan, where he conducted large operations on the Saginaw river and its tributaries, at a time when the lumbering industry in that section was at its zenith. He was a man of marked ability, of sterling attributes of character and of indefatigable industry. He was a Democrat in his political proclivities, his religious faith was that of the Episcopal church, of which his widow also is a devout member, and in the Masonic fraternity he attained to the thirty-second degree of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite. Robert M. Weidemann, whose name introduces this article, was born in Germany during a visit of his parents in the city of Dresden, and he was an infant of a few months at the time of their return to their home in Michigan. After availing himself of the advantages of the public schools of the city of Saginaw he continued his studies for three years in the celebrated University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor. In 1894, when twenty-three years of age, Mr. Weidemann went to Douglas county, Wisconsin, where he identified himself with lumbering operations. He remained in the lumber woods about nine months, and then went to Onotonagon, this state, in which section he was employed in tallying and inspecting lumber for a period of about two years. In 1897-8 he was employed in a saw mill at Green Bay, Wisconsin, and in March, 1899, he located in Marinette, Wisconsin, where he entered the employ of the Sawyer-Goodman Lumber Company, with whose interests he was identified until February, 1902, when he removed to Menominee and engaged independently in the wholesale hardwood lumber business, as senior member of the firm of Weidemann & Clough. In 1906 Mr. Weidemann assumed full control of the business, which he continued in an individual way until January, 1908, when he became one of the interested principals in the Weidemann & Lindem Manufacturing Company, of Marinette, Wisconsin. This company was organized at that time, as the successor of the Marinette Planing Mill Company, and the enterprise was established in 1894. The company is incorporated under the laws Vol. II-4

Page  678 678 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN of Wisconsin, with a capital stock of sixty-five thousand dollars, and it has a large and finely equipped plant, in which are manufactured sash, doors, blinds, interior finishings, general mill work, etc. The company is also giving special attention to the manufacturing of cabinets and tables for kitchen use, and the excellence of these products has brought a trade that more than tests the capacity of the factory. The mill work manufactured in this plant is sold over a wide radius of country, and the effective service given and the honorable policies brought to bear have given to the company an unassailable reputation. Of the corporation John A. Lindem, of Marinette, is president; August Garder, of Marinette, vice-president; and iMTr. Weidemann, secretary and treasurer. An extensive wholesale and retail trade in all kinds of lumber is likewise controlled by the company, and the business is constantly expanding in scope and importance under the present effective management. Though never a seeker of political office Mr. Weidemann ever shows a loyal interest in public affairs of a local nature and is arrayed as a stalwart in the local camp of the Republican party. He is affiliated with Menominee Lodge, No. 269, Free & Accepted Masons; Menominee Chapter, No. 107, Royal Arch Masons; and Menominee Commandery, No. 35, Knights Templars. On the 18th of May, 1901, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Weidemann to Miss Clara M. Stephenson, daughter of the late Iton. Samuel M. Stephenson, to whom a memoir is dedicated on other pages of this work. The one child of this union is Robert Samuel, who was born on the 29th of December, 1904. JOHN H. RILEY.-A man of keen foresight, possessing excellent executive and financial ability, John H. Riley holds a noteworthy position among the leading business men of Menominee, being vice-president, treasurer and local manager of the Dormer Company, and manager of the Builders & Supply Company, of which he was the promoter. A native of Wisconsin, he was born in Manitowoc county, where his father, the late Hughen Riley, was a pioneer settler. Hughen Riley was born in 1817, in England, where he was reared and educated. Emigrating to this country at the age of twenty-five years, he came to New York city in a sailing vessel, and for several years afterwards worked at the printer's trade in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Desirous of acquiring land of his own, he subsequently became one of the early settlers of Manitowoc county, Wisconsin, where he purchased a timbered tract of land, from which he cleared and improved a valuable homestead, living for a number of years in the log cabin which he first erected in the wilderness. Loyal to the country of his adoption, he enlisted during the Civil war in Company G, Thirty-second Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and with his regiment marched with General Sherman to the sea. He became prominent in public affairs, filling the various township offices, being first identified with the Whigs, and later was a stanch supporter of the principles of the Republican party. Religiously he was a member of the Church of England. He died at Menominee, Michigan, in 1903, at the age of eighty-six. His wife, whose maiden name was Martha Burges, was born in 1820, in England, and died in 1905, at Manitowoc. Seven children were born of their union, and all are now living, John TH. being the youngest child. Brought up on the home farm John H. Riley received excellent educational advantages, attending the common schools of Manitowoc

Page  679 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 679 and its high school. He subsequently took charge of his father's farm for three years, remaining beneath the parental roof-tree until 1886. Coming in that year to Menominee, Michigan, Mr. Riley was tallyman for the Kirby Carpenter Company for two months. In 1887, in partnership with Henry Spencer, he embarked in the livery business, operating a livery, feed and sale stable. He also operated mail routes from Menominee to Cedar River and from Cedar River to Stephenson, Michigan, and during the winter season ran stages across the ice from Menominee, Michigan, to Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, continuing in this business until 1902, in the meantime opening an agricultural implement business. In 1901 Mr. Riley was one of the organizers of The Dormer Company and is now its vice-president, treasurer and local manager. This company is carrying on a substantial wholesale fish business with offices at Buffalo, New York, Saginaw, Michigan, Lake Superior, and at Menominee, its special business being the marketing of fish. Mr. Riley was also one of the organizers, in 1909, of the Menominee Builders and Supply Company, of which he is manager. This company handles stone, gravel and sand and manufactures cement, and has its own boats for hauling its material to Menominee. He was one of the organizers of the Commercial Bank of Menominee, Michigan, and has acted as one of its directors since organizing. Mr. Riley married, May 1, 1889, Eliza Fulton, an old schoolmate of his and one of his childhood playmates. She was born in Manitowoc, Wisconsin., Her father, George Fulton, was born in New York state, and on coming to Wisconsin located in Manitowoc county, Wisconsin where he took up land and improved the farm on which he is now living, retired from active labor. Mr. Fulton married Nancy Hothersall, who was born in Yorkshire, England, in 1840, being a descendant of the original owners of Hothersall Hall. She died on the home farm in 1905, leaving five children, of whom Mrs. Riley is the youngest. In politics Mr. Riley is a sound Republican, uniformly casting his vote in favor of that party. He is a member and the vice president of the Menominee Commercial Club, one of the foremost business organizations of the city. Fraternally he is a member of Menominee Lodge, No. 269, F. & A. M.; of Menominee Chapter, No. 107, R. A. M.; and of Menominee Commandery, No. 35, K. T. ADOLPH E. GUENSBURG.-One of the extensive and ably conducted mercantile establishments that lends materially to the prestige of Menominee as a city of many metropolitan attractions and facilities is the Grand department store, owned and operated by the firm of A. E. & E. Guensburg. The firm handles dry goods, cloaks, millinery, carpets, clothing, furnishing goods, shoes, household goods, etc., and the establishment is one of the most attractive mercantile places in Menominee Valley. Basing their operations upon fair dealing and honorable business methods, the firm has built up a trade of wide scope and importance and its members are among the reliable and progressive business men and popular citizens of this section of the state. Adolph E. Guensburg, senior member of this firm, was born near the city of Prague, Bohemia, on the 27th of March, 1858, and is a son of Herman and Eleanora (Neuman) Guensburg, both of whom passed the most part of their lives in Bohemia, where the father's vocation was that of a merchant. He whose name initiates this article is indebted to the schools of his native land for his early educational training and at the age of seventeen years he severed the ties that bound

Page  680 680 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN him to home and fatherland and emigrated to America, where he believed superior opportunities were afforded for the gaining of independence and definite success through personal effort. He landed in New York city on the 6th of July, 1875, and shortly afterward he came west to Wisconsin and located in the city of Oconto, which was then a village, where he engaged in the manufacture of cigars. IHe was identified with this line of enterprise about seven months, at the expiration of which he sold his interest to his partner, Joseph Law, and he then removed to Hancock, in the upper peninsula of Michigan, where he secured the position of bookkeeper in a wholesale and retail meat market of Baer Brothers, with which firm he remained for a period of three years. At the expiration of this time he engaged in the produce commission business in the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and about six months later, in 1880, he opened a general store at Florence, that state, where he continued in successful business until 1893. Within this interval he also identified himself with other and numerous business interests and for a time had an office in Chicago. He operated particularly in the handling and exploiting of various patent rights. In 1883-93 he devoted much time and attention to the development of iron mining interests in Northern Wisconsin and Michigan and became one of the organizers of the Caledonia Mining Company, of which he was secretary and treasurer. The interests of this corporation were later taken by the Mansfield Mining Company. The properties at present are owned by the Oliver Mining* Company. Mr. Guensburg and others located and initiated the Bohemia Exploration, also at the order of the Mansfield Mining Company, in Iron county, Michigan. They were compelled to shut the dam at that point in order to move the machinery across the Michigamme River, and when the river bed was nearly done some men employed at the Caledonia discovered a deposit of iron in the bank of the river on the Caledonia side and the subject of this review was the third to discover the free iron ore, in 1891. Mr. Guensburg was also manager of several other mining companies, operating in Iron and Dickinson counties, Michigan, Florence county, Wisconsin, and in the state of Washington. In addition to the large and well-equipped general store at Florence, Wisconsin, Mr. Guensburg also maintained branch stores at Crystal Falls and Iron River, Michigan. He disposed of the last branch establishments in 1893, in which year he removed to Menominee and established a department store. In 1893 the title of the Grand Department Store was adopted, and in the conducting of the same Mr. Guensburg is associated with his younger brother, Emil, of whom specific mention is made on other pages of this work. This is one of the largest department stores in the entire upper peninsula of Michigan, and its trade is drawn from a wide section of the country normally tributary to the twin cities of Menominee and Marinette. While a resident of Florence, Wisconsin, Mr. Guensburg was a member of the directorate of the Florence State Bank, and was the owner of a large amount of valuable timber land in Florence county, Wisconsin, and in Forest, Gogebic, Houghton and Iron Counties, Michigan. He is at present one of the stockholders in the Menominee River Sugar Company, whose finely equipped plant is located in the city of Menominee. At all times Mr. Guensburg shows a lively interest and is ready to lend his co-operation in the promotion and support of industrial and commercial enterprises that tend to conserve the progress and upbuilding of his home city. He is known as an enterprising business man and essentially loyal citizen and he commands unqualified esteem in the community in which he has elected to center his interests.

Page  681 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 681 Mr. Guensburg was one of the organizers of the Menominee Commercial Club, of which he was the first treasurer, and he is now a member of this fine civic organization. He was the first to be initiated in Florence Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, at Florence, Wisconsin. He has attained to the thirty-second degree in the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite Masons, in which he holds membership in Michigan Sovereign Consistory, Sublime Princes of the Royal Secret, in the city of Detroit, where he is also affiliated with Mosleni Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. In politics he is a staunch Republican. DAVID BROWN.-It is pleasing to be able to give recognition in this historical compilation to so many of the sterling pioneers, who have been closely identified with the material and civic development and upbuilding of the various counties of the Upper Peninsula, and in this category David Brown, one of the best known and most highly esteemed citizens of Sault Ste. Marie, is to be given honorable classification. IIe has maintained his home in Chippewa county for nearly forty years and within this interval has witnessed and assisted in the upbuilding of this section from the status of a practical wilderness to that of a well settled and opulent portion of the Wolverine commonwealth. I-e is now engaged in the real estate business, and he is the owner of valuable properties in the northwest and southwest, as well as in his home city and county. There are many salient points of interest in both the personal and ancestral history of David Brown, but within a sketch of the limits prescribed for the one at hand it is possible to enter only the briefest of details. Mr. Brown was born in Strathroy, province of Ontario, Canada, on the 24th of September, 1850, and is a son of Francis and Permelia (Moore) Brown, the former of whom was born in Scotland, in 1814, and the latter in the province of Ontario, in 1825. The death of the father occurred in 1881 and his wife survived him by fully a score of years, as she was summoned to eternal rest in the year 1901. Her mother was the first cousin of General Andrew Jackson. William Moore, maternal grandfather of Mr. Brown, was one of the pioneer lumber men on the St. Lawrence river. Of the six children of Francis and Permelia Brown two sons and two daughters are now living,-William is a resident of Cheboygan, Michigan. James resides on the old homestead farm in Middlesex county, Ontario; Elizabeth is the wife of Charles Mortimer of Melvin, Michigan. Francis Brown was born in Scotland, as already noted, and was a mere boy at the time when his parents, David and Elizabeth Brown, immigrated to the Dominion of Canada. His father, who was a weaver by trade, first located in Prescott, Ontario, and he later removed to Middlesex county, where he died soon afterward, being the first person to be buried in his neighborhood, as he had settled in the forest and purchased land, with the intention of developing a farm. His death occurred in 1832 and his wife, who survived him by several years, was laid to rest by his side. They became the parents of five sons and two daughters and of the children Francis was the second in order of birth. Francis Brown received somewhat meagre educational advantages owing to the exigencies existing in the pioneer community, in which he was reared, and he was eighteen years of age at the time of his father's death. By the Canadian laws of entailment he was heir to his father's estate but he generously assigned his right to the same to his younger brother, who still remains on the old homestead farm.

Page  682 682 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN He purchased a tract of wild land adjoining the parental homestead which eventually became one of the valuable farms of Middlesex county, where he was long a citizen of prominence and influence in the community and where both he and his wife continued to reside until their death. David Brown, the immediate subject of this review, was reared to the sturdy discipline of the pioneer farm and his early educational privileges were limited to the somewhat primitive schools of the locality and period. He continued to attend school during the winter terms until fifteen years of age, and at the age of eighteen years he secured the position of driving a team of horses in the handling of oil at Petrol, Canada, for which service he received fifteen dollars per month. In 1871 his adventurous spirit led him to set forth for the far distant and then sparsely settled district of Manitoba, Canada. He proceeded as far as Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, and here the attractions proved sufficient to cause him to establish a permanent residence. He has excellent mechanical ability and after locating in the little village of Sault Ste. Marie he engaged in the work of the carpenter's trade. He became a successful contractor and builder and continued to be identified with this line of enterprise until 1876. He then entered one hundred and sixty acres of government land in Soo township, three miles distant from Sault Ste. Marie, and after erecting a modest house on the place he and his family there took up their residence. He reclaimed the land from the virgin forest and eventually added another tract of one hundred and sixty acres to his resident homestead. He cleared the greater portion of his land and brought it into effective cultivation, besides which he made upon the same the best of improvements of a permanent order. He continued to reside upon the farm until 1887, when he returned to Sault Ste. Marie, which city has since represented his home and here he has given his attention principally to the real-estate business. He still owns his farm as well as other valuable real-estate in Sault Ste. Marie and other sections of the country. In 1898, at the time of the gold excitement in the Yukon region, Mr. Brown made a visit to Alaska, where he remained about eighteen months, at the expiration of which he returned to his home in Michigan. In 1906 he went to the state of Wyoming, where he made judicious investments in city property and farm lands, and in the following year he went to southwestern Texas, where he purchased land lying in and contiguous to the city of Corpus Christi. In politics Mr. Brown is a staunch Republican and during the long years of his residence in Chippewa county he has never failed in his loyalty and public spirit as a citizen. I-e has achieved definite and worthy success and is one of the substantial capitalists of this section of the "upper country." In the Masonic fraternity his affiliations are here noted: Bethel Lodge, No. 358, Free & Accepted Masons; Sault Ste. Marie Chapter, No. 126, Royal Arch Masons; Sault Ste. Marie Chapter, No. 126, Royal Arch Masons; Sault Ste. Marie Council, No. 69, Royal & Select Masters; Sault Ste. Marie Commandery, No. 45, Knights Templars; and Ahmed Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, in the city of Marquette. He is a member of the Methodist church. On the 13th of September, 1874, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Brown to Miss Isabella Adams, who was born and reared in Chippewa county, Michigan, and who is a daughter of Anthony and Edith (Rains) Adams, who are numbered among the sterling pioneers of this county. Mr. Adams was born in Durham county, England, and

Page  683 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 683 his wife in the province of Ontario, Canada. Of their seven children, six of whom are daughters, Mrs. Brown is the eldest and all are still living. Mr. Adams came to America when a young man and devoted the major portion of his active career as railroad and marine engineer, having been a skilled machinist. Mr. and Mrs. Brown became the parents of nine children, of whom two died in infancy and concerning the others the following brief record is given,-Retta remains at the parental home; Lawrence H. was graduated in the law department of the University of Michigan in 1901 and is now engaged in the practice of his profession in the city of Spokane, Washington; James A., who was graduated in the University of Michigan as a mechanical engineer, is now assistant superintendent of the Gas & Electric Works, in the city of Grand Rapids, this state; Mazie is the wife of George Baldwin of Sault Ste. Marie; Edna, who was graduated in Alma College, at Alma, Michigan, is now a successful and popular teacher in the public schools of Tecumseh, this state; Ruth is a member of the class of 1911 in the high school of her home city; and David, Jr., is likewise a student in the public schools. ALFRED F. SNYDER, M. D., who occupies a prominent position among the leading members of the medical profession of Escanaba, Michigan, has been a practitioner here for nearly a dozen years. Doctor Snyder is a native of Wisconsin. He was born on his father's farm near Janesville, October 24, 1855, and there passed his boyhood and early youth. His father, Spencer Snyder, was a native of Pennsylvania, born near Reading, where he was reared, and from whence, about 1848, he came west to Wisconsin and settled near Janesville. His life was passed as a farmer, and he died at the age of fifty-seven years. As far as known, he was the only one of his family to leave the "Keystone State." He married Mary M. Silverthorn, a native of New Jersey and a daughter of Nichols and Margaret Silverthorn, also natives of that state. The Silverthorns were among the pioneers of Wisconsin, where the grandparents of our subject lived to ripe old age and died. His mother died on her seventy-ninth birthday. Tn the Snyder family were seven sons and two daughters, all of whom grew to maturity, the Doctor being the sixth son and seventh born. Five of the sons, John L., Ira B., Benjamin P., William R., and Nichols F.. were in the Civil war, four as drummers and one as a fifer. After a service of three years, three of the boys, John, Ira and Benjamin, re-enlisted for the rest of the war. At the Battle of Bull Run John was wounded in the hip, from the effects of which he died in the army. The others returned home after the war was over. Ira and William are still living. Alfred F. Snyder remained at the home farm until he was fourteen years old. Then he started out to make his own way in the world; he worked at whatever he could find to do, and for a few years was variously employed. All his leisure time he spent in study, and at eighteen he qualified as teacher. Then by teaching he paved his way to the medical profession. In 1884, he graduated at Rush Medical College, Chicago, and following his graduation he practiced his profession in Chicago for five years, going from there to Baraboo, Wisconsin, where he remained until 1898. That year he came to Michigan, and at Escanaba established himself in a practice that he has continued up to the present time. Here he has served as Health Officer and City Physician, and in other ways has been prominently identified with the best interests of the town, having been a member of the

Page  684 684 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN Escanaba Board of Education at the time of the erection of the Iigh School building. He has membership in the Delta County, Upper Peninsula, State, and American Medical societies, and in the first two named has been honored with the office of president. May 6, 1885, Dr. Snyder married Miss Laura Booth, a daughter of Dr. C. E. Booth of Elroy, Wisconsin, who was for a time located at Escanaba as physician for the C. N. V. R. R. Dr. Booth died in 1907. The children of this union are two daughters, Alfa Lovida and Marie, the former being the wife of James A. Mackillican, superintendent of the Michigan-Montana Development Company in Montana. Mr. and Mrs. Mackillican have a little daughter, Laura Jane. Fraternally, Doctor Snyder is identified with the K. O. T. M., the K. of P. and the F. and A. M. In Masonry he has received the Knight Templar degree and is a member of the Mystic Shrine. JOHN T. McNAMARA.-Well and favorably known as an active and influential citizen of Houghton, John T. McNamara has been identified with many important enterprises in this section of the state, and has rendered the county valuable service in an official capacity. A son of Edward McNamara, he was born, in March, 1868, in McKillop township, Huron county, province of Ontario, Canada. A native of the province of Quebec, Canada, Edward McNamara was born in Buckingham, Three Rivers district, and was there reared and educated. Arriving at man's estate, he started westward in search of a favorable location, going to Huron county, which was then a wooded country. Becoming an early settler of McKillop township, he purchased a tract of heavily timbered land, and immediately commenced the pioneer labor of redeeming a farm from the wilderness. He cleared quite a large part of his land, and in addition to tilling the soil he made a business of preparing timber for the British market. He was quite successful in his operations, erecting a good set of frame buildings, and adding other improvements of value, continuing his residence there until 1891. Renting his farm in that year, he came to the Upper Peninsula, entered the employ of the well known lumbermen, Flatt Brothers, and has since been a resident of Houghton. He married Marian Taylor, who was born in Greenoch, Scotland, and came to America with her parents, Archibald and Margaret (McAlpine) Taylor, who were pioneer settlers of Morris township, Huron county, Ontario, Canada. Three children blessed their union, namely: John T., Peter A. and Catherine. Reared and educated in Huron county, Canada, John T. McNamara came from there to Houghton county, Michigan, in 1890, and the following year was in the employ of Flatt Brothers, lumber manufacturers and dealers. He was afterwards with James Haley a few months, later working for Matthew Van Order until appointed under sheriff, a position in which he served eight years, being four years with Sheriff Dunn and four years with Sheriff Lane. Mr. McNamara then became one of the promoters of the Amphidrome, which he assisted in building, and of which he has since been the manager. He is also secretary of the Houghton County Agricultural Society and secretary and treasurer of the Houghton County Poultry Association. Fraternally Mr. McNamara is a member of Houghton Lodge, No. 218, F. & A. M.; of Gate of the Temple Chapter, No. 25, R. A. M.; of Palestine Commandery, K. T.; of Ahmed Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S.; and of Columbia Lodge, No. 144, K. of P. In politics Mr. McNamara is a stanch Republican, and has served as a member of the Village Council.

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Page  685 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 685 MATT N. SMITH, cashier of Escanaba National Bank, was born in Watertown, Wisconsin, February 16, 1872, and is a son of Christopher and Mary (Collins) Smith. Christopher Smith, a son of Irish parents, was born in Lowell, Massachusetts, and went to Wisconsin as one of the pioneers, in 1842, and still resides there. His wife is a daughter of David Collins, one of the early settlers of Wisconsin, and she died when about forty-five years of age. They were parents of four sons and four daughters, all living at this writing, Matt being the sixth child and third son. The boyhood of Matt Smith was spent in his native place, where he received his early education; later he attended the University of Notre Dame, at South Bend, Indiana, from which he was graduated in 1889. In 1890 he became mailing clerk in the postoffice at Soo, and in 1891 removed to Houghton, Michigan, where he served for a time as assistant post master. He located next at Norway, Michigan, where he was assistant postmaster for a year and a half. Mr. Smith came to Escanaba in 1894, and was employed as bookkeeper in the Bank of Escanaba. In 1899 he engaged in men's furnishing business, and March 1, 1901, accepted the position of cashier of the Bank of Escanaba. In December, 1906, the bank was reorganized, becoming the Escanaba National Bank, of which Mr. Smith became cashier, which position he still holds. Mr. Smith has been a resident of the Northern Peninsula nearly twenty years and is well known. He takes an active interest in local affairs, and has business interests outside of the bank. He is a stockholder and treasurer of the Escanaba Traction Company and a member of the Business Men's Association of Escanaba. He is well known and stands high in the estimation of all, is an enterprising and publicspirited citizen, and has a large circle of friends. In June, 1901, Mr. Smith married Mary, daughter of J. K. and Anna (Brown) Stack, and they have one son, John Stack. KNUTE SELFRED MARKSTRUM.-A man of sterling integrity and worth, strong in his convictions and progressive in his views, Knute S. Markstrum, of Bessemer, Gogebic county, has long been actively and promininently identified with the public affairs of Michigan and Wisconsin, ably filling positions of trust and responsibility. A son of the late Daniel Markstrum, he was born, February 18, 1854, at No. 28, Riddar Gatan, Stockholm, Sweden, and spent his boyhood days in his native city. Daniel Markstrum was born at Pitea in Northern Sweden. He attended school regularly when young, and subsequently served an apprenticeship at the mason's trade in Stockholm, where he resided until 1866. Coming then with his family to the United States, he followed his trade at Jamestown, New York, for four years, and then he moved to Titusville, Pennsylvania, where he lived three years. The following two years he was a resident of Ishpeming, Michigan, from there going in 1875 to Oshkosh, Wisconsin, where he spent three months. Locating then in Wausau, Wisconsin, he remained there, an honored and respected resident, until his death, in March, 1908, at the advanced age of four score years. He married Catharine Kellberg, who was born in Finland, but when a child crossed the river with her parents into northern Sweden, and there, in the Land of the Midnight Sun, grew to womanhood. She died, in Wausau, Wisconsin, in 1907. To her and her husband ten children were born, all dying in childhood except Knute S., Daniel, Gustave, Signa and Agnes. The latter died at the age of twenty-three years. Daniel Markstrum. the first-born, was a

Page  686 686 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN great reader, very patriotic, and while young became very much interested in the progress of the Civil war in the United States, his sympathies with the Union army being so aroused that in 1865 he crossed the ocean, and on arriving in New York enlisted in the Union army, went south, and was presumably killed on the field of battle, having never again been heard from. Having laid a firm foundation for his future education in the schools of Stockholm, Knute S. Markstrum completed his education in Jamestown, New York, as a good linguist, being familiar with the German, Swedish and English languages. Learning the painter's trade when young, he followed it a number of years with success. Interested in public matters from his youth up, he became a zealous supporter of the principles of the Republican party from the day of his arrival in Jamestown, New York, and in 1868 was selected as president of the Jamestown High School Grant & Colfax Club, and for many years afterward took a prominent part in political campaigns. Mr. Markstrum was appointed U. S. census enumerator for the city of Wausau in 1880, and later, by President Garfield, deputy revenue collector for the northern district of Wisconsin, and served until the administration of Cleveland. In 1886 he came to Bessemer, Michigan, to engage in mercantile pursuits, and in 1888 he stumped the Upper Peninsula and Northern Michigan for President Harrison. In 1889 Mr. Markstrum was appointed postmaster at Bessemer, and served efficiently for five years in that capacity. He has served four years as a member of the Bessemer Board of Public Works and for two terms as supervisor. While in Wausau, Wisconsin, he was likewise prominent in public matters, serving as a member of the city council, and as county supervisor. Although for so many years a stanch Republican, Mr. Markstrum differed from his party in regard to the acquisition of new territory, and is now independent in politics, casting his vote in favor of what he deems the best men and measures, regardless of party prejudices. Mr. Markstrum was married, November 22, 1899, to Emma Hoffman, who was born at Ripon, Wisconsin, but reared to womanhood at Rib Falls in Marathon county. Mr. and Mrs. Markstrom had one son, Freddie Markstrum, who died in 1907, and he lies buried in the family lot at Forest Home cemetery, Wausau, Wisconsin. JOHN POWER -A powerful representative of the legal profession and a politician who has taken more. than an ordinary interest in public affairs as an ardent supporter of the principles and policies of the Democratic party, at Escanaba, Delta county, Michigan, is John Power, who was born in the City of Waterford, Ireland, the date of his birth being July 13, 1846. He is a son of Matthew Power, who was also born in Waterford, Ireland, in the year 1802. Matthew Power received a good educational training in his youth and he was brought up in the faith of the Catholic religion. His wife, whose maiden name was Bridget Veale, was likewise born in Waterford, the year of her nativity being 1810; she too was well educated and a Catholic. Mr. and Mrs. Power became the parents of nine children and of the number four are now living, John, of this sketch, having been the fifth in order of birth. The father was summoned to the life eternal in 1874, and his cherished and devoted wife passed away in 1884. The paternal grandfather of him to whom this sketch is dedicated was John Power, of Portlaw, Ireland, and the maternal grandfather, Patrick Veale, of Waterford, Ireland.

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Page  687 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 687 John Power, of this review, immigrated to the United States in the year 1863, he being the first of the family to come to this country. He first located at New York, and there enlisted in the Seventeenth New York Volunteers. After the close of the Civil war, Mr. Power engaged in the work of teaching for four years, after which he took up the study of law. He was admitted to the Bar of the State of Michigan in 1872 and was admitted to practice before the Supreme Court of the United States in 1892. He entered upon the practice of his profession in 1872 and has been continuously engaged therein through the long intervening years to the present time, in 1911. In 1881 he located at Escanaba, Michigan, where, as well as throughout the state, he is recognized as a versatile trial lawyer and as a skilled and well fortified counselor. His clientele is of a general nature and he has been prominently concerned in many important litigations in the State and Federal Courts. In politics he has ever been aligned as a stalwart supporter of the principles and policies of the Democratic party, in the local and state councils of which he has long been a most active factor. He was village and City Attorney of Calumet and Escanaba for some fifteen years and was also prosecuting attorney of Keweenaw and Manitou counties. In 1894 he was appointed United States Attorney for the Western district of Michigan, remaining incumbent of that position for over four years. He was candidate of his party for representative in Congress from the ninth, eleventh and twelfth Michigan districts on five different occasions but failed of election in the ensuing campaigns on account of the normal Republican majority in this section of the state, though always running ahead of his ticket. IIe was district delegate to the Democratic National Conventions of 1880, 1884 and 1892 and was delegate at large from Michigan to the National Convention of 1904. He was also the candidate of his party for elector at large of president and vice-president in 1888. Mr. Power was a member and president of the Board of Education of Escanaba for ten years and was County Superintendent of schools. He has also been secretary of the Board of School Examiners and in every possible way has shown his interest in all things pertaining to the general advancement of educational matters in the old Wolverine State. He is a man of high ideals and generous impulses and is ever on the qui vive to do good in both a public and an individual way. In religion he has always been Catholic and is intimately affiliated with that church; he is a man of many friends and his charity knows only the bounds of his opportunities. His intrinsic devotion and patriotism to the land of his adoption was shown by his gallant service, when not much more than a mere boy, as a soldier in the Union ranks in the Civil war. He enlisted as a private in Company A, Seventeenth New York Infantry in May, 1863, and after participating in many important conflicts marking the progress of the war, including the memorable march of Sherman's army to the sea, he was mustered out of service on the 19th of June, 1865. Mr. Power retains a deep and abiding interest in his old comrades in arms and signifies the same by membership in the C. F. Smith Post, Grand Army of the Republic, in which he is present Post Commander. He is also affiliated with the Knights of Columbus, in which he was grand knight for nine years. On the 30th of September, 1868, at Cliff, Michigan, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Power to Miss Elizabeth Corgan, who is a daughter of Charles and Mary Corgan, the former of whom was in the service of the United States light-house establishment on the Great Lakes for fully thirty years. Mrs. Power received an excellent education in her youth

Page  688 688 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN and is a woman of the utmost graciousness and refinement. Concerning the children of Mr. and Mrs. Power, the following brief data are here incorporated: Walter J. Power, who was born at Copper Harbor, Michigan, March 30, 1870, is a lawyer and a mining operator, with business headquarters at Hibbing, Minnesota. He married Miss Dottie O'Connell. Catherine is also a resident of Hibbing, Minnesota. Patrick S., who is engaged in the practice of law at Menominee, Michigan, married Miss Nina Doton, Escanaba, Michigan. May Frances, of Chicago, Illinois, is also married. Roscoe B. is a dentist at Green Bay, Wisconsin. Matthew L., who is a doctor, is engaged in the practice of his profession at Hancock, Michigan. Victor L. is a prominent lawyer at Hibbing, Minnesota. Patricia, who is the wife of George Wink, resides in Sioux City, Iowa. Mr. Power is still engaged in the active practice of his profession. WARREN S. CARPENTER.-There is no need for conjecture or uncertainty in determining as to the value and success of the work thus far accomplished by this honored and public-spirited business man of Menominee, where his interests are of wide scope and importance and where he stands exponent of enlightened and loyal citizenship and where he has utilized his splendid powers and ability to a goodly end.:Looking into the clear perspective of his career, there may be seen the strong line of courage, persistence, determination and self-confidence, along which alone is definite success attained. Menominee has reason to take pride in claiming him as a citizen, even if consideration is taken of nothing further than his great work in connection with the establishing of the new Menominee Hotel, which is one of the finest and most admirably conducted in the northwest. Warren S. Carpenter was born at Pike, Wyoming county, New York, on the 15th of December, 1853, and is a son of William 0. and Lucetta (Spencer) Carpenter. The father was likewise a native of the old Empire state, where he was born on the 17th of October, 1823, and he passed the closing years of his life in Menominee, Michigan, where he died on the 10th of November, 1906. His wife, who was born and reared in the same state as was he himself, was summoned to the life eternal in 1891, and of the two children of this union, the subject of this sketch is the elder; the younger, Frederick I., is a member of the faculty of the great University of Chicago, and resides in Barrington, Illinois. William Oscar Carpenter was reared with the sturdy discipline of the old homestead farm in Wyoming county, New York, and his father, Alvin A. Carpenter, moved from that state to the historic old Western Reserve in Ohio in the early sixties. In 1850 William O. Carpenter went to California, having been lured to the new Eldorado by the memorable discovery of gold in the preceding year. He made the voyage in a sailing vessel by way of the Isthmus of Panama, and in California he was identified with gold-mining operations until 1852, when he returned to the state of New York, where his marriage was solemnized in that year. He then returned to California, where he continued to be identified with mining operations and the merchandise business until 1856. In that year he took up his residence in Elmira, New York, where he established himself in the mercantile business and in the following year, 1857, he came to Wisconsin and located in Monroe, Green county, where three years later he became associated with his brother August in the mercantile business. In 1861 he took a caravan of horses overland to California and in 1863 he en

Page  689 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 689 gaged in the lumber business in the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, becoming associated in this enterprise with the late Abner A. Kirby and the late Samuel N. Stephenson, under the firm name of Kirby, Carpenter & Company. This concern had much to do with the development of the great lumber industry in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, and operated a large and well equipped saw mill at Menominee. William O. Carpenter during most of this time maintained his home in Chicago, where he had large interests, but he passed his summers in Menominee from 1887 until his death. The concern of which he was a member, still continued extensive lumber operations in this section up to 1907 and the business was incorporated in 1874 under the title of The Kirby Carpenter Company. William O. Carpenter was one of the organizers of the Lumbermen's Mining Company, which is the better part of the Chapin at the present time. This corporation was prominently identified with the iron mining industry in the Upper Peninsula. Its mines are located at Iron Mountain. Mr. Carpenter was also organizer of the Iron Mountain Electric Company, at Iron Mountain, Michigan, and of the Menominee Street Railway Company. Under his efficient generalship both of these corporations installed well equipped systems which contributed materially to the metropolitan facilities of the two cities in which they operated and which proved of inestimable value in affording urban transportation. His productive energies knew no limitations and every enterprise that tended to advance the welfare and upbuilding of the sections in which his interests centered, received his earnest and faithful cooperation. He was one of the organizers of the Lumbermen's National Bank of Menominee, in which he continued as a stockholder until his death. In 1880 he purchased a large tract of land in South Dakota and forthwith initiated the development of the same. He later added to his holdings in that state until his landed estate there comprised an area of about fifteen thousand acres. There he gave special attention to the breeding of high grade cattle, principally of the short-horn Durham and polled Angus type. He also attained a wide reputation as a breeder of Percheron horses. He was one of the first to utilize artesian wells in South Dakota, and from wells that were constructed by him was derived sufficient water to make an attractive lake on his property. His identification with the lumber industry was not confined to northern Michigan and Wisconsin, for as early as 1877 he purchased a large tract of pine timber land in Louisiana. Mr. Carpenter was numbered among the best known and most influential business men of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, was especially active in the promotion of enterprises tending to advance the civic and material welfare of the city of Menominee, and ever commanded the implicit confidence and respect of all who knew him. His name merits an euduring place upon the roll of those sterling citizens who have made this section of the Wolverine state forge to the front as an eligible place for residence and the exploiting of manifold lines of industry. Though never a seeker of public office, he accorded a staunch allegiance to the Republican party. Warren S. Carpenter has well upheld the prestige of the honored name which he bears and he today ranks among the leading business men of the Upper Peninsula. He received his early educational discipline in the public schools of the city of Chicago, and after a course in the high school he began working at the carpenter's trade, in 1871. In 1874 he identified himself with the meat-packing business in that city, and he continued to be identified with the same

Page  690 690 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN until 1885. In the following year he came to Menominee and became prominently concerned with the lumber industry, with which he was associated thereafter until 1894, when he established himself in the dairy business in Menominee county, in connection with which he became a large and successful breeder of full-blood Holstein cattle and standard-bred horses. In 1897 he shipped to Guatemala, Central America, a car load of his fine Holstein cattle and in the following year he exported to Japan two car loads of the same blooded stock, this being the first exportation to Japan. His stock farm attained a high reputation and the sales mentioned were made after personal visits to his farm had been made by representatives of the countries mentioned. He owned a three-year-old Holstein heifer which secured first prize at a fair of the Holstein Association of America. From the milk of this animal eighty-seven pounds of butter were made in thirty days. The standard-bred mare that was raised by him and that attained a high reputation on the turf was "Florence Wilton" and she made a trial heat of one mile in 2:061/4, besides which he bred many other fine trotting horses. On the 1st of August, 1908, Mr. Carpenter purchased the hotel building erected in Menominee by the late Samuel N. Stephenson, and he has remodeled this property and made it one of the finest hotels not only in the Upper Peninsula but also in the Northwest, its reputation being such as to attract to it a large and appreciative patronage. He is also the owner of a large amount of very valuable realty in the city of Menominee as well as in other cities and various other states. He has never cared to enter the arena of practical polities, but is essentially public-spirited, as even the foregoing statements indicate, and his support is given to the cause of the Republican party. On the 10th of MIarch, 1887, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Carpenter to Miss Elizabeth Armstrong, who was born and reared in Menominee, and who is a daughter of the late Hiram Armstrong, long a representative citizen of this city. The two children of this union are William Spencer and Florence Lucetta. In conclusion of this sketch is entered the following excerpt from an article published in the Menominee Herald-Leader at the time when Mr. Carpenter purchased the hotel property mentioned. He has since made the best of improvements upon the hotel and it is now one of the distinctive attractions of Menominee. Menominee's roll of honor, made up of the men of wealth and enterprise who back their views of Menominee's future with open pocketbooks and level heads, contains well up towards the top the name of Warren S. Carpenter. Mr. Carpenter is a man of few words but many enterprises. His counsel and his money are a part of nearly every one of the industrial propositions that are so rapidly making Menominee well known as a good town growing better with giant strides. He takes the view, which is shared by hustlers like C. I. Cook, August Spies, John Henes, John W. Wells, Leo C. Harmon, William Holmes and many others, that money made in Menominee may well be reinvested in the industrial city which is supplanting the lumber town. Mr. Carpenter bought the hotel and will make it the best in the west, not to make a great return from the investment, but to give Menominee first place in this regard. He will spare nothing in accomplishing his purpose, and it is a compliment to him that no one doubts that when he has completed his work the new Menominee

Page  691 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 691 hotel will be in a class by itself. We believe the financial returns will quickly follow, giving to Mr. Carpenter a double satisfaction in his new enterprise. AUGUSTUS ALVORD CARPENTER, one of the founders of the vast lumber trade of Chicago and the northwest and a citizen who for more than forty-five years has also been a practical supporter of the higher life of the western metropolis, is now retired from business, and in his eightythird year he is justly entitled to the rest and recreation of a successful, veteran and honored member of the community. Mr. Carpenter has had the wisdom to devote much of his time and means to the furtherance of those municipal reforms which, in spite of all outside detractions, have maintained the standing of Chicago as an advanced metropolis of the world. He has been thereby wise, for he has added to his remarkable business career the honor of disinterested and elevated citizenship. Augustus Alvord Carpenter is a native of Chateaugay, Franklin county, New York, born on the 8th of June, 1825, son of Alanson and Guiaelma (Nichols) Carpenter. His earlier years were spent upon the home farm and in the district schools of his neighborhood, and at the age of seventeen he commenced a career extending over a decade, which was an experimental period of his life devoted to farming and general merchandising in the Empire state. In 1852, with his brother, he joined the California gold seekers by the ocean and isthmus route. While on the coast for three years he engaged both in mining and trading, most of this period being spent at Rose's bar on the Yuba river near Marysville. In 1855 he returned to the east, and soon afterward settled at Monroe, Wisconsin, where he was engaged in the dry goods and cattle business for the succeeding four years. When the effects of the panic of 1857 had virtually subsided, Mr. Carpenter entered into the field of operations of which for so many years he was one of the great masters of the northwest. In 1859, with his brother, William O., he established a retail lumber yard at Monroe, and in the following year the two purchased an interest in the business of Kirby and Stephenson, who were then operating a mulay mill at Menominee, Michigan, and a retail yard at Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The members of the original firm were Abner Kirby, a pioneer of the Cream City, and S. M. Stephenson, of Menominee, who afterward became one of the largest lumber men in the northwest and very prominent in Michigan politics. The addition of the Carpenter brothers changed the firm name to Kirby, Carpenter & Company, which in 1872 was incorporated under the Illinois laws as "The Kirby-Carpenter Company," and notwithstanding that Mr. Kirby withdrew in 1880, the corporate name remains the same and Augustus A. Carpenter is still president of the company. The original mill at Menominee consisted of a single saw, with a yearly capacity of 2,000,000 feet, and the first stock of the incorporated company amounted to $500,000, with a surplus of $362,000 and timber resources of 400,000,000 feet. In the early nineties three large mills were in operation, with a cutting capacity of 115,000,000 feet per year; the surplus had reached $3,871,000 and the company held some 800,000,000 feet of standing timber. About a thousand men were employed on an average, and a large grist mill was constantly running to supply feed for the four hundred horses and mules used in the various departments. In addition, there was a planing mill and several dry kilns, and the vast lumber yards in Chicago formed a leading feature of the city's industries.

Page  692 692 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN In 1862 Mr. Carpenter took up his residence in Chicago, and soon afterward a lumber yard was opened at the junction of the north branch with the main river, and soon much of the Milwaukee trade was attracted to this point. At the outset the sales amounted to about 10,000,000 feet per annum. In 1868 a new mill was erected, its capacity increased from time to time, and in 1892 the sales at the Chicago yards had reached 134,000,000 feet annually. From the time of his coming to Chicago Mr. Carpenter made this city the headquarters of all his interests, the manufacturing portion of which has been actively conducted at Menominee' for many years. Long prior to that time a large yard was maintained in the lumber district of Twenty-second street, where the bulk of the mill product was sold to country dealers. Mr. Carpenter was for many years a broad and active figure in the great lumber interests which center at Menominee, Michigan, and was one of the earliest and most successful developers of the mineral resources of the Superior region. For years he was president of the Lumbermen's Mining Company of Iron Mountain, Michigan; was for some time president of the Lumbermen's National Bank of Menominee; and was largely interested in the Electric Light Railway and Power Company of Menominee. In Chicago he became one of the incorporators of the Lumbermen's Exchange, was elected vice-president in 1876 and president in 1882, and served continuously on the executive committee until 1888. Although Chicago was abandoned as a distributing point by the Kirby-Carpenter Company, it remained the executive and financial center of Mr. Carpenter's widely extended interests and he continued to be identified with the city in many lines of activity. He has served for many years as a director of the First National Bank of Chicago and has been president of the Citizens' Association, as well as of the Union and Commercial clubs of that city. In 1863 Mr. Carpenter was wedded to Miss Elizabeth K. Kempton, of New Bedford, Massachusetts, and the children born to them were: Augustus A. Carpenter, Jr., now prominently engaged in the lumber and tie business; and Amie, wife of John E. Newell, a resident of Chicago. MAGNUS OLSON.-Possessing excellent business ability, tact and judgment, Magnus Olson is intimately associated with the advancement of the industrial interests of Ironwood, where he is well and favorably known as a prosperous contractor and builder, being at the head of the firm of Olson & Bergquist. A native of Sweden, he was born, October 16, 1868, on the home farm in Wermland. His father, Olof Erickson, was born eighty years ago in Wermland, on the farm where he is still residing, being an honored and respected citizen. Although an agriculturist by occupation, he was a natural mechanic, handy with tools of all kinds, being a shoemaker, a blacksmith and a most skilful wood-worker. Able to do all the repairing needed on the farm, he saved not only time but considerable money in his mechanical labors. He married Stina Hawkinson, who has also been a lifelong resident of Sweden, and of their union ten children have been born, as follows: Johan, Mary, Betty, Hannah, John, Gustav, Magnus, Christina, Matilda and Caroline. Hannah, wife of N. Skagman, of Omaha, Nebraska, John, living in Ironwood, and Magnus, the subject of this brief sketch, are the only members of the parental household that left their native land. At-tending school quite regularly until eleven years old, Magnus Olson then turned his attention to the shoemaker's trade, in which he

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Page  693 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 693 acquired some proficiency, and at the age of sixteen years began working at the carpenter's bench. Emigrating to the United States in 1887, he came directly to the Upper Peninsula, the home of many of his countrymen, locating in Norway, Dickinson county, where he was engaged in mining at the Green Pit for a year and a half. From there he came to Ironwood, which was then a small but a wide-awake little village situated in the midst of the woods. The following three years Mr. Olson was employed at the Ashland Mine, and then took up his old trade, which he had learned in Sweden, working as a journeyman carpenter until 1895, when he embarked in business for himself as a contractor. In 1902 he formed a co-partnership with Axel Bergquist, and under the firm name of Olson & Bergquist has since built up a substantial business as a contractor and builder, and has also dealt extensively in building materials. Mr. Olson married Mary E. Larson, who was born in Osceola, Michigan, a daughter of Soren and Clara Larson, natives of Norway. The union of Mnr. and Mirs. Olson has been blessed by the birth of five children, namely: Florence Elizabeth, Judith Irene, Clara Victoria, Walter Alvin and Hilda Augusta. Mr. and Mrs. Olson are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and in politics he is a strict Prohibitionist. GORDON MURRAY.-Among the leaders of almost every important public movement of his adopted city is Gordon Murray, who as mayor of Norway, Dickinson county, is filling the office with credit to himself and advantage to the city, his integrity, upright character and sound judgment making him a desirable man for the position. A native of Canada, he was born, August 14, 1863, at Bruce Mines, Huron county, province of Ontario, being the third in direct line of descent to bear the name in this country, his father and grandfather having borne the name of Gordon. His grandfather, Gordon Murray, the first, the descendant of a long line of sturdy Scotch ancestors, was born, bred and married in Ayrshire, Scotland. About middle life he emigrated to Canada, and for a number of years was engaged in farming on Saint Josephs Island, in the province of Ontario. He subsequently removed with his family to the Upper Peninsula, and spent his last days in Negaunee, Marquette county. One of a large family or children, Captain Gordon Murray, father of Mayor Gordon Miurray, was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, and was there educated. At the age of seventeen years he came with the family to America, locating in Huron county, Ontario, where he soon began work in the Bruce Mine, continuing there until 1869. Coming in that year to Michigan, he was for several months employed in the Quincy Mine, after which he worked in the iron mines of Marquette county, becoming a contractor at pit mining. He was afterwards captain at the Edwards Mine in Humboldt, from there going to Negaunee, where he was captain at the Cambria Mine until his death, in 1885, at the comparatively early age of forty-eight years. Captain Murray married Elizabeth Coatsworth, who was born in Richmond, Virginia, a daughter of Joshua Coatsworth, a native of England. She died in 1870, leaving three children, namely: Gordon, the special subject of this sketch; Sarah, now the wife of John Wasmuth; and Joshua. The Captain married for his second wife Mary McKenzie, and to them five children were born, John, Mary, Annie, Grace and Aleck. Leaving school at the age of fifteen years, Gordon Murray began his active career by driving a mule at the Michigamme Mine. He was afterwards employed in the Post Office at Ishpeming for two years, subseVol. II-5

Page  694 694 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN quently completing a course of study at the Quincy Business College, in Quincy, Illinois. Mr. Murray then accepted a position as book-keeper with the Deer Lake Company at Ishpeming, remaining there until 1885. Entering then the employ of the Metropolitan Lumber Company, in the Felch district, he was book-keeper for the firm for five years, subsequently, as superintendent, having charge of that company's affairs for nine years. In 1899 he entered the employ of the Commonwealth Iron Company at its Aragon Mine, Norway. In 1901 Mr. Murray became an employe of the Oliver Iron Mnining Company, in charge of timber lands and logging on the Menominee Range, while subsequently, upon the organization of the Oliver Iron Mining Company's "Department of Timber Lands," he was made superintendent of all work coming under that department on the Michigan and Wisconsin Iron Ranges. Mr. Murray married, in 1888, Margaret Hourigan, who was born in Detroit, Michigan, a daughter of Michael and Margaret Hourigan. She died in 1895, in early womanhood. Mr. Murray married for his second wife Henrietta Roche, who was born in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, to Thomas Roche and wife, whose maiden name was Owen. Of Mr. Murray's first marriage three children were born, namely: Gordon Howard, John and Margaret. By his present union he has one child, George. A steadfast Republican in politics, Mr. Murray has been active in party ranks, for the past six years having served as chairman of the Dickinson County Republican Committee. For thirteen years he was a member of the Board of Supervisors, and is now rendering the city appreciated service as mayor. Fraternally Mr. Murray is a member of Norway Lodge, No. 362, F. & A. M.; and of Iron Mountain Lodge, No. 2885, Modern Woodmen of America. JOHN S. COMAN.-The name borne by the subject of this sketch is one that has been worthily identified with the annals of American history from the early Colonial epoch to the present time, and its record is one that bears evidence of sterling honor and integrity on the part of its representatives, as one generation has followed another on to the stage of life's activities. Its members have been pioneers in various sections of the Union and have ever been found worthy, doing their parts in connection with the work of civic and industrial progress. John S. Coman was born at Morrisville, Madison county, New York, on the 4th of June, 1857, and is a son of Benjamin F. and Harriet (White) Coman. His father was born in Eaton township, Madison county, New York, on the 3d of August, 1819, and his death occurred in 1886; his wife was born in the town of Litchfield, Herkimer county, New York, in 1826, and her death occurred in 1904. Their marriage was solemnized at Utica, New York, and they became the parents of three children,-Harriet, who died at the age of twenty years; John S., who is the immediate subject of this review; and Henry B., who resides at Oneida, New York, and who is justice of the supreme court of that state for the Sixth district. The father devoted -practically his entire active career to agricultural pursuits and he continued to reside on the old homestead farm, the place of his birth, until the close of his long and useful life. He lived virtually retired during the last twenty-two years of his life and was one of the honored and influential citizens of his native county. He served for many years as township supervisor and for four years he was postmaster at Morrisville under the administration of President James A. Garfield. For fully two score years he was incumbent of the office of

Page  695 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 695 justice of the peace. In politics he was originally aligned as a supporter of the Whig party, but in 1857 he transferred his allegiance to the Republican party, of whose cause he was thereafter a staunch advocate. He was affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and both he and his wife were devoted members of the Baptist church, in which he was a deacon for many years prior to his demise. He was a son of Winsor Coman, who was born in the town of North Providence, Rhode Island, in 1775, and who died in 1861. Winsor Coman married Miss Keziah Smith, and of their four sons and three daughters, the father of our subject was the youngest child. In 1798 Winsor Coman set forth from North Providence, Rhode Island, and made his way on horseback to the wilderness of central New York. Ite secured a tract of land in what is now Eaton township, Madison county, where he literally hewed out a farm in the midst of the virgin forest. He was one of the earliest settlers of that section of the old Empire state and it was his to render valiant service as a soldier in the War of 1812, in which he received commission as ensign. He took part in engagements at Sacketts Harbor and Oswego. In the agnatic line the lineage is traced back to Roger Williams, the founder of Rhode Island. On the maternal side the subject of this sketch is the lineal descendant of William White, who came to America from England in 1622. Captain Basil White, another maternal ancestor, was captain in the Continental line during the war of the Revolution. John S. Coman, the immediate subject of this review, was reared on the old ancestral homestead and early became inured to the sturdy discipline of the farm. His rudimentary education was secured in the district schools and later he supplemented this by attending school at Morrisville and Cazenovia Seminary, at Cazenovia, New York. In 1878, shortly after attaining to his legal majority, he severed gracious home ties and set forth to seek his fortune in the west. He located at Bay City, Michigan, where he identified himself with the lumbering industry, with which he continued to be connected in that section until the spring of 1885, when he came to Menominee, Michigan, where he has since continued independent operations in the same important field of enterprise, in which his experience has been wide and varied. He is one of the substantial and honored business men of Menominee, is loyal and enterprising as a citizen and while never a seeker of political preferment, he accords a staunch support to the principles and policies for which the Republican party stands sponsor. He is affiliated with Menominee Lodge, No. 269, Free and Accepted Masons; Menominee Chapter, No. 107, Royal Arch Masons; and Menomine~ Commandery, No. 35, Knights Templars. On the 16th of April, 1883, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Coman to Miss Clara A. Waite, who was born in the city of Buffalo, New York, where the marriage was celebrated. She is a daughter of the late William Waite, who was a prosperous business man and representative citizen of that city. Mr. and Mrs. Coman have two sons. Harry L. and Lawrence J. The family is prominent in the social life of the community and the home is noted for its generous hospitality. BERNARD AM. TMORRIs.-As president and treasurer of the B. M. Morris Company, outfitters for men and boys, the subject of this sketch is numbered among the progressive business men and representative citizens of Sault Ste. Marie. He was born in Germany, on the 5th of June, 1855, and is a son of Moses and Esther (Nathan) Morris, the former of whom died at the age of fifty-five years and the latter at

Page  696 696 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN the age of fifty-four years; they are survived by three sons and one daughter. Moses Morris came with his family to America, in 1864, and located in the city of Detroit, where he was identified with mercantile pursuits until 1875, when he removed to Beaumont, Texas, where he was successfully established in the clothing business until his death, which occurred in 1890. Bernard M. Morris was afforded the advantages of the public schools of the city of Detroit and as a youth he secured a position as a clerk in a clothing store in that city. He was there engaged as salesman in connection with this line of enterprise for somewhat more than a decade and in 1883 he initiated his independent business career. In May, 1885, Mr. Morris took up his residence in Sault Ste. Marie, where he engaged in the clothing business, with which he has since been actively and successfully identified. On the 26th of March, 1903, he organized the Boston Clothing Company, of which he was the executive head until he effected a reorganization on the 23d of May, 1907, under the present title of B. M. Morris Company, of which he has since been president and treasurer. The company is a large and thoroughly metropolitan establishment and the fair and honorable dealings that have ever characterized Mr. Morris' business career have brought his concern a most liberal and appreciative supporting patronage. He is loyal in his civic attitude and while never a seeker of public office he accords staunch adherence to the Republican party. He is affiliated with Bethel Lodge, No. 358, Free & Accepted Masons; Sault Ste. Marie Chapter, No. 126, Royal Arch Masons; De Witt Clinton Consistory, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, in the city of Grand Rapids, in which he has attained the thirtysecond degree; and Ahmed Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, in the city of Marquette. He is also identified with the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias. On the 19th of August, 1884, Mr. Morris was united in marriage to Miss Agnes Lenhoff, who was born in the city of Syracuse, New York, and who is a daughter of Joseph M. and Emily Lenhoff. Mr. Lenhoff was born in Russia and came to America as a young man. He was a prominent merchant in Detroit, Michigan, and later in Saginaw, where both he and his wife died. Mr. and Mrs. Morris became the parents of two children,-Lillian, who died at the age of eighteen years, and Rose, who remains at the parental home. FRED W. RICHARDS.-A man of tried and true integrity, possessing great mechanical skill and good business ability, Fred W. Richards has won well deserved success by his thorough mastery of his calling, and the respect in which he is held by all with whom he is brought in contact gives evidence of his upright and manly life. A son of William Richards, he was born, April 3, 1850, in the parish of Saint Just, county Cornwall, England, the descendant of an old and honored family. His grandfather, John Richards, who married Gertrude Rapin, was a landed proprietor and a life-long resident of county Cornwall. Born in the parish of Saint Austell, William Richards was reared and educated in county Cornwall, his native county, and as a young man served an apprenticeship at the iron moulder's trade. He was subsequently foreman for thirty-six consecutive years of a foundry in the parish of Saint Just, residing there until his death, when but sixty-three years old. He married Ann C. Murton, who was born in Saint Austell parish, a daughter of Captain Robert and Mary (Carne) Murton, lifelong residents of county Cornwall, where her father was a mining captain. She died at the age of seventy-two years, leaving four children,

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Page  697 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 697 namely: Fred W., the special subject of this sketch; Alfred J., who spent his last days in Houston, Texas; Mary C., who is married and still resides in county Cornwall; and Maria S., living with her brother Fred at Iron Mountain. Completing his early education in the schools of his native parish, Fred W. Richards began learning the trade of a machinist at the age of fourteen years, and served an apprenticeship of six years. Ambitious to get a good start in his work, he immediately came to America, locating, in 1870, at Brantford, Canada, where he remained a year. Migrating then to Michigan, he was in the employ of the Lake Superior Foundry Company, at Ishpeming, for three years, and the succeeding year worked at his trade in Belleville, Illinois. Going back then to England to visit his family and friends, he remained there a year, and on his return to this country settled at Austin, Texas, where he followed his trade two years. From there Mr. Richards came to the Upper Peninsula, and the ensuing eight years was shop foreman at the mine in Republic, Marquette county. Going then to Norway, he held a similar position for four years with the Penn Mining Company, after which he spent another year in England. Returning to Michigan, Mr. Richards settled at Iron Mountain, and after spending four years as shop foreman at the Chapin Mine was promoted to the office of master mechanic, a position which he still retains and for which he is eminently fitted. Mr. Richards married, in 1880, Add G. Roberts, who was born in Houghton county, Michigan, a daughter of Enoch Roberts and granddaughter of William and Elizabeth (Solomon)' Roberts, who spent their entire lives in county Cornwall, England. Born and reared in the parish of Chacewater, Enoch Roberts began mining when young, and with the exception of a short time spent in Scotland followed that employment in England, his native country, until 1860. Coming then to America, he was employed at the Pewabic and Franklin copper mines in the Upper Peninsula for some time, afterward superintending the opening of the Arcadian mine, at Hancock, of which he was made captain. While there, in 1863, he was joined by his wife and three children, whom he had left in England three years before. After serving six years as captain of the Arcadian mine, Mr. Roberts was captain at the Brass and Wire Mine in Ishpeming for five years, subsequently having charge for a time of the furnace at Collinsville. He was afterwards pit boss at the Republic Mine, and then captain at the Metropolitan Mine, later serving in the same position at the mine in West Vulcan. From there he went to Waucedah as captain of the mine, thence to the Hemlock, and from there to the Mastodon Mine. Going then to Iron River, Captain Roberts opened the Dover Mine, which he superintended for a while, when, realizing that he was advancing in years and being desirous of less responsibility, he resigned his office as superintendent of the mine, but remained for a while as surface boss. Upon resigning that position the Captain spent a few months at Duluth, visiting a daughter, from there going to Ishpeming, where, two weeks later, he died, at the age of seventy-three years. The maiden name of his wife was Grace Blight. She was born in the parish of Chacewater, county Cornwall, a daughter of Joseph and Grace (Williams) Blight, the latter of whom spent her entire life in county Cornwall, and the former all excepting three years spent in Brazil, South America. The Captain and Mrs. Roberts reared five children, of whom the first three, Louisa J., Enoch and William H., were born in England, and the last two, Ada G. and Fred C., were born in Houghton county, Michigan. Religiously Mr. Richards was reared in the Episcopal faith, while

Page  698 698 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN Mrs. Richards was brought up in the Methodist faith. Fraternally Mr. Richards holds a place of prominence in the Masonic Order, belonging to Iron Mountain Lodge, No. 388, F. & A. M.; to Iron Mountain Chapter, No. 121, R. A. M.; to Hugh McCurdy Commandery, No. 43, K. T.; to the Marquette Lodge of Perfection; to the Lake Superior Council of the Princes of Jerusalem; to the Peninsula Chapter of Rose Croix; and to Ahmed Temple, Order of the Mystic Shrine. JOSEPH J. AIALLMANN, of Escanaba, treasurer of Delta county, was born in this county, September 9, 1872. His father, Peter Mallman, a lumberman and merchant in Delta county, was born in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, and he died in 1888. He was a son of John Peter Mallmann, a native of Germany and an early settler in Wisconsin. Peter Mallmann married (first) Gertrude Boltz, who died at the age of thirty-six years, leaving three sons and three daughters, of whom Joseph J. is the fifth child; Mr. Mallmann married a second time and had three children. The early years of Joseph J. Mallmann were spent at home in Delta county, where he attended the district schools and afterward the Escanaba public schools. He attended business college in Green Bay, Wisconsin, and then became engaged in mercantile business at Rapid River, in partnership with John P. McCall, under the firm name of McCall & Mallmann. Four years later, in 1901, Mr. Mallmann came to Escanaba, where for more than two years he served as deputy county treasurer and part of a term as acting county treasurer; in November, 1908, he was elected to the office, and still holds same. He has business ability and experience, and looks after the affairs of the public with the same care he would give his own interests. Mr. Mallmann is a stanch Republican, and actively interested in the success of the party. He served two terms as treasurer of Masonville township, and stands well in public opinion. He has been a lifelong resident of the Northern Peninsula, is well known in the community, and held in high esteem by all. He is a member of the Knighted Order Tented Maccabees. In 1895 Mr. Mallmann married Katherine B., daughter of Joshua and Sarah Willson, and their union has been blessed with four sons, Walter R., Kenneth, Joseph Alton and Robert W. ERNEST H. MADAJESKY, M. D.-Actively identified with the medical fraternity of the Upper Peninsula as head of the firm of Drs. Madajesky & Pinkerton, proprietors of the Gogebic Hospital at Bessemer, Ernest H. Madajesky, M. D., is widely and favorably known throughout this part of Michigan, where he has an extensive practice. A son of the late Frederick W. Madajesky, he was born, October 1, 1870, in Appleton, Wisconsin, where he spent the earlier years of his life. Frederick W. Madajesky was born and reared in Polish Germany, where his parents were life-long residents. Having completed his studies in the public schools, he served an apprenticeship at the blacksmith's trade, becoming a skilful workman. Immediately after his marriage he came with his bride to America, which to him was a land rich in promise, and located in Appleton, Wisconsin, where he was for many years in the employ of the Appleton Furnace Company. He continued a resident of that city until his death, in 1901. His wife, whose maiden name was Henrietta Manzek, was born in northern Germany, and like her husband, was the only member of her family to cross the Atlantic. She is still living, and of her five children two

Page  699 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 699 survive, namely: Ernest H., the special subject of this sketch; and Anna. After his graduation from the Appleton High School Ernest II. Madajesky was for a while employed as a clerk in a drug store. He subsequently entered the University of Wisconsin, and was there graduated from the school of pharmacy with the class of 1891. Going then to Ironwood, Gogebic county, Michigan, he remained there five years, having charge of the drug stores belonging to Thomas & McCabe. Turning his attention then to the study of medicine, he spent a year in the medical department of the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, going from there to Chicago, Illinois, where, in 1899, he was graduated from the College of Physicians and Surgeons, with the degree of M. D. Locating then in Bessemer, Dr. Madajesky became assistant to Drs. Loope & Whiteside, proprietors of the Gogebic Hospital, and in 1906, in company with Dr. W. J. Pinkerton, succeeded to the ownership of this institution, which is one of the best of its kind in the Upper Peninsula, and is well patronized. Dr. Madajesky married, in 1902, Ada McMinn, who was born, bred and educated in Michigan. Her parents, Francis and Matilda (Clark) McMinn, were born in the north of Ireland, of Scotch ancestry. The Doctor and Mrs. Madajesky have three children, namely: Frances, Ruth and Maxine. Fraternally the Doctor is a member of Bessemer Lodge, No. 392, F. & A. M. LEO C. HARMON.-A representative of that progressive spirit and distinctively initiative power that have brought the city of Menominee into prominence as an industrial and commercial center, Mr. Harmon holds precedence as one of the most alert and influential business men of the city, where he is identified with enterprises of wide scope and importance. He is president of the Menominee Electric Manufacturing Company, and is also president of the Richardson Shoe Company, and no citizen of the Upper Peninsula is more loyal and enthusiastic in regard to the advantages and profits here afforded. Leo C. Harmon was born in Walworth county, South Dakota, on the 31st of October, 1871, and is a representative of one of the pioneer families of that state. He is a son of Captain William and Zoe Lulu (Picotte) Harmon. His father was born at Springfield, Maine, on the 28th of June, 1835, was a resident of the state of Montana, and at the time of his death, which occurred on the 28th of October, 1903, he resided in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The mother was born in the city of St. Louis, Missouri, of French parentage, and died at Miles City, Montana, June 4, 1895. Of the four children two are living, the subject of this sketch being the elder; Joseph R. is engaged in the grocery business at Mandan, North Dakota. Captain William Harmon was a youth at the time of his parents' removal from the old Pine Tree state to the wilds of Minnesota, where they took up their residence in the year 1850. He eventually became identified with the operation of steamboats on the upper Mississippi river between Minneapolis and Anoka, Minnesota, and was the owner of the steamer "H. M. Rice." Captain Harmon served with distinction as a soldier in the Civil war, having enlisted in the First Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, with which command he served three years, being mustered out with the rank of first lieutenant. He thereafter was appointed to the captaincy in the Thirty-sixth regiment of the United States Infantry, and he continued in service with the regular army until 1870, when he resigned. He then engaged in government contract

Page  700 700 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN work in the territory of Dakota, being associated in this enterprise with Durfey & Peck Company and W. A. Paxton of Omaha, Nebraska. Later he removed to Montana, in which state he was thereafter actively identified with the live stock industry until the time of his death. He was a Republican in his political proclivities and was an appreciative and valued member of the Grand Army of the Republic. Leo C. Harmon was born at the time when his father was engaged in government contracting in Dakota, and owing to the limited educational advantages afforded in that section at the time, he was sent to the city of Montreal, Canada, where he was afforded the proper advantages. At the age of eighteen years he became bookkeeper for the Stock-Growers' National Bank of Miles City, Montana, and in 1893, when this institution met with financial disaster, owing to the great panic of that year, he was appointed receiver of the same. He showed much ability in making a final adjustment of its affairs and retired from the office of receiver in 1899. While receiver of the Stock-Growers' National Bank Mr. Harmon assisted in the organization of the State National Bank of Miles City in August, 1896, and was its first cashier and was later made second vice-president of that bank, which position he held until he removed to Michigan in January, 1900. In January of the following year he came to Menominee, Michigan, and assumed the position of manager of the Richardson Shoe Company, the pioneer manufacturers of seamless shoes. As one of the principal stockholders of this corporation he was elected its president in 1907, since which time he has continued incumbent of this office. The company has an extensive and finely equipped plant in Menominee and the same has a capacity for an output of two thousand pairs of shoes a day. W. S. Carpenter is secretary of the company and Nelson Bennor is superintendent. In 1902 Mr. Harmon became associated with his uncle, Milan S. Harmon, in the purchase and reorganization of the Menominee Electric Manufacturing Company, manufacturers of general electric supplies, and this also is now one of the important industrial concerns of the Upper Peninsula. A. D. Gibbs is vice-president; Henry Tideman secretary, and M. S. Harmon treasurer. Mr. Harmon is also a director of the Lloyd Manufacturing Company, one of the most extensive manufacturers of baby carriages in the United States; is secretary and treasurer of the Fisher Box Company, and is a member of the directorate of the Lumbermen's National Bank. The high civic ideals and movements fostered by the Menominee Commercial Club have made a distinctive appeal to Mr. Harmon, and he has served as president of this organization for two years. The Lloyd Manufacturing Company, of which mention has just been made, was reorganized largely through the well directed efforts of Mr. Harmon, who brought about its removal from Minneapolis to Menominee. He is ever elert in securing to his home city enterprises that will further its industrial and commercial precedence. He is a member of the Knights of Columbus. Both he and his wife are members of the Roman Catholic church. Though never a seeker of public office, Mr. Harmon is a stanch advocate of the principles and policies for which the Republican party stands sponsor. On the 28th of December, 1898, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Harmon to Miss Minnie E. Maher, who was born at Fort Dodge, Iowa. WILLIAM R. SMITH, president and general manager of the Delta Hardware Company, of Escanaba, was born in Wapello, Iowa, December

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Page  701 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 701 17, 1868. His father, W. P. Smith, was a native of New York, where he was reared and educated, and about 1864 he removed to Iowa, where he carried on farming for about six years. In 1870 he removed to Chicago and engaged in the grocery business in Oak Park. He also conducted a tannery for a time. Mr. Smith then removed to New York and settled in the city of Baldwinsville, where he died, at the age of fifty-four years. His wife, Hulda Herrick, daughter of 0. B. Herrick, of Baldwinsville, was also reared and educated in her native state; she now lives in Escanaba. They were parents of one son and one daughter, of whom William R. is the younger. The early education of William R. Smith was acquired in Baldwinsville, New York, where he was graduated from the high school; later he attended the University of New York. He began in business in the employ of Parshall & Searle Company, wholesale and retail dealers in hardware, as order clerk, where he remained one year; they were located at Syracuse, New York. Mr. Smith next entered the employ of the wholesale hardware firm of Kennedy & Spaulding Company, beginning as clerk and rising to the position of order clerk. He then removed to Chicago, where he accepted a position with Hibbard, Spencer, Bartlett & Company, as order clerk, and later became a house salesman in their employ, and worked in most departments of this large establishment. From this position he began as salesman on the road, at first substituting for a salesman who was sick, being assigned to the territory of upper Michigan in January, 1892. He continued in this territory until January 1, 1900, when he bought an interest with W. W. Oliver and reorganized the company of which he is now president into a stock company. Mr. Smith became president and general manager of this company, R. E. McLean, vice-president, and W. W. Oliver, secretary and treasurer. This is a concern of some magnitude, doing business in both wholesale and retail lines, and they employ about forty men. They keep two men on the road in their wholesale department. The personnel of the firm comprises keen, enterprising business men, and the affairs of the company are carried on in an able, up-to-date manner. They have been very successful, and the business is constantly growing. Mr. Smith is one of the directors of the Business Men's Association of Escanaba, and is actively interested in the progress and growth of the city. Politically he is a Republican and keenly interested in public affairs. He is a prominent Mason, being a Knight Templar and Shriner, at Marquette, Michigan. In 1896 Mr. Smith married Maud McKana, a native of Chicago, Illinois, daughter of John H. and Anna (Carroll) McKana, of Freeport, Illinois. Mr. Smith and his wife have one son, William John. JOHN E. WEBER.-Enterprising and progressive, John E. Weber is actively associated with the mercantile interests of Ironwood as a pharmacist, holding a good position among the successful business men of the place. He was born March 27, 1875, at Arcadia, Trempealeau county, Wisconsin, where his father, John Weber, was a pioneer settler. His grandfather, Peter Weber, was born in the village of Schwabach, Lorraine, then a part of France, but now included within the limits of Germany, being of French ancestry. He was a man of versatile talents, being variously employed in his native town, where his entire life was spent. He married first Ursula Ersman, who was born, lived and died in the village of Schwabach, her death occurring December 2, 1841, when her only child, John, was but three days old. Peter Weber married again, by his second marriage having one child, a daughter named Regina.

Page  702 702 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN Reared and educated in his native town, John Weber joined the army when twenty years old, and served as a soldier for seven years. Emigrating to America in 1873, he settled in Arcadia, Wisconsin, where he followed the carpenter's trade five years. Going to Marquette, Michigan, in 1878, he resided there until 1886, when he came to the new town of Ironwood, locating here when nearly all of the land in this vicinity was heavily covered with timber. For about four years he followed his trade in the meantime opening a boarding house and a dispensary, both of which he conducted successfully until the panic of 1893, when he lost his entire property. Starting life anew in Manitowish, Wisconsin, he remained there a year, and then went to Mercer, Wisconsin, where he erected a small building and conducted a dispensary until 1909. Coming then to Ironwood, he built a home, and is here living retired from active pursuits. He married, in 1874, in Arcadia, Wisconsin, Regina Meyer, who was born, May 25, 1853, at Weisskirchen, Lorraine, France, where her parents, Joseph and Anna (Wagner) Meyer, were life-long residents. She was the only member of her father's family to leave her native land, her brother Peter, and her sisters, Anna and Katherine, remaining in their native town. Two of her uncles, however, Casper Meyer and Nicholas Meyer, came to the United States, locating first in New York state, afterward becoming pioneers of Arcadia, Wisconsin. Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. John Weber, namely: John E., the subject of this brief sketch; Margaret, who married John J. Gorilla, and has three children, Lawrence Vincent, Allen Cyril and Veronica Claire; and Anna Regina, wife of George W. Goodman. The parents are members of the Roman Catholic church. Receiving the rudiments of his education in the public schools of Marquette and Ironwood, John E. Weber afterwards attended Saint Francis Seminary, in Milwaukee, for two years, completing his early studies at Saint Joseph's College in Dubuque, Iowa. Entering then the employ of the American Express Company, he served as clerk, messenger and cashier for six years. In 1903 he formed a partnership with John J. Gorilla and purchased the stock and good will of his former employer, and has since conducted a most successful business as a pharmacist. Mr. Weber married June 2, 1908, Lida Couch, who was born in Ishpeming, Michigan, a daughter of John and Elizabeth Couch. Fraternally Mr. Weber is a member of Ironwood Lodge No. 1396, K. of C., and of Saint Ambrose Court No. 271, Catholic Order of Foresters. HARRY T. HULST.-A man of scholarly tastes and ambitions, possessing much mechanical ability, Harry T. Hulst, of Ishpeming, chief engineer of the Oliver Iron Mining Company's properties on the Marquette Range, has already won for himself a fine reputation in mining circles, his splendid natural endowments having been heightened by a practical scientific education, from which he has signally profited. A son of Dr. Nelson P. Hulst, he was born, May 13, 1876, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and there received his elementary education. Although a native of East Brooklyn, New York, Dr. Nelson P. Hulst was brought up in Alexandria, Virginia, in that city and in Montgomery county Maryland, being fitted for college. Entering Yale college in 1863 he was graduated from the academical department in 1867, and two years later completed the course in mine engineering at the Sheffield Scientific School, receiving his diploma. Continuing his studies in the same institution another year, he s~

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Page  [unnumbered] TIHE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 703 cured his doctor's degree, and in September, 1870, became chemist and engineer for the Milwaukee Iron Company, at Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Two years later he traveled through the Menominee range, then unexplored, subsequently exploring the Breen and Vulcan mines, and the Felch Mountain range. In 1876 Dr. Hulst was made general superintendent of the Menominee Mining Company, and while thus employed opened up the Breen, Vulcan, Norway, Cyclops, Quinnesec, Chapin and Florence mines. In 1887, he, as manager of the Pewabic Company, opened the Pewabic mine. Becoming manager of the iron mining interests of the Carnegie Steel Company in 1897, the Doctor had full charge of the management of the Oliver Iron Mining Company, and at the formation of the United States Steel Corporation, in 1901, was made vice president of its various mining companies, retaining the position until his retirement from active pursuits. He is now living in Milwaukee a respected and honored citizen. He has a practical knowledge of everything connected with mining, and his wide experience in this line of industry has made him an authority on subjects connected with minerals and mines. Dr. Hulst married Florence Terry, and to them five children have been born, namely: Harry T., Clarence P., Edith R., Alfred N. and Alice F. The Doctor belongs to the Milwaukee Club, and is a member of Plymouth Congregational church, of which he is a deacon and a trustee. After his graduation from the Milwaukee High School, and the Milwaukee Academy, Harry T. Hulst still further advanced his education by an attendance at Black Hall School in Lyme, Connecticut, at the Sheffield Scientific School of Yale University, and at the Michigan College of Mines, in Houghton, Michigan. Thus equipped for his chosen work, he entered the employ of the Lake Superior Iron Company on September 1, 1901, as mining engineer, and in that capacity proved himself so capable and proficient that on July 1, 1908, he was promoted to his present position of chief engineer. One of the leading citizens of Ishpeming, Mr. Hulst is greatly interested in its growth and prosperity, willingly contributing of his time and means to further its material interests. In April, 1906, he was elected supervisor of the Second ward, and re-elected in April, 1908; he was likewise elected in 1908, as alderman from the Second ward to fill an unexpired term, and in April, 1909, was re-elected to the same office. Politically he is actively identified with the Republican party, and religiously he is a member of the Plymouth Congregational church of Milwaukee. Mr. Hulst married, May 12, 1902, Flora Bett, who was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, a daughter of William D. and Frances (Conwell) Bett, of that city. Her father was born and reared in Auburn, New York, but for many years has been a resident of Milwaukee, where his two children, Flora and Curtis, were born. Mr. and Mrs. Hulst have two children, Harold B. and Alfred W. WILLIAM J. CUDLIP.-A man of much force of character, possessing excellent business tact and judgment, William J. Cudlip holds an assured position as a representative business man of Iron Mountain, the flourishing county seat of Dickinson county. Here he is manager of the branch houses of the great meat-packing concern of Morris & Company, of Chicago. Mr. Cudlip has the distinction of being a native son of the Upper Peninsula as he was born at Calumet, Houghton county, on the 6th of August, 1874, being a son of the late James I. Cudlip. The lat

Page  704 704 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN ter was a son of Richard Cudlip, who was a native of Devonshire, England, where he was actively identified with mining operations until well advanced in years, when he removed to Australia, where he passed the residue of his life. He reared four children,-Richard, John, James H. and Joseph, all of whom immigrated to America and became early settlers of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Born in Devonshire, England, James H. Cudlip began working in the mines when but a boy and thus his early educational advantages were somewhat meager, besides which he received merely nominal pay for his arduous work. When but a boy he immigrated to the United States, believing that here he could secure more remunerative employment. He came to the Northern Peninsula of Michigan and here was soon actively engaged as an employe in the mines of Ontonagon county. When the now famous Calumet and Hecla mine was discovered he was one of the many miners who promptly rushed to the new mine and who assisted in mining the first ore taken from it. A few years later, upon the opening of the Chapin Mine, he removed to Iron Mountain and became one of the first workers in this mine. Subsequently he was advanced to the position of timber foreman and while actively engaged in the discharge of his duties in that capacity he was killed by accident, in July, 1881. His wife, whose maiden name was Ann Luxmore, was likewise a native of Devonshire, England, and passed the closing years of her life in Michigan, where she died in 1895, leaving five children,-James H., Samuel, William J., Laura and Robert. William J. Cudlip was a lad of five years at the time of the family removal to Iron Mountain and four days were required to make the trip from this place to Calumet, the journey from Quinnesec, the railway terminus at that time, being made with a team. The father died two years after thus establishing his home in Iron Mountain. The subject of this review obtained a good common-school education in the schools of the Upper Peninsula and while a youth initiated his active career as deliveryman for a meat-market. While working in the establishment of his employers he perfected himself in the trade of meat-cutting and he continued in the service of his first employers for a period of six years. He then secured a position in the employ of Morris & Company, the great meat packers and dealers of Chicago, under the late William S. Laing, the manager of the branch house in Iron Mountain, until the death of Mr. Laing, when he succeeded the latter as manager. He has since remained incumbent of this responsible position and in the same has given unqualified satisfaction to the company and to the many patrons of the establishment. Mr. Cudlip is recognized as one of the most loyal and progressive citizens of Iron Mountain and has always taken a very active interest in all that has tended to further the material and social advancement of the thriving city in which the greater portion of his life thus far has been passed. He is one of the most prominent and influential members of the Commercial Club and has done much to assist in its valuable work in behalf of the industrial advancement of the city, besides which he has contributed in an individual way to the securing of new business enterprises for Iron Mountain. Ile is a man of sterling character and commands unqualified confidence and esteem in the community. He is a member of the directorate of the First National Bank of Iron Mountain, is affiliated with Iron Mountain Lodge, No. 388, Free & Accepted Masons, and Iron Mountain Chapter, No. 121, Royal Arch Masons. In politics he is a staunch adherent of the Republican party and he served as undersheriff of the county while his elder brother was incumbent of the office of sheriff.

Page  705 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 705 In the year 1901 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Cudlip to Miss Luella Byrnes, who was born at Fayette, Delta county, Michigan, and who is a daughter of Thomas and Catherine Byrnes. MIr. and Mrs. Cudlip have five children,-Catherine, William, Luella, Samuel and Jeane. JACOB J. MARTINEK.-Among the sterling citizens and representative business men of Menominee who have turned the tide of success through their own efforts is Mr. Martinek, who here conducts an extensive real-estate, loan and insurance business and who has achieved high reputation as an aggressive, reliable and enterprising business man of the city to which he came shortly after attaining his legal majority. His name is synonymous with integrity and honor and he holds a secure place in the confidence of all with whom he has come in contact in a business or social way. Mr. Martinek was born at Radonic, Bohemia, on the 25th of July, 1864, and is a son of John and Margaret (Soukup) Martinek, the former of whom was likewise born in Radonic, where he is still living, at the venerable age of eighty-three years (1910), and the latter of whom was born in Crastavic, Bohemia, in 1833; she died on the 21st of October, 1907, and of the nine children six are now living. The entire active career of the father was one of close identification with the great basic industry of agriculture, but he has lived virtually a retired life for nearly a quarter of a century. In the schools of his native land Jacob J. Martinek received excellent training in his youth, and he was graduated in the gymnasium at Taus, Bohemia. In 1882, when eighteen years of age, he severed the gracious home ties and set forth to seek his fortunes in America, whither he came as a stranger in a strange land and with practically no knowledge of the English language. From New York city he made his way to Manitowoc, Wisconsin, where he attended high school for one year and thus fitted himself to meet such exigencies as might arise. He first secured employment in a glue factory in Manitowoc, and at the expiration of one year he removed thence to Oconto, that state, where he passed one year. He next went to Owen, Marinette county, Wisconsin, where he passed two and one-half years as clerk in the mercantile establishment of Marshall & Holmes. He was next found incumbent of the position of bookkeeper for Joseph Kadlec, of Spruce, Wisconsin, where he remained one year, and at the expiration of this period, in the autumn of 1886, he came to Menominee, Michigan, where he secured a position as clerk in a grocery store located at the corner of Ludington avenue and Kirby street. Thereafter he was clerk and bookkeeper in the George Horvath establishment for eight years, and for the ensuing two years he was a salesman in the dry-goods department of the large general store of the Kirby-Carpenter Company. Concerning the career of Mr. Martinek since he came to Menominee the following pertinent statements are so apropos as to be worthy of perpetuation in this volume: "Jacob J. lAartinek went into business for himself on the 1st of January, 1898. He had come to Menominee in 1886 and his business career in this city was started as a clerk in some of the best stores the city then possessed. The young man devoted his evenings to study and became specially interested in matters connected with insurance and real estate. He determined late in 1897 to start the new year as his own employer, and so, on January 1, 1898, he began business as an insurance agent in one room in the Masonic block. He began as a representative of two fire insurance companies. Today he is the agent and rep

Page  706 706 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN resentative here of twenty-four of the leading insurance companies. From such a modest beginning his business has grown until it today includes fire and life and accident insurance, as well as a department offering indemnity for loss through the agency of storms, boiler explosions, etc. HIe has a successful real-estate business and has handled a large amount of farm property, both improved and unimproved. His agents have been specially successful in their operations in southern Wisconsin, and a large number of desirable colonists have bought from Mr. Martinek the lands which they are rapidly developing into valuable farms. The real-estate branch of his business includes loans and mortgages, and he very naturally extended his operations into the business of furnishing abstracts. This department Mr. Martinek installed in 1902, and he now has a complete and accurate record of all real estate in Menominee county and city. He maintains a department devoted to steamship agencies, and furnishes tickets both to and from foreign ports. He also furnishes security bonds and general commercial sureties. "If Jacob J. Martinek had not believed in the future of Menominee county and city he might have been discouraged over the misfortunes that beset him at the start. When his business outgrew the one room in the Masonic block he moved to the Spies building, and there he was burned out with the other tenants in the disastrous fire of 1900. Undaunted, he again began business in the one room in the Masonic block, where he had started in 1898, and there he remained until 1903, since which time he has occupied a ground floor building at 928 Main street. This is well equipped in every way for the special requirements of his business. He has competent assistants in charge of every department and his business is rapidly increasing every year." The honorable and straightforward policy observed by Mr. Martinek in every detail of his business operations has gained to him unequivocal popular confidence, and he has so employed his splendid energies as to gain a success well worthy of the name, the while he holds prestige as one of the representative business men and leal and loyal citizens of Menominee, where his interests are centered and where he has an attractive home at 307 Chandler street. In politics Mr. Martinek is aligned as a stanch supporter of the cause of the Democratic party, and he served one term as supervisor of the Fourth ward of the city, an office to which he was elected in 1901. He and his wife are communicants of the Catholic church, holding membership in the parish of St. Adelbert, and he is identified with the local organizations of the Knights of Columbus, the Catholic Order of Foresters, the Modern Woodmen of America, the Menominee Turn Verein, and the Modern Brotherhood of America. On the 25th of June, 1894, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Martinek to Miss Agnes Doubek, who was born in the city of Taus, Bohemia, and who is a daughter of Anton and Anna Doubek, the former of whom died in his native land at the age of sixty years, and the latter of whom is still living in Bohemia. Mr. and Mrs. Martinek have two children: Edward M. and Helen M. WILLIAM C. SUTHERLAND.-Prominently identified with railroad interests in the Upper Peninsula and enjoying unqualified popularity in his home city, AMr. Sutherland holds the office of joint ticket agent at Sault Ste. Marie for the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic, the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie, and the Canadian Pacific Railroads, and he has proved a most discriminating and efficient executive in the position noted.

Page  707 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 707 William C. Sutherland was born in the attractive little city of London, province of Ontario, Canada, on the 26th of October, 1861, and is of the stanchest of Scottish lineage in both the agnatic and cognate strains. He is a son of Rev. William R. and Marian (Ross) Sutherland, the former of whom was born in Sutherlandshire, in the extreme north of Scotland, in 1822, and the latter of whom was born at Woodstock, province of Ontario, Canada, in 1838, of Scotch ancestry. The parents were married at Woodstock, Ontario, and concerning their nine children the following brief record is given: Margaret is the widow of Dr. Samuel D. Frederick and resides at Salem, Michigan; Elizabeth is the wife of Archibald McEachern, of Glencoe, Ontario; William C. is the immediate subject of this review; Owen, who died in December, 1908, at the age of forty-two years, was at the time serving as Canadian emigration inspector at Winnipeg, Manitoba; Lexie is the wife of Rev. John H. Clark, a clergyman of the Presbyterian church, and they reside at Calgary, province of Alberta, Canada; Minnie is the wife of A. M. Wightman, of Burwell Road, Ontario; John H. is a resident of San Bernardino, California, and is an engineer on the Southern Pacific Railroad; Miss Nettie is in the employ of the Canadian government at Edmunton, Manitoba; and Bernice, who died March 4, 1910, was the wife of William H. Grove, a resident of Fergus, Ontario. Rev. William Ross Sutherland was seven years of age at the time of his parents' emigration from Scotland to Nova Scotia, where he secured his early educational discipline. He later returned to Scotland, where he completed the classical course in the University of Edinburg, in which he was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He was ordained a clergyman of the Presbyterian church at London, Ontario. He returned from Scotland to America when twenty-three years of age and located at Glencoe, Ontario, where he held the pastoral charge of Knox Presbyterian church for a full half century, without interruption. He was a man of fine intellectuality and fervent piety, and his life was one of utmost consecration to the work of his noble calling, in which he labored zealously for the uplifting of his fellow men. At Glencoe he and his wife celebrated their golden wedding, and it was made an occasion of much affectionate enthusiasm on the part of the people of the community in which the venerable pastor and his gracious helpmeet had so long lived and labored. He was the owner of a farm near Glencoe, and gave his supervision to its reclamation and cultivation. On this fine homestead his loved and devoted wife continued to reside until she was summoned to eternal rest, in 1896, and there he died in 1900, at the age of seventy-eight years, secure in the reverent regard of all who knew him. On the old homestead just mentioned William C. Sutherland was reared to maturity under most gracious influences, as he waxed strong in physical powers under the sturdy discipline of the farm, the while the home was one of most generous and cultured order. He was afforded the advantages of the public schools of Glencoe and continued to be associated in the work and management of the home farm until he had attained to his legal majority. He then went to the city of Detroit, Michigan, where he was employed as driver on the old-time horse street-cars for about one year, after which he passed a year in the mining district of northern Ontario. The following year was passed in the state of Minnesota, and he then returned to Michigan and for six months he was employed as a teacher in a district school in Washtenaw county. At Salem, that county, he learned the art of telegraphy, and in January. 1888, he came to the Upper Peninsula and assumed the position of tele, i

Page  708 708 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN a6 graph operator for the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie Railroad at Delta Junction, whence he was shortly afterward transferred to Manistique, where he remained one year. Thereafter he continued in the service of the same company, at various points until the 1st of March, 1888, when he assumed the office of assistant to Frank E. Ketchum, joint agent at Sault Ste. Marie for the three railroads mentioned in the opening paragraph of this article. He served in this capacity until 1907, when he succeeded to the office of joint agent, of which he has since continued the efficient and popular incumbent. Mr. Sutherland is a Republican in his political allegiance. He is affiliated with Bethel Lodge, No. 358, Free and Accepted Masons, of which he is master for the year 1910; Sault Ste. Marie Chapter, No. 126, Royal Arch Masons; Sault Ste. Marie Council, No. 69, Royal and Select Masters; Sault Ste. Marie Commandery, No. 45, Knights Templar; and Ahmed Temple of the Mystic Shrine in the city of Marquette. He also holds membership in the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. On the 29th of October, 1890, Mr. Sutherland was united in marriage to Miss Alma Nixon, who was born at Byron,Ontario, and who is a daughter of Dr. Alexander and Eliza Nixon. Dr. Nixon was born in Ireland and in early life was a resident of Australia. He finally engaged in the practice of medicine at Napier, Ontario, where he continued to reside until his death, and his widow now resides at Watford, that province. Of their five children Mrs. Sutherland is the eldest; Mabel is the wife of William J. Howden, of Watford, Ontario; Dr. James is a representative physician and surgeon at Adrian, Michigan; Amy, the wife of Richard Truman of Strathroy, Ontario, died September 24, 1906; and Victoria remains with her widowed mother. Mr. and Mrs. Sutherland have one child, Dorothy V., who was born on the 22d of January, 1901. JOHN P. MCCOLL, engaged in the abstract and real estate business at Escanaba, Michigan, is well known throughout Delta county, which he served three terms as county clerk. Mr. McColl is of Canadian birth and Scotch descent. He was born at Chatham, Canada, January 5, 1851, son of Duncan and Mary (McCrea) McColl. Duncan McColl was a native of Scotland, who, when a young man, crossed the Atlantic to Canada, where he married and reared a family. In early life he was a school teacher; later he served as city clerk and filled other public offices. He died at the age of fifty-six years. His wife reached the extreme old age of eighty-nine. In their family were three daughters and three sons; two of the latter died in infancy. At about the age of fourteen, John P. McColl started out to make his own way in the world. He had attended common school near his home, but soon he felt the need of further education and subsequently he took a course in a commercial college at Detroit. Afterward he entered the employ of the Jackson Iron Company, at Fayette, Delta county, where he served as bookkeeper until 1886, when he was elected clerk of Delta county. He was twice re-elected to this office, and served three terms of two years each, this official preferment coming from the Democratic party. While clerk and register of deeds, Mr. McColl compiled a set of abstract books, and since the expiration of his service in that office he has devoted much of his time to the abstract business and is regarded as an authority on the subject. Also he has dealt in real estate, handling farm and timber lands extensively.

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Page  [unnumbered] THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 709 In 1877, Mr. McColl married Miss Edith Willson, daughter of J. C Willson, of Escanaba; and to them have been given five daughters, namely: Mary, Grace, Maud, June and Jean. He and his family are identified with the Presbyterian church. PATRICK FLANAGAN.-Prominent among the more prosperous and enterprising business men of Dickinson county is Patrick Flanagan, who has been identified with different lines of industry, and as president of the Sagola Lumber Company is carrying on a substantial business in.Sagola. He was born, March 17, 1849, in county Westmeath, Ireland, which was likewise the birthplace of his parents, John and Margaret (Cleary) Flanagan. In 1849, accompanied by his wife and two children, John Flanagan came in a sailing vessel to America, being six weeks on the ocean. Landing in New York, he was for a time employed on the New York Central railroad. In 1856 he removed with his family to Wisconsin, becoming a pioneer of Freedom township, Outagamie county. Securing a tract of timbered land, he erected a log cabin and a log barn, and then began the arduous task of redeeming a farm from the forest. Each winter for a number of years he was employed in lumbering, the remainder of the time being employed in clearing the land and tilling the soil. Successful in his undertakings, he bought adjoining farms, one of which, located just across the road from his homestead, had a good set of frame buildings on it. He continued his agricultural labors until his death, in 1885, at the age of sixty-seven years. His wife survived him ten years, passing away in 1895. They were the parents of nine children, as follows: Miary, who died in Ohio, at the age of six years; Patrick, the subject of this sketch; Michael, ex-judge of probate of Langlade county, Wisconsin; John, deceased; Thomas, of Iron River; Bernard, owning and occupying the old homestead in Wisconsin; James, residing in the state of Washington; Catherine, wife of James Murphy, of Seymour township; and Margaret, a teacher, who died at the age of nineteen years. Patrick Flanagan, the only member of the parental household now living that was born in Ireland, was but a few months old when brought to this country. He acquired his youthful knowledge in the district schools of Freedom township, living with his parents until sixteen years old. Coming then to Michigan, he spent that summer at Negaunee, and in the fall, with two companions, started westward, going by rail from Chicago to Saint Louis, and from there by boat up the Missouri river to Leavenworth, Kansas, where the three boys entered the service of the government as teamsters. On September 1, 1865, they left Leavenworth, each boy driving a team consisting of five yoke of oxen attached to a wagon loaded with provisions, their point of destination being Fort Union, New Mexico. On reaching the Cimarron river they were snow bound, and had to spend the winter there, with nothing to do excepting to look after their teams. Pushing on to the Fort in the spring, they were paid off, and Mr. Flanagan found employment in the quartermaster's office. Building was going on at the Fort, and he assisted in laying brick, and learned the trade, which he followed a year. Going then to Black Hawk, Colorado, he worked at his trade a year, his companions in the meantime prospecting and discovering gold. Mr. Flanagan acquired a third interest in the mine, and was successfully engaged in mining for a year, when the supply of gold failed and lie and his companions mined for a while at a loss. Going into the mine one day to make examinations, Mr. Flanagan was so seriously injured by a cave-in that he was confined to his bed in Central City for about nine months. Returning then to Vol. II-6

Page  710 710 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN Wisconsin, he taught school in Sagola until the fall of 1872, when he entered Lawrence University, at Appleton, Wisconsin, where he continued his studies three years. Accepting then the position of superintendent of the schools of Outagamie county, he devoted his attention to the duties of his office until 1880. In that year, having previously become interested with his father in stock raising, Mr. Flanagan came to the Upper Peninsula with a drove of cattle, and visited Ishpeming, Vulcan, Norway, Iron Mountain and Quinnesec, the terminus of the railroad. Being induced to establish a meat market in Norway, he operated it successfully for twenty years, during which time he had organized the Sagola Lumber Company, of which he was elected vice-president. Not until 1898, however, did Mr. Flanagan take an active part in the affairs of the Company. Removing to Sagola in that year, he has since devoted his time and energy to advancing the interests of this company, and, in 1905, having purchased the interests of one of the partners, was made president of the Company. Mr. Flanagan married, in 1876, Margaret Hayes, who was born in Cleveland, Ohio, of Irish ancestry. Her father, John Hayes, was for many years a well-to-do farmer of East Holland, Brown county, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Flanagan have two children, John J. and Mary. John J., vice-president of the Sagola Lumber Company, has inherited in a marked degree the business ability of his father, but not his politics, as he is a true-blue Republican, while Mr. Flanagan is an uncompromising Democrat. He married Rachel Thomas, of Spokane, Washington, and they have one child, Hortense. Mary is the wife of Henry Newkirk, M. D., of Iron Mountain. Mr. Flanagan served two terms as coroner while in Menominee county, and for fourteen years was justice of the peace in Norway, while on the organization of Dickinson county he was appointed as the first judge of probate and was six years chairman of the county board and finally had to refuse to again become a candidate. He is a member of the Catholic Order of Foresters at Norway. The family are members of the Catholic church. HARRY H. ALLYNS.-One of Escanaba's most enterprising citizens, Harry H. Allyn, cashier of the State Savings Bank, was born in Cleveand, Ohio, January 20, 1865. His father, Albert Allyn, was born in Wellington, Lorain county, Ohio. He studied law and was a practicing attorney for many years, dying at the age of forty-seven. He took a prominent part in public affairs, and served many years as a member of the school board. He was of a well known family as his father was one of the pioneer settlers of the Western Reserve. Albert Allyn married Abiah King, a native of Pittsfield, Ohio, and Mrs. Allyn's people were early settlers also of the Western Reserve. They were parents of one son and five daughters. The early education of Harry H. Allyn was acquired at Oberlin, Ohio, and later he attended business college at Cleveland. He removed to Escanaba, Michigan, in 1887, and became employed as collector and bookkeeper, which occupation he followed twenty-one and a half years, in the employ of the First National Bank. In 1909 he accepted a position as cashier with the State Savings Bank, being well recommended for this position by his long and faithful service with the First National. Mr. Allyn is a man of unquestioned honesty and integrity, well fitted by education and experience for business life. The institution with which he is at present associated is established on a sure foundation, and the men who have it in charge include some of the most conservative and successful business men of the

Page  711 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 711 community. The bank has a capital stock of $50,000, with a surplus of $4,000, and carries on a general banking business, paying special attention to savings accounts, etc. A. R. Moore is president, and Dr. H. B. Reynolds, vice-president. Mr. Allyn has taken an active interest in public affairs, and at one time served as a member of the school board of Escanaba. He is treasurer of the blue lodge of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, also belongs to the commandery. TIe is well known in the city, where he has universal confidence and respect. Mr. Allyn married, September 26, 1891, Jessie L., daughter of June Cox, of Escanaba, and they have two sons, Albert, an employe of the State Savings Bank, and Whitney, seven years of age. JAMES V. PIPER.-Distinguished as one of the pioneers of the Upper Peninsula, James V. Piper came to Iron River in the very early days of its existence, while his wife has the distinction of having lived in this vicinity longer than any other white woman, having come here to board miners in 1881. Mr. Piper was born, March 20, 1857, in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, a son of William Piper, Jr., a native of the Keystone state, and a grandson of William Piper, Sr., who there spent his entire life. William Piper, Jr., learned the millwright's trade when young, and after settling in Armstrong county carried that on in connection with general farming, owning and superintending the management of a good farm. He there lived to the good old age of three score and ten years, an esteemed and respected citizen. He married Jane Mickey, who was born in Pennsylvania, a daughter of William Mickey. She survived him, spending her last years in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. Attending the district school and assisting on the home farm, James V. Piper remained with his parents until eighteen years old, when he began working in a shingle mill. Coming to Iron River, Michigan, in August, 1882, he was for a while employed in a shingle mill at the Daber mine, afterwards being engaged in mining on his own account for eight years. Then, taking up a homestead about twelve miles out, in townships forty-two and thirty-six, he subsequently worked a part of the time at the mines and a part of the time in clearing his own land and getting out logs, living on the homestead seven years. In 1900 Mr. Piper built the Piper House, a commodious frame structure, two stories in height, containing about fifty rooms, and conducted it successfully for five years, when he leased it. In the meantime and since he has been actively engaged in exploring in the surrounding country, exploring not only the Young Mine but the McFarland and Buckholtz properties. Mr. Piper married, in 1900, Mrs. Catherine (Donovan) Harrington, who was born in South Boston, Massachusetts, a daughter of Jeremiah Donovan. IHer father, a native of county Cork, Ireland, emigrated to Massachusetts, locating in South Boston, where he and his wife spent their remaining days. The maiden name of his wife was Johanna Collins, and she was a cousin of Hon. Patrick Collins, for many years prominent in the public affairs of Boston. Catherine Donovan married for her first husband, in Lowell, Massachusetts, James Harring. ton, a native of that city, being a son of John and Mary Harrington In 1879 Mr. and Mrs. Harrington came to the Upper Peninsula, and for two years kept a boarding house at Quinnesec. In 1881, at the earnest solicitation of the Stambaugh Mining Company, they came to what is now Iron county, making the removal with mule teams,

Page  712 712 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN and pitched their camp near the present site of the Stambaugh Railway Station, Mrs. Harrington for many months thereafter being the only white woman within a radius of several miles. The following year they bought the lot now occupied by the Piper House, built a small frame dwelling, and Mrs. Piper has ever since been a resident of Iron River. By her first marriage she had four children, all of whom are now deceased, namely: James, John, Willie and Maggie. GEORGE J. EISELE.-A man of good business ability and tact, wise in his judgment and systematic in his methods, George J. Eisele has won success in the mining regions as assistant superintendent of the Oliver Mining Company's properties and is ably and satisfactorily performing the duties devolving upon him. He has been a resident of Iron Mountain for many years and is widely known as a man of sterling character and worth. A native of Ohio, he was born on the 14th of June, 1867, in the city of Cleveland and he traces his ancestry back to stanch German origin. His father, George Eisele, was born in Wiirtemberg, Germany, and there obtained his early education. He afterward served an apprenticeship at the shoe-maker's trade and upon completing it he immediately immigrated to the United States in search of a favorable location. Settling in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1855, he opened a retail boot and shoe store and also established a shop, where he kept several men busily employed making boots and shoes to order. He met with very good success in his operations and built up an extensive and lucrative trade both as a merchant and as a manufacturer, continuing to be thus identified throughout the remainder of his active career. Having accumulated a fair share of this world's wealth, he is now living retired in Cleveland. His wife, whose maiden name was Louisa Zeller, was born at Frankfort-on-theMain and came to this country when a young woman. She passed away in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1908, being survived by five children, namely, Emma, George J. (the immediate subject of this sketch), Edward A., Margaret and Ella. George J. Eisele was a regular attendant of the Cleveland public schools until thirteen years old, when he became messenger boy in the office of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, remaining in that position about six months. The ensuing five years he served as clerk in a general store and while thus employed attended evening school, where, by diligent study, he completed a full course in shorthand. Thus equipped, Mr. Eisele was for a year stenographer in the office of the Detroit & Cleveland Steam & Navigation Company, after which he was freight solicitor for the same company for a time. He was later employed in the local freight office of the Big Four (Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis) Railroad Company, in Cleveland, until 1890, when he resigned that position and removed to Iron Mountain, Dickinson county, Michigan, where he entered the employ of the Chapin Mining Company in the capacity of stenographer and clerk. In 1900 he removed to Ishpeming, where he was superintendent of the Winthrop Mine until March, 1901, when the mine was closed. Returning then to Iron Mountain he was chief clerk and cashier in the office of the Chapin Mining Company until 1903, when he became assistant superintendent of the Oliver Mining Company's properties, an incumbency which he has retained to the present time. Mr. Eisele married, November 25, 1892, Miss Hattie Riendeau, who was born in Oconto, Wisconsin, a daughter of Louis Riendeau. Mr. Riendeau was born in the province of Quebec, Canada, of French ancestry. He came to the states when a young man, locating in Oconto, Wisconsin.

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Page  713 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 713 At the outbreak of the Civil war he enlisted in Company G, Seventeenth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and with his regiment in all of its marches, battles and campaigns, including the march with Sherman to the sea, he participated in the Grand Review, in Washington, D. C., in June, 1865, and was mustered out July 14, 1865. Returning to Oconto, Wisconsin, after his discharge, Mr. Riendeau opened a general store in that place, also a hotel, and there lived until his death, July 4, 1909. He mairied Miss Jarvis, who was born at Green Bay, Wisconsin, where her father, Maxim Jarvis, was one of the pioneer settlers and an Indian trader and for several years government agent to the Indians, one of whom, it is thought, murdered him to get the money which he had received from the government to pay to the Redskins. The maiden name of the wife of Maxim Jarvis was Elizabeth Greenough, who was of French ancestry. The mother of Mrs. Eisele was summoned to the life eternal in November, 1904, leaving six children: Mamie, Hattie, Melvina, Exilda, Josephine and Maxim, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Eisele are the parents of three children, namely, Louis G., Dudley E. and Louise. Fraternally Mr. Eisele is a member of Iron Mountain Lodge, No. 388, Free & Accepted Masons; Iron Mountain Chapter, No. 121, Royal Arch Masons; and Iron Mountain Lodge, No. 700, B. P. 0. E. FRANK G. FERNSTRUM.-The city of Menominee originally owed its business prestige to the great lumbering industry of this section of the state but in later years it has forged rapidly to the front as a manufacturing and distributing headquarters, and among those who have assisted materially in conserving its precedence along these lines is Mr. Fernstrum, who is the proprietor of the Menominee Boiler Works. Frank G. Fernstrum is one of the sterling citizens contributed to the Upper Peninsula by the far Norseland. He was born in Westergotland, Sweden, on the 11th of May, 1844. He was reared to manhood in his native land, where he received good educational advantages and where he learned the trade of boiler maker. His parents passed their entire lives in Sweden. When nineteen years of age he became an employe in the machine shop and ship yard in which were built steamships and railroad engines. In this connection he gained valuable experience. In 1869 he emigrated to America, making the early stages of the trip by way of Glasgow, Scotland, and arriving in New York city on the 3rd of July of that year. From the national metropolis he made his way westward, and a comparison between railroad facilities in that period and the present may be offered in the statement that the train on which he took passage utilized four nights and three days in making the trip from New York to Chicago. Mr. Fernstrum recalls that he made a stop of one hour in the city of Cleveland on the Fourth of July and that he was much interested by the sounds of the national celebration, which to him was strange, as he did not know the occasion and was unable to speak the English lan. guage at the time. Upon his arrival in Chicago, the young emigrant set about to seek employment, but he found himself handicapped by his unfamiliarity with the language of the country, so that he was unable to find employment. In the meanwhile his financial resources became reduced to a disquieting minimum and from Chicago he finally went to Aurora, Illinois, where'he remained for a short time. He then came to the north country and in Marinette, Wisconsin, the twin city of Menominee, Michigan, he found employment with the firm of Hamilton-Merrymen & Company, in whose saw mill he was employed for one month, and from then until March, 1873, he was with the

Page  714 714 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN Menominee River Lumber Company. In 1873 the firm of Young & Burns organized the Menominee Boiler Works and Mr. Fernstrum secured employment in connection with this enterprise. He was thus enabled to demonstrate his technical skill at his trade and he continued thus employed until 1882. Mr. Young, the senior member of the firm which established the boiler works, purchased his partner's interest in 1875 and thereafter Mr. Fernstrum was in the employ of Mr. Young until the year 1882. I-e then manifested a desire to go east, in order to secure more profitable employment, but Mr. Young was so appreciative of his ability and service that he prevailed upon him to remain in Menominee and sold to him a one-quarter interest in the business. The enterprise was continued under the firm name of Lewis Young & Company until Mr. Young met an accidental death in November, 1886. Thereafter Mr. Fernstrum continued as superintendent of the establishment and business until January, 1888, when he purchased from the estate of his former and honored employer, Lewis Young, the entire business. Shortly afterward he admitted to partnership C. J. Fred, a practical boiler maker and plate worker, the subject of this sketch retaining a three-fourths interest in the business. In 1895 Mr. Fernstrum purchased his partner's interest and since that time he has individually continued the large and prosperous enterprise, under the title of the Menominee Boiler Works, being sole proprietor. In the well equipped plant are manufactured steam boilers of the best type and various kinds of sheet iron work, besides which a general repair department is maintained. The works and office are located at 1208 Ogden avenue. Mr. Fernstrum's son, John E., is foreman of the shops and his son, Herbert W., now has executive charge of the office affairs of the concern. Mr. Fernstrum has been a man of indefatigable industry and perseverance and through his well directed efforts has achieved a worthy success. He is numbered among the substantial, reliable and valued business men of Menominee and is a citizen who commands unqualified confidence and esteem. He gives his political support to the Republican party and he and his wife are members of the Swedish-Lutheran church. On the 30th of October, 1869, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Fernstrum to Miss Christiana Carolina Lagergren who, like himself, is a native of Sweden, whence she came to America when young. Mr. and Mrs. Fernstrum are the parents of ten children, of whom eight are now living. Concerning them the following brief record is given: Rosina C. is the wife of the Rev. C. S. Nelson, who is a clergyman of the Swedish-Lutheran church, and they reside in South Dakota; John E. is associated with his father's business, as has already been noted; Ellen Marie is the wife of George Quimby of Menominee; Caroline J. is the wife of Harry H. Hulbert and they reside in the city of Green Bay, Wisconsin; Herbert W., Albert, Benjamin and Mabel remain at the parental home. SAMUEL A. REID.-For nearly a quarter of a century a resident of Ironwood, Samuel A. Reid has wisely improved every opportunity for advancing not only his own interests but the welfare of his adopted town and county, his influence as a man of honor and integrity being felt throughout the community. He has been variously employed since coming to Gogebic county, for the past seventeen years carrying on a substantial business as a provision dealer. A native of Ontario, Canada, he was born, April 13, 1866, in the Muskoka district, where his father, Samuel A. Reid, Sr., lived for a few years. He is of Irish

Page  715 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 715 ancestry, his grandparents, William and Grace Reid, having emigrated from Ireland, their native country, to the province of Ontario, Canada, locating at Freelton, where they reclaimed a farm from the wilderness and spent their remaining years. Samuel A. Reid, Sr., was born on the home farm in Freelton, Wentworth county, Ontario, Canada, and there was bred and educated. When a young man he became a resident of the United States, and during the Civil war served as a soldier in the Union army. After receiving his honorable discharge, he returned to Canada, locating in the Muskoka district. About 1870 he again came to the "States," settling first at Bay City, Wisconsin, and from there going to Greenville, Michigan, where he followed his trade of a carpenter for a time. He subsequently spent a few years in Ironwood, Gogebic county, but is now a resident of Virginia, Minnesota. I-He has been twice married. He married first Annie Stewart, who was born in Dundee, Scotland, and came with her parents to America. Her father, Charles Stewart, purchased a tract of wild land in Starbane, Wentworth county, province of Ontario, and in addition to clearing and improving a farm followed his trade of a stone mason to some extent, living there the remainder of his life. Mrs. Annie (Stewart) Reid died about 1877, leaving three children, Samuel A., the subject of this sketch, Erle and Grace. Mr. Reid subsequently married for his second wife Mary Cooley, and they have four children, Eli, Frank, Leslie and Mildred. Acquiring a practical common-school education in the days of his youth, Samuel A. Reid began working when a boy, first being employed on a farm, then in a lumber mill, and afterward turning his attention to carpentry. In 1886 he made his advent into the new town of Ironwood, coming here when all of the western part of the Upper Peninsula was included within the limits of Ontonagon county and was covered with a heavy growth of timber. Ironwood was a small hamlet, the greater part of the town site being a beautiful woodland. Mr. Reid followed his trade in this vicinity for a time, afterward serving as assistant postmaster under E. B. Williams. IIe was later clerk in a meat market until 1893, when he engaged in the provision business on his own account, meeting with such satisfactory success in that branch of mercantile pursuits that he has continued it until the present time. Mr. Reid married, in 1891, Ellen Ryan, who was born in Rockland, Michigan, a daughter of John Ryan, a native of Ireland and a pioneer settler of Ontonagon county, Michigan. Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Reid, Samuel A., Jr., and Lloyd Stewart. A sound Republican in his political relations, Mr. Reid has rendered excellent service as a member of the County Board of Supervisors, representing the Second ward. Fraternally he belongs to Ironwood Lodge, Knights of Columbus; and to Saint Ambrose Court, No. 362, Catholic Order of Foresters. HARRY S. BUELL, D. D. S.-The profession of dentistry, which has reached so remarkable a development within the past two decades, represents both a science and a mechanic art, and among its most able and popular exponents in the Upper Peninsula is numbered Dr. Buell, who is engaged in the active practice of his profession in the city of Menominee, where he has an office and laboratories equipped with the most modern appliances and facilities, and where he is known as one well able to utilize the most approved methods known to dental science, according to the high standard maintained in

Page  716 716 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN America. He has been a resident of Menominee since his boyhood days, and has witnessed its upbuilding as an important industrial city and attractive place of residence. His loyalty to the city is of the most unequivocal type, and he is one of the distinctively progressive and public spirited citizens of this section of the Upper Peninsula. Dr. Harry S. Buell was born in Reading, Hillsdale county, Michigan, on the 26th of December, 1873, and to the public schools of his native town he is indebted for his early educational discipline. He was about fifteen years of age at the time of his removal to Menominee, where he completed the curriculum of the high school, in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1892. After leaving school he began the study of denistry in the office and under the able preceptorship of Dr. Joseph D. Crawford, in Menominee, his honored preceptor having been one of the ablest representatives of his profession in this section of the state. In this way Dr. Buell gained most valuable information and practical experience, and the second year following he entered the dental department of the University of Michigan, in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1896, and from which he received the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery. He forthwith returned to Menominee and entered into a professional partnership with his former preceptor, Dr. Crawford, and this mutually gratifying and productive alliance continued, under the firm name of Crawford & Buell, from 1896 to 1899, in which latter year Dr. Buell established himself in an individual practice, in which he has successfully continued during the intervening period. He controls a large and essentially representative professional business, and his finely appointed offices are of the best modern type in the matter of equipment and facilities, as has already been noted. He is a member of the Michigan State Dental Society; is a stanch Republican in his political proclivities; is affiliated with Menominee Lodge No. 269, Free & Accepted Masons; Menominee Camp, Modern Woodmen of America; and both he and his wife are zealous members of the First Presbyterian church. Dr. Buell is a son of Orlando F. and Mary Elizabeth (Sizer) Buell. The father was born in Lockport, New York, on the 25th of March, 1824, and, venerable in.years, he is now living a retired citizen in the city of Menominee. His mother was born in Blanford, Massachusetts, on the 9th of May, 1842, and her death occurred in the village of Reading, Michigan, on the 23rd of November, 1889. Their marriage was solemnized in the city of Adrian, Lenawee county, Michigan, on the 31st of January, 1870, and of their four children Dr. Buell is the eldest. On the 20th of June, 1899, Dr. Harry S. Buell was united in marriage to Miss Josephine B. Robinson, who was born at Chilton, Wisconsin, and who is a daughter of Frank and Eliza (McLean) Robinson, the former of whom was likewise a native of Chilton, where he was born on the 18th of March, 1849, being a representative of one of the sterling pioneer families of the Badger state. Since 1892 he has maintained his residence in Menominee, where he is a prominent merchant and influential citizen. Mr. Robinson is a Democrat in politics, and is affiliated with the Knights of Columbus, his faith being that of the Catholic church. His wife was born at Stockbridge, Wisconsin, and there married Mr. Robinson in the year 1873. They became the parents of five children, of whom Mrs. Buell is the eldest. Dr. and Mrs. Buell have two children, Crawford R., born February 20, 1902, and Genevieve E., born February 4, 1907. Mrs. Robinson died in 1885.

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Page  717 J THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 717 DAN H. BALLJ one of the able and distinguished members of the bar of the state of eichigan and who is recognized as a leading member of the profession in the Upper Peninsula, is an honored and influential citizen of Marquette. M3r. Ball was born in Sempronius, Cayuga county, New York, on the 15th of January, 1836, and is a son of James and Lucy (Chandler) Ball, the former of whom was born in Vermont and the latter in the state of New York. The maternal grandfather served as a gallant soldier in the Continental line in the war of the Revolution, and the paternal grandfather was a soldier in the War of 1812. The latter removed from Vermont to the state of New York, his ancestors having been numbered among the early settlers of the old Green Mountain state. He himself became a pioneer of New York, where he continued to reside until about 1836, when he removed to Michigan. He passed the closing years of his life in Washtenaw county, this state, and his active career was one of close identification with agricultural pursuits. James Ball, father of the subject of this review, located in Washtenaw county, this state, in 1836, about one year prior to the admission of the state to the Union. There he reclaimed a farm from the wilderness and there he continued to reside until his death, which occurred in the spring of 1852. He was a man of sterling integrity and of fine mental powers. He was one of the influential men of his county, where he was called upon to serve in various offices of public trust. His wife long survived him and passed the closing days of her life in the home of her daughter, Phoebe M., wife of Henry Lewis, in go Atlanta, Georgia, where she died in August, 1892, in her ninetieth year. Dan H. Ball was an infant at the time ci the family removal from the Empire state to Michigan, and he was reared to adult age amidst the scenes and influence of the pioneer farm in Washtenaw county. His preliminary educational advantages were those afforded in the primitive schools of the locality and period, and at the age of fifteen years, shortly after the death of his honored father, he entered the Wesleyan Seminary, at Albion, Michigan, where he continued his studies about one year. Thereafter he was engaged in teaching school for two years, and in the autumn of 1856 he entered the University of Michigan, where he continued his studies for one year, when his financial resources became so limited as to necessitate his leaving the university. He then resumed teaching and in the meanwhile he became -i student of law, to which he devoted himself with so much of earnestness that in the autumn of 1860 he was admitted to the law department of the University of Michigan, in which he spent one college 7ear, and was admitted to the bar at the close of the period. Shortly terward, he removed to Marquette to attend to a small mercantile usiness that had been left by his deceased brother, James W. He -mained in charge of the store for one year, at the expiration of aich he disposed of the business and shortly afterward purchased i interest in the Lake Superior News, as well as the Lake Superior i ernal, which were then consolidated and which eventually became A Mining Journal, now the leading newspaper of the Upper Peninia. Mr. Ball continued to be identified with the newspaper business )out two years and in the same was associated with Alexander Camp) ell. In the autumn of 1862, he was appointed register of the United States land office at Marquette to fill a vacancy caused by the death of Dr. James St. Clair. Concerning his identification with this office the following brief statements have been made: "The office was a busy place in those days, for the Civil war had caused great demands

Page  718 718 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN for both iron and copper, and there was a great rush after mineral lands in this peninsula. In the discharge of his duties Mr. Ball gave such satisfaction that on the expiration of his term he was re-appointed, by President Lincoln, and he held the office until 1865. Within this period he also practiced law to a limited extent, but his attention was mostly taken up by other business interests." Upon his retirement from the office just mentioned Mr. Ball resumed the practice of his profession in Marquette, where he remained until September, 1866, when he removed to Houghton, where he entered into a professional partnership with James B. Ross and where the firm built up a large and lucrative business. In September, 1870, Mr. Ball returned to Marquette, though he still continued for several years to be associated with J. H. Chandler in the business at Houghton. THe is now one of the most venerable members of the bar of the Upper Peninsula and he has long been recognized as one of its ablest members. IHe has been identified with much of the most important litigation in the courts of this section of the state and he is known as a most able and versatile trial lawyer, as well as a counselor admirably fortified in the learning of his profession. Sinc!89'3 he has had as a professional coadjutor his elder son, James Everett Ball, who was graduated in both the literary and law departments of the University of Michigan. Mr. Ball has been identified with various business enterprises that have tended to conserve the material advancement of his home city, and he became president of the Marquette Building & Loan Association at the time of its organization. His loyalty and public spirit have been of the most insistent order and he has given freely of his influence and aid in support of all measures that have tended to advance the general welfare of the community. His political allegiance is given to the Republican party and he has served in various offices of public trust, including that of member of the Board of Aldermen of Marquette. He was nominated for the office of circuit judge for the Twenty-fifth circuit but finally declined the honor as he preferred to give his undivided attention to his large and important law practice. In February, 1895, at the Republican State Convention, his name was prominently brought forward in connection with the nomination for the office of justice for the supreme court. He is identified with various fraternal and social organizations of representative order, and both he and his wife are members of the Protestant Episcopal church. They have been most zealous in support of the work of the parish of St. Paul's church and of the same Mr. Ball has served as vestryman and warden for many years, being at the present time senior warden of the vestry. On the 2nd of May, 1863, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Ball to Miss Emma E. Everett. who is a daughter of Philo M. Everett, one of the early settlers of Marquette, where he became a prominent and influential citizen. Of the six children of Mr. and Mrs. Ball, four wre living: —James E., who is associated with his father in the practice of law at Marquette, married Miss Sarah McConnell of Madison, Wisconsin; Charles W., who died in infancy, in March, 1867; Emily M., who was the wife of Clarence M. Smith of Redlands, California, died in May, 1905, leaving three children; Mabel E. is the wife of Walter B. Hill, a lawyer in active practice at East Liverpool, Ohio, and they have four children; George E. is a captain in the United States army; and Helen G. is the wife of John G. Stone of Houghton, Michigan, a son of Judge J. W. Stone of the Supreme Cout, of Michigan. They have four children. Mr. Stone has been in part-. I

Page  719 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 719 nership with Mr. Ball for the past five years, in the practice of law at Houghton. EDGAR J. SWART.-The able and popular chief of police of the city of Sault Ste. Marie is a native son of the Wolverine state and a representative of one of its sterling pioneer families. He was long identified with the great lumber industry in the Upper Peninsula, but in his present office he has found a place in which his services have conserved the welfare of the community and have been of the most efficient and discriminating order. Mr. Swart was born in the city of Flint, Genesee county, Michigan, on the 3d of November, 1850, and is a son of Martin and Sarah (Smith) Swart, the former of whom was born in Holland, in 1811, and the latter of whom was born in Oldtown, Maine, in 1820. Their marriage was solemnized at Lockport, New York, and of their seven children only three are now living, the subject of this sketch being the youngest of this number; Jeanette is the wife of Andrew S. Smith of Chesaning, Saginaw county, this state, and Nancy is the wife of James Grant of Montrose, Genesee county. Martin Swart was a son of Peter and Martha Swart and was a mere child at the time of the family emigration to America. The lineage of the family is traced back to stanch Holland stock, an element that has played an importand part in American history from the earliest colonial epoch. Peter Swart first located in New York city and later purchased land near Lockport, where he passed the residue of his life. He developed the first stone quarries in the state of New York and was a prominent and influential citizen of his section of the state; his wife died in the city of New York. Martin Swart, father of the chief of police of the "Soo," was reared to maturity in the old Empire state and as a youth was employed in a saw mill at Barnegat, New York, in which city he maintained his home until 1845, when he removed to the wilds of Michigan and located in Genessee county, where he purchased a tract of heavily timbered land to the reclamation of which he directed his energies. He erected two saw mills and had much to do with the development of that county, where he reclaimed a fine farm, which is now owned by the subject of this sketch. On this old homestead he continued to reside until his death, which occurred on the 21st of March, 1853. His wife long survived him and her death occurred in 1893. He was a man of sterling attributes of character, was a Whig in his political allegiance and both he and his wife were birthright members of the Society of Friends, in harmony with whose simple and noble faith both ordered their lives. The present chief of police of Sault Ste. Marie was reared under the invigorating discipline of the home farm and his educational training was secured in the public schools of Montrose, a village of his native county. In 1870 he became associated with his brother Menco in lumbering operations. They went to Georgia, and at Brunswick, that state, they devoted their attention to lumbering until 1874. Thereafter Edgar J. went to Kentucky, where he continued to be identified with the same line of enterprise until 1876. On the 23d of May of that Centennial year he came to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, where he was concerned with lumbering operations until 1891, within which period he was identified with a number of the leading lumber concerns operating in this section of the state. In the year last mentioned he removed to Detour, Chippewa county, where he had charge of the coal docks owned by T. C. Anthony until

Page  720 720 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN the spring of 1895, when he was elected county road commisioner, in which office he served until 1898. He was then appointed superintendent of public works in the city of Sault Ste. Marie, and in the autumn of the same year he was elected sheriff of Chippewa county. Of this office he continued incumbent for four years, having been reelected at the expiration of his first term. In February, 1904, Mr. Swart was appointed chief of police, and in this position he has since given most able and effective service, administering the affairs of the department with consummate discrimination and gaining the confidence and commendation of the local public. He maintains close discipline in his department, and has the confidence and high regard of all those employed under him. In politics Mr. Swart is Republican, and he has been affiliated with the Masonic fraternity since he was twenty-eight years of age, having become an entered apprentice on the 2nd of July, 1882. His present affiliations are with Bethel Lodge No. 358, Free & Accepted Masons; Sault Ste. Marie Chapter No. 126, Royal Arch Masons; Sault Ste. Marie Council No. 69, Royal & Select Masters; Sault Ste. Marie Commandery No. 45, Knights Templars, and Ahmed Temple of the Mystic Shrine, at Marquette. He also holds membership in the Sault Ste. Marie Lodge No. 552, Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks, and with Black Knight Lodge of Michigan. In October, 1878, Mr. Swart was united in marriage to Miss Mary E. Pratt, who was born in New London, Connecticut, and who is a daughter of Dean and Mary T. (Winthrop) Pratt, both of whom were likewise born at New London, Connecticut. The father died at the age of seventy-nine years and his widow now resides in Saybrook, at the age of seventy-one years. Of their three children Mrs. Swart is the second in order of birth. Dean W. is a resident of New York and Edith J. is the wife of Frank Young, of Saybrook, Connecticut. The father of Mrs. Swart was engaged in the coal business in New London until the close of the Civil war, after which he was in the employ of the government in the city of Washington until 1875, when he came to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and identified himself with the lumber industry in Mackinac county, Michigan. He retired from active business in 1881, and returned to his native state, passing the residue of his life at Saybrook, Connecticut. Mr. and Mrs. Swart have three sons and four daughters, namely: Sarah 0., who is the wife of Oliver F. Jones of Detroit, Michigan; Chester W., who is a resident of Sault Ste. Marie; Azra M., who resides in Sault Ste. Marie; Grant A., who is a student in the high school of his home city; and Jeanette, Edith and Frances, who remain at the parental home. PETLR M. PETERSON, proprietor of Peterson Opera House, Escanaba, Michigan, has been a resident of this city for a period of thirty-seven years and in many ways has been prominently identified with the city and county. Mr. Peterson was born in Sweden, June 17, 1845, and was reared in his native land, receiving a common school education and serving an apprenticeship to the trade of cabinet-maker. In 1869 he emigrated to America, coming direct to Michigan and stopping first at Manistique, where for four months he worked in a sawmill. Then he came to Fayette in Delta county, walking the distance from Manistique along the lake shore, and upon his arrival here went to work at the carpenter's trade. On May 15, 1875, he took up his residence in Escanaba, and for a time continued the work of carpenter and builder here. Among his early work here was the building of a home. From 1875

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Page  [unnumbered] THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 721 to 1882 he was in the employ of the Northwestern Railroad Company. Afterward he was in the furniture business for a time and for years was interested in contracting and building, at one time in partnership with 0. A. Norman and later with J. V. Linden. In 1893 he sold out all his business and purchased the building now known as Peterson Opera House. This had originally been a skating rink. Mr. Peterson remodeled it, fitting it up for a theatre and hall, and it has since been the leading place of entertainment in the city. From his early residence here Mr. Peterson has manifested a deep interest in public affairs and at different times he has rendered efficient service in town and county office. His first office was that of supervisor, to which he was elected in 1885; in 1887 he was elected mayor of Escanaba; he was elected county treasurer in 1888, and in 1900 he was elected alderman. To the duties of these offices he gave his best effort, as he always has to every private enterprise with which he has been connected. Mr. Peterson has been twice married. In 1874 he married Miss Sophia Larson, who bore him four daughters and a son. The son met a tragic death by drowning at the age of fourteen. The daughters, Lottie, Lucy, Hulda and Lylian, are all residents of Oakland, California. In 1902, some years after their mother's death, he married Miss Emma Gustaofson, his present wife. Mr. Peterson has been a member of the Business Men's Association of Escanaba for years, and he also has membership in the K. O. T. M., the B. P. 0. E., and other fraternal organizations. HENRY G. NEuENS.-Prominent among the active and enterprising business men of the Upper Peninsula is Henry G. Neuens, who is well known as an extensive and prosperous general merchant of Iron Mountain and as one of the directors of the Commercial Bank, one of the leading financial institutions of that place. He was born, July 23, 1863, at Port Washington, Ozaukee county, Wisconsin, a son of Michael Neuens. Michael Neuens was born in the village of Burglinster, Luxemburg, where his parents were life-long residents. He received good educational advantages, and when through school was for a while employed as watchman at a castle. Emigrating when a young man to the United States, he located at Two Rivers, Wisconsin, where he learned the tanner's trade, which he afterwards followed in different places, including Sheboygan and Port Washington in Wisconsin, and Cincinnati, Ohio. Subsequently establishing a tannery at Waubecka, he conducted it successfully a number of years, when his plant was destroyed by fire. Forming a partnership then with his son Edward, he was for a few years engaged in mercantile business at Fredonia Station. He subsequently sold his interest in the firm to his son, and thenceforward lived retired from business cares at his present home in Waubecka. He married Mary Neuens, who was likewise born in Burglinster, Luxemburg, and although bearing the same surname was no relation to him. Her father, Henry Neuens, a native of Burglinster, emigrated with his family to America about 1854, and was one of the earlier settlers of Fredonia township, Ozaukee county, Wisconsin. Buying a tract of timbered land, he began the pioneer labor of establishing a home in the wilderness, making a clearing in which to erect a log cabin. There were then no railways in the vicinity, Port Washington, thirteen miles away, being the nearest milling and marketing place. After clearing quite a tract of his land he sold out and removed to Waubecka, where he lived retired until his death, in 1870. He reared seven children, as follows: John, Nicholas,

Page  722 722 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN Peter, Michael, Margaret, Kate and Mary. Six children were born of the union of Michael and Mary (Neuens) Neuens, namely: Joseph, Charles, Henry G., Edward, Martha and Theresa. Receiving a good common school education in Waubecka, Wisconsin, Henry G. Neuens began his active career at the age of nineteen years as a clerk in the general store of C. H. Witt, with whom he remained three years. Going then to Milwaukee, he entered the wholesale leather house of Christ Anstadt, and while thus engaged took a course of study in the Excelsior Business' College. Going then to Sheboygan, Wisconsin, he was engaged in clerking for a few months. In February, 1887, Mr. Neuens came to Iron Mountain, Michigan, and entered the employ of Cooley Brothers, dealers in flour and feed, who at that time were furnishing meat to the contractors who were building the railway from Iron Mountain to Channing. Resigning his position on August 25 of that year, Mr. Neuens formed a partnership with E. F. Roell, and a few days later, on September 3, began his successful career as a general merchant as head of the firm of Neuens & Roell, and has continued the business ever since, a continuous period of twenty-three years, during which time Mr. Neuens has seen an almost complete change in the personnel of the business in Iron Mountain. Mr. Nuens married, February 5, 1888, Mary A. McVey, who was born in the province of Ontario, Canada, a daughter of Frank and Anna (Sweeney) McVey. Her parents were both born in Ireland, and on crossing the Atlantic located first in Canada, but subsequently migrated to Wisconsin, settling permanently in Depere, Brown county. Religiously Mr. and Mrs. Neuens are members of Saint Mary's Roman Catholic church. Politically Mr. Neuens is a stanch Democrat, and is now a member of the board of public works, which he has served as president. Socially he is a member of Saint Mary's Court, No. 1159, Catholic Order of Foresters, and Lodge No. 700, B. P. 0. E., of the latter being treasurer for seven years and was trustee of the cemetery board for four years. HENRY R. DOTSCH, a prominent attorney of Escanaba, is a nativeborn son of Delta county, and was born June 26, 1880. His father, John Dotsch, is a native of Wisconsin, where he was reared and educated. At the breaking out of the Civil war John Dotsch enlisted in a Wisconsin regiment, and served three years under General McClellan, participating in many important battles, and at the close of the war returning to Wisconsin. In 1865 he removed to the Northern Peninsula of Michigan, and now resides at Garden, Delta county. He married Mary Ansell, a native of Delta county, whose father, Edward Ansell, was born in England and was one of the early settlers of this locality. She died young, leaving five children, of whom Henry is the second. The boyhood of Henry R. Dotsch was spent in his native county and here he received his early education. He was graduated from the law department of the college at Bowling Green, Kentucky, in 1906, was admitted to the Michigan bar, and engaged in the practice of his profession at Escanaba. He has built up a good clientele, and is actively interested in political matters. Mr. Dotsch served as president of the village board at Garden when but twenty-one years old, and also held the office of clerk and trustee. He served as supervisor of the First ward of Eseanaba, and in 1908 was elected prosecuting attorney of the city, which office he now fills. He is a stanch Republican, an enterprising and public-spirited citizen, and held in high esteem by all. Mr. Dotsch has spent his life in this county, and is widely known, having a large circle of friends.

Page  723 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 723 TORSTEN EGGEN.-Noteworthy for his good citizenship and many excellent traits of character, Torsten Eggen has long been actively identified with the leading interests of Bessemer, and has been an important factor in advancing its business growth and prosperity. A native of Norway, he was born, March 21, 1850, at Trondhjem, where he was brought up and educated. Possessing natural mechanical ability, he learned the carpenter's trade when young, and followed it in his native land until 1880, when he came to the United States to establish a home. Locating in Michigan, he entered the employ of Captain Dickinson at Ishpeming, and for a short time did various kinds of surface work. IHe then entered the shops as a carpenter, and at the end of a month was made foreman, and continued in that position until 1886. Coming then to Bessemer, which was then in its infancy, he was for a while employed in building shafts at the mines. Embarking then in the furniture business, Mr. Eggen carried it on successfully three years, when he was elected a justice of the peace, in which capacity he served ably and faithfully for sixteen years. Mr. Eggen was also coroner for several years, and for three years was city clerk. In the meantime Mr. Eggen started in the insurance business, beginning on a small scale, and he now represents a number of well-known companies, including among others the Phoenix of Hartford, Connecticut, and the Phoenix of London, England. He has also been the American Express agent since 1903. Mr. Eggen married, in 1876, Bereth Johnson, who was born, reared and educated in Norway. She died in 1895, leaving five children, namely: Johannes; John; Olina, wife of A. O. Peterson, of Ishpeming, and they have one child, Gordon; Marit; and Arvoid. Mr. Eggen married for his second wife, in Bessemer, Mrs. Gunild (Mortensen) Magnus. Religiously Mr. Eggen was reared in the Lutheran church. Politically he is a sound Republican, and socially he is a member of the Scandinavian Society. ANDREW GRAM.-One of the substantial business enterprises of the city of Menominee is that conducted by this sterling business man and honored citizen, who is a dealer in second-hand engines, boilers and pumps and who also handles saw and shingle mill machinery. His shops and warehouse are located at the juncture of Saxton avenue and the lines of the C. & N. W. Railroad. He is a worthy representative of the Scandinavian element that has contributed so much to the development of this section of the state and is a native of Denmark, where he was born on the 9th of January, 1841. He is a son of Christian P. and Karem (Paulsen) Gram, both of whom passed their entire lives in Denmark, where the father followed the vocation of farmer. Of their twelve children only four are now living and of the number three are residents of the United States. The father followed a seafaring life in his younger days and later turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, in connection with which he achieved a due measure of success. Both he and his wife are members of the Lutheran church. Andrew Gram secured his early educational training in the excellent schools of his native land and was but fourteen years of age when he severed home ties and courageously set forth to fight the battle of life on his own responsibility and as a stranger in a strange land. At the age mentioned he embarked on a sailing vessel for America and thirty-five days elapsed before he disembarked in the port of New York city in 1855. He remained but a short time in the national metropolis whence he came westward to Green Bay, Wiscon

Page  724 724 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN sin, where he entered upon an apprenticeship in a machine shop. Ie became a skilled workman and after the completion of his apprenticeship worked at his trade until 1861, when he gave signal manifestation of his loyalty to the land of his adoption by tendering his services in defense of the Union whose integrity was menaced by armed rebellion. In response to President Lincoln's first call, he enlisted as a private in Company H, Twelfth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry and he was mustered into service on the 5th of November, 1861, at Madison, the capital of that state. Soon afterward he proceeded with his regiment to the front, having been in service at Fort Scott and Fort Leavenworth and then proceeded to St. Louis, Missouri, and onward into Kentucky and Tennessee, where his command participated in numerous engagements. He was with Grant's army in Mississippi and took part in the Pittsburg campaign. He was a participator in all the battles and skirmishes in which his regiment was involved and made a gallant record as a valiant and loyal soldier of the republic. He was mustered out at Chattanooga, Tennessee, on the 6th of November, 1864, duly receiving his honorable discharge. After the fall of Atlanta he returned to Wisconsin and some time afterward secured a position as engineer in the employ of the Ludington & Wells Company at Menominee, Michigan. With this well known concern, one of the most prominent in connection with the great lumber industry of this section, he continued to be employed for a period of thirty-seven years, severing his connection only when he established his present business enterprise. He has built up a very successful business and his reputation as a reliable and conservative business man is unassailable. A skilled artisan and thoroughly familiar with all the details of the mechanical industry with which he is thus associated, his well equipped establishment has facilities for the turning out of the best kind of work and the repair department is one that has a large support. His two sons, Ralph S. and James, are associated with him in business and are numbered among the representative young business men of Menominee. Mr. Gram enjoys unalloyed popularity in the city that has so long represented his home and he has been called upon to serve in offices of distinctive public trust. He was a member of the city council for one term and for three terms was supervisor of the township. In politics he gives his allegiance to the Republican party. Both he and his two sons are identified with the Masonic fraternity, being affiliated with Menominee Lodge, No. 269, Free & Accepted Masons, in which he served as master for three terms. He is also identified with Menominee Chapter, No. 107, Royal Arch Masons, and Menominee Commandery, No. 35, Knights Templars. In 1866 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Gram to Miss Annie Campbell and her death occurred in 1869. The two children of this union are both deceased. In 1874 Mr. Gram wedded Miss Annie Evans, who was born in Wales and who was summoned to the life eternal in 1904. Of the seven children the following brief record is given: Clinton W., Louis M., M. Jane, Chester E., Ralph S., Fannie E. and James. M. Jane is now the wife of E. G. Woodford, of Dunbar, and Chester E. died at the age of twenty-one years. Mr. Gram is a member of the Lutheran church, as were also his first and second wives. FRANK J. HAMACHER, secretary and treasurer of the Escanaba Hardware Company, was born in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, July 22, 1859. His

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Page  725 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 725 father, John W. Hamacher, a native of Germany, was reared in his native country and there married his first wife. On coming to America, about 1850, he located first at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and later removed to Sheboygan, where he lived a number of years. In 1864 Mr. Hamacher located in the Northern Peninsula of Michigan, first at Ontonagon, later in Houghton and Marquette, and in 1868 he settled in Escanaba. He took up the trade of iron moulder in this country, and after coming to Escanaba was for four years proprietor of the Michigan House. In 1874 Mr. Hamacher built the Hamacher House, on Ludington Street, where he spent the remainder of his life, passing away in 1877. By his first marriage he had two children, Mrs. John Hirt, of Milwaukee, and Mrs. J. J. Connolly, of Marquette, Michigan. He married, second, in Sheboygan, Mrs. Mary Jermain. They had eight children who lived to maturity, and all are still surviving with the exception of the eldest son. Frank is the third child and second son. Frank J. Hamacher was about four years of age when his parents moved to the Northern Peninsula, and his early boyhod was spent in Houghton, Ontonagon and Marquette; he was about nine years of age when the family removed to Escanaba, where he received his education. When fourteen years of age he began his mercantile career as clerk in the hardware establishment of W. E. Royce, of Escanaba, and later worked in a dry goods and clothing store in the same place. In 1877 Mr. Hamacher entered the employ of a railroad company as clerk, afterward becoming foreman of the ore docks at Escanaba. In 1879, in company with his eldest brother, he opened a grocery store, and in 1882 became book-keeper for Atkins & McNaughton Company. In 1885 he became book-keeper for Julius Rupvecht, at Stephenson, Michigan. The next year he again began working for the Northwestern Railroad' Company, and in 1894 went to Marquette, in the employ of the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic Railroad Company, as weigh master. In 1899 Mr. Hamacher returned to Escanaba, in the employ of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad Company, where he remained until the fall of 1901 and in that year began working for E. Olson Hardware Company as book-keeper. Two years later a stock company was formed, known as Escanaba Hardware Company, with Mr. Hamacher as secretary and treasurer, which position he still holds. In 1907 Mr. Olson sold his interest in the business, and since then Mr. Hamacher has also held the office of manager. Mr. Hamacher has been a resident of the Northern Peninsula fortyfive years, and has been identified with the growth and progress of Escanaba for a long time. He has always taken an active interest in politics, and served from 1890 to 1894 as alderman of the Fourth ward. He was a charter member of the Business Men's Association, was one of the organizers and one of the first directors, resigning his directorship for the reason that he felt himself unable to devote the time to the interests of the association necessary for its success. He is a public-spirited, useful citizen, well known in many parts of the peninsula, and universally liked and respected. In January, 1882, Mr. Hamacher married Kate, daughter of Henry Markatoris, and they became parents of four children, namely: Ella, Theodore F., Clarence H. and Charles Lowell. Ella is the wife of John Richardson, of Escanaba, book-keeper for the Escanaba Hardware Company. WILLIAM B. JEFFS.-Possessing a superior combination of qualities, William B. Jeffs, a leading citizen of Rockland, Ontonagon county, Vol. II-7

Page  726 726 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN has achieved marked success in the business world, ranking high among the financiers of the Upper Peninsula. A native of Rockland, he was born, June 16, 1868, a son of Benjamin Jeffs and Julia Sutter, pioneer settlers of this part of Ontonagon county. His father, Benjamin Jeffs was born in 1834 in Herefordshire, England, and migrated to America in 1857, spending the first year in Canada. Coming to the Upper Peninsula in 1858 he located in Rockland, Ontonagon county. There were then no railways in this section of the state, all travel being by river and lakes, or on foot and with teams through the virgin forests. He began as a miner at the then famous Minnesota mine and later embarked in mercantile pursuits, enlarging his operations as his means increased. In addition he became financially interested in mining, and acquired the Minnesota mine, in which he formerly worked. He was very successful in his undertakings and continued in business until his death in 1895. Benjamin Jeffs married Julia Sutter. She was born in Switzerland and was a grand-niece of Captain John A. Sutter, who first discovered gold in California. She came to America in 1854 and settled in Detroit. Many children were the result of this union, ten of whom are still living, as follows: S. A. Emma, William B., Walter O.. Ulysses S., Francis A., Lewis A., C. Jeanette, Mary A., Benjamin, and Milton D. W. One son, Edward H., died at the age of twenty-six years. Beginning when a mere boy to assist his father in the store, William B. Jeffs, the second child and eldest son, of the parental household, early became conversant with the details of the business, and after the death of his father became administrator of the estate. In 1898 Mr. Jeffs succeeded in interesting capital and organized the Michigan Mining and Copper Company, and at that time disposed of the greater part of his ownership in what was for many years the Minnesota mine. Since that time he has devoted his attention to mining, acquiring and retaining considerable interest in various mines of value in Utah and Idaho. Mr. Jeffs married Idabelle Becker. Fraternally he is a member of the Hancock Lodge, B. P. 0. E. HENRY J. CLEARY.-Among those prominently identified with the United States life-saving service on the Great Lakes is Captain Henry J. Cleary, who is now in charge of the life-saving station at Marquette, with the office of captain. He has encountered many dangers and done much arduous work in connection with his chosen vocation, but his mental and physical powers have been exerted with all of zeal and devotion in the protecting and saving of human life. Captain Cleary is a native of the state of Michigan, having been, born in Sanilac county, on the 18th of November, 1861, and being a son of William T. and Jane E. (Hunter) Cleary, the former of whom was born in Ireland and the latter in Canada. Of the ten children, four sons and three daughters are living. The father received a collegiate education in his native land and came to America as a young man. He made the voyage on a sailing vessel and landed in New York city, where, soon afterward, he enlisted in the United States navy, in which he served under Commodore Perry for a period of three years. He held the position of ship carpenter, having learned his trade in Ireland. Later he re-enlisted at Brooklyn, New York, and thereafter held the position of bookkeeper in the naval service about four years. He then removed to Port Sanilac,

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Page  727 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 727 Michigan, where he established himself in business as a boat builder and whence he later removed to Port Hope, Huron county, this state, where he continued in the same line of enterpiise for some time. He secured a tract of government land in that county, where he reclaimed a farm from the wilderness and where he continued to reside until his death. He was one of the honored and influential citizens of his county and was called upon to serve in various offices of public trust, including those of county clerk, justice of the peace and county school examiner. Iis widow now resides at Harbor Beach, Michigan. Captain Henry J. Cleary was afforded the advantages of the public schools of Port Huron, this state, and while still a school boy he assumed practical responsibilities. When but ten years of age he secured a position as cook on a schooner and later he was identified with the fishing industry. On the 1st of March, 1881, he entered the government lifesaving service at Port Aux Barques, on Lake Huron, where he was stationed for two years. He was then transferred to the station at Tawas City and one year later he was promoted to the office of captain. As such he was placed in charge of the Muskellunge Lake Station, where he remained until the spring of 1891, when, upon the completion of the new station at Marquette, he was assigned to the charge of the same, of whose work he has since continued in supervision. He is one of the able representatives of the service on the Great Lakes and has ever been found at the post of duty, no matter how great the hazard. He has had more special details than any other man in the service, having been detailed to the following expositions: Omaha, Buffalo, Pan-American, the Louisiana Purchase at St. Louis, Jamestown, and the Yukon at Seattle, Washington, and in his office hangs commemorative medals. McKinley's last boat ride was on Captain Cleary's lifeboat at Buffalo, the night before he was shot. Captain Cleary is held in high esteem by all who know him and is one of the popular citizens of the city of Marquette. The captain is Republican in his political proclivities, is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity and also holds membership in the Knights of Pythias and the Knights of the Maccabees. In the year 1884 Captain Cleary was united in marriage to Miss Mary Wagner, who was born in the province of Ontario, Canada, as were also her parents, Daniel and Abbie (Johnson) Wagner, who now maintain their home near Port Hope, Michigan, where the father is a prosperous farmer. Captain and Mrs. Cleary have one son, Charles H. LEE EARLL AMIDON.-As superintendent of the city schools of Iron Mountain, Dickinson county, Lee Earll Amidon occupies a prominent position among the leading educators of the Upper Peninsula. A son of Seth and Jeannette (Earll) Amidon, he was born, February 4, 1865, at Hamilton, Indiana. Of French ancestry on his father's side he is a lineal descendant in the eighth generation from Roger Amadowne, the line being continued through Philip, Henry, Henry, Moses, Moses and Seth to Lee Earll. Roger Amadowne, the emigrant ancestor, was born near La Rochelle, France, where members of the Amidon family are still in existence. He was a Huguenot, and when La Rochelle in 1628 was captured by the Catholics, he migrated to England. From there he came to America, and his name in this country first appears, in 1637, in the records of Salem, Massachusetts. He subsequently lived in Boston, and in 1648 settled as a farmer at Rehoboth, Plymouth county, where he died in 1673. Philip Amidown, born 1670, was a farmer at Rehoboth and later at Oxford, Massachusetts. He helped organize the church there, and

Page  728 728 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN was selectman. Henry Amidon, born 1699, was a farmer at Ashford, Connecticut. Henry Amidon, second, born 1727, was a farmer at Willington, Connecticut. He served in the Revolutionary war both at the Lexington Alarm and as Captain of the Third Company, Twenty-second Regiment, Connecticut Volunteers. Moses Amidon, born 1756, was a farmer at Willington. He served in the Revolutionary war as a private at Bunker Hill and as sergeant in Captain Hill's Company, Colonel McClellan's Regiment, Continental Army, on Long Island and at White Plains. Moses Amidon, second, born 1796, removed to Delanti (Stockton), New York. He married Laura Deming, whose grandfather, Daniel IYeming, served in the Revolutionary war in the Massachusetts Militia. Seth Amidon, born 1827, lived several years at Mantua, Ohio, where he learned the trade of wagon-maker. In 1849 he moved to Hamilton, Indiana, where in 1857 he married Jeannette, daughter of Nelson and Lauretta (Trowbridge) Earll. They had three children, Frank E., who died in infancy; Fred A., and Lee Earll, the special subject of this sketch. On his mother's side Mr. Amidon is ninth in descent from Ralph Earle, as follows: Ralph, Ralph, William, Nathaniel, Daniel, Watson, Nelson, Jeannette. Ralph Earle and wife, Joanna, are said to have come from Exeter, England, and first appear in America, in 1634, in Portsmouth, Rhode Island, records. He was a farmer. Ralph Earle, second, born in England, was a farmer at Dartmouth, Rhode Island. William Earle was a farmer at Compton, Rhode Island, and later moved to near Great Barrington, Massachusetts. Nathaniel Earll, born 1705, and called Captain Nathaniel, is said to have served in the Old French and Indian war. He was a farmer at Great Barrington, and later at Whitehall, New York. Daniel Earll, born 1732, was a farmer, and removed to Nova Scotia in 1770. He returned on the outbreak of the Revolution and served in the Massachusetts militia and later in the New York militia. He settled at Whitehall, New York, and in his old age removed to Onondaga, New York. Watson Earll, born 1760, was a farmer at Onondaga. Nelson Earll, born 1807, took up government land in La Grange county, Indiana, in 1836, and was one of its earliest settlers. He served in the Civil war in Company H, Indiana Volunteers. He died in service and is buried in the National Cemetery at Nashville. He married Lauretta, daughter of James Trowbridge. Their daughter Jeannette became the wife of Seth Amidon. In 1877, soon after the death of his mother, Lee Earll Amidon was placed in the care of Henry A. and Mary J. Watt, and was brought up on their farm, at Ainger (Montpelier), Ohio, receiving training in habits of industry, honesty, and thrift. Obtaining his elementary education in the district schools, he subsequently taught in those schools for three years, after which he further pursued his studies at Wooster University, Wooster, Ohio, teaching winters and studying summers to make up for the time lost. In 1892 he was graduated from the classical department of the University of Michigan with the degree of A. B., and the ensuing five years he was superintendent of schools at West Bend, Wisconsin. Entering Harvard University in 1897, Mr. Amidon took a post graduate course at that institution, and was there graduated with the degree of A. M. in 1898. Accepting the superintendency of the city schools of Iron Mountain, he has since filled the position ably and acceptably. He has belonged to the Upper Peninsula Educational Association since 1898, in 1906 serving as its president; since 1899 he has been a member of the Michigan State Teachers' Association, and of the National Education Association since 1893. In national politics Mr. Amidon is a Democrat. He attends the Presbyterian church. He is a member of the Michigan Society, Sons of the American Revolution.

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Page  729 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 729 Mr. Amidon married, June 17, 1893, Viola Powers, who was born, November 30, 1868, at Ainger, Ohio, and was educated in the common schools of her native district, and in the Normal College at Angola, Indiana, from which she graduated in 1892. Previous to her marriage she taught in the district schools at Ainger, Ohio, and in the high school at Waterloo, Indiana. After her marriage she taught with her husband in the high school at West Bend, Wisconsin, for three years, being a successful and popular instructor. She is a member of the Drawing Room Club, the oldest ladies' social organization in Iron Mountain. She is also a charter member of the Chippewa Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution. Mrs. Amidon comes from New England stock, being a descendant in the eighth generation from Walter Power, the lineage being as follows: Walter, Daniel, Jonathan, Oliver, Josiah, Stephen, Volney and Viola. Walter Power, born 1640, in England, first appears in the records of Concord, Massachusetts, in 1654. He was a farmer. Daniel Powers, born 1669, was a farmer at Littleton, Massachusetts. Jonathan Powers, born 1704, was a farmer and lived at Lancaster, Massachusetts. He served in the old French and Indian war, in 1755, on an expedition to Crown Point. Oliver Powers, born 1741, was a farmer at Lancaster, and after 1785, in Oneida county, New York. In 1760 he served under Colonel Williard in the French and Indian war. He served in the Revolutionary war at the Lexington Alarm. Josiah Powers, born 1772, a farmer at Farmington, New York, married Hannah Church, whose father, Josiah Church, served in the Massachusetts militia in the Revolutionary war. Stephen Powers, born 1800, lived at Farmington until 1837, when he and his three brothers migrated with ox teams to York, Indiana, being six weeks on the trip. He was a farmer, a surveyor, and taught forty-two consecutive terms of winter school. He served in the Civil war in Company A, Fortyfourth Indiana Volunteers. Volney Powers, born 1838, was the first white child born in York township. He served throughout the Civil war, first as a private and later as lieutenant of Company G, Seventh Michigan Volunteer Infantry. Since the war he has been a farmer at Ainger (Montpelier), Ohio. He taught school, and for many years has been justice of the peace. In 1866 he married Martha Kimmell. They have eight children, of whom Viola Amidon is the second. On her mother's side Mrs. Amidon is sixth in descent from Adam Kimmell, who with his brothers Jacob and Valentine came to America from Rotterdam, Holland, in the ship St. Andrew, commanded by Captain Abercrombie, and landed at Philadelphia in 1751. Joseph Kimmell, son of Adam, also lived in Philadelphia. William Kimmell, son of Joseph, was born in 1791. He migrated, in 1809, to Stark county, Ohio, where he became a farmer. His son, Adam Kimmell, born 1823, married Eliza Culberson, and in 1854 moved to Ainger, Ohio, where he was a farmer. His daughter Martha, born 1848, married Volney Powers, as stated above. ROGER MERCEIN ANDREWS, of Menominee, was born at Stamford, Connecticut, April 2, 1874. He is a great grandson of Thomas R. Mercein who was an active factor in the early days of the republic and a son of the Revolutionary war captain of the same name, and himself comptroller of the city of New York during the war of 1812. The subject of this sketch received his education at Hackettstown, New Jersey, Centenary Collegiate Institute, Peekskill, New York, Military School and Yale Law School (class of 1894). The following year he took up

Page  730 730 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN newspaper work, and was connected at various times, with the New York Recorder, Chicago Inter Ocean, Chicago Chronicle, Milwaukee Journal, and Milwaukee Daily News, and was special correspondent at Washington, District of Columbia, during two sessions of congress. In 1900 he was secretary of the Milwaukee National Democratic Convention Committee. In 1901 he located in Menominee, Michigan; in connection with William Webb Harmon, purchased the Menominee Herald, and in 1904, became sole owner thereof, the firm having established the Northwestern Farmer, the first agricultural newspaper in the Upper Peninsula, in 1903. The plant and business of the Evening Leader was also purchased from the estate of its former editor, in 1904, and Mr. Andrews was therefore owner of the two, which he consolidated under the name of Menominee Herald-Leader, and thereafter placed the entire property in a corporation called the Herald-Leader Company, of which Mr. Andrews had been at once both the mainspring and the balancewheel. During his management the plant of the company has been placed in the metropolitan class, and contains a duplex newspaper press, linotype machines, book and job presses, folding machine, bindery and a stereotyping room, and the patronage of both the newspaper and the jobbing department has been extended over a wide area, until the business has become a prosperous and profitable one. In matters of public interest Mr. Andrews has always been among those in the front rank, and he is credited with initiating many moves that became popular and enured to the benefit of the community. During his residence in Menominee he has held many positions of trust and of honor. He has been president of the Lake Superior Press Association; vice president of the Wisconsin Press Association; director of the Michigan Press Association; member of the Board of Trustees of Spies Public Library; lieutenant Michigan National Guard; director of the Lumberman's National Bank; twice chairman of the Republican city committee; secretary of the Commercial Club; director of the Michigan primary election league, and was appointed by Governor Warner as Commissioner of Mineral Statistics for the state of Michigan, March 31, 1908. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias, Elks, Modern Woodmen, Yeomen, Modern Brotherhood, Maccabees, Michigan State Grange, Press Club of Milwaukee, Chicago Press Club and Michigan Republican Editorial Association. In 1903 Mr. Andrews married a daughter of John H. Ebeling, a pioneer miller of Green Bay, Wisconsin. The result of the marriage is a happy and comfortable home on State Street, and a little daughter, Marjorie. In addition to the Daily Herald-Leader and the Northwestern Farmer, the publishing companies of which Mr. Andrews is the head, issue also the Twice-a-wieek Herald-Leaider, and the Northwestern, both edited by him, and the last mentioned being the first family magazine published in the Upper Peninsula. As we write this, we learn that Mr. Andrews has arranged to make his future home in Los Angeles, California, but he will retain an interest in his publications here and has his force of workers so in harness that he need no longer be confined very closely to detail. His activity, genial greeting, and public-spiritedness have won for him a host of friends that regret his departure. TOUSSAINT J. MARTIN, engaged in the produce and grocery business at 812 Ludington street, Escanaba, Michigan, is one of the enterprising, up-to-date business men of the town. Mr. Martin was born in Columbus, Ohio, June 15, 1864, a son of Canadian parents, Joseph and Philo

Page  731 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 731 mina Isabel Martin, who have for years been residents of Escanaba. In their family of thirteen children the subject of this sketch is the eldest. At the time the Martin family came to Escanaba, which was in the fall of 1875, T. J. was eleven years of age. He had attended school for a brief time in Canada, but the greater part of his education was received here. As a boy he assisted his father in his work in the lumber woods, and remained with him until he reached the age of twenty years. Then he became a clerk in a grocery store, and was thus occupied until 1891. During this time he learned the various details of the business and laid the foundation for his future success. In 1898 he opened a stock of groceries and produce in the basement of the Fair Savings Bank store, where he prospered and remained three years, until September, 1901, when he moved into his present quarters at 812 Ludington street. Here he has since carried a stock of groceries, meat, seeds, shelf hardware, etc., from time to time increasing the quantity carried, until he has one of the largest and best assorted stocks of the kind in Escanaba. With the exception of a few years, from 1891 until 1898, when he was at Green Bay, Wisconsin, he has been identified with Escanaba since he came here a boy with his parents, and during this time he has proved himself a public-spirited, enterprising citizen. He is a member of the Business Men's Association and one of the board of directors of the Agricultural Society of Delta county. In 1890, Mr. Martin married Miss Octave Fontaine, of Green Bay, Wisconsin, and their union has been blessed in the birth of two daughters, Miranda M. and Mildred. Fraternally, Mr. Martin is identified with the Modern Woodmen of America. CHARLES A. OTTO.-Among the industrious and much respected citizens of Iron River Charles A. Otto holds a position of note. A son of Charles A. Otto, Sr., he was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, March 20. 1856. His grandfather, John Otto, a native of Prussia, served his time in the Prussian army and was afterwards employed as a shepherd in his native land, living there until 1839. Joining then a colony consisting of sixty-two families, he emigrated to America, bringing his wife and children. These colonists were all Lutherans and were accompanied by their pastor. They spent about two years in Watertown, New York, and then, about 1841, the little colony settled in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, which was then a small village. John Otto was employed at various kinds of labor for a few years, and then settled near Cedarburg, Wisconsin, where he spent his remaining days. He reared five sons, namely: John, Louis, Charles A., Edward and Herman. Charles A. Otto, Sr., received his elementary education in the schools of Prussia, his native country, being seventeen years old when he came with his parents to America. While living in Milwaukee he attended the evening schools, becoming thoroughly acquainted with the English language, in the meantime being employed as a clerk in a general store. He subsequently engaged in mercantile pursuits with his brother Louis, whose interest he afterwards purchased. Mr. Otto then continued alone until selling out the entire business to his brother Edward. Forming then a partnership with Alonzo Schulflohn, Mr. Otto continued with him about three years, dealing in wagon makers' supplies. During the following two years he was silent partner in a hardware business, and afterwards kept a public house on the outskirts of Milwaukee for a while. Returning then to the city, he was there employed as a private watchman until his death,

Page  732 732 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN at the age of sixty-one years. He married Sophia Helm, who was also a native of Prussia. She died at the age of thirty-eight years. Of the children born to Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Otto, Sr., but three grew to years of maturity, namely: Charles A. (the subject of this sketch), Emma and Julius. After attending the public schools of Milwaukee two years Charles A. Otto completed his studies at a parochial school. At the age of fifteen years he began sailing the Lakes as a cabin boy, and each season for five years was engaged in nautical pursuits. He afterwards found employment in different establishments, remaining in that part of the state until 1878. Entering then the employment of the Menominee Mining Company, he continued with it until March, 1881, when, in the employ of Donald C. MacKinnon, he was for nine months an explorer in the Brule River country. In December, 1881, Mr. Otto made his advent in Iron River. The town had then just been platted, and the only building it contained was a log cabin, owned by a bachelor, James Innes, who was keeping boarders. Mr. Otto entered the employ of this bachelor as cook, and in January, 1882, Mrs. Otto here joined her husband, being the first, and for several weeks the only, white woman in the place. She was duly installed as cook and homekeeper in the only house in this part of Iron county. This house, a cabin built of logs, was situated on the northeast corner of Genesee and Second streets, and had but one room, that being used as a place to cook, eat and sleep by the entire family, including the boarders. There were tiers of bunks on either side of the room, eighteen in all, and as people came from afar to prospect for ore the house was usually well filled. The table was set three times for each meal, there not being dishes enough to serve more than one table at a time. At the end of six months Mr. Otto built a house on the outskirts of the town, and he and his wife occupied it about a year and then moved onto the homestead claim which he had secured in section seventeen, townships forty-three and thirty-four, and on which he had put up a log cabin. Subsequently Mr. Otto entered the employment of the Northwestern Railroad Company, with which he was connected in different capacities until 1907. Resigning his position in December, 1907, Mr. Otto accepted a position as janitor of the school building at Iron River, which he filled two years and then returned to the North-Western Railroad Company. On June 25, 1879, Mr. Otto married Florence J. Hall, who was born at Farmers Valley, McKean county, Pennsylvania, December 12, 1854, a daughter of Lavinus Hall. Her grandfather, Jesse Hall, a native of New England, moved first to New York state and afterward settled at Farmers Valley, Pennsylvania, where he bought land and was engaged in tilling the soil until his death. The maiden name of his wife was Polly Green. Lavinus Hall was born in Ithaca, New York, but was brought up and educated in Pennsylvania. Migrating to Wisconsin in 1856, he became an early settler of Winnebago county, where he bought land and was employed in general farming for about eight years. On October 20, 1864, he located in the Upper Peninsula, becoming a pioneer settler of Negaunee. where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits for two years. Mr. Hall afterwards spent a year at Champion, Marquette county, from there moving with his family to Quinnesec. Coming to Iron county in 1883, he took up a homestead in what is now Bates township, and having cleared off a part of the timber and erected a dwelling house, he was joined about two years later by his wife. He cleared about eighty acres of his tract,

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Page  733 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 733 and was there successfully employed in the care of his farm until his death, November 17, 1907. About two weeks before his demise, Mr. Hall gave an option to an exploring company, which in a short time discovered ore, and a mine is now being there opened by the Florence Iron Company. Mr. Hall married Elza Maria Edmunson, who was born in Ireland, probably in Belfast. Her father, William Edmunson, was born in Glasgow, Scotland, and went as a young man to Ireland, and there resided several years. In 1833, accompanied by his family, Mr. Edmunson came in a sailing vessel to America, after a voyage of three months landing at Quebec, and from there proceeding to Brockville, thence to New York state. He was well educated and talented, and after teaching school for a while in different parts of the Empire state he entered the government employ as secretary and was sent to Mexico, where he was taken ill and died. The maiden name of the wife of William Edmundson was Mary Palmer. She was born in Ireland, of French ancestry, and spent her last years with her two daughters in Michigan. Mrs. Hall, who survived her husband, still lives on the old homestead in Bates township. She reared seven children, two now deceased, as follows: Florence J., wife of Mr. Otto; Darby, deceased; Fred A.; Grace J., deceased; Euphemia; Fitz Henry; and Franklin Herbert. Mr. and Mrs. Otto are the parents of six children, namely: Carlyle, Claude, Fred, Herbert, Mildred and Roy. Claude married Mary Corbett, and they have two children, Mildred and Thomas. Mr. Otto has ever taken an intelligent interest in public matters, and served four years as village clerk; three years as clerk of Bates township; four years as a justice of the peace; and for six years was a member of the local board of education. EDWARD A. NEUBAUER.-A prominent and active business man of Iron Mountain and one of the leading jewelers of Dickinson county, Edward A. Neubauer is identified with the leading interests of the city, and is widely known in business, political and social circles. A son of Louis Neubauer, he was born, January 15, 1868, in Oconto, Wisconsin. His grandfather Neubauer, a native of Germany, emigrated with his family to the United States, becoming a pioneer settler of Manitowoc, where he spent his remaining years. Louis Neubauer was born and reared in Germany, at the age of eighteen years coming with the family to this country. Learning the trade of a miller, he built a flour mill at Oconto, Wisconsin, and operated it several years, when it was burned, and, there being no insurance, proved a total loss to the owner. Moving then to Pound township, Marinette county, he bought a farm and was there employed in agricultural pursuits until his death, at the age of sixty-two years. He married Mary Reitz, who was born in Germany, a daughter of Joseph Reitz, who emigrated to America, locating in Milwaukee, where he operated a line of omnibuses for several years, living there until his death. Mfrs. Louis Neubauer died at the age of forty-eight years, leaving five children, as follows: Annie, Louis, Edward A., Annito and Joseph. Brought up and educated in Oconto, Edward A. Neubauer began to make himself useful when young, and until twenty years old assisted his father in the mill. He then began to learn the jeweler's trade at Green Bay, and in 1893 embarked in business for himself in Iron Mountain, where he has since built up a substantial and remunerative trade as a jeweler, and has taken an active part in promoting the welfare of the community.

Page  734 734 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN Mr. Neubauer married, in 1894, Emily Oliver, who was born in Ishpeming, Michigan, where her parents, John and Emma (Hoskings) Oliver, located on emigrating to the United States from England, their native country. They were married in this country at Ishpeming. Mr. and Mrs. Neubauer have one child, Evelyn Neubauer. A valued worker in the Republican ranks, Mr. Neubauer was elected a member of the board of aldermen, and before the expiration of his term of service in that capacity was elected mayor of the city and filled the position two terms. He has also served as sheriff of Dickinson county. Fraternally he is a member of Iron Mountain Lodge, No. 388, F. & A. M.; of Iron Mountain Chapter, No. 121, R. A. M.; of Oak Leaf Camp, No. 2885, IM. W. A.; of Guttenburg Lodge, No. 7, Sons of Hermann; and of the Yeomen of America. Religiously he and his family attend the Presbyterian church. WILLIAM J. OBERDORFFER.-Since the decadence of the great lumber industry in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan there has been made wonderful advancement in the development of its agricultural resources, and in connection with this splendid field of endeavor none has labored with more energy and perseverance and has achieved a more generous measure of success than Hon. William J. Oberdorffer, who is one of the leading farmers and stock growers of Menominee county, where he has developed from the wilderness a finely improved farm of one hundred and eighty acres,-one of the best in this now favored section of the state. He has been in the most significant sense the artificer of his own fortunes, having come to America from Germany as a youth and having ever been dependent upon his own resources. Not only has he achieved success in temporal affairs but he has also gained recognition as one of the honored and influential citizens of Menominee county, which he has represented as a member of the state legislature and in which he has held various other public offices of distinctive trust. He is at present a member of the state board of agriculture, and no citizen of the Upper Peninsula is a more worthy exemplar of the great basic industries of agriculture and stock raising. William J. Oberdorffer was born near the city of Cohln, Germany, on the homestead farm of his father, and the date of his nativity is March 18, 1855. He is a son of William J. and Catherine (Reuter) Oberdorffer, both of whom were born in that same section of the great German empire,-the former in 1822 and the latter in 1833. They became the parents of nine children, of whom only two are now living: William J., who is the subject of this sketch, and Ienry J., of Iron Mountain, Michigan, who is now roadmaster of the Menominee River division of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad Company, in the employ of which he has been retained for the past thirty-six years. The father devoted practically his entire life to agricultural pursuits and continued his residence in Germany until his death. He was a members of the Roman Catholic church, as is also his wife. The latter emigrated to America in 1871 and was accompanied by her six children, four of the number having died after the family home was established in Michigan. The family landed in the city of Boston and thence came to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, locating in Menominee county. Iere in the following year the mother became the wife of Peter Putz, of Masonville, this county. The three children of this union are Mary, Richard and Theresa. Mr. and Mrs. Putz now make their home with the subject of this sketch, both being venerable in

Page  735 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 735 years. William J. Oberdorffer gained his early education in the excellent schools of his native land and was sixteen years of age at the time of the family emigration to America. The home was established at Masonville, Menominee county, and here Mr. Oberdorffer secured employment in a saw mill conducted by ex-Senator Richard Mason, in whose honor the village mentioned was named. He was thus employed about two years, after which he worked as a section hand on the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad, of which he later became a brakeman. In 1876 he secured forty acres of land in Stephenson township, Menominee county, and set to himself the herculean task of reclaiming a farm in the midst of the wilderness. Indefatigable industry and well directed application eventually brought him to the goal of success, as is shown in the thrift and prosperity evidenced in every department and appearance of his finely improved farm, which comprises one hundred and eighty acres. Virtually the entire tract is available for cultivation and the buildings are of a substantial and attractive order. In 1898, in connection with his agricultural work, Mr. Oberdorffer began devoting special attention to the breeding of full-blooded Holstein cattle, and in this field of enterprise he has been especially successful, having maintained a fine herd of this fine type of cattle and conducting at present a large dairy business in connection with which his facilities and equipments are of the best modern type. The products of his dairy command the highest prices in the market. His dairy herd at present numbers about thirty head and on the farm he keeps an average of about three head of horses. In politics Mr. Oberdorffer has been aligned as a stalwart supporter of the cause of the Republican party from the time of gaining the right of franchise, and he has been an influential factor in connection with public affairs in Menominee county, where he has ever commanded the highest degree of popular confidence and esteem. He has served fourteen years as supervisor of Stephenson township, and is incumbent of this position at the present time. In 1897 he was elected to represent his county in. the state legislature, of which he continued a member for two terms and in which he made an admirable record. He exercises much zeal and discrimination in furthering the interests of the Upper Peninsula and gained the unqualified endorsement of his constituents. He also had the distinction of being a member of the state constitutional convention of 1907, when was adopted the present constitution of the state. In 1904 he was appointed a member of the state board of agriculture by Governor Warner, and he has continuously served in this capacity since that time, having been elected to the office in 1909 by popular vote under the provisions of the new law. He and his wife are zealous members of the Methodist Episcopal church at Stephenson. HIe is affiliated with Green Bay Tent, No. 714, Knights of the Maccabees, in the city of Menominee. On the 27th of August, 1887, Mr. Oberdorffer was united in marriage to Miss Adelaide Corey, who was born near Maysville. Dodge county, Wisconsin, and who is a daughter of Hiram and Charlotte (Mace) Corey, the former of whom was born in the state of New York and the latter in Vermont; they now reside on their well improved farm near Ingalls, Menominee county, Michigan. Mr. Corey was a valiant soldier of the Union during the Civil war, having enlisted, in 1861, in a Wisconsin regiment of volunteer infantry and having served until the close of the war, when he received his honorable discharge. He participated in many of the most memorable battles of the great

Page  736 736 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN fratricidal conflict and proved a valiant and faithful soldier. After the war he was engaged in agricultural pursuits in Dodge county, Wisconsin, until 1882, when he removed to Menominee county, Michigan, where he and his wife have since maintained their home. He is a member of Lyons Post, No. 266, Grand Army of the Republic, and in politics he is a Republican. Mrs. Corey is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. They became the parents of six children, all of whom are living, and Mrs. Oberdorffer was third in order of birth. Mr. and Mrs. Oberdorffer have two daughters,-Cora Alice, who is a student in the Michigan State Agricultural College, and Jessie May, who is teaching now in her home township. FRANK BAWDEN.-Occupying a noteworthy position among the substantial and highly respected citizens of Eagle River is Frank Bawden, who has been identified with the leading interests in this section of the Northern Peninsula for the past twenty-five years, and is now rendering excellent service as treasurer of Keweenaw county. A native of Wisconsin, he was born February 10, 1854, in Dodgeville, Iowa county, of English lineage. His father, William Bawden, was born in County Cornwall, England, where his parents spent their years of earthly life. As a boy he began working in the mines, and continued laboring with pick and shovel in his native county until 1850. In that year, accompanied by his wife and two children, he crossed the ocean in a sailing vessel, after a tedious voyage of several weeks landing on American soil. Coming directly to the upper part of Michigan, he was for a time engaged in mining on Isle Royale, in Lake Superior. Going then to Wisconsin, he mined near Dodgeville for a year, after which he worked at the Cliff mine and at other mines, in Keweenaw county, Michigan. Moving then to Ontonagon county, he was employed in different mines, from there going to Duluth, Minnesota, where he resided until his death, at the age of sixty-five years. He married Elizabeth Trembath, who was born in Cornwall, England. She died in 1862, leaving seven children, as follows: William, Salina, Emma, Frank, Albert, Charles and Rosina. While young Frank Bawden acquired a practical education in the public schools, and, like most of his boyhood companions, began as a lad to work in the mines, being employed in various capacities, including that of engineer. Going to Eagle Harbor in 1880, Mr. Bawden began his mercantile career, being first employed as a delivery clerk, later acting as salesman, subsequently carrying on business on his own account until 1904, when he was elected sheriff of Keweenaw county. In 1906 he was re-elected to the same office, and in 1908 was elected to his present responsible position as county treasurer. Mr. Bawden married, in 1872, Elizabeth Cocking. She was born at Dodgeville, Wisconsin, where her parents, Stephen and Elizabeth (James) Cocking, settled on coming from England to the United States in 1847. In 1852 Mr. Cocking removed with his family to the Upper Peninsula, and commenced mining in Keweenaw county. He enlisted in 1862 in Company I, Twenty-third Michigan Volunteer Infantry, and served with the regiment until after the close of the war, being brigade bugler. Returning after his discharge from the army to Michigan, he was appointed keeper of the Gull Rock Light, and held the position a number of years. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Bawden, namely: Pearl, who married William J. Richards, has two children, Elizabeth and John; Milton; Edna; Sid

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Page  737 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 737 ney; and Ruby. Mrs. Bawden passed to the higher life June 16, 1906, her death being a loss not only to her immediate family, but to a host of friends and acquaintances. Politically Mr. Bawden is a straightforward Republican. GEORGE DAwsoN.-Few of the sterling citizens of the Upper Peninsula have contributed in more generous measure and beneficent way to the civic and industrial development and progress of this favored section of the Wolverine state than did George Dawson, who located in Chippewa county forty years ago and who identified himself with the great lumbering industry in this section, as well as with various other lines of enterprise that had potent influence in advancing material and social progress. He became the owner of a large amount of real estate in the county, was the founder of the village of Detour and at the time of his demise was one of the most honored and influential citizens of the city of Sault Ste. Marie, where he established his home in the early days and where he exemplified that loyal and practical public spirit that indicated his faith in the splendid future of the city. He was a man of fine mental equipment and splendid administrative and business ability, but above all his entire career was marked by the most inviolable integrity and honor in all the relations of life, so that he commanded at all times the high regard of his fellow men. Such was his position as one of the representative citizens of the Upper Peninsula that it is most consonant that in this volume be entered a tribute to his memory and at least brief record of his life and labors. He accumulated a substantial fortune through his own efforts and mature judgment, and he left the gracious heritage of an unblemished reputation. George Dawson was born near Kingston, province of Ontario, Canada, in 1839, and his death occurred at his home in Sault Ste. Marie on the 21st of March, 1894,-in the very prime of his strong and useful manhood. His accomplishment, however, was not to be gauged by years but by results, and into his half-century of life he crowded more effective service and gained greater rewards than come to the average man whose life is prolonged to venerable age. Mr. Dawson was reared to manhood in his native province, where he received such educational advantages as were afforded in the schools of the period, and he early initiated a business career that was to be marked by consecutive advancement and by eventual accomplishment that made him a man of large affairs and much influence. In 1869 he became prominently concerned with lumbering interests in the province of Quebec, Canada. While thus engaged he exploited the improved system of turning out squared timber, and he owned and operated three vessels, which were utilized for the transportation of his products to the city of Quebec, from whence they were shipped to Liverpool, England. Mr. Dawson's connection with industrial enterprises in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan had its inception in the year 1871, and his lumbering operations, which attained wide scope, were principally in Chippewa county, which then comprised a large part of the Upper Peninsula. He was among the first to institute lumbering operations at Two Heart River, Grand Marais and Tahquamenon River, and later on Drummond Island in 1880, at which time he also purchased dock property, covering more than a mile, at Detour, and in 1884 he bought ship property in the Soo. As early as 1877 he had purchased property in the straggling village which was the nucleus of the pres

Page  738 738 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN ent thriving city of Sault Ste. Marie, where he eventually acquired large and valuable holdings and thereby laid the foundation for his substantial fortune. He was the founder of the village of Detour, as has already been stated, and owned the entire tract on which the village was located. Upon coming to the Upper Peninsula he brought with him one hundred men, a number of whom had been in his employ in Quebec and who accorded to him uniform loyalty and esteem. In 1877 he erected a fine residence in Sault Ste. Marie, and the building at the time was surrounded by brush and scrub timber, making the entire environment of the most primitive order. His action showed his confidence in the growth and development of the city, in whose welfare and progress he ever maintained a most vital interest. His was the first pretentious dwelling to be built in Sault Ste. Marie. Here also he was the pioneer in the construction of large docks, owning a water frontage of four hundred and twenty-two feet. He was also one of the first three to engage in dealing in coal in the "Soo," and in many other ways did he exemplify his progressive spirit and his interest in furthering the welfare of the community. In the village of Detour, which was plotted by Mr. Dawson, his supply store and hotel were the first buildings erected in the now thriving town. He did an extensive coal business on his dock there, and he was the leading business man of that section of Chippewa county, and there conducted large and successful lumbering operations. When the late Guy H. Carlton, in his official capacity, laid out the streets of Sault Ste. Marie he named Dawson street in honor of the subject of this memoir and Carrie street in honor of Mrs. Dawson, who was familiarly known by this abbreviation of her name, Caroline. Mr. Dawson retired from active business in 1888, and thereafter gave his attention to the management of his large real-estate and capitalistic interests. He continued to reside in Sault Ste. Marie until his death, and here his name is held in gracious and appreciative memory. He was independent in his political allegiance, and while never a seeker of public office he supported all measures tending to advance the general welfare of the community. On the 7th of July, 1875, Mr. Dawson was united in marriage to Miss Caroline A. Cunningham, who was born in Jefferson county, New York, and who is a daughter of Henry and Mary (Kenwood) Cunningham. Mr. Cunningham was engaged in the insurance business, and he and his wife passed the closing years of their lives in Watertown, New York. Mrs. Dawson, a woman of most gracious personality and distinctive culture, was a successful and popular teacher in the schools of her native state, a teacher in the Watertown schools and for some time prior to her marriage, principal in the high school in Cape Vincent, New York. Mr. Dawson is also survived by one daughter, Miss Georgiana Marion, and she and her mother pass the summer seasons in their beautiful home in Sault Ste. Marie, while their.winter place of sojourn is California. They have traveled extensively throughout the United States and Canada, but they retain deep affection for their old home and many friends in Sault Ste. Marie, where the attractive residence on Spruce street is a center of gracious hospitality. JOHN ROBERTSON.-This well known and highly esteemed citizen of Marquette, of which city he has served as mayor, has contributed in large measure to the material upbuilding of the city through his operations in the handling of real estate, and he stands exemplar of the highest type of civic loyalty. Mr. Robertson was born at Brantford,

Page  739 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 739 province of Ontario, Canada, on the 25th of May, 1858, and is a son of William and Margaret (Kane) Robertson, the former of whom was born in Aberdeen, Scotland, on the 9th of MIarch, 1817, and the latter of whom was boin in Ireland, in 1836. The devoted wife and mother was summoned to the life eternal in 1904 and the father now resides at Owen Sound, Ontario, where he is living retired. Of their children all are living, and their names are here entered in order of birth, —Mary, John, Isabelle, James, William, Alexander, Annie, Henry, Jessie, Jennie and Martha. The father was reared and educated in his native land and there learned the trade of carpenter and joiner. In 1850 he emigrated to America and located at Brantford, Ontario, where he followed the work of his trade about ten years, at the expiration of which he removed to Grey county, Ontario, where he turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, in connection with which he won merited success. He is still the owner of the old homestead in that county, where he resides. He has ever shown the sterling integrity and marked pragmatic ability so characteristic of the Scottish race and his mature judgment was shown in his insistent determination to have each of his sons learn a trade and thus fortify themselves for the active responsibilities of life. He is one of the honored and influential citizens of his county, and is an appreciative member of St. Andrew's Society. John Robertson, the subject of this review, was reared to maturity in his native province, to whose public schools he is indebted for his early educational discipline. He continued to be associated with the work of the home farm until he had attained to the age of seventeen years, after which he served an apprenticeship of three years at the trade of blacksmith, in which he became a skilled artisan. For two years after completing his apprenticeship he was employed in a manufactory of agricultural implements, and on the 21st of June, 1880, he came to Marquette, Michigan, where he has since maintained his home and where through earnest and honorable endeavor he has won a large measure of success, the while his sterling traits of character and unmistakable ability have gained to him the confidence and high regard of the people of the community. On his arrival in Marquette Mr. Robertson became associated with F. W. Reed in the work of his trade, and this alliance continued about eight years, at the expiration of which he engaged in business for himself, in the line of his trade. In 1895 Mr. Robertson began buying real estate in Marquette, and upon the lots which he purchased he erected houses, which he sold. His operations in this line have materially contributed to the advancement of the city, as he has invariably made improvements of the best order. He is one of the leaders in this line of enterprise in the city, where he has already erected about twenty-five houses. From the time of his arrival in Marquette, Mr. Robertson has shown a deep interest in all that has touched the welfare of the community, and his progressive ideas and loyalty marked him as an eligible candidate for public office. In April, 1897, he was elected mayor of the city, and during oile term as chief executive he gave a most able and acceptable administration of the municipal affairs of Marquette. From 1895 until the time of his election as mayor he served as representative of the Fifth ward and he has served as a member of the board of directors of the Electric Light & Power Company since 1905. He is Republican in his political proclivities, is affiliated with the Marquette Lodge No. 101, Free & Accepted Masons, and Marquette Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, and both he and his wife hold membership in the Presbyterian church.

Page  740 740 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN Mr. Robertson has been twice married. On the 23d of April, 1883, he wedded Miss Margaret Kirkstone, who was born at Elgin, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, and whose death occurred on the 8th of April, 1898. Of the seven children only one is now living,-William A., who is employed by the D. S. S. & A. R. R. In May, 1900, Mr. Robertson was united in marriage to Miss Catherine Richardson, who was born at Elmvale, Simcoe county, province of Ontario, Canada. No children have been born of the second marriage. FRED M. OLMSTED, superintendent of the poor and of the Delta County Hospital, has been a resident of the Northern Peninsula of Michigan for forty years and has been a participant in the activities that have contributed to the development of Delta county. Mr. Olmstead was born in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, February 3, 1851, son of William and Judith Ann (Merrills) Olmstead. Through his maternal ancestry he traces back to Germany, and on the paternal side his ancestors were English, their history being traced back to 1632. The Olmsteads were among the early settlers of America, having landed here in Colonial times, and many representatives of the family were participants in the Revolutionary war. Job Olmsted, the grandfather of Fred M., was a drum major in the war of 1812. He was a native of New York state, as also was William Olmsted's wife, but William was born it Canada. William Olmsted and his wife were the parents of eight children, all of whom grew to adult age. Fred M. was the seventh child. His boyhood days were spent at Sheboygan, where he received a common school education, and from whence, when he was sixteen, he moved with his parents to Waushara county, Wisconsin. In 1870 he came to Delta county, Michigan, and at Sac Bay engaged in fishing. In 1876 he became connected with a trading vessel, running between the Bay and Chicago, and followed this business eight years, at the same time having mercantile interests. Mr. Olmsted's father espoused the Republican cause when that party was organized, and voted for Abraham Lincoln, and, following in his father's footsteps, our subject has always been a stanch Republican. In recognition of his loyalty to the party and his high standing as a citizen of Delta county, he has numerous times been the recipient of official preferment. He was elected county sheriff in 1896 and two years later was re-elected. In 1901, having served four years as sheriff, he was appointed Superintendent of the Poor and the Delta County Hospital, the position which he still fills. His office as sheriff took him on frequent occasions to various parts of the peninsula as well as over all the county, and gained for him a wide acquaintance with the best citizens as well as those who had disregarded the law. Indeed, few men in his locality are better known or more highly respected than he. In 1874, Mr. Olmsted married Hannah S. Hazen, a daughter of Eli and Betsy Hazen. She was born in Buffalo, New York, and when eleven years old came with her parents to Michigan, settling in Delta county. They have two sons living,-Henry T. and Fred D. Fraternally Mr. Olmsted is identified with the K. of P., the I. O. O. F., and the F. & A. M. WILLIAM S. FELLOWS.-Numbered among the enterprising business men and popular citizens of Menominee, Mr. Fellows is now incumbent of the responsible position of manager of the Michigan Refining & Pre

Page  741 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 741 serving Company, one of the leading industrial concerns of this thriving city, in which he has maintained his home since 1903. William S. Fellows finds due measure of satisfaction in reverting to the great western metropolis of America as the place of his nativity. He was born in the city of Chicago on the 15th of April, 1874, and is a son of Oliver and Matilda (Brown) Fellows, the former of whom was born in Kennebec county, Maine, in 1828, and the latter was born on the 20th of January, 1834. The father, who was a scion of one of the sterling families founded in New England in the colonial days, died in the city of Chicago in the year 1894, and there his widow still maintains her home. They became the parents of five children: Frederick, who is now a resident of California; Harriet, who is the wife of John W. Hunter of Chicago; Edward, who is a resident of Minneapolis, Minnesota; William S., who is the immediate subject of this sketch; and Caroline, who is the wife of Harry Schull, of Chicago. Oliver Fellows was reared and educated in New England and he took up his residence in Chicago in the early '60s. There he entered the employ of the Rock Island Railroad Company and was identified with the construction of its line between Chicago and Rock Island. After the completion of the road he became one of its first passenger train conductors, and the company with which he thus early identified himself was finally merged into the present Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad Company. He continued in service as a conductor on passenger trains for the long period of thirty-five years, during which he remained continuously in the employ of the Rock Island system. For a time he served as station master in Chicago, but the allurements of his original occupation soon drew him back to the same. He retired from active service only a few years prior to his death. He was a life member of Englewood Lodge, No. 690, Free and Accepted Masons, was a Republican in his political proclivities and was a stanch member of the Presbyterian church, of which his wife also has long been a devoted adherent. He was a man of sterling integrity, of quiet, unassuming manners and generous impulses, so that he drew to himself a wide circle of loyal friends. William S. Fellows gained his early educational discipline in the public schools of Englewood, now an integral part of the city of Chicago, where he continued his studies in the high school until he was fifteen years of age, when he secured a position in the establishment of Sprague Warner & Company, the great wholesale grocery house of Chicago, and he was eventually advanced to a responsible position in the traffic department of this concern. In 1903 he removed to Mlenominee, where he assumed a position in the traffic department of the wholesale grocery house of the Carpenter-Cook Company. In 1906 of the following year he was made manager of the Michigan Refining & Preserving Company, and in this capacity he has since continued to give most able and effective administrative service. Though never a seeker of political preferment, Mr. Fellows is aligned as a stanch advocate of the principles and policies for which the Republican party stands sponsor. He is affiliated with Menominee Lodge, No. 269, Free and Accepted Masons, and both he and his wife are members of the MIethodist Episcopal church of this city. On the 12th of January, 1897, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Fellows to Miss Helen Rea, who was born at Newport, Ohio, and who is a daughter of Richard and Francis (Collins) Rea, both of whom were likewise born in the old Buckeye state, where they still retain their residence. Mr. Rea is the owner of a well equipped flour mill at Newport, Vol. II-8

Page  742 742 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN that state, and is one of the representative citizens of that section. He is a Republican in politics and both he and his wife hold membership in the MIethodist Episcopal church. Mr. and Mrs. Fellows have two children: Helen and Richard. JOSEPH H. SANDERCOCK.-It is a matter of local history, although some of the many readers of this volume may not know it, that the earlier settlers of Iron Mountain were in reality "Tent Dwellers," and prominent among the number was Joseph H. Sandercock, of whom we write. Taking up his residence here in 1879, when the only shelter for man or beast was that afforded by the sweeping branches of the giant trees, he has watched the gradual disappearance of the dense forest that then covered the earth, and has witnessed with gratification and pleasure the rapid upbuilding of this up-to-date city of ten thousand souls, with its many beautiful homes, its substantial business houses, its numerous church buildings, and its fine public schools. A son of Edward Sandercock, was born, November 6, 1852, in Linkinhorne, county Cornwall, England. His grandparents, John and Mary (Reddle) Sandercock, were life-long residents of county Cornwall, the grandfather having a blacksmith shop at Cardingham for many years. Edward Sandercock was born in the parish of Bodmin, England, and when young learned the trade of a blacksmith in his father's shop. For about twenty years he was in the employ of the Cheesewring Granite Company, at Linkinhorne, where he subsequently rented land and conducted a dairy business and a blacksmith's shop. Now a venerable man of four score and four years, he is living retired in that parish. His wife, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Higgs, was born in Lanivet, county of Cornwall, where her parents, Joseph and Catherine (Moon) Higgs, spent their days. She died in 1907, in Linkinhorne, at the age of seventy-nine years. She reared but two children, namely,-Joseph H., the immediate subject of this review; and Edwin, who is engaged in farming in Alberta, Canada. Leaving school at the age of fourteen years, Joseph H. Sandercock worked with his father at the blacksmith's trade for fourteen months, subsequently continuing with his uncle, Henry Sandercock, who assumed the management of the shop his father had established, for four or more years. Making up his mind, when nineteen years old, to come to America, he landed in New York City, on May 3, 1871, an entire stranger. He proceeded at once to Farley, Dubuque county, Iowa, the home of one of his mother's brothers, John Higgs. After a visit with his uncle, Mr. Sandercock secured work with a blacksmith in Manchester, Iowa, remaining with him a year. Coming then to the Upper Peninsula, he followed his trade at Ishpeming until the fall of 1873, when, owing to the panic, the mines were closed. Migrating then to the Atlantic coast, Mr. Sandercock located in Hallowell, Maine, in February, 1874, and there followed his trade for about five months. Sailing then from Boston for his old home, he was employed at blacksmithing in Linkinhorne, until 1879, when, in the spring of that year, he again came to Michigan and took up his residence at Ishpeming. In July, 1879, Mr. Sandercock went to Quinnesec, then the railway terminus, and for about two months worked at the Quinnesec mine. On September 15, 1879, Mr. Sandercock came to what is now the Chapin Location, in the city of Iron Mountain, the country roundabout being then a vast wilderness, the few people in this vicinity living, as before stated, in tents. An employe of the Menominee Mining Company, his anvil was set upon a stump, the bellows being hung between

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Page  743 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 743 two trees, thus the first smithy in Iron Mountain having for his roof the blue canopy of heaven. Mr. Sandercock has continued with the Menominee Range Iron Mining Company and its successors from that beautiful autumn day, thirty-one years ago, until the present time, having continuously served as foreman of the blacksmith department. While these mines were closed, in 1893, Mr. Sandercock took his family back to his old home in England and there spent about eight months renewing old acquaintances and visiting with his kin. On February 14, 1878, Mr. Sandercock married, in Linkinhorne, England, Miss Annie Mitchell, who was born and reared in that parish and who is a daughter of John Mitchell, who, with his wife, Elizabeth (Budge) Mitchell, was born, lived and died in Cornwall county, England. Learning the trade of a brick and plaster mason when young, John Mitchell, Sr., father of the above John Mitchell, became a contractor and builder, was also a local preacher of the Baptist church for forty years and spent his entire life in his native county. His wife, whose maiden name was Celia Hosking, was born in the parish of St. Ive, county of Cornwall, a daughter of John Hosking. Six children were born of this union, as follows: Harry, Hosking, Edward, Mary Elizabeth, Annie and Francis, two of whom came to this country, namely, -Harry and Mrs. Sandercock. Mr. and Mrs. Sandercock have five children, namely,-Mabel, Joseph, Edwin, and Harold and Howard, twins. Mrs. Sandercock is a most estimable woman and a valued member of the Baptist church. Fraternally Mr. Sandercock is a member of the Iron Mountain Lodge, No. 388, Free & Accepted Masons; and of the Benevolent & Protective Order of Foresters, of England. He is a sound Republican in politics and has served two terms as county supervisor. Since 1895 he has been a member of the city council of Iron Mountain. JOHN A. ALLO, a prominent business man of Escanaba, was born in Montreal, Canada, January 1, 1862. His father, George Allo, was born in England and came to Canada when a young man, locating in Montreal, where he became a leather merchant. George Allo died in Montreal, in 1862; he married Natalie LeBlanc, a native of Canada, who died in Neenah, Wisconsin, October 29, 1908, at the age of ninety-one years. They were parents of eleven children, of whom John is the youngest, being six months old at the time of his father's death; only one other of the children survives, Georgiana, of Neenah, Wisconsin, who is unmarried. The early education of John A. Allo was acquired in a French school in Montreal, and at the age of thirteen, when he left it, he could not speak a word of English. He is largely self-educated, and through his own efforts gained a good knowledge of the English language and of other branches which would be useful to him. After leaving school Mr. Allo spent three and one-half years learning the trade of plumbing and steam and gas fitting in his native city. In the fall of 1876 he removed to Neenah, Wisconsin, where for sixteen years he was engaged in business. He then located in Ashland, Wisconsin, and for some time carried on a clothing business. In 1902 Mr. Allo learned the undertaking business, and July 1, 1905, embarked in this line on his own account at Escanaba, Michigan, where he has since carried on a profitable and constantly increasing business. He has probably the largest stock in his line in the Northern Peninsula, and carries several side lines. He sells and also sets monuments and is an able, enterprising man of affairs. Mr. Allo has become widely known and well liked in the city, and takes an active interest in public affairs. He is a Democrat in his political views,

Page  744 744 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN but in voting chooses the man he considers best fitted to fill the office. Mr. Allo is chairman of the musical department of the Business Men's Association, and is a member of the Woodmen, Catholic Order of Foresters, Knights of Columbus, Modern Brotherhood of America, St. Jacques Society and of Lodge No. 558 Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, of Ashland. Mr. Allo married, May 3, 1887, Mary Remich, and they have two adopted daughters, Marie and Natalie, fourteen and seventeen years of age. BERNARD BLUMROSEN.-Many of the Upper Peninsula's most alert, enterprising and energetic citizens are of foreign birth and ancestry, noteworthy among the number being Bernard Blumrosen, of Sault Ste. Marie, who has taken much interest in developing the mercantile prosperity of this city and has been active in its upbuilding. He was born, May 5, 1863, in Russia, the birthplace of his parents, Samuel and Reta (Shapero) Blumrosen. Emigrating with his family to this country late in 1865, Samuel Blumrosen, then twenty-three years of age, his birth having occurred in 1842, located in Michigan, first at Bay City, on the Saginaw bay, and later at Alpena, a little farther north. In 1875 he moved to Detroit, and was there successfully engaged in the clothing business until his death, in 1900. The maiden name of his wife was Reta Shapero, as above stated. She was born in Russia in 1843, and died at Detroit, Michigan, in 1902, leaving four children, as follows: Moses, a pioneer merchant of Manistique, Michigan; Bernard, the special subject of this sketch; Rachel, wife of L. Rosenthal of Manistique, and Hattie, wife of Arthur Rosenthal, a merchant at Traverse City, Michigan. Leaving home at the age of fifteen years, Bernard Blumrosen started northward in search of remunerative employment, locating at Manistique, Schoolcraft county. There he subsequently engaged in business with his brother, and in 1882 they built the first brick block erected in that county. In 1889 Mr. Blumrosen erected a brick block in Ashland, Wisconsin. In the spring of 1895 lured to Sault Ste. Marie by its fine opportunities for business projects, he opened a mercantile establishment in this city, and was here prosperously engaged in business until his retirement from trade in 1908. He has since devoted his time and attention to the care of his private interests, his real estate holdings being extensive and valuable. In 1906 Mr. Blumrosen built a fine business block at Nos. 313-317 Ashmun street. On July 12, 1908, this building was destroyed by fire, and three months later he erected the fine stone building in which the Odd Fellow's hall is housed. Mr. Blumrosen is very prominent in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, with which he united in 1884, becoming then a member of Manistique Lodge, No. 353, I. O. O. F., and being now a member and a past noble grand of Sault Ste. Marie Lodge, No. 123, I. O. O. F. He was a delegate to the Grand Lodge at Lansing, Michigan, and it was through his influence that the Interstate Convention of Odd Fellows was held in the Soo in 1909. At that time the beautiful silver trophy given by Mr. Blumrosen for the team showing the best drill in the National Canton degree work was won by the Canadian Soo team, who beat the American Soo squarely and fairly. Mr. Blumrosen is also a member of Red Cross Lodge, No. 51, K. of P. Politically he is a sound Republican. Mr. Blumrosen married, in February, 1888, Leah Goldstene, who was born in London, England, being the youngest child of Rev. W. and Jennie Goldstene. Mr. and Mrs. Blumrosen have one son, S. Blumrosen,

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Page  745 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 745 who was graduated from the Sault Ste. Marie high school, and is now a student in the literary department of the University of Michigan. WILLIAM. H. H URLEY.-Possessing a broad and comprehensive knowledge of the law, William H. I. I-urley, of Iron Mountain, has met with success in the practice of his profession and has made for himself an assured position among the leading members of the Michigan bar. A son of the late James Hurley, he was born, February 2, 1844, in Schenectady, New York. His ancestors, people of considerable note, lived in Ireland for many generations, the family name, it is said, having formerly been spelled O'Herlihey. Acquiring a good education in his youthful days, James Hurley taught school a number of years in County Cork, Ireland, his native place, living there until 1832. In that year, accompanied by his wife and three children, he crossed the Atlantic in a sailing vessel and after a voyage of six weeks landed at Quebec. Going from there to New York state, he taught school for a while in Schenectady, later being similarly employed in Albany. In 1850, following the tide of emigration westward, he went by way of the Lakes to Wisconsin, stopping first in Milwaukee, then a small village. He subsequently bought one hundred and thirty acres of heavily timbered land in Saukville township, which was then in Washington county, but is now embraced within the limits of Ozaukee county. All of the country roundabout was in its virgin wildness, he and his family following an Indian trail the greater part of their way thither, journeying on foot through the dense woods. He immediately began the improvement of a homestead, at the same time following his professional work for many years, being the pioneer teacher of that region and later the county superintendent of schools. On the farm that he redeemed from the wilderness he spent the remainder of his long life, passing away at the venerable age of ninety-three years. His wife, whose maiden name was Ellen O'Donovan, was born in county Cork, Ireland. She attained the age of ninety-two years. Seven children were born of their union,. as follows: Cornelius, Mary, Annie, James, William I. H., Robert and Julia. Attending the pioneer schools of Saukville township and profiting by his father's home teachings, William H. H. Hurley acquired an excellent knowledge of books while young, and at the age of twenty years was teaching school in Ozaukee county, Wisconsin. Then after taking a course of study at the University of Wisconsin, in Madison, he taught in the Cedarburg High School. In 1868 he entered the law department of the State University, from which he was graduated in 1870. Being admitted to the bar the same year, M1r. Hurley began the practice of his profession in Fond du Lac, and met with such encouraging success that he continued there twelve years. Coming to Iron Mountain in 1884, he has here built up an extensive and valuable clientele, being one of the best known and most successful criminal lawyers in the Upper Peninsula. Mr. Hurley cast his first presidential vote, in 1868, for Horatio Seymour, and has ever since been a consistent Democrat in politics. Although not an office seeker, he was elected justice of the peace in 1909, and is serving the people in that capacity at the present writing, in 1910. Fraternally Mlr. Hurley was one of the founders and is now past worthy of Iron Mountain Aerie, No. 428, Order of Eagles. Mr. Hurley has never married. On the 30th of June, 1861, he was at his father's home when the great phenomenon took place, which was declared by astronomers to be the earth's passing through the tail of a comet and by some declared to be IHalley's comet. He also remembers well the Indian troubles of 1865 in Wisconsin.

Page  746 746 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN GEORGE WALTER YouNGS.-Throughout the Upper Peninsula the name of Youngs is synonymous with thrift, enterprise and prosperity, in the business circles of this section of the country standing pre-eminent, and George Walter Youngs, a well-known capitalist, has such valuable and extensive interests in mines and real estate that, although a resident of Algoma, Wisconsin, he has to spend much of his time at Iron River, Iron county. A son of David Youngs, he was born, February 7, 1850, in Racine, Wisconsin, coming from pure Scotch ancestry. His paternal grandfather, John Youngs, was born and bred in Argyleshire, Scotland. In 1834 he came with his wife and son to the United States, landing in New York city. Proceeding to the western part of the state, he bought a tract of heavily timbered land in Niagara county, about six miles west of Lockport, known as Hess road. He was an early settler of that place, and there built quite a pretentious house for those days. A follower of Isaak Walton, he found pleasure not only with the rod, but with the gun, and being kept well supplied with money from home was enabled to enjoy his chosen sports of fishing and hunting to his heart's content. In 1836 he removed to Chicago, which was then a small village, and while there his wife, whose maiden name was Jane MacHutcheon, died, about 1837. He subsequently settled in Galena, Illinois, and while there secured title to an island in the Mississippi river. From Galena he went west, and was never again heard from, having, without doubt, lost his life on the plains. Born in Argyleshire, Scotland, David Youngs was a very small child when he crossed the ocean with his parents. He was an only son, and after the loss of his father went to Racine, Wisconsin, ana when a youth began to sail the Lakes, at the age of nineteen years being made captain of a vessel. IIe subsequently became owner of a line of boats, and was for many years engaged in the transportation business. Going to Algoma, Wisconsin, in 1855, he was one of the first settlers of that place, which was then and for many years thereafter known as Ahnepee. Embarking in the mercantile and timber business, he was thus actively engaged until his death, August 5, 1874. He married Amanda Harkins, who was born in Meadville, Pennsylvania. Her father, a native of Pennsylvania, was a pioneer of Racine, Wisconsin, locating there about 1828. She died in June, 1854, leaving three children, George Walter, Jane and Frank. The father never married again, devoting his loving attention to the care of his children. George Walter Youngs obtained his first knowledge of books, in 1857, in Algoma, Wisconsin, attending the school kept in a shack owned by his father, Irene Yates, who afterwards became the wife of B. F. Demming, being the teacher. Beginning when quite young to assist his father, he obtained a practical business experience that proved of inestimable value to him in his subsequent career. In 1867, his father gave him a saw mill located at the head of the Ahnepee river, and for over thirty years he was engaged in the manufacture of lumber and shingles. In 1876, in company with Mr. Fetzer, he built a grist mill at the head waters of the Ahnepee river. In the year 1897 he came to Iron River and engaged in the manufacturing of lumber and timber business. In the meantime he had become interested in the vast mineral resources of the Upper Peninsula, and in 1900 he opened the Hiawatha Mine, near Iron River. Since that time Mr. Youngs has opened the Youngs Mine at Iron River, the Groveland at Randville, and the McDonald Mine at Crystal Falls, and still has financial interests in each of these properties, and retains the man

Page  747 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 747 agement. Mr. Youngs likewise has mining interests in the west, a shareholder in Nevada and Colorado mines, and is president of the Battery Company of Milwaukee. Mr. Youngs is an extensive dealer in real estate, being always ready to buy or sell, having usually upwards of ten thousand acres on hand for disposal. In 1909 he platted an eighty-acre addition to the town of Iron River, known as Youngs' Addition, which will in course of time become an important part of the city. Mr. Youngs married, December 18, 1874, Kate Yates, who was born in Kenosha, Wisconsin, where her parents, J. L. V. and Jane (Ames) Yates, were pioneer settlers, moving to that place from Syracuse, New York. Mr. and Mrs. Youngs are the parents of three children, namely: Belle, David and Frank. Belle married Vojta Kwapil, and has one son, Walter Y. David married Irene Lucas, and has one child, Marion. Frank married Jane Myers, and they have one child, David M. Both sons are associated in business with their father, David being bookkeeper at the mines and Frank being superintendent. GEORGE L. HASTINGS.-At this point is entered a brief review of the career of one of the representative business men and popular citizens of Menominee, where he is manager of the Northern Hardware & Supply Company, one of the important wholesale concerns that lend precedence to this city as a commercial center. Mr. Hastings assisted in the organization of this corporation, and it is principally owing to his able and discriminating efforts that it has become one of the extensive and substantial business houses of the Upper Peninsula, throughout which its trade extends, as it does also into the greater part of northern and central Wisconsin. George Lee Hastings was born in St. Lawrence county, New York, on the 8th of September, 1860, and is a son of Nelson and Nancy (White) Hastings, the former of whom was born in Vermont, in 1807, and the latter of whom was born in New York state, in 1830, both being representatives of families founded in New England in the colonial era of the nation's history. The father died in St. Lawrence county, New York, in 1872, and his widow, long surviving him, passed the closing years of her life in Michigan, and died at the home of her son, G. L., in 1900. Of the five children of this union all are now deceased except the subject of this sketch, who is the youngest of the number. Nelson Hastings was reared to manhood in the old Green Mountain state, whence he removed to New York state when a young man, becoming one of the pioneer settlers of St. Lawrence county, where he reclaimed a farm from the forest and where he continued to maintain his home until his death. In politics he was a staunch adherent of the Democratic party, and his wife held membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. On the old homestead farm of his parents, in St. Lawrence county, New York, George L. Hastings was reared to the age of fourteen years, and in the meanwhile he received such educational advantages as were afforded in the district schools of the locality. At the early age mentioned he severed the home ties and valiantly set forth to fight the battle of life on his own responsibility. It may well be understood that the boy was not lacking in courage and self-reliance, and also that he encountered his full quota of vicissitudes and hardships. He bravely pressed forward, however, toward the goal of a definite ambition, and he gained valuable lessons in the stern school of experience. He has been in the most significant sense the architect of his own

Page  748 748 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN fortunes and has made of success not an accident but a logical result of persistent and well directed effort. At the age of fourteen years young Hastings was found employed at farm work in Tuscola county, in the Lower Peninsula of Michigan, and there he continued to reside from 1874 until 1887, in which latter year he went to the city of Saginaw, this state, where he secured employment in the extensive wholesale hardware establishment of Morley Brothers. Here he found opportunity to gain technical and business knowledge of valuable order and thus to lay a firm foundation for his future success in connection with the same line of commercial enterprise. I-e continued in the employ of Morley Brothers for a period of four years, at the expiration of which, in 1891, he came to Menominee, Michigan, where he soon afterward became one of the organizers of the Menominee Hardware Company, of whose business he was manager until June, 1898, when he disposed of his interest in the same. In the following November, now firmly established in the confidence and respect of the leading business men of Menominee, he became the principal promoter of the organization of the Northern Hardware & Supply Company, in which he has since held the office of general manager. The company now has a large and well equipped establishment, and from the same is controlled a representative and substantial trade throughout northern Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Mr. Hastings is known as a business man of marked discrimination and initiative power and as a citizen well worthy of the high regard in which he is held by all who know him. Close application, honorable methods and indefatigable industry have characterized his business career, and he has reason to be gratified in the success that he has achieved through his own ability and efforts. Though never a seeker of official preferment Mr. Hastings accords an unwavering allegiance to the Republican party, and he has shown at all times the utmost civic loyalty and public spirit. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal, and his wife of the Presbyterian church in their home city, where they have a wide circle of loyal and valued friends. On the 31st of January, 1894, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Hastings to Miss Nellie Louise Whitehorn, who was born and reared in Menominee and who is a daughter of Abraham and Anna M. (Hastings) Whitehorn. Mr. Whitehorn was born at Wellingsford, Chittenden county, Vermont, on the 12th of October, 1829, and is now one of the venerable and honored pioneer citizens of Menominee. His father was a native of England and was three times married; of his eighteen children the only one surviving is Abraham Whitehorn, father of Mrs. Hastings. When Mr. Whitehorn was a lad of twelve years he accompanied his parents on their removal from Vermont to Schuyler county, New York, where he was reared to maturity and whence he finally went to New York city, where he remained five years, within which he served a thorough apprenticeship at the carpenter's trade, in which he became a specially skillful artisan. Upon leaving the national metropolis he came west and located in Chicago, where he remained about one year, at the expiration of which he located at Green Bay, Wisconsin, where he engaged in contracting and building and where he erected the old Vermont House, one of the best of the early hotels of that now thriving city. In 1861 Mr. Whitehorn returned to his old home in Schuyler county, New York, and on the 13th of August, 1862, he enlisted for service in defense of the Union, becoming a member of Company H, One Hundred and Seventh New York Volunteer Infantry, and having recruited more volunteers

Page  749 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 749 for his regiment than did any other one man. He proceeded with his regiment to the front and it was his to endure his full quota of the hardships and sanguinary conflicts marking the progress of the war. He was the first member of his regiment to be raised from the ranks to a commissioned office, having been made second lieutenant of his company and having soon afterward been assigned command of a detachment of thirty men, whom he led forth on a successful foraging expedition. He was with Sherman in the Atlanta campaign and thence forward on the ever memorable march to the sea. In an engagement at Solomon's Grove, North Carolina, he received a severe saber wound in the head and there he was captured by the enemy, on the 15th of February, 1865, being taken to Libby prison, in the city of Richmond, Virginia, where he was held in duress until he was paroled. He participated in all of the many engagements in which his regiment was involved, including the historic and sanguinary battle of Gettysburg, and never was absent from duty during his prolonged period of service except for the time he was held as a prisoner of war. He had the privilege of participating in the Grand Review of the victorious troops in the city of Washington after the close of the war, and was mustered out at Annapolis, Maryland, in 1865. He received his honorable discharge after his return to New York state. He located in the state of New York, and continued to be engaged in contracting and building until 1870, when he came to Michigan and established his home in Menominee, where he became one of the leading contractors and builders of this section of the state. Many specimens of his skill in this line still remain in this city, and he erected the first bank building of Menominee in 1876. The interior finishing of this banking office was of beautful black walnut and the fittings were ornate and admirably installed under his personal supervision. At the completion of the work the office was one of the finest in the Union, and for many years it continued to attract much attention. Mr. Whitehorn was one of the organizers of Lyon Post, No. 266, Grand Army of the Republic, in Menominee, and was its first commander. He has been an elder in the Presbyterian church since 1871, and in politics he has been aligned as a supporter of the cause of the Republican party from the time of its organization. MIr. and Mrs. Hastings have two children,-Dorothy Lee and George Lee, Jr. WILLARD J. SMITH.-A wide-awake, brainy and enterprising young man, Willard J. Smith, of Mohawk, is actively identified with the advancement of an industry which forms one of the chief sources of the Upper Peninsula's wealth, being assistant superintendent of two large mining properties. A son of Fred Smith, he was born, May 9, 1876, in Huron, Houghton county, Michigan, coming from German ancestry, his grandfather, Joseph Schmidt, having spent his entire life in Baden, Germany. Born at Waldshut on the Rhine, Baden, Fred Smith was there educated, his earlier years being spent in school, mostly. Ambitious to secure a good start in life, he emigrated to this country at the age of eighteen years, coming directly to the Upper Peninsula, where he soon found employment at the Delaware Mline. Subsequently going to Rockland, he worked for awhile at the Minnesota, now the Michigan Mine, one of the oldest mines in this part of the state. Going from Rockland to Houghton, he was first clerk for the Smith Harris store, afterward clerking for the Huron Mining Company. He proceeded next to Copper Falls as clerk, and thence to the Allouez Mine as clerk, and superin

Page  750 750 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN tendent, resigning that position to accept the superintendency of the Wolverine Mine. Later, upon the organization of the Mohawk Mining Company, he was made superintendent of the Mohawk Mine, and has since had control of both the Wolverine and the Mohawk mines. The maiden name of the wife of Fred Smith was Rebecca Getchell. She was born at Machias, Maine, which was the birthplace of her father, Willard Getchell, who came to the Upper Peninsula at an early day and was first engaged in the manufacture of sashes, doors and blinds, afterward teaching school for a few years. In 1877 he located at Allouez, and was there a resident until his death, in 1899. Mr. Getchell married Susan Rebecca Chase, who was born in Maine, of old colonial ancestry, and they reared children. Mr. and Mrs. Fred Smith are the parents of five children, namely: Jessie, Willard J., Nettie, Carl and Rudolph. Having obtained his preliminary education in the common schools of Allouez, Willard J. Smith entered the Calumet high school, from which he was graduated with the class of 1893. He subsequently attended the Michigan School of Mines three consecutive years, and then, after staying out a year, returned, and was there graduated in 1899. Thus equipped for his chosen work, Mr. Smith was mining engineer for the Wolverine and Mohawk mines until 1903, when he was promoted to his present position as assistant superintendent of these mines, his father being the superintendent. Mr. Smith married, in February, 1905, Allie Kane, who was born at the Delaware Mine, Keweenaw county, Michigan, where her parents settled when coming from New York state to Michigan. Mr. Smith is prominent in fraternal circles, being a member of Calumet Lodge, No. 271, F. & A. M.; of Gate of the Temple Chapter, No. 35, R. A. MI.; of Montrose Commandery, No. 38, K. T.; of Ahmed Temple, Order of the Mystic Shrine; and of Calumet Lodge, No. 404, B. P. 0. E. A decided Republican in politics, he has served as supervisor since 1907, having been reelected to the office each year since that time. ED ERICKSON.-Energetic, enterprising and progressive, Ed Erickson is actively associated with the advancement of the commercial interests of the Northern Peninsula, and as the leading merchant of Escanaba is carrying on a thriving business. A native of Wisconsin, he was born, in Manitowoc county, Wisconsin, September 26, 1853, and was there brought up and educated. Holbar Erickson, Mr. Erickson's father, was born in Norway, and there resided until after his marriage. Coming with his young wife to this country in 1852, he immediately located in Wisconsin. There he resided until his death, at the advanced age of eighty-two years. His wife, whose maiden name was Sophia Berg, was born, brought up, and married in Norway, and is now a resident of Wisconsin, being eightyone years old. Her children, six sons and one daughter, were all born in Wisconsin, Ed, the subject of this sketch, being the oldest child. Living with his parents until seventeen years old, Ed Erickson acquired a practical common school education in his native town, and was afterwards employed in a saw mill two years. Going then to Tomah, Wisconsin, he was employed in the general store of J. D. Marsden for just three months. He afterwards clerked in a dry goods store at Sparta, Wisconsin, remaining there until 1874, when he located in Escanaba. Here he was similarly employed for about five years, first with L. Schram, and later in the dry goods and clothing establishment of Greenhood Brothers. The following two years, in partnership with P. N. Cardogo, he was engaged in the dry goods business on his own account, being

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Page  751 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 751 junior member of the firm of Cardogo & Erickson. Embarking then in business alone, Mr. Erickson began on a modest scale, and has gradually enlarged his operations, and is now carrying on an extensive business, having one of the largest dry goods establishments of the Northern Peninsula. In 1904 he built his present fine brick block, the largest store building in the city, and assumed its possession September 5, of that year. Mr. Erickson has been in this city for more than thirty-five years, and has met with well deserved success in his business career, being the leading dry goods merchant of this section of Delta county. Mr. Erickson married first, October 2, 1878, Belle Anthony, who was born in St. Louis, Missouri, a daughter of James and Susan Anthony, but who spent the greater part of her life in Northern Michigan. She died in Escanaba, having been the mother of the following children: Fred L., who was graduated from the University of Michigan, is now studying theology in New York City; Edward, in school, and Belle, who died July 24, 1909. Mr. Erickson married, second, Bess Livesay, of Adrian, Michigan. Fraternally Mr. Erickson belongs to Delta Lodge, A. F. & A. M.; and to the Commandery, Knights Templar, of Menominee, being one of its charter members. He is active in promoting the welfare of the city, and is now serving as a member of the Escanaba Board of Public Works. DANIEL W. POWELL.-The city of Marquette numbers among its representative business men and most highly esteemed citizens Daniel W. Powell, whose interests here are of varied and important order and whose services in various offices of public trust, including that of chairman of the board of supervisors of Marquette county, of which position he is incumbent at the time of this writing, in 1910. His career has been characteristic of unqualified integrity in all the relations of life and thus he has maintained a secure vantage place in the confidence and regard of his fellow men. Daniel W. Powell was born in the county of Devon, England, on the 30th of April, 1846, and is a son of Edmund and Eliza (Perry) Powell, both representatives of stanch old English stock. The mother died in 1872 and the father was summoned to the life eternal in 1900, at a venerable age. Of the twelve children all were born in England and of the number only three are now living: Eliza, who is the wife of Harry F. Handford, who is a representative merchant of Marquette; Margaret, who is a resident of Mineral Wells, Texas; and Daniel W., whose name initiates this review. In 1862 Edmund Powell came with his family to America and located at Bruce Mine, province of Ontario, Canada, where he was identified with mining operations until the spring of 1869, when he removed to Marquette, Michigan, where he engaged in government contract work in connection with harbor improvements. He was a pioneer contractor in this important line in this section of the Union, and he continued in active business until 1895, after which he lived retired until his death, which occurred in Marquette. No citizen was held in higher esteem in the community and none more thoroughly merited this popular estimate. Daniel W. Powell gained his early educational discipline in his native land and was sixteen years of age at the time of the family removal to America. At Bruce Mine, Ontario, he was associated with his father in connection with copper mining until 1866, when he removed to Kentucky and secured a position with the Frankfort Mining Company, for which he did prospecting and exploring work. In the employ of this company he went to Wisconsin and made explorations for lead mines

Page  752 752 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN at Mineral Point. He devoted about six months to this work and thereafter made a trip through the south. Later he passed a few months in prospecting work in Michigan and Wisconsin, and in April, 1870, he took up his residence in Marquette, where he became associated with his father in contracting work in connection with harbor improvements. In 1877 he engaged in the logging and lumber business in company with ~his brother Edmund and they continued to do a prosperous business in this line until 1883, when the brother retired. Daniel W. Powell then effected the organization of the firm of Powell & Mitchell, which soon assumed a position of prominence in connection with contracting for dock building and harbor work, mining and railroad construction. With this line of enterprise Mr. Powell is still actively identified, and he is also engaged in the buying and selling of timber land and in the lumber business. He was one of the organizers and has since been vice president of the Marquette National Bank. In politics Mr. Powell gives his allegiance to the Republican party and his attitude has at all times been that of a progressive and public-spirited citizen. He represented the Third ward of Marquette as a member of the board of aldermen for several terms and for fifteen years he has been a member of the board of supervisors of Marquette county, being chairman of the board at the present time. He is also a member of the board of park commissioners of his home city. He and his wife hold membership in the First Methodist Episcopal church, and he is affiliated with the Marquette Lodge, No. 101, Free and Accepted Masons; Marquette Chapter, No. 43, Royal Arch Masons; Marquette Commandery, Knights Templar; and Ahmed Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. On the 10th of September, 1873, Mr. Powell was united in marriage to Miss Susan Mitchell, who was born at Bruce Mine, province of Ontario, Canada, and whose parents were natives of England. Mr. and Mrs. Powell have four children: Josephine P. is the wife of Dr. Harry J. Hornbogen, of Marquette, and Arthur E., Pearl J. and Daniel Ward remain at the parental home. FRANK H. GETCHELL.-Noteworthy among the talented and capable men who are intimately associated with the mining interests of Keweenaw county is Frank H. Getchell, of Mohawk, who has inherited in no small measure the habits of industry, honesty and thrift characteristic of his sturdy New England ancestors, these being the corner stones of his success in life. A native of the Upper Peninsula, he was born, August 4, 1873, at Ripley, a suburb of Hancock, Houghton county. Andrew M. Getchell, Mr. Getchell's father, was born, reared and educated in Machias, Maine, coming from Colonial ancestry. Having there learned the trade of a pattern maker, he followed it a short time, and then, following the tide of emigration westward, came to the Upper Peninsula, locating in Hancock in 1860. For a short time he was associated with his brother in the manufacture of sashes, doors and blinds. He was afterward for thirty years superintendent of the pattern department of the foundry owned first by the Sheldon Brothers and later by the Portage Lake Foundry and Machine Company, being thus employed until his death, in 1889. He married Emily Hague, who was born in Leicestershire, England, a daughter of Thomas and Charlotte (Gore) Hague, who emigrated from England to America about 1850. On corning to the United States Mr. Hague settled with his family in Lowell, Massachusetts, living there about ten years. During that time, however, he spent a year searching for

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Page  753 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 753 gold in Australia, being one hundred and thirty days on the water while going to that country, and an equal length of time on his return voyage. Soon after his return to his family he left Lowell, and, accompanied by his wife and children, came to the Upper Peninsula, locating at Hancock, where, being a natural mechanic and a good workman, he was busily engaged in carpentering during the remainder of his active career. Now, a venerable and respected man of ninety-two years, he is living retired from business cares. To Andrew M. Getchell and his wife two children were born and reared, Morton C. and Frank H. When fifteen years old, having completed his early studies in the public schools of Houghton, Frank H. Getchell began life as a clerk, being first employed in that capacity by the Mineral Ridge Railroad Company, later being a clerk in the insurance office of Wright & Stringer, afterward continuing with the Sturgeon River Lumber Company, at Chassell, until 1896. Mr. Getchell was subsequently assayer for a year for the Lake Superior Smelting Company, giving up that position to accept a similar one with the Quincy Smelting Company, with which he was associated until 1898. The ensuing year he was employed as a clerk at the Allouez Mine, but since 1899 he has been clerk and purchasing agent for the Mohawk Mine, his long record of service in this position bearing evidence of his ability and good judgment. Mr. Getchell married, in 1899, Ella Major, who was born at Houghton, Michigan, a daughter of George and Mary Major, the former of whom was born in England and the latter in Wisconsin. Mr. Major was a carpenter, and followed his trade in different places in the Upper Peninsula, including L'Anse, where his wife was the first white woman that ever lived there. Mr. and Mrs. Getchell have two children, Alice and Marion. Fraternally Mr. Getchell is a member of Houghton Lodge, No. 218, F. & A. M.; of Calumet Chapter, R. A. M.; of Montrose Commandery, No. 38, K. T.; of Ahmed Temple, Order of the Mystic Shrine; and of Calumet Lodge, No. 404, B. P. 0. E. JACOB R. HoLFELTZ.-Inheriting the habits of industry, thrift and honesty characteristic of his German ancestors, Jacob R. Holfeltz has met with good success in his active career, and now holds an assured position among the prosperous business men of Iron Mountain, Dickinson county. He was born October 1, 1859, in Luxemburg, Germany, where he spent the earlier years of his life. His father, Jacob R. Holfeltz, Sr., a thrifty farmer, spent his entire life in the Fatherland, dying in the prime of a vigorous manhood. He married Catherine Rusdorfer, who survived him, and, in 1875, came with her children to America. She bought a farm in Meme, Mlanitowoc county, Wisconsin, and there resided until her death, in June, 1909. She reared five children, namely: Marie, wife of Frank Rock, of Marinette, Wisconsin; John, living on the home farm; Jacob R., the subject of this sketch; Nicholas, also living on the homestead; and James, of Escanaba, Michigan. Coming with the family to the United States in 1875, Jacob R. Holfeltz assisted in the clearing and improving of the home farm at Meme, Wisconsin, being associated with his brothers until he was twenty-six years of age. Locating then in Marinette, Wisconsin, he remained there two years. Coming then to Iron Mountain, he has since been here engaged in mercantile pursuits, and as a dealer in building materials and ice, coal and wood has built up an extensive and profitable trade.

Page  754 754 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN Mr. Holfeltz married, July 20, 1888, Anna Tauscheck, who was born at Cato, Manitowoc county, Wisconsin, a daughter of Ferdinand Tauscheck, a native of Germany. Mr. and Mrs. Holfeltz are parents of four children, namely: Mary, Margaret, Clara and Evangeline. True to the religious faith in which he was born and reared, Mr. Holfeltz is a member of the Roman Catholic church. He is a Republican in politics, and has served as a member of the city council, and at the present time, 1910, is one of the commissioners of the poor for Dickinson county. WILLIAM SIMPSON.-At Nos. 718-20 Main street is located the large and well equipped general hardware establishment of this sterling and representative business man of the city of Menominee, and the constructive solidity of his powers as a business man well indicates that he is possessed of those traits of mind that have made the true Scotsman a valuable factor wherever he has been found. He came to America from the land of the Grampian hills when a young man, and here he has achieved definite success through his own well directed energies. William Simpson is a native of Fifeshire, Scotland, where he was born on the 9th of July, 1861, and he is a son of Peter and Jane (Henderson) ~Simpson, both of whom were likewise natives of Fifeshire, with whose history the family names have been identified for many generations. The father was a sea-faring man in his earlier days and later turned his attention to the vocation of engineer. He continued to reside in his native country until his death, at the age of sixtyseven years, and his wife still resides in Fifeshire. He was a devout member of the Presbyterian church, as is also his widow. Of their seven children only three are now living,-Ann, who is the widow of John Henderson and resides in Scotland, where her husband was a mine superintendent at the time of his death; William, who is the immediate subject of this sketch; and Jane, who is the wife of Alexander Raber, of Fifeshire. He whose name introduces this article was afforded the advantages of the schools of his native land and as a youth he served a thorough apprenticeship at the iron-moulder's trade, which he continued to follow in Scotland until 1884, when at the age of twenty-three years he came to America and located in the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where he secured employment at his trade in the great manufactory of the E. P. Allis Company, with which concern he remained for a period of eight years. He was assistant foreman in his department for some time before resigning his position. In 1892 he went to Duluth, Minnesota, where he found employment in the shops of the Prescott Company, manufacturers of milling machinery, and where he remained thus engaged for two years, at the expiration of which, in 1894, he engaged in the retail hardware business in Duluth. He disposed of this enterprise in 1896 and removed to Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, where he was engaged in the same line of business until 1898, when he sold out and located in the city of Minneapolis, as a manufacturers' agent and broker in the handling of general hardware. In connection with this business he traveled extensively throughout the northwest and was specially successful. In 1906 Mr. Simpson came to Menominee and purchased the stock and business of the Northern Hardware & Supply Company, and he has since conducted a general retail hardware business in this city, where his careful methods, fairness and upright dealings have gained to him a large and constantly expanding trade, which clearly indicates the confidence and esteem in which he is held in the community. He carries the

Page  755 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 755 largest stock in his line to be found in the Menominee river district, and he has proved a valuable acquisition to the progressive business circles of the Upper Peninsula. Though never a seeker of political office, Mr. Simpson accords a staunch allegiance to the cause of the Republican party, and he shows a loyal interest in public affairs of a local order. He and his wife are zealous members of the Presbyterian church, and in the time-honored Masonic fraternity his affiliations are with Menominee Lodge, No. 269, Free & Accepted Masons, of which he was tyler in 1910; Menominee Chapter, No. 107, Royal Arch Masons; Menominee Council, Royal & Select Masters; and Menominee Chapter, No. 284, Order of the Eastern Star, of which last named body his wife is worthy matron at the time of this writing. In the city of Chicago, on the 3d of July, 1885, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Simpson to Miss Mary E. Fisher, who was born in Perthshire, Scotland, as were also her parents, William and Isabella (Wright) Fisher, both of whom are now deceased. The father died in his native land, but the mother came to America. Mrs. Simpson is the only one of their children now living. Mr. and Mrs. Simpson have seven children, namely: Peter B., William F., Isabella W., Jane H., Harry A., Robert S. and Mary E. CHARLES H. PEASE became a resident of Sault Ste. Marie nearly forty years ago and was long numbered among the most prominent and honored business men of the city, where he continued to reside until his death, which occurred in the city of Cleveland, Ohio, on the 1st of February, 1897. He was a man of sterling attributes of character and his success stood as the direct result of his own efforts as he initiated his independent career when but sixteen years of age. His effective labors as a business man and his high standing as a citizen renders most consonant a review of his career in this history. Charles H. Pease was born in the city of Rochester, New York, on the 25th of November, 1849, and was a son of Gideon C. and Maria B. (Campbell) Pease, the former of whom was born in Hamilton, New York, on the 2nd of December, 1824, and the latter of whom was born in the parish of Killashee, county of Longford, Ireland, on the 8th of March, 1830, her death occurring in Rochester, New York, in June, 1875. Of the eight children the subject of this review was the eldest. Charles H. Pease secured his early educational training in the city of Buffalo and when sixteen years of age he severed the home ties and set forth to seek his fortunes in the west. He secured a position as clerk for the Aultman Fur Company, in the city of Detroit, Michigan, where he remained until 1873, on the 4th of September of which year, he located in Sault Ste. Marie. For two years after his arrival he was employed by the firm of Prenzlauer Brothers and thereafter he had charge of the general store of Boyle and Roach, large contractors. Finally he associated himself with John B. Sevald and engaged in the general mercantile business, on Water street, where the firm built up a large and prosperous business. After two years Mr. Pease purchased his partner's interest and thereafter he conducted the enterprise individually for another two years. Nervous prostration resulting in partial paralysis necessitated his retirement from business in 1887, and thereafter he lived virtually retired, save that he served as deputy state oil inspector for the Twentieth district, a position to which he was appointed in 1893 and in which, notwithstanding his physical infirmities, he made a record

Page  756 756 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN for efficient and faithful service. He was a stanch Republican in his political proclivities and was affiliated with the Masonic fraternity and the Knights of Pythias. He was a man of most generous impulses and utmost kindliness and in his home city his circle of friends was coincident with that of his acquaintances. In December, 1896, he went to Cleveland, Ohio, for the purpose of securing medical treatment for his paralytic disorder and there his death occurred on the 1st of February, 1897, as already stated. His loving and devoted wife was by his side when he was summoned to the life eternal and she brought his remains to Sault Ste. Marie, where the funeral services were held at St. Mary's Catholic church on the morning of February 4th: the interment was made in the Hill cemetery. Mr. Pease was one of the best known and most popular citizens of Sault Ste. Marie and his death was deeply mourned by a wide circle of loyal friends. On the 13th of October, 1875, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Pease to Miss Sophia A. La Londe, who was born and reared in Sault Ste. Marie, and who is a daughter of the late Seraphin La Londe, to whom a memoir is dedicated elsewhere in this volume. Mrs. Pease survives her honored husband and still maintains her home in Sault Ste. Marie. Concerning their children the following brief record is given, in conclusion of this sketch,-Marie Augusta died at the age of nineteen years; Charlotte Adelaide was twenty-three years of age at the time of her death; Archangel E. died at the age of fourteen years; William Campbell; George Elmer; Olive Gertrude died at the age of eight years; Joseph S. remains at the maternal home and Viola Ruth died at the age of four years. HIRAM ABIFF BARR has a history of nearly half a century's association with the Northern Peninsula, which is a remarkable index to the development of this district, and has a noteworthy interest as the story of an individual life. Mr. Barr became identified with the Northern Peninsula in the service of a railroad. As a railroad man he has been best known. In the development of the magnificent natural resources of the Peninsula, the railroads were the most useful instrument employed by the giants of industry who blazed the trails to the heart of the Peninsula. Also the railroads have been the avenues of wealth and civilization ever since. For this reason one whose service for so many years was given to the promotion of the business interests of one of the principal railroad lines has reason to be considered among the builders of the industrial civilization in Northern Michigan. In 1864, an active and energetic young man of thirty years, he took charge of the dock of the C. & N. W. Railroad at the site on the shore of Lake Michigan where the city of Escanaba now rears its solid blocks of business houses and factory chimneys. The railroad, the shipping docks and a few stores hardly entitled Escanaba at that time to be called a village. Ten years later, in 1874, the importance of Escanaba having in the meantime grown so that the future of the city seemed assured, Mr. Barr was promoted to the position of general agent for the Peninsula division of the Northwestern Railroad. For over thirty years, until 1905, he filled this position with an efficiency that always made him equal to the growing importance of his duties and won for him the thorough commendation and esteem of the management of the Northwestern road. An injury in a runaway caused his retirement from active work in 1905, after more than forty years' continuous service for the railroad at Escanaba.

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Page  757 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 757 Having been identified with Escanaba almost from its beginning, Mr. Barr has combined an active public spirit with a successful business career. He was one of the first village presidents, before Escanaba was incorporated as a city. He was also a president of the school board. Besides his official connection with the railroad, he was interested in land and lumbering, and is still owner of considerable property in and about Escanaba. Mr. Barr was born in Franklin county, Vermont, seventy-five years ago, on September 5, 1834. His father, Conrad, a native of New York and of English, German and Scotch ancestry, was a farmer and died in Vermont. Iis mother, whose maiden name was Sally Carman, was of German and English descent and was born in Vermont. These parents had thirteen children, ten of whom grew to maturity. Hiram Abiff, the fourth in the family, lived on the Vermont homestead until he was twenty-two. For three years he lived in Massachusetts and also a time in Illinois before coming to the Northern Peninsula. He was married in 1874 to Miss Ellen Louise Perkins, a daughter of Eliab and Jane E. Perkins of Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. Mrs. Barr died in August, 1899. During their happy married life of twenty-five years there were five children born to them. Iliram C. lives in Idaho. Wallace died young. William W. is a lumberman of Seattle, Washington. James Allen is a mining instructor in Washington state. And Frank Wesley lives in Idaho. All the sons were born in Escanaba, and except the one deceased, grew up there, went to school, and have become successful business men and substantial citizens. The father now spends most of his time at the home of his son William in Seattle, returning occasionally to Escanaba to look after his business interests. Mr. Barr has been a life-long Republican. For many years he has been a Mason, and at one time was master of the Escanaba lodge. CHARLES A. WRIGHT, president of The Superior National Bank and president of The Superior Trust Company, of IIancock, Michigan, has taken an active part in the industrial and business development of the copper mining district of northern Michigan. He was born at Hartford, Connecticut, December 4, 1854. His father was Joseph Augustus Wright and his mother, Emily S. (Barker) Wright, daughter of Samuel Woodbury Barker, of Roxbury, Massachusetts. IIis father was an officer of one of the large insurance companies of IIartford, and afterwards continued the insurance business in Chicago, where he died in 1862. Iis ancestors on both sides originally came from England and were among the early settlers of the North American Colonies. On the father's side they are traced directly back to Thomas Wright, who settled in Wethersfield, Connecticut, in 1639, and was a deputy to the General Court in 1643. Joseph Wright, M. A., Yale 1807, grandfather of Charles A. Wright, married Sarah Lockwood, daughter of Rev. William Lockwood, M. A., Yale 1777, a chaplain during the Revolutionary war, a friend of General Washington and a member of the celebrated patriotic society, "The Cincinnati." The father of Rev. William Lockwood and great-great-grandfather of Charles A. Wright was Rev. James Lockwood, M. A., Yale 1738, a Fellow of Yale College and one of the most scholarly men of his times. In September, 1766, he was chosen by the corporation of Yale College as president of the College, but declined, and the place was filled by Dr. Daggett. Charles A. Wright received his early education principally in the Vol. II —9

Page  758 758 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN schools of Hartford, Connecticut, though it was frequently interrupt. ed, owing to his mother having married the second time an officer in the United States Army, Captain J. W. Keller, who was transferred from post to post, and whose wife and her only son and daughter generally accompanied him. In 1873, at the age of eighteen, he came to Hancock and accepted a position in the banking office of E. H. Towar & Company. A year later this firm organized the First National Bank of Hancock, of which AMr. Wright was appointed teller and held that position till 1880, when he accepted the office of secretary and treasurer of the Mineral Range Railroad Company. In 1885 he was made general manager of that company, and during this and the following year was mainly instrumental in the construction and completion of the first railroad bridge across Portage Lake, between Hancock and Houghton, thus giving for the first time a railroad outlet for the industries and population north of Portage Lake. In 1887 he was also made general manager of the Hancock and Calumet Railroad Company. In 1890 he organized and became the president of The Superior Savings Bank of Hancock, with a paid in capital of $100,000, this being the first savings bank to be incorporated under state laws in this part of Michigan. In 1893 he resigned the management of the Mineral Range and Hancock and Calumet railroads for the purpose of engaging in the practice of law, for which he had long entertained an ambition and desire. For seven months he assiduously devoted himself at his own residence to the study of the theory and practice of law, after which he applied for admission to the bar and was duly admitted to practice in April, 1894, after successfully passing an examination by court and attorneys in the open court room of the twelfth judicial circuit at Houghton, Michigan. In 1896, in conjunction with his co-directors of The Superior Savings Bank, he organized and became president of The State Savings Bank of Laurium. In 1899 he succeeded in effecting the organization of the Copper Range Company, a corporation which had for one of its principle objects the construction of a railroad along the copper range south of Portage Lake. The following account of this important enterprise, which has been the means of such rapid development of the copper mines south of Iloughton, is taken from The Houghton Daily Mining Gazette of December 23, 1899: "Ten years ago, in the fall of 1889, Mr. Wright, who was then General Manager of the Mineral Range and Hancock & Calumet railroads, invited a number of Houghton County gentlemen to attend a meeting at his office in Hancock for the purpose of considering the feasibility of building a railroad from I1oughton, Michigan, to Watersmeet, Michigan, about eighty miles. Those who attended the meeting were T. L. Chadbourne, James B. Sturgis, James R. Cooper, Johnson Vivian, R. R. Goodell, John Duncan and C. A. Wright, all of whom expressed themselves in favor of organizing a railroad company for the purpose of surveying a route and constructing a railroad between the points named. "At a meeting called for the purpose a short time later, the Northern Michigan Railroad Company was organized, and Messrs. Jay A. H-ubbell, John Daniell and Edgar H. Towar joined the enterprise. C. A. Wright became president of the company and James B. Sturgis secretary and treasurer. "Each of the ten gentlemen named above subscribed an equal amount, and the survey of the road was commended at once, and finished in the spring of 1890.

Page  759 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 759 "The South Range territory was known to possess great mineral value, which, taken together with the timber resources of this section, and the desirability of a competing road into this country, was thought sufficient to warrant the originators of the Northern Michigan Railroad Company in their efforts to procure the construction of the road. "The funds with the original promoters becoming exhausted, Mr. Wright at different times during the following years made efforts to induce the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway Company and the Chicago & North-Western Company to build the road, and also labored with various eastern capitalists without success. Just prior to the panic of 1893, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway Comnpany had almost determined to build it. The panic effectually postponed this and almost all other railroad expansion. In 1896 the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway Company actually decided to build the road, but were again prevented by the threatening condition of our currency system and the sudden alarm with which capitalists and financiers viewed the possibility of the free coinage of silver. "Disappointed in his efforts with the Northwestern and St. Paul people, Mr. Wright finally, in the winter of 1897-8, spent considerable time in Boston and succeeded in interesting, through Mr. Arthur G. Stanwood and Mr. R. R. Goodell, officers of the St. Mary's Canal & Mineral Land Company, the directors of that Company in the project of building about forty miles of the proposed Northern Michigan railroad from Houghton to a connection with the St. Paul Railway near Greenland, the directors agreeing to donate a certain amount of their valuable mineral lands in aid of the enterprise. In the meantime, through the influence of Hon. Jay A. Hubbell, who had always taken great interest in promoting the building of the road, a bill had passed congress, authorizing the use of the present Portage Lake railroad bridge by other railroad companies. "After securing the promise of a donation of lands by the canal company's directors, Mr. Wright immediately endeavored to secure the necessary capital to build the road. About this time the danger of a possible war with Spain was apparent, and there was evidently no time to lose. William A. Paine, of the firm of Paine, Webber & Company, was appealed to and at once subscribed a large amount. "Other large sums had been promised, and the enterprise again seemed certain of realization. The next day, in startling headlines, the daily papers announced that Congress had appropriated a $50,000,000 war fund. For the time being capitalists turned a deaf ear to the most attractive new enterprises, and after a number of rebuffs, realizing the futility of further efforts at present, Mr. Wright returned to Hancock. "During the following summer it became apparent that the war must end quickly. Stock values began to rise, and the lands of the South Range began to attract attention for exploration and development purposes. Mr. Wright had for a long time been the president and principal owner of the stock of the South Shore Mining Company, a corporation owning 3,360 acres of land on the west side of the Copper Range, a few miles south of Houghton, and conceived the idea of combining these lands with the lands of S. L. Smith and the Douglass estate, amounting to about 3,700 acres, together with 4,480 acres of lands of the canal company, making a solid block of 11,500 acres of land of great possible mineral value, in the organization of a mining and development company which should have as an important motive

Page  760 760 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN the construction of a line of railroad over a part or whole of the route surveyed by the Northern Michigan Railroad Company and which should be extended to Calumet and Lake Linden, and which would become a valuable means of developing the mineral resources of the company's lands particularly and the resources of the copper country. "The plan was outlined to W. A. Paine of Boston, J. 11. Seager, vice-president, J. H. Rice, cashier, and R. R. Goodell, a director of the National Bank of Houghton; also to S. L. Smith and Cameron Currie, of Detroit, all of whom were more or less interested in the above lands and who expressed their willingness to join the enterprise. Mr. Wright again proceeded to Boston and obtained from the directors of the canal company the passage of a resolution agreeing to grant to him and his associates a large amount of valuable mineral lands on completion of the railroad during the present year. The above named gentlemen immediately organized a syndicate, obtained from the canal company an executed agreement according to the above resolution, and the survey and location of a line from Houghton to a connection with the Chicago, MIilwaukee & St. Paul Railway was completed last winter by these gentlemen, who also purchased the rights and charter of the Northern Michigan Railroad Company from its stockholders and subsequently, in March of this year, organized the Copper Range Company, which now owns and controls the lands mentioned above and has nearly completed its railroad forty miles from Houghton to Range Junction on the St. Paul road. "No worse year for the construction of a railroad in this district could have been selected. In addition to the labor troubles and breach of contract for materials and high prices which have been the common experience, the oldest inhabitant has not known such an amount of rain in the summer season as has fallen this year. Nevertheless, before January 1, 1900, trains will be running the full length of the road. " Mr. Wright acted as general manager of the Copper Range Railroad during the period of its construction from Houghton to its junction with the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad, building this forty miles of track under exceptional difficulties in a single short Lake Superior season, in order to obtain the valuable land grant depending upon the prompt construction of the road. After the completion of the Copper Range Railroad, he again directed his attention particularly to his banking interests, and in 1903 organized and became president of the Superior Trust Company, with a capital of $150,000, this being the only trust company ever established in the Northern Peninsula of Michigan. In 1904, becoming impressed with the probable value of the undeveloped mineral lands of Keweenaw county, where the earliest copper mining had been undertaken by Michigan mining companies, and which at one time was the scene of their greatest activity, he obtained options on 40,000 acres of land in this county and caused them to be conveyed to the Manitou Mining Company, in which he retains a substantial interest. This company is under the control and management of the Calumet and Hecla Mining Company, and was organized under an agreement with MIr. Wright for the development of the lands under option to him. A few months later he obtained control of another large body of land in Keweenaw county, adjoining the Manitou lands, and organized, in March, 1905, the Keweenaw Copper Company, with an authorized capital of $10,000,000, and the Keweenaw Central Railroad Company, with an authorized capital of $1,000,000, becoming president of both

Page  761 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 761 companies. These companies are organized on the same plan as were the Copper Range companies, with much the same purpose in view of causing the development of unexplored mineral lands by the introduction of the necesary railroad transportation facilities, where hitherto there were none. The construction of the Keweenaw Central Railroad from Calumet to Mandan and Lac La Belle was at once undertaken, and the road is now being operated between these points, having about forty miles of completed track, and will undoubtedly prove as influential a factor in the development of the North Range in Keweenaw county as the Copper Range Railroad was on the South Range in Houghton county. The Keweenaw Copper Company owns about 20,000 acres of mineral lands, the entire capital stock of the Keweenaw Central Railroad Company, the controlling interests in the Washington Copper Mining Company and the Phoenix Consolidated Copper Company. As president of these companies much of Mr. Wright's time and attention is given to developments in Keweenaw county. The Superior Savings Bank was converted into The Superior National Bank in 1908, and together with The Superior Trust Company, under the same management, forms a strong financial combination, with aggregate capital, surplus and profits of $425,000. The directors are among the most prominent and representative men of the Copper Country. The bank directors are Charles A. Wright, president; Jacob Baer, vice-president; George Ruppe, of the old mercantile firm of P. Ruppe & Sons; Charles L. Lawton, general manager of the Quincy Mining Company; Joseph Bosch, president of the Bosch Brewing Company; Gordon R. Campbell, secretary of the Calumet & Arizona Mining Company; and Henry L. Baer, of the firm of Baer Brothers. The Trust Company directors consist of the foregoing and the following well known gentlemen: Charles Briggs, president of Merchants & Miners Bank of Calumet; James Chynoweth, of Calumet; John D. Cuddihy, president of First National Bank of Calumet; Lessing Karger, of S. Karger & Sons, Houghton; Norman W. Haire, of Hancock; Thomas Hoatson, president of the Calumet State Bank; Swaby L. Lawton, attorney of Hancock; Allen F. Rees, attorney of Houghton; Louis H. Richardson, clerk of Houghton county, Hancock; Thomas Whittle, of Hancock; and Ferdinand Wieber, Houghton. Mr. Wright has been a close student of banking and financial problems, and in 1904, realizing the inherent weakness of the American banking system, due to the inability of the large number of independent banks to adopt any practical form of co-operation for mutual protection, began the publication of a series of articles advocating the establishment of a Central Bank. The distinctive features of his plan as compared with various others which have since appeared, are as follows: Organization under the present national bank act; stock to be owned exclusively by representative officers or directors of the incorporated banks of the country in proportion to the capital and surplus of their respective banks; location to be in New York city, the financial center of America; powers to be the same as those possessed by other national banks; ultimately the issue of bank notes by all the associated banks on the successful Canadian system is proposed for a safe and elastic currency. The advantages claimed for this Central Bank plan are, simplicity, natural evolution of present banking system, freedom from control of politicians or special interests and no hurtful interference with existing banking and political institutions. Mr. Wright has always been an active and consistent Republican.

Page  762 762 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN He was for ten years chairman of the Houghton County Republican Committee, and for four years a member of the Republican State Central Committee. In 1902 he was a candidate for the nomination of congressman on his party's ticket, receiving the unanimous support of his home county, the most populous of the district, and having the honor of naming his own delegates to the Congressional Convention, which after a contest lasting three days nominated Hon. I. Olin Young, the present incumbent. Mr. Wright is a member of the Empire State Society of Sons of the American Revolution, and of the Lawyers' Club of New York City; he is a member of the Miscowaubik Club of Calumet, the Houghton Club, the Portage Lake Golf Club, and the Onigaming Yacht Club of Houghton. He belongs to the Order of Elks, is a member of the Board of Education, and is a member of the First Congregational church of Hancock. He was married on September 6, 1876, to Lillian Gregory Taylor, daughter of the late Rev. Barton S. Taylor of Albion, Michigan, by whom he has four children: Charles A. Wright, Jr., Edith Emily Wright (now Mrs. Paul D. Swift), Rowland Gregory Wright and Gerald Lockwood Wright. CHARLES W. MALLOCH, of Escanaba, register of deeds for Delta county, was born in Titusville, Pennsylvania, February 5, 1869, and was brought by his parents to Michigan the same year he was born. The family located at Lansing, where they resided several years, and in 1875 removed to Muskegon. Mr. Malloch received his education in the public schools of the latter place and taught three years. In. 1890 he located in Delta county, where he was employed as lumber inspector, and has since been a resident of the county. He has always taken great interest in local affairs and politics and is a stanch Republican. He has held several public offices, and served as township treasurer and member of the school board of Ford River, Delta county; in 1904 he was elected to his present office, which he is well fitted to hold. Mr. Malloch has been a resident of the Northern Peninsula nearly twenty years, and has become well known; he stands well in the community and has many friends. He is a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, being a Knight Templar and a Shriner. In 1896 Mr. Malloch married Hilda, daughter of Charles A. Dittrich, of Ford River, and they have three children, Ruth A., Wesley F. and Charles D. JOSEPH W. CORIN.-Noteworthy among the esteemed and respected citizens of Iron Mountain is Joseph W. Corin, who for the past six years has served as registrar of deeds for Dickinson county, filling the office satisfactorily and with credit. A native of England, he was born, April 14, 1863, at Redruth, county Cornwall, which was his home for nine years. His father, Matthew Corin, was born in Camborne, county Cornwall, England, and was there reared and married. Brought up in the copper regions, he began work as a miner when young, and continued thus employed until about 1865. Joining then the current of emigration turning t6wards America, he came to the United States in search of a favorable opportunity for making a good home for his wife and children, whom he had left in the old country. After spending a short time in Connecticut he pushed onward to Tennessee, and having found steady employment in the mines at Ducktown was there joined, in 1872, by his family. Two years later he removed to

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Page  763 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 763 Dodgeville, Wisconsin, and there worked in the lead mines four years. Coming to the Upper Peninsula in 1878, he was employed in the mines at Ishpeming for three years, and from 1881 until 1888 was engaged in mining pursuits at Norway, Dickinson county. He has since lived in Dodgeville, Wisconsin, making his home with a daughter, being retired from active labor. He is now a hale and hearty man of eighty-five years, bearing with ease and dignity the burden of age. He married Elizabeth Wilkinson, who was born in Carlisle, England, the daughter of an officer in the English Army. She died in 1889, leaving four children, as follows: Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Sims, of Dodgeville, Wisconsin; Joseph W., the subject of this brief sketch; William J.; and Mary, now deceased, who married John Sewall. Coming with his mother and the other children to the United States in 1872, Joseph W. Corin took wise advantage of every offered opportunity for adding to his stock of knowledge, attending school regularly and acquiring a practical business education. In 1881 he began working in the mines at Norway, Dickinson county, and was there employed in various capacities until 1888. The ensuing two and one-half years he was bookkeeper for O'Callaghan Brothers, after which he was for a time engaged in the lumber business. Subsequently Mr. Corin was for nine years agent for the Aetna Life Insurance Company, with headquarters at Iron Mountain, where he has since resided. A uniform and stanch supporter of the principles of the Republican party, he served as township clerk while in Norway, and in 1904 was elected registrar of deeds for Dickinson county, and served so acceptably that he was honored with a re-election to this position in 1906 and again in 1908. Mr. Corin married in September, 1907, Elizabeth Resse, who was born in New London, Wisconsin. Fraternally Mr. Corin is a member of Iron Mountain Lodge, B. P. 0. E. Louis ARNOLD.-Coming to this country from a foreign land, poor in pocket but rich in courage, ambition and health, Louis Arnold took a wise advantage of every opportunity for improving his financial condition, and by persevering industry, wise economy and good management has acquired a competency, and is now living retired from active business at his home in Iron Mountain. A self-made man, a brief record of his life may, perhaps, give to the young men of this day inspiration and encouragement, bearing evidence of the material success to be won by steady application and honest, upright dealings in business affairs. A Prussian by birth, he was born, November 6, 1846, in the village of Laharigula, county of Weissenfels, Prussia, which was the birthplace of his father, August Arnold, and the life-long home of his paternal grandparents. Learning the trade of a carpenter when young, August Arnold labored with energy, and in addition to following his chosen trade was also engaged in farming and in mercantile pursuits, dealing in lumber, wood and oak bark, and likewise in fruit, buying fruit on the trees in large orchards, and shipping it. Inheriting the old home, he spent the entire sixty-one years of his life in the house in which he was born. He married Christina Wayman, who was born in the state of Aldenburg, Germany. She died at the age of fifty-eight years, in Weissenfels, on the home farm. One of her brothers emigrated to this country, enlisted as a soldier in the Civil war, and was serving in the army when last heard from. To her and her husband five children were born and reared,

Page  764 764 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN as follows: Louis, the subject of this sketch; Gustav, who inherited the parental home and there spent his life; Emma, who married Albert Teuscher and now lives in Page county, Iowa; Bertha, deceased; and Agnes, living in Weissenfels, Prussia. Leaving school at the age of fifteen years, Louis Arnold served an apprenticeship of three years at the masons' trade, which he followed until attaining his majority. Emigrating then to the United States, he landed at Baltimore with the modest sum of twenty-five dollars as his sole assets. Going directly to Milwaukee county, Wisconsin, he worked at his trade for three years, and then went to Marysville, Missouri, where he remained a year and a half, subsequently following his trade for a year in Priderville, Page county, Iowa. Going back then to Wisconsin, Mr. Arnold was employed as a mason at Fredonia, Port Washington, and other near-by places until 1879, when he came to Vulcan, then Menominee county, Michigan. The railroad then came to Quinnesec only, and the present site of Iron Mountain was a dense wilderness. Entering the employ of the Menominee Mining Company, Mr. Arnold remained at Vulcan until 1882, when he located at Iron MAountain, entering the employ of the Chapin Mining Company, with which he was associated the ensuing nine years. In 1891, having by prudent economy and thrift saved his earnings, Mr. Arnold embarked in mercantile pursuits, beginning in a modest way, with a small stock of goods, As his trade increased he added to his stock, and as the years passed by he built up a lucrative and extensive business, dealing not only in groceries and meats, but in flour, feed and other commodities, continuing successfully until 1907, when he was succeeded by his sons. On October 14, 1873, Mr. Arnold married Louisa Roell, who was born February 27, 1856, in the same Prussian village that he was. Her father, John T. Roell, a native of the same place, came with his wife and three daughters to Wisconsin. Locating in Washington county, he purchased eighty acres of timbered land, and from the dense wilderness redeemed a farm and was there engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death. He reared two sons and five daughters. Mrs. Arnold passed to the life beyond August 20, 1908, leaving five children, namely: Robert, Otto, Bertha, Albert and Clarence. The youngest son, Clarence, will soon complete his studies in the Iron Mountain High School, and the other children are all in the store, Miss Bertha being the bookkeeper. PETER SIBENALER.-NO foreign land has contributed to our great American republic an element of greater value than has the empire of Germany. With notable completeness and rapidity have the sturdy German citizens of America been assimilated into the body politic. By as much as they have cherished the best heritages they brought with them from their native land and have woven them into the fabric of their citizenship, by so much have they added fine and strong fiber to the American people. One of the most honored citizens given to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan by the German empire is Peter Sibenaler, who has been identified with the business activities of the city of Menominee for more than thirty years, within which it has been given him to win decisive success along normal and legitimate lines of enterprise and to gain to himself an inviolable hold upon popular confidence and esteem. His energy has been unflagging, his policies have been liberal and progressive, his integrity of purpose has been unassailable, and he has made of success not an accident but a logical re

Page  765 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 765 suit. Loyal to all the duties of citizenship, maintaining a broad survey of matters of public polity, and ever standing ready to lend his influence and co-operation in the furtherance of measures and enterprises tending to advance the general welfare of the community, there is all of reason for the popularity he enjoys in the city that has so long represented his home and been the scene of his earnest endeavors. Mr. Sibenaler was born in Luxemburg, Germany, on the 20th of September, 1853, and is a son of Henry and (Kirk) Sibenaler. His father was an honored and influential citizen of Luxemburg, where his vocation during the greater portion of his life was that of wine manufacturing. He served as a soldier in the German army for a number of years, and was burgomeister of the city of Greiveldingen for several terms. He and his wife passed their entire lives in their native land, and of their children seven are now living,-John, who still remains on the old homestead in Germany; Magdalena, who was the wife of John Kass, of Menominee, Michigan; William, who served a due term in the army of Luxemburg and who is now a member of the faculty of a college in Metz, Germany; Peter, who is the immediate subject of this review; Nicholas, who is a resident of the city of Paris, France; and Katherine L. and Mary who still reside in Luxemburg. The honored father was born in the year 1813 and died in 1865, and the mother was born in 1814 and died in 1867. Henry Sibenaler owned extensive vineyards in his native land and conducted a large business as a manufacturer of and dealer in wines. As already noted, he served as burgomeister of the city of Greiveldingen and there he also held the position of superintendent of schools for about thirty years. Peter Sibernaler passed his boyhood and youth in his native city, to whose schools he is indebted for his early educational training. When but sixteen years of age he severed the gracious ties that bound him to home and fatherland and emigrated to America. IIe landed in New York city on the 3rd of June, 1871, and thence made his way to Chicago, where he remained about one week, upon the expiration of which he embarked upon a schooner and came by way of Lake Michigan to Menominee, this state, which city has continued to be his home during the greater portion of the long intervening years. His first occupation after his arrival in Menominee was that of assisting the loading with lumber of the schooner on which he had taken passage, and during the winter of 1869 he was employed in a saw mill and lumber camp. In the spring of 1872 he went to M1arysville, Missouri, where he entered the employ of his maternal uncle, John Kirk, and worked at his trade of cabinet maker until the fall of 1873. IIe then returned to Menominee and secured employment with the M\orrell Lumber Company, working in saw mills during the summer seasons and passing the winters in the lumber woods as a scaler, until 1879, when he associated himself with William Blom, and engaged in the furniture business in Menominee. In 1884 he purchased his partner's interest and he has since been continuously engaged in this line of enterprise in this city, where he now has the only exclusive furniture house. In this connection he also conducts a well equipped undertaking establishment. Ie is the owner of a fine stone building utilized for the accommodation of his extensive business and this building was erected by the firm of which he was a member shortly before he became sole owner of the business. Mr. Sibernaler is a stockholder and director in the Lumbermen's National Bank and a stockholder in the First National Bank and in the Richardson Shoe Company, which represents one of the leading industrial enterprises of Menominee. For

Page  766 766 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN the past twenty years he has been vice-president of the Cream City Bedding Company, of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Concerning the business career of Mr. Sibenaler, the following appreciative statements were given in a local newspaper and are well worthy of reproduction in this sketch. "During all these years Mr. Sibenaler has carried on his business with the determination to satisfy every customer and the Sibernaler guarantee has never for one moment been questioned by anybody. The big double stores to-day contain a splendid line of all kinds of furniture, from the cheapest to the best, which finds a market in Menominee and Marinette and throughout a wide range of adjacent territory. During these years Mr. Sibenaler has personally had charge of more than six thousand funerals. He has given to the difficult and delicate task of undertaker that conscientious effort which is so prominent a factor in his personal character. "Mr. Sibenaler was one of the original directors of the Lumbermen's National Bank, and to-day remains upon the board. He was in the city council for two years and for three years out of four years' service he was the president of the school board. For fifteen years Mr. Sibenaler was a cemetery trustee and has active charge of the cemetery improvements. During five years he was a member of the county board of supervisors and was chairman of a committee which improved and beautified the court-house grounds and built the sheriff's present residence. No more important work was ever done by a board committee than that which made the county's property into a beautiful park. In 1906 Mr. Sibenaler resigned from the school board and refused to serve in any more official positions. IHe remarked to friends that he thought it was about time he attended to his own business. Probably no man in Menominee has a wider circle of friends than Peter Sibenaler and, certainly, no business man has a greater reputation for integrity and those qualities which go to make up the really successful career." In view of even the brief statements already entered in this article, there is no need to conjecture as to the sterling integrity, indefatigable industry and worthy purposes that have characterized the career of this honored citizen of Menominee. He has been the architect of his own fortunes and has every reason to take pride in his achievements as a progressive and reliable business man. He and his wife are communicants of the Catholic church, and he was also a member of the building committee that had charge of the erection of the present fine German church of this denomination in Menominee. He contributes liberally to all departments of church work and has served as treasurer of his parish. In a fraternal way he is identified with the Royal Arcanum. In politics Mr. Sibenaler exercises his franchise in support of men and measures rather than following strictly partisan dictates, and especially in local affairs has he maintained an independent attitude. Concerning him the following words have been uttered: "He has given his time and energies to public work with a self-sacrifice that commands the respect and gratitude of all. For two years he was one of the leading, and most influential members of the city council, of which he served at times as president pro tem. While in the council he was untiring in his labors in behalf of city improvements and did a great work for the paving and sewerage systems. He was so constantly employed in this work that at length his health failed and he had to refuse re-election. He belongs to that class of men who labor for the best interests of the community and willingly

Page  767 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 767 devote themselves, their time, means and energies to the furtherance of public progress." On the 10th of May, 1880, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Sibenaler to Miss Gertrude Jobielus, who was born at Green Bay, Wisconsin, on the 6th of February, 1860, and who is a daughter of Jacob and Marie (Locchman) Jobielus. Her father was a native of Prussia and was one of the early settlers of Green Bay, and her mother was a native of Holland. The parents continued their residence in Green Bay until their death. Of their six children, all daughters, five are now living. The father was a cooper by trade and was but sixteen years of age when he came to America. Mr. and Mrs. Sibenaler became the parents of seven children, of whom five are now living, namely: Agnes, Emma, Edith, Marion and Lorinda. CAPTAIN JOHN TREVORROW.-Noteworthy among the men who are actively associated with the promotion of the mining interests of the Upper Peninsula is Captain John Trevorrow, of Mohawk, Keweenaw county, who twelve years ago assisted in sinking the shafts at the Mohawk Mine, and has been captain of the mine ever since. A son of Richard Trevorrow, he was born, December 10, 1843, in the parish of Saint Ives, County Cornwall, England, a region rich in its mineral deposits. Richard Trevorrow was born, lived and died in county Cornwall, England, during his active life being employed in mining. He married Elizabeth Trevorrow, who, though she bore the same surname, was not a kinswoman, and she, too, spent her entire life in county Cornwall. They reared six children, Thomas, Richard, James, Elizabeth, John and Henry. James, John and Henry crossed the ocean to America, becoming permanent residents of this country; Richard and Elizabeth located in Australia; and Thomas settled in Scotland. At the age of eleven years John Trevorrow began working in the mines of his native county, and continued there about nine years. Emigrating to the United States in 1864, he sought the mining fields of Michigan, locating in Keweenaw county. The greater part of the Upper Peninsula was then in its primitive condition, being an almost pathless wilderness, explorations having just commenced at Calumet. Securing work at the Keweenaw Mine, he toiled for a year with hammer, drill, pick and shovel at the Central Mine, afterwards being employed in different locations until 1874. Returning in that year to the Central Mine, he was rapidly promoted through the different grades of official positions until made captain, continuing there for nearly a quarter of a century. In November, 1898, Mr. Trevorrow accepted his present position as captain at the Mohawk Mine, and has since performed the duties devolving upon him in this capacity with satisfaction to all concerned, using rare good judgment in his work and excellent tact in supervising his men. Mr. Trevorrow married Jane Trevorrow, who was born in Saint Ives parish, county Cornwall, England, where her parents, Christopher and Elizabeth Jane Trevorrow, were life-long residents. Mr. and Mrs. Trevorrow have reared seven children, namely: John, Elizabeth J., Martha, Christopher, Johanna, Richard and David. John married Nellie Holman, and they have three children, Helen, Gretchen Mohawk (the first white child born in Mohawk); and John. Elizabeth J., wife of Frank Williams, has two children, Francis Harold and Raymond Elyot. Martha, wife of William Bowden, has two daughters, Sarah and Ethel. Christopher married Annie Johnson.

Page  768 768 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN Johanna, wife of Samuel Bowden, has one child, Elizabeth. Richard married Eva Joustraw, and they have two children, Arbutus and Richard. Mr. and Mrs. Trevorrow were both reared in the faith of the Methodist church. Politically Mr. Trevorrow is a Republican, and fraternally he is a member of Keweenaw Lodge, No. 242, F. & A. M. CHARLES MEESKE.-He whose name initiates this sketch is numbered among the prominent and influential business men and public spirited citizens of the Upper Peninsula, and is especially entitled to representation in this history. He is president of the Upper Peninsula Brewing Company, of Marquette, and has other capitalistic interests of important order. He has attained success through his own well directed efforts and well merits the proud American title of self-made man. Charles Meeske was born in Swinemiinde, Pomerania, Prussia, on the 6th of December, 1850, and is a son of Gustave and Wilhelmina (Mollenhauer) Meeske, who passed their entire lives in Prussia, where the father was the owner of a large brewery and hotel and where he was a prominent and influential citizen. Of the six children three are residents of America, and the subject of this sketch is the youngest child. Mr. Meeske was afforded the advantages of the excellent schools of his native land and there he learned the trades of miller and brewer, He served in the German army from 1868 to 1871, in which latter year he emigrated to America. He first located in the city of Oshkosh, Wisconsin, where he served as foreman in a brewery until 1873, when he engaged in the brewing business in the city of Milwaukee on his own responsibility. There he remained until the autumn of 1878, when he came to Marquette and entered into partnership with Reiner Hoch, under the firm name of Meeske & Hoch. For three years they operated, under lease, the brewery owned by Peter White, and at the expiration of that period they purchased the property. In 1890 Mr. Meeske organized the Upper Peninsula Brewing Company, of which he served for some time as secretary and of which he has been president and treasurer since December 8, 1896. The plant of the company is thoroughly modem in its equipment and facilities and the product thereof is of the best type, so that a large trade is controlled throughout the territory normally tributary to Marquette. The brewery has a capacity for the output of thirty-five thousand barrels annually. The company also have a well equipped brewery in the city of Negaunee. IMr. Meeske is also president of the Valley Milling Company, which owns and operates a flourishing mill, this plant having the latest improved machinery and being successfully operated. Mr. Meeske is a stockholder in the Ishpeming Street-Railway Company, is a director in the Marquette Savings Bank and has other capitalistic interests of important order. In politics he maintains an independent attitude and he has ever shown a loyal interest in all that touches the general welfare of the community, giving his support to measures and enterprises that have tended to advance the social and material interests of his home city. He is affiliated with the Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks and is identified with various social organizations of representative order. In 1876 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Meeske to Miss Amelia Heineman, who was born in the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and they have three children,-Charles, Ella and Flora. JOHN O'MEARA, a successful banker of Escanaba, was born in Watertown, Wisconsin, June 19, 1858. His father, Michael O'Meara, was

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Page  769 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 769 born in Ireland, where he was reared. Before coming to America he married Margaret Coonan, also a native of Ireland, and about 1848 they came to the United States, locating first at Cleveland, Ohio. Later they removed to Watertown, Wisconsin, where they died, Michael O'Meara at the age of eighty-five, and his wife at the age of seventy. They had three sons and one daughter, all living at this writing, John being the second son and third child. John O'Meara received his education in Watertown, Wisconsin, where he lived until about nineteen years of age, and then went to Chicago, where he spent seven years. In 1880 Mr. O'Meara located in Escanaba, where for three years he was clerk in John Coran's grocery store. There he formed a partnership with Mr. Coran and they continued business about three years, when Mr. O'Meara bought his partner's interest and continued in the business about four years independently. He then sold out and engaged in his present line. He is now the oldest banker in business in Escanaba, in point of years so occupied, and is widely respected and esteemed. He carries on his business in a conservative, able manner, and has won a reputation for business probity and fair dealing. Mr. O'Meara has taken an active interest in public affairs and served two years as city treasurer; he is now a member of the school board, and is serving his second term of three years. He has identified himself with the interests of the Northern Peninsula, and is one of the representative business men of Delta county. He is a member of several societies, namely: Knights of Columbus; Ancient Order of Hibernians; Catholic Order of Foresters; Yeomen, and is a charter member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Lodge No. 354, of Escanaba. Mr. O'Meara was married, in Chicago, in 1886, to Belinda Tuohy, a native of Chicago, where she was reared. Their children are: James L., Edith, Charlotte, Harold and Pierce, all born in Escanaba. James L. is attending college at Ann Arbor; Edith is a teacher in the public schools here, and Charlotte is to teach here also. FREDERICK A. BRUCE.-A native son of the great empire of Germany, this successful and sterling business man of Menominee well exemplifies the admirable attributes of character that have ever denoted the race from which he has sprung, and he has achieved a position of security in the confidence and esteem of the community in which he now resides, as is shown by the fact'that he has served as a member of the city board of supervisors and as a member of the board of alderman. Mr. Bruce was born in Mecklenburg-Schwerin, Germany, on the 24th of September, 1866, and that section was likewise the birth-place of his parents, John and Sophia (Harter) Bruce, the latter of whom died in Germany and the former of whom died at Laney, Shawano county, Wisconsin, when fifty-five years of age. Of the seven children of this union, all of whom are now living, the subject of this sketch was the fourth in order of birth. The father emigrated to America in 1881, in the autumn of which year he established his residence in Shawano county, Wisconsin, where he continued to be identified with agricultural pursuits until the time of his death, and where he was known as an honest and upright citizen and as one thoroughly loyal to the cause of the Republican party, after becoming a naturalized citizen, and his religious faith was that of the German Luthern church, of which his wife was also a devoted member.

Page  770 770 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN Frederick A. Bruce, whose name initiates this sketch, gained his early educational discipline in the excellent schools of his native land and was sixteen years of age at the time of the family emigration to America. In Shawano county, Wisconsin, he attended the district schools and later he completed a course in the Menominee Commercial College. From 1883 to 1890 he was employed as clerk in a general store in Menominee, and in the latter year he returned to Laney, Shawano county, Wis., where he became associated with his father in the conducting of a general merchandise store. His father died about two years later, in 1892, and he then closed out the business and returned to Menominee, Michigan. Here, in August, 1893, he purchased the grocery business of Joseph Fehrenbach and he has since conducted the enterprise with marked success. His well equipped establishment is located at 520 Somerville avenue, and the same has a large and representative supporting patronage. In politics Mr. Bruce is a stanch supporter of the cause of the Republican party, and he has been an active worker in its ranks. In the spring of 1895 he was elected city supervisor from the Third ward, and in this position he served four terms by successive re-election. In 1900 he was elected to represent the same ward in the city council for a term of two years, and at the expiration of the same, in 1902, he was again elected supervisor from his ward, of which position he continued incumbent until 1903. On the 1st of June, 1909, Mr. Bruce was appointed by Governor Frederick M. Warner county agent of corrections and charities for Menominee county, and he still holds this position. He is affiliated with Menominee Lodge, No. 133, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in which he has passed the various official chairs, including that of noble grand. He is a member of the German Lutheran church and his wife is a member of the Presbyterian church. On the 1st of April, 1891, Mr. Bruce was united in marriage with Miss Cora James, who was born in Pittsfield, Wisconsin, and who is a daughter of Ick and Alice James, the former of whom was born in the state of New York and the latter in Massachusetts. Mr. and Mrs. James still reside in Pittsfield, Wisconsin, and of their five children four are now living. Mr. James was sixteen years of age when his parents moved to Wisconsin, and he is one of the representative farmers of Braun county, that state. He is a Republican in politics, and has held various township offices, and both he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. and Mrs. Bruce have three children,-Ruth, Myrtle and Robert, all at home and attending school. WILLIAM B. GREGORY.-He whose name initiates this review is now conducting a well equipped job-printing establishment in Menominee, and he was for many years identified with the newspaper business in this city and its twin city, Marinette, Wisconsin, located on the opposite side of the Menominee river. He has made his own way in the world, and his is an unblemished reputation both as a citizen and as a business man, so that he well merits the high regard in which he is held by those who know him. Mr. Gregory is a native son of Michigan and a scion of one of its honored pioneer families. He bears the full patronymic of his paternal grandfather, who was the founder of the family in the United States, as will be more specifically noted at a later point in this context. Mr. Gregory was born in the city of Muskegon, Michigan, on the 18th of

Page  771 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 771 July, 1870, and is a son of John B. and Nancy (Joslin) Gregory, the former of whom was born in Albany, New York, in 1850, and the latter of whom was born in Muskegon, Michigan, on the 12th of September, 1854, a member of one of the pioneer families of that section of the state. The subject of this review was the only child born to his parents, and after the death of his father, in 1886, in Menominee, the mother became the wife of Frank King. Mr. and Mrs. King still reside in this city, where the former is engaged as foreman for the J. W. Wells Lumber Company. William B. Gregory, grandfather of him whose name introduces this sketch, was a native of Yorkshire, England, as was also his wife, and in England were also born their four children,-three sons and one daughter. The family moved to America in an early day, and the grandparents passed the closing years of their lives in the Lower Peninsula of Michigan. William B. Gregory, the grandfather, was a sawmaker by trade and followed his trade for a number of years in Albany, New York, whence he finally removed to Muskegon, Michigan, where he engaged in the manufacturing of saws and other mechanical appliances and where he continued to reside until his death, having been one of the pioneer business men of that city. He was reared in the faith of the Church of England, and the family in America have been identified principally with the Protestant Episcopal church, representing the same faith and denomination. John B. Gregory gained his educational training in the schools of Albany, New York, and Muskegon, Iichigan, in which latter place he learned the sawmaker's trade in his father's establishment. Later he became a steamboat pilot and captain, and for a number of years he was identified with navigation interests on the Great Lakes during the summer seasons, while in the winters he devoted his attention to the manufacturing of saws. In 1884 he established his home in Menominee, where he was employed for a time in a machine shop, after which he opened a shop of his own and engaged in the work of repairing saws and other machinery and tools. He lost his life as the result of an accident, having been caught in the machinery of his shop while engaged in adjusting a belt upon a pulley. He was a Republican in his political allegiance and was a prominent member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in which he had served as noble grand of his lodge in Whitehall, Michigan. He was a communicant of the Protestant Episcopal church, and his widow, now Mrs. King, is likewise a zealous communicant of this church. William B. Gregory, the immediate subject of this review, gained his early educational discipline in the public schools of Muskegon and Whitehall, Michigan, and was fourteen years of age at the time of the family removal to Menominee, where he continued to attend school for a short period. He was but sixteen years of age at the time of his father's death, and has depended largely upon his own resources from his boyhood days. When he was fourteen years old Mr. Gregory found employment in the office of the old Menominee Herald, and there gained his initial experience in the "art preservative of all arts." It has been said that the discipline of a newspaper office is tantamount to a liberal education, and the significance of this statement is not lacking in the case of Mr. Gregory. He remained with the Herald about six months, in the dignified office of "printer's devil," and for the ensuing year he worked at such employment as could be found. He then resumed his association with the printing business by securing a position in the office of the Menominee Democrat, a weekly paper which was later expanded into the Evening Leader, a daily, and which finally was consolidated with the Menominee Herald. Under the changes noted Mr. Gregory

Page  772 772 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN continued to be employed as a compositor and foreman until 1896, and for the following year he was in the employ of Chas. X. Fairchild, publisher of the North Star at Marinette, Wisconsin. He assisted in the transforming of this paper from a weekly to a daily edition. In 1897 he engaged with the Twin City Lumbercman, a weekly paper, published in Marinette, and finally he purchased a half interest in the business and plant. In 1898, having gained control of the plant, he removed the same to Menominee, where he utilized the equipment in the establishing of a job-printing business, which he has since continued with marked success. He has kept his office up to a high standard in mechanical facilities and modern methods, and the same has a reputation for the best class of work, so that he controls a trade of representative order. In politics Mr. Gregory maintains an independent attitude and gives his support to the men and measures meeting the approval of his judgment. He is held in high esteem in business and social circles in Menominee and is essentially loyal and progressive in connection with civic affairs. He is affiliated with Menominee Lodge, No. 269, Free & Accepted Masons; Menominee Chapter, No. 107, Royal Arch Masons; Menominee Commandery, No. 35, Knights Templars; and Menominee Chapter, No. 284, Order of the Eastern Star, of which Mrs. Gregory also is a member. He also belongs to several fraternal insurance societies, and both he and his wife are communicants of Grace church, Protestant Episcopal. On the 14th of May, 1892, Mr. Gregory was united in marriage to Miss Mary E. Waiteman, who was born at Montague, Muskegon county, Michigan, and who is a daughter of Charles and Phoebe (Esterling) Waiteman, the former of whom is deceased and the latter of whom still resides in Montague. Mr. Waiteman was born in England and after taking up his residence in Michigan he became a vessel captain and owner, in which connection he sailed the Great Lakes for a number of years. He served with distinction as a soldier in a Michigan regiment in the Civil war, and he endured to the full the dangers and hardships of the great conflict between the north and south. He was captured by the enemy and was confined in turn in the two notorious Confederate prisons, Libby and Andersonville, for nine months, from the latter of which he and other prisoners escaped through a tunnel they dug with their hands. Captain Waiteman was a Republican in politics and was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He is survived by three daughters. Mr. and Mrs. Gregory have two children,-J. Milton and P. Bernice. STEPHEN J. JAMES.-Familiar with mining from his youth up, Stephen J. James has worked in various positions, for the past twelve years having been engineer at the Chapin mine, an office for which he is eminently fitted, not only by reason of his mechanical ability and skill, but on account of his keen observation, and his close application to his manifold duties. A son of Richard W. James, he was born, September 15, 1874, at Central Mines, Keweenaw county, Michigan, of pure English ancestry., Henry James, his grandfather, a son of Richard and Margaret James, life-long residents of County Cornwall, England, was born in the parish of Ludgvan, where, when shoes were manufactured entirely by hand, he served an apprenticeship of seven years at the shoemaker's trade. After following his trade a short time, he embarked in mining, and continued in that work in Cornwall county the remainder of his life, spending his last years in the parish of

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Page  773 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 773 Camborne. Iis wife, whose maiden name was Tryphena Williams, was born in the same parish. After his death she came to this country, and died, at the age of sixty years, in Iron Mountain, Michigan. She reared two children, Richard W., and Henry, who was accidentally killed when but sixteen years old. Born September 24, 1848, in the parish of Ludgvan, County Cornwall, England, Richard W. James began working in the mines when twelve years old, continuing in his native parish until nearly eighteen years of age, when he located in Camborne, where he continued to work as a miner until 1871. Coming then to Michigan, he was for awhile employed in the Calumet Mine, and then went to the Central Mine, in Keweenaw county, where he remained eight years. In 1881 he settled in Norway, from there coming, in 1882, to Iron Mountain. He subsequently found employment at the Chapin mine, at which he worked until 1891, when he entered the government service, and has since been employed as mail carrier in the city of Iron Mountain. He married, in 1868, Elizabeth Ann Rule, who was born in Camborne, England, a daughter of Stephen Rule. She died in 1884, leaving four children, Richard H.; Stephen J., the subject of this sketch; William; and Tryphena. He married for his second wife Mary A. Beckerleg, who was born in Camborne, England, a daughter of William and Susan Beckerleg, and to them three children have been born, Clifford, Lillie, and Susan M. Mr. R. W. James is a sound Republican in politics, and fraternally is a member of Iron Mountain Lodge, No. 388, F. & A. M.; and of Crescent Lodge, No. 374, I. O. O. F. Both he and his wife are members of the Central Methodist Episcopal Church. Having received a practical education in the public schools of Norway and Iron Mountain, Stephen J. James began working in the Chapin mine at the age of thirteen years, for two years operating a small hoisting engine. He was subsequently made assistant to the chief engineer, Mr. McNaughton, and continued with him and his successor until 1898, when he was promoted to his present responsible position as chief engineer at this mine. Mr. James married, in 1896, Clara Bennett, who was born at Redruth, County Cornwall, England, a daughter of William H. Bennett. Her grandfather, William Bennett, was born in the parish of St. Irving, Cornwall county, where he spent his early life. He was engaged in farming in various places, including St. Irving, Wade Bridge, St. Austell, and at Redruth, where both he and his wife spent their last years. Her maiden name was Susan Strongman, and to them four children were born, as follows: James, William H., Mary Jane, and Joseph. Completing his early studies in the schools of Redruth, William H. Bennett assisted his father in the care of the home farm for several years, after which, with his brother, he worked in the mines for a time. Subsequently serving an apprenticeship at the carpenter's trade, he followed it in Cornwall until 1878, when he came to the United States, locating in White Pine county, Nevada, where he was engaged in silver mining for three years. In 1881 he went back to England, and on his return trip, in 1882, brought his family to this country, and settled at Iron Mountain, Michigan. On May 22, 1882, he began work with the Chapin Mining Company as a journeyman carpenter. In 1894, when the mine closed, he went to South Africa, and for nearly a year was foreman in the carpenter's shop at the Geldenhuis Deep Mine, in Johannesburg. Having then a severe attack of homesickness, he returned to Iron Mountain, reVol. 1-10

Page  774 774 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN sumed work at the Chapin mine, and two years later was made foreman of the carpentering department. William H. Bennett married, September 25, 1868, Maria Hawken, who was born at St. Columb, County Cornwall, England, a daughter of John and Jane Hawken, and to them nine children have been born, as follows: Annie, Edith, Clara, now Mrs. James; William J., Henrietta, Hollie, Wilfred H., Eva E., and Frank. Mr. and Mrs. Bennett are worthy members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Politically Mr. Bennett is a Republican, and fraternally he belongs to Iron Mountain Lodge, No. 388, A. F. & A. M. Five children have blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. James, namely: Henrietta M., Helen L., William C., Donald, and Richard W. Mr. James is a stanch supporter of the principles of the Republican party, and fraternally is a member of Iron Mountain Lodge, No. 388, A. F. & A. M. Both Mr. and Mrs. James attend the Central Methodist Episcopal church. EDWARD C. FENWICK.-A gentleman in the prime of life, active, energetic, with a clear head for business, Edward C. Fenwick, is one of the leading agriculturists of Sault township, and for many years has been a potent factor in developing the material interests of this section of Chippewa county. He was born, August 9, 1854, in Bloomington, Illinois, a son of George Fenwick. George Fenwick, the descendant of a Highland Scotch family, was born in England, and there reared and educated. In early manhood he emigrated to the United States, and for awhile was engaged in contracting and building in Bloomington, Illinois. Removing from there to Bruce county, Ontario, he continued his chosen occupation in that locality for many years, but is now living in Northwest Ontario. HIe married Hannah Thompson, who was born in England and died in Northwestern Ontario, in 1897, aged seventy-three years. They became the parents of ten children, eight of whom are living, Edward C. being the fourth child in order of birth. But two years old when the family moved to Bruce county, Ontario, Edward C. Fenwick was there brought up and educated. Working with his father, who was there employed as a contractor and builder during his earlier life, he became familiar with the use of tools, and subsequently learned the trade of a stone mason and a plasterer. In search of "pastures fresh and new," he came, in 1873, to Sault Sainte Marie, Michigan, and was soon employed as a lumberman in the Chippewa county woods. Mr. Fenwick succeeded well in his undertakings, and soon took contracts to get out logs from the woods in Chippewa county, Michigan, and he was also at Cascade Mine, Ontario, several years, engaged in running an engine and air-compressor. Embarking in agricultural pursuits in 1886, Mr. Fenwick bought land in Sault township, and as a farmer and stock-raiser has met with characteristic success. In his homestead he has one hundred and sixty acres of good land, eighty acres of which are cleared and well improved, and in addition owns one hundred and sixty acres of valuable timber land in Sugar Island township, Chippewa county. Mr. Fenwick is a lover of good stock of all kinds, especially horses, and breeds Durham cattle of a fine grade. Mr. Fenwick married, May 11, 1886, Elenora Sykes, who was born in New York state, a daughter of Walter W. and Mrs. Mary A. Sykes. Mr. and Mrs. Fenwick are the parents of four children, namely: Ethel May, attending the Michigan State Normal School at Marquette; Richard V.; George E.; and Olivia. Politically a straightforward

Page  775 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 775 Republican Mr. Fenwick has held numerous township offices, and is now serving as a justice of the peace and as a member of the local school board. Fraternally he is a member of Bethel Lodge, No. 358, A. F. & A. M. REV. JULIUS HENZE, pastor of St. Joseph Church and Parish, Escanaba, was born in Detroit, Michigan, August 27, 1874. He began his education in his native city, where his boyhood days were spent. In 1890 he graduated from St. Francis College, of Cincinnati, Ohio. Later he took theological courses at Louisville, Kentucky, and Oldenburg, Indiana, and in 1900 was ordained. His first charge was at Washburn, Illinois, and at Washington. He then had charge of a parish in Calumet, Michigan for five years. Since 1906 Father Henze has been located in Escanaba, where he has a congregation of some three hundred families. The church has in connection a high school, as well as elementary schools, and eleven teachers are employed. The schools have about four hundred pupils, and the work is carried on in an able and efficient manner. Rev. Father Henze has the affection and esteem of his people and is well liked and respected wherever known. He is a man of unusual gifts and many fine qualities of character, whose good works and high ideals are widely appreciated. There are many prominent and influential members in the congregation, and the affairs of the parish are in a flourishing condition. HoN. ALONZO RUSSELL NORTHRUP.-Among the live, wide-awake, prosperous business men of the Northern Peninsula is Hon. Alonzo R. Northrup, who has been a resident of Escanaba for fully thirty years, and is widely and favorably known as an insurance man, a real estate dealer, and a successful attorney-at-law. He was born, in Washington county, New York, a son of the late William R. Northrup. William R. Northrup, a native of Jefferson county, New York, spent his early life in the Empire State. Subsequently following the tide of emigration to Wisconsin, he resided in that state a number of years. living in different parts. Coming to the Upper Peninsula in 1880, he located in Escanaba, Delta county, and was here actively engaged in the insurance business until his death, which occurred when he was eighty-five years of age, on January 4, 1909. A man of great intelligence and ability, he was for many years one of the influential citizens of this section of Michigan, and founder of the Northrup & Northrup Insurance Agency with which his son and grandson are now identified. He served for several terms as justice of the peace, and was active in public life. He married Mary Warren, who was born in Washington county, New York, and who died, at the age of forty-six years, in Wisconsin. They reared one son and three daughters. But an infant when his parents moved to Wisconsin, Alonzo R. Northrup lived for a year in the vicinity of Milwaukee, after which he spent four years in Fond du Lac county, Wisconsin, going from there with his parents to Sheboygan county, where he grew to manhood on a farm. Coming with his wife to Escanaba, Michigan, he continued the study of law, which, while he was a superintendent of the public schools of Escanaba, he pursued for three years, and in 1883 he was admitted to the Michigan bar. For several years after his admission to the courts, Mr. Northrup practiced law in Escanaba, being very successful in his professional work, at the same time being interested in the insurance business with his father. In 1897 the lat

Page  776 776 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN ter business assumed such magnitude that Mr. Northrup gave up the law, practically, and has since devoted his entire attention to general insurance, being one of the most extensive underwriters of fire, accident and life insurance in the Northern Peninsula. Mr. Northrup married, in 1879, Ella G. Smith, daughter of Josiah Smith, of Juneau, Wisconsin, and they have four children, namely: William R., engaged in the insurance business with Mr. Northrup; Warren S., in his father's office; Eleanor; and Louisa. Mr. Northrup is one of the leading members of the Republican party, and for four years, from 1889 until 1891, represented his district, which included Delta and Iron counties, in the State Legislature. He was a member of the Escanaba school board for several years, and for two terms served as city attorney. Fraternally Mr. Northrup is a member of Lodge No. 354, B. P. 0. E. ANDREW BJORKMAN.-Occupying a foremost position among the worthy and esteemed business men of Iron Mountain is Andrew Bjorkman, one of the earlier settlers of this part of the Upper Peninsula, widely known as an extensive and wealthy lumber dealer. He was born August 7, 1859, at Forlanda, Hallands, Sweden, where his parents were life-long residents. They reared four children, namely: August, deceased, served as a soldier in the Swedish Army; Martin; Annie; and Andrew. The three children now living are residents of the United States. Brought up in his native land, Andrew Bjorkman acquired a practical education when young, and at the age of twenty years sailed for America, disembarking at Prince Arthur's Landing, Canada, where he was engaged in railroad construction for a short time. Coming from there to Marquette, Michigan, he took a contract to build a mile of the Detroit and Mackinac railway, and at its completion went to Florence, Wisconsin, where he was employed as a mining contractor until 1883. Locating in that year at Iron Mountain, Mr. Bjorkman was engaged in mining at the Chapin Mine for eight years, and since that time has been extensively engaged in the lumber business in the Upper Peninsula, his operations in Michigan having been in Ontonagon, Gogebic, Iron, Dickinson and Menominee counties, and in Wisconsin in Marinette and Florence counties, his work at the present time being principally in the latter county. As a lumber dealer he is meeting with satisfactory results, year by year adding to his wealth, and as a man of integrity and honor is held in high regard as a valuable member of the community. He is a director of the First National Bank of Iron Mountain, and is a member of the Board of Public Works, which he has served as president. Mr. Bjorkman married, in 1882, Johanna Nelson, who was born at Wiby, Orebro, Sweden, and is the only member of her family to come to this country. Seven children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Bjorkman, namely: Albin, Frank, Thera, Gust, Selma, Elsie and David. Politically Mr. Bjorkman is a straightforward Republican, and religiously is both a member and a trustee of the Swedish Mission church, to which Mrs. Bjorkman also belongs, and is one of the trustees of the United Presbyterian Mission Society. RANSOM L. HAMMOND.-Possessing a wide knowledge of the law, keenness of comprehension, and a power of grasping the essentials of a subject, Ransom L. Hammond, of Iron Mountain, has established and is maintaining an honored position among the better known attor

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Page  777 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 777 neys-at-law of Dickinson county. A son of Albert R. Hanmmond, he was born, December 11, 1860, at Marinette, Marinette county, Wisconsin, and was named for his grandfather, Ransom L. Hammond, Sr. Born and reared in New York state, Ransom L. Hammond, Sr., learned the trade of a carpenter when young, and became successful as a contractor and builder. Moving with his family to the territory of Wisconsin about 1840, he was one of the pioneer settlers of Oshkosh. Going from there to De Pere, a town on the frontier, he resided there until his death, in 1848. Albert R. IHammond was born in the state of New York and he spent his boyhood days in the Empire state. Following in the footsteps of his father, he made good use of his mechanical talents, and in due course of time began life as a contractor and builder. Soon after his marriage he settled in Marinette, Wisconsin, being a pioneer of the place. There were no railways in that locality when he went there, all transportation being by way of the lakes or by team. As one of the first to perceive the value of the timber to be found so plentifully in the Upper Peninsula, he embarked in the timber trade, and took contracts to operate saw mills in Menominee and Ontonagon counties, Michigan, and in the northeastern part of Wisconsin, his home being a part of the time in Menominee, Michigan. From there he moved to De Pere, Brown county, Wisconsin, where he resided with his family for a number of years. At the present time he and his wife are living at Lander, Wyoming, with a son. His wife, whose maiden name was Mary Dwyer, was born in Pennsylvania, a daughter of John and Mary Dwyer, who settled as pioneers in Holland township, Brown county, Wisconsin, and there improved a farm, on which they spent their last days, Mr. Dwyer living to the remarkable age of ninety-nine years, and Mrs. Dwyer attaining the age of ninety-eight years. Five children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Albert R. Hammond, as follows: Albert A., Ransom L., Frank L., Fred D. and Nellie. With a mind receptive toward the educational opportunities that came to him in his younger days, Ransom L. Hammond acquired a practical education, and in his early manhood began his professional career as a teacher in the country schools near Fort IHoward, Wisconsin. Subsequently beginning the study of law with George F. Merrill, at De Pere, he found it congenial to his tastes, and subsequently continued the study in the law department of the University of Wisconsin, at Madison. In 1881 Mr. Hammond located at Iron Mountain, and having been admitted to the bar in 1883 has since continued in the active practice of his profession in this city, being now one of its most successful attorneys. Mr. Hammond married, in 1889, Minnie L. Williams, who was born in Meadville, Pennsylvania, a daughter of David and Ann Williams. Three sons have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Hammond, namely: Eldredge, and David and Kenneth, twins. Politically Mr. Hammond is identified with the Republican party, and made his advent in political life in 1882, when he was elected a justice of the peace, an office which he held for four years. He has since served three years as city attorney, four years as prosecuting attorney for Dickinson county, and for two years as mayor of Iron Mountain. Fraternally he is a member of Iron Mountain Lodge, No. 388, F. & A. M. NELS CHRISTOPHERSEN.-An able and popular representative of the stanch Scandinavian element in the upper peninsula is Nels Christopherson, who is one of the substantial and reliable business men of

Page  778 778 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN Menominee, where he is a member of the firm of Christophersen & Amundsen, dealers in watches, clocks, jewelry, silverware, etc. The finely equipped establishment of the firm is located at 510 Main street, in the Hotel Menominee block, and it is essentially metropolitan in its equipment and facilities, so that it admirably meets the demands placed upon it by its large and appreciative patronage. Mr. Christophersen was born at Odalen, Norway, on the 21st of January, 1850, and is a son of Christopher and Olia (Larson) Christophersen, both of whom were representatives of sterling families of that section of the far Norseland. The father was born in 1818 and he passed the closing years of his life at Pensaukee, Wisconsin, where he died in 1877. His wife died in Norway, in 1855, when the subject of this sketch was a child of five years. Of the five children of this union, three are now living,-Bernt, who is a resident of Elgin, Illinois; Nels, whose name introduces this sketch, and Gina, who is the wife of John Vickery of Tacoma, Washington. The father's active career in Norway was one closely identified with agricultural pursuits, and in 1870 he came to America and established his home at Big Suamico, Brown county, Wisconsin. After having been employed in a saw mill about three years he engaged in farming in that section of the state, where he remained until his death, about four years later. Both he and his wife are devout members of the Norwegian-Lutheran church. Nels Christophersen received his educational training in the schools of his native land, and there his early experiences were thus connected with the work of the home farm. In 1869, at the age of nineteen years, he severed home ties and embarked on the steamship "Santiago de Cuba" and he landed in New York City on the 19th of August of that year. He came from the national metropolis directly to the west and located at Big Suamico, Wisconsin, where he found employment in a saw mill. After devoting about three years to this line of work he removed to Elgin, Illinois, where he secured a position in the Elgin watch factory. He remained thus engaged from 1872 to 1883, when he took up his residence in Springfield, the capital city of Illinois, where he was employed in the manufacture of the Springfield watches until 1885. In the year last mentioned Mr. Christophersen removed to Sac City, Iowa, where he initiated his career as an independent business man by establishing a jewelry store. This he conducted until 1887, when he came to Menominee, Michigan, where he has since continued actively and successfully engaged in the jewelry business. For some time he conducted the enterprise in a personal way and finally he admitted to partnership O. E. Amundsen, with whom he has since been pleasantly concerned, under the firm name of Christophersen & Amundsen. When it is stated that this firm has the largest jewelry store and carries the largest stock of its kind in Menominee River Valley it will be readily understood that their fair and honorable dealings have not been denied large and emphatic popular approval. Mr. Christophersen maintains a secure hold upon the esteem and confidence of the community in which he has been pleased to cast his lot and he is one of the valued citizens and representative business men of Menominee. Loyal to the institutions and customs of his adopted country, Mr. Christophersen takes due interest in public affairs, especially those of a local order, and his political allegiance is given to the Republican party. After becoming naturalized he had the privilege of casting his first presidential vote for General Ulysses S. Grant, and under

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Page  779 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 779 the administration of this honored executive he served as deputy collector of United States customs at Menominee. He has been a member of the county board of Menominee for a number of years, has done all in his power to further good municipal government and civic progress, and at present he is incumbent of the office of supervisor. He is identified with the time-honored Masonic fraternity, in which his affiliations are with Menominee Lodge, Free & Accepted Masons; Menominee Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; Menominee Commandery, Knights Templars, and Ahmed Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, in the city of Marquette. He also holds membership in the local organizations of the Knights of the Maccabees and the Modern Woodmen of America. He is a zealous member of the Norwegian-Lutheran church, as was also his wife, in his home city, and he is also a member of its board of trustees. On the 4th of August, 1877, Mr. Christophersen was united in marriage to Miss Clara Larson, who was born in Sweden, in 1858, and who proved a faithful and loving companion and helpmeet. She was summoned to the life eternal in 1904 and is survived by two children,-Albert and Alfred, who are twins. Albert is connected with the store and Alfred is connected with the Northwestern Railroad at Menominee. ALEXANDER MAITLAND.-The subject of this sketch has long been a prominent and influential figure in connection with financial and business affairs in the Upper Peninsula, and has served as president of the First National Bank of Negaunee from the time of its organization. He is essentially one of the leading and most honored citizens of this section of the state and the high esteem in which he is held is indicated by the fact that he served two terms as lieutenant governor of the state. He is prominently identified with the iron industry, in which his holdings are large and important. Mr. Maitland is to be designated as one of the pioneer citizens of the Upper Peninsula, as he has here maintained his home since the 1st of July, 1864, and here he has found opportunity to achieve large and definite success through his own efforts, being well deserving of the title of a self-made man. Alexander Maitland was born at Kilmarnock, Scotland, on the 20th of June, 1844, and is a son of James and Barbara (Kerr) Maitland, representatives of stanch old families of the land of hills and heather. The father was engaged in the wholesale boot and shoe business in Kilmarnock, until 1856, when he removed with his family to America. After passing a few years at Hamilton, province of Ontario, Canada, he removed to Hastings county, in the same province, where he purchased a farm and where he devoted the remainder of his active career to agricultural pursuits. Both he and his wife continued to reside on this homestead until their death, and of their children four sons are now living, the subject of this sketch being the youngest of the number. Alexander Maitland gained his early educational training in his native land and was about eleven years of age at the time of the family removal to America. At the age of fourteen years he began to work upon the home farm, and in the meanwhile he completed his studies during such hours as were at his disposal. Through this selfdiscipline he made satisfactory advancement and he thus continued until he had attained to the age of about eighteen years. In the winter of 1862 he secured employment in a carriage factory at Galt, Ontario, where he remained about ten months. In July, 1864, he came to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and located at Negaunee, where he se

Page  780 780 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN cured a position as rodman of the Mineral branch of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad. Two months later he assumed the position of explorer for the Iron Cliffs Mining Company, and he was thus employed until 1868, when this corporation gave him the position of surveyor and engineer, of which he remained incumbent for nine years. In 1879 he was appointed assistant general manager and in July, 1881, he succeeded to the office of general manager, in which he served with all of ability and discrimination until the 1st of January, 1891. In 1881 he also became general manager of the Cambra & Lillie Mining Company, and this office he retained until 1906. He is president of the Black River Mining Company, operating on the Gogebic Range, and also of the North Lake Mineral Land Company, whose properties are on the north shore of Lake Superior. Mr. Maitland has made judicious investments in mining stock and real estate and he has been president of the First National Bank of Negaunee from the time of its organization in May, 1887. This is one of the strongest and most popular of the financial institutions of the Upper Peninsula, and besides his identification with the same, Mr. Maitland is also a stockholder in the Miners' Bank of Ishpeming, the First National Bank of Escanaba, and the State Bank of Negaunee, of which last he was one of the organizers. Mr. Maitland has wielded much influence in connection with the development of the mining industry of the Northern Peninsula, as well as other sections of the Union. In 1904 he became the owner of the Scott iron mine, the development of which he instituted in the following year, and since 1908 he has leased the property to the Volunteer Ore Company. He is the owner of the North Home Stake gold mine located in the Black Hills, South Dakota, and he opened up this property in 1902, besides which he has large mining interests in the state of Minnesota. As a man of great business capacity and broad mental ken Mr. Maitland has naturally shown a loyal and public-spirited interest in public affairs, and he is an uncompromising supporter of the principles and policies for which the Republican party stands sponsor. He served three terms as mayor of Negaunee and was incumbent of the office of county surveyor of MIarquette county for two terms. In 1896 he was elected to represent his district in the state senate, in which he served two consecutive terms, and in 1902 he was elected lieutenant governor of the state, in which office he served during the administrations of Governors Bliss and Warner, proving a most able and loyal executive. He has attained to the thirty-second degree in the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite of the Masonic fraternity, in which his affiliations are here briefly noted,-Negaunee Lodge, No. 202, Free & Accepted Masons; Marquette Chapter, No. 43, Royal Arch Masons; Lake Superior Commandery, No. 30, Knights Templar; Ahmed Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine; and De Witt Clinton Consistory, Sublime Princes of the Royal Secret, in the city of Grand Rapids. Mr. Maitland and his wife also hold membership in the adjunct organization, the Order of the Eastern Star. On the 10th of June, 1874, Mr. Maitland was united in marriage to Miss Caroline V. Sterling, who was born at Utica, New York, and who is a daughter of the late Adam J. Sterling. Five children have been born to this union,-Alexander F., Katherine, Leslie M., Harvey K. and Rena. HENRY SAAM.-Numbered among the citizens of high repute and good standing in the mining community of Keweenaw county is Henry

Page  781 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 781 Saam, a man of excellent business qualifications and judgment, who is now serving as master mechanic at the Mohawk Mine. A native of Germany, he was born, May 17, 1850, at Hesse-Cassel, his birth occurring in the same house in which his father, John Saam, and his grandfather, also named Henry Saam, first drew the breath of life, it having been the ancestral home of the Saam family for upwards of three hundred years. The grandfather, a farmer by occupation, spent his entire life in the Fatherland. Two of his sons, however, Barnard and John, came to the United States. Barnard Saam settled first at Eagle River, Michigan, later removing to Rockland, Ontonagon county, where he was for a time employed in the Minnesota Mine, and subsequently spending his last years at Lake Linden, Houghton county. Reared to agricultural pursuits, John Saam remained in HesseCassel until 1857, when, accompanied by his wife and four children, he came in a sailing vessel to the United States, being fifty-seven days on the ocean. From New York City he came by way of the railroad, canal and Lakes to Sheboygan, Wisconsin, where he rented land, and lived until after the breaking out of the Civil war. Then, in 1861, he enlisted in Company A, Ninth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. Veteranizing in 1863, he served until the close of the conflict, being with his regiment in all of its marches, campaigns and battles. Receiving his honorable discharge from the army, he joined his family, who had moved to Hancock, in 1864, and there lived until his death, in 1870, being variously employed in the meantime, although, on account of ill health, he was unable to perform any very hard labor. His wife, whose maiden name was Margaret Harding, was born in Saxony, Germany, and is now residing in the Upper Peninsula, being eighty-nine years of age. She has five children, namely: Louis, Charles, Henry, Annie, and Minnie, the last named being the only one born on American soil. But fourteen years of age when his mother moved with her children to Hancock, Houghton county, Henry Saam at once there found employment as a mason's helper, afterwards working in a copper stamp mill, and still later becoming a fireman, and an engineer. At the age of twenty-two years, he entered a machine shop as a journey workman, and five years later was given charge of the machinery at the Allouez Mine, with which he was connected four years. From 1881 until 1882, Mr. Saam was in the employ of the Calumet & Hecla Mining Company for a year, after which he went to Canada to set up machinery for a mining company. Returning to Michigan at the end of five months, he was in the employ of the Calumet & Hecla Mining Company until 1887, when he located in Baraga, where he operated a saw mill, which he purchased, until it was destroyed by fire, a year later. Returning, he had charge of the machinery at the Allouez Mine until 1892, afterwards being connected with the Wolverine Mining Company until 1899. In that year Mr. Saam accepted a position with the Mohawk Mining Company, with which he has since continued as master mechanic. In 1872 Mr. Saam was united in marriage with Anna Funke, who was born in 1856, in Germany, a daughter of Engleberg and Frances (Drolle) Funke. Twelve children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Saam, namely: Joseph, Lillie, Hattie, Anna, Maud, Henry, John, Cora, Lucius, George, Fred and Girlie. Joseph married Mary Kaiser, and they have three sons, Joseph, George and Karl. Lillie, wife of John Kline, has three sons, John, Merwin and Joseph. Hattie, wife of Andrew Jackson, has three children, Thomas, Mildred and Hattie. Henry married Hilma Marenon. Cora, wife of George Kohn, has one son,

Page  782 782 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN Russell. Lucius married Ethel Stephenson, and they have one child, Harry. Mr. Saam is a member of the German Aid Society of Calumet. ARTHUR H. PALMER.-He whose name introduces this sketch is a native son of Marquette county and is one of the representative business men of the city of Marquette, where he is junior member of the firm of Asire & Palmer, who here conduct a large and important real estate business. His father was prominently identified with surveying and exploring operations in the Upper Peninsula in the pioneer days and the name has been long and prominently identified with the history of this now favored section of the Wolverine state. Arthur H. Palmer was born at Forestville, Marquette county, Michigan, about five miles distant from Marquette, on the 21st of November, 1870, and is a son of Leander and Emeline (Huntoon) Palmer. The father was born at West Milgrove, Wood county, Ohio, in the year 1834, and he died at seventy years of age, in 1904. The mother was born in the city of Jackson, Michigan, in 1842, and she now resides in Marquette. Of this union were born two sons, Edward Vose and Arthur H. The elder son, who is now located at Denver, Colorado, was graduated in the Michigan College of Mines, at Houghton, and is an expert mineralogist and mining engineer. Leander C. Palmer was a son of Samuel Stuart Palmer and Silenda (Chapin) Palmer and was a grandson of Vose Palmer, who was born in Connecticut of English ancestry and whose father was the founder of the family in America. The latter's death occurred a number of years prior to the war of the Revolution and he left his farm to be carried on by his widow and three sons. When the war of the Revolution began it became necessary for one of the sons to go forth in defense of the cause of independence and Vose, the youngest of the sons, was designated for this patriotic service, upon wvhich he entered when about sixteen years of age. Because of his youth he was assigned to duty as personal aide to one of the officers, who, family tradition states, was General Gates. After the close of the war he returned to his home at Stonington, Connecticut, and not many years afterward he married a Miss Stuart, who is said to have been a descendant of the royal Scottish house of Stuart. About 1796 Vose Palmer removed with his family to the town of Plainfield, Otsego county, New York, where it is presumed the residue of his life was passed. Samuel Stuart Palmer was born in Connecticut and was an infant at the time of the family removal to Otsego county, New York, as just stated. He was reared to the discipline of the pioneer farm and throughout his active career he never severed his allegiance to the great basic industry of agriculture. His wife, whose maiden name was Silenda Chapin, was born in Herkimer county, New York, and for some time after their marriage he continued to reside on his father's farm. lie then removed to Henderson township, Jefferson county, New York, where he was engaged in farming for the following decade. In the autumn of 1832 he removed with his family to Ohio and settled in the vicinity of West Milgrove, Wood county, where he secured a tract of land and continued to reside until the spring of 1857. He then removed to Minnesota, becoming one of the pioneers of that state. His wife died in Wood county, Ohio, on the 1st of September, 1841, at the age of forty-four years, and he died at Duluth, Minnesota, on the 1st of April, 1878. He was first a Whig and later a Republican in politics, and both he and his wife were devoted members of the Presbyterian church. Of their eleven children three are here mentioned: Samuel A. (deceased), Loren W. and Francis E. (deceased).

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Page  783 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 783 Leander C. Palmer, father of Samuel S., gained his early educational training in the common schools of Wood county, Ohio, and after devoting several winters to teaching in the district schools his desire for a wider and more congenial field of endeavor led him to make a trip to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, whither he came in 1856. For two or three years thereafter he worked at various points at the head of Lake Superior, making his headquarters at Superior, Wisconsin. In this section he was engaged in government surveys as a civil engineer and finally he established his home in Marquette, where he became one of the pioneers in his profession. He did a large amount of important work in surveying and in prospecting for minerals and timber lands. He examined the entire land grant for the present Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic Railroad, and during the last sixteen years of his life he devoted his attention principally to the real estate business. He laid out the beautiful Palmer addition to the city of Marquette, and the same is now practically covered with residences and other buildings of excellent type. He was most progressive and public spirited as a citizen and he did much to further the civic and material upbuilding of Marquette. He served as alderman from the Third ward for several terms and held other important offices of local trust. He was a zealous and earnest member of the Baptist church, in which he served as deacon and trustee, and in politics his support was given to the Republican party. Arthur H. Palmer, the immediate subject of this sketch, was afforded the advantages of the schools of Marquette, including the high school and also of a local business college. His first employment was in the capacity of messenger boy of the Marquette offices of the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic Railroad and later he became bookkeeper for a grocery house in this city. For two years after leaving this position he was secretary for the Lake Superior Ice Company and he then became the local bookkeeper for the American Biscuit Company. For some time he held the dual office of secretary and treasurer of the Lake Superior Carriage Works, and in 1892 he engaged in the general merchandise business, in which he continued until 1905, since which time he has been successfully engaged in the real estate business. In this line of enterprise he was first associated with George N. Hodgkins, under the firm name of Palmer & Hodgkins, which was retained until 1908, when Mr. Palmer withdrew from the firm and associated himself with Merwin E. Asire, in the same line of business, which they have since continued under the firm name of Asire & Palmer. In politics Mr. Palmer gives his support to the cause of the Republican party and he and his wife are members of the Baptist church, in Marquette, of which he is trustee. He is affiliated with Marquette Lodge, No. 101, Free & Accepted Masons; Marquette Chapter, No. 43, Royal Arch Masons; and with the Knights Templars. On the 18th of October, 1893, Mr. Palmer was united in marriage to Miss Minnie Russell, of Jackson, Michigan. She is a daughter of James H. and Ellen (Platt) Russell, both of whom are natives of Michigan, and still residents of Jackson, Michigan, Mr. Russell being a traveling commercial salesman. Mr. and Mrs. Palmer have no children. REV. JOHN K. NIKANDER, D. D.-Entitled to honorable recognition in a work of this character is Rev. John K. Nikander, D. D., who is widely known throughout the Upper Peninsula as one of the promoters and supporters of Suomi College, one of the important educa

Page  784 784 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN tional institutions of Hancock. As a preacher of the Gospel, he formerly held pastorates in different places in this vicinity and Houghton county, but has more recently devoted his attention to the interests of the college, giving to the work an enthusiastic zeal born of strong convictions and a noble purpose. He was born, September 3, 1855, in the parish of Lammi, village of Vilkkila, Finland, coming from a family of some prominence. His father, John K. Nikander, Sr., was born, reared and educated in Lammi, Finland. Although he had but meagre educational advantages, he made excellent use of his natural talents, becoming a skilful mechanic. He learned carpentry, and in addition to following his trade was prosperously engaged in the manufacture of spinning wheels and carriages, painting, and in operating a turning lathe, building up a good business. Removing to Heinola in 1864, he was there a resident until his death, in 1866. He married Hedwig Maria Metsmaa, who was born in Lammi, Finland, and died in Heinola, Finland, in 1883. Four children were born to them, as follows: John K., the special subject of this brief biographical sketch; Emma, living in Hancock, Michigan; Wilhelmina, wife of John H. Jasberg, of Hancock; and Edward Miettinen, a teacher in his native land. Having attended school in Heinola, Finland, four years, John K. Nikander entered a college at Jyvaskyla, where he was graduated at the age of eighteen years. Going then to Helsingfors, he entered the University of Finland, where he completed a full course of study, being graduated from the Theological Department with the class of 1879. Ordained to the ministry on July 7, 1879, Mr. Nikander began his ministerial labors in his native land, preaching in Saint Michel, Ruskeala, and Kerimaki. Sailing for America in December, 1884, Dr. Nikander, on whom the degree of D. D. has been worthily conferred, arrived in Hancock, Michigan, January 3, 1885. His coming was warmly welcomed in religious circles, and he afterwards continued his pastoral labors in Northern Michigan for twelve years, having charge of Finnish Lutheran churches at Hancock, Calumet and Allouez, in each place doing a noble work. Since 1897 the doctor has devoted his attention principally to the interests of the Suomi College, of which he was one of the founders, occasionally, however, supplying vacant pulpits in this vicinity. Dr. Nikander married, in 1902, Sanna Christina Rajala, who was born in Ilmajoki, Finland, and of their union three children have been born, namely: Wiljo K., Aino I., and Toivo S., all of whom were born in Hancock. THOMAS J. DUNDON.-A talented, cultured, and skilful lawyer, Thomas J. Dundon, of Ishpeming, is an able representative of the legal fraternity of Marquette county, having built up by his own efforts an extensive and remunerative practice. A son of the late John Dundon, he was born, May 14, 1853, at Brooklodge, county Cork, Ireland, where the first two years of his life were passed. Born, reared and married in county Cork, Ireland, John Dundon emigrated to the lUnited States in 1855, crossing the ocean in a sailing vessel. He located first at West Stockbridge, Massaehusetts, where for six years he was employed in the blast-furnace works. Coming from there to Marquette, Michigan, he lived here retired for several years, but spent his last days at De Pere, Wisconsin, passing away at the venerable age of eighty-eight years. His wife, whose maiden name was Mary Coakley, was born in county Cork, Ireland, and died, at the

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Page  785 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 785 age of fifty-nine years, in Marquette, Miichigan. Fourteen children were born of their union, seven of whom are now living, as follows: Richard, Ellen, James, Maurice, Edward, Lawrence and Thomas J. Both parents were members of the Roman Catholic church and reared their children in the same religious faith. While living in western Massachusetts Thomas J. Dundon obtained his first knowledge of books in the public schools, which was further advanced in the graded schools of Marquette, Michigan. An ambitious student, anxious to further advance his education, he was subsequently graduated from the University of Notre Dame, at Notre Dame. Ind., with the degree of B. C. Locating then in Clarksburg, Michigan, he remained there a number of years, being engaged in the manufacturing of pig-iron and having charge of the blast-furnace there until 1875, after which he taught school six years. Entering the law department of the University of Michigan in 1881, he was there graduated with the class of 1884. Being admitted to the Michigan bar, Mr. Dundon has since been busily engaged in the practice of his profession at Ishpeming, where he has a large clientele. Following in the footsteps of his father, he is a stanch supporter of the principles of the Democratic party, and is a faithful member of the Roman Catholic church. On May 9, 1892, Mr. Dundon married Margaret Stack, who was born in Delaware county, Ohio, a daughter of Richard and Mary (Fitzpatrick) Stack, both of whom were born in Ireland and died in Ohio. Six children have blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. Dundon, namely: John, Mary, Edward, George, Thomas and Margaret. CAPTAINZ EDWARD JAMES LORD, of Iron Mountain, has an unsurpassed acquaintance with mining in all its phases and for many years has been actively identified with the history and advancement of this most important industry of the Upper Peninsula, at the same time enjoying the highest standing as a citizen. He has held his present office of captain of the Pewabic Mine for upwards of a score of years. He is British by birth, having been born July 2, 1862, in the parish of Liskeard, county Cornwall, England, the father's name being George Lord. His grandfather, Jacob Lord, was born in the parish of Saint Austell and was a life-long resident of county Cornwall. He kept a hotel at Saint Austell for several years and afterwards removed to Liskeard where he adopted the profession of a gardener and where he spent his remaining years, passing away at a ripe old age. The father, George Lord, was born in 1817, in the parish of Saint Austell, and died in 1882, in the neighboring parish of Liskeard. Ile was a miner by occupation and during his entire active life worked in the tin and lead mines of Cornwall. The mother, whose maiden name was Jane Cowling, was born either in county Cornwall or in Devonshire. She survived her husband, passing away in 1896, at the age of sixty-nine years. There were seven children in the family: John lives in Northumberland, England; Harry emigrated to America and spent the rest of his life in this country, his home being in Pennsylvania at the time of his death; Susan remained in England; Fred is still in Northumberland; George is a prominent citizen of Detroit, Michigan, a former member of the state legislature and very active in public affairs; Annie, the youngest, still resides in her native land. Captain Lord was the fifth son. His baptismal name was Edwin, but since coming to this country his friends and associates have so frequently called him Edward that he has adopted that name.

Page  786 786 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN Captain Lord received a little early training in the English schools, but left their portals when only ten years of age. Although of such tender years he was almost immediately set to face the stern problem of earning his own living, and began his training as a miner, for two years screening ore on the surface, and for the following four years working underground with his father, grading ore. His judgment and executive ability proved of a quality so exceptionally high that when but sixteen years old he became a mine contractor and continued in this capacity until 1884, when he was a year or so past his majority. Knowing of the rich opportunities for advancement in his line of work in the mining regions of the New World, he emigrated in that year to the United States, landing in New Yory, February 14, 1884. He went directly to Nanticoke, Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, and was for fourteen months employed as foreman at tunnel work and shaft sinking in the coal mines. Advancing westward, he spent a short time at Pilot Knob, Missouri, and a few months in Freeland, Colorado, and then directed his course to the Menominee Range, in Michigan. In Norway, Dickinson county, he secured employment in his special line and then came on to Iron River, where he was offered a position in the Nanimo Mine. He accepted this and remained at Iron River until February, 1889. In the month above noted, Captain Lord decided to try his fortunes at Iron Mountain and began work with pick and shovel in the Pewabic Mine. Here he demonstrated his usual faithfulness and efficiency and a few years later, in 1893, was made foreman, which position he retained for four years. For the next three years he had charge of the Walpole Mine, and in 1900 he was promoted to his present responsible position as captain of the Pewabic Mine. In 1888 Captain Lord was united in marriage to Miss Emma Campbell, born in Greenfield, Carleton county, New Brunswick, her father's name being Kenneth George Campbell. Her grandfather, Alexander Campbell, was Scotch, and was born either in Scotland or in New Brunswick of Scotch parents, his descendants being somewhat uncertain in this regard. He was for many years a pilot in the harbor of Little Shippegan, and there spent his last days. The grandmother, Hannah Crabb Campbell, of English descent, was born at Miramichi, Northumberland county, New Brunswick, and died at Little Shippegan when nearly ninety years of age, having survived her husband for something like a score of years. Mrs. Lord's father was born on Little Shippegan Island, learned the carpenter's trade, and followed it in New Brunswick until 1880. He subsequently came to the Upper Peninsula and locating at Menominee, followed his trade in that place for four years. He removed to Iron River and his death occurred there not long afterward, his age being only thirty-five years. His wife was before her marriage Susanna Kinney, of Greenfield, Carleton county, New Brunswick, a daughter of John Shepard Kinney. Her grandfather, Stephen Kinney, was born in New England of English parentage. After his marriage with Meriba Ives, also a native of New England, he removed to Carleton county, New Brunswick, and there spent the remainder of his life. Her mother's father, John Shepard Kinney, was a New Englander, it is believed, and removed to Greenfield, New Brunswick, where he engaged in agricultural pursuits. The mother, whose maiden name was Sarah Ann Crabb, was born at Miramichi, her father being Richard Crabb, an Englishman. After emigrating to America he went first to New Brunswick, but subsequently became a citizen of the "land of the

Page  787 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 787 stars and stripes" and spent his last years in Illinois. Mrs. Lord's mother married for her second husband Abraham Walker, now a resident of Iron Mountain, Michigan. Her children, seven in number, are all of her first marriage. They are Emma, wife of Captain Lord; John A.; Hannah; Kenneth D.; Richard; Herbert R.; and Wesley A. PATRICK R. DOWNEY.-Among the successful and popular hotel men of the Upper Peninsula is Mr. Downey, who is proprietor of the Belvidere Hotel, in the city of Sault Ste. Marie. He was born in the village of Allumette Island, on the Island of the same name in the Ottowa river, Pontiac county, province of Quebec, Canada, on the 20th of December, 1868, and in the same county were born his parents, Patrick and Elizabeth (Ryan) Downey. The father was born in the year 1842 and the mother in 1841. The latter died in 1894 and the former on the 17th of June, 1903. They became the parents of nine children, all sons, and of the number five are living, the subject of this sketch being the eldest of this number; John is a resident of Marquette, Michigan, and a member of its board of aldermen; Charles A. resides at Sycamore Junction, British Columbia; Martin is a resident of the state of Montana; and Michael resides at North Bay, Ontario. Patrick Downey, father of the subject of this review, was engaged in agricultural pursuits in his native county until 1896, when he removed to Marquette, Michigan, where he maintained his home until 1901, when he removed to Ferry county, Washington, where he secured a tract of land and devoted the remainder of his life to agricultural pursuits. Both he and his wife were devout communicants of the Catholic church. Patrick R. Downey was reared in his native county and there received the advantages of the county schools. His independent career was initiated by the work of cutting wood for the Canadian Pacific Railroad, the product being used for fuel on the engines of the old type. Later he engaged as a clerk in a clothing store and finally he returned to his native county and worked on the farm of his maternal grandfather, John Ryan, in the meanwhile working his way through the common schools. Thereafter he was variously employed in his native province until September, 1888, when he went to the city of Montreal, where he completed a course of one year in Mount St. Louis College. Thereafter he was employed as clerk in a grocery store in the city of Ottawa for one year, and in September, 1890, he removed to Marquette, Michigan, where he became brakeman on the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic Railroad. He rose to the position of freight conductor and finally, in 1901, he was promoted to the position of conductor. He continued to serve as such with the road mentioned until 1906, when he accepted a similar position on the Duluth, Mesaba, & Northern Railroad, with which he continued in service until the first of July, 1907, when he came to Sault Ste. Marie and secured control of the Belvidere Hotel, of which he has since been proprietor and which he has made one of the popular hostelries of the Upper Peninsula, which same has secured a large and appreciative patronage under his effective direction, and his association with this business, as well as with railroad interests, has made him distinctively popular with the traveling public. He is a Republican in his political proclivities, holds membership in the Order of Railway Conductors and the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen, besides which he is affiliated with Sault Ste. Marie Lodge, No. 552, Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks. On the 20th of Miarch, 1893, Mr. Downey was united in marriage to

Page  788 788 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN Miss Marie McKelvie, who was born at Gait, province of Ontario, Canada, and who is a daughter of Robert W. and Jeanette (Carroll) McKelvie, the former of whom was born in Scotland, on the 4th of May, 1828, and the latter of whom was born in the city of Glasgow, Scotland, on the 22d of September, 1842. The father died on the 21st.of September, 1905, and his widow is now living at Calumet, Michigan. They were married at Gait, Ontario, on the 29th of February, 1857, and of their six children five are now living,-Margaret, wife of Frank A. Wentworth of Marquette, Michigan; Robert D., of Calumet, this state; John, a resident of the same state; Marie, wife of the subject of this sketch; and William S. of Calumet. Robert W. McKelvie came from his native land to Canada when a young man and there followed the work of the carpenter's trade until 1882, when he removed to Marquette, Michigan, where he became a successful contractor and builder, and he passed the remainder of his life in the Upper Peninsula. Mr. and Mrs. Downey had two sons,-Lawrence, who remains at the parental home, and Patrick Hartwell, who died in infancy. HARLOW D. BRAINERD, manager of the lumber yards of The I. Stephenson Co., at Escanaba, Michigan, enjoys the distinction of having filled this position for a period of thirty-seven years. Mr. Brainerd is a native of the Western Reserve and a descendant of Connecticut ancestry. He was born in Cuyahoga county, Ohio, October 28, 1844, son of David and Susan (Emmons) Brainerd, both natives of Ohio, the former of Cuyahoga county and the latter of Lorain county, both children of parents who had pioneered from Connecticut. David Brainerd was reared near what is now the city of Cleveland, and was married in that locality. In 1845 he and his wife and their two sons, Harlow D. being a babe of six months, came west to Racine county, Wisconsin, and settled on a farm near Burlington. There the subject of our sketch was reared. His boyhood days were spent in attending district school in winter and assisting in the farm work during the summer. On reaching his majority, he accepted a position as foreman in a retail lumber yard at Burlington, where he remained three years. Then he spent one season in Missouri. In the spring of 1872 he went to Chicago in the employ of The N. Ludington Co., now the I. Stephenson Co., with which he has since remained. In July of the following year they sent him to Escanaba, as manager of their retail lumber yard at this place, and here his term of service has already covered a period equaled by few employes in any line of work. Mr. Brainerd was first married in 1868, to Miss Sarah Amend. She died, leaving him with one daughter. In 1879, he married Miss Emma Brainerd, and some time after her death he wedded Miss Elise Olsen, the last marriage being in 1900. CLYDE HAYDEN.-One of the leading attorneys of Escanaba, Clyde Hayden, was born in Blackhawk county, Iowa, March 27, 1876. Mr. Hayden's English ancestor on the Hayden side was living in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1636 and in 1638 was among the first settlers of Connecticut. Otis Hayden, the father of Clyde, was also a native of Iowa, where he was a successful merchant for some years. In 1877, he removed to Freeborn county, Minnesota, and is now engaged in mercantile business at Albert Lea. He married Lottie Burnham, a native of Aurora, Illinois. Of this union Clyde is the older of two sons who

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Page  789 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 789 reached maturity, and was one year old at the time his parents removed to Albert Lea, Minnesota. The early education of Mr. Hayden was acquired in Albert Lea, where he was graduated from high school; later he attended the University of Minnesota, graduating in 1900, with the degree of B. S. He received his law course at Harvard, from which he was graduated with the class of 1904, with the degree LL. B. He immediately engaged in the practice of his profession, and located the same year at the Soo Michigan. In the fall of 1905 he became a resident of Escanaba, where he has since continued in active practice. Mr. Hayden has built up a good practice, and stands high in his profession and in the four years he has lived in Escanaba he has become well known and universally esteemed. Politically he is a Republican, and takes a commendable interest in public affairs. Mr. Hayden is a member of the Knights of Pythias. He is an able lawyer, and a young man of unusual promise. Mr. Hayden married, in 1906, Edith, daughter of George C. and Mary Watson, of Hartford, Wisconsin, a young woman of culture and refinement, who has made many friends in Escanaba. RICHARD M. EDWARDS.-Throughout his entire life Richard M. Edwards resided in Houghton county, Michigan, his birthplace being in the village of Houghton, on the 17th of February, 1864, and as a mineowner and developer, as an educator and as a citizen he has been an important factor in the development of the Northern Peninsula of Michigan. His name is familiar in business circles as the manager of the Indiana Copper Company and the North Lake Mining Company, two of the most important corporations of the copper region. He is also the son of a prominent mine developer of the north, Thomas W. Edwards, from the mother country of England and who spent some time in the copper mines there. Emigrating to the United States he became one of the pioneers in the development of the copper mines in the Northern Peninsula of Michigan, and he became widely known in his profession. He was an expert judge of minerals, and he helped to open and develop some of the most noted mines of the Peninsula, and he continued along this line until his death in 1900, his life's history in this country being almost synonymous with the history of the copper development of the north. His life's companion and the mother of his children was in her maidenhood Emily Collingwood. After passing through the public and high school of Houghton Richard M. Edwards entered Columbia College, New York City, a school of mines, and he graduated from the institution in 1886. Returning then to his native town of Houghton, he began teaching in the School of Mines and was soon appointed to a professorship in what is now known as the Michigan College of Mines. After three years as a college professor he became a mining engineer for the Tamarack Mining Company, with whom he remained until 1899, and from that time until 1904 he was the superintendent of the Isle Royal Mining Company. Since then he has acted in the capacity of superintendent of the Franklin Mine, the North Lake Mining Company, the Indiana Mining Company and the Bohemian Mining Company. In 1893 Mr. Edwards was married to Miss Mary Gottsten, a daughter of Peter Gottsten, one of the old time residents and highly esteemed citizens of Houghton, the birthplace of Mrs. Edwards. THOMAS H. BARRON.-A man of strong traits of character, energetic, enterprising, and an eminently capable business man, Thomas H. BarVol. II-1 1

Page  790 790 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN ron is actively identified with the mercantile interests of Iron Mountain as an extensive dealer in hardware, and as city treasurer is keeping an accurate account of its financial condition. He was horn, August 16, 1857, at Geneva, Ontario county, New York, which was also the birthplace of his father, John Barron, and of his grandfather, Thomas Barron. David Barron, the great-grandfather of Thomas H. Barron, was born, reared and educated in England, living there until after his marriage. The only member of his immediate family, as far as known, to leave his native land, he came with his young wife to America, locating as a pioneer in Geneva, New York. In common with the other early settlers, he built a small log cabin on the wild land which he had purchased, it being two and one-half miles from the lake, and labored with unceasing toil to improve a farm, in the meantime helping to develop the resources of that section of the state. There were no railroads in the vicinity, and the people depended upon wild game and the products of their land for subsistence. He and his good wife there spent the remainder of their lives, honored and respected throughout the community for their many virtues. Inheriting a portion of the homestead on which he was born, Thomas Barron spent his eighty-six years of earthly life in his native town, being engaged throughout his active career in agricultural pursuits. He married Margaret Mercer, who came from English ancestry, and she proved a most devoted and faithful companion, in the training of her children showing wisdom and good judgment. Brought up on the home farm, in Geneva, New York, John Barron was there engaged in agricultural pursuits during the earlier years of his life. Coming to the Upper Peninsula in 1870, he embarked in the lumber business, remaining here several years, his headquarters being in Marinette, Wisconsin. Returning after awhile to New York state, he bought a farm in Cayuga county, and was there a resident until his death, in 1905, at the age of three score and ten years. Ilis wife, whose maiden name was Jerusha Thorne, was born at Fort Ann, Washington county, New York, where her parents, Charles and Jerusha Thorne, were pioneer settlers, who, having improved a farm from the wilderness, there spent their last days. Mrs. Barron died in 1893. She had three children, namely: Thomas H., the special subject of this sketch; Carrie E., and Charles D., who died in 1871. Educated in the public schools of Geneva, Thomas H. Barron began his mercantile career at Bergen, New York, where for three years he was clerk in a general store. Returning then to the parental rooftree, he carried on farming until 1879, when he removed to Marinette, Wisconsin, there securing a position as clerk in a dry goods and clothing store. Coming to Iron Mountain in 1891, Mr. Barron formed a copartnership with Mr. George Corning, and has since been actively engaged in the hardware business, having built up a large and profitable trade, his upright, honorable dealings, unfailing courtesy, and his willingness to accommodate his many customers, having won for him a substantial patronage. Mr. Barron married, in 1881, Anna M. Gothard, who was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, a daughter of William and Roxanna (Percels) Gothard, natives of the Empire state, and early settlers of Wisconsin. Mr. and Mrs. Barron have two sons, Harry W. and Charles E. Harry W. now in the employ of the United States Steel Company, at Ironwood, Michigan, married Sigrid Netterbladt. Charles E. is now serving an apprenticeship at the machinist's trade. A prominent sup

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Page  791 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 791 porter of the Republican party, Mr. Barron takes an intelligent interest in the public welfare, and served, in 1907 and 1908, as mayor of Iron Mountain, and in 1909 was elected city treasurer. Fraternally he is a member of Iron Mountain Lodge, No. 388, F. & A. M.; and of Iron Mountain Chapter, No. 121, R. A. M. Religiously Mrs. Barron belongs to the First Presbyterian Church, in which she is an active and faithful worker. EMIL GUEN'SBURG.-Associated with his brother, Adolph E. Guensburg, as a member of the firm of A. E. Guensburg, the subject of this sketch is one of the interested principals in the ownership and conducting of the Grand department store in Menominee, which has precedence as one of the largest and most important institutions of its kind in this section of the country. Further reference to the enterprise is made in a sketch of the senior member of the firm, on other pages of this work. Emil G. Guensburg was born near the city of Prague, Bohemia, on the 20th of November, 1865, and is third in order of birth of the children of Herman and Leonora (Neuman) Guensburg, both of whom passed nearly their entire lives in Bohemia. Of their children five are now living. Mr. Guensburg was reared and educated in his native land, where he continued to make his home until 1882, when he came to America and joined his brother Adolph E. in the city of Oconto, Wisconsin. Subsequently the two were associated in the conducting of general stores at Florence, Wisconsin, and Crystal Falls, Iron River and Norway, Michigan. In 1893 his brother engaged in the general merchandise business in Menominee and in 1898 he himself came to this city, where the two have since been actively allied in the conducting of the Grand department store. Alert and progressive as a business man and loyal in all civic relations, Mr. Guensburg has a secure place in popular confidence and esteem in Menominee and is recognized as one of its representative business men. His political allegiance is given to the Republican party and he is affiliated with the York Rite Masonic bodies in the city, as well as with Michigan Sovereign Consistory of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite in the city of Detroit, in which he has attained the Thirty-second degree. In that city he also holds membership in Moslem Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is a member of Menominee Camp, No. 1794, Modern Woodmen of America, and also holds membership in the Modern Brotherhood of America and the Order of Yeomen. On the 1st of January, 1899, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Guensburg to Miss Delia C. Eckstein, who was born and reared in the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and they have two sons,-Lester Herman and Edgar Adolph. ISAAC W. BYERS.-Widely known as a man of legal ability and knowledge, an able lawyer and an upright judge, Isaac W. Byers, of Iron River, is one of the leading citizens of the place, and has for many years been closely identified with its progress and prosperity. A descendant of one of the early settlers of Pennsylvania and coming from Revolutionary stock, he was born, December 16, 1868, at Jackson Hall, near Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, a son of Benjamin F. Byers. His great-great-grandfather, Jonathan Bayers, was one of a family of eight stalwart sons, every one of whom, notwithstanding that their father was a Tory, fought for the independence of the colonies during the Revolutionary war. He subsequently settled in

Page  792 792 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN York county, Pennsylvania, and spent his last years in Manheim township, dying in 1808. His son, Benjamin Bayer, the next in line of descent, was a bishop in the Brethren in Christ, or the River Brethren church, and, with his wife, whose maiden name was Anna Miller, spent his entire life, as far as known, in the Keystone state. Their son, Henry Bayer, grandfather of Isaac W., was born in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, and was there engaged in farming during his life. He married Rachel Jacoby, also a native of Pennsylvania. Benjamin F. Byers, of the first generation to change the original spelling of the family name, was born at Shippensburg, Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, and was there reared to agricultural pursuits. In 1866 he purchased land at Jackson Hall, Franklin county, and was there engaged in general farming until his death, in 1876. He married Judith Wingard, who was born at Fayetteville, Pennsylvania, which was likewise the birthplace of her father, Jacob Wingard. Her grandfather, John Wingard, a life-long resident of that state, married Elizabeth Bachtel, a daughter of Samuel Bachtel. Her grandfather Bachtel, a native of Germany, emigrated to this country in Colonial times, settling in a locality known as Goshenhoppen, in Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, and there reared his family. Samuel Bachtel was born October 4, 1732, and died April 22, 1820. He married Anna Simon, who was born in 1735 and died in 1814. Her father, Isaac Simon, was a native of France, who fled from his country on account of religious persecution, coming to the United States and spending his last years in Pennsylvania. Jacob Wingard, grandfather of Mr. Byers, chose the independent occupation of a tiller of the soil. He secured title, through inheritance, to a tract of land in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, and in its management was very successful. He invested his surplus money in land, which steadily increased in value, and he became quite wealthy for his day. tIe married Hannah Lowry, who, without doubt, spent her entire life in Franklin county, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Judith (Wingard) Byers died in 1875, one year before her husband's death, leaving four children, namely: Elizabeth, deceased; Isaac W., the special subject of this brief biographical notice; Anna R., deceased; and Laban, deceased. At the death of his mother, when he was scarce seven years of age, Isaac W. Byers went to live with his aunt, Mrs. Anna Hade, of Greencastle, Pennsylvania, where he first attended the public schools. He subsequently continued his studies at the Keystone State Normal School in Kutztown, from which he was graduated with the class of 1888, having in the meantime taught school one year. Entering then Princeton University, at Princeton, New Jersey, Mr. Byers was graduated from that institution in 1893. Going then to Kentucky, he taught in the Princeton Collegiate Institute for a year, in the meantime being admitted to the bar. In 1894 he began the practice of his profession in Chicago, Illinois, from there coming, in 1895, to Iron River, where he has since built up an extensive and lucrative clientele, being now one of the best known and most successful attorneys-atlaw of this part of the Upper Peninsula. Mr. Byers married, in July, 1893, Dora Rosenstock, who was born at Weatherly, Pennsylvania, a daughter of Caspar and Elizabeth (Derh) Rosenstock, natives of Germany and Pennsylvania, respectively. Four children have been born of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Byers, namely: Anna F., Judith E., Benjamin and Ruth. A stanch Republican in politics, Mr. Byers has served as circuit court commissioner,

Page  793 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 793 as prosecuting attorney, as judge of the probate court and as county school examiner. Fraternally he belongs to Iron River Lodge, No. 162, K. of P., and to Iron River Tent, No. 336, K. O. T. M. Religiously both Mr. and Mrs. Byers are valued members of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Byers is a director in the First National Bank of Iron River. WILLIAM L. MASON is widely known as one of the leading lawyers of Baraga county, being a member of the firm of Mason & O'Connor, of L'Anse. A native of Houghton county, Michigan, he was born, February 20, 1865, at the Albany and Boston Mine, a son of Edwin L. Mason. He is a descendant of the seventh generation of Sampson Mason, a native of England, who fled to Leyden, Holland, to escape religious persecution, and afterwards returned to England, but subsequently emigrated to America, settling permanently in Plymouth, Massachusetts. The line was continued through Riley Mason, John Mason, Sr., John Mason, Jr., and Luther Mason, grandfather of William L., all of whom were born in Massachusetts. John Mason, Jr., Mr. Mason's greatgrandfather, served as a soldier in the Revolutionary war. Luther Mason was born, reared and married in the old Bay state. Subsequently, accompanied by his family, he pushed forward into the wilds of New York state, making the removal with ox teams, and taking all of his worldly goods with him. Becoming one of the early settlers of Livingston county, he cleared and improved a farm from the forest, and was there engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death. The maiden name of his wife was Ruth Luther, who was likewise of Massachusetts birth. She survived him many years, passing away in Rochester, New York. To her and her husband four children were born and reared, namely: Edwin L., William R., Elizabeth and Amy. Edwin L. Mason was born on the parental farm in Livingston county, New York, and was there reared to habits of industry and honesty, although his educational advantages as a boy were limited. In 1854, responding to an advantageous offer, he came to Michigan to accept the position of bookkeeper for the firm of Leopold & Austrian at Eagle River. He afterwards went with the firm to Hancock, Michigan, in the same capacity, and while there became postmaster at Hancock. He was afterwards a clerk at the Albany and Boston Mine, and later at the Franklin Mine. In 1871 he came to the new town of L'Anse, to establish, in company with Jay Hubbell, John Chassell, Samuel L. Smith and William Harris, the E. L..Mason & Company's Bank, which he operated successfully for upwards of twenty years, continuing his residence here until his death, in 1895, at the age of seventy-seven years. Edwin L. Mason married Mrs. Rebecca (Turner) Campbell, who was born in Argyleshire, Scotland. By her first marriage she had two children, John, of whom a brief sketch appears elsewhere in this volume; and Florence Campbell. By her union with Mr. Mason, two children also were born, namely: William L., the special subject of this sketch; and Edith, wife of Raymond T. Vent, of San Francisco, California. Edwin L. Mason was active in local affairs, filling the various township and village offices, and serving as judge of probate. After completing the course of study in the public schools of L'Anse, William L. Mason attended the Military Academy at Orchard Lake, and in 1884 entered the law department of the University of Michigan, from which he was graduated with the class of 1886. During the ensuing ten years Mr. Mason was engaged in the practice of his profession at L'Anse. Going to Detroit, Michigan, in 1896, he continued

Page  794 794 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN there as a lawyer for five years, when he returned to L'Anse, where he has since resided, having built up an extensive and lucrative practice, since 1908 having been associated with Mr. J. J. O'Connor, as above stated. Mr. Mason married, in 1888, Grace Mitchell, of Lawton, Michigan. Mr. Mason is a sound Republican in politics, and has served as prosecuting attorney of Baraga county. He is prominent in fraternal organizations, belonging to Houghton Lodge, No. 218, F. & A. M.; to Hancock Gate of the Temple Chapter, No. 35, R. A. M.; to Palestine Commandery, No. 48, K. T.; to L'Anse Camp, M. W. A.; and to Fall River Tent, No. 351, K. O. T. M. M. JAMES H. MOLLOY.-This well known and highly honored citizen of Ishpeming, where he is station agent for the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad Company, has been a resident of this favored "north country" since his boyhood days and has long been identified with railroad interests. His popularity is of the most unequivocal order, and as one of the representative citizens of the thriving city of Ishpeming he is well entitled to recognition in this publication. James H. Molloy was born in Fournier, Prescott county, in the extreme eastern part of the Dominion of Canada, on the 7th of April, 1857, and is a son of John M. and Mary Ann (Chesser) Molloy, both of whom were likewise natives of that country, where they were reared and educated and where their marriage was solemnized. Each was sixty-nine years at the time of death, and the father passed the closing days of his life in Tallapoosa, Georgia; his wife survived him by several years and died at Ishpeming, Michigan. Of the four children the subject of this sketch was the second in order of birth and of the number three are now living. John M. Molloy was long and prominently identified with the great lumbering industry in northern Michigan and Wisconsin and was one of the sterling pioneers of this section. He established his home in Marinette, Wisconsin, in 1865, and for a number of years thereafter he had the supervision of all the lumber drives down the Menominee river. He was one of the prominent and influential citizens of this section of the country, where he ever commanded unqualified confidence and esteem. At the time of the destruction of the village of Peshtigo, Wisconsin, in the terrible forest fires of the year 1871, he had charge of the supplies sent for the relief of the suffering citizens who had lost everything in the conflagration mentioned. During the last seven years of his life he resided in the south. Both he and his wife were members of the Episcopal church. James H. Molloy, whose name initiates this sketch, gained his rudimentary education in the schools of the province of Ontario, Canada, and was about ten years of age at the time of the family removal to Marinette, Wisconsin, where he continued his studies in the public schools until he had attained to the age of about fifteen years. In the autumn of 1871 he secured the position of messenger boy for the Marinette office of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad, and while thus engaged he gradually perfected himself in the art of telegraphy. In this connection he finally became manager of the Marinette office of the Western Union Telegraph Company and of the telegraph office of the railroad just mentioned. Later he was engaged as an extra or supply operator by the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad Company at various points along the line, and finally he became the company's station agent at Quinnesec, Dickinson county, Michigan, where he remained until the

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Page  795 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 795 24th of July, 1884, when he assumed his present responsible office as station and freight agent in the city of Ishpeming. He also has the supervision of the shipping of all the iron ore in this section, and this traffic constitutes one of the important features of his official business. He is known as a careful and able executive and has shown marked facility and accuracy in the handling of the manifold details of the business entrusted to his care. He is at the present time (1910) president of the Northern Peninsula Division of the Chicago & Northwestern Freight Agents' Association, and he is held in high esteem in railroad circles and by the traveling public, as well as by the people of his home city. In politics Mr. Molloy is a staunch supporter of the cause of the Republican party, and he has served as a member of the city council of Ishpeming. He was a valued member of this body at the time when the present and excellent sewerage system was installed. While a resident of Quinnesec, Michigan, he served as village postmaster, and for two terms was treasurer of Quinnesec township. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. On the 9th of January, 1877, was performed the ceremony that united the life destinies of Mr. Molloy and Miss Maria L. Lathrop, who was born near the city of Marquette, Michigan, and who was the fourth in order of birth of the seven children of Azel and Rosana Ann (Holland) Lathrop, both of whom; were born in New England. They were numbered among the pioneer settlers of Marquette county, Michigan, where Mr. Lathrop was engaged in farming and lumbering operations. He finally located in the midst of the wilds of Delta county, where he reclaimed a farm and where he also founded the village of Lathrop, which was named in his honor. He was the first postmaster of the town and was one of the most honored and influential citizens of that county, where he was called upon to serve in virtually all of the township offices of Lathrop township, including those of supervisor and treasurer. The township likewise was named in his honor. Both he and his wife continued to reside in Lathrop until their death, and of their children one son and four daughters are now living. In politics Mr. Lathrop was originally a Whig and later a Republican, and both he and his wife held to the faith of the Methodist Episcopal church. Concerning the children of Mr. and Mrs. Molloy the following brief record is entered in conclusion of this sketch: Marcus Q., who is now agent for the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad Company, at Daggett, Menominee county, Michigan, married Miss Ida Duncan, a native of Ottawa, Canada, and they have one daughter; Alice L. is the wife of Rev. Frank C. Walter, pastor of the Methodist Episcopal church at Atlantic Mine, Houghton county, Michigan, and they have two children; John, the third in order of birth, died in infancy; James H., Jr., is a student in the department of electrical engineering in the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, where he is a member of the class of 1911; and Maria L. and Carrie C. are students in the Ishpeming high school. The family is prominent in the best social life of the community and the attractive home is a center of cordial hospitality. SAMUEL LANGDON.-Mining, one of the principal sources from which the wealth of the world is derived, is numbered among the leading industries of the Upper Peninsula, and of men that have been active in developing the mines of this region is Samuel Langdon, of Iron Mountain, a man of industry, energy and sterling worth. He was born, December 8, 1850, at Redruth, county Cornwall, England, a son of Edward Langdon.

Page  796 I 796 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN Edward Langdon spent his entire life in county Cornwall. being employed during his active career as a miner. He married first Mary A. Phillips, who died in 1854. He married for his second wife Annie Richards, who was born in Cornwall, England, ninety years ago, and is now a resident of Iron Mountain, Michigan, where she settled on coming to America after the death of her husband. By his first marriage Edward Langdon reared five children, as follows: Eliza, Edward, William, Samuel and Thomas. Eliza died at the age of twenty-three years, and Thomas when but seventeen years old, the other three children emigrating to America. By his second marriage five children also were born, three of whom died in England, while the other two, James and Catherine came to America, and are now living in Iron Mountain, Catherine being the wife of Samuel Terrill. Acquiring his early knowledge in the public schools, Samuel Langdon began working as a miner at the age of fifteen years, and continued thus employed in Cornwall county for five years. Desirous of advancing his financial opportunities he emigrated then to America, coming directly to the Upper Peninsula, and the next three years was employed at the Calumet and Hecla Mine, in Calumet. He then spent a few months in Ishpeming, but not content with his prospects returned to Calumet. During the big strike of 1872 he located at Ontonagon, where he mined for three years. Going back then to Calumet, he resumed work at the Calumet and Hecla Mine, continuing there until 1879. Mr. Langdon then located at Quinnesec, which was then the railroad terminus, all of the territory above that place being an unbroken wilderness, and was employed for about two and onehalf years at the Quinnesec Mine. Coming to Iron Mountain from there he was timber boss at the Ludington Mine for twelve years. lie was subsequently employed at the Macedon Mine, in Crystal Falls, for eight months, after which he was connected with the working force at the Pewabic Mine, in Iron Mountain, for a time. Anxious to broaden his scope of action, Mr. Langdon visited Colorado, and for a few months was engaged in his chosen occupation in the Ute mine, near Lake City. He returned then to Michigan, and the following two years worked in the Pewabic Mine. Making a trip then to British Columbia, Mr. Langdon was for three years an employe at the famous Silver King Mine, near Nelson. Returning once more to Iron Mountain, he bought land about two miles north of the city limits, and was engaged in agricultural pursuits for seven years. Renting his farm at the expiration of that time, Mr. Langdon has since resided at Iron Mountain, and at the present time, in 1910, is running an engine at the Pewabic Mine. On December 5, 1872, Mr. Langdon married Anna Jane Hambly, who was born in St. Austell parish, county Cornwall, England, November 22, 1856. Joseph Hambly, her father, a native of the same county, was there reared and married. Emigrating to this country in 1858, he located in Ontonagon, Michigan, where, a year later, he was joined by his wife and child, who were twenty-two days in crossing the Atlantic in a steamship. After working a few years as a miner, he was forced to give it up on account of ill health, and for several years was employed in teaming between Ontonagon and the Lake. Locating then in Iron Mountain, he was here a resident until his death, at the age of sixty-eight years, in 1900. His wife, whose maiden name was Hannah Rouett, was born in Cornwall, England, and died in August, 1906, at Iron Mountain. To them eight children were born, as follows: Anna Jane, the only one whose birth occurred in

Page  797 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 797 England; Katie; Emma; Mary; William J.; Elza; Nellie; and Joseph. The union of Mr. and Mrs. Langdon has been blessed by the birth of seven children, namely: Edward, Nellie, Joseph, Thomas, James, Flora and Alfred. Edward married Laura Trembath, and they have one child, Ronald. Nellie, wife of W. Ernest Truran, has two children, Beulah and Percival. Joseph died at the age of twenty years, in British Columbia. Thomas married Martha Vermecelia, and they have two children, Roosevelt and Queenetta. James married Winnie Peterson, and they have two children, Dorothy and Douglas J. Flora, wife of John A. Reynolds, has one child, Florence Ione. Mr. and Mrs. Langdon are conscientious and valued members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and have reared their children in the same religious faith. THEODORE C. CHRISTENSEN.-Among the sterling citizens and representative business men contributed to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan by the far Norseland is Mr. Christensen, who has been a resident of northern Michigan from his infancy to the present time and who is now engaged in the retail grocery business in the city of Menominee, where he has a well equipped establishment at 1409 Broadway. He is also serving as supervisor of the Fourth ward of the city, and here he is held in high esteem as a citizen of unequivocal integrity and honor, besides which he may claim prestige as being representative of one of the pioneer families of Menominee county. Theodore C. Christensen was born in Christiania, Norway, on the 10th of May, 1866, and is a son of Ole C. and Olena (Avison) Christensen, both likewise natives of Christiania, where the former was born on the 2d of June, 1830, and the latter on the 31st of March, 1831. The father still maintains his home in Menominee and the mother was summoned to the life eternal on the 17th of August, 1909. Their marriage was solemnized in Christiania on the 11th of June, 1853, and of their three sons and three daughters two sons and two daughters are now living, namely: Emma, who is the wife of Albert Larson, editor of the lMe nominele Colnty Joulrnal at Stephenson; Anna M., who is the wife of Chas. C. Hansen, the present county clerk of Menominee county; Axel G., who is janitor of the county court house; and Theodore C., whose name initiates this review. For a quarter of a century Ole C. Christensen followed a seafaring life, and thus upheld the maritime prestige of his sturdy Viking ancestors. H-e made voyages into all sections of the world and finally, in 1857, at the earnest desire of his wife, he abandoned the sea and became superintendent of a gas plant in the city of Christiania. IHe retained this position for sixteen years, at the expiration of which, in 1868, he emigrated with his family to America. From New York city he made his way directly to Menominee, Michigan, where he entered the employ of the Ludington, Wells & Vance Lumber Company. He worked in the woods during the winter season and in the saw mills during the summers, and thus he continued his labors lor a number of years. He then purchased a tract of land in Stephenson township, Menominee county, and turned his attention to agricultural pursuits. I-e reclaimed much of his land to cultivation and made excellent improvements on the same. I-e was engaged in farming about twelve years, at the expiration of which he sold the place and resumed his connection with lumbering operations, with which he continued to be identified until 1897, since which time he has lived virtually retired.

Page  798 798 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN In politics he is a staunch adherent of the Republican party, and he taken an intelligent interest in public affairs, as a loyal and appreciative citizen of his adopted country. He is a member of the Swedish Mission church in Menominee, and of the same his wife also was a devoted member. Theodore C. Christensen was about two years of age at the time of the family emigration to the United States, and to the public schools of Menominee he is indebted for his early educational training. His first teacher was Professor J. W. Bird, and it is interesting to record that later it was his privilege to gain his initial business experience in a grocery store conducted by Professor Bird. In 1888 Mr. Christensen engaged in the logging business on his own responsibility, and he continued operations in this line until 1892, when he became a salesman in the retail grocery of Frank Penberthy, of Menominee, with whom he remained until 1894, when he became shipping clerk in the wholesale grocery house of Somerville, Cook & Penberthy, which firm was later succeeded by the present Carpenter-Cook Company. For a time Mr. Christensen was in the employ of McNeeley & Company, grocers, and in 1897 he became associated with his brother-in-law, C. C. Hansen in a retail grocery business, under the firm name of Hansen & Company. In July, 1899, he purchased his partner's interest and he has since conducted the enterprise under his own name. He has a well appointed store and through effective service and honorable dealings he has gained a substantial patronage, so that he is one of the prosperous business men of the city in which practically his entire life has been passed. In politics Mr. Christensen is arrayed as a staunch supporter of the cause of the Republican party, and he has at all times observed to the fullest extent the duties devolving upon him as a citizen. The confidence in which he is held in his home city is evidenced by the fact that he has served continuously as supervisor of the Fourth ward since 1904, by consecutive re-election. He has proved a valuable member of the county board of supervisors and has done all in his power to conserve wise administration of the county and city affairs. He is affiliated with Menominee Lodge, No. 133, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and Goodtown Tent, No. 714, Knights of the Modern Maccabees, and both he and his wife are zealous members of the Norwegian Lutheran church. In March, 1893, Mr. Christensen was united in marriage to Miss Emma Johnson, who was born in Norway and who is a daughter of John and Thilda (Miller) Johnson, both of whom were born in the vicinity of Christiania. Of the six children four are living and Mrs. Christensen is the eldest of the number; Jennie is the wife of Gust Peterson, of Iron Mountain, Michigan; Josephine is the wife of John Swanson, of the same city; and William is likewise a resident of Iron Mountain. John Jonson emigrated with his family to America in the year 1870 and took up his residence in Marinette, Wisconsin. He is an iron moulder by trade and at Marinette he was employed at his trade by the Prescott Company for a period of about fifteen years. He then removed to Pennsylvania, but a few years later he took up his residence in Iron Mountain, Michigan, where he is now living retired. He is a Republican in politics and both he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. and Mrs. Christensen have two children,-Paul, who was born on the 20th of October, 1894; and Elmer, who was born on the 11th of November, 1896.

Page  799 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 799 JOHN McKEE.-The subject of this review is engaged in the stove and furniture business in the city of Sault Ste. Marie and is numbered among the representative citizens of this flourishing city, where he is held in uniform confidence and esteem. Mr. McKee is a native of Ayrshire, Scotland, where he was born on the 11th of May, 1839, being a son of James and Jane McKee, the former of whom attained to the age of more than four score years, and the latter of whom was sixty-two years of age at the time of her death, which occurred in Lawrence, Massachusetts. Of the ten children only four are living,-Jeanette, John, James and Margaret. Mr. McKee was reared to maturity in his native land, where he received the advantages of the common schools and where he remained until 1861, in August of which year he emigrated to America. He landed in the city of Quebec, Canada, and thence made his way to Toronto, from which place he removed to Lawrence, Massachusetts. After five years there he moved to Acton, province of Ontario, Canada, where he was engaged in buying and shipping wool and grain. In 1873 Mr. McKee came to Chippewa county, Michigan, and purchased eighty acres of land located seven miles south of Sault Ste. Marie. He remained on this farm only a short time and then returned to the province of Ontario, where he resided until 1880, when he again came to Chippewa county and secured another tract of land twelve and one-half miles south of Sault Ste. Marie, where he reclaimed a farm from the wilderness. He remained on this farm for six years, at the expiration of which time he moved to Sault Ste. Marie for the purpose of affording his children better educational advantages, and here he was engaged in the draying business until 1887, when he established himself in the stove and furniture business, with which he has since been identified and in which connection he has built up a prosperous enterprise. In politics Mr. McKee gives his allegiance to the Republican party, and he is a zealous Presbyterian. He is affiliated with the Bethel Lodge, No. 358, Free and Accepted Masons; Sault Ste. Marie Chapter, No. 126, Royal Arch Masons, of which he is a charter member; and he is president of the Caledonia Club. On the 22d of February, 1869, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. McKee to Miss Elenora Dempsey, and for thirty years they passed down the pathway of life together, the idyllic association being severed by the death of Mrs. McKee on the 26th of April, 1899. Concerning the four children, the following brief data are given: Francis J. died at the age of twenty-nine years; Maude M. is the wife of R. E. Mimmo, of Sault Ste. Marie; Nora E. is the wife of Gale E. Hendry and resides in the city of Los Angeles, California; and John was drowned at the age of six years. REV. PETER CHARLES MENARD, pastor of St. Ann Parish in Escanaba, was born in Vercheres, Canada, October 27, 1845. He spent his boyhood days in his native place, and there received his primary education. After graduating at Joliette College, he attended the Grand Seminary at Montreal, and there graduated in a theological course. He was ordained in the church in Marquette, Michigan, April 23, 1875. His first charge was at Menominee, Michigan, where he spent five years. He was next stationed at Lake Linden for fourteen years, and in 1892 came to Escanaba. There are some four hundred families under his charge, although when he first came here there was but a small congregation. In his pastorate the membership has increased greatly, and the school has

Page  800 800 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN been much enlarged; the congregation have built the priest's house and convent, and doubled the property, and where they formerly owned three lots they now have six. The school has some three hundred and fifty pupils, with a corps of ten teachers. There is also an assistant pastor, Reverend Father Blin. Father Menard is an eloquent, zealous worker for the faith, and untiring in his efforts for the good of his people. His family are of French descent, and the emigrant ancestor came to Canada in 1657, from St. Malo, France. Father Menard's father was a lawyer in Canada. Highly esteemed Father Menard stands well in the community, is interested in every good cause and has won the affection of his people. He has the largest parish in the city of Escanaba. REV. THOMAS R. EASTERDAY.-No citizen of Sault Ste. Marie is more emphatically revered in the community than this honored pioneer clergyman, who has here maintained his residence for nearly half a century and whose life has been consecrated to the uplifting of his fellowmen, not only along spiritual lines but also in educational, social, and productive channels. For nearly eighteen years Mr. Easterday was pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Sault Ste. Marie and his ecclesiastical functions have touched the community closely and beneficently even as have his labors in the cause of popular education and in behalf of civic and material progress. Ever mindful of his stewardship and bringing to bear the splendid forces of a strong and noble nature, he has made an indelible impress upon the history of the city and state in which he has so long maintained his home, and the reverent affection accorded him by young and old in Chippewa county testifies to the popular appreciation of his faithful services as one of the world's great army of workers; and also indicates the intrinsic kindliness and tolerance and humanitarianism of the man himself. Any publication touching upon the lives and deeds of those who have been prominently identified with the annals of the Northern Peninsula of Michigan would stultify its consistency were there failure to accord a grateful tribute to Rev. Thomas R. Easterday who, though venerable in years, is still found actively engaged in productive labors for the good of his fellow men, as he has for the past fifteen years been incumbent of the office of Commissioner of Schools for Chippewa county. Rev. Thomas R. Easterday was born in Knox township, Jefferson county, Ohio, on the 27th day of October, 1837. He is a son of Daniel and Jane (Robertson) Easterday, whose marriage was solemnized in that county in 1836. Daniel Easterday likewise was a native of Jefferson county and was a member of one of the sterling pioneer families of that section of the old Buckeye state. The lineage of the Easterday family is traced back to patrician German origin, and the name has been identified with American history since 1575, when the parents of Martin Easterday, great-grandfather of the subject of this review, immigrated from the vicinity of Stuttgart, Germany, and settled in eastern Pennsylvania or New Jersey. In America the name was translated from its German form, Ostertag, to Easterday. Martin Easterday served as a soldier in the Continental line in the war of the Revolution and after the close thereof he engaged in agricultural pursuits in eastern Pennsylvania. His son Christian, next in line of direct descent to him whose name initiates this review, was born in Pennsylvania and he became the founder of the family in Ohio. Both he and Thomas Robertson, mater

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Page  801 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 801 nal grandfather of Mr. Easterday, immigrated from Pennsylvania to Ohio and secured tracts of wild land on the Ohio river, near the present city of Steubenville. Thomas Robertson was of Scotch-Irish lineage and his wife, whose maiden name was McMiillan, was a cousin of Hon. Andrew G. Curtin, governor of Pennsylvania at the time of the Civil war, and later United States minister to Russia. Representatives of the Robertson family were found aligned as patriot soldiers in the war of the Revolution. Both this family and the Robertson family also contributed loyal soldiers to the war of 1812, the Iexican war and the Civil war, and the respective names have ever stood exponent of the deepest patriotism. John Robertson, father of Thomas Robertson just mentioned, married a daughter of General Brady, the distinguished Revolutionary officer, and in honor of this renowned ancestor of Mr. Easterday's it is interesting to state that Fort Brady, located at Sault Ste. Marie, was named. Daniel and Jane (Robertson) Easterday became the parents of six sons and three daughters, and of this number all the sons and two daughters are now living, being residents of the state of Nebraska except the subject of this review and one brother now living in Palo Alto, California, and two sisters living in San Diego, California. Daniel Easterday removed with his family from Ohio to Montgomery county, Illinois, in 1851, where he was a prosperous farmer and highly honored citizen for a period of fully a quarter of a century. In 1883 he removed to Nebraska and in the city of Lincoln, that state, he passed the closing years of his life. He died on the 23d of June, 1900, at the venerable age of eighty-eight years, his cherished and devoted wife having been summoned to the life eternal on the 31st of December, 1891. Both were earnest and zealous members of the Evangelical Lutheran church and exemplified their faith in their daily lives, which were consecrated to all that is good and true in the scheme of human existence. Rev. Thomas R. Easterday gained his rudimentary education in the common schools of Jefferson county, Ohio, and was a lad of about fourteen at the time of the family removal to Illinois. At Springfield, that state, he continued his educational work, and one of his schoolmates was Robert T. Lincoln, son of President Lincoln and now a representative citizen of Chicago. Mr. Easterday well recalls the martyred president and his youthful admiration for this distinguished patriot and statesman has continued throughout his mature years. Mr. Easterday attended college and seminary for a period of seven years, and was unfaltering in his ambition to acquire a liberal education. In 1862 he was graduated from Illinois State University at Springfield, from which he received the degree of Bachelor of Arts. In 1864 from the Lutheran Seminary the degree of B. D. and in 1889 from Pennsylvania Ph. D., and three years later his alma mater conferred upon him the degree of Master of Arts. He was ordained to the ministry in the Lutheran church by the Synod of Northern Illinois in October 1865 at Princeton, Illinois, having been licensed to preach two years before, and at once transferred his ecclesiastical connection to the Presbytery of Lake Superior. His first regular pastoral charge was assumed when he came to Sault Ste. Marie and became pastor of the First Presbyterian church, on Christmas day of the year 1864. Data concerning this church and his connection therewith are well worthy of reproduction in this sketch. Records indicate that the Presbyterian church in Sault Ste. Marie was organized on the 28th of February. 1854, by Rev. William McCul

Page  802 802 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN lough, who had been holding services here for four months prior to the effecting of a permanent organization. The society held its meetings in the school house during the time that its building, the main part of the present old edifice, was being erected. The church was dedicated in 1855 and Mr. McCullough remained as its pastor for somewhat less than two years thereafter. From that time forward the church had no regular pastoral incumbent until nearly ten years later, when Mr. Easterday assumed the charge. The eleven members of the church at the time of its organigation were Philetus S. Church, Elizabeth Church, L. L. and Phoebe Nichols, Joseph and Jane Mason, Charles T. Harvey, Julia Hopkins, Olive W. McKnight, Adaline Jones, and Maria Spaulding. This is by several months the oldest Presbyterian church in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. The first Board of Directors comprised Philetus S. Church, L. L. Nichols, and the former continued in the position of senior elder for thirty years, his tenure of the same ending with his death, in 1884. Rev. Thomas R. Easterday assumed pastoral charge of the church on Christmas day of the year 1864. He soon brought about a reorganization, beginning with a list of seven members. He labored with all his consecrated zeal and devotion in the discharge of the duties of his pastorate for seventeen and one-half years, and his work was attended by distinctive growth in the spiritual and temporal well-being of the society. A paralytic stroke finally compelled him to resign and he retired from the pastorate in 1880. Concerning Mr. Easterday's labors in Sault Ste. Marie the following appreciative words have been written: "He has not only been interested in religious and moral training but has also given an almost equally devoted attention to the cause of popular education. He has fought valiantly for the divorcement of church and school and for the securing of the graded high school system which is now a source of pride to the city in which he has so long maintained his home. He introduced the resolution for the appropriation of the first one thousand dollars for the erection of the present high school building, and drafted the memorial to Congress by which the United States government gave the grounds occupied by the building." Mr. Easterday cast his first vote for President Lincoln, and during the long intervening years he has never wavered in his allegiance to the Republican party, in whose local camp he has given most effective service. In 1892 he came within thirteen votes of being elected county treasurer. He met defeat in the contest as representative of his district in the state senate. In 1895 he was elected commissioner of schools for Chippewa county and by successive re-elections he has continued incumbent of this responsible office during the long intervening period of fifteen years. IHis present term will expire December 31, 1912. The public school system of this county owes a debt of perpetual gratitude to Mr. Easterday for his administration of his present office, which has been essentially progressive, discriminating and faithful, resulting in concrete results of the most gratifying order, as the school system of Chippewa county will compare favorably with that of any other county in the state and is maintained at the highest standard. Mr. Easterday has been a veritable pillar of strength in the church of which he has was so long the beloved pastor, and his services have been enlisted since his retirement in much work of a ministerial order -particularly in the officiating at christenings, marriages and funerals. I-e has officiated at the marriage of young persons whose

Page  803 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 803 respective parents and grandparents were likewise united in the same holy bonds by his interposition. He has been the guide, counselor, and friend of the succeeding generations, has comforted those "in any ways 'afilicted in mind, body or estate," and has shown at all times that gracious faith that makes faithful. His heart is attuned to the deepest of human sympathy and he has comforted and sustained hundreds of those whose loved ones have been laid to rest under his charge. His encouragement and admonition have enabled young men to achieve success of pronounced order, and his practical ability has also enabled him to accumulate a comfortable competency for himself. No citizen is better known in Chippewa county than this venerable clergyman and able public official, and he is loved and revered alike by young and old in the community in which he has so long lived and labored to goodly ends. He has shown during the long years that have elapsed since he came to Sault Ste. Marie, a deep interest in all that has touched the material and civic prosperity of the city and has himself contributed appreciably to the work of development and progress. The late Hon. Henry P. Baldwin, a former governor of the state and long one of the most honored and influential citizens of Detroit, offered many years ago to establish a bank in Sault Ste. Marie if Mr. Easterday would assume charge of the same, but the latter felt that he could not withdraw from the work of his church for this purpose and thus declined the overtures. There was no banking institution in this city at the time this proffer was made. He has been a member of the high school board of his home city for thirty-nine years, and in all other ways has shown himself loyal to every civic duty. In 1863 Mr. Easterday was raised to the degree of Master Mason in Tyrian Lodge, No. 333, Free and Accepted Masons, at Springfield, Illinois, Orlin H. Minor, Sec. of State, Master, and he has been a most appreciative adherent of the time honored fraternity, in which he has attained to the thirty-second degree of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite. His Masonic affiliations at the present time are here briefly noted: Bethel Lodge, No. 358, Free and Accepted Masons of Sault Ste. Marie, of which he is past master; Sault Ste. Marie Chapter, No. 126, Royal Arch Masons; Sault Ste. Marie Council, No. 69, Royal and Select Masters; Sault Ste. MIarie Commandery, No. 58, Knights Templars; DeWitt Clinton Consistory, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, in the city of Grand Rapids, and Ahmed Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, at Marquette, this state. In the city of Springfield, Illinois, on the 24th day of December, 1862, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Easterday to Miss Leora J. Tyson, who was born at Utica, Michigan, on the 6th of January, 1844, and who is a daughter of the late John R. Tyson, a native of Lincolnshire, England. Mrs. Easterday has proved a devoted wife and helpmeet and she and her husband have passed down the pathway of life together for a period of forty-eight years, sustained and comforted by mutual love and sympathy. Of their three children the eldest, Lillie, died at the age of seven months; Rosa L., who died in Sault Ste. Marie on the 10th of December, 1897, was the wife of Dr. Thomas N. Rogers, who, with his two sons, now resides in the home of M'r. Easterday. The two sons of Dr. Rogers are Edison E. and Dan Tyson, both of whom are attending the public schools. Oro Thomas, the only living child of Mr. and Mrs. Easterday, was born in Sault Ste. Marie and he was a resident of Pasadena, California, for five years but is again a resident of this city engaged with Edward Demar, architect. He married Miss Harriet

Page  804 804 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN Danforth, daughter of William Danforth, a resident of California, and they have one son, Frank Russell, who was born on the 1st of January, 1909, in Pasadena, California. WILLIAM J. UREN was born at the Madison mine, Keweenaw county, Michigan, December 4, 1863, and is a son of Richard and Jane Uren. After attending the public schools, in 1880 he entered the employ of the Lake Superior Native Copper Works at Houghton, and engaged in the smelting and manufacturing of copper. From 1882 to 1885 he was at the Wolverine mine engaged in general mining. In 1886 he matriculated at the Michigan College of Mines, completing the course in 1888. In 1889 was connected with the Tamarack-Osceola Copper Manufacturing Company at Dollar Bay, and in the same year became connected with the Mineral Range and Hancock & Calumet Railroads, at Hancock, Michigan, as Civil Engineer. In 1895 he became connected with the Lake Superior Iron Works, Hancock, and in 1899 with the Trimountain and Elm River Mining Companies as Assistant Superintendent. In 1903 he became connected with the Ahmeek, Isle Royale, Osceola Consolidated, Seneca and Tamarack Mining Companies as Assistant Superintendent, and in 1905 was appointed General Superintendent of these Companies, which position he still occupies. He was married to Emma L. Forbes, of Plainwell, Michigan, October 5, 1895. They are the parents of four children: Richard F., born July 19, 1898, Mary A., born December 3, 1901, William J., born March 25, 1903, and Alice Margaret, born March 6, 1906. Mr. Uren's fraternal affiliations extends to the Masons and Elks. He is a Director of the Calumet State Bank. RICHARD UREN was born in Cornwall, England, January 10, 1835. He emigrated to America in 1851, reaching Houghton in September of that year. He worked as a miner from 1851 to 1855, and then formed a partnership with his brother John in a lease of the Copper Falls mine of Keweenaw county. After the expiration of this lease in 1859, he engaged as Mining Captain of the same mine and served until 1863, then forming a partnership with Dunstone and Blight, for the manufacture of safety fuse, at Eagle River. The machinery used was invented by him. He was then appointed agent of the Madison, Winthrop and Dana mines. In 1864 he was agent of the Pewabic and Franklin mines, resigning in 1868. He then went to California and established a safety fuse works. Returning to Lake Superior in January 1872, he leased the Pewabic and Franklin mines which he operated until July 1874. He was next agent again of the Madison mine. In 1877 he became interested in gold mining in the Black Hills, Dakota. Returning to Lake Superior he became interested in the Lake Superior Native Copper Works in 1880, as Secretary and Treasurer. He became interested in the Wolverine mine in 1881, as part owner and agent. Mr. Uren was married in Cornwall, England, August 11, 1859, to Miss Jane Nicholas, daughter of William Nicholas. They had five children: Elizabeth, died aged five years; Mary A., died aged seven months; William J.; Bessie, died when twenty-nine years; and Mary, died aged twenty-four years. Mr. Uren died March 12, 1897, and Mrs. Uren died September 13, 1902.

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Page  805 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 805 DR. WILLIAM AUVERGNE LEMIRE, one of the leading physicians and surgeons of Escanaba, was born in Nicollet, Canada, April 23, 1877. He is a son of Eugene and Denese (Pinard) Lemire, the father a native of Canada, and the mother of Connecticut. Mrs. Lemire was a school teacher, and she and her husband came to the Northern Peninsula in 1877, locating at Houghton. They now live on a farm some eight miles out of Houghton. Of their thirteen children, Dr. Lemire is the oldest, and nine are living at the present time. Dr. Lemire was about one month old when his parents located in Houghton, Michigan; he received his early education in the public schools of Houghton, and in 1894 was graduated from the literary course at St. Viateur's College, at Kankakee, Illinois. In 1899 he was graduated from the St. Louis College of Physicians and Surgeons, and in the fall of that year located at Garden, Delta county, Michigan. In 1903 he removed to Escanaba, where he has since remained in the successful practice of his profession. Dr. Lemire is a member of Delta County Medical Society, of which he is secretary; he is also a member of the State and American Medical societies. He has served since 1907 as County Physician, and is surgeon at the County Hospital, and has been elected a member of the Board of Education. He has been almost a lifelong resident of the Northern Peninsula, and takes an active interest in public affairs. He was president of the Village of Garden, and resigned this post upon removing to Escanaba. He is affiliated with the Knights of Columbus, and a member of the three local French societies, being medical examiner for all of them. Dr. Lemire married, in 1901, Isabel McDonald, and they have four children, namely: Myrtle Isabel, Loretta Lula, Catherine Mary and William Auvergne. NORMAN MCDONALD.-Although the possessor of a typically Scottish name, Norman McDonald was not born in the land of the thistle, but is a native of Germany. No matter under what flag his birth occurred, he has become a thorough American and has enjoyed prosperity in the land of his adoption, having come to be known as one of the most successful and substantial business men in the locality and a capitalist whose judgment is entitled to the greatest consideration. Mr. McDonald was born in Germany in October, 1863, his parents being Daniel and Mary McDonald. There he passed the first six years of his life, his parents bringing him to America in 1869. They landed at Castle Garden, New York city, and went almost immediately to Canada, it being the father's intention to secure employment in the copper mines. He afterwards became interested as an employer, and subsequently came to Calument, Michigan, where he devoted his energies to the mining industry up to the time of his death, which occurred in Red Jacket about the year 1898. His wife survived him and died two years later. Norman McDonald passed the greater part of his boyhood and youth in Calumet and owes his education to her public schools. Soon after leaving their portals he worked for his father in the mines and began to acquire that knowledge of mining in its many phases which has since proved very valuable to him. In later years his father identified himself with the drug business, and after his death Mr. McDonald took charge of his store, which was located on Fifth street, and later became sole proprietor of the drug stock. He continued successfully in this line until 1903, when he disposed of the concern and invested his money in copper mining stock. His success has been notable, and he has realized Vol. II-12

Page  806 806 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN very handsomely on almost every investment which his judgment and foresight have led him to make. Although by no means an old man, he is living in semi-retirement, his business interests being such as to require the greater part of his time and attention, although not identified actively with any concern. In 1897 Mr. McDonald was married to Miss Margaret King, daughter of Richard King, an old and much respected resident of Calumet. To this union was born one son, now deceased. The magnificent McDonald residence was erected in 1906, and is a credit to Laurium, being handsome in appearance and modern in all its appointments. The Masonic affiliations of this gentleman play a pleasant part in his life, these extending to Calumet lodge, F. & A. M., and to Calumet Chapter, R. A. M. He and his wife are members of the Methodist church. JOHN JAMES.-A prominent public-spirited citizen of Iron Mountain, John James has been a resident of this place for many years, and as a man of sound sense and good judgment his influence and assistance are always sought in behalf of undertakings for the public good and the advancement of the best interests of the city. He has served the city in various official positions, at the present time being a member of the board of education. A native of England, he was born, March 23, 1857, in the parish of Saint Agnes, county Cornwall, and with the exception of his brother, William H., was the only member of the parental family to come to America. On emigrating to the United States, William H. James settled at Iron Mountain, where, in June, 1892, he was accidentally drowned, leaving a widow and three children. Educated in a parochial school, John James began working as a wage-earner when but thirteen years old in the mines at Cornwall. Three years later he went to county Durham and was employed in the mines of that county and in Yorkshire until 1880. On May 4 of that year he sailed from Liverpool for America, and a week later landed in New York. Going from there to Pittston, Pennsylvania, he remained there a few months, working in the mines, and was afterward employed in the mines at Mount Iope, New Jersey, until May, 1881. Pushing his way westward, Mr. James located in the new town of Iron Mountain and became one of the first operators in the Millie Mine. Going a few months later with Captain Wicks to Keel Ridge, he remained there until March, 1882, when he began work at the Chapin mine, at which during the summer months he was night time keeper and afterwards was promoted to the position of chief time keeper, an office which he filled six years. HIe was then made bookkeeper, Thomas Cole being cashier and C. H. Cady, superintendent. In September, 1891, Mr. James resigned his position to engage in the grocery business, but at the end of a few months he retired from mercantile pursuits to become time keeper at the Ludington mine. In the ensuing fall that mine was inundated, and all work ceased. Going to Negaunee, Marquette county, in the spring of 1892, Mr. James was bookkeeper at the Buffalo group of mines with T. F. Cole. A few months later he became bookkeeper at the Dunn mine, of which Captain S. C. Bennett was superintendent. In December, 1892, Mr. James was transferred, with an increased salary, to the Aragon mine, in Norway, where he was bookkeeper until the panic of 1893, when the mine was closed and he sought a new field of operation, becoming agent for the Northwestern Accident Association. In May, 1894, Mr. James became special agent for the Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company, and on January 1, 1895, was promoted to his present position as district manager for the same company.

Page  807 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 807 Mr. James married, August 7, 1882, Amelia Skinner, who was born in county Cornwall, England, and reared in county Durham. Nine children have been born of their union, namely: Bessie, who died at the age of twelve years; Horace; Ethel; Harold; Garnet; Gladys; Clarence; Ruth; and Irving. In his political affiliations Mr. James is identified with the Republican party, and for a number or years has been a member of the board of education of Iron Mountain. For two years he served as alderman from the Fifth ward, and has represented that ward on the county board of supervisors. Fraternally he is a member of Iron Mountain Lodge, No. 388, F. & A. M., which he served as master two years; of Iron Mountain Chapter, No. 121, R. A. M., of which he was high priest two years; of Darius Council, No. 75, R. & S. M.; of Hugh McCurdy Commandery, No. 43, K. T.; of Saladin Temple, Order of the Mystic Shrine; and of De Witt Clinton Consistory, at Grand Rapids. True to the religious beliefs in which they were reared, Mr. and Mrs. James are members of the Episcopal church, of Iron Mountain, in the organization of which Mr. James was especially active and which he has served as lay reader. Mrs. James is also a valued member of the Ladies' Guild. ALFRED B. STRYKER.-One of the alert and loyal business men who have within recent years put forth such effective efforts in advancing the civic and material progress of the city of Menominee is he whose name initiates this paragraph and who holds an impregnable position as one of the representative business men of this city, where he is held in unqualified confidence and esteem. Alfred Breisch Stryker reverts with due measure of satisfaction to the fact that he can claim the fine old Keystone state of the Union as the place of his nativity. He was born in Milford township, Bucks county, Pennsylvania, on the 23rd of September, 1852, and is a son of Samuel and Catherine (Breisch) Stryker, both of whom are likewise natives of Bucks county, Pennsylvania, where the former was born in 1818 and the latter in 1819. They continued their residence in the Keystone state throughout their entire lives, the mother having passed away in 1859 and the father in 1867. Of their ten children four are now living, and the subject of this sketch was the eighth in order of birth. The father was a tinsmith by trade and followed this for a long period of years, besides which he was actively identified with agricultural pursuits, having owned a well-improved farm in his native county. He was a man of strong individuality and excellent mental attainments, and in his younger years he was a successful and popular teacher in the public schools of his native state for fourteen winter terms. For fifteen consecutive years he served as township assessor and he was a citizen of prominence and influence in his community. His political allegiance was given to the Democratic party and both he and his wife held membership in the Lutheran church. Alfred B. Stryker passed his boyhood on the home farm, and in the meanwhile availed himself of the advantages of the district schools. which he continued to attend until he was fourteen years of age, when the death of his father rendered it expedient for him to assume the practical responsibilities of life. When thirteen years of age he entered upon an apprenticeship at the cigar-makers' trade in a cigar factory in Milford, Pennsylvania, where he was employed during the winters, and during the summer seasons he devoted his attention to farm work. He thus continued until 1870, when he came to the west.

Page  808 808 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN In April of the following year he took up his residence in Menominee, where he worked at his trade until the 15th of September, 1873, when he initiated his independent career as a manufacturer of and dealer in cigars. He is now to be designated as the pioneer cigar manufacturer of this section of the state, and through his well directed efforts and honorable methods he has built up a large and prosperous enterprise. He has also identified himself with various other lines of business and is now one of the substantial capitalists of Menominee. He is a stockholder and director of the Lumbermen's National Bank; is a stockholder in the Richardson Shoe Manufacturing Company; and is a stockholder in the Menominee & Marinette Traction & Light Company. He has contributed to the full extent of all his powers to all the enterprises that have tended to promote the upbuilding of Menominee, in which place he took up his residence before it was incorporated and which has since expanded to a city of more than fifteen thousand population. In 1882 he was elected clerk of Menominee township, and from 1887 to 1889, inclusive, he was incumbent of the office of county treasurer. From 1896 to 1898 he held the office of county road commissioner. His retention of these responsible offices gives evidence of the high esteem in which he is held in the county which has so long represented his home. His political support is given to the Democratic party, and he has been an active worker in its local ranks. In the Masonic fraternity Mr. Stryker is identified with Menominee Lodge, No. 269, Free & Accepted Masons; Menominee Chapter, No. 107, Royal Arch Masons; Menominee Commandery, No. 35, Knights Templars; and Ahmed Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, at Marquette, Michigan. His wife holds membership in the Lutheran church. On the 25th of November, 1875, was solemnized the marriage of.Mr. Stryker and Miss Mary M. Sherman, who was born near Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, and who is a daughter of William Sherman, a native of Indiana. She was the youngest in a family of five children and was an infant at the time of her parents' death. GUSTAV TOLLEN.-Noteworthy among the thriving, prosperous and law-abiding citizens of Iron Mountain is Gustav Tollen, superintendent of the Oliver Mining Company's hydraulic works, and who is held in high respect as a man of upright principles and sterling integrity. A native of Norway, he was born, November 28, 1850, in the seaport town of Drammen, which is located twenty-eight English miles from Christiana. His father, an iron master or, in other words, a manufacturer of spikes, was a life-long resident of Norway. Five of his children, however, emigrated to America, settling here permanently, namely: John, Gustav, Andrew, Oscar and Jenny. Completing his early studies in the public schools, Gustav Tollen began working in his father's factory when fifteen years old, continuing with him two years. He was subsequently employed in railroad work a number of years, the latter part of the time being an engineer. Emigrating to this country in 1880, Mr. Tollen made his way directly to Iron Mountain, which was then but a small hamlet, although it was growing with rapidity. Securing a position with the Menominee Mining Company, he was for two years employed as master mechanic at their mine in Florence, Wisconsin, but since that time has had charge of the hydraulic works at Iron Mountain, which is now the property of the Oliver Mining Company, the successors of the Menominee Mining Company. His long record of continuous service in this position,

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Page  809 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 809 a period of twenty-eight years, bears speaking evidence of Mr. Tollen's ability and fidelity. Mr. Tollen married, in 1876, Laura Peterson, a native of Kingsbury, Norway, and they have one son, Gustav Tollen, Jr. In his political relations Mr. Tollen is a Republican, and in religion both he and Mrs. Tollen are members of the Lutheran church. MARTIN VOETSCH.-Noteworthy among the public officials of Baraga county is Martin Voetsch, of L'Anse, a man of high principles and broad general information, who has satisfactorily served as county clerk and register of deeds during the past eight years. He was born March 25, 1872, in L'Anse, coming from thrifty German stock. His father, Martin Voetsch, Sr., was born and reared in Wurtemberg, Germany, the life-long home of his parents. Emigrating as a young man to the United States, he came directly to the Upper Peninsula, being an early settler of Keweenaw county. He began his career in this new country as a miner, but later conducted boarding houses at different mine locations in the copper regions. Becoming a pioneer of the village of L'Anse in 1871, he opened one of the first hotels in this place, and while catering to the wants of the public was also engaged in the timber and wood business, supplying different mines with these needed products of the forests. Here he resided until his death, in 1883. The maiden name of the wife of Martin Voetsch, Sr., was Ursula Keifer. She was born in Germany, where her parents spent their entire lives. Coming in early womanhood to Michigan, she first lived at Eagle Harbor, where she married Mr. Voetsch on the 21st of February, 1855; and whom she survived for some time, passing away at the advanced age of seventy-eight years. She reared six children, as follows: Louis (who died at the age of three or four years), Philip, Mary B., William, Adelle and Martin. Both she and her husband were Lutherans in religion, and reared their children in the sanme faith. Receiving the rudiments of his education in the public schools of L'Anse, Martin Voetsch subsequently took a full course of study at the Detroit Business College, from which he was graduated in 1893. He was afterwards a bookkeeper in the city of Detroit until his return to his native village. In 1902 Mr. Voetsch was elected county clerk of Baraga county, and also register of deeds, and filled the position so acceptably to all concerned that he has been continuously re-elected ever since. On September 18, 1906, Mr. Voetsch was united in marriage with Grace J. Christopher, who was born in Negaunee, Michigan, a daughter of Captain John and.Catherine Christopher, her father being a well known mining captain of the Upper Peninsula. Fraternally Mr. Voetsch is a Mason, belonging to Houghton Lodge, No. 218, F. & A. M., and is likewise a member of Hancock Lodge, B. P. 0. E. THEODORE AXEL THOREN merits consideration in this publication as one of the able and representative members of the bar of the Upper Peninsula, and he is engaged in the successful practice of his profession at Negaunee, where he is also incumbent of the office of city attorney. He was born in Negaunee on the 8th of August, 1874, and is a son of Charles J. Thoren, who is one of the honored and influential citizens of this city. The father was born in Sweden, in 1838, and he emigrated to America, taking up his residence in Houghton, Michigan, and thus becoming identified with the interests of the Upper Peninsula. In 1870 he removed to Marquette county and located at Negaunee, where

Page  810 810 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN he was identified with the work of his trade-that of tailor, for many years and where he later engaged in the mercantile business, in which he continued until 1902, since which time he has lived virtually retired, having been succeeded in business by his son, Charles S., who had previously been associated with him as a member of the firm. In 1862 Charles J. Thoren was united in marriage to Miss Johanna Pleterson, who accompanied him upon his removal to America. They became the parents of six children, concerning whom the following brief record is given-Charles S. is one of the representative merchants of Negaunee; Clara M., who died August 16, 1909, became the wife of Rev. L. W. Gullstrom, who is a clergyman of the Swedish Lutheran church, and who now resides at Olean, New York; Wilhelmina died in childhood; Theodore A., the subject of this review, was next in order of birth; Herman J. died in childhood; and Titus E. is engaged with Charles S., at Negaunee. The honored father has served as representative of the Third ward in the board of aldermen in his home city, is a staunch Republican in politics, is identified with several fraternal orders, including the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Knights of Pythias, and both he and his wife are zealous members of the Swedish Lutheran church. Theodore A. Thoren is indebted to the public schools of his native city for his early educational training, and after completing the curriculum of the high school he entered the law department of the University of Michigan, in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1895, and from which he received the degree of Bachelor of Laws. For the following eighteen months he devoted his attention to teaching in the public schools of Texas, and he gained valuable experience in his travels through the west and southwest. Upon his return to Negaunee he opened an office and he has since been actively and successfully engaged in the practice of his profession in this city, being known as an able trial lawyer and as one of wide and substantial knowledge of the law and precedent. He is local counsel for the Mary Charlotte Mining Company and the Breitung Hematite Mining Company, Limited. In 1900 he was elected city assessor, in which he served four consecutive terms. In 1901 he was appointed circuit court commissioner by Governor Bliss to fill an unexpired term of the regular incumbent, who had removed from the county. In 1902 he was regularly elected to this office, of which he has since continued incumbent by successive re-elections. In 1904 he was elected city attorney, and he has since given most effective service in this office. Mr. Thoren has shown an intelligent and lively interest in public affairs and is a staunch advocate of the principles and policies of the Republican party. He is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, the Royal Arcanum and the leading Scandinavian society of his home city, as well as with Negaunee Lodge, No. 1116, Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks, of which he is a charter member and in which he had the distinction of serving as first exalted ruler, an office to which he was elected April 28, 1908, and to which he was re-elected in April, 1909. He is also identified with the Maccabees and with a number of social organizations of local order. He was reared in the faith of the Swedish Lutheran church, of which both he and his wife are earnest members. On the 28th of December, 1904, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Thoren to Miss Ellen L. Erickson, who was born at Cadillac, Michigan, and who is a daughter of John and Sophia (Peterson) Erickson, who were born and reared in Sweden, whence they emigrated to America soon after their marriage. They took up their residence in Ne

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Page  811 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 811 gaunee in 1890 and here Mr. Erickson is one of the representative business men, conducting a large and well equipped grocery establishment. Mr. and Mrs. Thoren have three children-Mildred E. and Theodore Roosevelt and Rollin K. E. CAPTAIN JAMES S. WALL.-Beginning life on a low rung of the ladder of attainments, Captain James S. Wall, of Iron River, Michigan, has been in truth the architect of his own fortune, and by means of close application, untiring energy, and diligent use of his faculties and opportunities has made himself an important factor in the industrial interests of this part of the Upper Peninsula and a most valued and trustworthy citizen. A son of Richard Wall, he was born, September 5, 1852, in Cornwall, England. John Wall, the Captain's grandfather, was born in Ireland, where he received excellent educational advantages, becoming a mineralogist of considerable note. He moved from Ireland to Cornwall, England, at an early age, and, although he spent much time in other parts of the world, always called that place his home. As a mineralogist and explorer, he traveled extensively in Europe, Africa and India, acquiring knowledge of value to the scientific world. He reared six sons, five of whom emigrated to America, as follows: James, William, John, Richard and Thomas. Born and bred in Cornwall, England, Richard Wall was there employed in the mines until 1848. Coming then to the United States, he was for two years employed in mining in Keweenaw county, Michigan. Going back then to his old home, he remained in Cornwall until 1852, when he made another trip to the Upper Peninsula, and for another two years continued his work as a miner. In 1860 he again visited Cornwall, and on his return voyage to this country brought with him his wife and five children. He located first at Copper Falls, Keweenaw county, a few years later going to Hancock, from there to Pennsylvania, finally settling at Gogebic, where he spent the remainder of his life, passing away at the age of sixty-six years. His wife, whose maiden name was Mary Trezise, was born in Cornwall, England, a daughter of James Trezise. She survived her husband for a long time, attaining the venerable age of eighty-one years. She reared ten children, namely: Mary, Richard, James S., Elizabeth, Sally, Amelia, Ruth, Edith, John and William. Seven years of age when he came with the family to Copper Falls, Keweenaw county, Michigan, James S. Wall pursued his studies in the humble log cabin used as a schoolhouse, and at the age of eleven years began wielding the pick and shovel in the mines. Though not attending the public schools after that time, he studied diligently as opportunity offered, and after he had reached his majority took a course in book-keeping and mathematics and civil engineering at Valparaiso University, Valparaiso, Indiana, acquiring a practical knowledge of each. Upon leaving college, Mr. Wall spent a year at Mesaba, Minnesota, as superintendent and general manager of mines. He afterwards remained a year in Gogebic, and then, in 1897, went to Alaska, where he was engaged in mining for two years. Returning to Michigan in 1899, he accepted his present position as superintendent of the Riverton mines at Iron River, Michigan. Captain Wall married, in 1876, Britania Nichols, who was born in the Province of Ontario, Canada. Mabel Wall, the only child of Captain and Mrs. Wall, married Victor Lang, and they have two children, James Duncan and Margaret Gordon. Fraternally the Captain is a member of Iron River Lodge, No. 457, A. F. & A. M.

Page  812 812 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN LUTHER C. COLLINS.-The able and popular chief of the fire department of the city of Menominee claims the old Pine Tree state as the place of his nativity, and there he was for some time identified with lumbering operations when a youth, as was he later in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. He was born at Linneus, Aroostook county, Maine, on the 22d of March, 1866, and is a son of Elmer and Mary (Starritt) Collins, both of whom were likewise born in Aroostook county and both of whom were representatives of staunch old families of New England. The father was born in 1843 and died in 1903; and the mother, who was born in 1844, died in 1901. They became the parents of four sons and three daughters, all of whom are living, and the subject of this sketch was the third in order of birth. Elmer Collins was engaged in the lumber business in his native state in his younger days and later became a successful farmer. He continued to be identified with this great basic industry until his death, and both he and his wife continued to reside in Maine until they were summoned to the life eternal. Elmer Collins was a Democrat in politics and was called upon to serve in various local offices of trust, and both he and his wife were zealous members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Luther C. Collins, the present chief of the Menominee fire department, was reared to maturity in his native state, and his early experiences were those of the average farmer boy of the locality and period. He attended school during the winter terms and in the summer seasons assisted in the work of the home farm. Later he worked in the lumber woods during the winters and assisted in the old-time log drives down the streams of the fine old state of Maine. In 1886 Mr. Collins came to Menominee, Michigan, and he was employed in connection with lumbering operations in this section of the state until May 26, 1888, when he became a member of the city fire department of Menominee. He was at first a pipeman, later became a driver, and in 1893 he was appointed captain of Company No. 2. His discrimination, zeal and faithful service received fitting recognition when, on the 1st of May, 1899, he was appointed chief of the department. His administration as chief has been marked by admirable service, excellent discipline and many decisive improvements in the facilities and works of his department. He has the confidence and good will of his subordinates and the unqualified esteem of the local public. In politics Chief Collins maintains an independent attitude, and in a fraternal way he is affiliated with Menominee Lodge, No. 269, Free & Accepted Masons; Menominee Chapter, No. 107, Royal Arch Masons; Menominee Lodge, No. 133, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; and Goodtown Tent, No. 714, Knights of the Maccabees. On the 13th of September, 1893, Mr. Collins was united in marriage to Miss Catherine Touhey, who was born at Wrightstown, Wisconsin. and who is a daughter of James and Catherine (Maginnis) Touhey, both natives of Ireland. CHARLES G. MINGAY.-For more than a quarter of a century Mr. Mingay has been a resident of the Upper Peninsula, and has been consecutively in the employ of the railroad company now known as the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic, for which corporation he is now serving as foreman of the round house in Sault Ste. Marie. His efficient and faithful service has gained him the confidence and esteem of the board of the executives of the company, and his attributes of character have given him a strong hold upon the good will of all with whom he has come in contact.

Page  813 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 813 Charles Gray Mingay was born in the county of Norfolk, England, on the 22nd of February, 1856, and is a son of James T. and Jane (Gray) Mingay, both of whom were likewise born in that same county. The father, who has now attained to the venerable age of eighty-five years, is living retired in the city of Stratford, Ontario, and his cherished and devoted wife died in Toronto, Ontario, in 1895, at the age of sixtyseven years. They became the parents of five sons and one daughter, all of whom were born in England,-Thomas William, a resident of Tecumseh, Michigan; Charles G., subject of this sketch; Frederick, a resident of Stratford, Ontario; Edward G., who died in 1902, at the age of forty years; Mary Jane, wife of Thomas P. Charlton, of Toronto, Ontario; and Frank Gray, a resident of Montreal, Province of Quebec. James T. Mingay was reared on a farm and was bookkeeper and accountant in the railway service in England until 1869, when he came with his family to Canada and established his home at Stratford, Ontario, where he was employed as a bookkeeper for the Grand Trunk Railroad Company until about 1885, when he removed to Toronto, where he became bookkeeper in the store department of the Canadian Pacific Railroad and where he continued incumbent of this position until 1894, since which time he has lived retired. He is a communicant of the Church of England, as is also his wife. Charles G. Mingay gained his early education in the schools of his native land and was thirteen years of age at the time of the family removal to America. After their arrival in Canada they passed about two weeks in the city of Montreal, and within this time the subject of this sketch there found employment in a wholesale furniture establishment, from which he received one dollar and a half a week for his services. He continued at his work in this establishment until one hour prior to the time when he started with his parents for Stratford, Ontario. On the morning after their arrival in that place Charles G. departed for St. Marys, Ontario, where he secured employment as parcel clerk in the general store conducted by Edward Long. About six months later he returned to Stratford, where he was employed at various occupations until 1872, when he there entered upon an apprenticeship at the machinist's trade in the shops of the Grand Trunk Railroad Company. He served five years and became a skilled artisan at his trade. In July, 1876, he removed to London, Ontario, where he became engineer and foreman of the city fire department, with which he was thus identified until February, 1880, when he returned to Stratford and again entered the employ of the Grand Trunk Railroad Company. On the 1st of May, 1882, he made his advent in Marquette, Michigan, where he entered the services of the Detroit, Mackinac & Marquette Railroad Company, in the capacity of expert machinist. During the long intervening years, marked by various changes in the control and title of the company, he has continued in its service without interruption. For seven years he was foreman of the round house at Thomaston, Michigan, and for an equal period he was master mechanic of the division known as the Mineral Range & Hancock & Calumet Railroads. In August, 1904, he was assigned to the office of foreman of the round house of the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic Company at Sault Ste. Marie, where he has since continued to give efficient service in this capacity. In politics he is a staunch Republican, and is affiliated with Red Cross Lodge, No. 51, Knights of Pythias. On the 8th of January, 1880, Mr. Mingay was united in marriage to Miss Annie Newell, who was born in the city of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania,

Page  814 814 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN and who is a daughter of James and Mary Ann Newell, the former of whom died in 1898, when more than four score years of age, and the latter of whom is now living in the city of Detroit, Michigan. Mr. Newell was born in Ireland and came to America when a young man. For a number of years he resided in the city of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and later he removed to Perth county, Ontario, Canada, where he reclaimed a farm from the wilderness and where he continued to reside until his death. He was a member of the Presbyterian church, as is also his wife, and of their seven children, one son and five daughters are now living. In conclusion of this sketch is entered a brief record concerning the children of Mr. and Mrs. Mingay,-Jennie May is the wife of W. Frank James, mayor of the city of Hancock, Michigan, and they have two children; Frederick James, who married Miss Minnie Inman, of Gladstone, Michigan, is now a resident of Glenwood, Minnesota, and is a locomotive engineer on the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie Railroad; Charles Newell is agent for the Western Express Company at Houghton, Michigan; Harry Raynor is electrical engineer in the beet-sugar factory at Croswell, Michigan; and Lorna Gray remains at the parental home. HERMAN BITTNER, a prominent merchant of Escanaba, was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, June 11, 1853. His father, John Bittner, was a native of Germany, who after marriage came to the United States and located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, when there were only three stores in the place, and there worked at his trade of shoemaker. He later settled on a farm near Milwaukee, and now deals in milk. John Bittner married Mary Hildgar, also a native of Germany, and they became the parents of seven sons and four daughters, all of whom reached maturity. Herman Bittner is the fifth son and fifth child of his parents, and received his education in the public schools of Milwaukee. When fifteen years of age he set to work to learn the shoemaker's trade, and in 1874 removed to Escanaba, Michigan, where he engaged in mercantile business in partnership with his brother Albert. They continued in business together twenty-seven years, and then Albert Bittner sold his interest to his brother, since which time Mr. Bittner has conducted the business alone. He owns two meat markets and has the largest business of the kind in the city. Mr. Bittner is one of the successful business men of Escanaba, and a representative and useful citizen. Mr. Bittner has been a resident of Escanaba thirty-five years, and has been identified with its affairs during that time. He takes an active interest in local political affairs, and served at one time as a member of the village board. He is well known in the community, and his integrity and high character are unquestioned. Mr. Bittner married in 1873, Mary Sauerhummer, and they became the parents of three sons and four daughters, namely: Herman, Theodore, Eddie, Lucy, Pauline, Bell and Freda. Mr. and Mrs. Bittner are members of the Lutheran church. JAMES W. THOMPSON.-Holding a place of note among the very earliest settlers of Iron Mountain is James W. Thompson, who made his advent here in the spring of 1880, when the town was yet in its infancy, and has since watched with pride and gratification its growth and development, in which he has, himself, played no unimportant part. He was born, June 3, 1849, in Morgan county, West Virginia,

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Page  815 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 815 where the emigrant ancestor of his immediate family settled in coJonial days, and where his father, Thomas Thompson, and his grandfather, William Thompson, were born and bred. William Thompson was a man of much prominence, for many years being successfully engaged in mercantile pursuits at Berkeley Springs, West Virginia, but subsequently removing to his farm, in Morgan county, and there living retired until his death, when upwards of a hundred years old. He was four times married, and reared nine children. Thomas Thompson grew to man's estate in his native county, living there until 1858. Migrating in that year to Illinois, he settled in Jo Daviess county, where he rented land, and was engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death, three years later, in 1861, at the comparatively early age of forty-five years. He married Isabella Rankin, who was born in Morgan county, West Virginia, where her father, James Rankin, a farmer and millwright, spent his entire life. She died at the age of sixty-seven years, leaving six children, as follows: James W., John T., Samuel J., Arthur V., Virginia B., and Stephen A. D. The eldest child of the parental household, and but twelve years of age when his father died, the responsibility of caring for the home farm devolved upon the shoulders of James W. Thompson when he was but a boy. He remained faithful to his duties, continuing with his mother until 1873, when he gave up farming and started westward. Locating at Ishpeming, Michigan, he was clerk in a general store three years, and from 1876 until 1880 was similarly employed at Linden, Wis. In the spring of 1880, before the railroad had been extended beyond Quinnesec, Mr. Thompson came to the new town of Iron Mountain, and having secured work with the Menominee Mining Company was for nine years employed at the Chapin mine, first as driver of a delivery wagon, and afterwards at the electric light plant. Resigning the latter position, he was employed in the warehouse of the Northwestern Railroad Company until 1900, when he became connected with the Iron Mountain Co-operative Society as a clerk. Filling that position most ably and faithfully, Mr. Thompson was subsequently promoted to his present position as its superintendent. This company carried a full line of groceries and provisions, and a large and well selected stock of general merchandise, its business, under the judicious management of Mr. Thompson being extensive and remunerative. Mr. Thompson married, in August, 1874, Caroline Rowe, who was born, March 7, 1854, in Jo Daviess county, Illinois, a daughter of David and Elizabeth (Hancock) Rowe, and to them three children have been born, namely: Lottie B., Wilbur V., and Myrtle E. Lottie B., wife of James H. Colwell, has one son, James T. Colwell. Wilbur V. married Emma Parent, and they have one son, Wallace. Mrs. Thompson is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and Mr. Thompson belongs to the Foresters of America. JAMES B. CooPER.-Among those prominently concerned in the management of the great mining industry of the Upper Peninsula, James B. Cooper, superintendent of the Calumet and Hecla Smelting Works at Hubbell, is especially worthy of mention. Thoroughly acquainted with the duties of his position, he is one of those clear-headed, constructive and able business managers whose persistent industry and quick perceptions win success in all undertakings, making him a first class man of affairs. He has made a close study of smelting in all

Page  816 816 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN its phases, and in looking after the interests of his employers has also paid good attention to his own concerns, by use of sound business judgment gaining a firm position among the capitalists of Houghton county. A son of James R. Cooper, he was born, in 1859, in Springwells township, Wayne county, Michigan, and has spent his entire life in this state. Acquiring his early education in Detroit, he first attended the primary and grammar schools, in 1877 being graduated from the Detroit High School. Entering then the employ of his father, he was in the Houghton office of the Detroit and Lake Superior Copper Company until 1879, when his business career was interrupted by a year spent at college. Upon his return to Houghton, Mr. Cooper resumed his former position in the office, continuing with his former employers for about eight years. Taking advantage of a position offered, he went to Bridgeport, Connecticut, in July, 1888, taking charge of the refinery of the Bridgeport Copper Company, and he remained there two years. Returning once again to Houghton, Mr. Cooper was made superintendent of the Calumet & Hecla Smelting Works at Hubbell in January, 1891, a position which he has since filled in a most able and satisfactory manner, his study, skill and experience admirably fitting him for this responsible place. Active and energetic, Mr. Cooper is identified with the establishment of various projects in the Northern Peninsula, and is one of the directors of the National Bank of Houghton. Mr. Cooper married, in 1892, Antoinette Senter, whose father is John Senter, a pioneer settler of the Lake Superior mining region and a prominent resident of Houghton, Michigan. THOMAS HOATSON.-A man of marked individuality, energetic and forceful, Thomas Hoatson, a prominent and highly esteemed citizen of Laurium, Houghton county, has contributed most appreciably toward the development of those industries which represent the stable prosperity of the Upper Peninsula, advancing public interests through private enterprise and capital. Of Scotch ancestry, he was born, in October, 1861, in Canada. Thomas Hoatson, Sr., his father, emigrated to America in 1852, and for twenty years was a resident of Canada. Settling permanently in Calumet, Michigan, in 1872, he was there employed as superintendent of Ridge Mine until his death, in 1900. His wife, whose maiden name was Grace Lorimor, survived him three years, passing away in 1903. Coming with his parents to Michigan in boyhood, Thomas Hoatson attended the public schools of Calumet until seventeen years of age, when he began working in the Calumet & Hecla mines of the Upper Peninsula, and was instrumental in organizing what was then known as the Bisbee Mine, afterward called the Calumet and Arizona Copper Mine, and was made second vice president of the company. Very successful in his mining operations, he accumulated much wealth. Mr. Hoatson's financial ability is unquestioned, the many positions of importance to which he is called bearing evidence of the confidence of the people in his wisdom and judgment. He is president of the Calumet State Bank, of Calumet; a director in the First National Bank of Calumet; second vice-president of the Calumet and Arizona Mining Company; also second vice-president of the Superior and Pittsburg Copper Mining Company, located in Arizona; is vice-president of the Hancock Consolidated Mining Company, of Hancock, Michigan; a director and second vice-president of the Keweenaw Copper Company; and vice-president of the Keweenaw Central Railway Company.

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Page  817 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 817 A Republican in national and state matters, Mr. Hoatson is independent in local affairs, voting for the best men and measures. While a resident of Calumet he served two terms as a member of the City Council, and has served one term in the Laurium Council. Fraternally he belongs to Hecla Lodge, No. 90, I. O. O. F.; and is a life member of Calumet Lodge, No. 404, B. P. 0. E. Mr. Hoatson married on the 24th of November, 1886, Caroline Chynoweth, who came with her parents to Ontonagon county in pioneer times, being among the earlier residents of the Northern Peninsula. Six children have been born of their union, namely: Gussie, Calvin D., James Ramsey, Chester, Gertrude and Grace. A most genial and pleasant companion, Mr. Hoatson, although a busy man, enjoys life in the open, taking especial pleasure in occasional hunting and fishing trips. On the shores of Lake Superior he erected a fine cottage, in which the family spent the summer months, but during the winter seasons they occupy the spacious residence, which is modern in all of its appointments, that he built in Laurium in 1903. RICHARD HOSKING.-Many of the most successful and highly respected business men of the Upper Peninsula are of foreign birth and breeding and have brought to their new home in this country those habits of industry and thrift that have won for them success in life, prominent among the number being Richard Hosking, a well known resident of Iron Mountain. He was born, August 24, 1840, in Lower Cornwall, England, where his father, John Hosking, a farmer, spent his entire life. His mother, Marjorie Hosking, came to America after the death of her husband, and spent her closing years in Brooklyn, New York. She reared six children, as follows: William, John, Richard, Mary Jane, Rebecca and Hannah, the four older of whom emigrated to the United States. Leaving the land of his birth at the age of twenty-two years, Richard Hosking came to America, hoping in this land of promise to establish a comfortable home and make a good living. Coming directly to Michigan, he located in Keweenaw county, in the extreme northern part of the state. The greater part of the Upper Peninsula was then unexplored, few, if any, evidences of civilization being apparent, while the land now occupied by flourishing towns and cities was then a dense wilderness. Obtaining work in the mines, he remained in that county until 1881, when he located in the new town of Iron Mountain. Here Mr. Hosking was employed in the mines about ten years, but since that time has been actively and successfully engaged in the wood and coal business, having built up an extensive and profitable trade. Mr. Hosking married, at the age of twenty-eight years, Christianna Pearse, who was born in Lower Cornwall, England, where her parents, William and Christianna (Jenkins) Pearse were life-long residents. Two of Mrs. Hosking's brothers, Nicholas Pearse and Alexander Pearse, emigrated to the United States, locating in Pennsylvania, and a sister, Mrs. Margaret Cox, lives in Washington, D. C. Mr. and Mrs. Hosking have reared six children, namely: John, Richard Henry, William Pearse, Walter P., Thomas and Bessie. John married Catherine Roberts, and they have ten children, Iva, Eddie, John, Richard, Jannie, Christianna, Ruby, Nasie, Orvey and George W. William P. married Annie Rule, and to them five children have been born, Janie, William, Bessie, Richard and Walton. Walter married Eva Kline, and they have four children, Harold, Myrtle, Mildred and

Page  818 818 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN Roland. Thomas married Tillie Cowling and they are the parents of three children, Maria, Edward and Ruth. Bessie, wife of John Thomas, has two children, Marjorie and Elwin. WILLIAM C. TRESTRAIL.-An expert miner, and an authority on all matters connected with the successful operation of.mines, William Chapple Trestrail is intimately associated with that department of industry by which much of the wealth of the Upper Peninsula is produced, being an inspector of mines in Dickinson county, with his home at Iron Mountain. A son of William Trestrail, Jr., he was born, April 7, 1860, in Cornwall, England, where his grandfather, William Trestrail, Sr., was a life-long tiller of the soil. Born and reared in Redruth, County Cornwall, England, William Trestrail, Jr., served an apprenticeship at the stone mason's trade when young, in Cornwall. Ambitious as a young man to try his fortune on foreign soil, he went to Cuba, where he was employed for a time in the mines. Going back to Cornwall, he remained there until 1860, when, the microbe of travel again seizing him, he emigrated to the United States, locating in the Upper Peninsula, Michigan, where he found employment in the Huron mine, afterwards assisting in building a public highway from Hancock to Keweenaw Point. He was subsequently one of the first to delve for ore in the Calumet mine, and while thus employed was joined, about 1864, at Calumet, by his family, who came over from England in that year. Leaving the Calumet mine in 1874, he made a trip to California, and was there engaged in gold mining two years. Returning then to Houghton county, he was employed at the Hecla mine until 1880. Locating, in August, of that year, at Iron Mountain, he was here employed at the Chapin mine until his death, March 5, 1881, when but forty-six years of age. He married Isabella Chapple, who was born in Cornwall, England, where her father, William Chapple, a farmer, spent his entire life. She died in March, 1885, leaving five children, as follows: Hannah, William and Mary Ann, born in England, and Henry and James, born in Michigan. About five years old when he came with his mother to Michigan, William C. Trestrail attended the public schools of Calumet until thirteen years old when he found employment at the Hecla mine, first working on the surface, and later in the mine, continuing until 1874. Going then to California, he spent two years on the farm of his mother's brother, Thomas Chapple. Returning to Calumet, he resumed work in the Hecla, remaining there until August, 1880, when he came to Iron Mountain, and was here engaged at the Chapin mine for three years. Going then to Dakota, he was employed at a gold mine in Lead City for eight months, afterwards being engaged in mining at Central City, Colorado, for a year and a half. From there he proceeded to Little Rock, Arkansas, but not liking the place he returned to Iron Mountain, and was here employed in the Chapin mine until 1892. Being in that year appointed mine inspector, Mr. Trestrail has since filled this responsible position most ably and satisfactorily, during the period having several times inspected every operating mine in Dickinson county. Mr. Trestrail married, January 22, 1887, Carrie Sims, who was born in the parish of St. Kea, County Cornwall, England. Her father, Joseph Sims, a native of that county, was an engineer, and operated a stationary engine while in England. Coming to the Upper Peninsula in 1870, he located in Marquette county, and nine years later his

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Page  819 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 819 wife and children joined him. In 1881 he came with his family to Iron Mountain, and has been employed in Dickinson county as a machinist and engineer ever since. To him and his wife, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Ann Bray, five children have been born, William, Carrie, Joseph, Edwin and Elizabeth. Mr. and Mrs. Trestrail are the parents of seven children, namely: William J., Albert H., Laura I., Edwin J., Frederick J., Carrie L., and Elsie E. Fraternally Mr. Trestrail is a member of Iron Mountain Lodge, No. 388, F. & A. M.; of Iron Mountain Chapter, No. 121, R. A. M.; and of Crescent Lodge, No. 374, I. O. O. F. WILLIAM A. PENGILLY.-The subject of this review has been a resident of Menominee from his boyhood days and is now numbered among its representative citizens. He is a member of one of the honored pioneer families of the city, and that he, himself, commands the unqualified confidence and esteem of the community, is evidenced by the fact that he has been called upon to serve in various positions of trust and responsibility, including that of county treasurer of Menominee county, of which office he is incumbent at the time of this writing. Mr. PenGilly was born in the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on the 19th of November, 1853, and is the son of Robert and Mary (Ledden) PenGilly, the former of whom was born at Illfraincomb, Devonshire, England, in 1823, and the latter of whom was born in Miramichi, province of New Brunswick, Canada, in 1824. The father died in Menominee in the year 1874, and the mother, long surviving him, was summoned to the life eternal in 1892. Their marriage was solemnized in the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and of their eight children, five are now living, the subject of this sketch being the third in order of birth. Robert PenGilly was reared and educated in his native land and there learned the blacksmith trade. Upon his emigration to America he made the voyage in a sailing vessel, which landed in the city of Quebec, Canada. He was seventeen years of age at the time and maintained his home for a number of years in New Brunswick, and whence he eventually removed to Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He was an expert in the making of edged tools, and in the Wisconsin metropolis he secured profitable employment in an ax factory. He later removed to Flat Rock, near Escanaba, Michigan, where he was employed for some time in the blacksmith shop of Jefferson St. Clair. In 1859 he came to Menominee, which was then a straggling and obscure little lumbering town, and here he engaged in the work of his trade upon his own responsibility. He became one of the valued and influential business men of the village and for a number of years was a member of its board of education. He continued in business here until his death and ever commanded the high regard of all who knew him. In politics he was a Democrat, but at the time of the Civil war he gave support to Abraham Lincoln, on his nomination for the presidency. He was one of the foremost promoters of the organization of St. John's church, the first Catholic church in Menominee, and one of the largest contributors to the erection of its first church edifice. Prior to the establishing of this parish the Catholic citizens of Menominee were obliged to cross the Menominee river by boat in order to attend church services in the city of Marinette, Wisconsin. His wife also continued a devout and loved member of St. John's parish until the close of her long and useful life. William A. PenGilly, the immediate subject of this sketch, gained his early educational training in the public schools of Menominee, and

Page  820 820 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN later completed a course in the Bryant & Stratton business college, in the city of Chicago, where he remained as a student until 1870. He then returned to Menominee, where he secured a clerical position in the general store of the Kirby-Carpenter Company, in which he later became bookkeeper. He continued to be identified with the business of this representative concern until the 1st of June, 1881, when he resigned his position to assume the duties of the office of county register of deeds, to which he had been elected in November of the preceding year. His administration met with unqualified popular approval, and he was twice chosen as his own successor, thus holding the office for three consecutive terms. Upon his retirement, in 1887, he engaged in the china, crockery, stationery and book business in Menominee, where he built up a large and prosperous enterprise and secured a representative patronage. He sold this business in January, 1899, and accepted the position of deputy clerk of the circuit court, besides which he became deputy county clerk and deputy register of deeds. He continued in practical charge of the office of register of deeds until November, 1908, when he was elected county treasurer, of which position he has since remained in tenure. He has shown much discrimination and due conservatism in the handling of the fiscal affairs of the county and has done all in his power to promote wise economy. He is a communicant of St. John's Catholic church, of which his father was one of the founders, and, possessed of much musical ability, he has been a member of the choir of this church for thirty-three consecutive years. He is a member of the Catholic Benevolent Legion, in which his affiliation is with Menominee Council, No. 455, and he is also identified with the Local Aerie, the Fraternal Order of Eagles. His political allegiance is given to the Republican party, and he has rendered efficient service to its cause. Mr. PenGilly is a bachelor. ROGER C. WILLIAMS.-A well-known and highly respected citizen of Baraga county, Roger C. Williams is numbered among the active, enterprising and capable business men of L'Anse, where a large part of his life has been passed. A son of the late Robert Roger Williams, he was born, September 28, 1864, in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, of substantial Welsh ancestry, his grandparents having been life-long residents of Wales. Robert Roger Williams was born in Llanberris, Carnarvon county, Wales, in 1834, and was there brought up and educated. Ambitious as a youth to find broader and better fields of work than were offered him in his own land he came at the age of eighteen years to the United States, locating in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, where for several years he was employed in the state quarries. He then moved with his family to Vermont, and, having formed a partnership with E. B. Humphrey, opened a general store, which he operated until 1873. Coming then to Baraga county, Michigan, he entered the employ of the Clinton State Company, and was here superintendent of the state quarries for five years, when the works closed. Settling then in L'Anse, he was employed in slate roofing for five years, after which he became associated with the Graphite mines, located ten miles south of L'Anse, which he opened and of which he was superintendent until 1884. Elected country treasurer of Baraga county in that year, he filled the position so ably that he was re-elected in 1886, and served until the close of 1888. He was subsequently for a time engaged in exploring the lands belonging to the Ayers estate, after which he lived retired from active business pursuits until his death, in 1897.

Page  821 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 821 He married Mary Williams, who, although bearing the same surname, was not a relative. She was born in Merionethshire, Wales, a daughter of John Williams, and is still living in L'Anse, Michigan. She reared four children, as follows: Annie, Roger C., Richard and Arthur. Gleaning his first knowledge of the three "r's" in one of the public schools of Fair Haven, Vermont, Roger C. Williams subsequently continued his studies at L'Anse and Calumet, Michigan, afterwards attending the Michigan Military Academy at Orchard Lake and spending a year at the State Agricultural College in Lansing, Michigan. When through school he accepted the position of bookkeeper with Williams & Upham, dredging contractors, remaining with that firm two years. Mr. Williams then served four years as deputy county treasurer, subsequently being elected county treasurer, a position which he filled two years. Since that time he has been prosperously engaged in making abstract of titles, in which he is skilled, and as a real estate agent, making a specialty of dealing in timber lands. He is likewise agent for the Detroit Graphite Company, having charge of all of its property in this section of the state. Fraternally Mr. Williams is a member of Houghton Lodge, No. 218, F. & A. M.; and of L'Anse Lodge, K. of P. JOSEPH BARABE.-A man of enterprise and ability, Joseph Barabe occupies a substantial position among the prosperous merchants of Marquette county, being one of the leading grocers of Negaunee. A native of New York state, he was born, September 9, 1861, in Isaacs county, in the same house in which the birth of his father, Joseph Barabe, Sr., was born, his birth having occurred in 1833. Embarking in the coal business in early life, Joseph Barabe, Sr., came to the Upper Peninsula when young, and spent several years in Marquette county as a coal contractor, being located the greater part of the time in Negaunee. After his marriage in New York state he lived there four years. In the fall of 1864 he again came to Negaunee, bringing his family with him, and was here engaged in the coal and wood business until 1892, subsequently living retired from active pursuits until his death, in 1896. He was a Republican in politics, and served as street commissioner of Negaunee. In religion he was a Roman Catholic. His wife, whose maiden name was Amanda Remley, was born in Canada, near the Vermont state line, in 1838, and is now a resident of Negaunee. Three children were born of their union, as follows: Joseph, the special subject of this sketch; Emily, who died at the age of eighteen years; and Sidney M., who died in 1897, aged thirty-three years. A child of three and one-half years when he came with his parents to Negaunee, Michigan, Joseph Barabe was educated in this place, attending both public and private schools. At the age of fifteen years he began working for his father during the summer seasons, attending the winter terms of school. He subsequently became delivery clerk for his uncle, A. Barabe, who was carrying on a grocery business in the same store now occupied by Mr. Barabe, remaining with him one and one-half years. Mr. Barabe was afterwards similarly employed in the Iron Cliff Mining Company's store, and in the general store of Donald McDonald, entering next the employ of the Marquette, Houghton and Ontonagon Railroad Company, now the Duluth, South Shore and Atlantic Railway Company, serving as brakeman two summers. He was afterwards employed for some time at the store of the Iron Cliff MinVol. II-13

Page  822 822 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN ing Company at Negaunee, and was for a while engaged in keeping books and teaming for his father. Returning to Negaunee, Mr. Barabe worked in the general store of Donald McDonald for eighteen months, after which he took charge of a lumber camp in the woods for his father. Going then to Rock River Run, he superintended his father's charcoal kilns until 1888. Coming back in that year to Negaunee, Mr. Barabe bought out the interests of J. C. Mainard in the grocery firm of Mainard & Sorenson, and carried on a substantial business as senior member of the firm of Barabe & Sorenson until 1898, when he bought out his partner. Mr. Barabe has since continued alone, and has a fine trade in staple and fancy groceries, carrying a well assorted stock of goods. Politically Mr. Barabe is a straightforward Republican, and in 1900 was elected a member of the Marquette County Board, representing the Fourth ward. He is a member of various local societies, and belongs to the Roman Catholic church. Mr. Barabe married first, in May, 1883, Emily Goodrich, who died in 1891. Five children were born of their union, four of whom are living, namely: William J., Moses S., Emily and Sabina. Mr. Barabe married for his second wife, February 12, 1895, Mary J. Marresette, and to them seven children have been born, one of whom has passed to the life beyond, those living being Joseph, Thomas, Leo, Clement, May and Leonora. JESSE OWEN, manager of the Escanaba branch of the firm of Brams & Van, of Iron Mountain, Michigan, wholesale dealers in produce, was born in Juneau, Wisconsin, March 11, 1871. His father, Job Owen, also a native of Wisconsin was a farmer by occupation. His family were early settlers of Wisconsin, having come from New York. Job Owen married Frances Deiter, a native of Wisconsin, born near Juneau. He died at the age of forty-nine years and his wife still resides in Escanaba, Jesse being the only son. Wlien about one year old, Jesse Owen removed with his parents to Ripon. Wisconsin, and when he was nine years of age his parents moved to Escanaba, Michigan, where he received most of his education, and which place has since been his home. He took a business course at Saginaw, Michigan, and afterward spent about eleven years in the employ of Erickson & Bissell, in the capacity of bookkeeper. For four years he was employed as bookkeeper and office manager by the Metropolitan Lumber Company, in their Escanaba office. In 1905 Mr. Owen assumed his present position with Brams & Van where he has since remained; this is only a branch of the company's business, though they do a large volume of business in this vicinity. Mr, Owen has been a resident of the Northern Peninsula for a period of thirty years, and is well known in the community. His business integrity and probity are well known and unquestioned and he has proven his business ability and intelligence, and shown his fitness for the post he now fills. In 1899 Mr. Owen married Isabella McKenzie Millar, of Escanaba, daughter of John Millar, deceased. They became parents of one son and two daughters. The son, Gordon died at the age of five years and the two daughters are Frances Grace and Janet Millar. Mr. Owen is a stanch Republican and served three years as member of the school board. He takes an active interest in public affairs and is a public-spirited, loyal citizen. He is a member of the Masonic Order, in which he has taken thirty-two degrees and is affiliated with

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Page  823 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 823 the DeWitt Clinton Consistory at Grand Rapids, Michigan, and is Past Master of the local blue lodge at Escanaba. REDMOND H. PANGBORN.-A man of superior business ability and tact, Redmond H. Pangborn has for several years been actively identified with the development and growth of the industrial interests of Menominee, and as general manager of the Peninsular Box and Lumber Company is widely and favorably known in manufacturing and commercial circles. A son of James K. Pangborn, he was born, May 28, 1876, in Saginaw, Michigan, coming on the paternal side of New England ancestry, and on the maternal side of Irish stock. Born in Barnard, Windsor county, Vermont, James K. Pangborn grew to manhood among the green hills of his native state. Subsequently migrating to Saginaw, Michigan, he followed his trade of a blacksmith in that vicinity for a number of years. Locating in Menominee in 1888, he is now living here retired from active pursuits. He is a stanch Republican in his political affiliations, and served as alderman of the city two terms, representing the Fifth ward. Fraternally he is a member of the Independent Order of Foresters. He married Catherine O'Connor, a native of Ireland, and to them four children were born, Redmond H., the special subject of this sketch, being the second child in succession of birth. A boy of twelve years when he came with his parents to Menominee, Redmond IH. Pangborn completed his early studies in the parochial and public schools of this city. Beginning life then for himself, he was for three years assistant city engineer of Menominee, after which he was employed as a civil engineer in Wisconsin, working first in Racine and later in Milwaukee. In 1896 Mr. Pangborn entered the employ of the Peninsular Box and Lumber Company at Menominee, as a general workman, and in the years that followed made himself so familiar with the work and so useful to the company that in 1904 he was made its vice president and general manager. This responsible position Mr. Pangborn has since held, and in the discharge of the various duties devolving upon him has proved himself eminently capable and efficient. Wide-awake and progressive, he gives careful attention to every department of the work, each winter visiting the four lumber camps operated by the company, personally inspecting the work done in the woods as well as at the factory. This company, organized in 1896, has developed with wonderful rapidity into one of the leading industrial institutions of Menominee, its officers, men of keen foresight and practical ability, being as follows: President, Howard Greene, of Milwaukee; secretary, Robert McMynn; treasurer, W. B. Strong, of Milwaukee; and general manager, Redmond H. Pangborn. This company has a large plant, which it works night and day much of the time, the saw mill cutting annually about ten million feet of lumber, while in its factory, which makes a specialty of box shooks, more than a million boxes are made each year. These are shipped in compact form, ready to be put together, and are sent, principally, to Indiana, the company's chief market. Mr. Pangborn married, July 14, 1897, Elizabeth Johnston, who was born in Saginaw, Michigan, a daughter of James Johnston, and to them four children have been born, namely: Ruth, Ethel, Pearl and Redmond James. Politically Mr. Pangborn is a steadfast Democrat, and has served three terms as city supervisor, being elected, without opposition, three times in the Seventh ward. In 1908 he was candidate for mayor of the city, but was defeated by seven votes only, his opponent,

Page  824 824 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN August Spies, being elected to the office. Fraternally Mr. Pangborn is a member of the Knights of Columbus. JACOB BAINBRIDGE.-The popular and efficient superintendent of the city water works of Sault Ste. Marie is one of the sterling pioneers of this thriving city, and none is held in higher esteem in the community than he. Mr. Bainbridge was born in Cumberland, England, on the 18th of November, 1857, and is a son of James and Jane (Dixon) Bainbridge, who emigrated to America in 1882 and located in Bruce county, Ontario, Canada, where the father secured a tract of wild land and reclaimed a productive farm. Both he and his wife were communicants of the Church of England. Concerning their children the following brief record is given,-Jacob, subject of this sketch, is the eldest of the number; John is a resident of Hamilton, Ontario; Elizabeth is the widow of Alexander Leslie and resides in Hamilton; Margaret is the wife of Robert Reed of Northumberland, England; William is a resident of Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Thomas J. maintains his home in the Rainey River District, Ontario; and Jane B. resides in Bruce county, Ontario. Jacob Bainbridge is indebted to the common schools of his native land for his early educational discipline, and he was twenty-two years of age at the time of the family emigration to America. After his marriage he was engaged in farming in Bruce county, Ontario, for a period of four years, at the expiration of which he disposed of his farm and in the spring of 1886 he came to Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, where he was employed at farm work by R. N. Adams until 1888, when he became a member of the police department of Sault Ste. Marie. In 1890 he became associated with Captain George S. Hoyt in the construction of Fort Brady, and this work enlisted his attention until 1893, when he entered the government service as a member of a party engaged in lake surveying work. In 1896 Mr. Bainbridge was made superintendent of streets of Sault Ste. Marie, and this position he held until 1899, after which he was identified with contract work until 1906, when he was made superintendent of city water works, of which position he has since remained incumbent. In 1893 Mr. Bainbridge purchased a farm of two hundred acres located one mile east of the village Rosedale, and this attractive rural estate is known as Elmhurst Farm. Here he erected the first stone house to be built in Chippewa county outside of the city of Sault Ste. Marie, and his farm is one of the best improved and most attractive in this section of the state. Mr. Bainbridge is aligned as a staunch supporter of the cause of the Republican party, and in a fraternal way he is identified with Bethel Lodge, No. 358, Free & Accepted Masons; Sault Ste. Marie Chapter, No. 126, Royal Arch Masons; Sault Ste. Marie Commandery, No. 45, Knights Templars; and Waubun Tent, Knights of the Maccabees. On the 1st of June, 1872, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Bainbridge to Miss Christina McLean, who was born in Bruce county, Ontario, and who is a daughter of Alexander and Nancy (Gregg) McLean, the former of whom was born in Scotland and the latter in Ireland. Mr. McLean came to Canada with his parents when a boy and he became one of the representative farmers of Bruce county, Ontario, where he continued to reside until his death, on the 21st of February, 1910, at the venerable age of eighty-seven years. His wife passed away in May, 1910. Mr. and Mrs. Bainbridge have one son, Benjamin, who was graduated in the high school of Sault Ste. Marie and who is now United States inspector of customs at this port.

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Page  825 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 825 FRANK L. BROWN.-Associated with the Menominee River Sugar Company as secretary and chief bookkeeper, Frank L. Brown, of Menominee, holds a noteworthy position in the business circles of his community, and is highly esteemed as a man of integrity and honor. A son of Whitman Brown, he was born, January 1, 1855, at Hartfield, Chautauqua county, New York, coming on both sides of the house from substantial New York and Pennsylvania ancestry. Whitman Brown was a native of New York state, and while a young man worked on the Erie Canal before the days of the "steam horse," the tow path then being the great highway from the Great Lakes to the Atlantic. In 1857 he, with the western fever in his veins, moved with his family to Wisconsin, passing through Chicago, then but little better than a village, and locating at Butte des Morts, Wisconsin, where he entered and engaged in the mercantile business, living there until the date of his death, an honored member of the community. He was a staunch member of the Republican party and a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He was married to Fannie Brown, a native of Pennsylvania, of Scotch descent, and they became the parents of five children, Edgar the eldest, dying at the age of sixty-eight, the surviving four, being Harriet, widow of Thomas Benedict, Jennie, widow of R. P. Benedict, Frank L., and Willis H., of McCook, Nebraska, a conductor on the Burlington & Missouri Railroad in Nebraska. After finishing his studies in the common school Frank L. Brown, like all other energetic boys wanting to see the color of the dollar earned by his own labor, took the first place that offered and went to "slashing" slabs in the saw mill in his home town, and it was the hardest earned as well as the most appreciated of any since that time. From saw milling he went to tallying lumber, but made up his mind that head work was better than hand work and entered the Oshkosh Business College, where he graduated, and after graduation, taught a term, until he accepted a position with the Houghton L'Anse & Ontonagon Railroad Company at Michigamme, Michigan, in 1873. Being offered a position with William Avery, of Oshkosh, Wisconsin, as bookkeeper, he was with him until a better offer was made as teller and bookkeeper for the private banking firm of Sackett and Turner, of Winneconne, Wisconsin, with whom he remained until the death of Mr. Turner, three years later, when he went with the Paine Lumber Company of Oshkosh, Wisconsin, and after being in their main office for six months, they sent him out to Hastings, Nebraska, where they were conducting a wholesale and retail yard. Being offered a position as bookkeeper in the Exchange National Bank of that city, after having been with the Paine Lumber Company for five years, he remained with the bank for three years and from there resigned to accept the position of cashier of the First National Bank of McCook, Nebraska, and president of its associate bank, The Farmers and Merchants, of Indianola, Nebraska, and was also elected to the office of secretary and treasurer of the McCook Loan and Trust Company. After passing through the "three dry years" in western Nebraska, Mr. Brown came north to accept a position with the Kirby Carpenter Company, with whom he remained for twelve years and until they went out of business, at which time he took charge of the books, at the organization of the Menominee River Sugar Company, becoming its assistant secretary in 1903 and secretary in 1905, which position he now holds, the Menominee River Sugar Company being one of the most important industries in the Upper Peninsula. Mr. Brown was married at Oshkosh, Wisconsin, December 25, 1877,

Page  826 826 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN to Katie M. Avery, who was born at Stevens Point, Wisconsin, a daughter of the late William and Catherine (Gottry) Avery, the former of whom was born in Pennsylvania and the latter near Strassburg, Germany. Mr. Avery was for many years one of the foremost lumbermen of Stevens Point, Wisconsin, where he erected the first saw mill in that city and also carried on an extensive stone quarry. Selling out his business he removed to Oshkosh, where he embarked in the wholesale millinery trade and also conducted a large retail grocery house. From there he moved to the Black Hills, South Dakota, and buying up a large tract of land in 1878, went into the stock business and was actively engaged up to the date of his death. To him and his wife seven children were born, four daughters and three sons, Mrs. Brown being the third in succession of birth. The union of Mr. and Mrs. Brown has been blessed by the birth of four children, namely, Martin F., of Seattle, Washington, president of the Brown-David Publishing Company, William Wayne, a dentist, Amy M., a graduate of the Pratt Art Institute of Brooklyn, New York, and now supervisor of art in the public schools of Eugene, Oregon, and Edgar A., attending the Menominee High School. Politically Mr. Brown is a staunch Republican, and while in McCook, Nebraska, served several terms as alderman. Fraternally he has been a Mason since attaining his majority. DR. MICHAEL P. FENELON, a leading physician of Escanaba, was born in Fond du Lac county, June 8, 1869. His father, Michael Fenelon, a native of Ireland, came to the United States at the age of fifteen years, and lived first at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, later removing to Milford, Dodge county, and spending some time in Springfield and Fond du Lac. He was a farmer by occupation, and also lived some time at Ripon; at present he resides at Fond du Lac. He married Mary Duffy, a native of New York, who also survives. They had six sons and two daughters who lived to maturity, and Dr. Fenelon is the second son and third child. Dr. Fenelon received his early education in the public schools of Ripon, Wisconsin, and was graduated from Ripon College. In 1894 he graduated from the Northwestern School of Pharmacy, of the Northwestern University, Chicago, and in 1898 was graduated from Rush Medical College, which he entered in 1895. He practiced his profession two years at Iota, Louisiana, and for a short time afterwards had charge of a hospital at Atkinson, Michigan; he spent a year and a half at Pentoga, Michigan, and in 1902 located at Escanaba, where he has built up a large practice. He stands well in the profession and has won the confidence and esteem of all who know him. Dr. Fenelon is a member of the State, Delta county and Northern Peninsula Medical Societies, and also belongs to the Knights of Columbus and Modern Woodmen and the Maccabees. For four years he has been a member of Delta County hospital staff, and was at one time assistant surgeon for the Northwestern Railway Company; he served during 1906-7-8 as city physician. Dr. Fenelon has been nine years a resident of the Northern Peninsula, and takes an active interest in public affairs. He is a stockholder in the State Savings Bank. Bank. In 1901 Dr. Fenelon married Mary, daughter of John and Mary McGraw; they have no children. ADOLPH F. HEIDKAMP, secretary and treasurer of the Bosch Brewing Company and vice-president of the Citizens' National Bank of Hough

Page  827 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 827 ton, is one of Houghton county's most substantial citizens, and enjoys the consideration of the community both as a man of splendid business ability and one deserving of esteem in a more personal sense. One manifestation of this esteem is the fact that he served for fourteen terms as president of the village of Lake Linden, where he has made his residence since 1887. Mr. Heidkamp was born at Port Washington, Wisconsin, February 2, 1863, and is the son of Adolph and Anna (Hanson) Heidkamp. As his name indicates he is Teutonic in origin, his father, also Adolph Heidkamp, having been born in Cologne, Prussia. He was a man of unusual ability and won no small distinction in America, the land of his adoption. He taught school for several years before crossing, and severed home ties in 1852, landing in New York, where he remained for two years. He then removed to Port Washington, where he remained for two years. He then removed to Port Washington, where he read law and was admitted to the bar. He practiced law for many years and for eighteen years was probate judge of Ozaukee county. From 1854 until 1881, the year of his demise, he was publisher of the Zeitung, a Democratic German weekly which enjoyed great vogue in that part of Wisconsin. He also served three terms as county superintendent of schools. The mother's maiden name was Anna Hanson. She was born in the Grand Duchy of Luxemburg, Germany, and died in 1871, at the age of forty-four years. Both she and the father were members of the Catholic faith. Of the children born to them the following four grew to maturity: Louisa, wife of Nicholas Watry, an optician of Chicago, Illinois; Anna, wife of William J. Diederich, of the M. H. Wiltsius Company, dealers in church goods in Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Adolph F.; and Emil M., a Chicago optician. By a former marriage with Frank Gengler, the mother of Mr. Heidkamp had three children: John, deceased; Margaret, widow of Joseph Malherbe, of Milwaukee; and Elizabeth, of Milwaukee. Adolph F. Heidkamp was educated in the public schools of Port Washington, Wisconsin, receiving the additional benefit of his father's training, and later learned the printer's trade in his father's office, following this for about six years. In 1882, he decided to cast his fortunes with the Northern Peninsula, and located in Houghton, Houghton county, where he was employed for two years in the offices of the transfer company. He then became associated with the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic Railway Company and remained with them for a similar period. In 1887 he removed to Lake Linden and became a bookkeeper for Joseph Bosch & Company, brewers. He remained in this capacity for about seven years and when in 1894 the firm was changed to a stock company, under the name of the Bosch Brewing Company, Mr. Heidkamp was selected as the best man for the offices of secretary and treasurer, and this position he still fills. Two years later he was first made president of the village, and his successive administrations were a credit to him. For a good many years Mr. Heidkamp was a Democrat, but since 1896 he has inclined towards the Republican party. He is a Catholic and gives his earnest support to its many good causes. Fraternally he is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and of the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and receives much pleasure from these affiliations. JOHN 0. BLIXT.-A man of broad mind and enlightened views, standing "pat" on the right side of every project calculated to advance

Page  828 828 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN the best interests of town and county, John O. Blixt holds an assured position among the esteemed and valued citizens of Iron Mountain, where he is actively engaged in the real estate business. A native of Sweden, he was born, June 11, 1868, in the village of Nya Kapparberg, Orebro Lan, a son of Olof and Grata Maria Johnson. His father was a life-long resident of Sweden, but his mother, now eighty-five years of age, came to America after the death of her husband, and is now living at Iron Mountain, making her home with John Blixt. She reared four children, namely: Emma, wife of Per Peterson, of Sweden; Charles August, of Escanaba; Lenda, now Mrs. Frank Lind; and John 0., the subject of this sketch. Growing to manhood in his native land, John O. Blixt acquired a practical education in the government schools, and after the death of his father came with his widowed mother to America. Locating at Ishpeming, Marquette county, Michigan, he found employment in the mines, and remained there until 1899. Removing then to Painesdale, Houghton county, he was for two years night captain for the Copper Range Mining Company. During the ensuing two years Mr. Blixt conducted a boarding house at Houghton for students, after which he was for two years connected with the Scandia Fish Company, of Chicago, as traveling salesman. He was subsequently agent for the American Relief Society of Bay City and in that capacity solicited accident insurance until 1903. Since that time he has been industriously and profitably employed as a dealer in real estate. He began his operations on a modest scale, dealing first with farm and timber lands in Dickinson and adjoining counties. Meeting with encouraging success, he has gradually extended his business into the far Northwest, being now agent for the Canadian Pacific Railway Company in the sale of their lands in what is now considered the "Eldorado" of Canada. Mr. Blixt married, July 4, 1896, Alma Caroline Molander, who was born in Sweden, a daughter of Alfred and Caroline Molander. Five children have blessed their union, namely: Viola Linea, Grace Sophia, Malba Emma (deceased), Roy Oscar (deceased), and Ellenora. Mr. and Mrs. Blixt are members of the Swedish Baptist church, in which he has held the various offices; he is an earnest worker in the temperance movement, and is now serving as treasurer of the Dickinson County Local Option Organization. ALEXANDER MACKINNON.-Thrifty, enterprising and energetic, Alexander MacKinnon is a fine representative of the courageous men who came to the Upper Peninsula in pioneer days and have since been among the foremost in developing its varied resources and advancing its material interests. He is an esteemed resident of Iron River, which he and his brother, Donald C., founded. A son of Hugh and Sarah (Campbell) MacKinnon, he was born, in 1844, in the village of Mull, Argyleshire, Scotland. His grandfather, a life-long resident of Argyleshire, Scotland, married a Miss Livingstone, who was an aunt of David Livingstone, the noted Scotch explorer and missionary to whom the world is so greatly indebted for much of its knowledge of Central Africa. A sketch of the parents of Mr. MacKinnon may be found elsewhere in this volume, in connection with the biography of his brother, Donald Campbell MacKinnon. But an infant when he was brought across the ocean by his parents, Alexander MacKinnon was brought up on a farm at Owen Sound, Province of Ontario, where he attended school as opportunity offered. When old enough to handle tools, he began to assist his father in building boats,

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Page  829 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 829 and afterwards learned the carpenter's trade. Leaving home at the age of seventeen years, he came to the States in search of fortune, locating at Marquette, Michigan, just at the time the Upper Peninsula was becoming somewhat noted as a mining region, although its hidden wealth, especially in the Iron and Gogebic ranges, was as yet unrevealed. After following the carpenter's trade for awhile, Mr. MacKinnon spent a year in learning to burn charcoal, then an important industry, but gave it up and sought more congenial work. He was for a while variously employed, but in 1878, he and his brother, Donald C., came as prospectors to what is now Iron county, walking from Quinnesec, the nearest railway station, packing their tents and provisions the whole fifty miles. Here Mlessrs. MacKinnon discovered and filed claims on several different mines and tracts of land. Spending the following winter in Quinnesec, they returned to Iron county in the spring to explore the mines, and in addition to that work cleared about four acres of land in section twentysix, townships forty-three and thirty-five, on which, in the spring of 1882, these brothers built a shanty,-the first place of abode in this part of the Peninsula. The same spring they planted potatoes, that being the first attempt at farming in this part of the state. Very early in the same spring Mr. MacKinnon and his brother platted the town of Iron River, and during the same year opened the Beta mine. Mr. MacKinnon has been a resident here since, and still has an interest in the leases of various valuable mining properties. He has never married, the presiding genius of his household being his sister Mary, who has lived with him during his stay in Iron River, as has also Miss IMay MacGinnis. LEON L. GOODNOW, M. D.-As an able and popular representative of the medical profession in the Upper Peninsula and as one of the prominent and influential citizens of Michigamme, Marquette county, where he is serving as a member of the county board of supervisors, Dr. Goodnow is entitled to special consideration in this publication. He was born at Churchville, Ontario county, New York, on the 14th of June, 1874, and is the only child of Lucius T. and Clara (Housel) Goodnow, both of whom were born and reared in the old Empire state and the former of whom is now living retired in the city of Coldwater, Branch county, Michigan. The mother died in 1901, at the age of fifty years. Lucius T. Goodnow was engaged in the hotel business at Victor, Ontario county, New York, for a number of years and later there engaged in the mercantile business. He finally removed to Coldwater, Michigan, where he continued in the same line of enterprise until 1907, since which time he has lived virtually retired. He is a Republican in politics and is a member of the Masonic fraternity and holds membership in the Presbyterian church, as did also his cherished and devoted wife. Dr. Goodnow gained his preliminary educational discipline in the public schools of Coldwater and in preparation for the work of his chosen profession he entered the Bennett Medical College, in the city of Chicago, in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1896, and from which he received his degree of Doctor of Medicine. He thereafter took a postgraduate course in anatomy and surgery and in initiating the active work of his chosen profession he located at Chicago Heights, Michigan, where he was engaged in practice about two years. Thereafter he was a practitioner at Elgin, Illinois, until 1902, when he came to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and associated himself in practice with Dr. John H. Hudson, of Negaunee. This alliance continued until 1904, when Dr. Goodnow removed to Mich

Page  830 830 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN igamme, where he has since followed the work of his profession and where he controls a large and representative private practice of a general order, besides which he is physician for the Cleveland Cliff Mining Company, the Niagara Mining Company and the American Mining Company, whose property is located near Ishpeming. Though not a resident of that county the Doctor has served as county physician of Baraga county. He keeps in close touch with the advances made in both the sciences of medicine and surgery and is identified with the American Medical Association, the Michigan State Medical Society and the Marquette County Medical Society, of which last named he served one term as vice-president. He has been a member of the board of supervisors of Marquette county since 1908, when he was elected supervisor of Michigamme township. In politics he is affiliated with the Democratic party and he is a Mason of Ishpeming Lodge. His religious views are in harmony with the tenets of the Episcopal church. The doctor married on March 9, 1900, Miss F. B. Thompson, a native of Chicago PETER LHOTE.-At Nos. 319-321 Grand avenue, in the city of Menominee is located the large and well equipped establishment of Lhote Brothers, who are manufacturers' agents, conduct a storage and transfer business, and handle vehicles, farm implements, saw-mill machinery and supplies, gasoline engines, etc. In connection with this flourishing enterprise the brothers also conducted a livery business, and of the firm the subject of this sketch is the senior member. He is known as one of the enterprising and reliable business men of Menominee and as such is entitled to recognition in this publication. Peter Lhote is a native of Battincourt, Belgium, where he was born on the 7th of February, 1865, and he is a son of Nicholas and Mary (Barth) Lhote, both of whom were likewise born in Battincourt, where the father still resides; the mother died in 1865, shortly after the birth of the subject of this sketch, and the elder of her two children is John L., who is engaged in mining operations in Alaska. After the death of his first wife Nicholas Lhote, who was born in the year 1829, married Miss Susan Stern, 'ho is still living, as are also three of their five children,-George, who is a resident of Menominee, Michigan; John, who is associated in business with the subject of this sketch, as junior member of the firm of Lhote Brothers; and Mary, who remains in Belgium. To the excellent schools of his native land Peter Lhote is indebted for his early educational training, and at the age of eighteen years he severed the home ties and came to America. His financial resources were very limited, but he had the staunch equipment of sturdy physique, honesty of purpose, industrious habits and determined spirit, so that he was amply fortified to fight the battle of life for himself. He landed in New York city and soon afterward made his way to Dubuque, Iowa, where he arrived on the 4th of March, 1883. In that vicinity he secured work on a farm, and he continued to be thus identified with agricultural pursuits until 1886, on the 18th of July of which year he made his advent in Menominee, Michigan. For the first three months he found employment in'connection with lumbering operations, and he then took up a homestead claim of one hundred and sixty acres of heavily timbered land in Ontonagon county, Michigan. He lived on this claim until he had perfected his title thereto, and then he sold the timber on the place and returned to Menominee, where he was employed for the ensuing eight months in the local

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Page  831 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 831 establishment of the great meat-packing house of Nelson Morris & Company, of Chicago. For the following three years he was employed in the city of Marquette, and he then returned to Menominee and engaged in the retail liquor trade, in which he continued for seven years. Thereafter he was engaged in the hotel business at Sister Bay, Wisconsin, until 1892, when he again came to Menominee and established the business in which he is now engaged and in connection with which he has built up a large and substantial business. In the enterprise his brother John has been associated with him from the beginning, and the livery department of the business was made an adjunct in January, 1909, when they purchased a well equipped establishment, to the facilities of which they have materially added since that time. In politics Mr. Lhote is a staunch supporter of the cause of the Democratic party, and he is a communicant of the Catholic church, in whose faith he was reared. He is affiliated with St. Anne's Court, No. 303, Catholic Order of Foresters, and with the local organization of the Knights of Columbus. He served as alderman one term and was reelected for the second term. On the 15th of June, 1890, Mr. Lhote was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Rasor, who was born in Osaukee county, Wisconsin, a daughter of Andrew and Leona Rasor, who now reside at Sister Bay, that state. Mrs. Lhote, who was a devout communicant of the Catholic church, was summoned to the life eternal on the 6th of October, 1908, and is survived by two daughters,-Angeline and Clara. Mr. Lhote married on the 25th of January, 1909, Susan Rasor, a cousin of his first wife. THOMAS B. DUNSTON.-In our age of refined reason and enlightened liberty the lives of the virtuous great who have lived and are interred in our own state exhibit the most attractive models for our emulation, for they have ennobled and blessed the state and nation. Few have been fraught with greater import for the advancement of the good of mankind than that of Thomas B. Dunston. The 23d of May, 1902, marks the time when Hon. Thomas B. Dunston was summoned from the scenes of his mortal endeavors and it was a day of deep mourning in the city of Hancock. His life was ordered along clean, moral principles and the success and good which he achieved were the outcome of his sterling integrity of character and his consecrated devotion towhat he considered the noblest things in life. As a lawyer he was most honorable and straightforward and his able and willing service in behalf of the public assure him a secure place in the memories of his fellow citizens. Mr. Dunston was born in Camborne, county of Cornwall, England, on the 4th of January, 1850, and he was a son of Captain James Dunston, likewise a native of the same county, where he was born on the 5th of December, 1827. In 1853, he came to America but returned in 1854 and brought his wife and family, the subject of this review being but four years of age. Captain Dunston located in Ontonagon county, Michigan, where he found employment in the Ohio & Trap Rock mine, of which he became captain and superintended the work until 1860, when he resigned in order to accept the captaincy for the Amygdaloid, Keweenaw. Later he became captain of the Central mine and in 1879 became agent for this mine, remaining incumbent of this position until his retirement in January, 1893. He thereafter resided in Hancock until his death, which occurred on the 6th of January, 1902. The maiden name of the mother of Thomas B. Dunston

Page  832 832 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN was Emma Bree, and she was also born in county Cornwall, England, and passed away on the 13th of October, 1904, at a venerable age, her death occurring at Hancock. Mr. Dunston, who was an only child, received excellent educational advantages in his youth. His preliminary training was that afforded by the public schools of Keweenaw county and his academic studies were pursued in Lawrence University, at Appleton, Wisconsin, in which institution he was graduated as a member of the class of 1871, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. In the winter of 1871-2 he was a student in the law department of the celebrated University of Michigan and was admitted to the bar of Keweenaw circuit in June, 1872. He at once entered upon the practice of his chosen profession and in the fall of 1872 he was elected judge of probate and prosecuting attorney for the county of Keweenaw, of which offices he was incumbent until 1879, resigning at that time and removing to Pontiac, Michigan, where he remained until 1882, in which year he returned to his former home at Central mine, Keweenaw county. In the autumn of the latter year he became the Republican nominee for the district, comprised of Keweenaw, Baraga, Ontonagon and Isle Royal counties, for representative to the state legislature. He was elected by a heretofore unheard of majority. The next fall he removed to Hancock, where he maintained his residence until his death in 1902, as already indicated. In 1884, as further mark of his ability and popularity he was nominated for the office of prosecuting attorney and was indorsed by the Democrats of his county. In 1888 he was a delegate from Michigan to the National Convention at Chicago, which nominated Benjamin Harrison, and in 1889 he was elected from the Thirty-second district as state senator. In this election he received a majority of over six hundred votes. He was an influential member in the state legislature, both in the capacity of representative and senator, and served on various important committees. In 1896 still greater honor was conferred upon him in that he was then elected by a large majority as lieutenant governor of the state. Upon retiring from this office, Mr. Dunston resumed the practice of law at Hancock, where he proved himself an able and versatile trial lawyer, well fortified in the learning of his profession. Here he became an interested principal in various industrial and financial institutions of wide scope and importance. IIe was President of the Victoria Mining Company and a director in the Adventure Consolidated Mining Company, the Quincy Mining Company and the Copper Range, the Rhode Island Mining Company; president of the Ontonagon County National Bank, at Rockland, and a director of the First National Bank of Hancock and of the First National Bank of Calumet. He was appointed by Governor Rich as a member of the board of control of the Michigan College of Mines and later was president of the board of control of that institute which position he held at the time of his death. In politics Mr. Dunston gave a stanch allegiance to the principles and policies for which the Republican party stands sponsor and was an active worker in its local councils. In a fraternal way his affiliations were as here noted: Keweenaw Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; Quincy Lodge, No. 135, Free & Accepted Masons; Gate of Temple Chapter, No. 35, Royal Arch Masons; Montrose Commandery, Knights Templars; and Ahmed Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He was a deep and appreciative member of the time-honored Masonic organization. On the 22d of July, 1875, was solemnized the marriage of Mr.

Page  833 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 833 Dunston to Miss Mary A. McDonald, who was born in Hazel Green, Wisconsin, on the 28th of November, 1854, and who is a daughter of Captain Samuel and Helen (Hannah) McDonald, the former of whom was born in the county of Cornwall, England, of Scotch parentage, and the latter of whom was a native of Creetown, Scotland. When a young man Captain McDonald removed to Scotland, where he was engaged in mining operations until 1854, when he emigrated to America and located in the southwestern portion of Wisconsin, where he was employed in the lead mines until 1859, when he took up his residence in Keweenaw county, finding employment in the Cliff mine. Later he was tendered and accepted the position of captain of the Sheldon & Columbian mine, at Portage Lake, which position he retained for a period of seven years, when he became interested in the Hancock mine. In 1876, he retired from active business affairs and took up his residence in Pontiac, where he remained until the death of his cherished and devoted wife, who passed away on the 8th of May, 1880. Her husband survived her by nine years, his death having occurred on the 28th of July, 1889, in Hancock at the venerable age of seventythree years. Both were devout communicants of the Protestant Episcopal church and he was a member of Keweenaw Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Mrs. Dunston was their only child. Mr. and Mrs. Dunston became the parents of five children, four of whom are now living,-Robert P., James S., Helen B. and Emma H. Robert P., who is engaged in commission business, resides at Hancock. On the 10th of August he was united in marriage to Miss Laura Stein and they have two daughters, Mary E. and Helen V. James S. is with the brokerage firm of Hornblower & Weeks of New York City, and he married on the 27th of April, 1904, Miss Eda L. Kempshall and they are the parents of three children,-Alice, Eda and Thomas. Helen B. is the wife of Charles W. Wright, a son of Charles E. Wright, formerly State Geologist of Michigan and they reside in Sardinia, Italy. Emma H. married September 14, 1910, George A. Osborn of Sault Ste. Marie, son of the Republican candidate for governor of Michigan. Mr. and Mrs. Dunston were also communicants of the Protestant Episcopal church, in which faith they reared their children. STANLEY D. NEWTON.-As resident manager for Hammond, Standish & Co., the Detroit packers, for the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, Mr. Newton is numbered among the essentially representative business men of Sault Ste. Marie, where he has maintained his home since 1905. Mr. Newton was born at Park Hill, Ontario, June 11, 1874, and is the second and only surviving son of E. H. and Julia (Smith) Newton. The father died in Bay City, Michigan, in 1896, and in that city his widow still maintains her home, having married Mr. John Hicks, a prominent wheat and cattle raiser of Milbank, South Dakota, and Bay City. E.;H. Newton was a child at the time of the emigration to America of his parents, who were successful farmers in New York. He was engaged in agricultural pursuits in New York and Ontario until 1884, when he removed to Bay City, where he engaged in contracting and building, in which line of enterprise he was prominently identified with the upbuilding of the southern part of the city after the same was swept by fire in 1891. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity and a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, as is also his widow. Stanley D. Newton gained his early educational training in the public grammar and high schools of Bay City, and when seventeen years of age he became a reporter for the Bay City Times. Later he entered the

Page  834 834. THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN employ of the Bay City Beef Company as office boy and assistant bookkeeper. In this connection he familiarized himself with all the details of the meat business. He became bookkeeper and city salesman successively, and from 1900 to 1905 he was traveling salesman for the company in the Flint and Lansing districts. In the year last mentioned he established his home in Sault Ste. Marie and has since remained there in charge of Hammond, Standish & Company's Sault Ste. Marie, St. Ignace, Gladstone, Escanaba and Marquette divisions. The business of the company in this territory reaches the annual aggregate of half a million dollars, and a large number of traveling salesmen and other employes are required. Mr. Newton's activities aside from the above include the invention and manufacture of a handy two-wheel delivery cart for the retail butcher trade, manufactured by the Bay City Vehicle Company, of which Mr. Newton was president up to the time of his removal to Sault Ste. Marie. The cart is used extensively in all parts of the civilized world, and has proved a decided success. He is also author and compiler of the book "Mackinac Island and Sault Ste. Marie," an entertaining record and story of this, the country of greatest historical interest in the Northwest. The picturesque charm of the North Country is shown to be supplemented by the stirring events of three hundred years under the flags of France, Great Britain and the United States. Mr. Newton is a member of Joppa Lodge No. 315, Free and Accepted Masons, and of Sault Ste. Marie Chapter. His political allegiance is given to the Republican party. In 1895 Mr. Newton was united in marriage to Miss Wilmetta Steenbergen, who was born in the state of Illinois, as were also her parents, William and Jeannette (Bates) Steenbergen, both of whom are now deceased. The ancestry of this family is traced back many hundred years, one branch rising in the city of Steenbergen, Holland, and another flourishing in the old German city of Leipsic. Mr. Steenbergen was engaged in farming in Kentucky and Ohio, whence he eventually removed to Illinois, where he followed the same line of enterprise until his death, leaving his farm, only to serve with honor as a soldier of the Union in the Civil war. Mr. and Mrs. Newton have three children,-Norma, Irma and Stanley D. Jr. JULIAN EDOIN, who has retired from active business life and resides in Escanaba, was born in Chateaugay county, province of Quebec, April 7, 1840. He is a son of Anthony and Margaret (Martin) Edoin, farmers and natives of Quebec province. Mr. Edoin was reared in his native place and spent his boyhood with his parents; at the age of sixteen years he began working for himself, going into the woods in Canada. He was two years in Warren county, New York, and August 1, 1864, located in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. He was there married, in 1865, to Ellen Mullen, a native of the state of New York. In 1869 they removed from Fond du Lac to the Northern Peninsula of Michigan, locating at Ford River in Delta county, where Mr. Edoin became foreman in a lumbering camp. He worked nineteen years for the Ford River Lumber Company, and then was employed in Wisconsin by the Prairie Lumber Company, as foreman. Returning to Delta county, Michigan, he spent two years in Escanaba as foreman for Ford Lumber Company. After another two years spent in the employ of Mann Brothers, of Two Rivers,

Page  835 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 835 Wisconsin, he retired from active business, and for the past sixteen years has been a resident of Escanaba. Mr. Edoin has always been an industrious, frugal and prudent manager, and has invested his savings to good advantage. He is a stockholder in the State Savings Bank of Escanaba, and owns a large tract of land in Delta county, besides city property. He started in life as a poor boy, with his own way to make in the world, and has been very fortunate to achieve the financial success he now enjoys. Mr. Edoin now owns one of the finest residences in Escanaba, and is well known, having been a resident of the Northern Peninsula so many years. Politically Mr. Edoin is a Republican and is now supervisor of the First ward of Escanaba. He served four years as alderman and five years as county road commissioner. He has always taken an active interest in the public welfare, and was largely instrumental in building good roads in Delta county. Mr. Edoin is a man of strict honesty and integrity, and his good character is recognized wherever he is known. He is a member of St. Ann's Catholic church. He and his wife have no children of their own but have reared a niece. WILLIAM E. McCLINTOCK.-Inheriting in no small degree the high moral principles and habits of industry and thrift characteristic of his Scotch ancestors, William E. McClintock has been a resident of Iron Mountain for upwards of a quarter of a century, during which time he has contributed his share in advancing the material interests of this section of the Upper Peninsula. He was born, December 23, 1843, in Venango county, Pennsylvania, on the present site of Oil City, on the same homestead on which the birth of his father, James McClintock, occurred January 4, 1800. His grandfather, Hamilton McClintock, the lineal descendant of one of three brothers who emigrated from Scotland to the United States about the middle of the seventeenth century, was born in Sherman Valley, Pennsylvania, May 21, 1771. Becoming a pioneer settler of Venango county, Pennsylvania, he bought a tract of wild land that is now included within the corporate limits of Oil City, and in the wilderness erected a log house for his first home. Toiling with energy, he cleared a large part of the land, and was there a tiller of the soil until his death, in 1857, at the venerable age of eighty-six years. He married Mary Culberson, who was born September 19, 1775, in Sherman Valley, Pennsylvania, and died January 27, 1863, aged eighty-eight years. One of a family of ten children, James McClintock grew to manhood on the home farm, and succeeded to the ownership of a part of his father's estate. He continued the vocation to which he was reared, and until his death, March 30, 1855, was engaged in agricultural pursuits. He married Louisa Reynolds, who was born in Venango county, Pennsylvania, September 5, 1802, a daughter of William Reynolds, who was born in Worcestershire, England, in 1752. In 1796 he emigrated to the United States, and the following year became a pioneer settler of Venango county, Pennsylvania. He bought a tract of timbered land while the country was still in its pristine wildness, and, with the Indians as his neighbors, began the improvement of the farm on which his last years were spent, dying there June 30,.1820. His wife, whose maiden name was Lydia Thomas, was born in Herefordshire, England, in 1758, and died in Venango county, Pennsylvania, in 1826, having borne him ten children. Of the union of James and Louisa (Reynolds) McClintock ten children

Page  [unnumbered] 836 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN were born, as follows: Hamilton, John, Maria, Mary Jane, Hugh C., Lydia, Adeline, Rachel, James and William E, But eleven years old when his father died, William E. McClintock subsequently lived on a farm with a married sister for a number of years, continuing his education as opportunity presented itself. Growing to manhood, he worked at different occupations, including those of clerk and bookkeeper. Leaving Pennsylvania in 1873, he lived for a few months in Escanaba, Michigan, from there going to Mvenominee, where he was employed as a clerk for two years. Coming then, in 1876, to Menominee Range, Mr. McClintock stopped a short time at Waucedah, going from there to Vulcan and thence to Quinnesec, where he started in business with a general stock of merchandise. Meeting, like many others, with reverses, his mercantile career was brief. In 1882 he located in Iron Mountain, and for five years was variously employed. Entering the employ of the Hamilton Ore Company as bookkeeper in 1887, Mr. McClintock was connected with that company and its successors until 1909, a period of twentytwo consecutive years, his record of service bearing evidence to his ability and fidelity. Since his resignation from that position, he has been engaged to some extent in the real estate business. Mr. McClintock married first April 18, 1868, Frances Black, who was born April 6, 1844, in Clarion county, Pennsylvania, and who died November 24, 1868. Mr. McClintock married for his second wife April 7, 1880, Katie Boucher, who was born in Brown county, Wisconsin, February 2, 1861. She passed to the higher life November 20, 1896, leaving three children, namely: Hallett E., Ina L. and Anna I. Hallett E., who, after his graduation from the Iron Mountain High School, attended the Michigan School of Mines, is now, in 1910, employed in the office of the chief engineer of the Union Pacific Railroad Company. Ina L., wife of Olof Been, has one child, Richard. Anna I., a graduate of the Iron Mountain High School, subsequently, after attending the University of Michigan for a year, was graduated from the State Normal School at Marquette, and is now a teacher in the public schools of Ironwood. Fraternally Mr. McClintock is a member of the order of Ancient Free & Accepted Masons. ARTHUR W. THOMPSON.-A man of versatile talents, and of superior business qualifications and judgment, Arthur W. Thompson has for many years been identified with the Penn Iron Company, holding positions of importance, at the present time having charge of its buildings, its insurance inspector, its loading of ores, and of other departmental work. He was born at Lyme, Grafton county, New Hampshire, September 7, 1859, a son of Dianiel W. Thompson. His ancestors lived for several generations in Vermont, his grandfather, William Thompson, and his great-grandfather, Samuel Thompson, Jr., having been born in Londonderry, where his great-great-grandfather, Samuel Thompson, Sr., was for many years a prosperous farmer. Samuel Thompson, Sr., born May 23, 1751, served as captain of a company in the Revolutionary war. He cleared and improved a farm in Londonderry, Vermont, and was engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death. He married Mary Miller, who was born in 1752, and died June 22, 1834. Born on the home farm, in Londonderry, November 27, 177.6, Samuel Thompson, Jr., spent his entire life in his native town, carrying on general farming until his death, September 22, 1853. His wife, whose maiden name was Abigail Haskin, was born July 27, 1776, and died August 13, 1862.

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Page  837 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 837 William Thompson was born in Londonderry, Vermont, December 5, 1813. Inheriting the paternal acres, he managed it successfully a few years, and then sold it, and moved to Saratoga county, New York. Buying land in Monroe township, he was there engaged in agricultural pursuits several years. Selling out, he spent the remainder of his life with his son, at Glens Falls, New York, passing away November 28, 1901. He married Nancy Rugg, who was born November 25, 1814, and died December 8, 1879. Daniel W. Thompson was born on the ancestral homestead, in Londonderry, Vermont, September 22, 1838, and was brought up and educated in the Green Mountain state, being twenty-two years of age when he moved with the family to Saratoga county, New York. In 1861, inspired by patriotic ardor, he enlisted in Company D, Twenty-second New York Volunteer Infantry, and served with his regiment until the expiration of his term of enlistment, when he was honorably discharged. Again, in 1863, he offered his services to his country, enlisting in Company E, Ninety-first New York Volunteer Infantry, and was first commissioned second lieutenant, subsequently being promoted to first lieutenant. He took an active part in many engagements of the war, among those of importance having been as follows: Second Battle of Bull Run; Battle of Antietam, and that of Pittsburg Landing. During a lull in the engagement at Antietam, Lieutenant Thompson, as he was passing a spring, found a comrade, Dr. Harvey King, lying severely wounded, with the enemy fast approaching. Assisting the doctor into the saddle, the lieutenant grabbed the horse's tail, started him up, and both escaped. At the Battle of Pittsburg Landing, the company charged a rebel battery three times, at the first assault the captain being killed, and at the second the first lieutenant lost his life. The second lieutenant, Daniel W. Thompson, commanded the company at the third charge, when the rebel battery was captured, and its guns spiked. Being honorably discharged after the close of the war, Lieutenant Thompson returned to his home, and for awhile thereafter was employed, at Albany, in the office of the Secretary of State. Subsequently engaging in the insurance business at Glens Falls, he was there a resident until his death, in November, 1868. Lieutenant Daniel W. Thompson married, in 1857, Sophia Frances Hodgkin, who was born, June 19, 1843, in Putney, Vermont, a daughter of Seth W. Hodgkin. Her grandparents, Ever and Charlotte (Briggs) Hodgkin, were life-long residents of Putney, Vermont, living and dying on their farm. Seth W. Hodgkin was born on the home farm, January 27, 1798. He subsequently removed to Troy, New York, where he established a boot and shoe store, and there resided until his death, October 21, 1866. The maiden name of his wife was Rebecca Bragg. She was born at Westmoreland, New Hampshire, a daughter of Benjamin and Anna (Shirley) Bragg, the former of whom was of English descent, and the latter of Scotch ancestry. Rebecca (Bragg) Hodgkin died March 17, 1876, aged sixty-seven years. Surviving her first husband, Mrs. Sophia Frances (Hodgkin) Thompson married for her second husband George W. Langdon. She is now living at Vulcan, with her son Arthur, who is her only living child, her other child, Lillie Louise, having died at the age of six years. Receiving his preliminary education in the city schools of Albany, Arthur W. Thompson subsequently completed his early studies at the Glens Falls Academy. He afterwards operated pleasure boats on Lake George for three summers, and the following three summers had charge of Carey B. Moon's steamers on Lake Saratoga. Entering then the emVol. II-14

Page  838 838 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN ploy of the New York Central Railroad Company, he was at first a fireman, later becoming an engineer. Resigning his position in 1890, he entered the employ of Norwood & Butterfield, lumbermen, and went to Mississippi, where he had charge of building roads for the firm, and of clearing mill sites. At the end of nine months, the climate not agreeing with him, he resigned, his resignation taking effect in August, 1891. The same fall Mr. Thompson came to Vulcan, and in February, 1892, began work with the Penn Iron Company as time keeper, with which he has since been associated. He served as time keeper but a short time when he was made surface foreman, and he has since served in different capacities, at the present writing, in 1910, looking after the Company's buildings, equipments, insurance, shipments of ore, and the many other things requiring attention. On June 24, 1880, Mr. Thompson was united in marriage with Cora Belle Gleason, who was born in Caldwell township, Warren county, New York, August 11, 1860, a daughter of Reuben L. Gleason. Her grandparents, Ingalls and Lucinda (Parker) Gleason, moved from Vermont to New York state, and spent their last years on a farm in Caldwell township. Born in Granville, Vermont, Reuben L. Gleason accompanied the family to New York state. One day in 1862, when he and his brother were busy shingling a barn, some friends came along on their way to enlist. Reuben said to his brother, —"We will go and enlist, and the war will be over before the snow flies, and we can then finish shingling." Leaving their job, both enlisted in Company B, One Hundred and Twenty-third New York Volunteer Infantry. At the close of the war, after serving gallantly for three years, Reuben L. Gleason was honorably discharged, and returning home engaged in butchering, and dealing in provisions, building up an extensive trade in meat at the popular summer resorts. He spent his last days in Caldwell township, passing away October 16, 1895. His first wife, Sarah Ann (Brown) Gleason, the mother of Mrs. Thompson, died in 1867, and he married for his second wife Melissa A. Williams, who now resides in Vulcan. She has two daughters, and one son, but Mrs. Thompson was the only child by the first marriage. Mr. and Mrs. Thompson have one child, Sadie S. Thompson, born December 26, 1883. She has received excellent educational advantages, after her graduation at the Norway High School, and at the State Normal School at Marquette, taking a course of study at the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor. She is now in charge of the stenographic department at the Lansing Business University. In his political affiliations, Mr. Thompson is independent, voting for the best men and measures, regardless of party restrictions. He is now serving as a member of the Board of Supervisors. Fraternally he belongs to Norway Lodge, No. 362, F. & A. M.; to Iron Mountain Chapter, No. 121, R. A. M.; to Hugh McCurdy Commandery, No. 43, K. T.; and to Ahmed Temple, Order of the Mystic Shrine, at Marquette. Mr. and Mirs. Thompson, and their daughter are members of Chapter No. 251, 0. E. S. Mr. Thompson is master of the Norway Grange, No. 1447, president of the Dickinson County Farmers Institute and president of the Dickinson County Menominee Range Agricultural Society. MARTIN ROGAN.-A pioneer settler of Crystal Falls, Martin Rogan has taken an active part in the upbuilding of this section of the country, and is widely known as a man of integrity and worth. A son of James Rogan, he was born, November 22, 1841, at Ballston Springs, Saratoga county, New York. His grandfather, Bartholomew Rogan, was born in

Page  839 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 839 County Mayo, Ireland, of Norman lineage, his ancestry dating back to the days of William the Conqueror. He spent his entire life in his native county, being employed in stone cutting. One or two of his brothers, all of whom were stonecutters or stone masons, emigrated to this country. Born and bred in County Mayo, Ireland, James Rogan came with his family to the United States in 1837, locating in Saratoga county, New York, where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits for about eight years. Industrious and economical, he accumulated considerable money in the meantime, and in 1845 returned with his wife and children to Ireland. Having while here become familiar with the democratic customs of our people, he resented the aristocratic ways of old Ireland, refusing to take off his hat to those who claimed to be his superiors, and at the end of two years returned to free America. After spending two weeks in Saratoga, New York, he moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he resided two years. In 1849 he went by way of the canal and lakes to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and after three weeks in that place proceeded by ox teams to Oconomowoc, Waukesha county, which was his home for five years. Locating then in Lebanon, Dodge county, he bought a tract of timbered land, built a log cabin in the woods and began the improvement of a farm. Subsequently selling out, he purchased a partly improved farm in the same county, and there resided until his death, at the age of seventy-two years. He married Nancy Carney, who was born in County Mayo, Ireland. Her father, Patrick Carney, served many years in the English army, for two years being a member of the King's Guards, his service being in Egypt, India and at Gibraltar. He spent his last years in his native county. He was a man of fine physique, six feet and six inches in height, while his brothers were still taller. Mrs. Nancy Rogan preceded her husband in death six weeks, passing away at the age of sixty-two years. To them nine children were born and reared, as follows: Catherine, Martin, Michael, Bartley, Mary, James, Margaret, Anthony B. and Helen. Five years old when he accompanied his parents to Ireland, Martin Rogan has quite a distinct recollection of the Emerald Isle. As a lad he attended the pioneer schools of Wisconsin, making the most of his opportunities, but the greater part of his education has been obtained through extensive reading of good literature. Commencing young to assist his father, he remained with his parents for many years, in addition to carrying on general farming and stock raising making a specialty of cultivating hops. In 1876 Mr. Rogan came to the Upper Peninsula and spent a year, afterward living in Wisconsin two years. In 1879 he made a second visit to this section of Michigan, coming by rail to Quinnesec, the railroad terminus, then with team to Bass Lake, where he spent a few days before returning to his home in Wisconsin. While here he learned from the Mally Brothers of the prospect for ore in what is now Iron county, and in 1881 located at what is now Crystal Falls. A sawmill stood one-half mile south of the place, but there was not a building on the town site. A few days later he returned to Florence, Wisconsin, but in June, 1881, returned as cook to what is now the Bristol Mine, remaining in that capacity four months. Coming then to Crystal Falls, Mr. Rogan bought a house lot, and that winter was employed as night watchman at the mill. In the spring of 1882, he embarked in the real estate business. He then built on his lot, established a boarding house, and for a year was engaged in exploring. He subsequently became a contractor in

Page  840 840 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN grading, excavating cellars, and putting in cellar walls, being successfully engaged in this industry for many years. He is now living somewhat retired from active pursuits, being afflicted with rheumatism. Mr. Rogan married, in 1885, Catherine Carney, who was born in Saratoga county, New York, a daughter of Patrick and Ann (Welch) Carney, and to them three children have been born: Joseph M., George M. and Ellen A. Rogan. Louis STOEKLY.-Honored for his upright principles and sterling traits of character, Louis Stoekly, of Iron Mountain, has been prominently associated with the development and progress of this section of the Upper Peninsula and has rendered appreciated service to his fellow citizens in various positions of trust and responsibility, at the present time, in 1910, serving as county treasurer of Dickinson county. A son of Jacob Stoekly, he was born, July 11, 1866, in Saukville, Ozaukee county, Wisconsin, of thrifty Swiss ancestry, his paternal grandparents having been lifelong residents of Switzerland. Born in Switzerland, November 30, 1819, Jacob Stoekly learned the trade of a wood-worker when young, becoming an expert lathe operator. He subsequently followed his trade in his native land a number of years, living there until after his marriage. Accompanied by his wife and their two children, he came to the United States and located in Saukville,, Wisconsin, where he continued at his trade several years. Removing then to Fountain City, Wisconsin, he established a factory, and with characteristic forethought and enterprise began the manufacture of spinning wheels, which were in common use in every household in that section of the country, and in that line of industry built up a large business, making the wheel, and on his forge all of its accompaniments. Retiring from active pursuits in 1896, he came to Iron Mountain, and resided here until his death, in 1906, in the eighty-sixth year of his age. He married Mary Mentz, who was born in Switzerland and died, in 1895, in Wisconsin. She reared five children, of whom two, Susie and a child that died in mid-ocean, were born in Switzerland, while the other three children, Adolph, John and Louis, were born in Wisconsin. Obtaining a practical education in the public schools of Fountain City, Wisconsin, Louis Stoekly became a clerk in a drug store at the age of seventeen years, continuing in the store three years. Resigning his clerkship then, on account of ill health, he came with a surveying gang to the Upper Peninsula, and for a few months assisted in surveying the route of the Northern Wisconsin, Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic Railroad. Coming to Iron Mountain in the spring of 1887, Mr. Stoekly was here engaged in the drug business until 1908, since which time he has devoted his time and energies to his official duties. In 1893 Mr. Stoekly was united in marriage with Julia Oderbolz, who was born at Black River Falls, Jackson county, Wisconsin. Her father, Uhlrich Oderbolz, was born in Switzerland, while her mother was of German descent. Mr. and Mrs. Stoekly have one child, Mary Louise. A stanch Republican in his political views, Mr. Stoekly made his first entry into public life when he was elected to represent the Fifth ward on the county board of supervisors. He has since served on the local school board, and was again elected supervisor. In 1901-2 he was elected to the office of city treasurer. He has served two years as mayor of Iron Mountain, and in 1906 was elected county treasurer, and at the expiration of his term, in 1908, was reelected to the same high position among the county officials. Fraternally Mr. Stoekly is a member of Hematite

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Page  841 TIlE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 841 Lodge, No. 123, K. of P.; of Oak Leaf Camp, No. 2885, M. W. A.; and 'of Guttenburg Lodge, No. 7, Sons of Herman. CIARLES J. OSTERBERG.-Distinguished as one of the original settlers of Iron Mountain, and being the only one living, Charles J. Osterberg has been closely associated with the rapid development and growth of this part of the Upper Peninsula, and as junior member of the firm of IIalberg & Osterberg is carrying on a substantial mercantile business. lHe was born, April 2, 1856, at Soderkoping, Ostergothland, Sweden, where his parents, one brother and two sisters, are still living. Five of his brothers, Harry and Hugo, twins, Robert, Jean, and Iver, emigrated to this country, and have here established their homes. Leaving school at the age of seventeen years, Charles J. Osterberg served an apprenticeship at the machinist's trade in Stockholm, and was there employed in his chosen occupation until 1879. In that year, filled with the ambitious hopes of energetic youth, he came to the United States, and in Chicago secured employment with the Menominee Mining Company, and was given free transportation to the town of Norway, Dickinson county, Michigan. After working a short time as shoveler at the stock pile, he was selected as one of a party of explorers, and was sent in a box car to Quinnesec. There the little band of eight people, including Captain Wicks, started with a four-mule wagon loaded with tools, tents, boards and provisions, for the interior, and came to the present site of Iron Mountain. About midway of their journey the party passed a log cabin occupied by explorers, Keelridge, and near the present site of the St. Paul Railway Station stood an empty cabin which had been occupied by loggers, those two cabins being the only buildings nearer this place than Quinnesec. The company pitched their tents on section thirty, and with the boards put up a shack to be used as a kitchen, building a roof over the table. Beginning at once to explore, these men finally uncovered what is now the Chapin Mine. When the cold winter came these pioneer miners often had to sweep the snow from the table before eating breakfast, and they anxiously awaited the building of a house where they could secure board. Just before Christmas their hopes were realized, Mr. Marehand opening a house which was crowded to the limit until two weeks later, when Jerome Rayame opened his boarding house. In the early winter an engine was brought here by the mining company, and Mr. Osterberg as engineer operated the first engine used at Iron Mountain, and continued as stationary engineer for the company until 1884. Embarking then in mercantile pursuits, he kept a general store here for three years. Going then to Iron county, he took up a homestead claim twenty miles north of Iron River, erected two log houses on the tract, and was there a resident until 1889. Returning then to Iron Mountain, Mr. Osterberg was for awhile employed as a clerk, first in a grocery, and later in a hardware establishment. Purchasing the building in which he is now located in 1890, he has since been prosperously engaged in the bakery and grocery business, since 1895 having been in partnership with Peter Ialberg under the present firm name of Italberg & Osterberg. Having never married, Mr. Osterberg is free from the cares and perplexities of domestic life, while his only knowledge of its comforts and happiness is gleaned from observation. Fraternally he is a member of Nordst Jernan Lodge, No. 15, S. H. & E. F. JOTIN B. CALI. —Well and favorably known as a young man of high principles and right thinking, John B. Calvi, a rising young lawyer of

Page  842 842 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN Iron Mountain, is prominent in municipal affairs, in which he takes an intelligent interest, and is bending all of his energy to make a success of his chosen profession. A son of Peter Calvi, he was born, August 17, 1878, in Milan, Italy, which was the home of his ancestors as far back as his lineage can be traced. Serving an apprenticeship when young at the trade of a brick, stone and plaster mason, Peter Calvi followed it in Milan, his native city, for several years, also working in different cities in France and Germany. Coming to America in 1880, he followed his trade for a time in Negaunee, Michigan, going from there to Norway, and later locating at Iron Mountain, where, in 1886, he was joined by his wife and son. He has since continued his residence in this city, and has here carried on an excellent business, by his honesty and fair dealings winning for himself not only a handsome competency, but gaining anenviable reputation as a worthy and desirable citizen. He married a native daughter of Italy, and to them, four children have been born, as follows: John B., the only child born in Italy, Rosie, Keeler and Henry. At the age of eight years, having previously attended school in Milan two years, John B. Calvi came with his mother to Iron Mountain, and here continued his education, passing through the different grades and being graduated from the high school with the class of 1899. The following three years he was variously employed, for one year serving as clerk in the office of R. T. Miller. Entering the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, in 1901, Mr. Calvi was there graduated in 1903, and immediately admitted to the bar. Going then to Ontonagon, he was for fourteen months assistant to W. R. Adams, district attorney, but since that time has been actively engaged in the practice of his profession at Iron Mountain. In 1905 Mr. Calvi was elected city clerk, and has served most satisfactorily in that position ever since. He is a steadfast Republican in politics, and fraternally is a member of Escanaba Council, No. 64, K. of C.; Crescent Lodge, No. 700, B. P. 0. E.; and of Iron Mountain Aerie, No. 428, Order of Eagles. CHARLES F. SUNDSTROM has been a resident of the Upper Peninsula since he was a child of four years, and here he has not only attained success in connection with the practical activities of life but has also gained the implicit confidence and high regard of his fellow men, as is shown by the fact that he has been called upon to serve in various offices of local trust and responsibility. He is one of the influential citizens of Michigamme, Marquette county, in which village he is engaged in the general merchandise business. Charles F. Sundstrom was born in Atvideberg, Sweden, on the 10th of March, 1865, and is a son of August F. and Christina Sundstrom, the former of whom was born in 1840 and died in 1905, at Iron Mountain, Iichigan. The mother is now living at Iron Mountain, this state, and of the six children five survive,-Elma, who remains with her widowed mother; Amanda, who is the wife of Charles Anderson, of Iron Mountain; Julia, who is the wife of Andrew Swanson, of Iron Mountain; Rose, who is the wife of Charles Peterson, of Iron Mountain; and Charles F., who is the subject of this sketch. The father was identified with mining operations in his native land, where he remained until 1869, when he emigrated with his family to America and came forthwith to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. For one year he was employed as a miner in the Calumet and Ieela mines, and

Page  843 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 843 he continued as one of the trusted employes of the great corporation operating these celebrated mines until 1870. He was at Humboldt for three years, and for the next twenty years at Michigamme. He then established himself in the general merchandise business at Iron Mountain, where he passed the residue of his life. He was a Republican in his political proclivities and was a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal church, of which his widow has also long been a devout member. As already intimated Charles F. Sundstrom was four years of age at the time of the family removal to America, and he gained his early educational training in the public schools of Houghton, Humboldt and Michigamme. In 1876 he secured employment in the drug store of Dr. John Vandeventer, at Michigamme, and later he was in the employ of John Hickey, who conducted a general merchandise enterprise at Michigamme. Still later he was employed in a grocery establishment in this village, and in 1890 he engaged in the same line of enterprise on his own responsibility. Through fair and honorable dealings he has built up a prosperous business in Mlichigamme, and he is one of the most honored and influential citizens of this place. In 1894 he was appointed deputy collector of revenue under the administration of President Cleveland, and he resigned this office on the 1st of July, 1899, after having given most effective service. He served five years as township supervisor and has also served as township treasurer and treasurer of the board of education in his home village. In 1904 he was the nominee of the Democratic party for the office of state treasurer, and though he was defeated in the ensuing election he ran fifteen thousand votes ahead of his ticket. He is affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. His wife holds membership in the Catholic church. On the 15th of August, 1888, Mr. Sundstrom was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Goodreau, who was born at Clintonville, New York, and who is a daughter of Thomas and Nellie (Lyhene) Goodreau, both of whom were likewise natives of the old Empire state and both of whom are now deceased. Mr. Goodreau came with his family to Michigan and located at Michigamme, where he became foreman for a lumber company and where he died at the age of forty-five years, his wife having been thirty-eight years of age at the time of her demise. Their six children, two sons and four daughters, are living. VICTOR A. LUNDGREN.-Holding high rank among the prominent and prosperous business men of Menominee, Michigan, Victor A. Lundgren is not only the leading druggist of this city but also of Marinette, Wisconsin, where he has a large and well-stocked drug store. Ile was born, April 17, 1875, in Ostersund, Sweden, which was likewise the birthplace of his parents, Carl A. and Martha (Thorson) Lundgren. Born in 1832, Carl A. Lundgren spent the larger part of his life in his native land, being profitably. employed in mercantile pursuits. Emigrating to this country in 1893, he located in Michigan, spending his last years in Menominee, living retired from active business until his death, in 1902. His wife, whose birth occurred in 1839, survived him about a year, passing away in 1903. Three children were born of their union, namely: Carl, living in Sweden; Anna, wife of Adolph Ronge, of Marinette, Wisconsin; and Victor A. Eighteen years of age when he came with his parents to Michigan, Victor A. Lundgren here continued his studies, attending first the

Page  844 844 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN Menominee Business College and afterwards the Farris Institute at Big Rapids, from which he was graduated in pharmacy with the class of 1903. Going then to Marinette, Wisconsin, Mr. Lundgren clerked for a short time for D. M. John, and then engaged in business for himself in that city, at No. 1331 Main street, becoming an importer of Swedish patent medicines. He built up an extensive business in that line, which he is managing at the present time. Coming to Menominee in 1906, Mr. Lundgren purchased the business of Forsythe & Company, and three years later, in 1909, bought the drug stock of R. J. Sawyer, and immediately moved to the Sawyer store, at 551 Main street, Menominee, where he is carrying on a large and remunerative business. Honest and upright in his dealings, and a thorough master of his profession, Mr. Lundgren is one of the best known and best patronized druggists of the Upper Peninsula, and is held in high esteem in both Marinette and Menominee. On June 1, 1904, Mr. Lundgren married Olga Olson, who was born in Marquette, Michigan, a daughter of Bernt Olson, and they have one son, Victor A. Jr. Politically Mr. Lundgren is an adherent of the Republican party, and fraternally he belongs to Menominee Lodge, No. 107, K. of P., and to Marinette Lodge, No. 189, I. O. O. F. ALVIN R. MOORE for two decades has figured prominently in the affairs of Escanaba, Michigan, and has exerted an influence that has been felt for good along the line of substantial development in the town. Mr. Moore is a native of the Pine Tree state. He was born at Madison, Maine, August 14, 1860, son of Cyrus and Hulda (Russell) Mloore, both natives of Maine. The Moores, of Scotch and English origin, were among the early settlers of the New England States. Grandfather and Grandmother Moore were born, passed their lives and died in Maine, the former dying at the age of eighty-seven years, the latter at the age of eighty-six. Mr. Moore's father was a farmer and lumberman. He died in Maine at the age of fifty-six years. The mother, now seventyfive years of age, is a resident of Burnham, Maine. To them were born three sons, all still living: Warren C., of Onalaska, Wisconsin; Alvin R., whose name introduces this sketch, and Willie E., of Long Beach, California. Alvin R. Moore spent his boyhood days on his father's farm and received his education in the common schools near his home. In the spring of 1879, while still in his teens, he left the parental home and came west, stopping at La Crosse, Wisconsin, where he spent two years, variously employed. From 1881 to 1886 he was with the Paine Lumber Company of Minneapolis, Minnesota, and from 1886 to 1890 he was purchasing agent for the Northern Pacific Railroad Company. In the last named year he became a resident of Escanaba, Michigan. Here he has ever since been identified with the real estate business and interested from time to time in the promotion of various enterprises. For two years he was associated with J. H. Clancy, then he became a member of the firm of F. J. Mariam & Co., of which, in 1896, he bought a controlling interest, and has since conducted business under his own name, dealing in real estate, fire insurance, etc. Mr. Moore was one of the promoters of the Escanaba Street Railway. In 1898 he bought a controlling interest in the road, subsequently built an additional line, and continued to operate the road until 1908. He sold his interest in the company in the following spring. Also Mr. Moore was one of the promoters of the State Savings Bank, which grew out of the Citizens Bank of Escanaba, and of which he is president. And he is proprietor of the Escanaba Stone & Gravel Co.

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Page  845 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 845 Politically, he has always been a stanch Republican and for eight years he served as a justice of the peace. In fraternal organizations he has for years been prominent and active. He was one of the charter members of the Escanaba lodge of Modern Woodmen of America. In October, 1896, he helped to organize No. 354, B. P. 0. E., of which he was one of the original officers; and he is a Knight of Pythias and a Mason. In Masonry he has advanced through the various degrees up to and including those of the Commandery, the Thirty-Second degree, and the Mystic Shrine. ANDREW JOHNSON SHORT.-The name of Andrew Johnson Short is well known in Sault Sainte Marie, its owner being of genial nature and prominent in business and fraternal circles. The Short home is one of the finest and most beautifully situated on the Northern Peninsula. It overlooks the Government park and lovely St. Mary's River, across whose extent lies the Canadian Sault Sainte Marie. From eighty to one hundred steamers (comprising all the shipping) pass the house each day in going through the locks. Mr. Short is now retired, having been formerly engaged in the brewing business. He served as an alderman from 1890 to 1894, and was candidate for sheriff in fall of 1894. Andrew Johnson Short was born in Manitowoc county, Wisconsin, October 9, 1860. His father's name was William Short. He lost his mother when only a small child, and his father did not long survive. He was the second in a family of four children. His boyhood was spent in the usual fashion of American youth and he received his education in the public schools of Manitowoc county, Wisconsin. He spent one year learning the blacksmith's trade with some idea of making it his life work. At sixteen years of age he moved to Baileys Harbor, Wisconsin, and spent two busy years working as a smithy. Fortunately he was not afraid to make a change and at the end of this time he removed to Menominee, Michigan, where he secured employment with the Marinette Lumber Company. His services were of excellent character and he remained in this association for ten years, being advanced to foreman, in which he continued for four years. Thereupon resolving to make an independent business venture, he went to Republic, Michigan, and established the firm of Short & La Fay, a livery business. At the end of two years, however, he sold his interest and took the agency of the Getterman Brewing Company of Milwaukee. In 1888 he came to Sault Sainte Marie, where he continued in the agency of this large concern, and in February, 1895, he removed to Omaha where he became western agent for the same company. In July, 1901, he returned to Sault Sainte Marie and built a brewery in the Canadian Sault Sainte Marie. This he conducted with remarkable success until April, 1910, when he sold the business and retired, although at a comparatively early age for such a step. He has various interests, however, and his life is by no means inactive. Mr. Short is an enthusiastic Democrat, believing implicitly in the superiority of the measures and policies of the Jeffersonian party. He is a member of the Sault Sainte Marie Lodge, No. 123, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and of Lodge No. 552, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. On June 25, 1890, Mr. Short took as his wife Miss Sarah Fegan, a native of Canada and daughter of Edward Fegan. Mr. Fegan moved to Michigan in 1883, and was one of Chippewa county's prosperous farmers. They have one daughter, Miss Verna. Mr. Short is a self

Page  846 846 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN made man, and his efforts at personal construction have been so thoroughly successful that he is now accounted one of the substantial citizens of Sault Sainte Marie. He likes to travel and seek fresh scenes, and recently made an automobile trip to Chicago, stopping in Milwaukee and other cities which had been the scenes of his former activities, and visiting his old home in Manitowoc county, Wisconsin, for the first time in thirty years. The journey took him over seventeen hundred miles. J. M. CLIFFORD, of Escanaba, Michigan, dock agent for Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway Company, was born in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, September 17, 1861. His father, Jeremiah Clifford, a farmer, was born in Ireland, and came to America when about twenty-one years old and settled in Sheboygan county, Wisconsin, when about twenty-five years old. His wife, Johanna Horgan, was also born in Ireland, and came to America when about eighteen years old; she died when about seventy. They were parents of nine children, all but one of whom lived to maturity, that one having died at the age of three years. J. M. Clifford is the youngest child. Mr. Clifford spent his early life in Sheboygan, and there attended the public school. When fourteen years old he began working in the railroad business, and shortly afterward began learning telegraphy at Hulbert, Wisconsin, with the Wisconsin Central Road. IHe was telegraph operator at various points and also worked as brakeman for a time and for about two years he worked as traveling auditor for the Milwaukee & Northern Railroad. In 1886 he became station agent at Iron Mountain, Michigan, where he remained until 1901. The road which was first the Wisconsin Central later became the Milwaukee & Northern, and finally became a part of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Road, these changes having been made during the time lhe was in the employ of the companies. Since 1901 Mr. Clifford has been in charge of the ore dock at Escanaba. He is a self-made man, and highly respected. In 1886 Mr. Clifford married Katherine, daughter of Arthur Connelly and his wife, of Chilton, Wisconsin, and they have two sons and one daughter, Jerold F., Paul M. and Genevieve M. Mr. Clifford has been a resident of the Northern Peninsula twenty-three years, and is widely known. He has always been actively interested in public affairs, although since coming to Escanaba he has not taken very much part in political matters. He served on the school board four years, two of which he was secretary; he was alderman six years and mayor two years in Iron Mountain. EDGAR ALONZO BARKER.-The business representatives of Ingalls include Edgar Alonzo Barker, a dealer in lumber and in general merchandise. He was born at DePere, Wisconsin, May 25, 1853, born to the marriage union of Walter and Mary (IHavilen) Barker, both natives of the state of New York, the father born in 1822 and the mother in 1820, at Saratoga Springs. They were married in that state, and soon afterward went to Janesville, Wisconsin, and settled on a farm. They were there for two years, and then in 1852 moved to Brown county, same state, locating on a farm near DePere, where they settled among the pioneers of that locality, theirs having been the third log cabin erected in the neighborhood. In time Mr. Barker wrested a good farm from out the wilderness there, but later sold the land and moved to Morrisontown in Brown county, where he purchased

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Page  847 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 847 another tract of timberland, cleared about sixty acres and made improvements, but finally left there and went to California. He spent the remainder of his life in the Golden state and died in the year of 1908. Ile was first a Whig and later a Republican in his political affiliations. Mrs. Barker died in the year of 1904. Three of their six children are living,-Edgar, George and Solomon. The boyhood days of Edgar A. Barker were spent on the home farm, attending school during the winter months and helping in the fields during the summers. He also served as a fireman in a steam saw mill in Greenleaf, Wisconsin, for nine months, afterward going to DePere and spending one summer in fishing. In the fall of 1879 he came to Michigan and located on a farm in section 6, Ingallstown township, and after spending one year in a shanty on the land he built a log house and in time succeeded in clearing his land, while in 1886 he erected a frame house and continued to follow general farming until in 1903 he became the owner and proprietor of a saw mill four miles east of Ingalls. In 1896 he sold his mill to engage in a general mercantile business in Ingalls. He has filled many township offices, and is a member of the Maccabees lodge at Ingalls. Iis political support is given to the Republican party. On the 1st of January, 1876, Mr. Barker was married to Elizabeth A. Croto, born at New Lisbon, Wisconsin, November 14, 1859, and she died on the 12th of August, 1899. Of the twelve children born of the union the seven now living are: Rose B., wife of Thomas LaVeck, living at Daggett, Michigan; George, who married Carrie Bauprey and is living at Ingalls; Ida A., wife of E. C. Haywood, of Cedar River, this state; Charles F.; Amy, wife of Samuel Bebo; Mabel M., at home; and Clifford. OSCAR KECKONEN.-MIany of the strongest and most able business men of the Upper Peninsula were born on the other side of the broad Atlantic, noteworthy among the number being Oscar Keckonen, an active and prominent citizen of Calumet, Houghton county, who is widely and favorably known as manager of the Keckonen Hardware Company. Born in Finland in 1876 he came to this country with his parents in 1881, and was here brought up and educated. Beginning life as a clerk, he became familiar with mercantile affairs while working for others, and when sure that he had thoroughly mastered the details connected with trade, he embarked in business on his own account in 1898. In 1905 the business was incorporated as the Keckonen Hardware Company with Mr. Keckonen as president, treasurer and general manager. The company is carrying on an immense business, its trade extending to all parts of the county. The substantial brick building owned and occupied by the company is three stories in height, its three floors and basement being used all of the time, their large and complete stock of goods requiring all available space. The company has also two large warehouses located on the Copper Range Railway, where the heavier goods are stored. A Republican in politics, Mr. Keckonen takes a lively interest in the selection and election of good men to fill the various local offices of the village, and is at the present time serving his second term in the village council of Red Jacket. Mr. Keckonen is married, and has an interesting family of seven children. Fraternally he is a member of Modern Woodmen, Knights of the Modern Maccabees and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks.

Page  848 848 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN JOHN EDWARD JONES.-The life of the late John Edward Jones, cut off as it was in its prime by the hand of death, nevertheless exerted a beneficent and lasting influence upon the community in which he was best known, and in consequence he was loved and esteemed. The announcement made Wednesday morning, June 23, 1904, that he had passed away, cast a gloom over all Lake Linden, where for a number of years he had made his home. Mr. Jones was born at Rockville, Wisconsin, March 3, 1863, and in June of that year he went to Hancock, Michigan, with his mother to join the husband and father who had preceded them in November, 1862. It was in Hancock that a great part of Mr. Jones' life was spent. He received his education in the public schools, graduating from the high school when seventeen years of age, and a little later entering the employ of the First National Bank. By the exercise of untiring zeal and devotion to business he was in the course of time promoted to the responsible position of head bookkeeper, which he held until August, 1889, when he resigned to accept the cashiership of the newly organized First National Bank of Lake Linden. He continued in this capacity up to the time of his death, his services being distinguished by faithfulness and a high order of ability. He was also a director of the bank, as well as president of the Lake Linden Supply Company, and a director of the Lake Superior General Hospital and vice-president of the recently organized Cor-Ago Company. As a member of the Board of Education for a number of years, he made it his affair as far as he was able to elevate the ideals of education. His altruistic tendencies made it but natural that he should be active in church work, and as a member and deacon of the Congregational church his earnest and enlightened offices will long be missed. His social and fraternal inclinations found expression in his lodge connection. He was high in the councils of the Masonic order, being past master of the John Duncan Lodge of Lake Linden, a member of the Gate of the Temple Chapter of Hancock, of Montrose Commandery of Calumet, of Ahmed Temple of the Mystic Shrine of Marquette, and a thirty-second degree Mason of the Michigan Sovereign Consistory of Detroit. On March 10, 1892, Mr. Jones was united in marriage to Miss Annabelle Maclntyre, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Allan MacIntyre, and besides the widow, four children, Allan James, Margaret Sarah, Annabelle and Lucille Edna, the eldest having been eight years old and the youngest twenty-two months old at the time of his death, survive him. He is also survived by his father, James Jones, a sister, Miss Sarah Jones, of Lake Linden, and two brothers, Thomas V., of L'Anse, and Dr. Richard R. D. Jones of Calumet. In respect to the memory of the deceased, the stores and other places of business in Lake Linden were closed during the funeral, the flags at the schools and other public places were put at half mast, and the many beautiful floral tributes attested in the strongest possible terms to the love and esteem of the people for the deceased. The obsequies were very largely attended, the whole town uniting in paying a last tribute to one who will long be remembered. The following resolutions were adopted by the directors of the First National Bank of Lake Linden, June 25, 1904: "Whereas, On June 23rd, 1904, the Supreme Ruler of the universe called to rest one of our members, the late John Edward Jones, who has been cashier of this bank for nearly fifteen years, therefore be it "Resolved, That in his death the town and county lose a public

Page  849 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 849 spirited citizen, and the bank an official who ever worked for its success and advancement; be it further "Resolved, That we extend to the bereaved ones our heartfelt sympathy in this the hour of their affliction; be it further "Resolved, That these resolutions be spread upon the records of the bank, a copy given to the press, and a copy sent to the family." OLIVER EvANs.-Occupying an assured position among the active and esteemed citizens of the Upper Peninsula is Oliver Evans, cashier of the Commercial Bank of Iron Mountain, who is widely known in business circles as a man of much ability and of personal worth. A native of Wisconsin, he was born, January 30, 1857, at Berlin, Green Lake county, coming from substantial New England ancestry. His father, Oliver Evans, Sr., was born and reared in Milton, Vermont, where as a young man he learned the shoemaker's trade. Subsequently moving to Wilmington, Essex county, New York, he built a house and was there a resident for several years. In 1855, following the rapidly increasing tide of emigration, he went to Wisconsin, traveling by rail from Ogdensburg via Chicago to Sheboygan, then the terminus of the railroad to Oshkosh, and thence by boat to Berlin. Accepting there a position as foreman in a shoe shop, he retained it until his death in August, 1856, when but thirty-five years of age. He married, in Wilmington, New York, in 1849, Nancy Ann Bunel, who was born at Barnston, Stanstead county, province of Quebec, February 15, 1829, a daughter of Seth Bunel. Born in Claremont, New Hampshire, Seth Bunel learned the trade of a blacksmith, and after following it for a time in his native state moved to Barnston, Quebec. A few years later he settled in Derby, Vermont, and there resided until his death, at the age of three score and ten years. He was twice married, the maiden name of his second wife having been Olive Ashley, who was born in Claremont, New Hampshire, and died in Derby, Vermont. She reared eight children, among them having been Nancy Ann Bunel, who became the wife of Oliver Evans, Sr. Left an orphan when fifteen years old, Nancy Ann Bunel learned the dressmaker's trade in order that she might become self-supporting. The first year after her mother's death she lived with an older sister in Canada, afterward making her home for a short time with another sister in Derby Center, Vermont. From there she went to Wilmington, New York, and married, in 1849, Mr. Evans. After the death of her husband she continued her residence in Berlin for eleven years, following the dressmaker's trade. Moving then to Wausau, she continued at her trade there for a long time, her last years, however, being spent at Iron Mountain with her son, her death occurring at his home in January, 1910. She was the mother of two children, namely: Annie, wife of Almer D. Stiles, and Oliver. After completing the course of study in the public schools of Berlin, Oliver Evans took an advanced course at Plover. At the age of twenty years, having taught school the previous year, he began to learn telegraphy at Plover. Becoming proficient in the work, he was employed as an operator on the Wisconsin Central Railway, first at Stevens Point, then at Menasha, and later at Milwaukee. In 1881 Mr. Evans entered the employ of the Northwestern Railroad Company, succeeding L. A. Laughlin as station agent at Iron Mountain, retaining the position until 1889. In 1887 Mr. Evans was one of the organizers of the First National Bank of Iron Mountain, and was assistant cashier of the institution until

Page  850 850 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 1889, when he resigned his position as station agent and became cashier. In 1892 Mr. Evans assisted in the organization of the Commercial Bank, of which he has since been the cashier. Mr. Evans has been twice married. He married first Olive Fisher, who died in 1904. He married for his second wife Irene Bowring. Mr. Evans has but one child, a daughter named Alice. CLYDE S. MACKENZIE.-A man of scholarly attainments, ability and integrity, Clyde S. MacKenzie, the worthy representative of an EnglishScotch pioneer family of the Upper Peninsula, is rendering excellent service as registrar of deeds for Houghton county. A native of this county, his birth occurred August 15, 1858, in Hancock. His grandfather, Frederick MacKenzie, Sr., was born and reared in Edinburgh, Scotland. As a boy disclosing those inherited talents that were afterward to distinguish him, he was sent to London, where he became a celebrated water-color artist, and was made secretary of the Royal Art Institute. He continued an honored resident of that city until his death. His wife, whose maiden name was Sarah Heines, was a native of England. They had but two children, Frederick, Jr., the father of Clyde S., and Polly, who died in childhood. Frederick MacKenzie, Jr., was born in the city of London, England, in 1832, and was there brought up and educated. In 1865, deciding to try new ventures, he came to America, locating at Rantoul, Indiana, where he tried farming a few months. Having a severe attack of fever and ague, he came to the Lake Superior country, which was noted for its healthful climate, landing at Eagle River even with the world as regarded his finances. After working a short time at the Pennsylvania mine, he removed to Hancock, and the ensuing years was in the employ of Charles Holland, first as a delivery clerk, and later as a supply clerk. He then accepted the position of supply clerk with the Calumet & Hecla Mining Company, at Calumet, and remained with that company about twenty years. In the meantime he became a correspondent for the Detroit Free Press, and for the Portage Lake Mlining Gazette, his writings appearing over the nom de plume of "The Parson." While with this company, he also embarked in the lumber business as proprietor of the Pioneer Lumber Company, and likewise bought the Calumet Evening News. After a service of twenty years with the Calumet & Hecla Mining Company, he resigned his position, and from that time until his death, January 17, 1902, devoted his entire attention to the publication of his paper. He married Emma Banks, whose parents were life-long residents of London, England, and she is now living in Calumet. The six children born of their union are as follows: Edith, Nellie, Emma, Frederick, Clyde S., and Robert Bruce. Leaving school at the age of thirteen years, Clyde S. MacKenzie began to learn the art preservative, and served an apprenticeship of four years at the printer's trade in the office of the Calumet Evening News, which was then published by its founders, Messrs. Kelly and Noble. Going then to Buffalo, New York, he was there graduated from Bryant & Stratton's Business College. Returning to HIoughton county, he was subsequently employed in the clerical and reportorial department of the Calumet Evening News until 1889. Making a trip westward then, Mr. MacKenzie was engaged in newspaper work in the states of California and Washington for three years. Coming back to his Calumet home in 1892, he was associated with his father in the management of his paper, the Calumet Evening News, of which, after his father's death, he became sole manager, and continued in that position until the paper was

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Page  851 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 851 sold, in 1904. Mr. MacKenzie also succeeded his father as clerk of Calumet township, and served in that capacity until the fall of 1904, when he was elected to his present office as registrar of deeds. Mr. MacKenzie married, in 1892, Helen Keith, a bonnie Scotch lassie, who was born in Huntly, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, a daughter of John and Helen (Christie) Keith, life-long residents of Scotland. Helen Keith came to Michigan as a young lady to visit relatives, and became the bride of Mr. MacKenzie. Three children have blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. MacKenzie, namely: Muriel Keith, Dorothy Earle, and Clyde Keith. Politically Mr. MacKenzie cast his first presidential vote for William McKinley. Fraternally he is a member of Calumet Lodge, No. 271, F. & A. M.; of Gate of the Temple Chapter, No. 35, R. A. M.; of Montrose Commandery, No. 38, K. T.; of Ahmed Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S.; and of Hancock Lodge, No. 381, B. P. 0. E. JAMES R. SPENcER.-Making good use of the opportunities our nation offers to men of energy, worth and ability to rise by their own efforts to commanding positions in the business world, James R. Spencer has gained an honorable position in legal circles, and is successfully engaged in the practice of his profession at Iron Mountain. A native of England, he was born, May 20, 1862, near the city of Hull, Yorkshire, a son of John Spencer. His grandfather, James Spencer, was born in the parish of Riston, Yorkshire, England, of substantial English ancestry, and spent his ninety years of earthly life in his native county. IHis wife, whose maiden name was Jane Chapman, died in middle age, in Yorkshire, the place of her birth. John Spencer was born in Hatfield parish, Yorkshire, England, March 2, 1834, and was there brought up and educated. Turning his attention to agricultural pursuits at the age of fifteen years, he followed farming principally until early in the '60s he moved to Cleveland, Yorkshire, England, and was there associated in the mining business until 1879, when, lured by the glowing accounts of the material advantages to be gained by the poor man on American soil, he emigrated to the United States, and for a few months was employed in the mines at Norway, Michigan. Coming then to Iron Mountain, he worked several years at the old Ludington iMine, later the Chapin Mine, and was subsequently engaged in tilling the soil on a farm of his own in Menominee county. Returning to Iron Mountain, he has since been a resident of this city. He married, in 1858, Matilda Spence, who was born in Beverly, Yorkshire, England, a daughter of Joseph and Alice Spence. She died at Iron Mountain, Michigan, June 21, 1907, leaving two children living: James R. and John Thomas. At the age of sixteen years, having completed his studies in the public schools, James R. Spencer followed various occupations and finally embarked as a sailor on a British merchant vessel and spent about four years on different vessels. While sailing the sea he visited different cities in France, and made one voyage to Australia. IHe was subsequently employed for a time as street car conductor in his native county, New Castle-on-Tyne, and in 1882 he emigrated to America, coming directly to Iron Mountain, Michigan, where for a number of years he was variously employed at the mines. Going to Ypsilanti in 1889, Mr. Spencer took a course of study at Cleary's Business College, and after his return to Iron Mountain was for a while, in company with his brother, engaged in lumbering and stone quarrying. He erected a building of importance at Iron Mountain, the Spencer Block, and was the first in

Page  852 852 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN this vicinity to use native stone for building purposes. Going to Crystal Falls in 1891, Mr. Spencer was employed at the mines for a year and a half, after which he was located at Coal City, Illinois, for a similar length of time. Then, after spending some time with the Fox Solid Pressed Steel Company at Joliet, Illinois, Mr. Spencer located in Chicago, where for about two years he was in the employ of the Deering Harvester Company, first in the engineering department and later in the shipping department. He afterward clerked for a short time in a department store in that city, subsequently becoming buyer for the Gould Company. During his years in Chicago, Mr. Spencer spent his leisure time in studying law, spending one vacation at the Illinois College of Law, and in May, 1899, was graduated from the Chicago Law School. Being admitted to the Illinois bar, he practiced for a brief time in Chicago, coming from there to Iron Mountain. On March 23, 1903, he was admitted to practice before the supreme court of Michigan, and has since been actively and successfully engaged in the practice of his profession at Iron Mountain. Mr. Spencer married in England, while there on a visit, Kate Isabel Wardle, who was born and bred in Sunderland, County Durham, England, a daughter of Adam and Isabelle Wardle. Mr. and Mrs. Spencer are the parents of two children, Benjamin W. and Ruth M,. Politically Mr. Spencer is affiliated with the Republican party, and religiously he and his family attend the Methodist Episcopal church. ROBERT H. SHIELDS.-Never before has the Northern Peninsula of Michigan been so conspicuous and so prosperous, never have elements of strength been better organized and working more effectively than in this first decade of the twentieth century, marked by opulent achievement along all lines of industrial activity and civic advancement. All this is but the natural result of definite forces working to a definite end. The industrial spirit has been quickened in the minds of the representative bjusiness men and capitalists of the fair "upper country," and they have thus been prompted to show forth more clearly to the world the great natural and acquired advantages of this favored section of the state of Michigan. To those whom, through identification with affairs of broad scope and importance, have conserved this social and material progress must be accorded a large meed of commendation and credit, and one of the distinct functions of this publication is to give specific recognition to those sterling citizens who stand as veritable captains of industry in the Upper Peninsula. Of this number Mr. Shields is one of prominence, and his success and civic status are the more gratifying to contemplate in view of the fact that his advancement has been won through his own ability and well directed efforts, besides which he claims the Upper Peninsula as the place of his nativity. He is one of the leading citizens of the thriving and attractive city of Houghton, and is president of the Arcadian Copper Company and the new Baltic Mining Company, two of the important corporations engaged in the exploiting of the great mineral resources of the Northern Peninsula. Robert Hugh Shields was born in Hancock, Houghton county, Michigan, on the 22d of May, 1861, and is a son of James and Ann (Parker) Shields, the former of whom was born in Kilmarnock, Scotland, and the latter in Cumberlandshire, England. James Shields, a scion of one of the staunch old families of the land of hills and heather, was reared to maturity in Scotland, whence he emigrated to America when a young man.

Page  853 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 853 Robert Hugh Shields gained his rudimentary education in the public schools of the village of Ripley, Houghton county, Michigan, and he early assumed the practical duties and responsibilities of life, thus gaining experience that has made him ever appreciative of the dignity and value of honest toil and endeavor. When but eleven years of age he secured employment in the stamp mill of the Franklin mine, at Hancock, and while continuing his work he did not abate his ambition to secure a good education, as he devoted the major part of his otherwise leisure time to study and reading, in the meanwhile attending school at intervals. That his ambition was one of definite progress and accomplishment is shown by the fact that when eighteen years of age he proved himself eligible for pedagogic honors and engaged in teaching in the district schools of Ripley. Frugal and industrious, he carefully saved his earnings and finally was able to enter the Northern Indiana Normal School and Business University in the city of Val paraiso, where he continued his studies for two summers, in the meanwhile finding employment that partially defrayed his expenses. Later he completed a thorough course in the Bryant & Stratton Business College in the city of Detroit, in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1883. Thereafter he was engaged in teaching in the public schools of Houghton county until the summer of 1884, when he founded at Hancock the Hancock Copper Journal, a weekly paper, of which he continued editor and publisher for two years, at the expiration of which he sold the plant and business, after having made the paper an effective and popular exponent of local interests. Thereafter he was in the employ of the Mineral Range Railroad Company until 1890, when he resigned his position to accept that of chief clerk for the Centennial Mining Company. In 1892 he was elected county clerk of Houghton county, in which office he served for six consecutive years, by successive re-election. In May, 1898, shortly after his retirement from this position, Mr. Shields was appointed chief clerk for the Arcadian Copper Company, of which he was made superintendent two years later. His careful and effective administration of the affairs of the company finally received due recognition, as in 1908 he was elected president of this important corporation, a position of which he has since remained incumbent. As chief executive of the company he has shown great discrimination and initiative ability, through which forces he has done much to advance the interests of the corporation. Energy, determination and sterling integrity of purpose have characterized the business career of Mr. Shields, and his success has been on a parity with his splendid powers as an executive and administrative officer. Broad-minded and progressive as a citizen and taking deep interest in public affairs, Mr. Shields has been a leader in the councils of the Republican party in the Upper Peninsula, and has been influential in the manoeuvering of its local forces. He has served since 1904 as chairman of the Republican County Committee of Houghton county, has been a member of the Republican State Central Committee since 1906, and has repeatedly served as delegate to county, congressional and state conventions of his party. In 1904 Mr. Shields was appointed, by Governor Bliss, a member of the state board of tax commissioners, and, through successive gubernatorial appointments, he has continued in tenure of this office without interruption, his present term expiring in 1915. Deeply appreciative of the teachings and benefits of the timehonored Masonic fraternity, Mr. Shields has attained therein the Vol. I —15

Page  854 854 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN thirty-second degree of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, in which his affiliation is with the consistory in the city of Grand Rapids. His affiliations in the York Rite body are here briefly noted: Quincy Lodge, No. 135, Free & Accepted Masons; Gate of the Temple Chapter, No. 25, Royal Arch Masons; and Palestine Commandery, No. 48, Knights Templars of Houghton. He is also identified with the adjunct organization, the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, in which he holds membership in Ahmed Temple, in the city of Marquette. Of this temple he served as illustrious potentate for three years. He is also a member of Columbia Lodge, No. 144, Knights of Pythias, of Houghton, and of Hancock Lodge, No. 381, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He is one of the valued members of the new Houghton Club and is its secretary at the time of this writing. A man of cordial and genial manners, unostentatious and kindly in his association with all classes of men, Mr. Shields holds a secure place in popular confidence and esteem and is looked upon as one of the essentially representative citizens of the Upper Peninsula. On the 14th of September, 1893, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Shields to Miss Carrie K. Merton, who was born and reared in the city of Hancock, Houghton county, and who is a daughter of James and Marian Merton, who were born in Scotland and who established their home in Hancock in the pioneer days. Mr. and Mrs. Shields are the parents of four children,-Marion, Dorothy, Nathan and Merton, and their family home is a center of gracious hospitality. EDWARD P. LOTT.-A man of sterling character and ability, Edward P. Lott, of Iron River, has been closely associated with the advancement of this section of the Upper Peninsula for many years and occupies a prominent position among its public-spirited and valued citizens. A son of the late Jeremiah Lott, he was born, December 1, 1844, in Muskego, Wisconsin, coming from Dutch ancestry. His grandfather, John Henry Lott, a native of New Jersey, was a lineal descendant of one of two brothers, John Lott and Henry Lott, who were born and bred in Holland, where their ancestors had settled on fleeing from England to escape religious persecution. These brothers came to the United States in colonial days, settling in New Jersey, where many of their descendants still live. About 1820 John Henry Lott moved to New York state, and having purchased a large farm near Penn Yan, was there engaged in agricultural pursuits the remainder of his life. Jeremiah Lott was born, in 1816, in New Jersey, and was but four years of age when his parents settled in Penn Yan. His mother died while he was yet a child, and his father married again. Having no love for his step-mother, Jeremiah left home when but twelve years old, and, joining some of his neighbors, started westward, journeying with teams to old Fort Dearborn, the present site of the city of Chicago. The land now included within the limits of that great city was owned by the government, and for sale at one dollar and twenty-five cents an acre. He had to hustle for a living, and for sometime he sailed on the Lakes a part of each year, the remainder of the time working at the carpenter's trade, with headquarters in Chicago, remaining there until after his marriage. About 1838 he went with his father-in-law to Michigan City, Indiana, and two years later located at Muskego, Wisconsin. Going from there to Port Washington, Ozaukee county, Wisconsin, he entered government land in that vicinity, and was there a resident until 1852. Selling out in that year, he

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Page  855 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN came to the Upper Peninsula, Michigan, which was then a dense wilderness, Marquette, the largest place, being a mere hamlet, containing a few shanties. He located at the Cliff Mine, Keweenaw county, while copper mining was still in its infancy, and was head carpenter at the mines until 1858. Going then to Houghton, he tried farming for seven years, after which he was engaged in the provision business at Escanaba for a while. Migrating to Minnesota in 1868, he became a pioneer settler of Cottonwood county, taking up a homestead claim, the larger part of which he placed under cultivation, and remained there until 1890. Selling out in that year, he came to Iron River, and thenceforward made his home with his son Edward, living here until his death, in 1892, at the age of seventy-four years. Jeremiah Lott married Sarah McKown, who was born in Maine, which was also the native state of her father, Thomas McKown. IHer grandfather McKown was a man of great patriotism, and served in both the Revolutionary war and the war of 1812, losing his life in the last struggle. A carpenter and millwright, Thomas McKown moved from Maine to Canada, and a few years later located in Chicago, Illinois, where he followed his trade for a time. From there he went to Michigan City, Indiana, thence to Muskego, Wisconsin, and subsequently bought a farm near Port Washington, Wisconsin, where he spent his last years. His wife, whose maiden name was Lydia Perley, was born in Maine, and died, several years after he did, at the home of a son in Muskego, aged eighty-one years. Mrs. Jeremiah Lott died on the home farm in Minnesota in 1889, aged seventy-one years. She and her husband reared five children, namely: John Henry; Edward P., the subject of this sketch; Ann Eliza; Joseph; and Elizabeth. Having laid a substantial foundation for his future education in the public schools of Houghton, Michigan, Edward P. Lott was graduated from a commercial school at Detroit. Beginning his active career as a teacher, he was principal of the Houghton School for two years, after which he clerked in a general store at Escanaba for five years. Mr. Lott then established the Escanlaba Republican, now known as the Iron Post, and conducted it about six months when he sold out, and for a short time thereafter was engaged in mercantile pursuits in Escanaba. During his residence in that city, Mr. Lott served as county clerk and registrar of deeds for Delta county, and as justice of the peace, all of which offices he filled until 1872. Resuming in that year the study of law, with which he was somewhat familiar, in the office of F. O. Clark, of Escanaba, he made good progress and in 1873 was admitted to the bar. Mr. Lott came from that city to Iron River in 1885, and has since been actively engaged in the practice of his profession and is also interested in the insurance and real estate business. On April 17, 1865, Mr. Lott was united in marriage with Lillie E. Birs, who was born in Brandon, Vermont. Her father, Clement Birs, was born in Switzerland, of French ancestry, and came to this country with his parents, locating in Montreal, Canada, where he learned the blacksmith's trade. He subsequently moved to Brandon, Vermont, where he worked at his trade until 1862. Coming then to Houghton, Michigan, he continued at his trade in that place until his death, in 1869, his death being caused by the kick of a horse. He married H. Eloise Dufort, who was born in Montreal, of French parentage. She survived him, passing away in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. Five children have been born to Mr. and IMrs. Lott, namely: Minnie V., wife of George A. Taff, of Florence, Wisconsin, and has

Page  856 856 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN three children, George A., Lillie and Lalla Carrie; Carrie M. married first Willis E. Myrick, who died, leaving her with three children, Birdie, Willis E. and Elsie, and she married for her second husband R. Elmer Wolf, of Saint Paul; Ida M., wife of Claude M. Atkinson, of Hibbing, Minnesota, has two children, Marc and Beatrice; Winnifred E.; and Edward P. J., who married Lillie M. Grece, has four children, Clarence E., Edna, Winnifred and Lillie M. Fraternally Mr. Lott is a member of Escanaba Lodge, No. 165, F. & A. M. Politically he is a steadfast Republican, and, as mentioned above, has served in various official positions. WADE A. SIEBENTHAL.-There is all of consistency in recording in this volume recognition of Mr. Siebenthal, superintendent of the Republic Mine, one of the most important of the iron mines of the Upper Peninsula. He is one of the representative citizens of the village of Republic, where he is held in confidence and esteem. Wade A. Siebenthal is a scion of one of the sterling Swiss families that settled in Switzerland county, Indiana, in the pioneer days of that state. He himself was born at Vevay, that county, on the 6th of January, 1874, and is the eldest in a family of ten. His father, Andrew J. Siebenthal, is likewise a native of Switzerland county, where he was born in 1841, is a miller by trade and now resides at Bloomington, Indiana. His wife, Onisca Netherland Siebenthal, is also a native of that state, and is likewise a member of its pioneer families. The parents are both members of the Christian church and in politics the father is an adherent of the Republican party. He whose name initiates this review is indebted to the public schools of his native village for his early educational training, which included a course in the high school, from which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1891; was a student in Indiana University, 1892-93, following which he was engaged in teaching in the public schools of Indiana, 1894-98; again a student in Indiana University, 1898-1900; taught school in the Appleton, Wisconsin, schools, 1900-01, and was a student in Lawrence College. Leaving there he came to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, locating at Vulcan, where he was employed in the mines of the Penn Iron Mining Company for a period of eighteen months. He then resumed his studies in Indiana University, from which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1903, with the degree of A. B. Shortly after his graduation Mr. Siebenthal returned to the Upper Peninsula and located at Republic, where he assumed the position of electrical engineer and chemist for the Republic Iron Company, with whose interests he has since continued to be activly identified and of whose mines he has been superintendent since 1907. He is a progressive and energetic young business man and in his present position has proved a capable executive officer, as well as one familiar with the details of the iron mining industry. The mine of which he is superintendent has an annual output of about one hundred and seventy-five thousand tons of iron ore. Mr. Siebenthal has not hedged himself in with business and other private interests but has shown a liberal attitude as a citizen and has given his aid and influence in support of all measures tending to further the best interests of the community. In 1908 he was elected supervisor of Republic township, and has since remained incumbent of this office, in which he is a member of the County Board of Supervisors of Marquette county. He has also served as a member of the Board of Education of his village since 1908. His political support is given the Repub

Page  857 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN ' IF 857 lican party, and in a fraternal way he is identified with the lodge and chapter of the Masonic fraternity at Ishpeming; with.Beacon Lodge, Knights of Pythias, in Republic; and the council of the Royal Arcanum at Appleton, Wisconsin. JOHN C. EsLICK.-Numbered among the industrious, enterprising and respected residents of Iron Mountain is John C. Eslick, well known throughout this section of Dickinson county as under-sheriff. A son of Captain James Eslick, he was born, May 18, 1860, at "The Mass," Ontonagon county, Michigan, of English ancestry. A native of England, Captain James Eslick was born in the parish of Saint Blazey, county Cornwall, where his ancestors for generations untold had spent their lives. But four years of age when his father was killed in a mine accident, he was put to work when but six years old in a stamp mill, and just as soon as large enough he began working in a mine, and continued his mining operations in his native county until twenty years of age. Emigrating then to America, the poor man's paradise, he located at Copper Harbor, Keweenaw county, Michigan, where he continued as a miner several years. He subsequently worked at the Central Mine, Ontonagon county, from there going to Calumet, where he was engaged in the grocery business three years. Proceeding to the Menominee Range in 1879, Captain Eslick stopped first at Quinnesec, then the railway terminus, and for five years was captain at the Quinnesec Mine. Locating then at Iron Mountain, he lived here retired until his death, at the age of seventy-three years. He married Elizabeth Dyer, who was born at Saint Blazey, county Cornwall, where she was one of his early playmates and his only sweetheart. Having plighted her troth to him before he left home, she subsequently came to Michigan to join him, and they were married at Fort Wilkinson, which was then occupied by United States troops. She passed away at the age of seventy-one years, leaving four children, namely: Susanna, wife of James Gregg; James S.; John C., the subject of this sketch; and Joseph B. Attending the district schools of Ontonagon county and the public schools of Calumet, John C. Eslick acquired a practical education, and, like his father, began at an early age to work in a stamp mill. When his father embarked in the grocery business, he delivered the goods, and when the father closed out he entered the employ of Benny & Northey, manufacturers of soda water and other soft drinks, continuing with that firm two and one-half years. He afterwards worked in the mines at Ishpeming a few months, and then returned to Calumet. Going to the Menominee Range in 1879, when that entire country was a wilderness, Mr. Eslick was employed at the Quinnesec Mine two and one-half years, and the ensuing three years worked for Patrick O'Connell, a soda water manufacturer. Going then to Florence, Wisconsin, he was agent for the Blatz Brewing Company for about eighteen months. Coming then to Iron Mountain, he formed a partnership with James Langdon, and, under the firm name of Eslick & Langdon, was successfully engaged in the draying business for fifteen years, when the partnership was dissolved. Mr. Eslick has since been extensively and profitably engaged in the manufacture of soda water and other temperance beverages, having now a well-established business. Mr. Eslick married, in 1882, Margaret Jane Brooks, who was born in Peshtigo, Wisconsin, a daughter of Gardener and Jane (Mattes) Brooks, natives of New England, and both of English stock. Eight

Page  858 858 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Eslick, namely: Della, Willie, Harry, Gertrude, Oris, Carter, Dorothy and Claude M. Politically Mr. Eslick is identified with the Republican party, and has served as deputy sheriff and is at the present time filling the office of under-sheriff. He was one of the original members of the Iron Mountain Fire Department, belonging to Fire Company No. 1. He is a charter member of Victoria Lodge, No. 262, Sons of Saint George; also a charter member of Iron Mountain Lodge, No. 700, B. P. 0. E.; and a charter member of Oak Leaf Camp, No. 2885, M. W. A. JAMES CORNELL SHERMAN.-Distinguished not only as a man of genuine worth and ability, but as a veteran of the Civil war, James C. Sherman, of Menominee, has won an assured position among the most esteemed and respected citizens of the Upper Peninsula, and as deputy internal revenue custom house collector is serving the people with fidelity. A son of the late Daniel Sherman, he was born February 19, 1842, on Long Island, New York, coming on both sides of the house of excellent ancestry. Spending his childhood days in Dupage county, Illinois, James C. Sherman received his early education in the district schools of Sikes Corners. He subsequently accompanied his parents to Wisconsin, living first in Ball Prairie and later in Menekaunee. In 1856, when fourteen years of age, he found employment in a saw mill, in which he worked two summers, attending school during the winter terms. In October, 1861, he enlisted in Company F, Twelfth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, at Menekaunee, and served with his regiment until receiving his honorable discharge on January 5, 1864. On the same day Mr. Sherman re-enlisted at Natchez, Mississippi, in the same company and same regiment, as a veteran, and remained with his command until after the close of the conflict, in July, 1865. While marching from Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, to Fort Riley, he received injuries which caused him to be detailed on detached duty the remainder of the time, and during the siege of Vicksburg was wagon master in the Seventeenth Corps, commanded by General Blair. He was with Sherman in his march to the sea, and took part in the general review at Washington, D. C., on July 16, 1865, being honorably discharged from the service at Louisville, Kentucky. Coming immediately to Menekaunee, Wisconsin, Mr. Sherman entered the employ of his brother, John J. Sherman, who established the first drug store in this place, and the first on the Menominee river. In the spring of 1867 he accepted a position as clerk on the steamer "Queen City," plying between Menominee, Michigan, and Green Bay, Wisconsin. The following spring Mr. Sherman became timekeeper for the Kirby Carpenter Lumber Company, and likewise a clerk in the Company's store. Two years later he became dock agent for the company during the summer seasons, while in winter he assumed charge of its supply teams, about thirty of which were used in delivering supplies to the different lumber camps, continuing in these capacities until 1880. On April 20, 1880, Mr. Sherman was appointed deputy collector of the District of Superior, State of Michigan, and served until March 22, 1881, when he was appointed by President James A. Garfield, postmaster at Menominee, an office that he filled acceptably four and one-half years. He has since been actively associated with many of the city's most beneficial enterprises, having belonged to the Menominee Volunteer Fire Department, and having been one of the organ

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Page  859 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 859 izers of the Michigan Telephone Company. Mr. Sherman has the distinction of having been the first superintendent of the Menominee Street Railway Company, now the Menominee and Marinette Light and Traction Company, serving as such two years, when he retired from the railroad service to devote his entire attention to the management of the telephone business, with which he was associated until 1906. In 1907 he was appointed to his present position as deputy internal revenue custom house collector. On October 20, 1867, Mr. Sherman was united in marriage with Mary 3H. Morris, who was born in Massachusetts, a daughter of Thomas and Hannah Morris, both natives of New England. Of the seven children born to Mr. and Mrs. Sherman, three are now living, namely: Jessie, wife of Irvin T. Perritt, of Oak Park, Illinois; James H., of Calumet, Michigan; and Samuel M., of Menominee. Politically Mr. Sherman is a warm advocate of the principles of the Republican party, to which he has been true since casting his first presidential vote, while in the army, for Abraham Lincoln. Fraternally he is a member of Menominee Lodge No. 269, F. & A. M.; of Menominee Chapter No. 107, R. A. M.; of Menominee Commandery No. 35, K. T.; and of Menominee Chapter No. 284, 0. E. S., to which Mrs. Sherman also belongs. Mr. Sherman is a member of Lyon Post No. 266, G. A. R. CHARLES H. Moss.-The men who rightly handle the wealth accumulated through agricultural, commercial or mining pursuits are dominant factors in the regulation of business undertakings, and occupy honored positions in the world of finance. Prominent among this number is Charles H. Moss, well known throughout Houghton county as cashier of the Citizens' National Bank of Houghton, which was brought into existence largely through his efforts, and has prospered through his ability and sagacity. The descendant of a New England family of worth, he was born, May 11, 1868, in Hartford, Connecticut. coming on both sides of the house of a stalwart race, and possessing in an eminent degree the qualities which distinguished his ancestors. The emigrant ancestor of his family, Hon. John Moss, was born in England in 1619, and twenty years later came to America to settle. From 1640 until 1670 he was a resident of New Haven, Connecticut, from that time until 1708 living in Wallingford, Connecticut. His son, John Moss, (2) born October 12, 1650, married Maria Lathrop, and lived until MIarch 31, 1717. Their son, John Moss, (3) who married Elizabeth Hall, was born March 10, 1682, and died May 14, 1755. The line was continued through Joseph Moss, (4) who was born February 9, 1714, married Lydia Jones, and died October 6, 1777. Their son, Moses Moss, (5) who was born March 18, 1738, married Abial Hall, and died September 21, 1809. The next in line of descent, Moses Moss, (6) who married Ann Brooks Ives, was born April 5, 1763, and died January 16, 1839. Amos Moss (7), the succeeding ancestor, married Sarah Pierpont, who was born March 10, 1814, and died an accidental death in 1840, while yet in the prime of early womanhood. Their son, Frederick Moss, (8) was born December 6, 1838, and married Alice Lucretia Higgins. Charles H. Moss, (9) is the subject of this brief sketch. The coat of arms to which the Moss family is entitled is: Ermine (white) on a cross (Greek), sable (black), besant (gold). The crest is: Out of a coronet or, a griffin's head ermine (white), charged on neck with a besant. The family seat is Mosse-Horton, Regis, County Bedford.

Page  860 860 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN On his mother's side Mr. Moss is a Mayflower descendant, tracing his lineage directly to William Brewster, the lineage being as follows: William Brewster, (1); Jonathan Brewster, (2); Mary (Brewster) Turner, (3); Grace (Turner) Christopher, (4); Joanna (Christopher) Leffingwell, (5); Elisha Leffingwell, (6), who served as a soldier in the Revolutionary war; Lucy (Leffingwell) (1'untington) Abel, (7); Avelina S. (Abel) Gardner, (8); Mathilda L. (Gardner) Higgins, (9); Alice Lucretia (Higgins) Moss, (10); and Charles H. Moss, (11). Several of the maternal ancestors of Mr. Moss fought bravely in the struggle for independence, including Simeon Abel, who was sergeant in Captain Waterman's company; Caleb Gardner, Simeon Gardner, and David Gardner. David Gardner served under General Israel Putnam in the Third Connecticut regiment, which was raised at the first call for troops by the special session of legislature, which convened in April, 1775. It was recruited in Windham county, Connecticut, and in May, 1775, with a company raised in London county, marched to the place of encampment near Boston. Upon the expiration of its term of service, December 10, 1775, this regiment was adopted as Continental, and a part took an active part in the Battle of Bunker Hill, and a few of the men joined the Quebec expedition. In 1776 the regiment was reorganized, Benedict Arnold being commissioned as colonel, John Durkie, captain; Joshua Huntington, first lieutenant; Lemuel Bingham, second lieutenant; and Beriah Bell, ensign. Acquiring his elementary education in the public schools of Waterbury, Connecticut, Charles H. Moss afterwards completed his early studies in an academy at East Greenwich, Rhode Island. In 1884, when but sixteen years of age, he began working for wages in Chester, Connecticut, for a while being shipping clerk for C. J. Bates, afterwards being employed for two years in the establishment of S. Brooks & Son. Ambitious to broaden his field of action, Mr. Moss came from there to Northern Michigan, and for two years was book-keeper in the First National Bank of Bessemer, Gogebic county. Going then to Ishpeming, he was for seven years teller in the Ishpeming National Bank, and its cashier for a year. That institution being sold to the Miners' National Bank, Mr. Moss removed to Houghton, and was here instrumental in organizing, in 1901, the Citizens' National Bank, of which he was immediately made cashier, a position which he has filled in a manner most highly satisfactory to all concerned. This bank, organized in 1901, the number of its charter being 5896, had a capital stock of $50,000, and a surplus of $500,000, and its present capital is $100,000, and its surplus $65,000. The officers are as follows: president, James R. Dee; vice-presidents, Claude V. Seeber, Adolph F. Heidkamp; and cashier, Charles H. Moss. Mr. Moss married, October 10, 1894, Florence Chynoweth, who was educated in the common schools of Ontonagon county, Michigan, and at Oberlin College, in Oberlin, Ohio. Her parents are Benjamin and Elizabeth Chynoweth, the former of whom was born and reared in Philadelphia. Her grandfather Chynoweth emigrated from England to the United States, Cornwall having been his birthplace. He was a miner, and for several years was associated in mining, at Greenland and Rockland in Ontonagon county, Michigan, the mines which they opened being afterwards closed for a period of ten years. He was killed by accident at a mine in Pennsylvania. Four children have been born to Mr. Moss, namely: Harold Frederick, born August 9, 1895; Ruth, born August 31, 1899, died March 8, 1903; Irving Brew

Page  861 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 861 ster, born June 28, 1901; and Stanley, born February 1, 1906, died February 4, 1906. Fraternally Mr. Moss holds high rank in the Masonic Order, being a Knight Templar, and a member of Ahmed Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S.; and he is also a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. Religiously he and his family attend the Presbyterian church. Mrs. Florence C. Moss died March 22, 1907, of pneumonia. April 28, 1909, Mr. Moss married Miss Ellen Vivian, daughter of W. J. Vivian and Jennie DeFoe Vivian. OTTO C. STEGATH, organizer and manager of the Stegath Lumber Company, one of the most substantial and successful business enterprises of Escanaba, Michigan, was born July 11, 1874. He is a son of Charles Stegath, who was born in Memel, Prussia, in 1839, and who came to America in 1870, and two years later to Escanaba, which has been his home ever since. Soon after coming to this city he was married, and his children were all born in Escanaba. Mr. Stegath always enjoyed the confidence and respect of all with whom he has done business, and has a reputation for honest and straightforward business dealings. He has the qualities which make for success, and coupled with his energy and ambition they gained him a position of wealth and independence. The Stegath Lumber Company comprises the six sons of Charles Stegath, now a retired lumberman, all of them working zealously for the success of the enterprise, and putting into the work their individual gifts and ideas. All have faith in the future of the company, which is well borne out by the achievements already reached. Otto C. Stegath, the most energetic and ambitious member of the company, although conservative to a great degree, has been engaged in this line of business since he was about sixteen years of age. In 1890 he entered the employ of the I. Stephenson Company, and remained with them ten years, making the most of his opportunities for learning the details of the business. He made such good use of his time that in August, 1900, he completed arrangements for the organization of the present company, their activities at first being confined to retailing lumber. As they were able they added coal, lime, brick and cement. As their success increased the business was expanded and a planing mill was established, which proved such a good move that a short time since a saw mill was erected and is now in operation. The saw mill has a capacity of twenty-five thousand feet daily and is probably the only electrically operated sawmill in the state, thus being of great interest to other mill owners and operators. The planing mill is also operated by the same power, which has proven more economical than steam. The current is supplied by the Escanaba Power Company, who have a power dam in the Escanaba river. The enterprising manager of the Stegath Lumber Company and his colleagues have other plans for the future of this company which they have not yet divulged, preferring to let their fulfillment speak for them. The company owns over twenty-five hundred acres of virgin timber lands, in Maple Ridge, Baldwin and Escanaba townships, and is gradually increasing its holdings; this is some of the most valuable timber land in the county, and is a desirable asset. They do not contemplate cutting their own timber as long as there is a supply to be purchased sufficient to keep the plant in operation. This timber land is increasing in value each year, and the disposition of it will be made only after long debate and careful planning. The Stegath Lumber Company gives employment to some fifty men on an average,

Page  862 862 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN with a prospect of doubling the force before many years have elapsed. It is made up of men who are largely instrumental in the progress and improvement of the state, and their value to the public should be widely appreciated. Besides Otto C. Stegath, the other members of the firm are: Albert J., Gideon R., Frederick H., Richard and Guy S. The eldest son is the general manager, but has valuable assistants in his brothers, each being manager of a department as warranted by his individual capabilities. Albert, thirty-two years of age, has charge of collections, and his able management has contributed not a little toward the success of the undertaking. Gideon R., twenty-eight years of age, is of a mechanical turn, and manages the planing mill. Frederick H., assisted by his sister Mary, keeps the books and takes charge of the office force. Richard and Guy have charge of the coal and cement branch of the business. Each member of the family exerts himself to make his department keep up to the standard set by the general manager, and the best efforts of each is necessary to the accomplishment of the end in view. Otto C. Stegath is taken to all parts of the Northern Peninsula in the discharge of his duties, and he keeps in touch with modern business methods and manufacturing machinery. He was the originator of the plan for erecting a planing mill, which in reality is a factory for the manufacture of all kinds of interior finish, being the only establishment of its kind within a radius of sixty miles. They are constantly adding new machinery, in order to keep up with the growing demand for their output. MURDOCK M. KERR, M. D., physician and surgeon of Laurium, is well known throughout the Upper Peninsula, and wherever he is known is recognized as a credit to his profession. He was born in Ontario, Canada, October 18, 1871, but belongs by ties of inheritance to Caledonia, the integrity and sturdiness of whose sons has been the theme of poets, his parents, John and Isabella (Mattheson) Kerr, both having been natives of Scotland. They came to America in 1848 and located for a while at Zora Hamilton, Ontario. They subsequently removed to Lake Superior, where the father was employed in the mines and also pursued the calling of a vessel merchant on the lakes. He died in 1887 at Lake Linden, Houghton county, and the mother survives, her present residence being at Laurium. Murdock M. Kerr was a graduate of the high school of Lake Linden, Michigan, and while still at an early age decided upon the medical profession for his life work. In preparation for this he entered the medical department of the Detroit College, from which he was graduated in 1889. Shortly thereafter he came to Laurium and opened an office, and as confidence in his ability has steadily grown his practice has kept step with it. His study and research did not terminate with his departure from college, for he realizes to the utmost that to keep pace with the latest discovery in his marvelous science requires constant attention. Dr. Kerr is a man who finds much pleasure in his fraternal relations, and stands high in Michigan Masonry. He is a member of the John Duncan Lodge No. 373, A. F. & A. M., and also belongs to the Hancock Chapter, which has recently been changed to Calumet Chapter, R. A. M. He is likewise affiliated with Lodge No. 245, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. In a professional connection he belongs to the Houghton County Medical Society and to the American Medi

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Page  863 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 863 cal Association. Dr. Kerr's brother, Hon. Angus W. Kerr, is prominent in politics and is favorably mentioned as a member of congress from the home district, the Twelfth Michigan district. Dr. Kerr is unmarried. JOHN CUMMISKEY, of the firm of Cummiskey & Spencer, attorneys at law, Escanaba, Michigan, dates his birth in Livingston county, this state, June 21, 1868. His parents, Patrick and Julia (McCabe) Cummiskey, natives of the "Emerald Isle," early in life came to America, the father landing in this country at the age of twenty-one and the mother at eighteen. They were married in New York state, and at once came west to Livingston county, Michigan, where Mr. Cummiskey improved a farm and for many years carried on agricultural pursuits. He died at the advanced age of eighty-seven years. In their family were ten children, of whom six are now living. John is the youngest of the family. His boyhood days were passed on his father's farm and he received his early training in the public schools. At the age of seventeen he began teaching. The next few years he taught country school during the winter months and in the summer vaactions he occupied his time in the study of law. Three days after he was twenty-one, he was admitted to the bar and when he was twenty-two he was elected prosecuting attorney of Livingston county. Immediately after his admission to the bar, he opened an office at Howell, where he practiced law until 1897, when he removed to Escanaba. In 1890, he formed a partnership with Judge Yelland, which lasted six years, until 1906, when the Judge retired from business and the firm of Cummiskey & Spencer was formed. Mr. Cummiskey was elected prosecuting attorney of Delta county in the fall of 1900, was re-elected in 1902, and served two terms of two years each,-this official honor at the hands of the Republican party, of which he has always been a stanch supporter. Mr. Cummiskey married, in 1894, Miss Clella B. Farrell, a daughter of Joseph and Emily (Brown) Farrell. GEORGE IRVING.-As superintendent of the Iron Mountain Electric Light and Power Company, George Irving is actively identified with one of the most important enterprises of the city and is rendering excellent service to his fellowtownsmen. A son of Captain George Irving, Jr., he was born August 18, 1865, in Kent county, New Brunswick, of substantial Scotch ancestry. His grandfather, Captain George Irving, Sr., was born and bred in Scotland, the home of his ancestor for many generations, and as a young man began to follow the sea. Emigrating in early manhood to Kent county, New Brunswick, he continued his seafaring pursuits until his death, during all of his later years commanding vessels in the British Marine service. To him and his wife six children were born, as follows: William, Elizabeth, George Jr., Henry, Mary and James. Born in county Kent, New Brunswick, George Irving, Jr., was the only member of the parental household to come to the United States. Inheriting a love of the sea, he shipped as a sailor before the mast when young, and gradually worked his way upward until made captain of his vessel, and in that capacity had command for many years of vessels used not only in coast trade but in European trade. He is now living retired from active pursuits, spending the winter seasons with his sons in Texas, the remainder of the time living at Iron Mountain with his son George. Captain George Irving, Jr., married Ann Beattie,

Page  864 864 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN who was born in county Kent, New Brunswick, a daughter of James Beattie, and they became the parents of four children, namely: George, the special subject of this brief sketch; James, deceased; and William and Edward, who reside in Palestine, Texas. Attending the public schools of his native county during his boyhood days, George Irving followed the sea from 1879 until 1884, when he came to the States in search of remunerative employment. Locating in Wisconsin he worked through the ensuing summer season in the mill owned by Hamilton & Merriam, and through the next winter at their lumber camp in the woods. Entering the employ of a professional building mover in the spring of 1885, Mr. Irving came to Iron Mountain to assist in moving buildings at the Chapin location, all of which had to be moved on account of the cave-in which had just begun. He was subsequently engaged as a building mover for about five years, after which he entered the fire department of Iron Mountain, and devoted his entire attention to his duties as fireman during the next few years. Accepting the superintendency of the local Electric Light and Power Company in 1895, Mr. Irving has since filled the position most ably and satisfactorily, having made such changes and improvements in the plant that the service is now pleasing to both the owners and to the patrons. Very soon after Mr. Irving took charge of the plant a change in the service rendered was apparent to all, and with the practical improvements that he is continually adding Iron Mountain can now boast of one of the best equipped and most serviceable light and power plants in the Upper Peninsula. Mr. Irving married, April 19, 1887, Jennie Manning, who was born in Marinette, Wisconsin, a daughter of John and Mary Manning, natives of the Empire state. Mr. Irving is ever interested in local affairs, and has served his ward as a member of the city council. Fraternally he is a member of Iron Mountain Lodge, No. 388, F. & A. M., of which he is past master; a member and past high priest of Iron Mountain Chapter No. 121, R. A. M.; a member of Hugh McCurdy Commandery, No. 43, K. T.; of Darius Council, No. 75, R. & S. MV.; and of Iron Mountain Chapter, No. 41, 0. E. S., to which Mrs. Irving also belongs. ROBERT RIDDLER.-A well-known business man of Iron Mountain, Robert Riddler has identified himself with the interests of this part of Dickinson county since coming here, and has proved himself a valuable and worthy citizen. A son of Robert Riddler, Sr., he was born, June 29, 1861, in Kemnay, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, of excellent Scotch ancestry. Robert Riddler, Sr., a native of the same county, Aberdeen, was there brought up and educated. In his youth he learned the trade of a stone mason, but did not follow it very long. He had much native literary ability, and being a great reader and possessing a remarkably retentive memory, he became familiar with the best authors of his time, and as a local preacher he advocated various reforms and questions in dispute were often submitted to him. He visited America at one time, and after stopping awhile in Canada returned to Scotland and spent his last years in Aberdeenshire, passing away at the age of seventy-six years. He married Margaret Milne, who was born seventy-seven years ago in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, and is still residing there. She reared nine children, namely: Robert, Isabella, John, Janet, Margaret, William, Ellen, Mary and Annie. Receiving his early education in his native village, Robert Riddler began when but ten years old to learn the trade of a stone cutter, and

Page  865 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 865 served an apprenticeship of eight years, learning the different branches of the trade. On attaining his majority he came to the United States, landing at Portland, Maine, and from there proceeded to Hallowell, where for awhile he worked in the stone quarries. He then went to Albion, New York, thence to Grindstone Island in the St. Lawrence river, and worked for a brief period in each of those places. Returning then to his old home in Scotland, he spent a few months with his friends, and then followed his trade for a time in Penryn, England, after which he spent a year in London, England. He then returned to Penryn, where he remained two years, and after visiting Ireland then worked for a short time on the docks in Liverpool. Mr. Riddler subsequently located in London, but a few weeks' residence in that city sufficed him, and he again crossed the Atlantic, landing in Boston. Going from there to Quincy, Massachusetts, he was employed in the monumental shops for a time, and then came west, locating at Waupaca, Wisconsin, where for a few months he was foreman in the quarries. Mr. Riddler then settled at Amberg, Wisconsin, where, after working for four years as granite cutter for the Amberg Iron Company, he formed a partnership with Frank Pomeroy and purchased the Amberg Granite Quarries, which they operated together for three years. Mr. Riddler then purchased his partner's interest, and soon after sold to the Pike River Granite Company. Subsequently, with the exception of a few months spent at Chilton, Wisconsin, he continued a resident of that place until April, 1902. Coming then to Iron Mountain, he established his present business, "The Iron Mountain Monumental Works," his step-son, Irving Riddler, being associated with him. Mr. Riddler married first, at Penryn, County Cornwall, England, Minnie Dunston, who spent her entire life in Penryn, dying two years after her marriage. Mr. Riddler married for his second wife Mrs. Margaret (Randall) Wright, who was born in Waupaca, Wisconsin, where her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Randall were pioneer settlers, going there from New England. By her first marriage Mrs. Riddler had two children, Nettie and Irving. Nettie married Frank Cleveland, and has three children: Lloyd, Isabelle and Grover. Irving, who bears the name of Riddler, is associated in business, as above mentioned, with Mr. Riddler. He married Amanda Danielson. Fraternally Mr. Riddler is a member of Hematite Lodge, No. 129, K. of P.; of Oak Leaf Camp, No. 2885, M. W. A.; and of H. W. Carey Tent, No. 737, K. O. T. M. CAPTAIN JAMES BENDRY.-Among the original settlers of the Upper Peninsula no one was more conversant with its early history than the late Captain James Bendry, who came to this part of the country seventy or more years ago, roughed it with the brave pioneers who became so closely associated with the development of its varied resources, and ably contributed his share in advancing its interests. Industrious, farseeing and enterprising, with great faith in the future possibilities of this region, he made wise investments, becoming one of the largest individual landholders of northern Michigan, but in the memorable panic of 1893 the greater part of his fortune was swept away. He was widely known as a man of honest integrity and sterling worth and commanded the respect of all with whom he was brought in contact. A native of England, Captain Bendry was born in Wootton-Basset, Wiltshire. His parents spent their lives in Wiltshire, but two of the Captain's sisters and one of his brothers came to this country. Thomas located permanently in L'Anse, Michigan. One sister married George

Page  866 866 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN Shakespeare, and after living at Sault Ste. Marie a few years removed to Minnesota. Elizabeth became the wife of Charles M'ajor and spent her last years in L'Anse. At the age of eighteen years, in 1840, James Bendry emigrated to America, coming directly to the Upper Peninsula. Locating at Sault Ste. MIarie, he purchased a sailing vessel and resumed his former occupation, having been employed on the water since his boyhood days, for several years carrying freight and passengers across the lake. In the fall of 1846 he located on the present site of Baraga, which, with the surrounding country, was then a dense wilderness, and having taken up a tract of government land that is now included within the limits of the village of Baraga, erected a log cabin in what is now the mill yard. Here he lived for three years, in the meantime continuing to sail the lakes. The following three years he resided with his family in Sault Ste. Marie. Returning then to Baraga county, he bought land now included within the boundaries of the village of L'Anse, and embarked in mercantile pursuits, trading largely with the Indians, in addition building a sawmill and manufacturing lumber. Removing to iHoughton in 1860, Captain Bendry built a dock, and was prosperously employed in the lumber business for about three years, after which he spent a year in L'Anse, there carrying on general farming. In 1864 he again took up his residence in Baraga, built the first steam sawmill ever erected in this vicinity, and having built up an extensive and prosperous business as a manufacturer of lumber and shingles, was here a resident until his death in 1895. Soon after his location in Sault Ste. Marie, Captain Bendry married Charlotte Contoui, who was born in that place of French and Indian blood. Her father, Augustus Contoui, came from France to America when a boy of fourteen years. After living a while in Canada he came to the Upper Peninsula, settling at Sault Ste. Marie, where he soon married the daughter of an Indian chief. He was a baker by trade, and for many years cooked for the soldiers at the fort. Mrs. Bendry died in 1892, three years before he did. They were the parents of eleven children, namely: James, Thomas, William, Mary, Emma, John, Helen, Josephine, Georgiana, Jacob and Elizabeth. The Captain was a man of much enterprise and public-spirit, taking an abiding interest in the general welfare of the community, and served his fellow-citizens ably and faithfully in various official capacities, for many years being supervisor of Baraga township. JOHN DUNHAM.-The substantial and progressive citizens and the active business men of Menominee county have no more worthy representative than John Dunham, a leading merchant of Daggett and head of the well-known firm of Dunham & Son. A native of Wisconsin, he was born, January 21, 1859, in Dodge county, a son of John H. Dunham. John H. Dunham was born near Troy, New York, and in his earlier years was engaged in business at Geneva, New York, as a flour manufacturer and dealer. Coming westward in 1846, he located at Juneau, Dodge county, Wisconsin, where he established livery business, and became prominent in the management of public affairs. He served ably in various township and county offices, and as registrar of deeds made the first index record books in that county. He was for many years engaged in mercantile pursuits in Juneau, and afterwards became a buyer and seller of farm lands. He subsequently removed

Page  867 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 867 to Cameron, Barron county, Wisconsin, where he is now engaged in the real estate business. He married Orpha Harrington, who was born in Lyons, New York, and to them three children have been born, as follows: John, with whom this sketch is chiefly concerned; Clara, wife of Dr. I. T. Burnside, of Duluth, Minnesota; and James, a resident of Minnesota. Completing his studies in the schools of Dodge county, Wisconsin, John Dunham began his active career as a clerk in his father's store. Coming to Daggett, Michigan, in the spring of 1884, he entered the employ of George Bush, a lumber manufacturer and dealer, and continued with him as book-keeper for four years. Mr. Dunham then became manager of G. H. Westman's general store, which was sold in the fall of 1891 to the G. H. Westman Lumber Company, with which Mr. Dunham remained in the same capacity until 1894. Messrs. Westman and Dunham then purchased the entire interests of the company, and conducted the business under the firm name of Westman & Dunham for five years. In 1899 Mr. Westman sold his share in the firm to Messrs. Dunham and Collette, and the firm name was changed to Dunham & Company. In February, 1906, Mr. Dunham bought his partner's interest in the business, and admitted his son to the firm, which has since been known as Dunham & Son. Mr. Dunham has been influential in public affairs since coming to Daggett, and has served with ability and fidelity in many official positions. He was justice of the peace several terms; township treasurer six years; supervisor one term; and for the past six years has been a member of the school board. Politically he is a Democrat, and active in party ranks. Mr. Dunham married, October 30, 1886, Emma Genor, who was born in Rhode Island, a daughter of the late Louis and Delia Genor, both natives of Canada. Mr. Genor, a blacksmith by trade, moved with his family from Rhode Island to Wisconsin, settling first in Fond du Lac, afterwards locating in Marinette, where he worked in the woods for several seasons. Subsequently coming to Daggett, Michigan, he followed his trade in this place until his death, in the spring of 1886. To him and his wife, also deceased, a large family of children were born, and two are now living, namely: Mrs. Dunham and her brother, Delar. Mr. and Mrs. Dunham are the parents of eight children, namely: Clara, John Jr., Orpha, Gertrude, Dorothy, Alfred, Richard and Emma. THOMAS WILLS.-Noteworthy among the enterprising, intelligent and capable business men of Iron Mountain is Thomas Wills, a well-known provision dealer, being the senior member of the firm of Wills & Carbis. An Englishman by birth and breeding, he was born, May 14, 1872, in the parish of St. Agnes, County Cornwall, which was likewise the birthplace of his father, Thomas Wills, Sr., and for many generations the home of both his paternal and maternal ancestors. Soon after his marriage, Thomas Wills, Sr., emigrated to America, locating at Calumet, Michigan, where for a while he worked as a miner. His family then returned to Cornwall county, England, and he went to Brazil, South America, where he was employed in mining for a time. Subsequently joining his family in St. Agnes parish, England, he died there in 1872, while yet in manhood's prime. His wife, whose maiden name was Sarah Penrose, was born in St. Agnes parish, and there her death occurred when she was but forty-two years old. Seven of her children grew to years of maturity, namely: Rose, Laura, Sarah, William, Franklin, Ada and Thomas, the latter being the only one to settle permanently in this country.

Page  868 868 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN Receiving excellent school advantages, Thomas Wills acquired a practical business education in his native parish, residing there until 1890. Coming in that year to the Upper Peninsula, he located at Iron Mountain, where he soon obtained a position as bookkeeper in a provision store, and retained it for ten years. Embarking in the provision business on his own account in 1900, he conducted it alone for five years. In 1905 he admitted to partnership his brother-in-law, William James Carbis, and has since been head of the firm of Wills & Carbis, which is carrying on an extensive and lucrative business, having built up a large trade. Mr. Wills married, in 1895, Mamie Carbis, who was born in Virginia, a daughter of Captain Frank Carbis. Captain Carbis was born near Liskeard, County Cornwall, England, where his parents, William and Mary M. (Clyma) Carbis, were lifelong residents. Emigrating to America in 1869, Captain Carbis was for a year engaged in mining near Hancock, Houghton county, Michigan, after which he spent a year at the mines of Bedford county, Pennsylvania. Going to the Pacific coast in 1871, he was for two years employed in gold and silver mining in California and Nevada. Returning east in 1873, the Captain resided in Amherst county, Virginia, until the fall of 1876, when, with his family, he visited friends in England for a few months. Returning then to Michigan, he was employed for a year in the Republic Mine in Marquette county. Going back then to Amherst county, Virginia, he accepted the position of captain at the mine where he had previously worked, retaining it for quite a while. He subsequently again crossed the ocean with his family, and for nearly two years worked in the coal mines of Scotland, in the vicinity of Edinburgh. Then, after a short visit at his old home in England, he returned to Michigan to resume work at the Republic Mine. He afterward worked for a while as a miner in Amherst county, Virginia, but not content there, returned to the Upper Peninsula, settling permanently at Iron Mountain, where for the past fourteen years he has served as captain for the Republic Iron and Steel Company. Captain Carbis married Fanny Taylor, who.was born in St. Cleer parish, England, a daughter of James and Mary Ann Taylor, and they have reared six children, namely: Mamie, Matilda, William James, Beatrice, Martha and Mabel. Mr. and Mrs. Wills have one child, Marion L. Wills. Religiously Mr. and Mrs. Wills attend the Methodist Episcopal church. WILLIAM T. MENGE.-NO finer representative of the native born citizens of L'Anse need be found than William T. Menge, whose birth occurred in this village August 19, 1873. Possessing good business ability, he has been actively associated with the administration of public affairs in an official capacity for many years, and has been identified with one of the leading industries of Baraga county several years, being secretary and treasurer of the Baraga County Publishing Company. He is a son of August and Theresa Menge, of whom a brief biographical sketch may be found on another page of this volume. Acquiring his early education in the public schools of L'Anse, he was graduated from the Detroit Business College with the class of 1891. Embarking then in mercantile pursuits, Mr. Menge conducted a confectionery store for thirteen years, and in 1905 and 1906 was successfully engaged in the life insurance business. In 1907 the Baraga County Publishing Company was organized, and Mr. Menge was elected secretary and treasurer of the corporation, to which he has since devoted his best energies.

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Page  869 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 869 In August, 1898, Mr. Menge was united in marriage with Katherine Wahl, who was born in Newberry, Pennsylvania, a daughter of Andrew and Katherine Wahl, natives respectively of Germany and Pennsylvania. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Menge, namely: Raishe W., Gage T., Ellis Richard, Lola H. T. and Karl W. Elected township treasurer in 1897, Mr. Menge was re-elected to the same position in 1898; in the fall of that same year he was elected county treasurer, and to this position was re-elected in 1900. He has also served since most satisfactorily as township treasurer and assessor. R. AUGUSTE PARADIS, M. D.-One of the distinguished physicians and surgeons of the Upper Peninsula is Dr. Roche Auguste Paradis, who is widely and favorably known not only by reason of the distinctive success which he has achieved in the work of his profession but also as proprietor of the Paradis Hospital, which is one of the best equipped institutions of this kind in the Upper Peninsula. lie received the best of advantages in preparing himself for his exacting vocation and his devotion to the same has been of unequivocal order, as he has not only taken great pride and interest in his work but has also been animated by deep human sympathy of the kind that transcends mere sentiment and becomes an actuating motive for helpfulness. He is a scion of a distinguished French family and the name which he bears has been long and prominently identified with the history of the province of Quebec, Canada. Dr. Paradis is a descendant, in the eighth generation, from Pierre Paradis, who was born at Perche, an ancient division of France, in the province of Maine, now divided among the departments of Orne, Eureet-Loir and Eure, and the date of his nativity was 1605, his death occurring in 1675. The next in order of direct descent was Guillaume, who was born in 1648 and was married, in Quebec, Canada, in 1670, to Genevieve Millouer; he died in 1700. In following out the genealogy from this point the head of each generation in the direct line will be noted. Jean Paradis, the sixth in order of birth of the children of Guillaume Paradis was born in 1690 and he married Francoise HudonBeaulieu, of Kamouraska, province of Quebec, on the 25th of April, 1718. Their son, Joseph, was born in 1734 and in 1756 he was married to Anne Moreau, of Kamouraska. Jean Baptiste Paradis, son of Joseph and Anne (Moreau) Paradis, was born in 1765 and in 1786, at Riviere du Loup, Quebec, he was united in marriage to Josephte Damfause and their sixth child, Amable Paradis, was the grandfather of him whose name initiates this review. Amable Paradis, who was a lifelong resident of the province of Quebec, Canada, was born in 1796 and his death occurred on the 4th of May, 1848. He was for many years engaged in mercantile pursuits and was an able and successful business man. On the 14th of October, 1823, was solemnized his marriage to Miss Elizabeth Phineas, of Riviere du Loup, and she died on the 25th of August, 1829, at the age of twenty-seven years and four months. Amable Paradis married as his second wife Sophie Rousseau, of Nicolet, and this union was solemnized on the 21st of January, 1833. Amable and Sophie (Rousseau) Paradis became the parents of five children and of this number Ovide Joseph, father of the doctor, was the second in order of birth. He was born on the 3d of January, 1835, and was reared and educated in the province of Quebec. On the 16th of June, 1857, he married Louise Chamard. He was summoned to the life eternal in January, 1876, and his devoted wife passed away on the 5th of March, 1868, her Vol. II-1 6

Page  870 870 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN birth having occurred on the 28th of June, 1836. They became the parents of seven children and of the number the doctor is the youngest. Concerning the others the following brief data are given,-Seraphin, who is deceased; Marie Joseph Ernest, who died at the age of two years and eleven months; Irene, who died at the age of fourteen and a half months; Ernestine, who was born on the 13th of May, 1862; George Arthur, who was born on the 7th of October, 1863; Emile 0., who was born on the 19th of December, 1864; and Roche Auguste, who was born on the 29th of August, 1866, and who figures as the immediate subject of this review. Ovide Joseph Paradis was born in the province of Quebec, Canada, on the 3d of January, 1835, as has already been noted. He received excellent educational advantages and inherited considerable means but he never manifested any predilection for professional life, preferring to give his attention to industrial and business pursuits, in connection with which he achieved a large measure of success. As a young man he erected a saw mill, as well as a carding and fulling mill, and both of these he carried on successfully for a number of years. Upon disposing of his interest in this line of enterprise he built two steam boats, which he placed in commission in the transportation of passengers and freight on the St. Lawrence river. It is especially worthy of note that one of these steamers "La Mouche-a-feu" is still in service on the St. Lawrence. After a few years Mr. Paradis disposed of his boats and thereafter he traveled extensively throughout the eastern section of the United States, where he gave special attention to visiting and inspecting various piano and organ factories in different states. Upon his return to his home he built a fine pipe organ which he presented to the church at Saint Michel D'Yamaska, in the county of Yamaska, Quebec, of which church both he and his family were communicants, and later he manufactured several other organs. After the death of his first wife he removed to the city of Montreal where he continued to maintain his home until his death, which occurred in January, 1876. Dr. Roche Auguste Paradis was born at Saint Michel D'Yamaska, in the county of Yamaska, province of Quebec, on the 29th of August, 1866, and in his native town he received his preliminary educational training in the parochial schools. He subsequently attended Nicolet College and in 1891 he was graduated in the medical department of Laval University, in the city of Quebec, from which historical and admirable institution he received his well earned degree of Doctor of Medicine. He initiated the active practice of his profession at Lotbiniere, of the county of the same name in the province of Quebec, where he remained two years, at the expiration of which he came to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and located at Ironwood, where he was engaged in the successful work of his profession for the ensuing two years. He then, in 1895, removed to Bessemer where he has built up a large and representative practice and gained for himself a secure place in popular confidence and esteem by reason of his fine professional ability and on account of his sterling character and his loyalty and liberalty as a citizen. In 1902 the Doctor established the Paradis Hospital, which is modern in all of its equipment and facilities and which affords advantages that are greatly appreciated by its many patrons. Dr. Paradis is identified with the Gogebic County Medical Society, the Michigan State Medical Society and the American Medical Association and the alumni associations of Laval University, besides which he is a member of the American Geographical Society. He has not only been a close student of his profession but has shown a deep interest in the best of general

Page  871 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 871 literature, as well as in scientific investigation and study. He is a man of broad intellectual ken and is well fortified in his opinions. In politics Dr. Paradis maintains an independent attitude and he gives his support to all measures and enterprises tending to advance the best interests of the community. Both he and his wife are communicants of the Catholic church, in whose faith they were reared. In the year 1893 was solemnized the marriage of Dir. Paradis to Miss Marie Octavie Virginie Le May, who was born at Lotbiniere, province of Quebec, Canada, in 1864. Her father, who is now eighty-nine years of age (1910) was likewise born and reared in the province of Quebec, where he received a collegiate education and where he devoted his attention to the study of theology for two years. His health became impaired, however, and he thus decided to resign the idea of preparing himself for the arduous duties of the priesthood of the Catholic church. He has served as notary public for nearly sixty years and is now the oldest incumbent of this office in the Dominion of Canada, while there can be slight doubt that both in years and in point of service he is the oldest incumbent of this position on the continent of North America. Dr. and Mrs. Paradis have eight children, whose names and respective dates of birth are here noted,-M. E. Lucette, July 18, 1894; Charles Ovide, November 16, 1895; David Philippe Auguste, June 7, 1897; William Gerard, July 16, 1899; Marie Louise, November 20, 1900; Jean Arthur Emile Ernest, November 26, 1904; Virginia Eulalie Juliette, July 2, 1906; and Henry Leopold Le May, July 10, 1908. JAMES RUBEO LISA, Italian consular agent and steamship agent located at Calumet, is the owner of considerable valuable city property and is a citizen of influence, particularly among the members of the Italian element. He is a native of "sunny Italy," his birth having occurred in the village of San Martino, Cannanese, on October 12, 1845. Until his thirteenth year he attended the common schools of his native country, and then began his apprenticeship in a bakery shop. Having completed his baker's training he traveled a short time as a journeyman, but when about eighteen years old he concluded to seek the country of whose opportunities so much had been told. He arrived in America in July, 1873, and went immediately from New York to Hancock, Michigan, later going on to Calumet. He secured employment in the copper mines of the Upper Peninsula, remaining thus engaged for a number of months, and then going with the Calumet & Hecla Company. In 1874 this new American citizen removed to Chicago and spent the next three years in this great metropolis, employed in various kinds of work. In 1877 he returned to Calumet and became a clerk in the general merchandise store of Nappa & Company. Mr. Lisa, who is possessed of unusual business acumen, by 1880 found himself in a position to become more independent, and started a candy store. His business grew steadily and rapidly and his means accumulated in gratifying fashion. Mr. Lisa retired from this business only after twenty-six years. During this time he built his brick block, fiftyeight by ninety-six, and two stories in height. In 1895 Mr. Lisa was appointed consular agent for the Upper Peninsula in Michigan. His business in correspondence has been largely confined to the Italian element. He has been prominently identified with city affairs and was for two years a member of the council. He has been for several years a member of the village board of Red Jacket. Fraternally he is a member of Hecla lodge, I. O. O. F.

Page  872 872 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN Mr. Lisa's wife, before her marriage Miss Martha Nida, is also a native of Italy. Their union was celebrated on the 13th of February, 1871. They are the parents of seven children, six daughters and a son. Josephine is the wife of Maurice Bandettini, proprietor of the Hotel Michigan; Julia is bookkeeper for Petermann & Company, of Wolverine; Mary resides in the west; Angeline, Irene and Catherine are all at home; and James is a student at the Michigan state university. DR. HARRY W. LONG, a prominent physician of Escanaba, was born in New Brunswick, July 29, 1878. His father, H. M. Long, was of English and Scotch descent and also a native of New Brunswick, as was his wife, Annie Perkins. They came to Menominee, Michigan, in 1887, and there died, the father at the age of seventy-four and the mother at sixty-five years. They were parents of four sons and three daughters, all of whom lived to maturity, and still survive. Dr. Long is the fifth child and third son of his parents, and was (t nine years of age when the family came to the Northern Peninsula. He received his primary education in the public schools of Menominee, and in 1891 came to Escanaba to continue his studies, graduating in 1894 from the Escanaba High School. He attended the University of Michigan one year, taking literary work, and took a medical course at the Northwestern University at Chicago, graduating from the medical department in 1900. Returning to Escanaba, he began the practice of his profession, and has built up a large practice. He has won the confidence and esteem of the citizens of Escanaba, and has made a good showing in his work. Dr. Long is a member of the Delta County, State and American Medical Societies, also the Upper Peninsula Medical Society, and stands well among his associates. He is now president of the Delta County Society and was at one time secretary of the Upper Peninsula Society. He is at present serving as health officer of the city of Escanaba. Dr. Long is a member of the Masonic order, being affiliated with the Chapter, Commandery and Shrine; he also belongs to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and to the Knights of Pythias. He is a stanch Republican, and takes a commendable interest in local public affairs. Dr. Long has been for twenty-two years a resident of the Northern Peninsula, and has won a host of friends. In 1904 Dr. Long married Emily, daughter of D'avid and Mary (Powell) Rees. They have one living child. JUDGE ELMER S. B. SUTTON.-Holding a place of prominence on the list of names that have conferred honor upon the legal profession in the Upper Peninsula is that of Judge Elmer S. B. Sutton, of Sault Ste. Marie, whose position as a man and a lawyer is such as to clearly entitle him to representation in this volume. A son of the late Jonathan Sutton, he was born, March 20, 1854, in Orion, Oakland county, Michigan, of English lineage. He comes of colonial ancestry, tracing his lineage in a direct line to one William Sutton, who emigrated from England to the United States in 1666, locating in the town of Eastham, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod, and spending his remaining years in that vicinity, at his death being buried in the little Quaker churchyard in Woodbridge, Massachusetts. Three of his descendants, Jonathan Sutton, the Judge's great-grandfather, and Jonathan's brothers, Uriah and Joseph, served in the Revolutionary war, the latter taking part in the battle of Monmouth and the other two bearing the commission of captain and serving bravely in

Page  873 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 873 various engagements. Jonathan Sutton's son, Jacob Sutton, the grandfather of Judge Sutton, was born in Sussex county, New Jersey, October 12. 1773, and died at Franklin Furnace, October 28, 1832, while yet in manhood's prime. Judge Sutton's father, Jonathan Sutton, was born in Elizabeth, New Jersey, December 24, 1807, and there spent his early life. In 1839 he followed the trail of the emigrant to Michigan, locating in Oakland county, where he was for many years engaged in mercantile pursuits, and likewise in general farming. He was a war Democrat, and notwithstanding the fact that while a resident of New Jersey he was a slaveholder, he raised a company of soldiers for service during the Civil war, assembling the brave men on his farm at Pontiac and standing all the expense himself. He was a successful business man, and continued his active career until his death, December 5, 1874, on his home farm. His wife, whose maiden name was Delilah Predmore, was born in New Jersey, of English ancestors, and died, in 1892, in Michigan. Five sons and five daughters were born of their union, and of these four sons and two daughters are living, the Judge being the youngest child. But eight years old when his parents moved from Orion to Saginaw, Michigan, Elmer S. B. Sutton there received his elementary education at the age of eighteen years being graduated from the high school. He subsequently studied Latin with Rev. Father De Cunick, after which he read law three years in the office of Colonel John Atkinson. Admitted to the bar in Wayne county, Michigan, in 1876, Mr. Sutton located in Sault Ste. Marie the following year, being the second lawyer to open an office in this part of Chippewa county, and has since been actively and successfully engaged in the practice of the profession of his choice, his only partner during all of these years having been T. J. Martin, with whom he was associated in 1887 and 1888. Judge Sutton has been prominent not only in legal and political circles, but also in social and fraternal organizations, having ever been among the foremost in promoting the public welfare since coming to the "Soo." He has served both as county inspector of schools and as county superintendent of schools; was circuit court commissioner from 1880 until 1884; was judge of probate at the same time; and in 1886 was elected prosecuting attorney for one term. He was largely instrumental in the early days in suppressing the lawlessness that obtained in this section of the state, and in 1880, as an appreciation of his good services in securing the conviction of a gang of counterfeiters from Canada, the Judge was appointed a life commissioner of the court of the queen's bench of the Dominion. Since 1894 he has served as United States commissioner. Giving up somewhat the general practice of law in 1891, Judge Sutton has since confined his attention largely to admiralty law, on which he is an authority, and has been interested in many notable marine cases. As attorney for the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie Railway Company, he transacts all of their business at this end of the line, and during the existence of the Sault Ste. Marie National Bank he was one of its directors and its attorney. He is a member and was the president of the Soo Club, and is very prominent in the Masonic order, in which he has taken the thirty-second degree, being a member of lodge, chapter, council, commandery and shrine. He likewise belongs to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and to the Knights. of Pythias. He is a stanch supporter of the principles of the Republican party. He is a most successful trial lawyer, having cases of im

Page  874 874 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN portance oftentimes in the supreme court, his practice extending into other cities. Judge Sutton married, October 1, 1881, Annie A. Scranton, who was born in Sault Ste. Marie, a daughter of Myron W. and Henrietta (Barbeau) Scranton. Her father was born in Ohio in 1835, and was an early settler of Chippewa county, having, previous to 1856, been agent for the first steamboat company doing business at the "Soo." He was engaged in the mercantile business afterward, and for many years served as county treasurer and as township treasurer, continuing active in public life until his death in 1907. His wife, who was born in 1841, survived him, passing away in August, 1909. Her father, Pierre Barbeau, Mrs. Sutton's grandfather, was a factor of the American Fur Company, having jurisdiction from Detroit to Hudson's Bay. He was very well known and very popular, Baraboo, Wisconsin, having been named in his honor. Mrs. Sutton was one of a family of four children, being the third child in succession of birth. ANDREW J. BOYINGTON.-Distinguished as a pioneer resident of the Upper Peninsula and as the pioneer hotel keeper of Iron River, Andrew J. Boyington, now living retired from active pursuits, was for many years actively identified with the leading interests of Iron River and a prominent factor in promoting its agricultural and material prosperity and growth. He was born, September 3, 1842, in Allegany county, New York, a son of Asahel Boyington. His father, Jonathan Boyington, who came from English ancestry, was a native, it is supposed, of Vermont, where he grew to manhood and married. He afterwards lived for a number of years in New York state, from there moving to Wisconsin and spending his last days in Jefferson county. Born in the Green Mountain state, Asahel Boyington was there reared to agricultural pursuits, which he subsequently followed for a while in Allegany county, New York. From there he moved, in 1843, to Wisconsin, being accompanied by his family. Starting with a team, he traveled across the country to Buffalo, a distance of sixty miles, and there embarked, team and all, on a steamer and proceeded by way of Lake Erie to Milwaukee, then a small village. From there, with teams, he followed an Indian trail to Jefferson county, going forty miles through the forest. He there purchased a tract of timbered land in what is now Sullivan township, and having cleared an opening erected a log cabin in which to live. He was the only settler within a radius of five miles, while Milwaukee was the nearest post office and the only depot for supplies. The wild beasts of the wilderness had not then fled before the advancing steps of civilization, but, with the dusky savage, inhabited the forests, roaming at will through the dense woods. Clearing a part of the land, he was there one of the leading farmers until 1863, when he disposed of his homestead, although he remained a resident of the county. After the return from the army of his son, Andrew J. Boyington, the subject of this sketch, he bought a well improved farm in Hebron township, and resided there a few years. Moving then to Fort Atkinson, he lived there until his death, at the venerable age of eighty-three years. His wife, whose maiden name was Esther Sanford, was born in New York state, a daughter of Abram and Susan (Woodworth) Sanford. She lived until ninety-five years of age. Nine children were born of their union, as follows: Titus, David, Jesse, Sarah, Hiram, Melinda, George, Andrew J. and Lucy. All of the sons, six in number, served bravely in the Civil war. Reared among the pioneer scenes of Jefferson county, Wisconsin,

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Page  875 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 875 Andrew J. Boyington remained beneath the parental roof-tree until after the breaking out of the Civil war, when his patriotic enthusiasm was aroused and he cheerfully offered his services to his country. Enlisting, September 30, 1861, in Company H, Thirteenth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, he served with his comrades at the front until the expiration of his term of enlistment. In 1863 Mr. Boyington reenlisted and continued with his regiment in all of its marches, campaigns and battles until November 21, 1864. On that day, while on patrol duty, guarding a railroad at Huntsville, Alabama, he was shot by a bushwhacker, and as a result lost his left arm. In June, 1865, he was honorably discharged from the service and returned home. In partnership with his father, Mr. Boyington then purchased a farm in Hebron township, and was there engaged in tilling the soil until 1870. Traveling then by stage where there were no railways, he went to the Northwest territories, and until 1871 was employed in prospecting for the precious metal in Montana. Returning then to Wisconsin, Mr. Boyington married in the following spring, and in April, 1872, came to the Upper Peninsula, locating at Menominee, then a small log-cabin village. On July 16 of that year, he was joined by his bride, who came in on the first regular passenger train that entered the place. Opening a billiard room and a dispensary, he was there in business until 1877, when he sold out and went to the Pacific coast. He settled at Seattle, in the territory of Washington, which was then a town of three thousand inhabitants, with scant promise of its present proud position among the coast cities. He remained there until the fall of 1878, when he returned to Menominee, where he continued his residence for more than a year. Coming from there to Iron county, Mr. Boyington located at Iron Mountain on January 7, 1880. At that time there were but four buildings in the place, and they were unfinished, although two of them were occupied by grocery stores. There was not a woman in the town until the advent of Mrs. Boyington, the few men residing there keeping bachelor's hall. Buying two lots, Mr. Boyington erected two buildings, the ground floors to be used for stores, and the upper stories for residential purposes. Selling out in 1882, Mr. Boyington came to Iron River, making the removal with a pair of horses and a wagon, bringing his family and all of his household goods and arriving February 16, 1882. The site of Iron River was then a wilderness, the only buildings in the vicinity being three small log cabins. He at once began the erection of a hotel, which, though it was then far from complete, he opened to the public on November 1, 1882. It contained fifty rooms, and was well equipped for those days. On June 27, 1885, the structure was burned, but Mr. Boyington, with characteristic enterprise, moved to a house near by and continued as before to entertain travelers. In the meantime the work of rebuilding progressed rapidly, and on the first of July, 1886, the present Boyington Hotel threw open its doors to the public. In addition to conducting his hotel, Mr. Boyington also operated his farm of two hundred and forty acres, two miles and a half from the village center, raising an ample supply of milk and vegetables for the hotel and all of the hay needed in his livery. In 1897 he admitted his son, Philip L., to partnership, and continued with him until 1906, when he sold out to his partner. Since that time Mr. Boyington has lived retired from active pursuits, having a most pleasant home but a few blocks from the hotel. Mr. Boyington married, March 16, 1872, Lefa Wait, who was born. June 30, 1850, at New Berlin, Waukesha county, Wisconsin, a daugh

Page  876 876 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN ter of Thaddeus Wait. Her grandfather, Samuel Wait, was born, it is thought, in England, came with his parents to the United States, and began life as a farmer in northern New York. From there he moved to Wisconsin and spent his last years in Waukesha county. His wife, whose maiden name was Lorania Covey, survived him and died at the home of a daughter in Winnebago county, Wisconsin. Born in New York state, Thaddeus Wait was young when he moved with his parents to Wisconsin. Buying forty acres of land at New Berlin after his marriage, he resided there until 1852, when he went to Outagamie county, Wisconsin, becoming an early pioneer of that section. Buying government land, he built a log cabin, began the improvement of a homestead, and there resided until his death, at the comparatively early age of forty-three years. The maiden name of the wife of Mr. Wait was Lura Barber. She was born in Vermont, which was also the birthplace of her father, George Barber. A pioneer of New Berlin, Wisconsin, George Barber moved there several years before there were any railways in that vicinity; and for sometime was there engaged in teaming, taking produce from that place to Milwaukee, on his return trip bringing back merchandise of all kinds. He was accidentally killed by being thrown from his wagon when his team ran away. The maiden name of the wife of George Barber was Polly Crampton. She survived him, passing away at the home of a daughter at the age of four score years. She reared five children, namely: Viola; Lefa, wife of Mr. Boyington; Manville B.; Julia; and Julius. Two sons were born to Mr. and Mrs. Boyington, Burt L., who lived but fourteen years; and Philip L., of whom a brief sketch may be found following this. PHILIP L. BOYINGTON.-Enterprising, genial and accommodating,.Philip L. Boyington, of Iron River, proprietor of the Boyington Hotel, has acquired an enviable reputation as "mine host," and is especially popular with the traveling public, being ever mindful of the wants and comfort of his guests. A son of Andrew J. and Lefa (Wait) Boyington, he was born, July 29, 1876, in Menominee, Wisconsin, of substantial New England ancestry. Further parental and ancestral history may be found on another page of this work, in connection with the sketch of his father, Andrew J. Boyington. A lad of six. years when he came with his parents to Iron River, Mr. Boyington has since made this place his home. On attaining his majority his father gave him a half interest in his property and his business, and they were associated in the management of affairs until 1906, when Mr. Boyington bought out his father's share of the house and livery, and has since been sole proprietor and manager. In addition to caring for these, he likewise has charge of the home farm, on which all of the milk, vegetables, poultry and eggs used in the hotel, and the greater part of the hay and grain used in the livery, are produced. Mr. Boyington married Abbie Gilman, and they have one child, Gladys Boyington. HUGH DOUGLAS WHITEWELL is to be designated in this publication as one of the progressive and representative young business men of St. Ignace, where he is serving as city treasurer and where he has maintained his home since his boyhood days. Here he is now successfully established in the lumber business, besides which he is proprietor of the Leclerc Hotel, one of the well conducted and popular hostelries of the Upper Peninsula. Mr. Whitewell was born in Dunnville, Monck county, Province of

Page  877 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 877 Ontario, Canada, on the 13th of May, 1872, and is a son of Thomas and Agnes (Jameson) Whitewell, the former of whom was born in Ontario, of English parentage, and the latter is a native of Scotland. They now maintain their home in St. Ignace, Michigan, with whose business and civic activities the father has long been prominently identified. Of the five children, four are living and the subject of this sketch is the eldest of the number; the other children are Jessie, John and Clarence. The father is a brick and stone mason by trade and he continued to be engaged in the work of his trade in Ontario until the spring of 1882, when he came to St. Ignace to assume the position of foreman in the building of the retorts for the Martell Furnace Company. Later he engaged in general contracting and building, with which he was actively identified until 1907, since which time he has lived virtually retired. He is a stanch Republican in his political proclivities and both he and his wife hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. The subject of this review gained his rudimentary education in the public schools of his native town and was about ten years of age at the time of the family removal to St. Ignace, where he continued his studies in the public schools until he was sixteen years of age. His initial business experiences were gained as a clerk in a drug and grocery store conducted by Charles H. Wilber, with whom he remained four years, after which he was employed for one year as clerk in a hotel conducted by Charles Y. Bennett. Thereafter he was superintendent and foreman of the lumber camps of the firm of J. H. Green & Son for two years, at the expiration of which he became manager of the Leclerc Hotel. On the 1st of May, 1902, he assumed charge of this popular hotel, of which he has since been the proprietor and which he has since so well conducted as to merit the large and representative patronage accorded it. Since 1906 he has also been actively engaged in the lumber business as a retail dealer. In politics Mr. Whitewell is a stanch advocate of the principles and policies of the Republican party and he is well fortified in his convictions as to matters of public polity. He is chairman of the Republican city committee of St. Ignace and he has been an active worker in the local ranks of the party. In the spring of 1910 Mr. Whitewell was elected to the office of city treasurer and in the same he has given a most able and satisfactory administration. In the community in which he was reared his circle of friends is limited only by that of his acquaintances and he is one of the well known and popular citizens of Mackinac county. He is a member of St. Ignace Lodge, No. 369, Free and Accepted Masons; and Gateway City Lodge, No. 93, Knights of Pythias. On the 28th of November, 1894, Mr. Whitewell was united in marriage to Miss Clara Walters, who was born in Germany, and who is a daughter of August Walters, who still resides in the German fatherland, where Mrs. Whitewell was reared to adult age, being the next to the youngest in a family of six children. Mr. and Mrs. Whitewell have one child, John Walter, who was born on the 1st of October, 1910. JOSEPH H. SIMANSKY is one of the active young business men of Menominee, whither he came when a boy. He was born in the province of Lodz, Poland, March 21, 1873, and his parents, Isaac and Pesha (Goldburg) Simansky, were born in the same province. They were married in the fatherland, and of the twelve children which blessed their marriage union, the following four are living: Joseph H., Anna May, wife

Page  878 878 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN of Max Greenburg and a graduate of the Menominee high school, Emma, attending the same institution, and Hattie. Isaac Simansky was a clothing merchant in Germany, but after coming to the United States and to Menominee, Michigan, in 1882, he turned his attention to the hardware business, but later sold that establishment to resume the clothing business and to become the head of the firm of I. Simansky and Son. He was a member of the Independent Order of Foresters and of the Jewish societies, while in politics he affiliated with the Republican party. Joseph H. Simansky came to the United States in 1883 and joined his father at Menominee in the same year, where he completed his educational training. When a young man of nineteen years he began selling goods on the road, and later going to Chicago he was a clerk in a clothing house there for a year and a half, returning at the close of that period to Menominee. The firm of I. Simansky and Son was organized in October of 1891, for the purpose of carrying on a mercantile business in men's clothing and furnishings, hats and shoes. They started in a modest way on a side street, for they were at first handicapped by lack of capital. Their first store was on the corner of Kirby street and Grand avenue, in the original Wistrand block, and from that small beginning a large and profitable business was gradually built. After seven years this first store building was found entirely inadequate for the handling of the growing business, and John Wistrand was induced to erect the commodious Wistrand Block opposite the post office, for the purpose of giving to the firm of I. Simansky and Son a large double store. The new building was so designed as to afford skylights, as well as front and rear windows in conformity with the plans urged by Joseph H. Simansky, who at the time of the opening of the new store in 1901 selected on that account the name "Daylight Clothing House," by which the store is now known over a wide territory. A few years after the opening of the store the senior partner, Isaac Simansky, was compelled on account of declining health to give up the active management and direction of the business, which was assumed by his son, Joseph H. Simansky, and on the 15th of October, 1906, the father was called from this life, closing a career which proved a credit to himself and a source of pride to his many friends. Joseph H. Simansky married on the 15th of February, 1905, Anna Raphael, and their two children are Lillian R. and Irvin B. Mr. Simansky is a Chapter and Royal Arch Mason, an Odd Fellow, a Knight of Pythias and a member of the Independent Order of Foresters and of the Modern Brotherhood of Yeomen. His political affiliations are with the Republican party. WILMER MARVIN RAMSDELL.-A man of ability and intelligence, Wilmer Marvin Ramsdell holds a noteworthy position among the prominent and influential citizens of Norway, where he is carrying on a substantial mercantile business, and is also an extensive owner of city property. Coming from both sides of the family of sturdy New England stock, he was born, October 22, 1855, in Racine, Wisconsin, where his father, Justus L. Ramsdell, was an early settler. His grandfather, Daniel Ramsdell, a son of Daniel Ramsdell, Sr., was born and reared in Wardsboro, Vermont. Choosing the independent occupation of a farmer, he purchased two farms in Shoreham, Vermont, and was there for many years extensively engaged in general farming and stock raising. Disposing of his Vermont land in 1856, he removed to Wisconsin, locating at Eureka, on the Fox river,

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Page  879 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 879 and there resided with his son the remainder of his life, dying in 1858. He was twice married, his second wife, whose maiden name was Betsey Green, dying the same year that he did. She reared five children, three sons and two daughters, one of whom was Justus L. Born March 14, 1829, in Shoreham, Addison county, Vermont, Justus L. Ramsdell early became familiar with all branches of agriculture. In 1853 he settled in Racine, Wisconsin, then a flourishing village, and subsequently introduced into that part of the state the first full blooded stallion ever brought there, it having been a Black Hawk Morgan. About 1855 he removed to Eureka, Wisconsin, and was there a resident until 1865. He afterwards lived seven years in New London, then in Manitowoc until he went to Peshtigo, Marinette county, where he kept a boarding house six years. Removing from there to Escanaba, Michigan, he remained two years, and then returned to Wisconsin, spending one year at Shawano, and six years in Peshtigo, and after which he lived for a time in Escanaba, subsequently going to Oshkosh, Wisconsin, and from there coming to Norway, Michigan, where his death occurred in January, 1903. The maiden name of his wife was Martha Cotton. She was born, July 31, 1833, in Shoreham, Vermont, a daughter of Horace Cotton. Her grandfather, William Cotton, a native of England, came to America when a young man, and followed the tailor's trade during his active life in Connecticut. He married Katie Resch, who was born in Amsterdam, Holland, and was but two years old when her parents crossed the ocean, and settled in Portland, Maine, where she was brought up and educated. At the age of fourteen years Horace Cotton was bound out, and for seven years served an apprenticeship at the shoemaker's trade. Going then to Massachusetts, he married, in Sandisfield, Berkshire county, Rebecca Marvin, who was born in that town, a daughter of Daniel and Rebecca (Smith) Marvin, natives of Massachusetts, of early colonial ancestry. Immediately after his marriage, Horace Cotton started on horseback for Vermont, his bride taking her little four-year-old sister before her. Following a trail marked by blazed trees, they arrived in the town of Shoreham after a few days of riding. Buying a tract of timbered land, he built a log house in the wilderness, and there followed his trade for a while. Subsequently removing with his family to the site of the present village of Shoreham, he bought six acres of land, and while he was remodelling the house which stood upon his property, the family occupied the first house ever erected in Shoreham, and in it their daughter Martha, who married Justus L. Ramsdell, was born. Late in life Mr. Cotton removed with his family to Racine, Wisconsin, purchased a home, and there he and his wife passed their remaining years. Wilmer Marvin Ramsdell was the oldest of a family of three children, the others being his sister Genevieve and his brother Herbert. He attended school in the numerous places in Wisconsin and Michigan in which the family resided during his youthful days, and while yet in his teens served an apprenticeship at the baker's trade in Peshtigo, Wisconsin. Subsequently, while at Escanaba, he clerked for five years in the hardware store of W. J. Wallace. Embarking in business on his own account in 1882, Mr. Ramsdell came to the Upper Peninsula, settling in the new village of Stambaugh. Purchasing a corner lot, he put up a building, his goods coming on the first train that came over the railroad into the place, and was there engaged in the hardware business until 1884. Coming then to Norway, he entered the

Page  880 880 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN employment once more of Mr. Wallace, clerking for him until 1888, when he purchased an interest in the business. Two years later, Mr. Ramsdell became sole proprietor of the store, and in 190-, moved to the new town site, and erected, at the corner of Nelson and Raymond streets, a commodious brick building, the first one in the new location, and has since been the leading hardware merchant of this part of Dickinson county. He has been eminently successful in his operations, in addition to his store and stock owning city property of value. On April 3, 1878, Mr. Ramsdell married Stella Pamelia Seckler, who was born in Menekaunee, now East Marinette, Wisconsin, May 2, 1857. Her father, Philip Seckler, a native, it is thought, of Tonawanda, Pennsylvania, was an early settler of Menekaunee, where he followed the trade of brick and plaster mason during his active years, subsequently spending his last days in Marinette, dying there at the age of sixty-five years. He married Eliza Dyer, whose parents were born and reared in Connecticut. She survived him, passing away, in Marinette, at the advanced age of eighty-three years. She reared six children, as follows: Mary Abbie; George; Wellman; Dorsey; Jeff; and Stella P., wife of Mr. Ramsdell. Mr. and Mrs. Ramsdell have two children, Ellis T. and Myrtle B. Always identified with the Republican party, Mr. Ramsdell has rendered good service both as alderman and as a member of the school board, and for two terms was city treasurer. Fraternally he is a member of Norway Lodge, No. 362, F. & A. M.; of Iron Mountain Chapter, No. 121, R. A. M.; of Hugh McCurdy Commandery, No. 43, K. T.; of Ahmed Temple, Order of the Mystic Shrine, at Marquette; of Iron Mountain Lodge, No. 700, B. P. 0. E.; of Pine Camp, M. W. A.; and of Norway Lodge, Sons of Hermann. ERIC ERICSON.-The Scandinavian nations have contributed a most vital and valuable element to the cosmopolitan social fabric of our great American republic, and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan has been signally favored in having gained a strong quota of worthy citizens from this source. Such a representative citizen is Eric Ericson, who is the able and popular postmaster of the village of Republic, Marquette county. Mr. Ericson was born at Oboga, Sweden, on the 24th of January, 1844, and is a son of Eric and Christena (Anderson) Ericson, the former of whom was born in 1808 and passed his entire life in his native land, where he died in 1870, his widow came to America and passed the closing years of her life at Republic, where she died in the early '90s. Of the four children three are living,-Andrew, who resides in Sweden; Charlotte, who is the wife of Rudolph Erickson and resides at Republic; and Eric, who is the immediate subject of this review. Eric Ericson was reared to maturity on the old homestead farm in Sweden and was afforded the advantages of the schools of the locality. For a time he was engaged as clerk in a mercantile establishment in his home province, and in 1869, at the age of twenty-five years, he severed the ties that bound him to home and native land and set forth for America, where he believed he could find better opportunities for winning independence and success through personal endeavor. He landed in the port of New York city and soon afterward came to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. He located at Ishpeming and thereafter was employed as a miner for a period of about two years. He then removed to Republic, where he was employed as clerk in a general

Page  881 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 881 merchandise store until 1877, when he engaged in the same line of enterprise on his own responsibility. He became one of the leading merchants and influential citizens of the town and he has done well his part in connection with its development and substantial upbuilding. He retired from the mercantile business in 1898, in which year he was appointed postmaster of Republic, an office which he has retained during the intervening period of more than a decade. His protracted incumbency offers the best voucher for his efficient service, as well as for his personal popularity in the community that has so long represented his home. He is a man of sterling attributes of character and has a secure place in the esteem of all who know him. He is a stalwart advocate of the cause of the Republican party. His wife holds membership in the Swedish Methodist Episcopal church. In the year 1872, Mr. Ericson was united in marriage to Miss Johanna Olson, who was born in Sweden and who was thirteen years of age at the time of the family immigration to America. Mr. and Mrs. Ericson have six children, namely: Hilda, Jelmar, Hugo, Arthur, George and Ralph. Hilda is the wife of C. W. Rosenberg, of Chicago, and Jelmar and Hugo were graduated in the Marquette Business College, and the latter is his father's assistant in the postoffice. JAY W. HOOSE.-A well known factor in advancing the business activities of Iron Mountain, Jay W. Hoose has been a resident of this city for upwards of twenty years, during which time he has gained the respect and esteem of his neighbors and associates, having proved himself a valuable and worthy citizen. A son of William Hoose, he was born July 9, 1860, at Wautoma, Waushara county, Wisconsin. His grandfather, John William Hoose, a native either of Connecticut or Virginia, was a farmer by occupation and spent his last years in Virginia. Born and reared on a Virginia plantation, William Hoose migrated to New York state in early manhood, locating in Penn Yan, where he purchased land and for a few years was engaged in tilling the soil. Subsequently following the trail of the emigrant westward, he went by way of the Erie canal and the Great Lakes to Berlin, Wisconsin. All of the country in the vicinity of Green Lake county was then a pathless wilderness, the greater part of the land being owned by the government. Securing a tract, he cleared and improved a portion of it and then moved to Wautoma, Waushara county, where he purchased another tract of timber from the government. There he cleared a good farm and resided until his death in 1863. The maiden name of his wife was Mary Adeline Ruddock. She was born in Buckland, Franklin county, Massachusetts, a daughter of Justin Ruddock, who was born and reared in Massachusetts. Removing to New York state, Mr. Ruddock resided for a number of years in Onondaga county, from there going by way of the canal and lakes to Wisconsin. Settling at Berlin, Green Lake county, he took up land from the government, and having improved a farm was there a resident until his death, at the advanced age of ninety-six years. The maiden name of the wife of Mr. Ruddock was Rhoda Damon. She was born in Massachusetts, and died in Wiscoilsin. After the death of her husband Mrs. William Hoose came to Iron Mountain and here spent her closing years, passing away at the age of sixty-three years. But two years old when his father died, Jay W. Hoose was brought up by his mother, receiving a good common school education and being trained to habits of industry and thrift. When ready to embark in business on his own account, he opened a provision market at Berlin,

Page  882 882 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN Wisconsin, and conducted it until 1889. Coming then to Iron Mountain, he purchased the stock and good will of a provision store and carried on a remunerative business for about fifteen years, when he sold out. Mr. Hoose has since been variously employed, having been a contractor in railroad construction, likewise engaging in steam shovel mining and in logging, in his operations being uniformly successful. Mr. Hoose married in December, 1898, Gussie Olson, who was born in Sweden, which was also the birthplace of her parents. Emigrating to this country in 1869, Gust Olson located at Menominee, Michigan, where, in 1870, he was joined by his family. He subsequently bought land in Nadeau, Michigan, and has since been there engaged in farming and charcoal burning. Mr. and Mrs. Hoose have one daughter, Thelma. He and his family attend the Presbyterian church, of which Mrs. Hoose is a member. Politically Mr. Hoose is identified with the Republican party, and fraternally he is a member of Hematite Lodge No. 700, K. of P. CHARLES H. MACHIA.-The present efficient and progressive mayor of the city of St. Ignace is one of the representative business men and most liberal and public spirited citizens of Mackinac county and in his home city he is successfully established in the lumber business. Charles Henry Machia was born at Egg Harbor, Door county, Wisconsin, on the 15th of September, 1870, and is a son of James and Lydia (Post) Machia, the former of whom was born in the state of New York, and the latter in Connecticut. The mother died in 1883 and is survived by four of her five children,-namely: Charles H., the subject of this review; Fannie, wife of Captain Lewis Strahn, of Marinette, Wisconsin; Charlotte, wife of Frank Vallier, of St. Ignace; and Matilda, wife of Lloyd Powell, a resident of the state of Washington. James Machia settled in Wisconsin in the pioneer days and became one of the successful farmers of Door county, where he continued to be identified with the great basic industry of agriculture until 1895, since which time he has lived virtually retired in the village of Sturgeon Bay, that state. He is a Republican in politics and is a member of the Catholic church, as was also his cherished and devoted wife. Charles H. Machia was reared to the sturdy discipline of the home farm and his early educational advantages were such as were afforded in the village of Egg Harbor, his native town. When sixteen years of age he began work in the lumber camps and also as assistant in driving the logs down the various rivers. He continued to be identified with this line of enterprise in his native state until 1891, when he came to St. Ignace and here secured employment in the neighboring lumber camps, where he was thus engaged until 1899, when he began lumbering operations upon his own responsibility as senior member of the firm of Machia & Vogelsanger, which still continues successful operation, with headquarters in the city of St. Ignace. In addition to his connection with this important enterprise Mr. Machia is also manager and purchasing agent of the leading wood-pulp corporations at Appleton, Wisconsin. In politics Mr. Machia gives a stalwart support to the cause of the Republican party and during the years of his residence in St. Ignace he has been a valued factor in the local councils of his party. In the autumn of 1908 he was appointed a member of the canvassing board of Mackinac county and he served in this position for two years. In April, 1910, he was elected mayor of St. Ignace and in this

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Page  883 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 883 office, of which he is now incumbent, he has given a most progressive and business like administration, doing all in his power to advance the industrial and social interests of his home city. He and his wife are communicants of the Catholic church and he is affiliated with the Knights of Columbus, the Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks and the Woodmen of the World. On the 7th of February, 1892, Mr. Machia was united in marriage to Miss Agnes Terrian, who was born and reared in St. Ignace and who is a daughter of Joseph and Margaret (Closs) Terrian, the former of whom was born in the province of Ontario, Canada. and the latter in St. Ignace, where her parents settled many years ago. The parents of Mrs. Machia are now deceased and of their nine children three sons and five daughters are now living. Mr. and Mrs. Machia have two children,-Maitie and Lydia. DR. JOHN OTTO GROOS, a prominent physician and surgeon of Escanaba, is a native of the Northern Peninsula of Michigan, having been born in Delta county, April 18, 1869. His father, Peter Groos, a native of Luxemburg, Germany, came to the United States in 1843, locating first in Peoria, Illinois. Two years later he located in Delta county, Michigan, where he was a sawyer in the employ of the Ludington Lumber Company. He remained with this company until 1885 and then engaged in stone quarry business, which he continued until 1903, the year of his death, he being sixty years of age at the time. IHe took an active part in public affairs, and served twenty-two years as township clerk. He was one of the pioneers of the Northern Peninsula, and was well known. Peter Groos married Anna Hoffman, also a native of Luxemburg, who survives him, being now (1910) sixty-eight years of age. They became parents of four sons and four daughters, all living. Dr. Groos is the eldest son and second child. The boyhood days of Dr. Groos were spent in Escanaba, and here he received his primary education. He remained at home until eighteen years of age, and then entered Green Bay Business College, from which he was graduated. Returning to Delta county, he worked for a time in a sawmill, and then accepted a position as book-keeper in the employ of Hessel & Henchel, in the meat business. In 1890 he was employed in a drug store, where he remained one year, after which he took a course in the Northwestern University at Chicago, Illinois; he passed his examination before the State Board of Michigan in 1892, and again became engaged in the drug business, in Escanaba. In 1898 he entered the medical department of Illinois University, from which he was graduated in 1902. He immediately entered into the practice of his profession in Escanaba, and has met with a very flattering degree of success. At one time he was a member of the hospital staff and he served as health officer from 1903 until 1906, and is now city physician. Dr. Groos is a self-made man, and has gained his present honors and position through his own energy and ambition. At the age of ten years he began working in a sawmill, where he remained eight years. Dr. Groos has been a lifelong resident of Delta county, where he is well known, and has always taken an active interest in public affairs. He is a Democrat as regards national politics, but in local affairs casts his vote for the man he considers best fitted to hold each respective office. He is a member of the Michigan State, Delta County and American Medical associations, and is a member of the Knighted Order Tented Maccabees. He also belongs to the Catholic Order of Foresters, Modern Woodmen of America and Yeomen. He is a director of the Escanaba National Bank.

Page  884 884 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN June 9, 1902, Dr. Groos married Julia, daughter of Michael and MarKellner, of Kellnersville, Manitowoc county, Wisconsin, and they are parents of three children, Louis, Harold and Marian. HANS P. SCHMIDT, who is numbered among the business men of Menominee, was born in Alsen, Germany, June 28, 1864, a son of Peter N. and Matta M. (Larson) Schmidt, who were also born in the province of Alsen, the father in 1811 and the mother in 1827. In his younger life Peter N. Schmidt was a sailor but later became a mail carrier and received a pension from the German government. He was a member of the German Lutheran church, and in its faith he passed from this life in 1876, and his wife died in the same year. Hans P. Schmidt, was the fifth born of their six children, four of whom are now living, and after the completion of his education in the German schools he learned the baker's trade. He came to the United States in 1883, and locating at Marinette, Wisconsin, he worked at his trade there until coming in 1886 to Menominee, Michigan, and embarking in business for himself. He has built up a splendid trade in this city, and is well known among the business men. In October of 1886 Mr. Schmidt was married to Hannah Olson, who was born at Green Bay, Wisconsin, and of the thirteen children which were born to them the following ten are living: Milda, Christinne, Axel, Frederick, Ellen, Hejn, Louis, Herman, Sigfred and Tyra. Mr. Schmidt is an independent political voter, and is a member of the Danish Lutheran church. CARL PETERSON.-The subject of this review is one of the sterling Scandinavian citizens who has gained a large measure of success through his well directed efforts as a citizen of the Upper Peninsula, and he is today one of the leading business men of the village of Republic, Marquette county, where he controls a large and prosperous enterprise as a dealer in jewelry, watches, clocks, etc., as well as in hardware, drugs, lumber, coal, wood, etc., besides which he conducts the leading undertaking business in the town. No citizen is held in higher confidence and esteem, and this fact has been shown by his long retention of the office of treasurer of Republic township. Carl Peterson was born in Nyhyttan, Westmanland, Sweden, on the 15th of September, 1855, and is a son of Peter Peterson. Both the mother and father passed their entire lives in Sweden, where the former died in 1858 and the latter in 1859. Of the five children the subject of this review is the youngest and of the number four are now living. The father was a successful farmer, and he and his wife were devout members of the Swedish Lutheran church. Mr. Peterson was reared to the sturdy discipline of the farm and early began to assist in its work, the while he availed himself of the advantages afforded in the public schools of the locality and period. At the age of nineteen years he entered upon an apprenticeship to the watchmaker's trade and served three years without compensation, in the meanwhile becoming an expert workman. At the age of twenty-two years he began working at his trade as a journeyman, and he was thus employed about two years in his native land. He then set forth to seek his fortunes in America, arriving in the port of New York on the 4th of July, 1879. Soon afterward he came to the Upper Peninsula and located at Ishpeming, where he was employed at his trade until 1883, when he removed to Republic and purchased the jewelry department conducted by Carl Weirnberg. In 1885 he also purchased the drug

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Page  885 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 885 business of Mr. Weirnberg's estate, and at this time he became a partner of J. A. Munson, with whom he continued to be associated, under the firm name of Munson & Peterson, until the death of his honored partner, and then the latter's widow filled his place until 1904, when Mr. Peterson bought out her interest, since which time he has individually controlled the large and important business built up by this firm. In March, 1889, Munson & Peterson purchased the hardware business of John HI. McCabe, and this enterprise likewise is conducted by Mr. Peterson. In 1904 the business of the firm was destroyed by fire, and Mr. Peterson in that year erected his present fine double store. He is the leading jeweler of the town and in all departments of his business he conducts a substantial and flourishing enterprise. He is a staunch Republican in his political proclivities and has served for a number of terms as township treasurer, being incumbent of this office at the present time. On the 4th of June, 1891, Mr. Peterson was united in marriage to Miss Mary Suneson, who was born in Sweden and who is second in order of birth of a family of eight children, four of whom are living. She was four years of age at the time when her parents, John and Matilda Suneson, came to America. The family located at Duluth, Minnesota, where the father found employment as a miner. Later he removed to Republic, Michigan, where he continued in the same line of enterprise until his death; his wife also died in this place. Mr. and Mrs. Peterson have four children,-Dagmar, Carl A., Earl and Lowell. Louis NADEAU.-A prominent and successful manufacturer and merchant of Nadeau, Menominee county, Louis Nadeau is numbered among the wide-awake, enterprising business men who have contributed so largely towards the development of the industrial interests of this section of the Upper Peninsula, being a member of the firm of Nadeau Brothers. A son of Bruno and Mary F. (Jonet) Nadeau, he was born, January 26, 1859, in Kewaunee, Kewaunee county, Wisconsin, being one of a family of nine children, five sons and four daughters, all of whom are living. Bruno Nadeau was born in 1827 in New Brunswick. Thinking to improve his opportunities for advancing his financial condition he left his native place when young, and coming westward to Wisconsin, located first in Kewaunee, later going to Green Bay and then to Marinette. Soon after the breaking out of the Civil war he enlisted in Company I, Twenty-third Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and served faithfully throughout his term of enlistment, when he received his honorable discharge from the army. He took an active part in various campaigns, serving under General U. S. Grant. He was with his regiment in many engagements and marches, including the following named: The Red River expedition; the siege of Vicksburg; was with the Hospital Corps on the Mississippi river; participated in the Chattanooga campaign; and in many others. After his discharge he returned to Wisconsin, remaining there until 1873, when he came to Menominee county, Michigan, where he took contracts in the building of the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad, and also embarked in the lumber business. Taking up a homestead claim in 1874, he erected a house for himself and family in the wilderness, and began the clearing of a farm. The settlement in which he located was named Nadeau in his honor, as was the postoffice, of which he was the first postmaster. He became influential in public affairs, and served as the first supervisor of the township, and was justice of the Vol. II-17

Page  886 886 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN peace several years. He cleared and improved a good farm, and was here engaged in the lumber business also until his death, October 23, 1905. In his political affiliations he was a sound Republican. As a boy and youth Louis Nadeau attended the public schools of Kewaunee, Green Bay and Marinette, Wisconsin, after which he completed his studies in Chicago, at Bryant & Stratton's Business College. He subsequently worked with his father in the woods until 1880, when, in partnership with his brother David, he took a logging contract. Meeting with success, these brothers in 1882 accepted a contract for making charcoal, and at the same time established the mercantile business which they have since -conducted. In 1886, with characteristic enterprise and forethought, Nadeau Brothers built their first saw mill, and have since erected three other saw mills. Two of their mills have been. destroyed by fire, one of which they rebuilt in the summer of 1908. On January 26, 1907, this firm, which manufactures and sells Rock maple cant hook handles, hardwood charcoal, lumber of all kinds, flooring, siding and shingles, cedar posts and poles, railroad ties, etc., and carries a full line of general merchandise, assumed possession of its new store building, which is forty-eight feet by eighty-four feet, two stories in height, with a basement. It is built of stone, brick and iron, and is furnished with plate glass windows, being of modern construction and furnished with modern equipments. Mr. Nadeau married, April 6, 1885, Frances Brooks, who was born in Menominee, Michigan, a daughter of the late Josiah Brooks. Mr. Brooks was born, February 3, 1832, in Washington county, Maine, and in 1847 settled in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Three years later he came to Menominee, Michigan, and in 1851 moved to Chambers Island, which was his home for eleven years. He was a fisherman and a cooper, carrying on a substantial business for many years. Returning to Menominee in 1862, Mr. Brooks subsequently took a prominent part in the management of public matters, and had the distinction of being a member of the first board of supervisors of Menominee, and the first registrar of deeds of Menominee county. For eight years he was under sheriff of the county, and for nine years was deputy collector of customs. He married, in 1858, Caroline A. Abbott, eldest daughter of Samuel W. Abbott, the first postmaster at Menominee, and to them eight children were born, four sons and four daughters, Mrs. Nadeau being the second child in succession of birth. Four children have blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. Nadeau, namely: Howard E., who was graduated from the law department of the University of Michigan with the class of 1909; David, residing at Sand Point, Idaho; Flora, a junior in the University of Michigan; and Louis B. A firm adherent of the Republican party, Mr. Nadeau has served the township as supervisor, clerk and treasurer, and for the past twelve years has been a member of the board of county road commissioners. WILBER E. CAMPBELL, a man of superior ability and enterprise, is actively associated with the leading interests of Iron River as business manager of the printing and publishing department of the Stambaugh Reporter, one of the best known newspapers of Iron county, being associated with Patrick O'Brien, editor and proprietor of that journal. A son of Jerome S. Campbell, he was born April 18, 1862, in Union City, Branch county, Michigan, coming from hon ored Scotch stock. His great-grandfather Campbell, the emigrant ancestor, was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, and married a Miss Hooker, who was of English descent. After coming to this country he located permanently in Massachusetts.

Page  887 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 887 Homer Campbell, grandfather of Wilber E., was born and bred in Massachusetts. With the same ambitious desire to improve his condition as animated his father, he, too, moved westward, going to New York state, and settling as a pioneer in Genesee county. Buying a tract of wild land he cleared and improved a fine homestead, and there spent his remaining days. He married Olive Patterson, who was born at Castle Garden, New York, just after the arrival of her parents in that place, when they came to this country from Ireland, their native land. She also spent the closing years of her life on the home farm. Jerome S. Campbell, a native of the Empire state, learned the trades of a blacksmith and machinist when young, and soon after moved to Jackson, Michigan, finding employment in a shop in which threshing machines were manufactured. He subsequently followed his trade in various places until 1863, when he enlisted in the engineer corps of a Michigan regiment. At the end of his term of enlistment he joined the engineer corps of an Ohio regiment, and served until the close of the Civil war. IIe subsequently resumed work at his trade in Union City, Michigan, remaining there until 1871, when he went to Colorado, where for a year he was employed in the mining camps tempering steel drills. Returning then to Michigan, he resided in the southern part of that state until 1880, when he settled at Eastport, Antrim county, where he followed his trade until his death, at the age of seventy-two years. iHe married Sarah A. Jones, who was born, sixty-seven years ago, in New York state, a daughter of Algernon S. and a Miss (Munson) Jones, and they reared two children, namely: Wilber E., and Cora, wife of N. O. Larrabee. Receiving his elementary education in the public schools, Wilber E. Campbell, while in Denver, Colorado, attended a private military school for a time. At the age 'of thirteen years he left school, and for six years was variously employed, after which he again continued his studies in the higher branches of learning for six months. From that time until twenty-three years of age, Mr. Campbell worked in lumber camps and on railroads, and then became associated with his father. During all of these years he continued his studies, acquiring a substantial education, fitting him for a professional career. In 1886 Mr. Campbell taught school in Antrim county, and the following six years was engaged in teaching during the winter terms of school in either Antrim or Charlevoix counties, working in the shop the remainder of the year. Locating then in Traverse City, Michigan, he engaged in business as a general merchant, and also manufactured candy, which he sold to the trade. Selling out at the end of two years he was for a few months engaged in selling pianos and organs. In 1895 Mr. Campbell made his first venture in journalism, establishing a newspaper at Ellsworth, Michigan. Six months later he formed a partnership with the owner of the Elk Rapids Progress, and for a while conducted both papers. Selling out his interest in both, he did editorial work on different newspapers until 1897, when he purchased the Empire Leader, which he published at Empire for five years. Moving then to Northport, in the same county, Mr. Campbell remained there eight years, continuing the management of the paper, which he leased from 1908 until 1909, when he sold it. In 1908 Mr. Campbell assumed the editorship and management of the Manistique Courier-Record, with which he was associated a year. Coming to Iron River in September, 1909, he has since been business manager of the printing and publishing business of the Iron

Page  888 888 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN River Stambaugh Reporter, being associated with Patrick O'Brien, of whom a brief sketch may be found elsewhere in this work. Mr. Campbell married, in 1889, Frances E. Sweet, who was born in Castalia, Ohio, a daughter of Byron and Mary E (Grove) Sweet, and they have one child, Frances Lenore Campbell. Fraternally Mr. Campbell is a member and a past master of Northport Lodge, No. 265, F. & A. M.; a member of Northport Lodge, No. 16, I. O. O. F.; of Northport Tent, No. 489, K. O. T. M.; and of Evergreen Lodge, No. 93, K. of P., of Manistique. EMIEL A. CROLL.-An efficient, intelligent and trustworthy business man, Emiel A. Croll is actively identified with one of the leading enterprises of the progressive city of Iron Mountain, having been superintendent for the past eighteen years of the city water works. Coming from thrifty German ancestors, he was born September 6, 1862, at West Bend, Washington county, Wisconsin. Adolph Croll, his father, was the son of a seedsman, and was born and brought up in Hamburg, Germany. Left an orphan when young, he attended school in Hamburg and in Vienna, obtaining a good education. At the age of fourteen years he began learning the trade of a watchmaker at Stralitz, serving an apprenticeship of seven years. In the meantime, however, he was a sharpshooter, during the Revolution of 1847, in the German army, and after coming to this country he received notification that he had been awarded the iron cross for gallant and meritorious services while in the army. Landing in New York city when a young man, he went to Dubuque, Iowa, where he and a companion took a job at wood chopping, an occupation entirely new to both. With undaunted courage, these young men selected a large, straight tree on which to begin operations, thinking it would be an easy one on which to start work. Having spent the whole of the first day in felling it, they commenced splitting it. They drove in wedge after wedge, but it did not yield, the large elm, which had grown in the open, proving a tough problem. They chopped several weeks, but did not again tackle an elm. The ensuing spring Adolph Croll went to Chicago, then a small place, giving but scant promise of its present greatness, and was there engaged in the jewelry business a short time. In 1852 he proceeded north to West Bend, Wisconsin, passing through Milwaukee, which had been incorporated as a city but a few years before, a large part of the state being then a wilderness. A few years later he located as a jeweler in Cedarburg, Wisconsin, from there going to Fond du Lac, where he was engaged in business until 1865. Coming then via the Lakes to the Upper Peninsula, he located at Marquette, where he entered the employ of John Wollner. In 1868 he started for the Pacific coast, going by rail to Cheyenne, where he purchased a team, and taking with him the stock of watches and jewelry with which he had provided himself before commencing his journey, he made an overland trip from there to California, trading along the way with the Indians and with the whites whenever he found any. Making but a brief stop in California, he returned as far east as Central City, Colorado, where he carried on business two years. Coming back then to Michigan, he joined his family at Marquette, and was afterwards in business at Negaunee several years. Going thence to Michigamme, he worked at his trade for a time, afterwards running a hotel. Moving then to Ishpeming, he was there engaged in the jewelry business until failing eyesight compelled him to retire from

Page  889 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 889 active pursuits, a few years before his death, which occurred in that city January 8, 1903, at the age of seventy-seven years. The maiden name of the wife of Adolph Croll was Magdalene Selzle. She was born at Stuttgardt, Germany, and was there brought up and educated. She crossed the ocean in a sailing vessel, being seventeen weeks battling with the waves, and she was accompanied by her sister, who married a Mr. Bonnell, of New York city. After her marriage to Mr. Croll she accompanied him to the various places in which he resided, and died June 15, 1910, at Michigamme. She reared five children, as follows: Emiel A., the subject of this sketch, Louise, Frederick, Emma and Max. Acquiring a practical education in the public schools of Marquette and Negaunee, Emiel A. Croll began working in the mines at the age of fifteen years. Removing in 1880 to Vulcan, he was employed in the East Vulcan Mine for two years, his mining career being then concluded. He had worked in various capacities in the mines, the last five years of the time having been in the engineering department. In 1882 Mr. Croll entered the employ of the Northwestern Railroad Company as baggage master at Vulcan, and in 1885 was made station agent at Waucedah, retaining the position six years. In September, 1891, he located at Iron MIountain, and the following spring was appointed city clerk. The same year Mr. Croll was made superintendent of the Iron Mountain Water Works, and has since filled the position with great credit to himself, and to the satisfaction of both the proprietors and the patrons. Mr. Croll married in 1884 Elizabeth Ann Dolf, who was born at Grand Island, Michigan, where her father, Warner Dolf, settled on emigrating from Germany to this country. Three children have blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. Croll, namely: Clara, Elmer and Edna. Clara, wife of Earl La Nore, has one child, Clarence. Edna, wife of Walter Arens, has one daughter. Fraternally Mr. Croll is a member of Iron Mountain Lodge No. 388, F. & A. M.; a member and past high priest of Iron Mountain Chapter No. 121, R. A. M.; and a member of Crescent Lodge No. 700, B. P. 0. E. D. MIERRITT WILCOX, D. D. S.-Dr. Wilcox has the distinction of being the dean of his profession in the city of Menominee, where he has been engaged in practice continually since 1892,-a longer period of such service than can be claimed by ony other representative of the dental profession in this city. He is a liberal and public-spirited citizen, is now serving as secretary of the Menominee board of education, and his personal popularity is assured by reason of his sterling integrity of purpose and his genial and generous traits of character. Dr. Wilcox is a native of Waupun, Fond du Lac county, Wisconsin, where he was born on the 14th of July, 1867, and he is a son of George W. and Rebecca (Beardsley) Wilcox, the former of whom was born in Pennsylvania, in 1826, and the latter of whom was born in the state of New York in 1828. They became the parents of seven sons and one daughter, and of the number three are now living,Frank W., who is engaged in the insurance business in Menominee; William E., who is a resident of Oconto, Wisconsin; and D. Merritt, who is the immediate subject of this review. The father, who was a carpenter by trade, was a pioneer of Wisconsin, where he took up his residence in the early '50s. He first located at Mauston, Juneau county, whence he later removed to Waupun, where he engaged in the fire insurance business, as did he later in the city of Oconto,

Page  890 890 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN where he maintained his home until his death, which occurred in 1886. His wife was summoned to the life eternal in 1901. He was a member of the Waupun Lodge of Free & Accepted Masons, was a stanch Republican in his political adherency, and both he and his wife held membership in the Presbyterian church. Dr. Wilcox gained his early education in the public schools of Waupun, Wisconsin, and thereafter continued his studies in the high school of Oconto, that state. In preparation for the work of his chosen profession he entered the dental department of the Northwestern University, at Evanston, Illinois, in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1892, and from which he received his degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery. Soon after his graduation the Doctor located in Menominee, where he has since been engaged in the successful practice of his profession, in which he has retained from the start a representative clientage. He is a member of the Michigan State Dental Society and is recognized for superior skill in both laboratory and operative departments of his profession. He is affiliated with Menominee Lodge No. 269, Free & Accepted Masons, of which he had the distinction of being the master, a position of which he was incumbent for one term. He is also a valued member of Menominee Chapter No. 107, Royal Arch Masons; and Menominee Commandery No. 35, Knights Templar. He served seven years as organist of the First Presbyterian church, of which both he and his wife are members, and of whose choir the latter was leader for five years, being a talented artist in both instrumental and vocal music. Mrs. Wilcox is also identified with the Woman's Club and the Mothers' Club, two of the representative organizations of her home city, and she is a prominent and popular figure in connection with the social activities of the community. In politics Dr. Wilcox gives his allegiance to the Republican party, and he has ever shown a deep interest in local affairs of a public order. He was elected a member of the board of school trustees in 1901 and has been secretary of the board of education since 1902. On the 21st of August, 1901, Dr. Wilcox was united in marriage to Miss Edna H. Kimball, who was born in the vicinity of Portland, Ionia county, Michigan, and who is a daughter of Richard and Myra L. (Holliday) Kimball. The father was a farmer by vocation and continued his residence in Michigan until the time of his death. Dr. and Mrs. Wilcox have one daughter, Marian Julia, who was born on the 21st of January, 1906. HON. ADELBERT D. EDWARDS.-One of the more progressive and energetic citizens of Atlantic is Hon. Adelbert D. Edwards, who is actively associated with the mining industries of the Upper Peninsula as clerk for the Atlantic mine, and stands prominent in fraternal and political circles, at the present time representing his district in the State Legislature. He was born, in the town of Lincklaen, Chenango county, New York, of early English ancestry. The emigrant ancestor who founded that branch of the Edwards family from which he is descended came, so says tradition, from England to America, locating at Jamestown, Virginia, in early colonial days, his descendants removing from there to Southwestern New York, thence to Chenango county. George Edwards, his father, was born in Pitcher, Chenango county, and was there reared to agricultural pursuits. Following in the footsteps of his ancestors, he spent his entire seventy-six years of

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Page  891 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 891 earthly life in Chenango county, during his active career being engaged in tilling the soil. He married Favilla Eldredge, who was born in Pitcher, New York. Her emigrant ancestor came from England to this country, settling in New England, while his descendants of a later generation located in Chenango county, where her father, David Eldredge, was a life-long farmer. She died at the age of forty-two years, leaving three children, Harriet, George S., and Adelbert D. After leaving the public schools of Lincklaen, Adelbert D. Edwards taught school several terms, in the meantime continuing his studies at the Cortland Normal School. Subsequently coming to MIichigan, he entered the Ypsilanti Normal School, from which he was graduated with the class of 1882. Continuing his professional labors, he subsequently taught school four years, being employed as a teacher at Allouez, Phoenix, and Ripley. In 1889 Mr. Edwards accepted the position of clerk at the Atlantic mine, and has held it ever since, his business ability and sound judgment especially qualifying him for this place. Mr. Edwards is prominent in the Masonic fraternity, taking great interest in promoting the good of the order, and is a member of South Otselic Lodge, Nb. 659, F. & A. M.; of Gate of the Temple Chapter, No. 35, R. A. M.; of Palestine Commandery, No. 48, K. T.; of David Kendall Council, R. & S. M.; of Valley Consistory, of Grand Rapids; and of Saladin Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S. In his political affiliations he was a Democrat until 1896, when, disagreeing with the financial policy of that party, and being in favor of an honest dollar and a sound currency, he became a Gold Democrat, later joining the Republican party. He has served as a member of the Houghton, County Board of Supervisors for fourteen years, the last seven years serving as chairman of the board, representing Adams township, and is now serving as a member of the state legislature, to which he was elected in 1907, and re-elected in 1908. HORACE M. OREN.- One of the leading representatives of the legal profession in the Upper Peninsula is Horace Mann Oren, former attorney general of Michigan, and save for the period of his service as a state official has been actively engaged in the practice of law in the city of Sault Ste. Marie since 1883. No slight distinction has been that gained by him in his exacting vocation, to which he has brought the resourcefulness of an admirably disciplined mind, great practical ability and remarkable powers for consecutive application. He is known as a man of fine scholarship and distinctive professional ability, and his success has not been an accident but a logical result. He has shown that he knows the value of work and he has had the ambition that begets action of definite order. He has been called to various positions of public trust and his standing in his profession needs no further voucher than that afforded in his election to the office of attorney general of the state,-a position of which he continued incumbent from 1899 to 1903, under the administrations of Governors Pingree and Bliss. Horace Mann Oren was named in honor of that distinguished educator, Horace Mann, the first president of Antioch College, at Yellow Springs, Ohio. Mr. Oren was born near Oakland, Clinton county, Ohio, on the 3d of February, 1859, and is a son of Captain Charles and Sarah A. (Allen) Oren, both of whom were born in the same county, the former in 1831, and the latter in 1836. Captain Charles Oren was educated in Antioch College and prior to the Civil war he

Page  892 892 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN was a successful teacher in the public schools of his native state. In 1863 he recruited a company of colored volunteers for the Union service and when the same was mustered into the United States army, as a part of the Fifth United States Colored Infantry, he was made captain of the company. He was killed in the siege of Vicksburg, in July, 1864, a martyr to a righteous cause. He was a grandson of John Oren, who removed from Pennsylvania to the eastern part of Tennessee in the latter part of the eighteenth century, and the latter was a son of Joseph Oren, who emigrated from England in 1745, and who resided in York county, Pennsylvania. It has been recorded that at the time of the War of the Revolution the home of Joseph Oren was burned by Tories and that he and his family, including ten children, were compelled to pass the severe winter in the rudely constructed barn on the home farm. Elihu Oren, father of Captain Charles Oren, was born in Tennessee in 1809, and in the following year his parents removed to Ohio and settled in Clinton county, with whose pioneer history the name was prominently identified. After the death of Captain Oren his widow found it incumbent upon her to provide for the maintenance of herself and her two children, the elder of whom is the subject of this review and the younger is Cata, now the wife of William Chandler, of Sault Ste. Marie. The devoted mother, a woman of distinctive culture and refinement, was afforded the advantages of Antioch College, and she was a most suceessful and popular teacher for a number of years. She is a daughter of Abraham Allen and the maiden name of her mother was Cata Howland, a member of the prominent Quaker family of that name in New York. In 1869 Mrs. Oren became a teacher in the high school in Indianapolis, Indiana, and in 1873 she was elected state librarian of Indiana, having been the first woman chosen for this office. Later she became a member of the faculty of Purdue College (now Purdue University), at Lafayette, that state. She finally contracted a second marriage, becoming the wife of Wesley Haynes. She died at Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan on the 21st of April, 1907, secure in the affectionate regard of all who had come within the sphere of her gracious influence. Horace Mann Oren completed the curriculum of the public schools of Indianapolis, where he was graduated in the high school as a member of the class of 1877. He became his mother's assistant in the work of the state library of Indiana, and this association, as well as that of the city library of Indianapolis, in which he held a position for some time, gave him further educational discipline of the most beneficent order. He had also the advice and counsel of his devoted mother, who encouraged him in his educational work, in which she, as a woman of marked intellectuality, greatly aided him. Finally he was enabled to enter the University of Michigan, in which celebrated institution he was graduated, in the classical course, as a member of the class of 1881, in which year he' duly received his well earned degree of Bachelor of Arts. In 1883 he was graduated in the law department of the same university, from which he received the supplemental degree of Bachelor of Laws. He had passed the preceding summer in Sault Ste. Marie, where he held the position of editor of the Sault Ste. Marie News, and he continued to give more or less attention to newspaper work after he had initiated the practice of law. In June, 1883, soon after his admission to the bar of the state, Mr. Oren established his permanent residence in Sault Ste. Marie, where he was engaged in individual practice until 1892, when he

Page  893 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 893 entered into partnership with Hon. John W. McMahon and William M. Snell. In 1894 Mr. Snell retired from the firm and before the close of the year Mr. McMahon died. In 1895 Mr. Oren formed a partnership with William Webster, and this professional alliance continued until his election to the office of attorney general of the state. Since his retirement from this office he has conducted his professional business in an individual way. Concerning him the following pertinent and well merited statements have been made: "Mr. Oren's scholastic and professional acquirements preparatory to engaging in the practice of law were far above those of the average young lawyer. During his whole life he has been a student. The opportunity of reading which he enjoyed in early life by connection with public libraries, were exceptionally well improved. His taste for literature, perhaps engendered in the libraries, has been cultivated through all the years that have followed. The historical and scientific information there acquired has proved invaluable for professional uses. He began the practice of law as a scholarly, thoughtful young man, with aspirations of the sort that always lift one higher. His training had been excellent,-by a mother of fine mind, thorough education and beautiful character; he had confidence in mankind and in his own ability to succeed. He had learned the lesson of manly self-dependence and was ready to join the company of older lawyers. He asked no special favors, but desired only an even chance. His views of professional life were not rose-tinted. He knew it meant work,-constant application, unremitting toil,-and that even the favored of fortune have found no other way to reach honorable distinction and eminence that is permanent. With a realization of the essential conditions, he settled among strangers and went to work. He has gained the popular confidence and won professional esteem. He has established himself and secured his position on merit. He is modest in his pretentious and bold in the assertion of his rights. Iis character is well and firmly compacted of the elements and principles that fortify a man against assaults and qualify him for professional distinction, as well as for the encountering of the actualities of social and business life." Well fortified in his opinions and convictions concerning matters of public polity, Mr. Oren has ever been a stanch advocate of the principles of the Republican party and has given effective service in behalf of its cause. In 1885 he was elected city attorney of Sault Ste. Marie and he retained this office four years. He served one term as circuit court commissioner and in 1894 he was elected prosecuting attorney of Chippewa county, an office in which he gave most able and discriminating service, with the result that he was chosen as his own successor in the election of November, 1896, by a majority of eleven hundred votes. He heightened his reputation as a versatile and resourceful trial lawyer by his able administration as prosecuting attorney, and there were none to doubt his eligibility when he was made the candidate of his party for the distinguished office of attorney general of the state, to which position he was elected in November, 1898. The best evidence of popular appreciation of his efforts was that given in his election as his own successor in 1900. As before stated, he served during the administrations of Governors Pingree and Bliss, and upon his retirement from office, in 1903, he resumed the work of his profession in Sault Ste. Marie. He has been identified with much important litigation in both the state and federal courts in Michigan and has won many splendid forensic victories. He has shown a deep and abiding interest in all that touches the welfare of

Page  894 891 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN his home city and as president of its board of education he did much to raise its public schools to their present high standard. He is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias. On the 1st of January, 1890, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Oren to Miss Margaret J. Wallace, who was born at Grindstone City, Huron county, Michigan, and who is a daughter of Robert and Margaret (Degan) Wallace, the former of whom was born in the county of Armagh, Ireland, of Scotch lineage, and the latter of whom was born in Canada. The father, who survives, now resides at Port Austin, Huron county, Michigan, where he is a successful manufacturer of grindstones. Mr. and Mrs. Oren have two children,-Robert Allen, who was born on the 6th of December, 1890, is a member of the class of 1913 in the University of Michigan; and Chase Osborn, who was born on the 26th of December, 1895, is a student in the public schools of Sault Ste Marie. In this city Mr. and Mrs. Oren have an attractive home and the same is a center of much of the best social activity of the community, being recognized as a place of gracious hospitality. MATHIAS BOTTKOL.-Prominent among the business men of Menominee is numbered Mathias Bottkol, who came from Kewaunee, Wisconsin, to this city in 1895. He had for a number of years in Kewaunee been engaged in milling, but after coming to Menominee he embarked in the flour and feed business, later adding thereto a grocery department. He has been successful as a business man in Menominee, and is accounted one of its representative citizens. Since his election in 1899 he has represented the Second ward on the board of supervisors continuously with the exception of two terms, and he is the present incumbent of the office. His political affiliations are with the Democratic party. Mr. Bottkol was born in Prussia, Germany, April 13, 1848, a son of Michael and Mary Bottkol, who were born in the same place as their son. They were married in Germany, and of the five children, three sons and two daughters, which were born of their union only the following three are now living: Michael, Mary and Mathias. The family came from the Fatherland to the United States in 1856, spending thirty days on the ocean in a sailing vessel, and landed in the harbor of New York city. From there they made their way to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, but a short time later located on a timbered farm in Kewaunee county, that state. Mr. Bottkol purchased that tract of two hundred acres at a dollar an acre, and building the little log house into which he moved with his family he at once began the difficult task of clearing the land and preparing it for cultivation. He was one of the pioneers of Kewaunee county and one of its honored residents, and he spent the residue of his life on the homestead he had hewed from a wilderness. This old place is yet in the possession of the family. He, too, supported the principles of the Democratic party. Mathias Bottkol was a lad of eight years when he came with his parents to the United States in 1856, and his boyhood days were spent in helping his father clear the timber from his land, attending school during the winter months. With his brothers, George and Mitchell, he later bought timber land, which they cleared and farmed in partnership until in 1870 Mr. Bottkol married and began farming alone. But after one more year he left the farm and building a grist and flour mill at Kewaunee he followed the milling business there until coming to Menominee in 1895. Mrs. Bottkol was before marriage Clara Armilla, a native daugh

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Page  895 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 895 ter of Bohemia, Austria, and the five children which have blessed their marriage union are Mathias, Frank, Joseph and Mary (twins) and John, but the son Frank died at the age of eighteen years. ARTHUR WELLINGTON QUIRT. —Prominent among the substantial business men and leading citizens of Iron River is Arthur Wellington Quirt, a man of strong personality, self-reliant and resourceful, now, as mayor of the city, standing at the head of the municipal government. A son of William H. Quirt, he was born, May 26, 1860, in the town of Arthur, Wellington county, Province of Ontario, Canada, coming from thrifty Scotch-Irish stock. John Quirt, his paternal grandfather, was born in county Antrim, Ireland, in 1800, of Scotch ancestors. His sister Sally, who married James Church, came to America, settling at Guelph, Canada, and a brother who emigrated to Canada located at Winchester, Province of Quebec. On coming to this country John Quirt bought land in Ogdensburg, New York, and after farming there a few years removed to Canada, and there spent his last days with his children, dying in 1863. He married Elizabeth Church, who was born in county Down, Ireland, the birthplace of her father, George Church, who was born in 1772. Coming with his family to America, George Church settled first near Ogdensburg, New York, where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits until 1856, when he went to Wellington county, Canada, to reside with a son, and there died at the remarkable age of one hundred and one years. His wife died at about the same age, and their daughter Elizabeth, who married John Quirt, lived to the age of eighty-seven years. William H. Quirt was born, in 1832, in Ogdensburg, New York, where as a lad he began working in a saw mill. Locating in Wellington county, Canada, in 1856, he purchased one hundred acres of heavily timbered land in Arthur township, and while he was clearing a space and erecting a log house on his property his family resided in the village of Arthur. When well settled as a farmer, he built a saw mill, and for a few years was engaged in the manufacture of lumber, afterwards devoting his entire attention to the tilling of the soil, living there until his death, July 29, 1866, when but thirty-four years old. He married Bridget Doherty, who was born near Ogdensburg, New York, where her father, Patrick Doherty, settled on coming to the United States from county Tipperary, Ireland. She died April 13, 1869, aged but thirty-four years, leaving six children, namely: John, Alexander, Elizabeth, Arthur Wellington, Thomas J. and William H. Left an orphan when in the ninth year of his age, Arthur W. Quirt lived for a year with his paternal grandparents, and afterwards made his home for a number of years with his uncle, Thomas Quirt, in the mean time attending school and assisting on the farm. Coming to the "States" when nineteen years of age, he first found employment as a farm laborer near Oconto, Wisconsin. A few months later he went to Bark River, Michigan, where, during the winter of 1879 and 1880, he chopped wood and railroad ties for a living. In the spring of 1880 Mr. Quirt was employed to explore in the Felch Mountain range, continuing in the work a few months. In August, 1880, as employes of Donald C. and Alexander MIacKinnon, Mr. Quirt, with Malcolm McLish and John McAuley, came to Iron River, walking from Quinnesec, then the nearest railway station, fifty miles away. After exploring in this vicinity for a year, Mir. Quirt, in August, 1881, went to Florence, bought a team, and was there employed in draying until February, 1882. He then came back to Iron River, on the site

Page  896 896 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN of which there was at that time but one building, that being made of logs, with a roof thatched with brush. In company with his brother Mr. Quirt bought a lot, cut off trees to make space for a building, and then built a hewed log house, riving shingles to cover the roof, this being in reality the very first house completed in the city, and that same year the railroad was extended to this place, the growth of the city, however, being very slow at first. During the winter of 1881 and 1882, Mr. Quirt worked in the woods, and in the spring of 1883 walked to Ontonagon, where he took passage on the "Manistee" for Duluth, which then had a population of three thousand souls, and assisted in the construction of the railroad between Two Harbors and Tower. In the spring of 1884 he entered the employ of the government and assisted in surveying the Hunter's Island and Lake of the Woods territory, previously unexplored. In the fall of that year, Mr. Quirt invested all of his savings in the Mesaba Range mining properties, and lost every cent. He then spent the following winter in the woods, and for two months in the spring worked on a farm, saving in the meantime one hundred dollars of his wages. Mr. Quirt then bought forty acres of land that is now included within the limits of the city of Duluth, paying one hundred dollars in cash, and going in debt seven hundred dollars. Going then to North Dakota, he worked as a farm hand four months, and on his return to Minnesota paid another hundred dollars on his land, and then put up a house. Subsequently, with his brother, Mr. Quirt cut four hundred cords of wood on his land. In the spring of 1886 he became brakeman on the Duluth and Iron Range Railroad, continuing in that capacity until the fall of that year. He then disposed of his land for $1,600, and sold his four hundred cords of cut wood for $1,400. Coming back then to Iron River, he set type in the local printing office for four months, and then returned to Duluth, where he superintended the six men employed to look up lands and mines for entry, continuing there until fall, when he purchased a team and spent the following winter logging. In the spring of 1888, Mr. Quirt took up the study of book-keeping in the W. F. Parsons Business College, from which he was graduated in July, 1888. Returning then to Iron River, Mr. Quirt ran a saw mill until the spring of 1889, when he went to the new state of Washington, locating at Blaine, where he conducted a hotel for three months. Selling out at the end of that time, he was for three months engaged in the real estate business at Duluth, after which he embarked in the logging business at Iron River. In 1890 he began buying standing timber, which he cut and sold to different lumber companies, continuing thus profitably employed until 1903, when, with his brother Alexander and others he erected a saw mill and engaged in the manufacture and sale of lumber and shingles. In 1906 Mr. Quirt became sole owner of the plant, which was burned in 1907 and rebuilt by him in 1908. Mr. Quirt married, in 1891, Theresa V. McDowell, who was born in Oconto, Wisconsin, a daughter of William and Mary (McDowell) McDowell. Six children have blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. Quirt, namely: Leila, Wilfred, Marion, Ethel, Walter and M'ildred. Fraternally Mr. Quirt is a charter member of Iron River Lodge, No. 442, I. O. O. F.; a charter member of Iron River Tent, K. O. T. M.; of Iron River Camp, M. W. A.; of Iron River Lodge, K. of P.; and of Iron River Aerie, F. O. E. A man of pronounced convictions, Mr. Quirt is independent in his political views. He has served ably in various public positions, having been a member of the Township Board for two years and a member of the Iron River Board of Education for sixteen years,

Page  897 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 897 serving three years as its president. Since 1908 he has filled the mayor's chair. FREDERICK H. JOHNSON, the efficient and popular treasurer of Mackinac county, has been a resident of the Upper Peninsula for nearly twenty years and is one of the valued and essentially representative citizens of the thriving little city of St. Ignace. Mr. Johnson was born in Proton township, Grey county, province of Ontario, Canada, on the 20th of July, 1869, and is a son of George and Annie (Fraser) Johnson, the former of whom was born in England, in 1846, and the latter at Collingwood, Ontario, in which province she continued to reside until her death, in 1884, at the age of thirty-three years. Of this union were born three sons and three daughters, of whom five are now living,-namely: Frederick H., Sarah, Ephraim F., Agnes and Alfred. George Johnson was a boy at the time of his parents' immigration from England to Canada and the voyage was made on a sailing vessel, which, after a long and weary passage, reached the port of Quebec. His father, Carby Johnson, first located at Port Hope, Ontario, and later became one of the pioneer settlers of Grey county, that province, where he reclaimed a farm from the wilderness and where he continued to reside until his death. He was long numbered among the honored and influential citizens of Grey county, serving for two years as postmaster and holding other offices of local trust. His son George, father of the subject of this review, was reared to maturity in Grey county, where he contributed his quota to the reclamation and development of the home farm and where his marriage was solemnized. As a young man he learned the carpenter's trade, to which he devoted his attention until 1880, since which time he has been actively identified with agricultural pursuits in the country that had so long represented his home. Like his father he has ever held a secure place in popular confidence and esteem and has been called upon to serve in offices of public trust, including that of member of the council of Proton township, positions of which he was incumbent for a number of years. He has been an earnest member of the Presbyterian church from his boyhood days and his devoted wife was likewise a member of this church. Frederick H. Johnson was reared to maturity in his native county, where he received the advantages of the public schools, after which he continued his studies in the collegiate institute at Owen Sound, thus gaining an excellent academic education. At the age of twenty-three years he put his scholastic acquirements to practical use by engaging as a teacher in the schools of his native county, where he devoted his attention to the pedagogical profession for three years. In the autumn of 1889 Mr. Johnson came to the Upper Peninsula and located at Sault Ste. Marie, where he secured a position as sawyer in a saw mill. H-e had practical charge of the mill for five years, at the expiration of which, in 1894, he engaged in the grocery business at Pickford, in the county of Chippewa. This enterprise he continued until 1898, after which he was employed for two years at bookkeeping in the same village, Pickford, which is right on the county line, and in the autumn of 1908, when he was elected county treasurer for a term of two years. This necessitated his removal to the city of St. Ignace, the judicial center of the county, and here he is a most able administrator of the fiscal affairs of the county. His term will expire January 1, 1911. Mr. Johnson is a man of engaging personality and his genial ways and sterling integrity of purpose have gained to him a wide circle of

Page  898 898 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN friends in his home county. He has given yeoman service in support of the cause of the Republican party and is one of its leaders in Mackinac county. Ile is identified with St. Ignace Lodge, No. 369, Free & Accepted Masons; and Pickford Lodge, No. 189, Loyal Orange Lodge, of which he served as master for four years. He is also affiliated with the Independent Order of Foresters, the Knights of the Maccabees and various other social organizations. Both he and his wife hold membership in the Presbyterian church. On the 19th of September, 1900, Mr. Johnson was united in marriage to Miss Jennie Stirling, who was born in Goderich township, Huron county, province of Ontario, and who is the daughter of William and Jane Stirling, the former of whom was born in Scotland and the latter in the province of Ontario. Of the large family of children Jennie was the fourth in order of birth. William Stirling was born in Scotland, whence he came with his parents to America when he was a young man. The family located in Huron county, Ontario, and became prominently identified with the pioneer development of that section of the province. William Stirling devoted his entire active career to agricultural pursuits and was one of the well known and honored citizens of Huron county, Ontario, at the time of his death, which occurred in May, 1910, at which time he was an octogenarian. His widow still resides in Ontario. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson have five children,-Jean D., Winifred J., Vernon S., George E. and Luella M. JOHN A. DANIELSON.-A man well and favorably known in the copper region and the surrounding country is John A. Danielson, who has charge of the surface work for the Calumet & Hecla Mining Company. Mr. Danielson, who has been a resident of the Upper Peninsula for many years, was born near Toronto, Canada, June 12, 1832. His parents were Frederick and Sophia (Eckheart) Danielson, the former a native of Massachusetts and the latter a Canadian. In 1838, when Mr. Danielson was about six years old, the family crossed the line to the United States and finally settled in Michigan, near Fenton. When well along in years the father removed to Detroit where he remained until his death. John A. Danielson passed his boyhood and school days at Fenton, Michigan, the latter of which were ended in his sixteenth year. He employed himself with various occupations until his twentieth year, when he came to Lake Superior and located in Ontonagon county, where he was employed by A. C. Davis in the Norwish Copper Mine. From there he went to Superior City, where he remained a short time, and then went to Detroit, his residence in that city covering a period of two years. He came to Houghton, and after a time there returned to Detroit. In 1868 he came to Calumet, entering the employ of the Calumet & Hecla Mining Company, and has continued his services faithfully and efficiently with this company until the present time, a period of forty-two years. He fills the important position of surface overseer. He is a prominent Mason and belongs to Calumet Lodge F. & A. M.; to Calumet Chapter, R. A. M.; and to Montrose Commandery, K. T. He gives an intelligent consideration to matters of public moment and politically is a stalwart Republican. Mr. Danielson was married in 1857, during his first residence in Detroit, to Miss Mary A. Graham, a resident of that city. Her parents were Robert and Anne (Stuart) Graham. To Mr. and Mrs. Danielson have been born seven daughters and two sons, as follows: Annie J., Frances, Hattie, Nettie, Della, Daisy, Addie, Ulysses G. and Walter.

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Page  899 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN 899 COLEMAN NEE, of Escanaba, a successful dealer in coal, lime, cement, brick and other building materials, was born in Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin, November 13, 1864. His father, David Nee, was a native of Ireland, and came to America when a young man, locating first in New York and later becoming one of the pioneers of Wisconsin. David Nee lived to be one hundred and three years of age. He was a farmer, a respected citizen, and well known in the vicinity of his home. He married Mary Griffin, also a native of Ireland, who came to America when a young girl; she is still living, at the age of seventy-four years. They were parents of seven sons and five daughters, all of whom grew to maturity, and Coleman is the second child. Coleman Nee spent his early life in his native state and county, and when about fourteen years of age began life on his own account, working the first two years at anything that offered. When sixteen years old he engaged in work for a railroad company, at first in laying the track. IIe also worked at bridge building, and was for five years fireman on the Northwestern Railroad. He was an engineer on the same road until 1900 and then engaged in his present line of business, having been very successful. He conducts his business along intelligent lines, and his financial future is assured. Mr. Nee is a stanch Republican in politics, and takes an active interest in local political matters. He has become well known among the business men of Escanaba, and has been accorded a place among its enterprising, representative, public-spirited citizens. Mr. Nee married, in 1900, Margaret Glavin, and they have two daughters, Mary and Margaret. JOHN EKLUND.-Standing prominent among the active and influential citizens of Norway, Dickinson county, is John Eklund, a man of enterprise and integrity, whose natural aptitude for business has placed him upon the high road to affluence, his success as a jeweler winning him a noteworthy position among the leading merchants in his line of trade. A native of Sweden, he was born, October 7, 1845, in the village of Sunne, state of Wermland, coming from pure Swedish stock on both sides of the house. His father, John Johnson, was born in the town of Grasmark, Wermland, Sweden, in 1812. A man of versatile talents, he was employed during his active career in various kinds of labor, spending his entire life in Sweden, his death occurring in 1869. He married Kajsa Olson, who was born, August 18, 1816, in Sunne, Sweden, the descendant of a family whose lineage is easily traced back for a period of three hundred years. She survived her husband many years, passing away in 1902, at the venerable age of eighty-six years. She reared two sons, both of whom took the name of Eklund, namely: Olof Eklund, who is engaged in agricultural pursuits in his native land; and John Eklund, the subject of this sketch. She inherited many family relics, among them being a watch now owned by her son John, which has been in the family since 1766. Although as a youth John Eklund had no opportunities for obtaining an education excepting that offered by the Sunday School, he made excellent use of his keen powers of observation, and, with the added knowledge acquired by a wise selection of reading matter, and by extensive travel, he has accumulated a vast fund of information, his education being broad and liberal. When very young he began working in a saw mill, in due course of time becoming foreman of the mill. Subsequently, having learned the trade of a carpenter and joiner, he built two

Page  900 900 THE NORTHERN PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN saw mills in Finland. Immigrating to America in 1879, he spent two months in Lockport, Illinois, in June, of that year, coming to the Menominee Range, making his first stop on the present site of Norway, which was then in its primitive wildness, Quinnesec being the terminus of the railroad. Purchasing a lot, he erected a house, in which, before the end of the year, religious services, the first in Norway, were held. The ensuing year Mr. Eklund erected the first church building in Norway, the Swedish Methodist Church, Rev. Lindstrum becoming its first pastor. For two years Mr. Eklund continued as a contractor and builder, being quite successful. Establishing himself in the jewelry business then, on Main street, he continued there until 1910, building up a substantial trade. Taking possession of his present quarters, on South Nelson street, in 1910, Mir. Eklund put in a complete stock of jewelry, and of the goods carried generally by jewelers, and has now the distinction of having one of the best equipped and best stocked jewelry establishments to be found in any part of the Upper Peninsula. Mr. Eklund married, in 1870, Christina Nerburg, who was born in Skane, Sweden. She died, in 1907, while Mr. Eklund was away from home, visiting in Sweden. Fraternally Mr. Eklund is a member of Norway Lodge, No. 362, F. & A. M.; and of Iron Mountain Chapter, No. 121, R. A. M. An extensive traveler, he has traversed the length and breadth of the United States, and has visited the principal points of interest of every country in Europe, having several times crossed the ocean, both for business and for pleasure. JOHN MACRAE, M. D., has resided in the copper district for over thirty years, having arrived at Lake Linden, Michigan, on October 12, 1879. He was then in his eighteenth year, born in Bruce county, Ontario, November 12, 1861. His education, secured in a Canadian high school, was continued at Lake Linden preparatory to entering his profession. Having decided to make the practice of medicine his life work, he entered the medical department of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor in 1881, where he remained for two years, continuing his studies for a third year at the University of Pennsylvania, from which institution he graduated in 1884. He practiced medicine for some years, then took a post graduate course at the Johns Hopkins Medical School, Baltimore, in 1894. On his graduation in 1884 he served as assistant on the medical staff of the Calumet & Hecla Mining Company, at Calumet and Lake Linden. In 1887 he removed to Central Mine, Keweenaw county, where he served as physician to the Central Mining Company for eleven years. He returned to