History of Lapeer County, Michigan : with illustrations and biographical sketches of some of its prominent men and pioneers.

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Page  1 c IT. - -A - ads / / i l 1. I P/A I II {1 r ^il I It I > crw I I S: \::: v APE E R COUNTY MICHIGAN, I I I i i I 1 4, ~ll I I wI li i N' I II ii 4. - I r I I At A::: WITH ILLusTrrs~ D BIOGWP IG4L SKETCHES OF SOME OF ITS Prorminent Men alld Pioneers. CHICAGO: la..A. ^ AGE; & CO. 1884. I 11*11, LX — /I;:w. I I j - 7 - — ~ i,_~~~~ —~ ~;~ J~~`==11;i=;~=;~;il --— ~~-~ ~~~-~ /-~~~~~~~-~ 1 ---~ —~~~~-~/~;~kz "- - " W-W-11 —1,I:~:':\ ", "I, " X, ",\,,:~ ~ ~ ~ i ~~ ~j; 11 ~ ~si — V-ll*lS: X

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Ip History of,apper County......... 9 Indian Treaties:..................... 10 Organizing Countes.................... 11 County Surve.......................... 11 County Offi(eIrs........................ 12 Court-H ouse......................... 13 Townships ()rganlzeed................... 13 First Settlement of thle County.......... 14 Period of tht, Land Fever............... 14 D escril)tive............................ 15 Pioneer Pictures...................... 15 Pioneer, Professim)al, and E(lucational Historvy................................. 20 Courts and Bar.................... 2.1 Earjy Law and Lawyers................. 22 First Educational Efforts................ 24 Early Lumberin g...................... 25 County Societies....................... 27 Statistical.................. 30 Almonlt Township..................... 30 L and E ntries......................... 30 Early History........... 33 C ivil H istory.......................... 35 Town Officers........................ 36 Village of Almont...................... 36 Church History........................ 39 Almonnt Societies.................... 40 Lapeer Township......................' 50 L an d E ntries.......................... 50 E arly H istory.......................... 52 Town Officers.......................... 53 City of Lapeer........................ 57 Biographical Reminiscence.............. 59 Early Incidents....................... 60 Pioneer W omen........................ 61 Lapeer Postcffice....................... 62 Lapeer Newspapers..................... 63 Incorporation........................... 64 Village Officers......................... 64 City Officers........................... 65 Retrospective........................ 65 Lapeer Churches...................... 67 Lapeer Schools........................69 Secret Orders.......................... 71 Lapeer Industries...................... 72 Hadley Township....................... 83 Land Entries........................ 83 Early H istory.......................... 84 O rganization........................... 86 School M atters......................... 86 The D eserted City...................... 87 Village of Hadley..................... 87 Hadley Churches....................... 88 Societies.............................. 89 Town Officers.......................... 89 Drvdeu Township...................... 93 Town Officers.......................... 93 Land E ntries.......................... 94 Early H istory......................... 96 W higville............................ 96 A Memorable Period................... 97 Early Events.......................... 98 Personal Reminiscences................ 98 An Indian Scare...................... 100 Early Religious History................ 101 Thornville............................ 103 An Afflicted Family.....................103 Dryden Village........................103 I I I I I i The Old Log Ho-ss..................... 105 Earfly Movemer s......................106 Ladlies' Library A.ssociti............. 10 6 Societies.............................. 108 Metamora Townshii................... 115 L and E ntries.......................... 115 E arly H istory..........................117 Religious History..................... 121 Village of Metamora.......................121 The Metamora Bee...................... 122 Library Society.......................*122 Town Officers........................122 S tatistical.............................. 123 Early History of Farmers' Creek........129 Elba Township....................... 131 Land Entries........................ 132 Early History......................... 133 Town Officers...................... 133 School Report.........................134 Marathon Township.................... 135 OrgoAniza;tion.......................... 135 Land Entries................... 136 Early Historv.......................... 137 Village of Columbiaville..............139 Societi s................................139 Incorporation....................... 140 Genjeral Progress.......................140 Village of Otter Lake.................... 141 Early History..........................141 Churches......................141 Pier,,onville......................... 144 Town Officers......................... 144 Attica Townsh ip.......................147 Laud Entries..........................147 Early Histor.y.................... 148 Town Officers......................... 149 Village of Attica....................... 151 C hurcl es.............................. 151 Soeceties.............................151 Ma rfield Township....................154 Laid Entries.................... 154 Eorly History........................155 Town; Ofice.......................... 156 Fish Laka or Stephens............ 156 Five L akes............................157 Oregon Township.................... 159 L and E ntries........................ 160 Early HIistory......................... 161 Organization....................... 161 Town Officers....'....................162 Iralay Township........................ 164 Laiud Entries.......................... 164 Early H istory.......................... 165 O rgan izttion........................... 166 General Progress....................... 167 Town Officers..........................168 Tm lav C ity............................. 169 Ineorporation..........................170 Village Officers........................170 Imalay City Churches.................... 17(0 Secret O rders.......................... 171 N ewspapers.......................... 171 Goodland Townsh.ip.................... 174 L and E ntries.........................175 Early H istory.......................... 176 Civil H istory........................... 176 Town Officers......................... 176 Burnside Township.....................179 i i i Ii II I I I Ii Land Entries..........................179 Early H istory.......................... 181 Civil History........................... 181 Schools.............................. 182 Town Officers.......................... 182 North Branch TGownship).............. 184 Land Entries......................... 184 Early History.........................185 Schools................................. 186 Town Officers........................ 186 Village of North B3)ljch................ 187 Churches...............................187 Societies............................... 188 Incorporation.......................... 189 Deerfield Township..................... 191 Land Entries....................... 192 Civil History............................ 193 Town Officers.......................... 194 Fire of 1881............................ 194 Burlinaton Towns. ip....................196 Village of Clifford..................... 198 Land Entries..........................198 Civil H istory........................... 199 Town Officers.............................200 Arcadia Township...................... 202 Land Entries......................... 203 Early H istory.......................... 204 Town Officers..........................205 Rich) Township..................... 206 Land Entries.........................207 Civil H istory........................... 209 Town Officers...........................209 BIOGRAPHIES. Abbott, A. V........................... 82 Abbott, Jolhn........................... 63 Abbott, W. L.......................... 177 Abbott W illiamn L...................... 177 Alien, George W......................... 48 Allen, Ssinford C......................111 Altyea, W arren C....................... 152 Andrews, William....................... 178 Angle, John M........................110 Aris, Henry............................ 190 Arm(, ur, Robert...................... 140 Arms, Samuel..........................159 Armstrong, Wr. R....................... 45 Arnold, Perry..........................113 Ash, Jchn S...........................41 Atwell, David C.................... 153 Austin, C. V...........................159 Aurand, William H....................145 Babcock, H. C......................... 125 Babcock. Robert S.................... 173 B acon, D. C............................106 Baker. Thomas C..................... 195 B r:lch, F. V.............................. 41 Baldwin, J. H.......................... 191 Ballard, Charles....................... 189 Barnes, Thomas........................ 178 Barrows, E. P.......................... 128 B artlett, Elijah....................... 113 Bartlett, H enry.........................112 Bartlett, H orace..................... 115 Bates, Zadock......................... 55 Bates, W illiam W....................... 55 B ayley, W. L........................... 128 Beach, Isaac T......................... 44 I \ -I: I dlvi6-^ X I-:w W I ~ ~ ~4 l' J --

Page  3 4 ---- _ --- ot --- CONTENTS Continued. Bearss, Joseph H....................... 196 Beckman, W illiam.................... 134 Beckwith, Orlow....................... 143 Beden, W alter M..................... 92 Beebe, Parley L....................... 154 Bentley, Jasper........................ 79 Bentley, W illiam...................... 202 Birdsall, Henry A...................... 73 Black, Oscar F........................168 Blake, Dr. W illiam..................... 152 Blow, James............................. 112 Blow, John........................... 110 Blow, William H..................... 112 Bohnsack, Joseph...................... 164 Booth, Horace M................ 46 Borland, John.......................... 174 Bostick, Gilbert........................ 48 Bradshaw, Amos........................ 201 Braidwood, John........................ 109 Braidwood, Mark....................... 43 Bredin, Richard........................ 109 Brigham, Aaron........................ 85 Brigham, Aaron G......................86 Brigham, Henry S...................... 85 Brigham, Johl, Sr.....................85 Brigham, John, Jr..................... 86 Brigham, Samuel L........... 86 Bristol, Joseph................ 49 Bristol, Sheldon....................... 48 Brooks, William....................... 56 Broomfield, George................. 179 Brophy, James D.................. 109 Brown, Charles W..................... 78 Brown, Clarence E................... 124 Browne, A. C......................... 128 Brownell, E. A....................... 90 Bruce, John G....................... 183 Bnuerger, John A....................... 81 Buchanan, H. M........................ 177 Buck, William I...................... 163 Buck, W illson........................ 209 Bullock, Frederick G.................... 135 Bullock, Lewis......................... 135 Burgess, Alfred................. 140 Butler, Jerome B......................] 83 Butterfield, Ira H...................... 76 Butterfield, W........................ 55 Byer, John R.........................154 Cady, Nelson..........................12 7 Cahill, Dennis.........................158 Caley, M atthias......................... 54 Caley, Thom as......................... 55 Callis, W illiam.........................159 Campbell, John W........................92 Cardwell, Jirall.........................168 Carpenter, G. W.......................158 Carpenter, &- Lloyd..................... 143 Carpenter, Sam uel...................... 163 Carpenter, Stephen..................... 158 Carr, Gardiner......................... 50 Carter, O liver........................... 196 Cary, Gec.rg e H........................ 81 Case, C............ 202 C astle, H. S............................ 189 Castle, Jo (hn...........................189 Castle, L evi K.......................... 189 Castle, Ozro J......................... 189 Chambers, Stepl en.....................190 Chaplin, Harvev S.................. 210 Chapman, C. R..................... 127 Chapman. George P.................... 56 Chase, Alfred........................... 191 Chase, George A........................ 191 Cheasbro, William H. H.................113 Churchill, Charles...................... 178 ChurchJill, David................... 178 Clhurchill, W. B.......................172 Clark, Alpthonso........................ 112 Clark, B. W............................ 128 Clark, John............................ 146 Clark, Walden.......................... 114 Clark, William........................128 Clark. W illiam.......................... 47 Cliff, Charles H........................144 Closson, Myron D...................... 48 Closson, Nelson E...................... 48 Clute, Ephraim.................. 140 Clute, Richard A....................... 145 Clute, W illey A.........................145 Coffron, W. W....................... 190 Cole, J. W............................114 Collins, E li............................ 55 Compton, Jerome.......................135 Comstock, Dr. J. S...................... 24 Comstock, L. H. M...................... 202 Conant, Alonzo....................... 159 Conklin, Robert B..................... 76 Conner, E. L...........................129 Cooley, D...........................112 Corey, Alexander W.................... 81 Coryell, A. B...........................128 Cotter, E. B............................ 43 Courter, John......................... 114 Courter, William H.....................114 Coutts, Peter......................... 44 Cowan, A. S.......................... 126 Cramton, George W.................... 90 Crosbv, W illiam........................ 47 Cummi ngs, G. H.......................191 Cummings, William C.................. 143 Currier, F. P........................... 48 Currier, H. A......................42 Cushing, Thomas R..................... 163 Daley, William F.....................80 D aly, A. S............................. 153 Darwood, Joseph....................... 112 Davenport, George.....................90 Davenport, Oliver...................... 90 Davis, Murdoch L................. 143 D ay, D. P.............................158 Day, WVilliam C........................ 11ll Davton, Chlarlts.....................201 Dean, C. T........................... 56 De GTroat, Henry C.....................206 Delaney, John.......................... 111 Demorest G. F........................ 76 Deneen, John N........................172 Dennis, J. W....................... 54 Denoyer, Aitoine................. 154 Dickerson, Chilion F................... 177 Dingman, Charles..................... 195 Dirtine. Thlomas................. 129 Dirstine, Sanmuel.......................129 Dittman, Augustus..................... 112 Dodds, Archibald......................209 Dodds, H enry.......................... 56 Dodds, John H........................ 56 D)odge, W. T........................... 173 Donaldson, George..................... 76 Douglass, Dr. E. G..................... 76 Dudley, M iles F....................... 196 D utdley, Robert......................... 126 E arl, E. K.............................. 77 Earl, Jeremiahl.................... 77 Edwards, W illiam B....................201 Eggleston, John P...................... 173 E lliott, Orlindo....................... 164 Ellsworth, R. C........................110 Ellsworth, Samuel...................... 109 Emmons. B. R........................ 46 Empev, G. P...........................113 Eoff, Ezra.............................. 112 Eoff, Jacob........................ 113 ErIes, Slmuel.......................... 124 Evans, Daniel............................ 157 Evans. Isnac............................ 157 Evans, John B......................... 157 Farnum, R. K.......................... 42 Farrmui, Williaml P................... 45 Farnswortllh, Christopher................ 157 Fay, Thomas...........................179 Ferguson, Alexander WI................. 44 Ferguson, C.. So.................... 41 Ferguson, Charles...................... 41 Ferguson, Charles.................... 41 Ferglson, Jam es F................................ 49 Ferguson, Peter....................... 43 Ferg nson, Snalmuel E.................... 50 Ferguson. Yates........................ 115 Fisher, George W.................... 109 Flansburgll, Calvin D...................178 Flansburgh, L. W...................... 178 Folsom, Abner C........................196 Folsom, Harvey J...................... 178 Foote, John H..........................110 Foote, P. H............................110 Fosdick, Silas.......................... 91 Fowler, F. E..........................56 Fowler, Francis........................ 56 Fox, Martin.......................... 210 Freer, James.............................109 Freer, John.................... 111 French, James......................... 128 Fricke, Charles A.......................122 Fricke, Frederick D................... 195 Frider, M orris......................... 146 Fuller, Myron...................... 163 Galbraith, Rev. F. J...................189 Gallinger, Cyrenius................. 196 Gark, Robert L,........................173 G askill, Silas B......................... 23 Gark, Sylvester................ 126 Gass, Nicholas..........................204 G ates, A. B............................135 Gates, John G........................ 55 Gates, Stephen V...................... 83 Gilbert, Edwin W......................141 Gillings, Joslihua........................112 Glasure, George........................ 184 Gleason, Frank......................... 90 Goetehi us, Hen y B..................... 45 Goodale, E. Allen......................159 Goodale, Warren W.................... 159 Gordon, John..........................109 Gould, C.B.........................183 Gould, Edwin R.......................42 G ould, F. E............................. 45 Govan, R. B............................111 Grandy, Norton T..................... 92 Graves, Amos..........................63 G ray, A. J............................. 54 Gray, Arthur J........................ 81 G ray, J. S............................ 163 Gray, Stephen D.......................162 G ree j, Ira........................... 81 Green, N. N........................ 92 Greene r& Rulison..................... 79 Gregory, Albert L...................... 80 Gregory, George B..................... 77 Groff, Edward.......................... 128 Groover, S.D.......................... 126 Gunn, Joshua..........................183 Gutches, JameslM.......................45 Gutches, Oliver C.....................45 Haddrill, Lorenzo J.................... 73 Hadlev, Forest......................... 77 Haines, Frank M.......................206 H all, Seth.............................108 Hall, W. F............................172 Hallock, Alfred..................76 Ha:llock, John.......................... 44 Hamilton, Williaml B................... 72 Hammond, John R..................... 135 Haimmon(l, William....................134 Harp. John A......................... 125 Har}p, W illiam................201 Harris, Benjamin J.....................145 H arris, Charles......................... 56 Harris, Edward T...................145 Harris, Gardner J...................... 56 H art, Alonzo............................ 92 H ait, Alvin N.......................... 59 Hart, Noah H...................... 22 Hart, Rodnev G........................73 Havskin Brotihers........................ 174 Haskin, M. J..........................174 Haskin, Nelson......................... 174 H atch, 'Horace E........................ 77 I Hazen. Dennison E..................... 49 i H eenan, Johll.......................... 109 Hemingway, IRaac L................... 145 Hemingway, Rev James............ 87 Hemingway, James H.................. 91 Helmingway, William.................... 22 Hcndernsonl, Frederick L................ 52 J I M -4 N b~ - V

Page  4 0.-"- - --------- C O N T E N T S-Continued I Henderson, Jacob S.................... 127 Henderson, William................... 125 Hewitt, William W....................41 Higley, George W..................... 54 Higley, York T........................ 80 H illiker, Albert.........................113 Hilliker, H. F......................... 42 H lies, Jam es........................... 109 Hinks, James.......................... 113 Hinman, Hon. Lord W.................. 79 Hodge, David........................ 129 H odges, Jam es......................... 152 Hodgson, J. A.......................... 91 H odson, J. R.......................... 152 Hollenbeck, Edmund................... 163 Ho!lenbeck, George W.................. 163 Hollenbeck, Jacob.....................145 Hollinger, Daniel................... 191 Hollinshead, William................. 144 H opkins, John.......................... 43 Hosmer, Allen.................... 1.... HoEsack. D uncan....................... 183 H ough, B. C........................... 159 Hough, Charles D......................153 Hough, E. B........................... 47 H otugh, E. S............................178 Hough, George O.................... 179 Hough, John B....................... 76 Hough, Theodore B................... 179 Howard, Edward........................158 Howard, Martin J.......................80 Howe, S. W........................... 184 Howland, Hiram........................ 46 Howland, William......................134 Howland, Willis....................... 46 Hughson, E. B......................... 196 Hungerford, James A.................. 81 H unt, Jonathan.........................178 Isham, E..............................126 Ivory, Elwell.......................... 91 Ivory, John............................ 90 Ivory, Rufus........................... 90 Jackson, W lliam A................... 79 Jenkins, James...................... 128 Jenness, I. N...........................150 Jennings, Ward H...................... 77 Johnson, Andrew....................... 127 Johnson, Frank M..................... 43 Johnson, James H..................... 210 Johnson, Jeremiah.....................196 Johnson, W illiam A....................209 Johnston, Alexander.................. 141 Johnston, B. F.................... 41 Jones, George W......................... 173 Keeler, James P........................ 190 Kelch, W illiam, Sr................. 210 Kelcb, W illiam. Jr..................... 210 Kelley, Albert E........................ 210 Kelley, Mark N.......................125 Kendrick, Hon. Frank...................110 Kendrick, George H....................112 Kendrick, J. S...................... 115 Kendrick Lucius....................... 102 Kennedy, Jonathan D...................201 Kennett, Charles....................... 44 Kennett, Charles, Jr.................. 44 Kenly, Hon. Myron C.................. 78 Kfster, Andrew........................195 Kidder, Samuel........................ 46 Kingsbury, Andrew L.................. 55 Kittridge, Ebenezer................... 111 Kluss. Julius................. 92 Lamb, Elizabeth D..................... 105 Lamb, Horace........................ 172 Lamb, Jacob C......................... 172 Lamb, John J..........................172 Lamb, John Merri t.....................103 Lamb, J. M erritt........................ 112 Lamont, David........................ 127 Langdon, R. V.........................191 Laughlin, William F............ 110 Lawrence, Denis G.....................146 Lawrence, Ebert W 4.................... 47 Lawrence, F. P....................... 126 Lawrence, Nelson K.................... 210 L each, Sela............................146 Learmont, J. W..................... 49 Lee, Henry............................ 158 L ee, H iram............................ 90 Lee, James H......................... 124 L ee, Jesse.............................. 1 i7 Lee. Orrin........................ 128 Le Valley, Leander..................... 145 Lewis, Oliver A........................114 Lincoln, Frederick..................... 77 Lippincott, R. B...................... 190 Lofft, William......................... 77 Louks, W illiam H...................... 55 Lucas, W illiam........................ 190 Lunday, Eli........................ 126 Lyman, A. W..........................202 Lyons, H. H.......................... 174 LN ons, W alter S.................... 168 M cAlpiue, Jonas........................ 143 McCormick, John..................... 190 McDonald, W illiam..................... 79 McElroy, Francis....................... 77 McEntee, W. H..................... 173 McGarry, Frank................. 145 McGillis, Daniel....................... 174 M cGregor, James....................... 128 M cIntire, James....................... 195 M cKillop, Daniel.......................202 M cKillop, A. B......................... 200 McKillop, Angus..................... 201 McKillop, Archibald............. 200 McLennan, Alexander................ 80 McMonagle, Cornelius................... 46 M cER oy, James......................... 49 McRov, Thomas J................... 49 M ahaffy, M arshal.......................113 M air, Andrew.......................... 128 Manwarin g, George R.................. 173 Manwaring Hon. Joshua............... 74 Manwaring, Joseph................. 112 Manzer, Seymour A..................... 79 Marsden, John......................... 124 Marshall, Mrs. Olivia A................. 153 Marshall, Sardis B....................78 Martin, Hiram B................169 Martin, Maitland E.....................48 Mathews, Samuel....................... 42 Mathews, W illiam....................... 109 Maynard, Sanford.................... 106 Maynard, Washington................ 115 Maynard, W illiam...................... 159 Merrill, Lorenzo........................ 196 Merritr. & Balch...................... 41 M erritt, John A........................ 128 Merritt, W. E.........................50 Middaugh, Christopher.................. 202 Middleditch, Pulaski.................... 183 M iles, N elson......................... 77 M iller, A. B........................... 183 M;ller, George W....................... 110 M iller, Hiram C........................41 M iller, J...............................11 M iller, J. N......................... 110 M iller, J. W........................... 110 Miller, William M.....................152 Misener, Almon........................ 157 M itchell, James........................ 202 Mitchell, Rev. Lewis.................... 206 Moore, Hon. Jos. B.................... 76 M oore, Morris R........................ 135 Moore, Silas......................... 135 M ore, Jam es............................ 114 More, James L......................... 127 More, J. F................... 191 M orey, H. R......................... 48 M organ, Chancy........................ 109 Morgan, Francis S............. 145......... M organ, W illiam........................ 42 Morrison, W illiam...................... 42 M ors, Richard...................... 125 Morse, Charles F................... 128 Morse, George C............. 125 M orton, Charles........................ 43 Morton, Morris...............43 Morton, W illiam D.................... 44 ~~~ ~~~ ~~ ~~41. M-,ses, Oliver.................. 128 M air, Jam es............................ 47 M uir, John F........................... 174 Muir, William.......................... 45 MAurnihan, D. H. F............. 202 Nelson, Robert....................... 164 Newton, Francis........................111 Newton, Isaac.......................... 111 Oliver, Barney.......................... 196 Oliver, Leonard........................ 196 Orr, Daniel......................... 191 Ovens, W illiam......................... 50 Owen, Harmon..................... 158 Palmer, James A.......................206 Palmer, James E........................127 Palmner, Joel M......................... 82 Palmer, John H........................ 79 Palmer, Robert............. 154 Palmer, Thomas........................127 Palmerlee, Asa......................... 55 Palmerlee, Hoel........................ 55 Park, W illiam..................... 124 Parker, Thomas........................ 163 Parmlee, Virgil S....................... 46 Paton, Andrew.........................178 Payne, Richard.................... 152 Pearson, Ande............... 202 Peaslee, Mrs. Julia Ann.............. 129 P eck, Ira.............................. 56 Peck, Miles G......................... 56 Pendleton, E. C........................206 Pendleton, Munson.................. 206 Perkins, Charles W................... 158 Perkins H. F.......................... 125 Perkins, James O...................... 127 Phelps, J. T............................ 114 Pierce, Philemon....................... 153 Pierson, Rufus.......................... 144 Pike, H. D............................ 77 Pike. O. B............................. 55 Pitcher, A. A...................... 126 Pitcher, George W......................129 Porter, Albert.......................... 126 Porter, Alvin..........................126 Porter, F. S............................190 Porter, John H......................... 114 Porter, Julius A...................... 114 Porter, M ason......................... 126 Potter, H enry N........................ 134 Powelson,Ebenezer W.................. 135 P rice, F............................... 127 Price, M rs. L........................... 127 Price, 'I obias........................... 124 Pringle, John H....................... 182 Purdy, Reuben.......................... 20 5 Quatermass, William.................... 172 Raymond, Archibald.................... 195 Read, John........................ 129 Read, L. H........................... 129 Read R,. H.......................... 54 Read, Samuel.......................... 54 Redfield. Esli R........................ 80 Reed, Nathaniel....................... 126 Reid. Hulbert................... 50 Reid, James............... 43 Retherford. L. M....................... 46 Reynolds, Ira.......................... 54 Reynolds, William....................114 Reynolds, William J.................... 114 Rich, Hon. John T...................... 135 Rich, Virtulon...................... 23 Riches, Thomas........................ 111 Riley, Harvey.................... 92 Riley, Silas F......................... 92 Roberts, A. M........................ 42 Rood, Alpheus......................... 56 Rood, Charles F.................. 174 Rood, Horace D...................... 158 Rood, Pierce N........................ 153 Rook, George.......................... 146 Ross, Amrasa...................... 168 Ross, David P......................... 45 Ross, John F........................ 163 Rossman, Hiram....................... 124 Ruby, Francis......................... 56 j L4 L 9). -I- XI — I1# g,< I i A,

Page  5 ------- -:- I, - - so C O N T E N T S- Continued. - -_ Rumuph, Peter..........................210 R npert, J. J............................ 113 R ussell, A. C.......................... 56 Russell, George W.....................152 R nssell, L. J........................... 56 Ryan, John P..........................205 Sage, Edwin........................... 124 Sage, Orvil............................124 ngla e, W illiam..........................124 Sanborn, Orville T...................... 45 Sanborn, Rufus T.................. 92 Schanck, Henry.........................110 Schenck, Garrett....................... 48 Scnlley, Edward DI).....................81 Selleck, GeorgeMV......................205 Seaman, Rev. Henry................... 201 Seyfarth, Louis................209 Sheldon, Clarence L.................... 158 Shepherd, Alexander................... 178 Sherman, Sylvester 0................... 143 Shipp, John........................... 47 Shipp, Joseph........................ 47 Shippey, Charles W................... 189 Shoemaker, MI........................ 49 Sicklesteel, George.....................190 Silsbury, James L...................... 163 Simon, Joseph Sr..................... 43 Simmons, David Marvin................ 145 Sinclair, Alexander...................183 Skym, W illiam......................... 190 Slater, Joseph W......................... 159 Sleeper, David......................... 46 Sleeper, Stoughton....................46 Sm ith, C. J............................127 Smith, Cornelius L.....................196 Smith, D. P......................... 43 Smith, Edwin........................110 Smith, Mrs. Fannie Jane................201 Smith, George L..................... 82 Smith, H iram..........................43 Smith, I. C............................ 125 Smith, James P....................... 152 Smith, John O......................... 81 Smith, Joseph......................... 113 Smith, M yron B....................... 78 Smith, Nathaniel.......................109 Smith, Nathaniel, Jr....................168 Smith, Philip........................ 43 Smith, Stephen H...................... 76 Smith, William C..............................202 Smith, William M...................... 168 Snook, Andrew......................92 Snyder, M yron......................... 134 Spalding, Charles H....................206 Spears, W illiam........................ 163 Spencer, Jonathan.....................201 Springett, Charles H.................... 49 Springett, TLomas..................... 49 Squier, Ethan.........................109 Squier, Rufus.......................... 153 Stephens, A. L.........................158 Stephens, Alexander.................... 128 Stevenson, John.............. 178 Stevenson, Thomas..................... 127 Stewart, John....................... 134 Sticknev, William W................... 23 Stiver, Peter...........................201 Stocker, D.............................124 Stonie, David F.........................123 Stone, Mrs. Hannah I.................. 153 Stroup, C. F.......................... 157 Struble, Lewis Y....................... 152 Stuart, Benjamin D................... 177 Sutter, John........................... 195 Swain, Robert......................... 110 Sweet, Joseph C........................ 195 Taggart, Roswell....................... 49 Taggart, W illis........................ 168 Tainter, Benjamin D.................... 129 Tainter, Loren......................... 129 Tanner, Edwin J....................... 143 Taylor, D. M..........................202 Taylor, Robert L.......................82 Taylor, Thomas C...................... 41 Taylor, W. W.......................... 42 Tennant, Rensselaer R.................. 80 Terry, Benjamin....................... 108 Terrv, H. H..........................110 Thatcher, Charles L................... 80 Thickstine, James C.................... 77 Thomas, Alba.......................... 126 Thomas, Calvin P...................... 82 Thompson, Arthur H................... 79 Thompson, Frank..................... 77 Thompson, Jollhn N..................... 153 Thompson, O. C.......................125 Thompson, Robert.....................190 Thomson, Daniel....................... 44 Topham, William H.................. 164 Townsend, Clark....................... 125 Townsend, Uriel........................ 47 Tozer, George.............. 195 Tozer, John............................ 195 Travis, Austin.......................... 129 Travis, H iram.......................... 129 Treadway, Joseph....................... 135 Tripp, H E.......................... 173 Tripp, Holden.........................114 Tripp, George C........................ 56 Tripp, John L......................... 56 Tucker, Matthew B................... 178 Tunison, Mahlon C.................... 92 Turrill, George N...................... 78 Turrill, Hon. James................... 78 Tuttle, Benezett A.................... 80 Tuttle, Columbus...................... 80 U lrick, Peter...........................114 U lrick, Peter........................... 114 Utley, Timothy....................113 Van Antwerp, Abraham................. 49 Vandecar, J..........................189 Van Vranken, James A................. 143 Van Wagoner, Milton A................ 76 Varnum, Prescott...................... 127 Varnum, W illiam N.................... 79 Vincent, Shad. N..................... 73 Voorhies, Isaac I...................... 81 Wadsworth, William R................. 80 W ales, C. E........................... 50 W alker, Charles....................... 47 W alker, David...................... 54 W alker, Robert B....................... 55 W alker, Roger T....................... 82 W alker, Thomas........................ 54 W alton, J. T..........................172 Walton, Sidney Walker.................172 Warner, Matthew...................... 47 Warren, Andrew........................195 W atkins, John J........................ 82 W atkins, Newel T......................153 W atson, Adam.......................... 42 W attles, D. C...........................190 W ebster, H. D......................... 73 Webster, Mrs. Martha................. 112 W ebster, Milton H...................... 46 W ebster, W. S.......................... 43 W eed, Dr. A. E........................191 W ells, Igil............................. 45 W ells, Thurston........................210 W elton, Charles E......................174 W est, D aniel........................... 152 W est, Francis M........................152 W eston, H. C.......................... 189 W heeler, Joseph T...................... 145 Wheelock, Marquis Lafayette............ 49 W hitaker, Elisha.......................113 W hitaker, James....................... 113 W hite, Chester G...................... 82 White, Enoch J.......................... 82 W hite, Henry K........................ 78 White, Robert A.............. 79 White, Thomas V...................... 190 W hitehead, W. H...................... 49 W hiting, L. R..........................190 W ilber, Clarence G....................153 W ilcox, Lewis.......................... 210 W ilder, B. F...........................123 W ilder, R. E...........................123 W ilder, W.............................123 W illey, Abijah.........................146 Willey, Seth...........................146 W illiams, Anthony................... 153 W illiams, Henry H...................... 44 W illiams, John A......................127 W illiams, Leonard...................... 44 Williams, William B..................... 73 Wi'son, Henry B.......................195 W ilson, J. B..........................204 Wilson, John................141 Wilson, Rev. John B....................142 W inegar, Adam.................... 124 W inship, John......................... 134 Winslow, Joseph............... 114 Winslow, Wesley.......................114 W inslow, W illiam...................... 153 Woodruff, Edward T.................... 74 Woodruff, Rev. Jonathan Alden.......... 74 Yerex, D. V........................... 174 Yorker, Charles J....................... 81 Yorker, Charles L.:.................... 81 Young, W illiam......................... 153 Zavits, Nelson.......................... 111 — l jA - l

Page  6 - _ -As iC-: i - m w — II I I 1 CONTENT S- Continued. I I I "I i%- '1yrR 1*0rIIO. Abbott, John.......................... 63 An Early Cottage...................... 27 Bacon, D. C............................ 107 Bacon, Emma L..................... * * * 107 Bacon, D. C., Twin Elms Hotel.......... 107 Blow, James, Old Homestead............ 140 Blow, WVilliam H., Sheep Barns.........161 -Bonheur, Rosa.......................... 197 Brigham, Aaron..................... 85 Brigham, John......................... 89 Brigham, MIrs. John...................... 89 Bristol, Sheldon........................ 48 Bristol, Mrs. Shleldon.................... 48 Bristol, Sheldon, Residence............. 48 Brown, Charles W...................... 24 Brownell, Ellery A..................... 92 Back, William I., Residence............ 164 Bullock, Lewi s....................* 131 Carpenter, G. WT.,Residence.............. 98 Chapman, G. P....................... 57 Chapman, Mrs. G. P............****** 57 Chapman, G. P., Residence............ 179 Clark, John, Residence................. 17! Davenport, George, Residence............ 98 Emmons, B. R., Residence............... 98 Farnum, R. K., Residence............... 1 6I Gillings, Joshua, Residence.............. 188 Haddrill, L. J........................... 16 Hall, Charlotte......................... 113 Hall, Seth...................... 113 H art, A. N................................. 13 H art, R. G............................. 73 Higley, George W....................... 52 H illiker, L. L.......................... 107 Hossack, Duncan, Residence............ 179 Hough, John B......................... 36 Lamb, John M........................ 105, Lamb, M rs. J. M....................... 105 L ee, H enry............................ 158 Lee, Jesse.............................. 1191 Lee, Mirs. Jesse..................* * 119 Louks, W. H., Residence................ 30 M anwaring, J..................* * * * * 77 Manwaring, Mrs.J.................* 77 Miller, J. N., Residence................. 140 Pierson, Rufus........................ 144 Porter, Alvin.................. 126 Prince & Charley................ 179 Sanborn, O. T., Farm and Town Residence 30 Stone, Dr. D. F., Residence.................140 Struble, Lewis Y., Residence............ 140 Terry, George B., Residence............. 188 Treadway, Joseph.......-........... 135 Treadway, Mrs. Joseph.................. 1535 Turrill, James.......................*.** 80 Vincent, Shad. N....................... 68 WT illiams, Anthony.................... 153 Woodrnuff, J. A................ *.170 r I -,VW; I I (0 ) 1. ISC - l --- I 1 79 — 6 - ' 11 AAM _ -- 7-PI

Page  7 by A:.t *v I' *A

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Page  9 4-it-i -;c__aw i r HISTORYr OF LAPEER COUNTY. CHAPTER I. IMPORTANT GENERAL EVENTS.-INDIAN TREATIES.-IMMIGRATION COMMENCED. -ORGANIZATION, SURVEYS AND LOCATION OF LAPEER COUNTY SEAT. By anordinance of the Congress of the United States, passed July 13, 1787, the whole of the territory of the United States, lying northwest of the Ohio River, though still occupied by the British, was organized as the "Northwest Territory," of which General Arthur St. Clair was appointed governor. The ordinance of 1787 provides that there shall be appointed, from time to time by Congress, a governor, a secretary and three judges, who should be residents and freeholders within the territory. It further provides that the territory should be divided into not less than three nor more than five States, and that "there shall be neither slavery nor involuntary servitude in the said territory, otherwise than in the punishment of crimes.' In pursuance of the treaty of November 19th, 1794, Captain Porter, in the beginning of June, 1796, with a detachment of American troops, took possession of Detroit, entered the fort which the British had previously evacuated, and flung to the breeze the first American flag that ever floated over the Peninsula State. By an act of Congress, approved May 7, 1800, the territory northwest of the Ohio River, was divided into two separate territories, and "all that part of the territory of the United States, northwest of the Ohio River, which lies to the westward of a line beginning at the Ohio, opposite to the mouth of the Kentucky River, and running thence to Fort Recovery, and thence north until it shall intersect the territorial line between the United States and Canada," was constituted a separate territory, to be called the "Indiana Territory," the seat of government of which was established at St. Vincennes, Chillicothe being the seat of government of the Northwest Territory. Of this Territory (Indiana), General William HIenry Harrison was appointed governor. \ By an act of Congress, approved January 11, 1805, it was provided, "that from and after the 30th day of June of that year, all that part of Indiana Territory, which lies north of a line drawn east from the southerly bend, or extreme, of Lake Michigan, until it shall intersect Lake Erie, and east of a line drawn from the said southerly bend, through the middle of said lake to its northern extremity, and thence due north to the northern boundary of the United States, shall constitute a separate territory, and be called Michigan. " The act further provides that the territory shall have the same form of government as provided by the ordinance of 1787, that the governor, secretary and judges shall be appointed by the President of the United States, and that Detroit shall be the seat of government. On July 1, 1805, General William Hull, the newly appointed governor, assumed the duties of his office at Detroit. On the 11th of June previous, Detroit had been destroyed by fire. Like most of the frontier settlements, it had been compressed within a very small compass,-the streets scarcely exceeding the breadth of common alleys. General Hull at once turned his attention to the subject, and laid out the town in its present shape, the arrangement of which is attributed to Judge Woodward, one of the pioneers of the Territorial court. On the 18th of June, 1812, war was declared by Congress against Great Britain. Previous to, and in anticipation of the declaration of war, General Hull, governor of Michigan Territory, was appointed commander-in-chief of all the forces of the Northwest. On the 9th of July General Hull received orders from the secretary of war, to proceed with his army and take possession of Malden, (which was the key to that portion of the British provinces), if consistent with the safety of his posts. The garrison was weak, and seemed an easy conquest. Having arranged for the expedition, General Hull crossed the Detroit River on the 19th day of July, and encamped at Sandwich, where the army remained in a state of inactivity for nearly a month, when, intimidated by the hostile manifestations of the Indians, and the report that a large British force would soon arrive at Malden, without having made an attack he re-crossed the river to Detroit on the 9th day of August, where he remained until the 15th, the day of his inglorious surrender. A provisional government was established by the British, at Detroit, and a small force placed in the fort. On the 10th of September, 1813, the victory of Commodore Perry, in the battle of Lake Erie, resulted in restoring Michigan to the Union, and on the 29th of the same month, Detroit was occupied by a detachment of the army of General Harrison. On October 9th, 1813, Colonel Lewis Cass, who had rendered essential service to the territory, was appointed governor of Michigan. Congress, in 1823, by an act providing for the establishment of a legislative council, invested the territory with a more energetic and compact government. The council was to consist of nine members, to be appointed by the President of the United States, with the consent of the Senate, from eighteen candidates elected by the people of the Territory. They, with the governor, were invested with the same powers which had been granted by the ordinance of 1787 to the government of the Northwest Territory. By that act the legislative power of the governor and judges was taken away, the term of judicial office was limited to four years, and eligibility to office required the same qualifications as the right of suffrage. The first legislative council of Michigan convened on the 7th of June, 1824, at Detroit. In 1831 General Cass having been appointed secretary of war, he was succeeded by George B. Porter in the government of the Territory. During his administration, Wisconsin, which had before been annexed to Michigan, was erected into a separate Territory. On the 6th of July, 1834, Governor Porter died, and was succeeded by Stevens T. Mason. In the spring of 1835, a controversy arose in regard to the L k9 -: __,, i_ bp

Page  10 6 in J i E! ^ ----- \ " I I 10 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. I boundary line between Michigan and Ohio, and the right to a valuble strip of land, to which both laid claim; the former under the provisions of the ordinance of 1787, and the latter under a provision in their State constitution. Each party sent a military force to the frontier, the one to sustain, and the other to extend jurisdiction over the territory in dispute. A high state of excited public feeling existed, but the most serious inconvenience suffered by either party was the apprehension and temporary imprisonment of a few persons. By an act of Congress, passed June 15, 1836, the Constitution and State government of Michigan were accepted, and upon condition of accepting the boundary claimed by Ohio, she was admitted into the Union. These terms were exceedingly unsatisfactory to the people of Michigan, who were impatiently.awaiting recognition as a State government, having elected their State officers in the month of October of the previous year. A convention held at Ann Arbor, on the 14th and 15th of. December, 1836, resolved to accept the conditio n imposed in the proposition of Congress, at the same time protesting against the right of Congress, under the constitution, to require this preliminary assent as a condition of admission into the Union. By act of Congress, approved January 26, 1837, Michigan was declared "to be one of the United States, and anlmitted into the Union on an equal footing with the original States, in all respects whatever." By an act of the legislature, approved March 16, 1847, the seat of government was removed from Detroit to Lansing. TREATIES WITH THE INDIANS. Before passing from these general events it will be well to notice the three important treaties with the Indians, by means of which settlement was made possible. The first treaty of importance, which was made for the extinguislllllhent of the Indian title to the soil of what now comprises the state of Michigan, was the one entered into by William Hull, then governor of Michigan as a territory, and ex-officio superintendent of Indian affairs, with the natives at Detroit, in 1807, when a tract of land in the south-eastern part of the State was ceded by them to our government. Detroit and a belt of land adjacent to it, lying along the river and lake, six miles in width, were not affected by this grant, we having before that succeeded to the possessory rights of Great Britain to the District of Detroit, so called, which she had held for a series of years co-extensive with the claims of her predecessor, France, and which, by the treaty of Greenville, made by General Wayne on behalf of our government in 1795, had been reassured to and made perfect in us. With that exception, the title to the southeasterly part of our State was obtained from the natives by the treaty of 1807. The northerly line of this grant included only small portions of what are now the counties of Lapeer and Genesee, and was a little north of their southern boundaries, thus leaving Saginaw River and its principal affluents, the Flint, the Cass, etc., entirely unaffected by the provision of that treaty. This portion of the State remained in Indian possession, with the rights of the natives intact and unaffected until the treaty of Saginaw of 1819. In that treaty the Saginaw region was particularly interested, for the cessions of lands then made by the natives, with the reservations therein provided for, include the rich and flourishing valleys of the Saginaw and its tributaries. General Cass was commissioned to act as the agent of the general government in securing to it this important addition to our territory. He appeared upon the Saginaw, upon the site of what is now Saginaw City, September 10, 1819, accompanied by a staff of interpreters and assistant. The conference lasted ten or twelve days and witnessed many stormy scenes, but the terms of treaty were, at length, calmly discussed and agreed to. The harmonious adjustment of their differences was reached chiefly through the instrumentality of Stephen V. R. Riley, an Indian trader who married a squaw, and Jacob Smith another trader. In the treaty agreed to, the Indians ceded to the United States all but 40,000 acres of their territory, reserved for the benefit of the tribe in common. In 1837 another treaty was made with the Indians, in which they ceded to the United States the 40,000 acres belonging to the tribe in common. According to the terms of this treaty the government was to cause the land to be surveyed and put into market at $5.00 per acre and held at that price for a certain length of time, and then what remained unsold should be reduced to a minimum of $2.50 per acre and the Indians to receive the avails of the sales after deducting the cost of survey and sale and a large amount advanced to them with which to pay their debts. The chiefs who visited Washington to perfect this sale were, O-ge-mLa-ke-ga-to, Ton-dog-a-ne, Sha-e-be-no-se, Wos-so, Mose-gaskink, Ma-sha-way and Nau-qua-chic-a-me. The white men were Henry O. Connor, Capt. Joseph F. Marsac and Charles Rodd, a half-breed, as interpreters, and Gardner D. and Benjamin O. Williams. The result of this visit was that Mr. Schoolcraft was ordered to call a meeting at Flint, for the purpose of concluding the treaty, which was done. The treaty of 1819 was a very important one, as this portion of the State was then in Indian possession, and the object of the government was the cession by the natives of the vast tract in which was included the rich and flourishing valleys of the Saginaw and its tributaries. The chief speaker for the Indians was O-ge-ma-ke-gato, and he opposed the proposition of Gen. -Cass with indignation. Said he: "You do not know our wishes. Our people wonder what has brought you so far from your homes. Your young men have invited us to come and light the council fire; we are here to smoke the pipe of peace, but not to sell our lands. Our American father wants them. Our English father treats us better. He has never asked for them. You flock to our shores; our waters grow warm; our lands melt like a cake of ice; our possessions grow smaller and smaller. The warm wave of the white man rolls in upon us and melts us away. Our women reproach us; our children want homes. Shall we sell from under them the spot where they spread their blankets? We have not called you here; we smoke with you the pipe of peace." The treaty was finally made and the Indians returned to their lodges. The Chippewa nation was then comprised of ten or twelve bands, each governed by a hereditary chieftain. These chiefs formed a council which governed the nation and elected the ruling chief annually. O-ge-ma-ke-ga-to was not a chief by blood, but his remarkable intellectual qualities as well as his undaunted courage, made him a power among his people, and at the early age of twenty-five he was a leading spirit. Gen. Cass was surprised at the remarkable brain-power-of the man, and remarked that he was "the smartest and most eloquent Indian he had ever met." His administration of the affairs of his people was-so satisfactory that for over thirty consecutive years he was annually re-elected to the position of hlead chief. He never ruled a single band until in the later years of his life, when he became chief of the Tittabawassee band, to which he belonged. His power of oratory made him a great favorite with his people, and the fame of O-ge-ma-ke-ga-to spread far and wide. Subse-:: I 0: v 4 --- -- — l

Page  11 i 14 I (RaI I I/ I I I 4 I a HfISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 11 quently, at the ratifvving of the reservation treaty at Detroit, many learned and able lawyers were present, not one of whom, after hearing his great speech interpreted, dare to accept hzis-challenge to discuss the questions affectingo the Indians' welfare with him.. After the treaty of- Saginaw had been ratified and the Indians had becomue reconrciled to the encroachmrent of the white Mail, O-gema-ke-ga-to was quite friendly, and, like an hzonorable man, endeavored to fulfill his obligations to the new com~ers unlder the treaty. IMIMIGRATION COMMENCED. Prior to thle administration of Governor Cass there wras a general opinion that the wh~ole peninsula was one vast swamp and wholly un~fit for cultivation. The commissioners sent out to 'Locate bounty lands for soldiers, after visiting Detroit and going a few miles west, pronounced the country-iothing but morass, and cousequently the bounty lands were located elsewhere. This report retarded immigration but the ultimate result was advantageous, inasmuch as when the tide of immigration did reach its shores it brought thither the better class of population. Gov. Cass procured a survey of the territory and a, wagon road was laid out from Detroit to Chicago. By this means the country was brought into notice and its real merits made known. In 1818 some of the public- lands which had been surveyed, were brought into market and a, steatdy flow of immigration began. The population of the territory increased from 8,876 in 1820, to 31,630 in 1830. ORGANIZING COUNTIES. Monloroe county was organized July 14, '1807; Malt-comnb county, Jatnuary 15, 1818; Oakiland county, nMarch 28, 1820; St. Clair County, May 18, 1821. About this time, as previously mentioned, immigration began to increase rapidly, and on September 10, 1~822, Governor Cass, under the provisions of an act of Congress approve, July 13, 1787, laid out tenl new counties, of wht'ic11 L;2peer was one; although there was not, at; that time nor for several years afterward, a single white inllabitant within its boundaries. The proclamation issued by Governor Cass was as follows: "And I have also thoughzt it expedient to lay out the followingI~ county; that is to say: '"All'thee country includled in thze following boundaries, begrinning at the northwest corner of the county of St. Clair, and runnzing thence wTest to th~e line between the sixth andl seventh railges,, east of the principal meridian; thence south 'to the line between the townships numbered five and six, north of the base line; thence east to tkhe line between tile twelfth and thirteenth ranges, east of the principal meridian; thence north to the place of beginning; sball form a countv to be called the county of Lapeer. "Given' under ruy Phand, at Detroit, this 10th day of Septem — ber,, in the year of our Lord 1822, and of the Independence of the United States the forty-seventh. LEW. CASS. " it is said that thie name "Lapeer" was derived from a French word lapier, signifying flint-an idea suggested by the flinty sub — stances found along the banks' of the Flint River, and for a long time was called Lapier, subsequently the i was dropped and e substituted; since whnich2 time it has been known as Lapeer. LOCATING THE COUNTY SEAT. In 1830 Governor Cass appointed S. T. R. Trowbridge, G. O. W~hitmuore and Hervey Parkes, the latter a surveyor, and all of Oak land County, commissioners to locate the county site of Lapeer Co unty. The commissioners left Pontiac September 14, 1830, taking with them one Josiah Terry as guide. They encamped the first night o11 the W~hitmore plains about twelve miles so~uth~ of their destination. On the following day, September 15th, they established the county site on the northeast fractional quarter of section 5, township 7 north, range 10 east, and thus described in the proclamation of Governor Cass. A point bearing south forty-six degrees thirty minutes west and distant twenty-seven chains from tile northeast corner of section 5 in town 7 north, of range 10 east, and a short distance northwest from the junction of Farmzers' Creeki withn Flint River on lands owned by the United States, being as near as may be the location of the buildings now occupied by the county of Lapeer. After completing their work, the commissioners returned to the camp of the day previous, where they spent the night, but on awakening the next morning Terry was nowhere to be foundl, and wyas next beard of in Detroit. Terry being in the emlploy of Judlge Leroy, of Pontiac, and the records of the U~nitedt States land office showing Danieel Leroy, of Pontia~c, as having bought the land above dlescribedl as the county site of the embryo county of Lapeer, was a very satisfactory explanation of his mysterious disappearance. COUNTY SURVEY. Lapcer" County as first laid out contained twenty-seven townships of laznd, tile bounddaries of which have already been described in the proclamation of Governor Cass. The contract for surveying the countryv betwyeen range 8 cast and Lakie H~uron, extending north to Saginaw Bay. and south to towllship 6, embracingg about eighty townships of land in what are now thle counties of Saginatw, Tuscola, Huron, Sanilac, St. Clair, Lapeer and Genesee, hald been let to Joseph Wampler, a surveyor from Ohio. In tile fall of 1822 Wampler had surveyed about twenty-four townships, atnd being completely daunzted by the hardships of the work, finally atbandloned it, leaving the north line of township 10 unsurveyed, and returned at once to his home in Ohio. It is said hne was starved out by the failuare of the packmnen, their sole means of procuring supplies being to make their way throuigh swamps whlere they wouzld be! nearly stung to death by mosa uitoes. Thlis work: was not resumed' till January, 1834, when Hervey ~Parkies, the surveyor wh~o bad assisted in laying out the county site of Lapeer Couutygv, undertookr to complete the job, which b e finally succeededi in doing after elicounterin.6- terrible hasrdships. Lapeer, which had become qiuite a little hamlet, was t~he headquatrters of the surveying party. The show wats then eighteen inches deep, andt the streams not yet frozen over. After a few weeks' hard work,, the first dav of wh~ich they failed to reach their camp and were obliged to remuain all nightt in the woods without supper, tents or blankets, they abandoned it for a time. During this survey it was no uncommon thing for each man to shoulder and carry during the day a pacsk containing a blankeet and several days' provisions. Under such toils it is not surprishr~g that the myen soon became exhausted. After six weekrs' rest tile w~ork was resumed, andc this timne Parktes made three deposits of p~rovisions; one at Lapeer, another at Ml'ill Creek, and a third at Burfch's M~iill, on Blatck River, -six miles north of Port Huron.. Here he expected to be able to use p~ack horses, but was soon obliged to send them back to Romeo and rely entirely on packmen. They were at best able to make but thlree Miles a day, often not more than two, as ruuch of the way the men would sink to their knees at every step inl the soft and spongy soil. During the survey a packman was lost while returning from ttlie, deposit -at Mill Creek, and wandered in thle woods until he fortunately met a packman returning from the Burch Mill deposit, who piloted him into camp, from which he had been absent two weeks, having suffered hardships in his aimlless wanderings in the wctilderness. I They were at last obliged to return home in April and wait until autunin to finish their work, wFhen they found the country in i I'll -1 -Al -46 1 i 4 - I - & — 4m -- 77 -- C I~ -I.

Page  12 O -____. 4- Vr^ms __ aI II 12 12 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. I - a better state, the water being partially drained from the surface. The work was finally completed in February, 1835, and the party returned home, more than twelve years having elapsed since Wampler began the lines. Messrs. M. B. Smith and E. J. White, of Lapeer, were engaged in this survey, and so far as known Mr. Smith is the only survivor of the party. Mr. Smith, speaking of their experiences, says: "We were frequently obliged to lay down poles and pile on them hemlock boughs to keep out of the water while we slept. I remember we built one camp fire on the earth, covering roots of an overthrown hemlock, after driving center poles to scaffold up to the fire. The difficulty of transporting provisions caused us to be on short allowance, and I well remember at one time when our hunger had not been satisfied for days, and while establishing a corner on the bank of Lake Huron a couple of the boys killed a coon when starting for camp, and not being able to reach it before night, we roasted one-quarter of the coon for our supper and lay down blanketless for our night's repose. The remainder of the little animal, with the last pint of flour at camp, was quickly disposed of on our arrival." CHAPTER II. LAPEER COUNTY ORGANIZED-COUNTY OFFICERS-EARLY ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS —TOWNS ORGANIZED-FIRST SETTLEMENT- PERIOD OF THE LAND FEVER. Lapeer County was organized by an act of the legislative council of the territory of Michigan, approved January 20, 1835, and reads as follows: SECTION 1. Be it enacted by the Legislative Council of the l'erritory of Michigfan, That the county of Lapeer shall be organized from and after the taking effect of this act, and the inhabitants thereof entitled to all the rights and privileges to which, by law, the inhabitants of other counties of this territory are entitled. SEC. 2. That all suits, prosecutions, and other matters now pending before any of the courts of record of Oakland County, or before any justice of the peace of said county, shall be prosecuted to final judgment and execution; and all taxes heretofore levied and now due shall be collected in the same manner as though the county of Lapeer had not been organized. SEC. 3. That the circuit court for the county of Lapeer shall be holden on the Tuesday next after the third Monday in February, and on the first Tuesday after the seeond Monday in July. SEC. 4. That the sheriff for the county of Lapeer shall provide a convenient place for holding courts in said county, at or near the county seat, until public buildings shall be erected. SEC. 5. That this act shall take effect and be in force from and after the first Monday of February next. Approved January 20, 1835. There were then three organized townships in the county: Grand Blanc, consisting of the four southwestern townships of the county, now a part of the county of Genesee, organized March 9, 18338. Bristol was organized March 7, 1834, comprising townships 6 and 7 north, of range 12 east, now known as the townships of Almont and Imlay. Lapeer Township was organized December 30, 1834, and comprised all of the county of Lapeer, not included in the townships of Bristol and Grand Blanc. By the terms of the act under which the county was organized, the inhabitants were entitled to all the rights and privileges of the dwellers in other counties of the territory. The first election of county officers was held on the 7th and 8th of November, 1836. There are no records of this election among the county records, but in the records of the township of Hadley, which was organized March 22, 1836, therev is a record of it, and William Hemingway and N. H. Hart give the following list of officers elected at that time: Sheriff, Samuel Merlin; clerk, Noah H. Hart; treasurer, Joseph B. Hart; register, Caleb Carpenter; judge of probate, Henry lM. Look. COUNTY OFFICERS. County officers elected since that time have been as follows: 1838: Sheriff, Minor Y. Turrill; treasurer, William Hart; clerk, Elijah B. Witherba; register, William S. Higley, Jr. 1840: Sheriff, John Shafer; treasurer, Horace Hinman; clerk, Noah H. Hart; register, William T. Mitchell; probate judge, Mason Butts. 1841: Alanson Porter was elected register to fill vacancy caused by removal from the county of William Mitchell. 1842: Sheriff, David Ingalls; treasurer, Horace Hinman; clerk, Augustus G. Pratt; register, M. B. Smith. 1844: Sheriff, James Bullock; treasurer, Horace Hinman; clerk, John W. Day; register, George F. Ball; probate judge, James M. Needham. 1846: Sheriff, Harvey C. Mills; treasurer, Horace Hinman; clerk, William Buck; register, George F. Ball; probate judge, Alvin N. Hart. 1848: Sheriff, Garry Goodrich; treasurer, Horace Hinman; clerk, William Beech; register, George F. Ball; judge of probate, Jacob Van Antwerp. 1850: Sheriff, Walter P. Beach; treasurer) William H. Clark, clerk, William Beech; register, Reuben McArthur. 1852: Sheriff, George W. Rood; treasurer, William H. Clark; clerk and register, William Beech; probate judge, N. B. Eldridge; prosecuting attorney, John M. Wattles. 1854: Sheriff, George W. Rood; treasurer, William H. Clark; clerk and register, William Beech; prosecuting attorney, A. C. Maxwell. 1856: Sheriff, James More; treasurer, M. B. Smith; clerk and register, Charles Rich; probate judge, Charles Kellogg; prosecuting attorney, Charles M. Walker. 1858: Sheriff, James More; treasurer, M. B. Smith; clerk and register, Charles Rich; prosecuting attorney, Charles M. Walker. 1860: Sheriff, Samuel Carpenter; treasurer, D. E. Hazen; clerk, Hubbell Loomis; register, William Arnold; judge of probate, Wesley Vincent; prosecuting attorney, Silas B. Gaskill. 1862: Sheriff, E. R. Emmons; treasurer, M. B. Smith; clerk, Hubbell Loomis; register, William Arnold; prosecuting attorney, Silas B. Gaskill. 1864: Sheriff, John B. Sutton; treasurer, William W. Barber; clerk, Jasper Bentley; register, U. D. Bristol; 'probate judge, Charles Rich; prosecuting attorney, Silas B. Gaskill. 1866: Sheriff, L. B. Eldridge; treasurer, William W. Barber; clerk, Jasper Bentley; register, U. D. Bristol; prosecuting attorney, Silas B. Gaskill. 1868: Sheriff, John B. Sutton; treasurer, William Arnold; clerk, Jasper Bentley; register, U. D. Bristol, probate judge, John B. Hough; prosecuting attorney, Stephen V. Thomas. 1870: Sheriff, Alonzo S. Hatch; treasurer, Orville O. Morse; clerk, Jasper Bentley; register, John Abbott; prosecuting attorney, William W. Stickney. 1872: Sheriff, U. D. Bristol; treasurer, Orville O. Morse; clerk, Jasper Bentley; register, Robert L. Taylor; prosecuting attorney, Joseph B. Moore. 1874: Sheriff,'Alonzo S. Hatch; treasurer, Orville O. Morse; clerk, Jasper Bentley; register, Robert L. Taylor; prosecuting attorney, Joseph B. Moore. j e I al - -I r' --. IN- -

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Page  13 4 _ __.. -- /, - I1 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 13 I 1876: Sheriff, William Townsend; treasurer, Henry Lee; clerk, Henry A. Birdsall; register, Charles W. Ballard; probate judge, John B. Hough; prosecuting attorney, Harrison Geer. 1878: Sheriff, William Townsend; treasurer, Henry Lee; clerk, Henry A. Birdsall; register, Charles W. Ballard; prosecuting attorney, Harrison Geer. 1880: Sheriff, William Colerick; treasurer, William B. Hamilton; clerk, Henry A. Birdsall; register, Edward T. Woodruff; probate judge, Charles W. Brown; prosecuting attorney, Robert L. Taylor. 1882: Sheriff, William Colerick; treasurer, William B. Hamilton; clerk, Henry A. Birdsall; register, Edward T. Woodruff; prosecuting attorney, William B. Williams. The earliest records in the clerk's office are dated 1838. The election of that year was held November 13 and 14, for the inhabitants were so scattered and there being no roads, it was deemed necessary to keep the polls open for two days. A law had been passed in the meantime vesting the powers hitherto held by the board of supervisors in a board of three county commissioners, one of which was to be elected at each annual election. At the first election of course three were to be elected for one, two and three years respectively. That law was long since repealed and the power returned to the board of supervisors. In the winter of 1835-'36 the first board of supervisors for Lapeer County met at the county seat. There were but two members, Caleb Carpenter, of Bristol, and J. R. White, of Lapeer. The first meeting of supervisors of which there is any record in the clerk's office was held on the first Monday in July, 1842, and ten towns were represented. At this session of the board the total equalized valuation of the real and personal property of the county was determined to be $500,824.88. The aggregate State and county tax was $4,085.41. COURT-HOUSE. The years between 1835 and 1840 brought a wonderful increase of population to this county, mostly an excellent class of people, as regards intelligence and good morals,4,and natives of New England and eastern New York, as firm and as unbending as their own granite hills. Being of this description it is not surprising that various feuds and parties arose, and animosities were kindled, which it was the work of many years to subdue. The most serious of these was what has been styled " the court-house war." The first court-house built in the county was destroyed by fire before it was entirely finished. It was located at the lower ends of the town, a little north and east of the present building. The citizens at the upper part of the town were very anxious to secure the court-house site, and many hard things were said on both sides. When the first court-house was burned it was thought by some to have been the work of an incendiary. A court-house however was a prime necessity, and both factions made a most determined effort to secure the coveted building. Hon. A. N. Hart built the house now used by the county, at an expense of $10,000, which was really a beautiful building for the times. The White brothers built a plainer one about 1840 on the site of the present high school building. After a bitter struggle, Mr. Hart's building was accepted by the board of supervisors, at a cost to the county of about $3,000, greatly to the chagrin of Messrs. White, but really they had done a better work for ttiunty than Mr. Hart. Their house had a beautiful locat iso became known as the Lapeer Academy building. In K i it became the property of the district and for the next ~tw*,X the high school building of the city. The district retairils+:d d when the old building became unfit for use it was repll^ fic3^ jpresent elegant and commodious structure. Thus good: fromr the acrimonious contest. TOWNSHIPS ORGANIZED. GRAND BLANC. —The first township organized was Grand Blanc, March 9, 1833; composed of townships 6, 7 and 8 north, in range 7 east, and townships 6 and 7 north, in range 8 east. The first township meeting was held at the house of Rufus Stevens. MIA.-The second township organized in the county was Mia, March 7, 1834; composed of townships 6 and 7 in range 12 east. The first township meeting held at the house of Daniel Black. Dec. 12, 1834, the name Mia changed to Bristol. April 7, 1846, the name Bristol changed to Almuont. LAPEER.-Dec. 30, 1834, the township of Lapeer was organized, including all of the county of Lapeer, not included in the townships of Grand Blanc and Bristol. First township meeting held at house of E. H. Higley. Previous to this the inhabitants of this extensive tract of country were obliged to go to Pontiac to pay taxes and attend to all judicial business. ATLAS.-March 22, 1836, the township of Atlas was organized, embracing township 6 and the south half of township 7 north, in range 8 east. The first township meeting held at Davison's mills. HADLEY.-March 22, 1836, the township of Hadley was organized, embracing township 6 north, range 9 east, and township 6 north, range 10 east. The first township meeting held at the house of Timothy Wheeler. Territory attached to the county of Lapeer and made a part of the township of Lapeer. March 28, 1836, that part of the United States survey, lying north of the county of Lapeer, designated as the townships in ranges 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 east, now the county of Tuscola, was attached to the county of Lapeer for judicial purposes, and was attached to and made a part of the township of Lapeer. RICHFIELD.-March 11, 1837, all that portion of the United States survey, designated as the north half of township 7 and township 8 north, in range 8 east, was organized as the township of Richfield. The first township meeting held at the house of Draper and Witherbee. LOMOND. —March 11, 1837, township 6 north, range 11 east, and township 7 north, range 11 east, were organized as the township of Lomond. First township meeting held at the house of Daniel Smith. Dunham.-April 2, 1838, the name Lomond changed to Dunham. Dryden.-April 3, 1839, the name Dunham changed to Dryden. METAMORA.-April 2, 1838, township 6 north, range 10 east, detached from the township of Hadley and organized as the township of Metamora. First township meeting held at the house of Tobias Price. ELBA.-April 2, 1838, township 7 north, range 9 east, was detached from the township of Lapeer and organized as the township of Elba. First township meeting held at the house of Wm. S. Bird. MARATHON.-March 22, 1839, all that part of the township of Lapeer designated as townships 8 and 9 north, range 9 east and township 9 north, range 10 east, was organized as the township of Marathon. The first township meeting was held at the house of Abijah Willey. DAVISON.-March 19, 1840, township 7 north, range 8 east, was detached from the townships of Atlas and Richfield and organized as the township of Davison. The first township meeting was held at the house of G. Townsend. ATTICA.-Feb. 16, 1842, township 7 north range 11 east, was detached from the township of Dryden and organized as the township of Attica. First township meeting held at the school-house near John B. Henderson's. kV I. *1I.1^1.'11I --- e c} e

Page  14 I4S'OR OFLAER OUT - - Q!!L. 14~ I i lI I 14 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. t both locatiilg lands in township 6 nortTl, of= range 12 east, now -know as Alulolzt. None of these persons however became actual I FOREST.-March 9, 1843, township 9 north and south half of township 10 north, range 8 east, and south half of township 10 north, range 7 east, was organized as the township of Forest. First township meeting of Forest held at the house of Stephen Beagle. MAYFIELD.-March 9, 1843, township 8 north, range 10 east, was organized as the township of Mayfield. First township meeting held at the school-house near Martin Stiles'. March 15, 1849, the township of Mayfield was attached to and made a part of the township of Lapeer. March 13, 1869, township 8 north, range 10 east, except that portion included in the limits of the city of Lapeer, was again organized as the township of Mayfield. First township meeting held at the school-house near Christopher Farnsworth's. OR(EGON. —March 2.5,1846, township 8 north, range 9 east, was detached from the township of Marathon, and organized as the township of Oregon. First township meeting held at the house of William Skinner. IMLAY.-March 25, 1850, township 7 north, range 12 east and township 8 north, of range 12 east, were detached from the townships of Almonot and Lapeer and organized as the township of Imlay. First township meeting held at the house of Joseph Deneen. GOODLAND. — Feb. 12, 1855, township 8 north, range 12 east, was detached froim Imlay and organized as the township of Goodland. First township meeting held at the house of Calvin C. Symons. ALIsoN. —Feb. 13, 1855, township 9 north, and south half of township 10 north, range 12 east, were organized as the township of Alison. First township meeting held at the house of William Brown. Burnside.-March 17, 11863, th e name Alison changed to Burn side. NORTH BRANCH. —Dec. 18, 1855, township 9 north, range 11 east, was organizecd as the township of North Branch, by the board of supervisors. First township meeting held at the house of Richard Beech, the pioneer of the'township. Inspectors of election, James Deaming, Richard Beech and David C. Wattles. DEERFIELD. —De. 18, 1855, townships 9 and 10 north, range 10 east, were organized as the township of Deerfield. First township imeeting held at the house of Lorenzo Merrill. Inspectors of election, Lorenzo Merrill, Leonard Oliver and Martin Hoffman. BURLINGTON.-Dec. 18, 1855, township 10 north, range 11 east, was organized as the township of Burlington. First township meeting held at the house of Edward Spencer. Inspectors of election, Edward Spencer, Henry Bedell and William Kettle. ARCADIA.-Oct. o15, 1856, township 8 north, range 11 east, was organized as the township of Arcadia. First township meeting held at the house of William Shotwell. Inspectors of election, John B. Wilson, Joseph Wager and Samuel Fitch. RICH.-Dec. 1, 1859, township 10 north, range 10 east, was detached from the township of Deerfield and organized as the township of Rich. The first township meeting was held at the house of James Miles. Inspectors of election, Simeon Crawford, Horace Fox and James Miles. This completes the organization of the townships. Of these Grand Blanc, Atlas, Davison, Richfield and Forest now form a part of the county of Genesee, and township 10 north, range 9 east, once a part of the county of Lapeer, is now the township of Watertown, Tuscola County. FIRST SETTLEMENT OF THE COUNTY. The first entry of land in the county was by Calvin C. Parks, and John K. Smith, of Oakland County, Michigan Territory, Dec. 12, 1825, the east half of northeast quarter of section 32, township 7 north, of range 12 east, now known as Imlay. The next entries were made by Lydia E. L. Chamberlain and Diana Kittridge, both of Macomb County, Feb. 15, 1828, and May 27, 1828, respectively, both locating lands in township 6 north, of range 12 east, now know as Almont. None of these persons however became actual settlers. The honor of being the first settler of the county belongs to James Deneen, from Trumbull County, Ohio, who located 80 acres, the west half of the northeast quarter section 9, township 6 north, of range 12 east, and removed there with his family in the autumn of 1828. For two years he was there alone, but in 1830 he was joined by Jonathan Sleeper, the brothers Oliver and Bezaleel Bristol, and Elijah Sanborn, who settled in the same township. Alo onut is therefore the oldest settled town in the county. PERIOD OF THE LAND FEVER. The years from 1833 to 1838 may probably be set down as the time when, more than in any number of corresponding years during the present century, occurred the greatest immigration from the Eastern to the Western States and Territories. It is safe to say that Michigan more than doubled her population during that brief period. The wvinding trails have disappeared, save here and there they may be traced through the groves of timber, and the broad highways have taken their place. The pioneer's log house has been replaced by others more commodious, ornamental and convenient. Villages have sprung up, and many of them grown into cities; railroads have traversed the country and spanned a continent. War has visited its destruction upon our fair land, and a race of people have been converted from slaves to freemen. IMany of those who brought civilization to this county now sleep with the fathers, but their children are honoring their parentage in their ways and works. By 1836 the spirit of land speculation, that had been rising for some time in the country, had reached its highest pitch. After I General Jackson, in 1833, caused the deposit of the surplus revenue of the United States to be witheld from the old United States Bank and deposited with the State banks, large amounts accumulated in the vaults of the latter, which President Jackson encouraged the banks to loan to individuals by saying that it was by means of the trade of the merchants in paying the import duties on their merchandise into the treasury that the money had accumulated, and it was no more than right that they should have the use of the money to facilitate the operations of their business. But by this hint to the banks they were not particular as to the business which the parties were engaged in who desired loans, and almost any one who was thought shrewd enough to make a good speculation by investing money, could obtain a loan. After the money was borrowed the point was to- make a profitable investment of it, and nothing looked more attractive than the virgin soil of the West, where Uncle Sam possessed millions of broad acres which he could dispose of in parcels of forty acres, or in other subdivisions of sections, at the rate of $1.25 per acre. Michigan was then considered the El Dorado of the West. A heavy emigration from New York and the New England States had for three or four years previously, directed its course to the beautiful peninsula, so that at about the year 1836, parties having money to invest thought it beyond a doubt that if they should forestall those immigrants and purchase the land from the United States, they would receive a large advance from those who wished to make actual settlement. In view of: above mentioned facts it was not likely that those specul casting their eyes over the map of Michigan for a pl their investments, would overlook that part of the ~1 deep indentation of the Saginaw penetrates the h- t - sula and the branches of the broad river eda: out ';every direction like the branches of an enormous tree, e of which V — p I I I i I I I v S. i> I I II." 1 l IC r --- - 7- '"' I -40 K-0 M_

Page  15 — 4 1 I e1. i - - - - - - ^ - 0 l HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 16 is the medium through which tile sap flows, as the outlet of the river is for the trade and commerce of a large portion of northern Michigan. Lapeer County, lying upon the margin of the Saginaw Valley, was proportionately affected with the balance of the Territory. In the fall of 1836 the land office was removed from Detroit te Flint. The office of the register while at Detroit was situated on Jefferson Avenue, just above the Biddle House, and so great was the rush for land in business hours, that parties wVishing to locate lands formed themselves into line and awaited their turn to present their minutes; but a favored few found access by way of the back door or through a window, and would get their locations secured ahead of the crowd. Looking land and furnishing minutes was a lucrative business and furnished employment to many of the early settlers. The description of the land selected was usually kept a secret until it was located at the office. Some parties coming from the East were not so cautious and would generally find when they went to the office to locate their lands that it hlad already been selected. After the land office was removed to Flint that place was thronged with speculators. Purchases of government lands were made with gold and silver. " Bill Gifford " kept a small hotel at Flint, and during the autumn of that year there were nights, when, it is said, more than $40,000 in specie was lying in different parts of the house, which had been brought by guests, who were waiting their turn to do business at the land office. The great financial panic of 1837 most effectually put a check upon the general movement westward, and the wildcat and safetyfund period of 1838 was the culmination of a series of events that brought distress and ruin upon thousands of business men, and consequent hardships, want and distress, upon all the inhabitants of the land, which has had no parallel during the present century, with the exception of the time of the rebellion. With all these calamities and hardships incident thereto, did the early settlers have to contend, and most heroically did they overcome, as an evidence of which the present prosperous condition of the county bears abundant and conclusive testimony. DESCRIPTIVE. Lapeer County is bounded on the north by Tuscola and Sanilac, on the east by Sanila.e and St. Clair, on the south by Macomb and Oakland, and on the west by Genesee and Tuscola. It has an area of 666 square miles, and had, in 1880, a population of 30,188. Lapeer, a city of 3,000 inhabitants, is the county seat. The surface of the county is quite rolling, with very little swvamp land. It is well watered by rivers and spring brooks. There is little available water power except for light work. The principal stream is the Flint River. There are a large number of small lakes and various creeks scattered over the country. The soil varies in the different townships from a sandy loam to a clay loam. The subsoil is invariably clay. The prevailing varieties of timber are beech, maple, ash, hickory, elm and walnut. The principal crops are winter wheat, corn, oats, potatoes, clover and timothy. Apples, pears, plums and grapes succeed well; peaches only in favorable localities, and in favorable seasons. The small fruits and berries grow in abundance, and good markets are found at the railroad stations for all the surplus fruit. The cost of clearing averages from $3 to $15 per acre, according as the timber has been burned off, with a good wood market at the mills and machine shops in Lapeer, and along the line of the railroad. There are no government or State lands of any value in the market. There is considerable unimproved land, with the pine and oak cut off, which can be had at from $5 to $15 per acre. The soil is of good quality, well adapted to agriculture. The "stump lands" also have a good soil, and are rapidly being taken up. Improved farms range in price from $20 to $80 per acre. There are three State roads running north and south; one from Imlay City to the forks of Cass River, one from Attica to Cass River, and one from Lapeer to Lexington, via North Branch. The county roads are generally in a good condition. Snow falls in November, but no sleighing is looked for before Christmas. The average depth is about a foot. When the fall of snow is light, the ground freezes to an average depth of two feet. Spring plowing begins from the 20th of March to the 1st of April. The schools and school buildings of Lapeer County are all good. Agriculture is the principal industry, though lumbering, charcoal burning, and the getting out of ties, posts and telegraph poles, is carried on to a considerable extent. Labor is in fair demand, particularly on farms during the sum-. mer season. Farm labor brings from $16 to $20 per month with board. Frorm $20 to $26 per month is paid in the lumber camps. The Chicago & Grand Trunk, the Detroit & Bay City, its branch to Five Lakes, the Almont branch of the Port Huron & Northwestern, and the Pontiac, Oxford & Port Austin Railroads enter the county at different points. The Otter Lake extension of the Flint & Pere Marquette, and the Port Huron & Northwestern, also touch the borders of the county, hence the farmer can find good markets in any direction, for anything he may have for sale. The numerous railroad facilities found within the borders of this county offer special advantages to many kinds of manufacturing enterprises, and there is every prospect that Lapeer will have its full quota of factories at no distant date. CHAPTER III. PIONEER PICTURES-GOVERNOR BAGLEY ON PIONEER LIFE-PIONEER WOMANHOOD —THE VILLAGE, ETC. The pioneers were not adventurers, but seekers after homes, and comforts for their families. Their endurance of present hardships was strengthened by hopes of future rewards. Back in their home amid pleasant surroundings and social privileges in some Eastern State or in one of the older counties of Michigan, husband and wife have debated earnestly and long the question of seeking a home in some new country where land was cheap. Late at night while the children slumbered and the babe worried in its mother's arms, the anxious parents weighed the hardships and privations, and the chances for home and comforts in the future. Often they traced upon the map the line of journey to some fancied spot. It was far into the forest, and as they pictured to themselves the pinched cabin in a little clearing, they could almost feel the loneliness which enveloped it. But while their gaze was fixed upon the painted section the mists of the future cleared away, the clearing expanded, vines crept up the cabin walls, and flowers sprang up about the door; a garden shaped itself beside the house and grain tops waved above the stumps; the forest river expanded and the fields grew cleaner, and then a cottage came between them and the pile of logs; into view came other farms and homes, the school-house and the church, and just beyond, the vil lage with its active life. Thus they saw the picture that fancy drew, and each knew that the question was settled with the other. In his dreams he hurls the glittering ax deep into the monarchs of the woods, and his slumbers are disturbed by the crash of falling trees. In her dreams she moves about the pictured cabin adding touches here and there, and sighs an accompaniment as she thinks of the sacrifice involved. The shadows are beginning to deepen in the thick woods, and 4 - #,Y 11 r

Page  16 -J1 ) N ad I r 16 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. the family of immigrants come to a halt in front of a cabin that is hedged about with stumps in the cramped clearing. The jaded oxen sink wearily upon their sides; the husband leans upon his ax and looks inquiringly at his wife whose tired gaze is fixed upon the cabin. Both are too much exhausted to talk or to analyze their feelings and see if the feeling that oppresses them is weariness or sadness. The wagon contains a motley aggregation. There is a stove, beds, a barrel of pork and another of flour, some boxes, and a few small articles that will be needed in the household. Upon an extemporized seat sits the wife and mother holding a babe in her arms, and the boy has clambered down to make an examination of the place. The journey has been a wearisome one. He has cut out the the road with his ax, and ever and anon has had to lift and pry his load out of the "cat holes" which were frequent along the way. He has been here before to chop the little clearing and prepare a shelter for his wife and little ones when they should come. Now they make such few preparations as are necessary for the night and then rest themselves until the morrow, when a new era of life will begin. Sometimes the journey has not been made as easily even as this one. Reminiscence is crowded with mishaps and trying situations through which pioneer families had to pass. Perhaps, as has been the case, the mud was deep, the heat intense. and flies vicious beyond description. At last when completely exhausted the oxen sink upon the ground unable to proceed, and the immigrants atre stalled in the woods five miles from their destination. Leaving I the team and load in the path and turning loose the cow that was: tied behind the wagon, the husbancd takes the babe il his arms and continues the journey on foot followed by his Nvife. Somehow they reach the end of their journey, and a night's rest is the only tonic or | liniment needed or used as a restorative. The shanty has not always been built in advance, and temporary shelter is provided until one can be built. The wagon is capable of being made serviceable in many ways, bowers are made, or the shanty of a settler already oln the ground, is made literally to swarm with the numerous families that seek shelter beneath its hospitable roof, for the door of a settler's cabin was never closed against a new comer while there was room upon the floor for another bank. House building was a simple job and soon accomplished. A few boards or logs hastily put together, some sort of covering for a roof, a blanket for a door, a sheet for window, and temporary quarters were provided. Once settled in their pioneer home, no matter how rude, the battle of life in the wilderness began, and as a rule was successfully waged. Privations and hardships were the rule rather than the exception. Provisions were scant even amidst the greatest plenty, for markets were far away and money scarce. Il one cabin potatoes and salt have been the diet for weeks at a time; in another, sifted bran has beelnthe only food the larder could produce, still other families have subsisted on berries and milk, or possibly only berries composed the bill of fare. But there was sunlight beaming through the rifts of clouds, and life had more of brightness than of glooml. Every fa nily knew their neighbor and the neighborhood was not circumscribed by boundaries. Thev knew all about the settlers in the next township, whence and wlhy they came, the amnount of money in each purse, and the quantity of provisions in each store, and no matter how low the flour in the barrel or the potatoes in the heap, enough always remained to divide until all were gone. These were months of the hardest toil, but this was not a con sideration with them, and they performed it with a relish. Every tree that fell crashing to the ground echoing and re-echoing among the pillars of God's temple, saluted their ears with music; every log heap, which, in the shades of night, sent a gleam of light through the dark forest, sent also a bright ray of hope to their hearts, and every clearing large enough to admit God's sunlight through to bathe the original soil gave to them an earnest of the harvest that, in time to come, should gladden their hearts and richly reward them for their labors. And so the clearing widened and bloomed; vines crept up and covered the cabin; flowers blossomed here and there, and slowly but surely the picture of their dreams was being brought out in more lasting colors, by these sturdy artists of the wilds. As farms multiplied the neighborhood grew smaller, aud communities formed. Along the forest paths came the itinerant preacher and religious worship was established. Some morning the chorus of children's voices about an abandoned shanty announced the opening of the first school. Interests and duties multiplied, the wilderness is pushed into the distance, and pioneer life has become a reminiscence of the past. GOVERNOR BAGLEY ON PIONEER LIFE. The late GovernorBagley, who was himself a pioneer, once drew the following excellent picture of pioneer life: "We find in the dictionary the word pioneer means to go before-prepare the way for. The noun pioneer meant originally a foot soldier or a foot passenger-one who goes before to remove -obstructions or prepare the way for others. How fully we who have been pioneers appreciate and understand these technical definitions of the word, and yet how incomplete and imperfect they are. Foot passengers, indeed, we were. It was easier to walk than to ride; but whether it was or not, we walked. The few household goods we ownedthe spinning wheel and the oven-filled the wagon, and mother and the children chinked into the spare places, and we and the dog walked. Preparers of the way, indeed, were we. The roads we built, the log bridges we threw across the streams we did not destroy, but left for those who were to come after us. The pioneer was unselfish. He cared not whether friend or foe was behind him; if he could make his way any more easy he was glad of it.He felt he was in partnership with the world-la fellow feeling made him wondrous kind.' He was the advance guard of an army-countless il numbers, irresistible in its power,-an army that knew no such word as fail, and listened to no order for retreat. The pioneer was the child of progress. He looked up, and not down; forward, and not back. Behind was the past; before him the future. He felt that the wise men came from the East, and took courage. The needle of his compass always pointed westward, and he followed it. Our pioneer dreamed dreams and saw visions. He dreamed of the old home on the hillsides of New England, or the quiet valleys of New York; of gray-haired father and mother, watching from the low doorway the departing children, or, perchance, sleeping in the village church-yard; perhaps of smaller green mounds covering his John or Kate; or of the country church, where theologic dust, knocked from the pulpit cushion in the good old orthodox way, had so often closed his eyes and ears on drowsy Sundaty afternoons; or of the spelling-bee or singing school, where he first met the country lass, 'Who, tying her bonnet under her chin, FEd tied the young man's heart within,' and kept it tied forever after. Il'is dreamis were of the yesterdays -his visions were of tomorrow. He foresaw hard work and- hard times, back-ache and heart-ache, blue days and weary nights; but he saw, too, in the i ii i,. i:j: E e f~f:I q - I (1) F 1'C.

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Page  17 Tl -- D |I I HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY 17 dim future, the town, the village, the city, the county, the State, an empire of itself; he saw schools and churches, factories and fertile fields, institutions of science and learning; he saw capital and labor, brain and body, mind and muscle, all employed in the advancement of civilization and the permanent improvement of mankind. And of all this he was to be a part and parcel. What visions were these! Do you wonder that the pioneer was brave, cheerful and faithful? "Though his visions were grand, the realization is grander still. He builded better than he knew, but with abundant faith in the future, adopted as the motto of the State, 'Si qul(eris peninssulamr, amneanamn. circutmspice-(If thou seekest a beautiful peninsula, behold it here),'-and, thanks to his right arm and courageous heart, we do behold it, covered with quiet villages, thriving cities, fruitful fields, and blooming orchards, dotted all over with schools and colleges, churches and public institutions, that tell the story of a civilization, grand in its conception and mighty in its.progress. This is the handiwork of the pioneer, the ripened crop of the whitecovered wagon. "We look back to the old times as hard times, and so they were; full hearts and empty purses, hard work and plenty of it, shivering ague and wasting fever, were the common lot of our early settlers, yet they hlad their share of good times too, and were free from many a plague that annoys their children. i"Hard money and soft money were not debatable questions. You may remember the story of the man who, when he heard that the bank of Constantine had failed, said his heart came into his mouth when he heard of it, and he rushed home and to the bureau drawer, when he found he hadn't any Constantine money, or any other sort. He was a pioneer. "Butter and eggs were pin-money; wheat paid the store-keeper; sled length, knotty wood, that wouldn't make fence rails, paid the minister, while an occasional pig, or a grist of corn or wheat paid the doctor. Trade was the order of the day,-the necessity of the time. And so we traded, and dickered, and swapped, exchanging products and helping one another; and while in the outside world bankers talked of stocks and values, politicians quarreled over tariffs and free trade, and statesmen wrote of the laws of trade, of corporations, monopolies, finances, etc., somehow or other, in our trading and dickering, we managed to grow a little better off from year to year. "Quarrelsome school meetings were unknown in those days. We never fought over thie question of whether we should build a three-story school-house with a basement, or a four-story one without; or whether we should put a cupola or a mortgage upon it. We built our log school-house, set the teacher at work, and boarded him round the neighborhood. The religious life of the pioneer was free of sectarianism. The itinerant minister doing his Master's work was always welcome to home and hearth-stone. The schoolhouse was open to him, regardless of his creed. He baptized, and buried, and married, and asked no questions, and got but few fees. "The different schools of medicine let the pioneer kindly alone. The boneset and wormwood, pennyroyal and catnip that hung on the chimney-breast, or on the rafters in the roof, were commonly enough; but if not, when we called in the hard-worked, poorly-clad, yet patient and jolly doctor, we did not question his "pathy" or his diploma. It may have been parchment or paper, from a college on earth, or in no-man's land, but we were sure his pills would be big enough, and that we could safely trust his jalap and cream of tarter, his calomel and quinine. "Questions of domestic economy and home discipline, that do worry the best of us nowadays, gave the pioneer but little trouble. No dispute could be gotten up over the pattern of the parlor carpet, for they hadn't any, or, if they had, it was of rags. "The fashion plates did not reach the woods in those days, and Jane's bonnet and Charlie's coat were worn, regardless of style, till they were worn out, and then they were made over for the younger clhildren. Who called first, and who called last, and who owed calls, were not debatable questions with our mothers; they visited when they had time and wanted to, and when they didn't they stayed at home. "Insurance agents did not worry the pioneer,-his log house was fire proof. Patent-right peddlers haunted him not, for necessity made him his own inventor. Lightning-rod agents, smooth-tongued and oily, let him alone, as lightning had no terrors for him. The jaunty, affable sewing machine man had not been born to trouble the soul of our mothers. "Mellifluous melodeons were not set upD in the parlor on trial. The robins and frogs, the orioles and the owls made music enough for him. "The height and color, the architecture and structure of the first house gave us no uneasiness. It was built of logs any way. If we were inclined to be extravagant, we painted the door and window-casings red, making the paint of buttermilk and brick dust. The pathway to the gate was lined with pinks and fouro'clocks, sweet-williams, andlarkspur,-Latin names for American flowers had not been invented then. Hollyhocks and sunflowers lifted their stately heads at either end of the house; morning-glories climbed gracefully over the two front windows, and the hop vine, with its drooping bells, crept quietly over the door.,"The patent pump or rattling wind-mill were as yet unknown; the well-sweep lifted its awkward hand as if beckoning one to quench his thirst from 'the old oaken bucket that hung in the well. 4"On questions of public policy the pioneer had decided opinions. His New England or New York education had fixed these firm and unchangeable, and the partisans of Jackson and Clay, Van Buren ana Harrison, argued their respective merits and demerits as warmly as we do to-day. But office-seekers were scarce and office-holders scarcer, though they existed then, as now, a sort of necessary evil. "One of the most prominent characteristics of the old time was the universal hospitality and helpfulness that abounded everywhere. The latch-string ran through the door. The belated traveler was sure of rest at the first house. Everybody was ready to help in case of accident to wagon or cattle. 'Lend a hand' was the motto of the pioneer. Teams were hitched together for breaking up; in harvest time, the neighbors cradled and raked and bound for each other; when one went to the mill he went for the neighborhood; logging-bees and husking-bees, quilting-bees and raisings were play-spells. We boast, and very justly, too, of all that machinery has done for us, and especially in the field of agriculture; but has it ever occurred to you how much it has done to make machines of us? We have no need to call upon our neighbor for help in the harvest field, -the reaper takes his place. The old-fashioned quilting, with its gossip and talk, its evening frolic and games, has departed. The sewing machine does the work of willing hands in the long ago. We are not as dependent or as generous in these days as in the old ones. We ask less, and of course give less. "We are richer, and the world is richer for its inventions, though I cannot help think that the swelling of our pocket-books is accompanied by a shrinking of our hearts. Whether this be so or not, the hospitality, the generosity, the helping hand and kindly heart that made 'the whole world kin' when we were young, are worth remembering and imitating as we grow old. 1I __ L_ ____ Ill, Y —, -I O, —

Page  18 i f If i f f 1 i j I f i, 4 1 I I i 18 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. - "The pioneer was a worker. 'From toil he wins his spirits light, From busy day the peaceful night; Rich, from the very want of wealth, In Heaven's best treasures, peace and health.' I don't know that he loved work any better than we do; but he had to do it, and everybody around him, wife and children, worked too. 'God and the angels were the only lookers on' in the old time. "The boys held the plough and the girls held the baby. The wife rocked the cradle and rall the spinning-wheel at the same time, and to the same tune. To get the trees out and the crops in was the ambition of the family, and they all helped. *"The one grand impelling power that directed the pioneer was the idea of home. He left the home of his boyhood, not to float idly on the world's surface, not to tarry here a while and there a while, but with a fixed, firm purpose of founding a home of his own. He knew that States and communities, cities and villages, would follow his footsteps, but the goal he strove for was home. For him, 'East or West, home's best.' The love of home we bear to-day is, our inheritance from the fathers, 'more to be desired than gold yes, than much fine gold, sweeter also than honey and the honey comb.' Let us cherish it, increase it with watchful care, and as new swarms go out from the parent hive, let them settle in a hive of their own, remembering that "There is a spot of earth supremely blest, A dearer, sweeter spot than all the rest, Where man, creation's tyrant, casts aside His sword and scepter, pageantry and pride, While in his looks benignly blend Tile sire, the son, husband, brother, friend; Here woman reigns, the mother, daughter, wife, Strew with fresh flowers the narrow way of life. In the clear heaven of her delightful eye, An angel guard of love and graces lie; Around her knees domestic duties meet, And fireside pleasures gambol at her feet. Where shall that land, that spot of earth, be found? Art thou a man,-a patriot,-look around; O! thou shalt find, whcre'er thy footsteps roam, That land thy country, and that spot thy home.' "The spirit of unrest, of conquest, and of progress that has animated the Anglo-Saxon for so many centuries is the spirit of pioneership. The men and women of the Mayflower, when they cast anchor in Plymouth Bay, saw in the land that gladdened their eyes a home free from persecution, a land where they could worship God with freedom and according to the dictates of their own conscience, and that was all. They knew not that the hand that guided them in pursuit of religious freedom had chosen them as the founders of a nation. They felt not the power of the spirit of civilization impelling them. They did not realize that in the wake of their little craft there followed the steamship, the locomotive, and the telegraph. In the cabin of that vessel the arts and sciences, invention and discovery, commerce and trade, were unseen passengers. At its masthead floated the simple banner of the cross, and though the red, white and blue of the December sky hung over them, they did not see in it the flag of a nation of fortv millions of people. All this they knew not, for in the small compass of their ken they only saw the immediate present. They forgot that the blood of the centuries that flowed in their veins was that of the pioneer. "Our own pioneers, and we too, have not recognized this in our rovings and migrations. They and we set out on our pilgrimage to find a home for ourselves, and have established empires and builded states. The divine purposes of the Great Ruler have been entrusted to the pioneer. He has been the instrument in subduing the waste places, in civilizing and humanizing the world. I I The pathway he carved out has become the highway upon which the world is traveling, bearing in its train the civilization of the nineteenth century, laden with the love of liberty and freedom, freighted with the noblest, highest hopes of humanity. The great procession is still in motion; it cannot pause or stop; still there are worlds to conquer, still there is work for the pioneer. The Pilgrim Fathers founded the -nation, their sons saved it, and it is ours to preserve and perpetuate. Let us then, in this birthyear, highly resolve to be true to the blood of the pilgrim and pioneer that courses through our veins. They laid the foundation strong and sure. It is for us to complete the structure. Let us see to it, then, that our work be well done, so that with us education and morality, religion and liberty, free thought and free speech shall abide forever. 'For the structure that we raise, Time is with material filled; Our to-days and yesterdays Are the blocks with which we build. 'Truly shape and fashion these, Leave no yawning gaps between; Think not because no man sees, Such things will remain unseen." PIONEER WOMANHOOD. Local history, as a general rule, does not award to pioneer women the recognition they deserve. One might almost infer that the early settlers were a race of old bachelors, and that the light of woman's presence never illuminated their rude cabins. Had this been true, civilization would have halted at the border, for without the wife and mother there is no home, and without home the structure of our civil liberty is without foundation. But pioneer women have done more than to illuminate cabins or influence society; in many a clearing she worked by her husband's side, chopping and clearing, and in other ways she was a helpmeet in the fullest sense. A wife and mother refers to pioneer women as follows. "In the days of the Revolution, many a man had occasion to remark: 'God bless America's women;' and to-day many a pioneer farmer has reason to cherish his wife in her noble support of him in the most trying period of his life-breaking up a new farm with the traditional wolf howling at the door for admission. And to go into one of these homes to-day you will hardly realize from the personal appearance of the comely matron that her life has had as much of the shadow as of the sunshine cast upon it; converse with her upon the subject and in nine cases out of ten, she will tell vou that the years have slipped by so rapidly and so smoothly that she can hardly realize that these big sons and daughters are hers, or that she has seen the broad acres that surround the residence brought to a state of tillage. I know a woman, of sweet and motherly dispositiou, who now rides in her carriage and could dress in silks and satins if she chose to; who lives in a fine large house, and whose husband and three stalwart 'boys' till 170 acres of splendid land, who told me, as she smoothed the silvered hair that crowns her shapely head, that for years of her pioneer life she never wore a shoe, and had but two calico dresses; for foot covering in the winter she was dependent upon old rags and deer skins, and went barefoot in the summer. For two years their log cabin had for furniture a common bedstead, a pine table, one rocking chair and three stools, a cook stove and some shelves in the corner for dishes. Her household duties were simple enough-no dainty pastry or toothsome cake ever graced that deal table-and when not sewing she went into the logging field or burned brush. Her husband was strong and energetic, and used to work away from home whenever opportunity offered, and come home and swing his ax by moonlight until 2 o'clock in the morning. On such occasions she used to 'top' and trim the trees for him, and make his work lighter and more i I -,\ l JI I L 93 I ---- [ 1 -"II

Page  19 II L. HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 19 I I e i cheerful by her presence. Do you wonder that her husband's deep voice softens into love cadences when he speaks of or to 'mother,' or that manly sons and womanly daughters worship the woman that gave them birth? There is in that home an atmosphere of love and veneration that the memory of toil and tribulation cannot banish, and who will deny that wifely tenderness and motherly love has produced it? "I know another woman whose husband was so deep in the mire of poverty, that he had to go into the lumber woods to work, leaving her to care for the oxen, the cow and the pig, which composed their stock. She had a babe at the breast, and through that long, dreary winter, was forced to chop her own wood, do all the chores, and walk eleven miles, at frequent intervals, with her babe in her arms, to obtain what few groceries she required. The howling of wolves at eventide mingled with her lullaby song, and often she was kept awake all night by the noises made by the frightened cattle and hog. On one occasion she found that a huge bear had gained access to the pen, and seizing an ax she determined that the killing of the hog should be a dear conquest for him. On her approach the bear stuck his head over the pen, and was brained by a single blow. Finding that the terrible animal was dead, the brave woman returned to the house to rest; in the morning she skinned and dressed the monster, and had bear meat all the rest of the winter. "I know another woman whose husband was prostrated by a severe sickness two years after he commenced to clear his farm, and for nine weeks she made weekly trips to a village, ten miles distant, for groceries and medicines, chopped the woed, took care of the stock, and nursed her husband almost day and night. And, all this, her husband says, without a single murmur. Was she not a heroine? "I know another woman, now forty years of age and surrounded with every comfort, who tells some soul-stirring stories of personal experience. She came to the county many years ago, a bride of a month, and they were dreadfully poor. During the first six months they had nothing to eat but potatoes and corn bread, (wheat bread was a rarity then), and were very glad to get enough of such food to satisfy hunger. She has plowed, hoed and dug potatoes, raked hay, cut corn -in fact, done all manner of farm work except cradle grain and mow hay. Notwithstanding her hardworking life, she is to-day a fresh looking, healthy matron, and the mother of tenll children, all living. "I know another woman, rising sixty years of age, the narrative of whose pioneer experience would make a very readable volume. Her husband took up a farm and parted with every cent he had in the world in paying the regular fees. For several years she assisted her husband in the logging and harvest fields, sowed grain, hoed and dug potatoes, etc., in the meantime caring for a large family. It was pinching times with them for years, so close, in fact, that it seemed impossible for them to maintain life. It was nine miles from their home to a grist-mill, and this woman for several weeks traveled that distance daily to obtain from 15 to 30 cents worth of meal, to keep the family from starving. Her husband was a blacksmith, and almost daily did some odd job for a neighbor, and the few pennies earned in that way for months constituted the family's support. Her husband, her son-in-law and herself logged nine acres of heavily timbered land in eleven days, their labor often extending far into the night. On one occasion, when her husband was absent cooking on the drive, she laid twenty rods of rail fence in a day, in order to protect the growing corn. This woman for four years did not have a shoe on her feet, wearing shoe packs, made by her husband out of unfinished leather obtained at the tannery, and to her a calico dress seemed rich raiment. She was cheerful and I i I I i I i hopeful under the most discouraging circumstances, and now that they are comfortably situated, the old gentleman often says that if it had not been for 'mother's' pluck and words of cheer, he would have given way under the strain. "Spartan womanhood pales in the light of that of the newly developed farming regions of the northwest, and the rising generation should be given to understand that in the early lives of 'grandpa' and 'grandma' was more of want and trouble, than of plenty and comfort. "All of the women of whom I have spoken are healthy and strong yet, despite their years, and though their girth may not be fashionable, or their raiment made by Worth, they are the best of wives and mothers, and companionable to a marked degree. "Side by side, with the experience of a pioneer farmer, should be placed that of his hard-working, self-denying, never-complaining wife. The brightest jewel in a woman's crown is her all absorbing affection for husband and children; and none shine brighter than those that have borne the test of rugged experience." THE VILLAGE. It lieth ill the East, or in the West; it lieth in the South, or in the North; it is set upon a hill and is seen afar, or in a vale where silvery rivers glide by to the sea; it standeth on a plain amid monarchal groves, or it looketh out on waves that wrap the globe-the village whereof we write. It has two streets, or it has ten. It has 5,000 inhabitants, or it has 500. It has gilded vanes on snowy or rock-built spires, or it hath none of these. It has showy mansions or old-fashioned houses with great chimneys, or both. It is fast and alert, or it lags in the wake of time fifty years bellind. The traveler comes to it on the rushing train, or in the stately vessel or lethargic stage. The morning papers reach it before the matutinal meal or in the middle of next week. Wherever on earth's wide floor you please, lieth this ubiquitous village. Its founders were solid and worthy men-tradition hath it ever thus. It existed in the "good old times," when frosty meeting-houses were without fires in December; when shirt-fronts were ruffled an ell deep; when silver shoe-buckles were in vogue; when whitewashed panels of the tavern door were indorsed "Rum, Brandy, Gin;" or the sun light and cloud-shade fall upon it where, a few years ago. was no human habitation. Arts fade, kingdoms fail, years cole and go, but the habit of the village endures through all. In this village whereof we write, are many men of many minds, and women in like case. It has, one in a dozen, a person who makes other people's business a special study, going up and down and to and fro attending to the same. He is as silent as a clam on his own affairs, but he knows his neighbors' like a book. He does not read-too busy with some one's credentials. His gastronomic idol is No. 3 mackerel, which fosters poking inquisitiveness. He is great on '"they say", a like nuisance. He thinks he is shrewd, but quiet people esteem him a bore, a social ferret, a miserable pump, a portable clack mill. Medicine cannot cure him, missions don't move him; lhe noses on, with just prudence enough to avoid a suit for slander through a specific defect in the law. The keen old prophet of the Koran taught that in his paradise there was no place for such. It has persons eminently honest who are always taxed too high and haunt the board of assessors, but are scrupulous about taking oath. It hath traders who, when you wish to buy, are all suavity and sweetness, but if you have anything to sell, are quite the reverse; who, when they buy their goods, beat down and shop around fearfully. In this selfsame village are many persons who don't like the minister; he isn't a big gun; he preaches politics, or he doesn't; prays for the government, or he doesn't; called here twice and there once; too energetic, or not enough so; quotes Shakspeare, keeps a good horse, wears turn-down collars-don't like him at all —won't go to church as i I I -.9-. r -- r r 1 - -?7-0

Page  20 ,1 i ------ - 1 I I -1 _. 20 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. lo 1 I long as he preaches; (probably won't, whoever preaches). Also, in this village, which attends the earth on its annual and diurnal revolutions with notable regularity, are certain persons who voluntarily contribute to keep watch and ward over the affairs of young people; who administer on such by authority of -they say" and "I guess," utterly oblivious in their querulous years that they were youthful once and lived in glass houses that a pebble might have shattered, Many a fair reputation have they insidiously "shouldn't-wondered" to Hades which, else, had shone like the sun. Over many a young heart that was striving to win a place among the honored and worthy have they cast a cloud of heaviness that has smothered its hopeful merits in despair. They are ever on the alert to detract, never to encourage. But it was ever thus. But in this village are many good people who live in charity and neighborly feeling one toward another; who remember that all men are not oracles of advice; who do not suffer the barnacles of detraction to soil their garments; whose hearts go out in benign feeling toward their fellow mortals: who were taught the valuable lesson in early youth to avoid things that concerned them not; whose minds to them such kingdoms are that they have enough to occupy them without meddling with other people's business. Such people are the golden pillars which uphold the place. Such is the village and such will it be "till the funeral note of the world shall be knelled" by eternity's solemn bell. CHAPTER IV. PIONEER PROFESSIONAL AND EDUCATIONAL HISTORY- EARLY RELIGIOUS MATTERS-BENCH AND BAR —EARLY DOCTORSEARLY SCHOOLS. "The groves were God's first temples; ere man first learned To hew the shaft and lay the architrave And spread the roof above them; ere he framed The lofty vault to gather and roll back The sound of anthems." A high order of civilization was introduced into this new country by the early settlers. They came from a land of churches and schools and brought with them a high appreciation of the worth of a Christian intelligence. The first echo of the woodman's ax had scarcely died away before the itinerant preacher arrived and the notes of prayer and praise ascended from a place of worship. The denominations first represented here were the Methodist, Congregational, Presbyterian, Baptist and Christian. The first religious service in the county was held by the Rev. Abel Warren, of the M. E. Church, who preached a funeral discourse for an infant son of Mr. Bezahel Bristol, of the township of Almont. Rev. Mr. Warren was the pioneer preacher of this and several other counties. He was a man of large heart, and his labors were crowned with great success. His memory is still green in the hearts of the old pioneers and their children. He also performed the first marriage ceremony, that of Mr. Culien Baldwin and Miss Nancy Elderkin, at the house of Mr. Oliver Bristol, of Almont, Jan. 15, 1832. No church was organized here however until 1834, whenl a class was formed by Rev. L. D. Whitney, who, however, did not remain here long. This was known as the Newbury appointment, and was the nucleus of the present M. E. Church of Almont. About the year 1832 an M. E. minister by the name of Swazie, came from Flint to Lapeer. He was a man of rough speech and assumed the high prerogative of judge of the living and dead, which aroused the spirit of the pioneer young men to such a degree that he hastily left and did not return. His successor was a cripple named Washington Jackson, who came from Farmington. In 1835 Lapeer circuit was formed, with Rev. O. F. Northl as pastor. The same year the Hadley church was organized by Mr. North and was composed of four mermbers. The first sermon in Hadley was preached by Rev. James Hemingway. The first M. E. love feast and communion was held by Rev. E. H. Pilcher, the presiding elder, some time in 1835. The M. E. Church havingr orgranized a circuit with its headquarters at the county seat, the preachers in charge organized classes in almost every settlement in the county, meeting with these classes once a month perhaps. The history of much of this heroic labor and selfsacrifice will never be written, the very names of many of the pioneer preachers having been forgotten, as the policy of this church is a continual change of pastors. When Lapeer was first made an appointment, in 1834, it was attached to Detroit district, with Rev. James Gilruth for presiding elder, who was succeeded in 1836 by Wm. Herr; he in 1838 by Geo. Smith; he in 1812 by Elijah H. Pilcher. In 1813 Lapeer was attached to Shiawassee district, with Larman Chattield for presiding elder. In 1845 Larman Chatfield was still presiding elder, but the district bore the name of Grand River. In 1816 the appointmelnt was again placed on Detroit district, with Elijah Crane for presiding elder, who was succeeded in 1848 by James Shaw. In 1850, it was embraced in Flint district with George Bradley for presiding elder, who was succeeded in 1852 by George Smith, who in turn was succeeded in 1856 by Samuel Clements, Jr., who was succeeded in 1858 by James S. Smart. In 1862 Hadley was placed on the Romeo district, with John Russell for presiding elder. At the present time Lapeer belongs to the Flint district. Contemporary with the labors of Washington Jackson, 0. F. North and L. D. Whitney, of the Methodist Episcopal Church, were the labors of Rev. Mr. Ruggles, of the Congregational Church, who was a man of unbounded zeal and energy. He resided at Pontiac, and preached wherever he could gather an audience, making his missionary tours mostly on foot. He planted several churches in the wilderness, some of which are extinct, but most of them remain a monument of his arduous labors. Presbyterian and Congregational churches were organized at a very early date in Lapeer, as many of the first settlers there were adherents to the "Westminster" creeds. The First Congregational Church of Lapeer was organized in July 1833, by Mr. Ruggles. This society was afterwards known as the Congregational and Presbyterian Church, and still later the Congregational part was dropped altogether. Subsequent to the organization of the Lapeer society one was organized in Hadley. The Congregational Church has long since been merged with other religious. bodies. The Presbyterian Church still remains one of the oldest and wealthiest religious bodies in the county. Rev. Mr. Sly was, we believe, the pioneer Presbyterian home missionary. In 1838 a Congregational society was formed in Almont, the result of the labors of Rev. Hiram Smith, who ministered to the church for three years, then was succeeded by Rev. Mr. Parker, to whom the county is largely indebted for his noble educational efforts. His successor, Mr. James R. Taylor, was also a prominent educator in early times. Indeed we can scarcely appreciate the good done by these men who went into the wilderness preaching and teaching, sharing the scanty fare of the pioneer, and forming the mind and tastes of the youth then growing into manilhood and womanhood in these wild forests. If they did not plant as many churches or gain as many converts to their peculiar creed as did their Methodist brethren, we can but think that their influence on society was even greater, for they were menL of liberal culture, of which the circuit rider of those days possessed far too little. But the present generation cannot be too thankful for the services of both home missionaries and circuit riders in those early days. Both classes did their work, and did it well. True we smile at many of the questions which produced theological disputes, in which there J -~ 4-1 _ <Xr I -' At 9 ^

Page  21 1 i j3J I _ ~ ___ — ~ I HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY 21 - - - was too much of the spirit of the world, the flesh and the devil, but these were the errors of the times. Among these early home missionaries who were also teachers, were Rev. E. W. True, who for a long time taught the Lapeer academy, and Rev. Charles Kellogg, of Almont, who was tried for heresy while pastor of that church. He wasp acquitted and soon after resigned his charge and we believe left the sacred desk. Presbyterian and Congregational Churches were also formed at Farmer's Creek in 1838 and 1840. Tlhe Presbyterian Church was founded by Rev. Abijah Blanchard, who was its pastor for two years, but his New England Puritan ideas were far too rigid to suit the free life of the wilderness, or the untamed spirit of Young America. Indeed some of the prosecutions brought before the church were of such a trivial character as to lead us to wonder what manner of spirit could possess the pastor and church. Of course a church a prey to intestine broils is but short lived, and after the removal of Mr. Blanchard we hear nothing more of it. The Congregations] Church, formed upon its ruins, flourished for a number of years, but being decimated by death and removals was disbanded. The United Presbyterians have for years had a flourishing society among the Scotch in the town of Almont, and the Congregationalists a few years since built neat churches at Imlay City, Metamlora, and several other points. There is also a large church at Oakwood, just over the line in Oakland County, which numbers some of Lapeer's best citizens among her members. In the year 1837 the Baptist Church in Almont was organized by the Rev. C. Churchill, with sixteen members. He was its pastor for seven years, leaving in 1844. In 1846-'47 they built a church, which we believe they still occupy. The usefulness of this church was at one time greatly crippled by dissensions with their pastor, the Rev. Mr. Patton, who, after his expulsion from the ministry for heresy, founded a Christian Advent Church of which we believe he is still pastor. The Baptist Church of Hadley was also founded in 1837, with seven members. Its first pastor was Rev. W. D. Potter, who remained with them for several years. In 1854 they built and dedicated a church, and soon after the Rev. Mr. Potter resigned his pastorate. Since then this worthy man has' been engaged in various religious and benevolent enterprises, and identified with almost everything calculated to raise the standard of moral or religious culture. For years he was a missionary of the American Sundayschool Union engaged in organizing Sunday-scllools in destitute neigborhoods, and his early labors in the causes of education and temperance will not soon be forgotten. Nor will tile sufferers of the forest fires of 1871 soon forget his disinterested and zealous labors for their relief. Some time previous to 1840, a church was organized in the eastern part of Metamora, with Rev. Ezra Tripp pastor for a time. A few years after they erected a church at Thornville, but the organization long ago became extinct and the building passed into other hands, and is now called the Free Church. A church was also formed at Lapeer at an early day and prospered for a time, but difficulties between the members and the pastor, which led to the exclusion of the latter from the ministry, ruined the church. Subsequently a new church was formed, which has since prospered greatly. The Baptists have also church edifices at Imlay City and North Branch, and a flourishing church organization at Gardner's schoolhouse, which is taking measures to erect or procure a house of worship. There are also other societies in the county connected with this denomination. Although a great deal of pioneer labor was done by ministers of the Christian denomination, very little fruit is apparent at present. Rev. Mr. Cannon founded several societies, all of which are now extinct. But the labors of such men as the Revs. Cannon, McIntyre and Oviatt cannot be lost, although they did not succeed in establishing their particular tenets here. The Protestant Methodists in some cases followed the Christians, but owing to some peculiarities in their old discipline, their labors were mostly confined to the uneducated class at first. They have two churches at Lapeer, one in the city-the building 'formerly owned by the Baptists-and one a few miles east of the city, and two or three church edifices at other points. They are increasing quite rapidly of late years. The Free-will Baptists did some good work at an early day, but the violent opposition of some of their pastors to all secret societies of whatever name or character, and the political sermons preached by others weakened their influence and destroyed the good effect of their labors, so that at present their numbers are very small. Indeed the preaching of political sermons seems never to have any other effect than to destroy the influence of the pastor and break up and scatter churches. The tour of the Seventh Day Adventists, with their cotton tent, the organization of the church at Lapeer, the building and burning of the first church and the subsequent erection of their present brick edifice, the organization of the large and influential Catholic and Universalist Churches, and the advent of the Lutheran, First Day Advent and Free Methodist Churches are of comparatively recent date. THE COURTS AND BAR. One of the first institutions established in a community of pioneers has invariably been some sort of a court of justice, where law could be expounded, justice administered, and other kinds of business, too numerous to mention, transacted. The justice of the peace who presided over the principal court of the early days was necessarily a being of varied attainments in theory, if not in reality. It was his business to unite in holy bonds of matrimony such as desired to be pronounced, and to separate by solemn decree of divorce such as could show just and sufficient cause. He must also apply the principles of law and justice to the whole range of offenses from murder to neighborhood quarrels. The present system of judiciary of Michigan is most excellent, but it has been developed through a tortuous way. From the date of the settlement of Detroit by the French, in 1701, the people of the region now included in the State of Michigan have lived to the present time under various forms of governments —edicts of kings, orders of military commanders, decrees of imperial parliaments and provincial governors, ordinances of national congresses, enactments of territorial governors and councils, provisions of State constitutions, and the laws of the State legislature. From the couttU,(e de Paris to the last State constitutionl and enactments of the last State legislature, the changes of 182 years have left their impress alongo devious ways. Among the first acts of the State legislature was one dealing with the circuit court. It decreed that "the Fourth Circuit shall be composed of the counties of Oakland, Lapeer, Shiawassee, Genesee, Saginaw, Ionia and Kent, and the counties attached thereto for judli-:ial purpose." Changes have been made in the territory of circnits as the necessities and convenience of population demanded. The first term of the circuit court held in Lapeer County convened on the 17th of October, 1837, Hon. George Morrell presid ing and Hon. Norman Davison as associate. N. H. Hart was clerk and Samuel Murlin sheriff. The judges presiding since are as follows: Hons. Charles N. Whipple, Daniel Goodwin, Warner Wing, Sanford M. Green, Josiah Turner, James S. Dewey, Levi B. Taft, Augustus C. Baldwin, S. B. Gaskill and William W. Stickney. The machinery of justice was much more complicated at that I I I I I I q -Ie a.i, I5 PI -p - r - - I __F - = —4

Page  22 El H —T O F- - 22 HISTORY OF L' _-1 lk -- - I kPEER COUNTY. I I lSaLl, and coIltiIllle(l it elatil his death ill July, 1881. Colonel I I I I I j P) time than at present. Every prisoner arrested for any criminal offense was brought before the grand jury and a true bill of indictment found against him before the case could proceed to trial, andt every circuit judge had at least one associate. The first grand jury summoned in the county was as follows: Caleb Carpenter, Jonathban 0. Freeman, John Shafer, Richard Arms, J. B. Morse, Jedediah E. Hough, Oliver P. Davison, Josiah R. Rood, Timothy Wheeler, William Hart, Isaac Goodale, Ira Peck, Samuel Lason, Oliver B. Hart, Isaac Evans, Josiah Baughart, Ezra R. Parshall, Stepllen Smnith. C;aleb Carpenter was appointed foreman of the grand jury, and the court appointed George F. Ball and James H. Andrus deputy sheriffs to attend the grand jury. The petit jury were as follows: Cyrus Humphrey, foreman, John S. Smlit, Walter K. Hough, Schuyler Irish, Andrew Mattoon, Aaron Rood, Luke Perkins, John Brigham, John Thompson, Zachariah Olmstelad, Abram Tunison. The court appointed Richard Butler, of Mt. Clemens, Macomb County, prosecuting attorney, p])o test. It would l)e difficult at this day to find a jury in the county of Lapeer made up of men of sounder judgment and common sense than these men possessed. Nearly all of themn have passed away, only Messrs. John Brigham and Andrew Mattoon are known to be living at present in the county, and both aged men. At this term of court three indictments were found, two for selling spirituous liquor to Indians, and one for assault and battery. A soldier of the Revolution, Samuel Washburn, aged eighty-eight years, made application for a pension for his services as a soldier in the war of the Revolution, appeared in court and made oath to his declaration. All the business of the court was disposed of on the second day of the term, and the court thein adjourned. Times have changed and now court convenes three or four times a year, and a hundred or more cases come before it every term. EARLY LAW AND LAWYERS. Silas D. McKeen, Noah H. Hart and Col. Jonathan R. White, were the pioneer members of the Lapeer County bar. McKeen came here from New Hampshire and began practice about the year 18411. He and his brother Isaac were men of note in those early times, and the former was a man of talent. He filled various county offices and was proposed as candidate for governor but failed to receive the nomination. He built a mill on the Flint River northwest of Lapeer, afterwards burned. He might have risen to wealth and high station had he not fallen into intemperate habits which blasted his prospects and robbed him of his property and finally of life. His brother Isaac died years before during the prevalence of the terrible spotted fever epidemics and no nearfriend or relative was there to follow the remains of the wreck of one of Michigan's most gifted sons to their last resting place. Noah H. Hart was admitted about the same time. He is a son of Oliver B. Hart, one of the first settlers of Lapeer, and was born in Litchfield County, State of Connecticut, Oct. 30, 1813. He came to Lapeer in May, 1832, and since 1841 has been engaged in the practice of law,being now,by more than ten years the oldest member of the Lapeer County bar. He has held the office of justice of the peace for thirty years, and has held various other local offices, including those of county clerk and prosecuting attorney. In October, 1861, he went into the service, having raised a company of which he was first lieutenant. In 1863 he was promoted to captain. He remained in the service until February, 1865, when lie was mustered out. He is now the oldest member of the Lapeer County bar. Colonel J. R. White, whose name is frequently mentioned in the history of Lapeer; being one of its pioneers, began practice about 1841, and continued it until his death in July, 1881. Colonel White was in all respects a pioneer, and had much to do with the prosperity of Lapeer city and county. He -was interested in the building of the first mill in the county, and through his life was extensively engaged in business pursuits aside from his profession. The Lapeer ('larion speaking of the death of Colonel White said: "l Colonel Jonathan R.White, a resident of this place since February,1832,died at the asylum for the insane, at Pontiac, on Tuesd'ay, aged 75 years. Colonel White's was the second family to settle in the then wilderness of Lapeer, and for many years lie wa.s a large land owner and influential citizen. He was an attorney by profession, and has held mally offices of public trust, among them a seat in the lower house of the State legislature. His wife died a few years ago, childless, and since that time his health, which had keen poor many years, rapidly declined, and a few months ago his friends took him to the asylum whele he died. He was one of four brothers, all of whollm have lived here since the early days-Phineas, Henry K., Enoch J. and J. R. The two former survive. His funeral was attended at the residence of Mrs. E. J. White, yesterday afternoon. He was buried with Masonic hionors." Moses W. Wisher came here from Pontiac and was practicing in 1842. He continued here a few years and then returned to Pontiac. He was once governor of Michigan, and was an officer in the army. He is now dead. H. W. Williams was editor of the Sientii:l in 1840 and afterward practiced law for a short time. He finally went to St. Louis, Mo., where he still resides. William T. Mitchell, now of Port Huron, came here earlyin the forties and. was engaged ill practice, but went to Romeo before 1846. lHe has been judge of the circuit court and a prominent man in the State. J. M. Wattles settled in Lapeer in 1846. He was born in 1819 in Bradford County, Pa. Went to the university at Galesburg, Ill., where he commenced the study of law, about 1842. Was admitted to the bar at Towanda, Pa., ill 1844. Came to Lapeer in 1846. Practiced law until about 1876. Commenced business as a banker in 1874. Has been prosecuting attorney, circuit court commissioner, justice of the peace, alderman, etc. Was married to Fanny M. Hart, of Lapeer, in 1846. who died in January, 1882. Three children survive her. One of his sons is associated with himn ill the banking business. N. H. Redman, who was raised in the county, practiced law for several years at Almont, and he was the only addition to the bar for a number of years. Andrew C. Maxwell practiced in the county for some time prior to 1857, when he removed to Bay City and became prominent as a lawyer. Maxwell's jokes would fill a volume. William Hemingway settled in the village of Lapeer and became a member of the bar in 1857, although he had practiced law more or less for several years prior to that time. He was born in Chili, Monroe County, N. Y., in 1815. Attended the common schools of the town and also went to the Wesleyan Seminary at Lima, N. Y. Came to Michigan in 1835. Remained in Oakland Township, Oakland County, for two years. Went to Hadley, Lapeer County, and commenced farming. Had studied the surveyor's profession in New York State and followed it in Lapeer County for some ten or twelve years. Commenced practicing law in 1850. Came to Lapeer Township in 1857. Has been circuit court commissioner for twenty years. In 1863-64 was a member of the State legislature. Has served as a supervisor for Hadley, also for one of the city districts. Has been a town clerk, highway commissioner, school inspector, and a justice of the peace, in both city and township for twelve years. Married in 1837 to Mary A. Vail of Riga, I I I I i I I I i r -F — O a d -I ---- --- —------------ T -^1 I V9 w1.a!L' t~ f~ X ~'- -'i

Page  23 S-V I I -W, HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 23 - - Monroe County, N. Y. They have five children, four daughters and one son. In 1856 the late Charles M. Walker was admitted to the bar and engaged in practice at Lapeer. After the war broke out he went into the service. and after returning from the army settled in Adrian, where he died in 1878. He became a prominent member of the bar and was highly esteemed as a citizen of Adrian. William W. Stickney, now circuit judge, began the practice of law in Lapeer in 1856. He was born in Shoreham, Addison County, Vermont, in 1832. He attended the common schools and Newton Academy in his native place, also academies at Bakersville and Brandon, Vt. Commenced the study of law in 1854 at a law school in Poughkeepsie, N. Y., graduating in August, 1855. He then went to Judge Hayden's private law school in Poland, Ohio. Came to Lapeer in 1856, and went into the law office of John M5. Wattles. Was admitted to the Michigan bar in June, 1856, at a term of court held in Flint, Hon. Sanford M. Green, presiding judge. Has been in practice in'Lapeer County until the spring of 1881,when he was elected judge of the sixth Michigan judicial circuit. Among other offices held by him may be mentioned those of prosecuting attorney, city alderman and a member of the school board, of which he was also president. Married in 1856 to Georgiana Atwood, a native of Shoreham, Vt. They have three children, one daughter and two sons. Silas B. Gaskill, who was succeeded on the bench by Judge Stickney, became a member of the Lapeer County bar in 1859, and is yet one of its leading members. He was born in 1828 in the town of Gainesville, Genesee County, N. Y. His parents left there in 1837, and went to Niagara County. Attended the Wesleyan College at Lima, N. Y. Studied law with Judge Hiram Gardner at Lockport, N. Y. Came to Hadley Township, Lapeer County, in 1853. Was admitted to the bar at Midland City, Midland County, at the first term of court held in that county. It was presided over by Judge Turner of Owosso. Settled permanently after his admissionin Lapeer, and has practiced his profession there ever since. In 1880 was appointed circuit judge by Governor Croswell to fill a vacancy in the Sixth Judicial Circuit, which comprises Lapeer and Oakland Counties. Was elected to the same office in the fall of 1880. Held it until the expiration of the term January 1, 1882. Has been an alderman and member of the school board in Lapeer. Is married. Dr. N. B. Eldredge, now member of Congress, practiced medicine at Lapeer at an early day, and afterward engaged in the practice of law. He removed to Adrian, where he continued in thle legal profession. Virtulon Rich, now a resident of Mayfield, became a member of the Lapeer County bar in 1857, although lie had then been engaged in the practice of law for more than twenty years. He was born in Shoreham, Vermont, in 1811, and in 1832 went to Ohio and located in Morgan County, where he continued the study of law which he had began in Vermont. He finished his legal school education in Zanesville, Ohio. Studied law in Indianapolis, Ind., and was admitted to practice in London, Ohio, in 1834. He practiced his profession there, and in Zanesville and McConelsville until 1857, when he came to Michigan and was admitted to the bar in Saginaw City. He then came to Lapeer City, where he engaged in the practice of law up to 1869, when he moved on his farm on section 32 in the township of Mayfield, and has since that time devoted his attention almost exclusively to farming. He has held the office of probate judge in the county of Lapeer two years, and is now (1883) serving his third term as justice of the peace. He was married in 1835 to Miss Sarah C. Bush, of Shoreham, Vt. She died in 1850, and he was again married the following year in Columbus, Ohio. They have five children, two sons and three daughters. Egbert Corey and Jacob L. Green also began practice here prior to 1860. The former is still a member of the bar, and resides at Almont. The latter removed tA Conlecticut, and is president of an insurance company in that State. There was also an early day lawyer named Bennett, who practiced a short time at Lapeer. The list thus made covers the fullest extent of the pioneer period. The bar in Lapeer County has had fewer changes by either removal or death than is usually the case, and with respect to rank will compare favorably with that of other counties. The bar in 1883 is composed of the following members: William B. Williams, prosecuting attorney; J. H. Palmer, Frank Millis, circuit court commissioners; Harrison Geer, William Hemingway, Joseph B. Moore, Jasper Bentley, E. W. Corey, F. P. Andrus, E. J. Landers, R. V. Langdon, George Mott, H. A. Birdsall, C. A. Hovey, S. B. Gaskill, John M. Wattles, T. C. Taylor, Calvin P. Thorns, Noah H. Hart, Sidney D. Walton, V. S. Miller, George Morse, J. Lynch, R. L. Taylor. Mallory N. Stickney, brother of Judge Stickney, was a graduate of the Michigan law school, and practiced in Lapeer a short time prior to 1881, when he died. Cass H. McEntee, studied with Judge Gaskill, and practiced a short time. He was drowned in 1878. The Lapeer County Bar Association was organized about 1863. William Hemingway has been president since the beginning of its organization. The first court-house and jail in Lapeer was a single building, burned soon after its erection. Here the murderer Daum was confined after his arrest for the murder of Ulrich. It is said that the criminal after his arrest became a prey to abject fear, and virtually acknowledged his crime to the sheriff. Then recovering himself he suddenly became violently religious, and spent most of his time in his cell in prayer and singing hymns. After his acquittal he gave the sheriff a terrible cursing, then started at once to a church where religious exercises were in progress, and gave an exhortation which produced a profound impression upon the audience. This trial lasted two weeks, and during its progress was attended by crowds of excited people. No one doubted the prisoner's guilt, and had the law been then as now he would have been convicted, but the evidence being wholly circumstantial the jury, fearing lest they might condemn an innocent man to death, acquitted him. For about eight years after the first settlement was made, this county formed a part of Oakland County. For the first two or three vears there were no towns organized, and the settlements were so small and so remote from each other that what little civil law there was in the days of Territorial legislation could scarcely be enforced; and if difficulties arose between neighbors, they were generally settled by compromise, arbitration or an appeal to armsor rather fists-when of course the strongest of the doughty champions won the day. And it was well for our growing commonwealth that our first settlers were a law abiding class of citizens. Had they not been such, in this unsettled state of society, with the absence of local supervision and the local prejudices which the settlers had brought from their former homes, "border ruffianism" would have been as rampant here as it has been in some of our sister States. One prolific cause of disagreement which might be mentioned arhlong our early settlers, arose from cutting and gathering marsh hay from government lands. This was absolutely necessary. The very existence of their cattle depended upon it, and as all cut and drew away as much as possible, endless disagreements arose, which usually culminated in fights. The scene of many of these conflicts still bears the name of "squabble meadow." How 4LI~ ----- ------ A y I - -2

Page  24 l -a s I I I. __ 24 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. I ever with the adoption of the State constitution and the organization of the county a new order of things began, and lawyers, lawsuits and office seekers appeared upon the stage. Then too, speculation in real estate and paper money was rife. Wildcat banks sprang up in every backwoods hamlet, and populous cities were mapped upon paper and city lots sold in Eastern cities for high prices. But by and by the bubble burst. It was soon ascertained that one keg of specie served as capital for many wildcat banks, and that the bills of those institutions were worth scarcely more then the paper they were printed upon. Then came the buyers of city lots to look after their purchases; and when they found that those eligible city lots, for which they had paid fabulous prices, were located in the depths of the forest, or on the bosom of some of the little lakes, which dot the surface of the Peninsular State, their rage knew no bounds, and of course recourse was had in many cases to fruitless litigation to obtain satisfaction for the swindle. This was useless, for at this time the country was bankrupt and the poor pioneer suffered far more in those days of utter business prostration after the collapse of the wildcat banks, than their children have from the present financial depression. At this time there was almost no money in the country. Prices of produce were so low at one time, that if a man marketed his grain, he must board himself and team during the necessarily slow journey, perhaps fifty miles to the nearest market town, for the price of his load would barely pay the expenses of his journey. The following is but one of the many amusing incidents related of the manner in which justice was administered in those early times. After the collapse of the Lapeer wildcat bank its officers were arrested on a charge of swindling, and brought before a justice of the peace residing in Hadley for examination. After the prisoners had been brought into court and the preliminaries gone through with, the justice, who was at times a sufferer from rheumatism, found himself too lame to proceed with the case, and it was accordingly adjourned till next day. Two of the prisoners were removed to a neighbor's house, where they retired to an unfurnished chamber for the night, two constables remaining at the foot of the stairs to guard them. During the night a son of the host brought a ladder to the open chamber window, by means of which the prisoners made good their escape. A witness who had been left in charge of the justice for the trial of the ensuing day, that kindly official turned over to the custody of his daughter who took pity upon him and allowed him to quietly depart. Of course when the constables found their prisoners had gone they started in pursuit, but did not succeed in re-arresting them, although they were at their homes as usual the next day, and one of them rode 'back to inquire concerning the squire's health. The suit was finally discontinued. EARLY DOCTORS. Dr. J. S. Comstock, one of the early physicians of Lapeer County, mentions the early doctors as follows: "In 1839, whei I came into the county, there were but two physicians within, its limits, Dr. Leete, who had been in the county previously, having just removed to Rome. Dr. M. Y. Turrill was in Lapeer, and Dr. Carpenter at Almont, both of whom are now dead. Soon after, Dr. Powers came to Lapeer from Oxford, stopped about one year, removed again to Oxford, and from thence to Detroit, and is now dead. Dr. Miller then took Powers' place, and a Dr. Jones came to Almont. Dr. Miller stopped at Lapeer about two years, thence removed to Flint, and from there to Chicago. Dr. Jones soon removed farther West, and his place was supplied by Dr. Bailey, who soon after removed to Joliet, Ill., and from there to Memphis, Tenn. Next came Dr. Trowbridge, to Almont. Next came to Lapeer, Dr. Loud, followed by Dr. Kenney. Dr. Loud long since removed to Rormeo, where he now resides. Dr. Kenney still remains at Lapeer. "The practice of medicine is but mere child's play at present, compared with those early times. The population was scattered and poor, many of them had spent their last dollar for land, and it was not an uncommon thing for a physician to rise in the middle of the night for a ride of seventeen or eighteen miles, with no roads but an Indian trail, which nothing but Indian ponies could follow while the woods echoed to the dismal howling of the wolves. These are the hardships of which the present generation can have no conception. No class of men know more of the hardships and sufferings of the pioneer people than the pioneer physician." BIOGRAPHY OF DR. COMSTOCK. Dr. J. S. Comstock was born near Providence, R. I., Aplil 2, 1813. When he was very young his father removed to Tioga County, N. Y., and his youth and early manhood were spent here and in his native State, where he taught for a year or more in one of the factory villages near Providence. He studied medicine with Dr. Angell, and graduated from the Geneva Medical College in 1838. In May, 1839, he came to Michigan by rail from Detroit to Birmingham, then to Flint but not being pleased with any of these locations he came to Lapeer, thence to Farmers Creek, where he established himself as physician and has remained here ever since. September 16, 1840, he was married to Miss Elizabeth C., daughter of J. B. Morse, They had one son and three daughters. The son, 0. F. Comstock, enlisted in the United States Construction Corps, and started with Sherman's army in his march to the sea, and died June 29, 1864. The oldest daughter is unmarried; the second, Sarah F., married F. W. Goodale, and removed to Kintner, Tuscola County, Mich.; the youngest, Mary E., died May 8, 1873, at the age of eleven years. Mrs. Comstock died May 16, 1875. October 22, 1876, he was married a second time to Mrs. Sophronia Wetherell, of Mt. Morris, Mich. During a severe thunder storm in May, 1880, his dwelling -was struck by lightning, and he received a terrible shock, which caused him several months of suffering, and from which he has never recovered. Since this he has given up his profession, and resides on his farm. He is the oldest physician in the county, and the only survivor of those who came here prior to 1840. FIRST EDUCATIONAL EFFORTS. All the schools established prior to the admission of Michigan as one of the States of the Union, were, of course, private schools. After the adoption of the State constitution and the munificent grant of land amounting to one thirty-sixth of the public domain within the bounds of the new Peninsular State, and which was kept sacredly for the primary schools, the private schools were superseded by those of the district organization; and when the system was so perfected as to enable the adoption of the union high school as the center of all educational effort, the numerous academies established all over the land for the most part succumbed to the pressure. The private schools and academies of the early days were a great blessing, and but for them the present excellent system of free schools would not have been so speedily perfected. In those days the public school was an impossibility, for there was yet no fund, the ever increasing interest of which could be applied to such a purpose, and even if there had been, the settlements were too small and too widely scattered for the people to receive any practical benefit from it. The early settlers of Lapeer County knew the value of good schools, and the importance of educating their children. As soon -9 f l F - j k e -r - 1S - -e A _ - 11 -

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Page  25 I "".1 7-A' HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 25 I as there were a few children in a neighborhood, some person was found to teach them. Schools were kept before school buildings were built. The first school in Lapeer was kept in a building erected for a shop. The first school-houses were rude log buildings erected by subscription, and the teachers were frequently paid in a like manner. Wages were very low. If a teacher was paid $2 a week with board it was considered a good salary. The first schools in the county were taught in Lapeer village; in 1833, a select school by a Miss White, and in the fall of that year Captain N. H. Hart taught in a little building on the ground where White's Opera House now stands. The first school in Almont Township was taught at the present village of Almont, by a Miss Freeman, who received a salary of 75 cents a week. In the winter of 1836-'37 Elijah C. Bostwick taught a school in the Deneen neighborhood. Mr. H. M. Look also taught a private school at Farmers Creek, at the house of J. B. Morse, in the winter of 1836-'37. But as soon as the townships were organized and school inspectors elected, as provided by statute, the work of organizing districts began, and these private schools were superseded at once by the district primary school. Still the academies held their place, for no one expected to gain anything more than the rudiments of an education at these primitive district schools. After the county was organized and the two court-houses built, and the "lower town house" had been accepted as the "seat of jurisprudence," the upper town court-house was occupied as an academy building, and while from its rival, human beings were sent forth to the shame of jail and prison, from the other, young men and women were being educated for lives of honor and usefulness. When a union school district was formed in the city, this building became the high school building, and was used as such until replaced by the present elegant and commodious brick structure. The old house, soon after its removal from the old site, was destroyed by fire. Like many other things it had survived its usefulness; but we fancy all who had been educated within those old walls regretted its fall. In 1844 an academy was established at Almont by Rev. E. Parker, which was for years a successful institution. Some years afterward a house was built there for an academy, which was taught for a time by Mr. Charles Kellogg. This building afterward became the property of the district, and was the high school up to 1867, when it was superseded by an excellent brick school-house. When the University of Michigan was being established it was proposed to establish preparatory schools, as auxiliaries to that institution, at convenient points throughout the State. What was then known as the northeastern portion of the State, consisting of the counties of Oakland, Macomb, Lapeer and St. Clair, would be entitled to such a school. These institutions were to be known as branches of the University of Michigan, and there was quite a strife among the new formed settlements to secure the establishment of such an institution in their midst. Farmers Creek, among others, sent in a bid for the school; and to assist in the laudable enterprise an academy was started under the auspices of Mr. James R. Taylor, aman of liberal education. His school was for a time a flourishing institution, and pupils gathered there from almost all the settlements in the county, but this academy did not succeed in gaining the expected aid from the State and soon died a natural death, as did also the system, whose aid it invoked, not many years after. Many of the teachers of these early seminaries of learning have died, and the very names of some have perhaps been forgotten, but the influence they exerted over the minds of the generation then coming on the stage will not soon pass away. It is to those labors in the early history of our State that we owe our magnificent high school buildings and those neat and commodious primary school-houses which may be found in every country neighborhood throughout the Peninsular State. I CHAPTER V. EARLY LUMBERING-LAPEER COUNTY SOCIETIES —STATISTICAL INFORMATION. The subject of lumbering finds a very proper introduction in the language of Judge Albert Miller, of Bay City, as follows: "The pioneers of Michigan, who settled in the northern part of the State fifty years ago, were fully aware that there were vast forests of pine timber lying around their settlements and to the north of them, but could not have anticipated the great value which the rapid improvement of our whole country, and especially the western portion of it, has found those forests to possess. The early settlers of that portion of Michigan of which I am writing were principally from the New England States and from New York, and when they looked back to the large amount of pine timber they had left behind them, they did not suppose that in their life-time it would be exhausted, and that large amounts would have to be transported from a thousand miles interior to supply the Atlantic States. -At that time Maine was of itself considered a 'world of pine forests,' and its proximity to Boston gave that city and the State of Massachusetts a supply of cheap lumber; and passing along farther west and south we find the Connecticut River reaching far up into the region of pine forests in northern Vermont and New Hampshire, and large quantities of pine in every shape, from the tall spar used in fitting out our Atlantic marine, down to manufactured clap-boards and shingles annually floated down its rapid current to supply western Massachusetts and the State which adopted the name of the said river, without a thought on the part of the consumers that the supply was ever to be exhausted. The supply of pine timber on the banks of the Connecticut River was considered by the early settlers in that region as inexhaustible. The, writer has seen large quantities of pine logs near the banks of the river, not over one hundred miles from its mouth, which had been hauled from the land by the early settlers while clearing it for cultivation, rolled into a ravine and suffered to decay, which, if they were now sound, would be worth more than the farm from which they were cut. If the man is not now living, he has but recently passed away, who was hired by the proprietor of this same farm to fell the pine trees on a certain tract of land for no other purpose than that they should not draw sustenance from the soil and thereby impoverish it and lessen its value for future cultivation. It must be admitted that said proprietor was not a skillful woodsman, nor an experienced agriculturist, he being an English sea captain. I mention this reckless destruction of a commodity which time and circumstances have made so valuable, as a warning to prevent the proprietors of Michigan forests from permitting any waste of their timber; for in less time than has passed away since the circumstance transpired that I have related above, a good pine lumber tree will be as great a rarity in Michigan as it is now in that part of Vermont. I believe that every sound forest tree in Michigan, of whatever kind, is of more value to the proprietor than the ashes it will make, after bestowing much labor to convert it into that commodity. If more land is required for cultivation, let it be supplied by the boundless prairies of the West, but let our Michigan forests remain till the timber is required for some useful purpose, and then let the land be put into the highest state of cultivation. But to return to the pine forests of the Eastern States forty years ago. Passing over the Green Mountains we come to the pine region of Lake Champlain and the waters emptying into i i4. t 0*! I - - I I - AK '1k

Page  26 ,A 1 — 26 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 26I it, which, with regions on the head-waters of the Hudson, produced such quantities of lumber, finding a market at Albany, that that city was for a long time the great lumber market of the United States, and she still maintains an ascendancy in the trade, although the great source of supply is now in the west and Canada. We might continue and mention the regions of the Delaware and Susquehanna, as the great source of supply for the more Southern and Atlantic cities, and then pass on to western New York and look at the hlead-waters of the Genesee and its branches. I was recently told by a pioneer of northern Michigan, that a little more than forty years ago he was in the town of Dansville, which is situated on a branch of the Genesee River, and that within four or five miles of that town good pine lumber could be bought at the mills for $2.50 per thousand, and paid for in almost any kind of barter, and that in 1826, after the Erie Canal was open and in use from Albany to Buffalo, pine lumber was sold in the city of Rochester for $6, $8 and $10 per thousand. In view of the circumstances related above, it cannot be supposed that at that time the idea could have been conceived of doing a profitable business by manufacturing lumber in the forests of Michigan and transporting it to the Atlantic cities. "The first saw-mill that was ever built on waters that are tributary to the Saginaw River was the one built on the Thread River at Grand Blanc, in 1828 and 1829, by Rowland Perry and Harvey Spencer. The object of building the mill was to supply the want of that settlement, the nearest mill to it then being at Waterford, about twenty miles distant. There was no pine timber in the immediate vicinity of the mill, the nearest being a small pinery four or five miles distant, in a northeasterly direction, from which the farmers used to haul logs, to be manufactured into lumber for their own use. The mill was a poor affair, not profitable to the owners, and after three or four years was wholly abandoned, and the land which was occupied by the pond has been cultivated for over thirty years. The second mill was built by Rufus Stevens in 1829 and 1830, on the same stream, four or five miles north of the one first mentioned, and within two miles of the Flint River, just above the present location of the 'Thread Mills.' That mill was run a portion of each year for several years, but without much profit to the owner. The supply of pine logs was procured from the pineryheretofore mentioned, the pinery being within about two miles of the last mentioned mill. The first raft of lumber that ever floated on the tributaries of the Saginaw was manufactured at this mill, and hauled across to Flint River and floated down that stream. There was an attempt made in 1830 by Alden Tupper to build a mill on the Flint River, below Flushing, but it never progressed any further than to erect a frame, which was suffered to stand without covering till it rotted down. No mills were built on any of the tributaries of the Saginaw except those above mentioned previous to the building of the steam mill by Harvey and G. D. and E. S. Williams in 1835. Harvey Williams had previously been engaged in Detroit in building the engines of the steamboat 'Michigan,' which in her day was the finest boat that had ever floated on the Western lakes, and after completing his contract in winding up his business in that city, he took a steam engine and machinery for a saw-mill, which he transported to Saginaw, and in company with G. D. and E. S. Williams erected in 1835 the mill at Saginaw City, which was the first steam mill erected in the Saginaw Valley, if not the first in the State of Michigan. Joel L. Day, late of Bay City, performed the millcwright work and put in the first muley saw that was ever used in this pait of the country. During the winter of 1835 and 1836 a fine stock of logs for the mill was provided on the banks of the Tittabawassee, near Sturgeon Creek, and run to the mill, and owing to the local demand for timber, I think the Messrs. Williams did a profitable business with their mill during the season of 1836. "When the Messrs. Williams began to operate their mill, so little was known about running steam saw-mills economically, that when they commenced to build their new mill they contracted for large quantities of cord wood to be delivered for fuel with which to run it. "In 1834 there was but one saw running on the Saginaw River. That was before the days of muley saws, uit the machinery that propelled that saw was fearfully and wonderfully made. Charles A. Lull was the sash and I was the pitman. When I was a lumberman, the season's cutting for one saw was estimated at one million feet. We fell short of that amount that vear; but we did cut enough to lay the floors in Mr. Lull's log house that he built on his farm, which is now in the town of Spaulding, and which was the first house built in Saginaw County away from the banks of the river." LAPEER COUNTY LUMBERING. The north two-thirds of Lapeer County was originally covered with pine timber of a very superior quality, and yet the manufacture of pine lumber never contributed very largely to the.progress of material interests in the county. Water transportation was and is necessary to the successful manufacture of pine lumber, and Lapeer County had neither rail nor water facilities for transportation. The consequence was that a great proportion of the pine was floated to Flint and Saginaw and contributed its wealth to building up those cities. The first saw-mill in Lapeer County was located on Farmers Creek, near the railroad bridge, at Lapeer. Its construction was begun late in the fall of 1831, by the Pontiac Mill Company. Upon his arrival at Lapeer soon after, Colonel J. R. White purchased an interest in the mill and in a short time the entire property passed into the hands of J. R. and Phineas White. The second mill was built by Mr. Alvin McMaster, one of the first comers to the county. Not long afterward Estes Higley built the third mill. Martin Stiles came from Canada and built a mill north of Lapeer village. In 1834 a mill was built in Imlay Township by Wilcox and Hovey, which afterward passed into the hands of the Imlay Mill Company. Mills sprang up at various points and cut the pine in their respective neighborhoods and then disappeared. This business however did become an organized industry. The principal lumbering points in the county were Fish Lake, Five Lakes, Columbiaville and Otter Lake. The Gerritt-Smith tract purchased by Messrs. Page & Benson, who operated at Otter Lake, afforded a very superior quality of pine, said by some to have been the finest ever manufactured in Michigan. Probably the most extensive lumberman now in the county is William Peter, who now lives in Toledo, and has extensive interests at Columbiaville. In December, 1872, a list of lumber manufacturers in Lapeer County, together with their postoffice address was made, and is as follows: Stephens, Courier & Co., Fish Lake, Stephens postoffice, one saw-mill and one shingle-mill, four miles east and four and three quarters miles north of Lapeer. H. H. Woodruff, Five Lakes postoffice, two mills with shinglemill and planer attached, four miles east and six miles north of La peer. Parker & Redfield, Lapeer, one saw-mill with shingle mill attached, one and one-half mile east and five and one-half miles north of Lapeer. McCreery, Ivory & Co., Lapeer, one saw-mill and shingle-mill attached, one-half mile west of Parker & Redfield's mill. 5I l k9 1 IU___________________ A- i --- -I --- —-* -.I - j ^-^.

Page  27 II -_\ if w ] I 7, I - -N HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 27 Michael & Dennis, Lapeer, one mile south of city, saw and shingle-mill. C. A. Smith, lumber and shingle-mill, Lapeer, one mile west and four miles north of the city. Dodge & Vandyke, saw and shingle-mill, three miles north and east of city. They also buy heavily of other manufacturers and ship to Eastern points. Address, Lapeer. Lawrence, Richmond & Co., two saw-mills. Address, Marathon. B. B. Redfield & Sons, wholesale and retail lumber and shingle dealers, Lapeer, yard one-fourth mile east of P. H. & L. 1M. depot. Haynes Bros, wholesale dealers in lumber and shingles, Lapeer. James McKenzie, commission dealer and shipper, Lapeer. William McAuley, inspector and commission dealer, Lapeer. George Patrick, lumber inspector, Lapeer. J. D. Mills, manufacturer and commission dealer, Lapeer. George Higley, saw-mill, one mile south and one mile east of Lapeer. J. W. Filler, saw-mill and shingle machine and planer, five miles southeast of Lapeer. George Lumbard, saw and shingle-mill, three miles east and one mile south of Lapeer. Parson & McGunegal, shingle-mill, three miles west and two miles north of Millville. S. R. Lathrop, saw and shingle-mill, Millville. George W. Rood, shingle-mill, three miles east and one mile north of Lapeer. F. J. Peter, shingle-mill, one mile east and nine miles north of Lapeer. Peter & Smith, shingle-mill, one mile west and four miles north of Lapeer. A. A. Sage, shingle and lumber mill, three miles east and onehalf mile north of Lapeer. Alexander Johnson, shingle and lumber manufacturer, mill one mile east and nine miles north of Lapeer. Hitchcock & Walker, two miles south of Lapeer, shingle-mill. Bennett & Avery, shingles and lumber, four miles east and two miles north of Lapeer. J. R. White, lumber and shingles, mills four miles east and three miles north of Lapeer. George Cliff, shingle-mill, ten miles north of Lapeer. Shubal Smith, shingle andlumber-mills, four miles east and ten miles north of Lapeer. Tuttle & Gregory, planing, sash, doors and blind shop, onefourth mile west of P. H. &. L. M. depot, Lapeer. Charles M. Hemingway & Co., planing, sash, doors and blindmill, in Lapeer. William Watson, shingle-mill at Hemingway & Co's factory, Lapeer. J. J. Merritt, agent for Howe, Van Etten & Go's stave-mill, Lapeer. H. W. Shaw, stave dressing machine, near P. H. & L. M. depot, Lapeer. S. N. Vincent, postmaster, saw-mill, seven miles east and one and one-half miles south of Lapeer. COUNTY SOCIETIES. THE LAPEER COUNTY PIONEER SOCIETY. The first meeting of this society was held February 11, 1874. An organization was then effected and a constitution drafted and adopted. At this meeting Hon. A. N. Hart, the first actual settler of Lapeer City, Mr. J. M. Palmer, who was his companion and employe at his removal, Hon. J. R. White, the second actual settler at this point, and many other old pioneers from the older towns of the county, were present. Mr. James Turrill, brother of Dr. Turrill, the third settler here, himself an old pioneer of the county, was elected president, and Tobias Price, of Metamora, vice-president, both of whom have since died. Mr. Hart died the following summer at his home in Lansing, and his remains were brought to Lapeer and interred by those of his wife. Unfortunately the minutes of the first two meetings were lost, but there were many present at that meeting who have since died, among others, Horace Hinman, an early settler here, and afterward a great traveler, spending many years of his life in the wild mountain regions of the West, and E. J. White, who was one of Park's surveying party, who ran the section lines through Lapeer County. The object of this society was twofold, first to bring the early settlers of this county together, and renew acquaintances and friendships severed by time and care, also to collect the history of the settlement of the county and the various stages of its progress. i I I 14r. -r -O AN EARLY COTTAGE. At this meeting it was voted to hold the next meeting in October of the year following. The board of managers met the 1st of October, 1874, and in view of circumstances existing at the time, thought it would be impossible to gather a meeting at the time fixed the winter previous, and finally decided to hold the next meeting February 11, 1875. This was a most enjoyable meeting, but many of the faces we greeted at the first meeting were missing. Mr. Hart had died and Mr. James Turrill, the president, on account of age and infirmity was unable to be present. At this meeting the deaths of A. N. Hart and Mrs. Lucy A. Lathrop, widow of H. N. Lathrop, an early settler in Lapeer and Mayfield, and a prominent business man for many years, were reported, and the society paid due honor to their memory. H. D. Rood was elected president, Joseph Bristol, since deceased, vice-president, Mrs. R. G. Hart, secretary, and it was decided to hold two meetings in each year in February and June respectively, the June meeting to be a picnic, and christened the pioneer reunion. A corresponding secretary was also appointed in each town, whose duty it should be to gather statistics. The Iralay City reunion was a great success but no minutes were kept. Noah H. Hart was the orator of the day and numerous short speeches were made by old pioneers and others. At the meeting February 11, 1876, H. D. Rood and Mrs. R. G. Hart were respectively re-elected president and secretary, John Look, then a resident of Metamora, vice-president. Several re ( - Q4 - _ _ ~ _ _ - i'. 1 Q v'

Page  28 - - i I: HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 28 sponses were made by the town corresponding secretaries. Sketches of the early history of Metamora and Dryden were presented and read. The death of Mrs. Thurza Henderson, wife of Jacob Henderson, a resident of the township of Metamora for thirty-four years, was reported. The reunion for this year was held at Metamora, June 21, 1876, and a strenuous effort was made to free the society from a debt which had rested like an incubus upon it from its first organization. When the managers met the following January to make arrangements for the next meeting, they found the society had appointed it on Sunday, February 11 happening to fall this year on that day. So the third annual meeting was held at the court-house February 16, 1877. At this meeting the society paid off many little debts and its members fondly thought themselves square with the world. A history of Hadley, Metamora, and Elba from the first settlement up to their organization into separate townships, was presented by the secretary, and a history of the township of Hadley, by Mr. M. C. Tunison, since deceased, and a short but comprehensive sketch of the early settlement of Rich by Mr. Charles Hall. At this meeting of the society the death of Mrs. Rebecca Covil, wife of Samuel Covil, a pioneer of Metamora Township, of the year 1836, was reported; also of Samuel Covil, her husband, aged eighty-eight years. It was decided to hold the June reunion at the old farm of James Deneen, now occupied by his daughter, Mrs. Charres Walker, who was the first white child born in Lapeer County, as this was the fiftieth anniversary of the settlement of the Deneens'here. William North was elected president; J. M. Palmer, vice-president; Nettie Comstock, secretary. The next annual meeting appointed at Metamora the third Thursday of February, 1878. February 21, 1878, was a terribly stormy day, as have generally been the days of the winter meetings. The old officers were re-elected with exception of vice-president, M. B. Smith being elected to that office in place of J. M. Palmer. The reunion was appointed at Columbiaville, Thursday, June 20, 1878. At this meeting, on account of the absence of the secretary from the two previous meetings, the secretary's report was presented, a history of Almont. Dr. W. B. Hamilton also gave a history of the township of Marathon, and of the village of Columbiaville. The annual meeting for 1879 was held at the Bates House, Attica, February 13, 1879. At this meeting it was voted to defer the election of officers until the June reunion, which was appointed at Metamora, June 19, 1879. The deaths of M. C. Tunison, the historian of Hadley, at the annual meeting of 1877; of Franklin Bruce, for forty years a resident of Elba, and supposed to be the oldest man in the county; of Benjamin Terry, John M. Caulkins, the venerated father of Dr. J. S. Caulkins, and of Seth Hall, one of the oldest pioneers of Dryden, were reported. These were all residents of Dryden. Mr. Caulkins was a very early settler of Almont, the others pioneers of Dryden, and the death of Mrs. Elizabeth Varnum, a pioneer of Metamora, was also reported at this meeting. At the reunion at Metamora, of June 19, 1879, a motion to rescind the twelfth article of the constitution, and to amend tile eighth article so as to hold but one meeting in the year, this to be the third Thursday of June, and another to so amend articles eight and twelve, as to hold the election of officers in June, were presented and laid upon the table till next meeting, under the rules. The deaths of John S. Foote, of Dryden, a pioneer of 1837, and the main instrument in erecting the Methodist Episcopal Church in that town named for him; of Orson H. Look, son of John Look, the pioneer of Hadley Township; of Shepherd Wheeler, a pioneer of Hadley, in 1836, and father of Judge H. H. Wheeler, of Ludington; of Joel M. Palmer, who came to Lapeer with Hon. A N. Hart, in November, 1831, and had resided there ever since; of Col. Needham Hemingway, brother of Rev. James Hemingway, who came to Oakland County in 1824, and to Lapeer County, and built mills in Marathon at an early day; of Mrs. Margaret Miteaux, a pioneer of Almont, of the year 1834; of Mrs. Oliver Lewis and Mrs. Edmund King, pioneers of Dryden, of the year 1836, and of Aaron Balch, a pioneer of Dryden, of the year 1840, were reported; also those of Mrs. Emeline Parker, a sister of Mrs. J. R. White, and a resident of Lapeer since 1,833, and of Mr. and Mrs. Tobias Price, pioneers of Metamora, of 1836. Mr. Price was the first supervisor in that town. The annual meeting for 1880 was held Thursday, February 12, 1880, at the court-house in the city of Lapeer. At this meeting all old claims against the society were paid, and this was the last of the society's debts. Some additional by-laws were adopted, and the officers received new instructions. The first amendment proposed to the constitution at the June meeting lost; the second indefinitely postponed, it being thought impossible to manage the society without a business meeting once a year. Joshua Manwaring was elected president; Daniel West, vice-president; Nettie Comstock, secretary. The reunion for this year was held June 17, 1880, at Imlay City. This meeting was a great success as regards members and enthusiasm, but no business was done, nor any history added to the records here, and this year, strange to say, no deaths were reported among the old pioneers. The next meeting was held at Lapeer, February 10, 1881. On account of the excitement attending the examination of Mrs. Nettie M. Barnard, accused of the murder of Mrs. Charlotte Curtis, then going on at the court-house, but a quorum was present. It was decided here that the winter meetings should be strictly business meetings. Daniel West was elected president; Joshua Manwaring, vice-president, and Nettie Comstock, secretary. The deaths of Mrs Sarah Barrows, wife of Eber Barrows, the pioneer of Metamora village; ani of Mrs. Sophronia Pitcher, wife of Geo. Pitcher, and sister of Mrs. Barrows, also of Metamora, were reported. The reunion was held at Hunter's Creek, June 23, 1881. Another effort was made here to amend the constitution, and the resolution laid on the table according to the rules. The archives of the society, which were in a state of great confusion, were placed at the disposal of a committee who instructed the secretary to engross them in a book provided for the purpose. The death of Hon. Frank Kendrick, son of Geo. Kendrick, who was one of the early pioneers of Dryden, was reported; also of Joseph Bristol, vice-president of the society in 1875, a resident of Almont; and of his sister, Mrs. Diana Smith, of Imlay, who were a son and daughter cf Bezaleel Bristol, a pioneer in Almont, of 1830. The annual business meeting for 1882 was held at Manwaring Hall, Lapeer, February 9, 1882. Sheldon Bristol was elected president; Dennis Griggs, vice-president; Nettie Comstock, secretary. The resolution to amend the constitution was taken from the table, and after long debate returned to the table, and a committee appointed to thoroughly revise the constitution and by-laws. The deaths of Rev. James Hemingway, of Hadley, father of William Hemingway, of Lapeer, and John and James M. Hemingway, of Hadley, at the age of ninety-three; of Mrs. Margaret Halpin, a resident of Lapeer Township for nearly forty years; of Mrs. Clarissa Hartwell, identified with the Hadley Baptist Church and Society for more than forty years, were reported, and the Hon. J. B. Wilson invited to _ ----— ~ I b r —I we4

Page  29 I 6-, l- I ------— L 1 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 29 I read a paper, at the June reunion, to be held at Hadley, June 15, 1882. The reunion of June, 1882, was held at the Hadley Fair Ground, and was a most pleasant meeting. J. J. Watkins, historian of the society, delivered a historical address, and Hon. J. B. Wilson gave his recollections of a fifty years' residence in Michigan. Many old pioneers were present, among others Rev. Mr. Potter, the veteran Baptist minister, Russell Cobb, and Robert Davenport and Gardner Dexter. The deaths of Mark Halpin, a pioneer of Lapeer Township; of Mrs. Betsy Farrar, widow of William Farrar, a pioneer of Hadley, of 1837, at the age of eighty-eight years; of Daniel Hartwell, at the age of eighty-nine, for more than forty years the deacon of the Hadley Baptist Church; of Mrs. Eunice Bruce, a pioneer of Elba, of 1840, and of John A. Merritt, a pioneer of Metamora, of 1838, were reported: The annual business meeting for 1883 was held at Manwaring Hall, Lapeer, February 8, 1883. The society at this meeting appointed Messrs. J. Manwaring, J. B. Wilson, and J. J. Watkins as delegates to the next meeting of the State Pioneer Society, and the following resolution was presented and unanimously carried. Resolved, That our senator and representatives in the legislature are requested to introduce a bill, authorizing the boards of supervisors to vote such sum or sums of money as may be necessary to furnish a complete history of the township; this appropriation to be made to the County Pioneer Societies, to enable them to make a complete history of the respective counties. A new constitution and by-laws were presented by the committee, and after some debate, was left in their hands for correction and revision, and by vote of the society the old officers were re-elected,riva voce. The reunion was held June 21, 1883, at Dryden village. A large crowd gathered in the orchard of Ethan Squier, the pioneer of Dryden village. The death roll was long and sad: Mrs. Elizabeth Lamb, widow of John M. Lamb, once a very prominent man in the county; Elisha Farnum, one of the oldest pioneers of Almont; Mrs. Asa Richards and Mrs. Hollenbeck, of Marathon; Mrs. Polly Hart, the last survivor of the heads of the three families who settled Hadley village in 1835; Mrs. Fitch, for many years a resident of Almont and Hadley, and John M. Hemingway, son of the Rev. James Hemingway, a pioneer of Hadley of 1837, and at his death supervisor of that township, were reported as having died during the year. Hon. J. B. Wilson gave a sketch of the early history of Arcadia, and Virgil Parmlee and Mrs. Carpenter some reminiscences of their labors as teachers forty years and more ago, and the society adjourned to meet in Lapeer, February, 1884. AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. The Lapeer County Agricultural Society was formally organized in August, 1883, and the following officers were elected: —President, Geo. N. Turrill; vice-president, Hoel Palmerlee; treasurer, John Dodds; secretary, John Abbott; directors, Geo. P. Chapman, Myron Snyder, William Halpin, John A. Buerger, Henry Lee, and the president, secretary, treasurer and vice-president. The society determined to issue stock and complete the track at once. Twenty acres of ground were purchased about one-half mile south of the business portion of the city of Lapeer, and improvements imme adiately commenced. The track is a half mile in length, and great pains are being taken with its construction. The society is a joint stock association. This is the third county agricultural society that has been organized in this county. At an early day fairs were held on ground south of the court-house, that is covered now with buildings. In 1878 a society was organized, of which Daniel West was president; John Abbott, secretary; and Joshua Manwaring, treas urer. Grounds were rented and fairs held three times, after which the society disorganized. The plan upon which the present society is organized seems to warrant continued success. HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY. The Lapeer County Horticultural Society was organized February 10, 1882, with fifty members. Officers: President, F. McElroy; vice-president, Henry Lee; Secretary, H.' W. Davis; treasurer, John Abbott. LAPEER COUNTY GRANGE. The grangers of Lapeer County met at Attica Grange Hall November 5, 1880, pursuant to notice, and organized a Pomona grange, assisted by C. L. Whitney, lecturer of State Grange, with the following names as officers: Master, W. A. Montgomery; overseer, John F. Muir; lecturer, William North; steward, H. Bradshaw; assistant steward, R. H. William; Chaplain, N. Burley; treasurer, E. Bartlett; secretary, G. W. Rudd; gate keeper, S. D. Nye; Ceres, Mrs. S. G. Muir; Flora, Mrs. N. H. Bradshaw; Pomona, Mrs. M. Lockwood; lady assistant steward, Mrs. F. Howard. The officers for 1883 are as follows: Master, Elijah Bartlett; overseer, Harrison Bradshaw; secretary, Jacob W. Shell; trersurer, Philander H. Foot; chaplain, Henry Seaman; lecturer, Benjamin Spencer; steward, William A. Montgomery; lady assistant steward Phoebe M. Howard; Ceres, Ellen L. Bartlett; Flora, Sarah J. Muir; Pomona,- Mrs. Harrison Bradshaw; gate keeper, J. F. Muir. Meetings are held once every three months. The membership is about seventy-five. Eight granges are included in the county grange, viz: Dryden, Attica, Goodland, Sharps Corners, Elm Creek, Burlington, Deerfield and Lapeer. The Lapeer County Bible Society was organized in 1842, and is still actively maintained.*P, o There are also the Medical and Bar Associations. VETERANS' ASSOCIATION. The Lapeer County Veterans' Association, composed of the soldiers and sailors of the county who were in military service, was permanently organized in June, 1880, and officered as follows: President, Maynard Butts; vice-presidents, Henry K. White, William Henderson; secretary, George W. Stone; treasurer, Henry A. -Birdsall. At the annual meeting in August, 1883, the following officers were elected: President, George Davenport, Hadley; vice-presidents, Daniel West, Attica, Nicholps Brown. Columbiaville; treassurer, L. W. Hinman, Lapeer; secretary, H. C. Spencer, Hadley; colonel, Col. L. Y. Struble, Attica; lieutenant colonel, E. R. Redfield, Lapeer; major, A. B. Weston, North Branch; adjutant, M. B. Bolton, Lapeer; quartermaster, J. A. Buerger Lapeer; chaplain, Rev. Parmenter, North Branch. The treasurer's report shows the receipts and expenditures for the past year, as follows: Total receipts........................... $64 14 Total expenditures..................... 59 16 Balance in treasury................... $ 4 98 Three members of the association have died within the last year. FIRST SPIRITUALIST SOCIETY. The First Spiritualist Society of Lapeer was organized at a meeting held in the township of Oregon, February 16, 1873. The officers were as follows: President, Oliver E. West; vice-president, Maria Clark; secretary, Maria Sims; treasurer, Mary. A. Carpenter; corresponding secretary, Lydia C. Houghson. The regular quarterly meetings at Lapeer and vicinity. In 1883 John O. Bruce is president, and Lucy E. Owen, secretary. j 10 i L k ----1

Page  30 -ye -- - 7 X - 1 I J i 30 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY! STATISTICAL. The census of 1840 was taken by Noah H. Hart; there was a total population in the county of 3,364, as follows: MALES. FEMALES. TOTAL. Bristol, now Almont................. 444 444 888 Dryden...................... 435 372 807 Lapeer.......................... 401 354 755 H adley.............................199 172 371 Metamora........................ 181 170 351 Elba....................... 57 43 100 M arathon.......................... 52 40 92 The total population in 1850, 7,029; in 1860,14,754; in 1870, 21,344; in 1874, 25,140. According to the census of 1880, the population wvas as follows: Normal School................................... 370 98 Normal School-grading grounds, etc................. 125 58 Agricultural College-general and other expenses...... 516 44 State Public School............................... 735 06 Michigan School for the Blind —general and other expenses..................................... 1,093 76 Institution for the Deaf and Dumb —general and other expenses................................... 1,036 39 State Reform School-current expenses.............. 722 22 State Industrial Home for Girls-general and other expenses.................................... 1,056 96 State House of Correction —building, etc.............. 115 55 Asylum for Insane-eastern-additional power boiler.. 54 74 Asylum for Insane-Michigani-building, etc.......... 194 20 Asylum for Insane-new-building, etc............... 3,209 88 Asylum for Insane —criminal-building, etc........... 962 96 Board of Fish Commissioners....................... 320 99 State Board of Health............................. 32 10 M ilitary purposes................................. 919 18 Relief of Sufferers by fire of 1881.................... 1,105 80 Paving Cooper Street in Jackson.................... 52 96 General purposes................................. 9,805 79 Aggregate of tax to be apportioned............ $23,667 58 TO~WN OF ALMONT. Almont (including village, 837)......................... 2,050 Attica Township...................................... 1,911 A rcadia............................................. 1,043 Burlington,...................................,.. 1,252 B urnside............................................ 1,060 Dryden............................................. 1,535 Deerfield................................... 1,001 E lba................................................ 1,291 G oodland............................................ 1,241 H adley............................................... 1,474 Imlay (including Imlay City, 971)....................... 2,400 Lapeer Township..................................... 1,166 City of Lapeer.......................................... 2,914 First W ard City...................................... 548 Second Ward City................................. 898 Third W ard City..................................... 393 Fourth W ard City................................... 1,075 M arathon............................................ 1,667 M ayfield............................................ 1,733 Metamora Township.................................. 1,384 North Branch........................................ 1,655 Oregon.............................................. 1,420 Rich........................................... 882 T otal......................................... 30,079 Whole number of farms in county, 3,580; number of manufacturing establishments in the county, producing at least $500 annually, including cost of material, 186; number of deaths in the county during the census year (May 31, 1879, to June 1, 1880, were 357, 36 of which were in Lapeer City. The total equalized valuation of real and personal property in the several townships in 1882 was as follows: Almont.....................................$ 1,314,000 A ttica.......................................... 540,000 A rcadia......................................... 324,000 Burnside....................................... 495,000 Burlington...................... 382,000 Dryden......................................... 873,000 D eerfield....................................... 265,000 E lba........................................... 549,000 G oodland....................................... 306,000 Hadley........................................ 792,000 Im lay......................................... 450,000 Lapeer........................................ 697,000 Mayfield.............................. 504,000 M etam ora....................................... 810,000 Marathon 540,000 M arathon....................................... 540,000 North Branch.................................. 405,000 Oregon.......................................... 387,000 Rich........................................... 270,000 Lapeer City.................................. 1,143,000 BY DR. WILLIAM B. HAMILTON. The town of Almont occupies the southeastern corner of Lapeer County. It is bounded on the north by Imlay, on the east by St. Clair County, on the south by Macomb County, and west by the town of Dryden. It was in this township that the first settlers in Lapeer County located, hence it is a section of territory full of historic interest. In 1840 the town had a population of 888. Census of 1874: Population, 2,056; acres of taxable land, 21,836; of improved land, 14,902; No. of sheep, 6,586; of swine, 779; neat cattle, other than oxen and cows, one year old and over, 1,199; of milch cows, 670. Products of preceding year: 34,107 pounds of wool, 9,950 pounds of cheese, and 69,950 of butter; 41,287 bushels of wheat, 46,515 of corn, 53,952 of other grain, 21,035 of apples, 461 of pears, 604 ofl cherries, 1,200 pounds of grapes, 19 bushels of strawberries, 12,150 bushels of potatoes and 2,949 tons of hay; 305 barrels of cider were made. In 1874 9,738 pounds of maple sugar were made. In.1880 the population of the town and village was 2,050. The aggregate valuation of real and personal property as equalized by the board of supervisors in 1882 was $1,314,000. The following list shows by whom the first entries of land were made: a, I LAND ENTRIES PRIOR TO 1846. TOWNSHIP 6 NORTH, RANGE 12 EAST. SECTION 1. Calvin A. Shaw, October 15, 1835. Joseph Warner. October 15, 1835. Henry Waldron, May 28, 1836. Eben B. Morehouse, June 9, 1836. Levi C. Turner, June 9, 1836.' SECTION 2. Henry Waldron, May 28, 1836. Nelson Kirby, June 3, 1836. Abner Cook, Jr., June 9, 1836. Levi C. Turner, June 9. 1836. SECTION L3. Luther Shaw, October 15, 1835, Lyman Wheeler, November 6, 1835, Luther Shaw, March 24, 1836, Total..................................... 11,046,000 The following is tile amount of State tax proportioned to Lapeer County for the year 1883: University.......................................$ 650 00 University-general and other expenses.............. 597 04 L I_ I -I — A k, I X ( r -v <

Page  [unnumbered] L l r I - ~ ijs R ES. F.W. H. Lo u K S. LAPEER T. TF LAPEER CO.MIC1.

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Page  31 1 i I 1I _i - - A I I t - HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 31 S 3 A 7 SECTION 3. Amos Hewitt, April 27, 1836. Orris Smith, April 27, 1836. Luther Shaw, April 27, 1836. Daniel Matthews, May 2, 1836. Henry Waldron, May 28, 1836. Truman Shaw, July 6, 1836. Elisha Lee, March 4, 1836. SECTION 4. Lydia E. S. Chamberlain, February 1, 1828. Elisha Webster, February 14, 1829. Samuel Deneen, February 24, 1831. Marshal Crane, January 15, 1833. Cyrus Boles, October 10, 1834. Joseph B. Deneen, November 12, 1834. Varnum Wilcox, June 20, 1835. Alvin Cheney, July 11, 1836.' Samuel Deneen, May 28, 1836. John Shaw, January 18, 1837. SECTION 5. Erastus Day, July 14, 1829. Ephraim Chamberlain, October 29, 1830. Gilbert King, December 16, 1834. Varnum Wilcox, June 20, 1835. N. Dickinson, W. H. Imlay and George Beach, March 7, 1836. Richard Nelson, April 21, 1836. Harvey Wilcox, February 24, 1836. SECTION 6. Peter Aldrich, Jr., February 26, 1831. Peter Aldrich, May 9, 1831. Gad Chamberlain, April 25, 1838. J. D. Baldwin and Sylvester G. Abbott, February 20,1836. Nathan Dickinson, William H. Imlay and George Beach, March 7 and May 10, 1836. David Clark, June 23, 1826. SECTION 7. Hiram Wilcox, June 5, 1835. John Taylor, Jr., March 14, 1836. Hermanns B. Fall, May 10, 1836. William H. Imlay, May 10, 1836. Nathan Dickinson, William H. Imlay and George Beach, May 24, 1836. Brainard Root, June 25, 1836. SECTION 8. John Taylor, September 6, 1831. James Deneen, October 29, 1834. Asahel Wilcox, May 19, 1835. James Deneen, July 9, 1835. David T. Smith, November 6, 1835. Nathan Dickinson, William H. Imlay and George Beach, May 24, 1836. SECTION 9. James Deneen, October 16, 1828. Abner H. Fisher, May 24, 1831. John Taylor, September 6, 1831. Josiah Fletcher, February 7, 1833. Josiah Fletcher, September 24, 1833. Varnum Wilcox, November 1, 1833. Harvey Wilcox, November 1, 1833. Daniel Freeman, October 16, 1834. David Paddock, November 5, 1835. SECTION 10. Elisha Lee, March 4, 1837. William C. Baldwin, October 17, 1832. Hiram Wilcox, November 1, 1833. Richard Nelson, April 21, 1836. Henry Waldron, May 23, 1836. Henry Waldron, May 28, 1836. John Shaw, May 28, 1836. SECTION 10. John S. Peck, June 9, 1836. Adam Boles, July 16, 1836. Adam Boles, November 22, 1836. James W. Sleeper, December 26, 1836. SECTION 11. Benjamin Hurlburt, May 10, 1836. Henry Waldron, May 23, 1836. Henry Waldron, May 28, 1836. Nelson Kirby and Gardner Carr, June 3, 1836. Elisha Lee, March 4, 1837. SECTION 12. Levi Bannister, May 10, 1836. SECTION 13. William W. Green, February 17, 1836. James C. Wallack, April 22, 1836. Thomas Durkee, May 6, 1836. Nelson Draper, November 19, 1836. Samson Salisbury, December 26, 1836. John Stephens, January 7, 1845, SECTION 14. Walter Thompson, April 25, 1836. Alexander Jackels, May 8, 1836. William H. King, May 6, 1836. Thomas Durkee, May 6 and 12, 1836. Lewis Alverson, May 18, 1836. Otho Bell, June 2, 1836. Gardner Carr, June 16, 1836. SECTION 15. Mary Hollister, May 29, 1828. William Boles, July 22, 1833. Benjamin Sleeper, October 29, 1833. Adam Boles, May 21, 1834. Stephen Smith, June 7, 1834. Adam Boles, October 2, 1834. Benjamin Sleeper, May 21, 1836. Hiram L. Salsbury, July 11, 1836. Otho Bell, August 4, 1836. SECTION 16. Daniel C. Bacon, October'17, 1842. A. R. Fisher, November 2, 1842. A. Fisher, November 2, 1842. E. DeLong, June 5, 1843. E. S. Curtis, December 14, 1844. David Ingalls, November 11, 1842. E. T. Curtis, February 23, 1843. Y. B. Humphrey, September 4, 1843. Anson Humphrey, September 4, 1843. Daniel Black, September 24, 1843. SECTION 17. Elisha Farnum, September 19, 1835. Clark Bates, November 7, 1835. Leonard Wells, December 16, 1835. Elvin King, January 29, 1836. Nathan Dickinson, William H. Imlay and George Beach, May 24, 1836. Stephen Briggs, June 13, 1836. SECTION 18. Nathan Dickinson, William H. Imlay and George Beach, March 14 and March 24, 1836. SECTION 19. William Vandebogart, December 7, 1835. David Weeks, December 11, 1835. Dickinson, Imlay and Beach, May 2 and 10, 1836. Nathan Dickinson, June 17, 1836. Nathan Dickinson, William H. Imlay and George Beach, May 24, 1836. SECTION 20. E, H. H ough and J. B. Hough, May 8, 1834. James Andrews, May 17, 1834. William Kingg, June 11, 1834. Milton Fox, September 25, 1834. Harvey A. Newberry, September 25, 1834. i I I -nI 7-0 Id e 2 I - tl".- - I25 -

Page  32 A -' __ _ A 32 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. SECTION 20. Cyrus Humphrey, Junie 9, 1835. Davis Newberry, June 9, 1835. Dickinson, Imlay & Beach, March 29, 1836. Nathan Dickinson, June 17, 1836. SECTION 21. Daniel Black, June 6, 1833. Daniel Black, July 13, 1833. Edward H. and John B. Hough, May 8, 1834. Philo Farnam, Jr., May 29, 1834. W. H. Wing, June 4, 1834. Jonathan O. Freeman, June 7, 1834. Henry H. Newberry, September 25, 1834. Cyrus Humphrey, October 11, 1834. Philo Farnam, Jr., October 13, 1834. James McCoy, April 25, 1835. Henry H. Wing, October 16, 1835. SECTION 22. Nicholas Richardson, May 17, 1831. Otho Bell, May 26, 1831. William F. Teed, March 12, 1834. James H. Kidder, April 17, 1834. Jonas Cutler, April 18, 1834. James H. Kidder, May 7, 1834. Ganet Schenk, June 26, 1834. John A. Conklin, October 1, 1835. SECTION 23. Nathan Rogers, May 17, 1833. Oliver Bristol, February 5, 1836. Rufus Beall, March 19, 1836. Zadock H. Hallock, April 22, 1836. William H. Wing, May 6, 1836. Ira C. Day, May 21, 1836. David Ingalls, October 26, 1836. Elisha Lee, March 4, 1837. SECTION 24. Zadock H. Hallock, April 22, 1836. Lemuel Pratt, April 22, 1836. Thomas Durkee, May 6, 1836. Samuel Salisbury, July 11, 1836. SECTION 25. Zadock H. Hallock, April 22, 1836. Thomas R. Hallock, April 22, 1836. John W. Thompson, May 25, 1836. William Thompson, May 25, 1836. Benjamin B. Kercheval, December 27, 1836. John Robb, August 23, 1841. John Marshall, May 31, 1842. Thomas B. Hallock, June 8, 1836. SECTION 26. Nathan Rogers, Jr., May 17, 1833. Rufus Prentice, October 1, 1833. Robert A. Quatermass, October 24, 1835. Charles W. Richardson, April 7, 1836. Rebecca Day, May 21, 1836. William Thompson, May 25, 1836. David Ingalls, October 26, 1836. Elisha Lee, March 4, 1837. SECTION 27. Oliver Bristol, October 6, 1830. Otho Bell, May 26, 1831. Ira S. Saunders, September 23, 1833. William F. Teed, August 8, 1834. Giles Wickwire, October 14, 1834. Wesley Platt, October 15, 1834. Robert A. Quatermass, October 24, 1835. Harvey Carpenter, November 16, 1835. Rufus Beall, March 19, 1836. SECTION 28. Jonathan Sleeper, November 23, 1830. Walter K. and Ebenezer Hough, September 23, 1833. James Taylor, May 7, 1834. SECTION 28. Jonathan C. Freeman, June 7, 1834. William R. Gardner, September 19, 1834. Garry Goodrich, May 6, 1836. SECTION 29. Jedediah E. Hough, March 22, 1834. Edward H. and John B. Hough, May 8, 1834. William King, June 11, 1834. Washington Allen, November 7, 1834. Josiah Banghart, April 4, 1835. Simeon Balch, June 15, 1835. Willard Wales, July 16, 1835. Josiah Banghart, November 18, 1835. SECTION 30. Willard Wales, April 3, 1835. Almeron W. Wales, April 3, 1835. John J. Joslin, March 22, 1836. Nathan Dickinson, William H. Imlay and George Beach, May 2, 1836. Nathan Dickinson, William H. Imlay and George Beach, May 10, 1836. SECTION 31. John T. Smrith, November 13, 1834. Philip Smith, January 20, 1835. Van Rensselaer Beach, March 20, 1835. Almeron W. Wales, April 3, 1835. John De Witt, June 10, 1835. Hezekiah Wyncoop, July 4, 1835. Edgar T. Leet, July 4, 1835. Van Rensselaer Beach, July 24, 1835. Ora Beach, August 22, 1835. Rufus Palen, September 17, 1835. Schuyler Irish, October 22, 1835. Schuyler Irish, May 31, 1836. SECTION 32. Ben Taggert, October 30, 1830. Nathaniel Smith, February 14, 1834. Witherell Hough, October 28, 1834. Oliver Smith, November 3, 1834. Samiuel Johnson, November 7, 1834. Hannah Palen, June 29, 1835. Hiram Hoit, Septemher 21, 1835. SECTION 33. David Ingalls, October 30, 1830. Bezaleel Bristol, July 16, 1831. Walter H. and Ebenezer Hough, September 23,1838. Nathaniel Smith, July 2, 1835. Nathaniel Smith, September 16, 1835. Samuel Johnson, November 28, 1835. John S. Smith, June 27, 1836. SECTION 34. Diana Kittredge, May 27, 1828. Elijah M. Sanborn, June 26, 1830 Benjamin Taggert, October 30, 1830. John E. Walden, July 9, 1832. George H. Holden, September 26, 1833. Philip S. Frisbie, July 21, 1834. Mark Winchal, December 11, 1834. William Whitney, July 9, 1835. SECTION 35. Rufus Beall, May 26, 1831. Joshua Smith, June 21,1833. John Taylor, June 21, 1833. John Hopkin, June 29, 1833. William Robertson, June 29, 1833. Giles Wickwire, October 14, 1833. Avery Reniff, February 1, 1836. SECTION 36. James Thomson, June 12, 1833. William Thompson, May 25, 1836. Hoyer G. Kittredge, October 26, 1836. Seymour P. Fletcher, October 26, 1836. I A ---O I - - - < 6 < r

Page  33 -"A. II I I: - HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 33 I SECTION 86. Hutchins Washburne, October 27, 1836. Seymour P. Fletcher, October 31, 1836. EARLY HISTORY. The first trace we can find in the memory of the "oldest inhabitant," of the opening up of our beautiful township to the adventurous white man, takes us back to 1827. In that year William Allen, his son, G. W. Allen, and James Thorington, with Levi Washburn as hunter and guide, from the neighborhood of the township of Washington, with invading axes cut a road through northward, near the present main street of our village, to the pineries beyond. Tradition says they found the road about as hard to travel as the famous Jordan of the song, and that when they "pitched their nightly tents" they were serenaded in such lively style by roving bands of wolves that sleep forsook their mossy pillows, and daylight was welcomed with more than usual pleasure. They found here a fine tract of country, offering great inducements to the farmer; the southern portion somewhat rolling and consisting in great part of windfall land and oak-openings; the northern more level and covered with heavy timber, mostly beech and maple, intermingled with strips of pine. The first purchase of land in the township was made in the spring of 1828, by Lydia Chamberlin, the east one-half northeast quarter of section 5. In the fall of the same year James Deneen bought from government, and actually settled upon the west onehalf northeast quarter section 9. To him belongs the distinction of being the leading pioneer of this township and county. For two years he was the only one, his nearest neighbors being some ten miles to the southward, while away to the northwest lay the great Saginaw Valley, now crowded with cities and villages; then known only as the seat of an obscure trading post. Mr. Deneen went to California in the height of the gold fever, antd soon after died there. Honor to the pioneer hero! Next came Jonathan Sleeper, who settled in the fall of 1830, on east one-half northeast quarter section 28. He built a log house on the south end of the lot, nearly one-half mile south of the center of our village. Opposite, on the east side of the road, the same fall, Oliver Bristol built a frame house; the first in the town, and still standing in good preservation; and next May, 1831, he moved in with his family. His brother, Bezaleel Bristol, came with him, and located near by. A little farther south, on the town line, Elijah Sanborn bought in 1830, and settled in 1831. Those were trying times for the hardy pioneers, and we in our days of comparative ease and luxury, earned by their labors, can hardly realize how much they had to endure. Mr. Sanborn came in March, but the winter was unusually prolonged by a heavy fall of snow in April, and he had to feed to his stock his scanty store of flour and even the straw from the family bedticks to keep the animals alive, while he went an arduous journey of twenty miles to Troy for supplies. Mr. Sleeper was a poor man, and was obliged to leave home and work in the settlements south in order to support his family while clearing up his farm. While he was absent the wolves were impudent enough to come right up to the doorstep and even put their feet on the window sill and look into the house. Imagine the feelings of a lonely woman, with her little ones, under such circum stances. About this time these ferocious animals killed and devoured a valuable cow belonging to Oliver Bristol. a sufficient proof of their power and murderous intentions. In those days a tub of soap grease left out over night was pretty sure to be gone in the morning, and the smaller kinds of stock had to be carefully housed up in order to preserve them. The writer remembers hearing the howl of the wolves as late as 1843 in a swamp in the southeast - corner of the township, about the time when they killed seven sheep in one night for Reeves Hallock just over the line in Berlin. EARLY EVENTS. In 1830 the first birth among the white settlers took place, that of Anna Deneen, daughter of James Deneen. This lady, now the widow of Chas. Walker, still lives on the old homestead. She was the first white person born in Lapeer County. The first funeral also occurred this year, that of an infant son of Bezaleel Bristol. On this occasion the first or second sermon ever delivered in Lapeer County was preached by "old Father Abel Warren," as he was familiarly called. Mr. Warren belonged to the M. E. Church and was the pioneer preacher of a large tract of wilderness, embracing this and several adjoining counties. He must have been a man of many sterling qualities of brain and heart, judging from the success of his heroic labors and the affectionate remembrance in which he is still held by the surviving pioneers. In January, 1832, the first wedding took place. Cullen Baldwin was married to Nancy Elderken by Father Warren, at the house of Oliver Bristol. The happy couple settled in Bruce, but afterward moved to this township. Both have since died; Mr. Baldwin only a year ago at Romeo. John Walden came in the spring of 1832 and died in the fall of 1833, being the first adult white man known to have died in the township. Abner Fisher, Wm. Boles, Josiah Sleeper, Benj. Sleeper, Philip Frisbie and father, and others were added to the settlement at this time. David Ingalls came in 1829, bought in 1830, built in 1831 and settled in 1836. In 1833 there was a notable increase in the number of actual settlers. David Taylor, John Hopkins, James Thompson and Wm. Robertson commenced the Scotch settlement in the southeast. In the winter Nathaniel Smith and in the fall Philip Smith located in the southwest, while Bradford, Philip and Varnum Wilcox and Elisha Webster settled in the northwest, where, a year after, the latter built a saw-mill, which was for a long time the only one in town. In July of this year, also, the first house, a log one, was built on the site of the present village of Almont, on the spot now occupied by the Robertson Block. Daniel Black was the owner and builder, and to him belongs the title of founder of the village. James Thompson is one of the few men now amongst us who assisted at the raising. As early as the winter of 1834, Mr. Black kept a sort of tavern in his log house. He had to go to Pontiac and take out a license at a cost of $18, and then had to keep two extra beds and stabling for two spans of horses in order to comply with the law. He had several dances and the young people used to come to them from Rochester and Utica. Considering the state of the roads in those days, this certainly showed a great deal of enterprise in the pursuit of pleasure under difficulties. Mr. Black was present at the first court held in Lapeer County in 1837. He was township collector ten years in succession, being very accommodating in dealing with the poor settlers, taking ashes, black salts, oats-anything they had that was merchantable-in payment of taxes. Bears were very abundant a year or two previous to this, and Oliver Bristol had a rather exciting adventure with one near the site of the present Congregational Church. He was a cripple at the time, the result of a limb fractured some six months before. He had fired at the bear, wounding and knocking it down. When commencing to reload he perceived the bear, a very large one, making toward him. He turned to run but his crippled leg failed hinm. His only recourse was to reload. With a few of the liveliest motions he ever made in his life, he did so, and dropped the powder in the pan of his old flint-lock just as Bruin rose to receive him with open J l I -A 4 - I ---- --------— a --- 0

Page  34 4 4^ __ HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 34 34 arms. But for the lucky shot that followed, the name of Oliver Bristol would probably have figured no more in this eventful history. Quite a large influx of population took place in 1834. Six families of Houghs, viz: those of Witherell, Jedediah, Edward, Ebenezer, Walter K. and John B., with James Taylor, James Andrus, Elisha Farnum, Cyrus Humphrey, Otis Freeman, William and Harrison King, James H. Kidder, Stephen Smith, Milton Fox, Willard Wales and Josiah Banghart were added to the number of influential citizens. Nicholas Richardson had come in 1833, but did not settle till 1834. Simeon Balch and Clark Bates came a year later. As an illustration of the pluck and energy commonly shown by those enterprising men, this circumstance is related in regard to Mr. James Andrus. He reached this place on the 12th of May, chose a location one and one-fourth miles west on the 13th, traveled on foot to Detroit on the 14th, bought his land and walked back on the 15th, reaching Black's a little after sundown. During the two days he was gone, his son, James H., worked alone, cutting the first road west from the village, and inside of two weeks from their first arrival, the family were snugly fixed in a comfortable log house on the new farm. This year was also rendered notable by the organization of the township and the holding of the first town meeting. At this election thirteen votes were cast-not as many votes as there were offices. Those must have been rare times for office-seekers! Oliver Bristol, Democrat, was elected supervisor, and for two years went as such to Pontiac, the county seat of Oakland County, as Lapeer County was not then fully organized. This year also witnessed the foundation of our school system. Nicholas Richardson was one of our first highway commissioners. Some idea may be formed of the state of the roads in those days from the fact that he pronounced it utterly impossible to make a road on the site of our present beautiful gravel turnpike to Romeo. Dr. Caleb Carpenter, the pioneer physician, settled in the village this year. Dr. Lute followed in a year or two, in the southwest part of the town. About the close of the patriot war there was a' free immigration from Canada, and the town became quite populous, so that in this brief sketch we can no longer mention all the names. Several families of Churchills and Edgertons were among these new comers. But little wild land was now left untaken. The Scotch settlement was largely reinforced by the numerous families of Cochranes, Mortons, Millikins, Hamiltons, Muirs, Mairs, Marshals, Fergusons, Reids, Braidwoods and Patons, with John Wason, Wm. Wallace and others, and these added largely by their industry and thrift to the material prosperity of the town. Zadoc H. Hallock came in 1838 and settled one-half mile east, where he still lives, and cut the first road and took the first wagon through eastward into Berlin; Joshua Smith and Thomas Morton settled by the "Red Run" in 1838, of whom the latter might be styled the ';advance guard" of the army of Scotch who followed after 1840. Mark Farley in 1840, David and Wm. Clark in 1838 and 1840, and Virgil Parmlee were added to the settlement north. The Chas. Kennetts, Sr. and Jr., Solon Spafford and Wm. Nichols also came about the same time. Adam Watson and J. G. Thurston came two or three years later, SQUIRREL HUNT. The summer of 1843 is probably remembered by many on account of a grand squirrel hunt in which the whole town took part, the north part being pitted against tbe south. It was arranged in connection with the second celebration of the 4th of July. A dinner was to be provided by contributions from the farmers, and fifty squirrel tails were required from a man and twenty-five from a boy to entitle him to a seat at the table. The hunt lasted a week, and almost any one who chose to try could secure the requisite number, so exceedingly plentiful was the game. The result of the hunt was 5,700 tails, the southern division being victors. A grand jollification followed. There was a procession, the marshals being Wm. Myers and John Colwell. familiarly known as Colonel Windy. Then followed the dinner with toasts and speeches. At the breaking out of the Mexican war in 1846, Almont sent a delegation of four men, viz: John C. Hincks, Thomas Goetchius, Theodore Banghart and Albert Schenck. During the decade between 1840 and 1850 the political complexion of the town changed. D. W. Taylor, Democrat, was supervisor in 1843 and 1844; James Taylor, Democrat, from 1845 to 1848 inclusive; Calvin A. Shaw, Whig, in 1849 and 1850. During the years between 1850 and 1860 the town partook in the great political excitements that convulsed the country, and was the scene of many enthusiastic mass-meetings addressed by mighty stump orators, such as George W. Peck, George C. Bates, Crofoot, Baldwin, Blair, Chandler and others. In 1851 Z. H. Hallock, Democrat, was elected supervisor and re-elected in 1852. James Taylor, Democrat, was elected again in 1853, and retained in office four years. In 1857 the town yielded to the pressure of the times, and became Republican, Samuel Carpenter, supervisor. D. E. Hazen was elected in 1858 and 1859, and Hiram Howland in 1860, both Republicans. It is worthy of note here that Mr. John Rattray, Sr., became justice of the peace in 1857, and has been continued in that office to the present date. In the summer of 1858 we lost one of our most esteemed public men, Mr. James Taylor, by accidental drowning. During this decade population had continued to increase till, in 1860, the votes cast for supervisor were 409, the total population being about 2,000-nearly double that of 1850. To the call for men during the war for the Union, Almont responded with energy and enthusiasm, two companies being organized here and many men furnished to other organizations, and not a few of her sons sealed their patriotism with their blood. In this connection we must not forget to mention our war supervisor, J. B. Hough, who held the office for five years. To his credit be it said, that we never had to stand but one draft, and at the close of the war we had credit for five men more than our quota. In 1866 Mr. Hough retired to accept a collectorship, and D. E. Hazen was elected and served for the next five years. SCHOOL HISTORY. The first school-house in the town was a log building erected in 1834, and located a few rods west of the present store of D. and A. Cochrane. Charlotte Freeman was the first teacher, and received the extravagant salary of 75 cents per week. In the winter of 1834-'35 Elijah C. Bostwick taught a school in the Deneen shingle shanty. In 1840 a frame school-house was built where William Colerick's residence now stands. About 1844 Eliphalet Parker instituted an academic school which he conducted successfully for several years. The building used by him is still standing just east of the Baptist Church. About 1855, Rev. Charles Kellogg, who had recently resigned the pastorate of the Congregational Church, became teacher in an academic school, a building for which had been erected by subscription. This building afterward became the property of the village district, and was occupied by the district school until 1866. There arose in 1866 a demand for a change in the school system to keep pace with other improvements. After a good deal of e I - -- -- - -

Page  35 ^. — - ---- I - I 1 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 35 - - - - contention a Union School District was organized, and in 1867 a fine brick school-house was erected and was an ornament to the village and an evidence of the liberality and refinement of the people. This building was burned December 9, 1881, and in 1883 preparations are being made for the erection of a new building to cost about $14,000. It is expected to have the work completed before the beginning of 1884. CIVIL HISTORY. The town of Almont was organized March 7, 1834, comprising townships 6 and 7 north, of range 12 east, now known as the towns of Almont and Imlay. It was organized under the name of Mia, which was soon afterwards changed to Bristol, and finally to Almont. The name Mia was suggested by Elisha Webster, one of the earliest settlers of the town in honor of his daughter, now Mrs. Virgil S. Parmlee. The name Bristol was given in honor of Oliver Bristol, the first supervisor; and the name of Almont was suggested by the name of the Mexican general, Almonte. The records of the town of Almont from its organization up to March 29, 1842, having been destroyed by fire, the following statements in regard to the first town meeting are based upon tradition, and the recollections of the few persons now living who were present on that occasion. The first town meeting was held in Daniel Black's tavern, which has been described in another part of this history. This tavern, the scene of the beginning of the town's civil history stood about where now stands the block occupied by B. F. Johnston's furniture store, and Sullivan & Green's carriage shops in the village of Almont. Ira S. Sanders, having been appointed by the governor justice of the peace, presided at the meeting. There were about thirteen voters present, besides many from adjoining towns and boys of the town who had not attained to the dignity of voters, but who fully appreciated and' were competent to take part in the fun which was the invariable characteristic of town meetings in early days. The serious business of voting was enlivened by plenty of whisky, ball-playing, wrestling and good natured fun.:It is related among the incidents of the meeting that a negro known as "nigger Ben," who was present from an adjoining town, stepped up to Daniel Black, who from too brief a residence in the town was not a voter, and slapped him on the shoulder with the remark, "We blacks can't vote." The officers elected were, as nearly and as fully as can be ascertained, as follows: Supervisor and justice of the peace, Oliver Bristol; clerk, Jonathan Sleeper; treasurer, Daniel Black; assessors, Nicholas Richardson, and Elisha Webster; highway commissioner, James Deneen. 1842-March 29th, settlement with town treasurer shows amount of cancelled orders, $19.38; orders outstanding, $162.21; money on hand, $1.40. April 4th, at annual town meeting, it was voted that no money be raised for road purposes except for bridges; that town officers receive 75 cents per day for services. 1843-At special town meeting February 25th Deacon James Taylor was elected supervisor and John B. Hough justice of the peace to fill vacancies caused by resignation of David Ingalls, who had been elected sheriff of the county. At annual town meeting it was voted not to elect assessors. October 5th, town board voted $200 for town expenses. 1845 —Record missing. 1846 — March 30th board fixed compensation of clerk at $25 per year for services as clerk, school inspector, and all other ser I I vices required of him by law. This year the name of the town was changed to Almont. 1847-At town meeting, on question of liquor license, the votes for license were 105 against eighty-nine. And April 10th the board decided that the public good required but one place to be licensed for the sale of ardent spirits, and granted license to Miles J. Beach, of the Almant Exchange, on payment of $8 license fee and $2 fees of the board. 1849-At annual town meeting it was voted to raise 50 cents per scholar for support of common schools. On question of license nine votes were given in favor and thirty-seven against. 1850-June 15th, at a meeting of town boards of Almont and Imlay for the purpose of making a division of money and effects, there was found due Imlay $7.67 and road districts of Imlay $95.74. It was agreed to divide the library books on the basis of $15 worth to Imlay to $56 worth to Almont. 1851-Amount raised for contingent expenses was $50, and the same amount was raised in 1852. 1855-At annual town meeting it was voted to raise $1,000 by direct tax for a town house. 1858-July 19th supervisor gave notice that there was assessed against the town of Almont for State and county purposes, $1,265.26; valuation as estimated by supervisor, $295,880. November 10th supervisor gave notice that the assessment for school purposes was a total of $701.43. 1860-In the proceedings of annual town meeting appears an evidence of the advance of civilization in a resolution that hogs be not allowed to run at large, and that the board provide a pound. 1862-At a special town meeting held November 24th it was voted to raise the sum of $4,000 as fund from which to pay bounties to volunteer soldiers under the call of the general government for 300,000 men. There were 213 votes in favor and seventysix votes against the proposition. February 28, 1863, the board in accordance with the vote of the town directed the issue of town orders of $100 in payment of bounties, and such orders were issued to forty volunteers. 1864-February 25th a special town meeting voted 162 to twenty-nine to levy a tax for payment of $100 each to all persons volunteering in the army or that were drafted, and furnished substitutes under the last call of the president for 2C0,000 men. March 29th treasurer's settlement showed balance March 31, 1863 $255.51; received, etc., $10,495.21; paid, etc., $10,463.68; balance in hand, $287.04. Orders were drawn for payment of seven bounties. April 4th at annual town meeting it was resolved that all volunteers that the town may need now or hereafter to fill any calls made by the president-shall be paid $100 bounty, and that the board pay each man who has been drafted and gone to the war or furnished a substitute, or that may hereafter be drafted from the town $100. It was voted to divide the library among the districts. 1865-Settlement with treasurer showed debits, $13,179.76; credits, 12,888.19; balance in hand, $291.55; expended for schools, $1,625.74. December 1st, statement of taxes assessed as follows: Highway commissioners' orders, $47.80;,rejected taxes, $14.44; interest on county bonds, $64.13; returned by Road District No. 11, $4.60; excess of taxes, $50.77; State tax, $1,445.69; county tax, $10,872.02; school tax, $1,518.26. 1866-September 12th, T. E. Hough appointed town clerk in place of A. V. Amerman, resigned. 1869-Taxes assessed as follows: State, $1,149.52; county, $3,220; county bonds, $963; contingent fund, $200; highway commissioners' orders, $125; school, $8,607.89. 1870-April 15th, at a special town meeting it was voted 310 to 102 to pledge the aid of the town to the Romeo & Almont Rail 4 JR I t co I ~ I1 L. I of

Page  36 - - # - - i JLS i i I - 1 36 HISTORY OF LAPEERu COUNTY. I I - I I road Company to the amount of $45,000 for the construction of a railroad from Romeo to Almont, and May 11th the bonds provided for were issued. 1872 —February 2d A. C. Dickerson resigned as treasurer and William W. McKay was elected by the board to fill the vacancy. 1874-December taxes assessed as follows: State, $1,200.91; county, $3,722.06; town, $614.12; highway, $71.12; school, $5,170.27. In 1870 dWState tax was $936.99; county tax, $3,275.61; town tax, $501.51; for school purposes, $4,313.97. At the April election in 1883, a proposition was voted upon to raise the sum of $2,000, payable in four annual installments, to be appropriated to aid in the purchase of a site and the erection of a building thereon by the township and village in company; said building to contain a town hall four the -public use, and also ar council room, engine room and jail for use of said village. This proposition was carried by a vote of 190 for to ininety-six against. Work upon the construction of the building was commenced during the summer. The annual report of the school inspectors of the town of Almnont for the year 1882 shows the slumber of school children to have been 525; number of school buildings, 8. Inspectors for the ensuing year: C. R. Ferguson, James Bruce, C. -B. Kidder, John Mitchell, Warren Fisher, George Retherford, John Bialdwood, W/illiam H. Reid, Linas Fisher. TOWN OFFICERS. The following is a list of the principal town officers elected since 1841: 184f2-Supervisor David Ingalls; clerk, Jonathan Sleeper; treasurer, Daniel Black. Number of votes, 155. 1843-Supervisor, -Danliel W. Taylor; clerk, Jamnes H. Andruls; treasurer, Daniel Black. 1844-Supervisor, Daniel W. Taylor; clerk, Abner Burrington; treasurer, Daniel Black. Number of votes, 203. 1845-No record. 1846 -Supervisor, James Taylor; clerk, S. P. Spafford; treasurer, Danliel Black. 1847-Supervisor, James Taylor; clerk, S. P. Spafford; treasurer, Daniel Black. Number of votes, 200. 1848-Supervisor, James Taylor; clerk, Hiram C. Wells; treasurer, Daniel Black. Number of votes, 209. 1849-Supervisor, Calvin A. Shaw; clerk, Robert I. Goetchius; treasurer, Daniel Black. Number of votes, 239. 1850 Supervisor, Calvin A. Shaw; clerk, Robert I. Goetchius; treasurer, Daniel Black. Number of votes, 173. 1851-Supervisor, Z. H. Hallock: clerk, Robert I. Goetcbius; treasurer,-Daniel Black; Number of votes, 199. 1852-Supervisor, Z. H. Hallock; clerk, Robert I. Goetchius; treasurer, Daniel Black. Number of votes, 249;' 1853-Supervisor, Jamnes Taylor; clerk, Robert I. Goetchius; treasurer, Garry Goodrich. Number of votes, 280. 1854-Supervisor, James Taylor; clerk, Robert I. Goetchius; treasurer, Garry Goodrich. Number of votes, 295. 18055-Supervisor, Jaules Taylor; clerk, Hiram D. Fitch; treasurer, Robert I. Goetchius. Number of votes, 334. 1856-Supervisor, James Taylor; clerk, D. E. Hazen; treasurer, Walter P. Beach. Number of votes, 350. 1857-Supervisor, Samuel Carpenter; clerk, D. E. Hazen; treasurer, Eiram D. Fitch. Number of votes, 378. 1858 - Supervisor, D. E. Hazen; clerk, Janes R. Taylor; treasurer, Hiraml D. Fitch. Number of votes, 407. I I I 1859. Su-ervisor, D. E. Hazen; clerk, James R. Taylor; treasurer, Oliver P. Strobridge. Number of votes, 401. 1860 Supervisor, Hiram Howvland; clerk, Hiram D. Fitch, treasurer, D. E. Hazen. Number of votes, 409. 1861 Supervisor, John B. Hough; clerk, D. E. Hazen; treasurer, Anthony C. Dickerson. Number-of votes, 319. 1862-Supervisor, John B. Hough; clerk, D. E. Hazenr treasurer, Anthony C. Dickerson. 1883- Supervisor, John B. Hough; clerk, D. E. Hlazen; treasurer; Anthony C. Dickerson. 1864-Supervisor, John B. Hough; clerk, D. E. Hazen; treasurer, Anthony C. Dickerson. 1865-Supervisor, John B. Hough; clerk; D. E. Hazen; treasurer, Anthony C. Dickerson. 1866-Supervisor, D. E. -Hazen; clerk, A. V. Amerman; treasurer, Anthony C. Dickerson. 1867-Suipervisor, D. E. Hazen; clerk, T. E. Hougrh; treasulrer, Anthony C. Dickerson. Numbler of votes,:306. 1868-Supervisor, D. E. Hazen; clerk, William W. Taylor; treasurer, Anthony C. Dickerson. Number of votes, 423. 1869 ---Supervisor, D.. E. Hazen; clerk, T. E. Hough; treasurer, Anthony C. Dickerson. Number of votes, 328. 1870-Supervisor, D. E. Hazen; clerk, Leland H. Briggs; treasurer, Alltholly C. Dickerson. Number of votes, 377.1871-Supervisor, P. H. McEntee; clerk, Leland H. Briggs; treasurer, Anthony C. Dickerson. Numnber of votes, 326. 1872-Supervisor, Uriel Townsend; clerk, EgYbert W. Corey; treasurer, Anthony (J. Dickerson. Number of votes, 286. 1873-Supe'rvisor, Daniel C. Bacon; clerk, Egbert W. Corey; treasurer, Anthony C. Dickerson. Number of votes, 273. 1874-Supervisor, Uriel Townsend; clerk, Eabert Wv. Corey. treasurer, E. S. M~cEntee. Number of votes, 318. 1875-Supervisor, Charles Ferguson; clerk, Benjamin F. Johnston; treasurer, E. S. McEntee. Number of votes, 373. 1876-Supervisor, Charles Ferguson; clerk, Benjamin F. Johnston; treasurer, E. S. McEntee. Numlber of votes, 298. 1877-Supervisor, Maitland E. Martin; clerk, James 0. Thurston; treasurer, E. S. McEntee. Number of votes, 401. 1878-Supervisor, Maitland E. Martin; clerk, James O. Thurston; treasurer, E. S. McEntee..Number of votes, 397. 1879-Supervisor, Maitland E. Martin; clerk, E. S. McEntee; treasurer, James 0. Thlurston. Numnber of votes, 388. 1880 Supervisor, Maitland E. Martin; 'clerk, Frank P. Andrus; treasurer, James 0. Thurston. Numrb er of votes, 347. 1881 Supervisor, M~vaitland E. Martin; clerk, James 0. Thurston; treasurer; Thomas C. Taylor. Number of votes, 329. 1882-Supervisor, Maitlalld E. Martin'; clerk, James 0. Thurston; treasurer, Thomas C. Taylor. Number of votes, not recorded. 1883-Supervisor, Maitland E. Martin; clerk, L. 0. Folsom; U reasurer, James 0. Thurston. VILLA-GE OF ALMIONT. About the year 1834 the village was first christened, and strangely enough the baptismal font was a keg of whisky. A " bee" had been called to open a road one-half mlile north from the cor ners. To aid in the work a keg of spirits was procured by subscription; but some one who loved a horn himself, fearing, perliaps, the men might abuse the blessing, slyly took measures to prevent this, and serve a private end besides, by boring a hole il the keg, drawing off a large portion and filling up with water, and then carefully obliterating all traces of the operation. So he may be I. t. 7-v Il 0.:t r Gil kg AL I I 7-1W )

Page  37 -c II i aI LI- - aiU II r.. _ __. _.I HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 37 la __ I truly said to have in-AUGER-ated the first effort in behalf of temperance. When the whisky came to be used, it didi not have the expected effect; suspicion was excited, an investigation instituted, and the discovery made that the keg had been tapped. So it was then and there decided to call this place Tapshire, and the oldest inhabitants often call it so to this day. Philip Frisbie suggested the name. 1835-'36. In 1835 the first parcel of land was sold to second hands on the village site. December 19th Hubbard Hall bought of Oliver Bristol eight acres on northwest corner of section 27 for $80, and soon after sold to Philo Farnum one acre from the northwest corner for $10. Tile present value of this acre, with its buildings, is something near $20,000. Here he built a log house, and shortly after a small shop; and commenced as pioneer in the shoemaking business. In the spring of 1836 or thereabouts, Daniel Black sold out his land to Otho Bell, excepting a small piece on the southeast corner where his house stood. This he disposed of to Lewis Alverson, who here kept the first stock of groceries ever brought for sale into this place; but the first building raised for a store and occupied as such was Charles B. Keeler's. It was built on the present site of Farquharson & Taylor's store, and was filled with a general stock of dry goods and groceries, in 1836. Albert Southwell established the first blacksmith shop about this time; and the first hotel building, the present Exchange, was erected by Hubbard Hall, immediately purchased and kept by Henry Wing. In this year the State government was organized, though the State was not admitted to the Union till the following January; the county of Lapeer was also organized, and the township incorporated therewith, and the name Newburg adopted by the village, which now consisted of a school-house, hotel, store, blacksmith shop, shoe shop and five dwellings. A PLATTED VILLAGE. The first plat of the village was made and recorded September 8, 1836, by Oliver Bristol, Jonathan Sleeper, C. B. Keeler and James Thorington. John Dawitt, James Lsarmont, George W. Allen, Gerritt Schenck, Samuel Kidder, Garry Goodrich, Amasa Ross, Hiram and Reuben Howland, Truman and Calvin Shaw; William B. Owen, Amos Hewitt and John Matthews became settlers here during this and the following year. Caleb Carpenter was supervisor in 1836, and C. B. Keeler in 1837 and 1838. For many years during those early times Dr. Caleb Carpenter used to carry the mail once a week on horseback through from Royal Oak, and often the weather and roads were so bad as to prevent his getting through as often as that. And people were glad enough to get the news once a week and to get letters even at the rate of two shillings a piece. The first regular postoffice was in Caleb Carpenter's house, in 1835; the second was in C. B. Keeler's store, in 1836. Ezra, Hazen became postmaster in 1838. In 1837 Dr. Jones came and built the first physician's office, the building now occupied by McGeorge's meat market, and Stephen A. McGeorge commenced gunsmithing. In 1838 a grist-mill was built by Adam Boles one half mile east of the corners, Orrin Belknap commenced mercantile business, William and John Steele succeeded Charles B. Keeler in the Newburg store, and Dr. F. K. Bailey settled in the northern part of the township and commenced practice. Cook Wells also settled in the northwest. On this year's 4th a crowd was assembled, a pole was raised, the flag displayed, and anvils fired to celebrate the day for the first time. EARLY JUSTICE. During much of this time Squire Oliver Bristol was chief justice of the peace, and administered the judicial affairs of the town with due rigor and impartiality. One case is recalled to illustrate the I I times. It was a jury trial. During the progress of the case a jug of first-rate whisky had been introduced among other arguments, a proceeding which completely disarmed the prosecution. Several of the jury were soon so powerfully affected that in the words of truthful James, "the subsequent proceedings interested them no more;" the judge became so mellow that he exclaimed, "Come, boy,/let's quit lawing and settle this thing up." The council and cliei[ts literally laid their heads together and wound up the suit witf a compromise-and another drink! Both Oliver and his brother Bezaleel have long since departed this life. Their children are still among us, and to the excellent memory of Joseph and Sheldon, sons of Bezaleel, this history is indebted for most of its earlier dates and inciden ts. BUSINESS PROGRESS. In 1810 Beach & Rundell started the first wagon shop; in 1842 John Roberts joined the firm, withdrawing a few years later to go into the grocery and fur trade with his brother Amariah. In 1843 Isaac McKeen opened the first law office in town. A pearlash factory was also established by Daniel Black and Garry Goodrich a few rods north of the present Congregational Church, and Stephen Briggs built his carding and fulling-mill, which is still in operation. Henry Stephens, afterward so prominent in the business of this place, now made his first adventure in the mercantile line, also running opposition in the ashery business; but at this time he only remained about six months. In November Calvin A. & D. R. Shaw succeeded the Steeles in the Newburg store, and soon worked up a business that took the lead for about eleven years. In 1844 the firm of Muzzy & Barrows started another foundry, James H. Andrus and James Lyons other stores and Matthew Tacey another blacksmith shop, James Goetchius having been engaged in the latter business for some time. There was a revival among the Methodists this year, and a church edifice, the first in town, was built, under the ministry of Elder Noble. All through these years down to the present time the circuit has been regularly supplied with preachers by conference. J. S. Jenness opened a store in 1845, and soon became one of our most active business men. O. P. Strobridge, M. D., joined us this year, and entered upon an extensive practice. Both these gentlemen became of some note in public affairs, and served the State in the legislature. About this time the lumber business developed into one of the most important branches of our trade. In 1844 Beach, Imlay & Morse had erected a large steam saw-mill in Imlay, (F. P. Currier being builder); and that enterprise, together with the completion of a plank road from the mill through the village to Mt. Clemens via Romeo, and the establishment of a starch factory, on a large scale, two years after, by Moody, Chamberlin & Co., gave such an impetus to the general prosperity of the place as to mark an important era in our history. In 1846 Silas D. McKeen, attorney, became a resident, practicing with his brother Isaac. He was a man of unusual ability, and might have attained to any position in the State; but intemperance ruined him. The first hardware and tin shop was opened this year by McGeorge & Cardwell. It soon passed into the hands of R. I. Goetchius. William Colerick was the first tinsmith. Bird Johnston & Hiram Wells also established the first furniture store the same season. These times are especially memorable to many here on account of the potato rot. 25,000 bushels in the starch factory rotted in a mass, and polluted the neighboring air with a horrid stench. Coincident with this, whether caused by it or not, there occurred a terrible epidemic in the winter of 1847-'48 known as the "potato fever." The disease was very malignant, about fifteen deaths occurring in a short time, among them that of Isaac McKeen,d< I I -- ~ t - _7/ I " y

Page  38 i 38 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. and Mr. Hendershot, but the exact percentage of mortality cannot now be ascertained. Daniel Black, having returned to the village, built in the summer of 1848 the first brick edifice, a store, and engaged in mercantile business, on the site he formerly occupied. This building was destroyed by fire, together with several adjacent buildings, some ten years later. In this year N. H. Redmond, having studied with S. D. McKeen, commenced practice of law, and was elected prosecuting attorney of Lapeer County. Meanwhile the starch factory changed hands. Samuel Rogers operated it in 1849, J. S. Jenness in 1850, and Charles Kennett in 1851. Farmers say they made money then raising potatoes at 10 cents a bushel. The starch factory changed hands again in 1851. The manufacture of starch ceased, and Briggs & Teller transformed the factory into a steam grist and saw-mill. McHardy & Morton ran it in 1857-'58; Charles Ferguson from that time till 1862. James Mead also purchased the old water-mill built by Adam Boles, and put a steam engine into it. Two or three years later he was caught in the fly-wheel and instantly killed. In 1851 the foundry and machine business passed all into the hands of one firm, viz: J. P. Muzzy and F. P. Currier, Sr., at Muzzy & Balrows old stand. Two years after, the present shop was put up, on the site formerly occupied by Price & Hendershot. The first steam engine built in the county was made by horse power, in Muzzy & Currier's shop in 1853, William Rider being head machinist. It is still running in the shop of Currier & Bro. Various changes have taken place in this business, the last in 1869. The firm name became H. A. & F. P. Currier, Jr., and remains so to this day, with a flourishing business. In 1852 the National Hotel was built by Garry Goodrich, and then called the Goodrich House, and Walter P. Beach commenced ' a large mercantile business. In 1854 the McEntee Bros. commenced the manufacture of fanning-mills. In 1861 a severe conflagration destroyed the store of John Harris, in which it originated, and seven contiguous buildings. Mr. Harris was dangerously burned, being left a cripple, and barely escaped with his life. The loss of property was about $5,000. In this fire the town records and those of the school district were lost. TEMPERANCE MOVEMENT. The first temperance society in the county was organized in Almont February 4, 1842, with Henry Rix as president, and Elijah Johnson, M. D., secretary. The pledge was signed by 148 persons. Mr. Joseph Bristol has yet in his possession a copy of the pledge and some of the original records of the society. Mr. Benjamin Sleeper, who was one of the first settlers of the town, undertook to have a temperance raising when he built his log house, but could get only three men to come. He then went to Romeo after whisky which took him two days. He invited hands to his raising, and everybody came-came early in the morning. He said that at that time whisky was scarce in Almont, but was as thick as mosquitoes in Romeo. The year 1847 saw a great "tidal wave" of Sons of Temperance sweep over the State. A lodge was organized here. That was a bad time to start a brewery, as Mr. Lyons found to his cost. He commenced such an enterprise, but it lasted only about three months. One alleged cause of its fall was that a temperance lecturer named Moody launched the thunderbolts of his eloquence against it; another, perhaps more potent cause, was that the workmen drank the beer about as fast as they could make it. Tradition * says that on one occasion, when Mr. Lyons returned from a brief absence, he found the words, "Rat Soup Factory," painted in large characters on various parts of the building, and in a fit of disgust wound up the concern at once. FIRST FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION. In 1845 the Fourth of July was celebrated here for the first time in regular form. The writer, then but a lad, has a most vivid recollection of the scene. Seth Dewey was president; Isaac MeKeen, orator; Dr. Bailey, reader; Henry Rix and William Myers, marshals. A small cannon, cast in Price & Hendershot's foundry, and bored out in James Goetchius' blacksmith shop, furnished the thunder. The music was produced from a clarionet, played by a Mr. Whittaker, who wore a long calico gown, and from a big drum beaten with herculean strokes by William Nichols. The grandeur of the, marshals with their cocked hats, cockades and glittering swords, as they galloped about in all the "pomp and circumstance of glorious war," the roar of the artillery, the brilliant array of banner ladies, were well calculated to impress the imagination and memory of the average backwoods boy. The procession marched one-half mile north to the woods where the Spaulding House now stands, and after the exercises marched back to the common near Ed. Lee's blacksmith shop where a splended free dinner was provided. The writer distinctly remembers the sensation of being crammed to suffocation that followed that feast of fat things. We have seen many celebrations since that time, but none equal in grandeur and solid satisfaction. CHANGE OF NAME. Up till 1846 the name of Bristol had adhered to the township, and Newburg to the village. This duplicity of names, and also their extreme commonness, caused great inconvenience in postal matters. To remedy this a movement was now made to adopt one name for both, that would be convenient, euphonious and distinctive. A meeting was called by James H. Andrus, then postmaster, and the name "Almont" adopted. It is a modification of the name of the well-known Mexican general, Almonte. James Thompson claims the honor of presenting the name. INCORPORATION. The most important event was the incorporation of the village of Almont under a charter in 1865. The population of the village at that time, as ascertained by census, was 818, and the principal business men and firms, in the mercantile line, were Henry Stephens, Farquharson, Townsend & Taylor, Williams & Moss, John S. Jenness, John N. Harris, Thomas Cherryman, C. R. McEntee; John Wright (hardware), D. W. Richardson (drugs), McEntee Brothers (fanning-mill factory), B. F. Johnston (furniture), and Payne Brothers, who, commencing in 1862, carried on an extensive industry in the old starch factory building, viz: steam saw and grist-mill, planing-mill, and sash, blind and door factory. R. K. Farnum, the present proprietor, succeeded them in 1870. The first bank was started in 1866 by Williams & Moss. Under the charter a new era of improvement was inaugurated, vastlyimproving the general appearance of the village. Streets were neatly graded and graveled, sewers dug, sidewalks repaired and improved and greatly extended, while many of the old style inferior buildings on the main streets gave place to fine brick blocks, and a number of large and elegant residences appeared on the outskirts, with beautiful lawns and gardens, giving the whole place an air of wealth, culture and refinement. The appearance of substantial comfort and general prosperity is aided not a little by the fine churches and other public buildings. Presidents of the village: Oliver P. Strobridge, 1865; D. R. Shaw, 1866; J. S. Jenness, 1866-'67; O. P. Strobridge, 1868; D. i I 0 s>9 i IJ? - L -L L. "% ) r

Page  39 -j - 1 I~ I i I-! 7 n,. I 9I HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 39 s I _y Ehy E. Hazen, 1869-'70; I. T. Beach, 1871-'72-'73; P. H. McEntee, 1874; I. T. Beach, 1875-'76; M. T. Moore, 1877-'78-'79-'80; Charles R. Ferguson, 1881; I. T. Beach, 1882-'83. The officers in 1883 are as follows: President, I. T. Beach; clerk, Frank P. Andrus; treasurer, William H. Taylor; assessor, F. P. Currier; street commissioner, Stephen Taylor; constable, S. Hartsell; trustees, John Sullivan, James O. Thurston, Benjamin F. Johnston. In the spring of 1883 the electors of the village decided by vote to raise the sum of $2,800 for the purpose of purchasing a fire engine and equipments. CHURCH HISTORY. THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL SOCIETY. In 1834 the Almont Methodist Episcopal Society was organized, consisting of five members, and was included in Mt. Clemens circuit for that year and the next. The preacher was L. D. Whit ney. In 1836 Romeo circuit was organized, and this class was included in it, and remained so until 1844, when it was separated under the name of Newburg circuit. In 1868 the society built a commodious brick edifice, which was dedicated by Dr. Jocelyn in 1869. Rev. L. D. Whitney, so prominent in the early religious history of Almont, was soon obliged from a disease of the throat to renounce his sacred calling. He then studied medicine, and settled as physician at Hadley about 1849 or 1850. Here he had a lucrative practice, and had the respect of all who knew him, at one time representing the county in the State legislature. His son, Lieutenant George D. Whitney, was a brave officer in the army during the late war, and gave his life to his country in one of those terrible battles during the winter of 1864-'65. The loss of his only son was' a terrible blow to the father, and one from which he never fully recovered. In 1875 he was compelled to relinquish his profession from age and infirmity. He then sold his property at Hadley, and bought a small farm near Grand Blanc, where he removed with his family. In September, 1876, he died, and his remains were brought to Hadley and buried by his son. Among the pastors of the church have been the Revs. Haggadone, John Armstrong, Hankinson, S. Warren, F. E. York, Gage, Daniels, Samuel Bird, David McFawn, and George W. Jennings, the present pastor. The membership of the church is now about sixty. It has a flourishing Sunday-school with an average attendance of about fifty-five THE CONGREGATIONAL SOCIETY. On December 6, 1838, nine individuals formed the body now known as the Almont Congregational Society and, six weeks after, fourteen more were added to their number. The first pastor was Rev. Hiram Smith, and meetings were held in a school-house one mile west. Mr. Smith's ministry continued three years, and an important revival occurred in the second year. In the fall of 1847 the first Congregational Church edifice was built on Main Street north. This was the second year of the pastorate of Rev. Charles Kellogg. The society numbered about ninety, but was now increased by affiliation with the church at Belle Arbor to 110. This church had been formed in 1836 in the "Shaw Settlement" on Belle River, at the north line of the township, under the leadership of Rev. Luther Shaw, who preached there for several years. The new house of worship was dedicated January 27, 1848. It was of wood, 40x50 feet, and cost $1,800. In 1854 Rev. Charles Kellogg was tried for heresy and acquitted. His resignation followed the year after, and the place was supplied by E. L. Bowing, who remained one year. In April, 1857, Rev. Henry Bates became pastor, and remained nearly four years; a remarkable revival added thirty members to the church during his first year. Next year the church edifice was much enlarged, and furnished with a vestry. Soon after Mr. Kellogg's resignation, he became teacher in an academic school, an edifice having been built by subscription for that purpose. This house subsequently became the property of the village district, and was used as the district school till 18R66. From March, 1861, to December, 1863, employed Rev. E. W. Borden as pastor, and in 1864 called Rev. H. R. Williams. In the spring of 1870 about forty members were added to this church, and as many more to the other churches, the fruits of a general revival enjoyed during the previous winter. On November 30, 1871, their church edifice was burned. In the winter of 1872-'73 subscriptions were made, and the corner stone of a new edifice was laid June 18, 1873. An address was delivered on the occasion by Rev. John S. C. Abbott. The completed building passed into the hands of the trustees in November, 1874. It is a very elegant structure of brick in the Gothic style, costing upwards of $23,000. The dedicatory discourse was preached by Rev. Dr. Eddy, of Detroit, January 19, 1875. In May, 1880, Rev. F. W. Dickinson became pastor, succeeded February 11, 1882, by the present pastor, Rev. Edward D. Kelsey. The present membership of the church is about ninety-five. The Sunday-school has a membership of 126. THE BAPTIST SOCIETY. In 1837 the Baptist Society was organized with sixteen members under Rev. C. Churchill, who remained their pastor till 1844, when he was succeeded by Elder William Tuttle. In the spring of 1847 the society finished their house of worship on East St. Clair street, which bhd been raised the previous fall, and dedicated it in July. A marked revival occurred the following winter under the preaching of Elder Taft, which added largely to their numbers. In 1850 Stephen Goodman, in 1851 C. Churchill, in 1852 E. Steele, were successively chosen pastors of the Baptist Church. In 1858 they had an important revival under W. G. Wisner, who remained pastor till 1860. Then followed A. D. Williams, 1861; B. F. Bowin, 1866; B. H. Shepherd, 1869; and J. H. Paton, 1870, (tried and convicted of heresy and dismissed in 1872); A. H. Gower called 1876. Following Elder Gower came Needham, and in January, 1879, Rev. E. Steele, who has continued in the pastorate of the church to the present time. The membership of the church is about forty-six. The Sunday-school has an average attendance of from forty-five to fifty. ADVENT CHRISTIAN CHURCH. In 1872 Rev. J. H. Paton, who had separated from the Baptist Church, formed an independent society of fifteen members, under the style of the Advent Christian Church, with the brief creed, "The word of God the only rule of faith and practice, and Christian character the only test of fellowship." This society erected a small frame chapel in the fall of the same year. Mr. Paton still continues the pastor of this church. UNITED PRESBYTERIANS. This society was organized December 22, 1846, in the town of Bruce, a portion of its original members being residents of Almont. Of these John Hopkins is the only one now living. Previous to the organization of the society services were held in a buildirg erected by Neil Gray on his farm in the town of Bruce, missionaries having l - -i A.., 4a l I) AL `r TT: D:- -- I a

Page  40 ___j I, 6 II I I; 11 I 40 HIISTORYR OF L &PEEE ER COUNTY,'T i I b~een sent from time to time to this field of labor. In 185i2 a church building wats erected in the south~east part of thze town of Almont. The first pastor, Rev. Andrew Irons, was settled in 1854, and remained till 1858. He was succeedect by Rev. John Mc~clellan, whlo remained till 1.871. Rev. John B. Wilson succeeded him.. He was followed by Rev. WV. W. Curry, now pastor of the church. THE PRESS. In 1852 the Almuont Palladhonclc was established, W7. W. Maynard, editor. He conducted the paper for about two years, when it passed into the hands of Henry Ulrich. and Peter Ferguson, and died a natural death in 1855. In January, 1875, the Almout Heraht~n was started b A.. H. Patterson, who continued its publication until January 15, 1881, when lie was succeeded by J. M. Johnson &- Son. June 1,6, 1881, the office passed into the hands of Patterson & Johnson. March 2, 1882, Frank M.i~ Johnson became sole proprietor, and remains such at the present time. HOTELS. The Astor House, formerlv called the Exchange, was tile first hotel in the village of Almnont. It was built in 1836 by Hubbardi Hall, and soon after was purchzased and kept buy Henry Wing. It has had a nuunber of proprietors, among whom were Messrs. Miles, Beach and Race. In 1880 it was purchased by John S. Ash, the present proprietor, and the name chanzgedt to the Astor House. The Harrington HE~ouse was built in 1852 by Garry Goodricll. It was first called the National Hotel, afterwardl tile Goodrich House, and still later the name was changed to the Harrington1 House. Mfr. H. F. Hilliker, the present proprietor, purchased the property in May, 1883. The hotel has been enlarged and improved since it was built. PROFE SSIONTAL.. In 1854 Dr. A. B. Stone began practice in the village. He was followed by Dr. Traver (homoeopathic) in 1865, Dr. M~r. T. obtained a charter for themr in 1850. This society still lives, a useful and successful institution. The officers in 1883 are as follows: President, J. S. Johnzson; vice-pre sident, B. F. Johnston; secretary, F. P. Andrus; treasurer, E. W. Corey; auditor, T. C. Taylor; librarian, George Gr~ant. s~Ehe first officers after the charter was obtained were as follows: President, Virgil S. Parmlee; I i I I I I i I II I i I I vice-president, N. H. Redmond; secretary, G. E. Cai-ulkin; treasurer, H. C. Wells; librazrian, G. W. Culver; auditor, Jame's Taggart. MASONIC. Almuont Lodae No. 51, F. & A. Mi., received their dispensation in 1852 and their charter the following year. The date of the charter is January 14, 1853. The principal officers were W. M3., Hirama D. Fitch; S. W., Williaml Colerick; J. W., S. S. Spaff'ord. The o~fficers in. 1883 are as follows: B3. F. Johnston, WN. M~.; Gilbert Bostick, 'S. W. -Joshua Smith, J. W.; John Green, treasurer; Albert Springett, secretary; G. A. Bostick, S. D.; 0. T. Sanborn, J. D.; Rev. E. Steele, chaplain; Henry Marshall and George Brown, stewards; John M/urdock, tyl~er. Almont Chapter No. 76, R. A. M., was chartered January 10, 1871, Charles H. Brow~n b~eingr Grantld High Priest. Officers, H. P.) ~John Robinson; K(., John Armstrono,;- scribe, P. H. M~cEntee. Officers in 1883 are as follows: B. F. Johnston, H. P.; R. A. Bolton, Ki.; John Green, S.; James Ovens, C. H.; Gilbert Bostick, P. S.; 0. T. Sanborn, R. A. C.; I. T. Beach, secretary; C. P. Leete, treasurer; G. A. Bostick, M.. 3 V.; J. N. Mills, M...2 V.; N. Haskrins, M'. 1 V.; Rev. E. Steele, chaplain; A. L. Spencer, sentinel. ODD FELLOW~S. Almont Lodge No. 181, I. 0. 0. F., was instituted March 6, 1872. William H. McEntee was N. G.; E. W. Corey, secretary; Cook Wells, V. G. In 1883 there are thirty-six memzbers. Officers, N. G., George Tyler; V. G., Adamn Harrington; secretary, Cook IWells; treasurer, J. Sirnon. Regular mleetings are h~eld on Wednes1day evening of each Week. ROYAL ARCANUM. A lodge of this order wats instituted at Almont in July, 1878, with twenty members. First officers: Regent, J. S. Johnson; vice-regrent, Uriel Townsend; past regent, H. A. Currier; orator, S. K. Farnuni; secretary, A. M. Roberts; collector, D. M. Washer; treasurer, C. Fergutson; chaplain, William Colericki; guide, D. B. M/accabees was organzized by the district commander. The following officers were elected: Ex. Sir K~t. Gen. Com., L. M. Retherford; Sir Kt. Com., Joseph Simon; Sir Kt. Lieut. Com., Stephen, White; Sir Kit. Prelate, Georgre Retherfoid; Sir Kt. Record Keeper, William Green; Sir Kt. Finance Keeper, AQ. R. Stone; Sir Kt. Sergeant, John Sullivan1; Sir Kt. Master at Arms, Arthur B. Witt-, I I iI I p rb

Page  41 AH i ^ -- ~ %- N" HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 41 I Sir Kt. 1st Master of Guard, Thomas Weatherill; Sir Kt. 2nd Master of Guard, Thomas E. Mitchell; Sir Kt. Sentinel, P. S. Miller. There were eleven charter members. The membership in 1883 is thirteen. Principal officers: SirK. C., Hervey Llppincott; Sir Lt. C., George W. Retherford; record keeper, George Tyler; finance keeper, J. Simon. Regular meetings are held on the first Monday evening of every month. The village of Almont in 1883 contains a population of about 1,000, and is an exceedingly attractive inland village. The country about it is delightful and very productive. The new town hall and public school building when completed will be ornaments to the place. The completion of the railroad gave it long needed connection with outside points. BANKING. The firm of C. FERGUSON & SON, bankers, consists of Charles Ferguson and his son Charles R. Ferguson. They succeeded December 2, 1872, the firm of Currier &.Townsend who established the bank in March, 1870. The confidence reposed in the bank by its patrons and the community generally, is evidence that its business has been conducted with shrewdness, honesty and faithfulness to trust. A successful business has been the necessary result. The senior member of the firm, CHARLES FERGUSON, was born in Scotland, February 22, 1822. Came to New York in 1842; was engaged there in farming. In the fall of 1848 he came to Almont and was employed in farming until 1862, when he went into general merchandising in which he continued until 1872 since which time he has been engaged in banking. He was married in 1846 at Rust, N. Y., to Charlotte McHardy, a native of Aberdeen, Scotland, and has three sons and one daughter. CHARLES R. FERGUSON, the junior member of the firm of C. Ferguson & Son, was born in Rust, N. Y., 1847. Came to Almont with his parents in 1848. Was educated at the seminary at Ypsilanti, Mich. He was engaged with his father in general merchandising from 1867 to 1872 and since then in the banking business. He was married in 1871 to Jennie M. Fatin of Hackensack, N. Y., and has two children. INDUSTRIES. There are a number of prosperous manufacturing industries in the village, all doing a thriving business and contributing to the general thrift of the place. These industries are diversified, there being an agricultural works, grist-mill, sash, door and blind factory, stave-mill, and wool carding, etc. There are also carriage shops, and the usual other shops to be found in such villages. The firm of Merritt & Balch, manufacturers of heading, staves and shingles, consists of W. E. Merritt and F. V. Balch. Their manufactory is located in the southeast part of the village of Almont, and was erected in 1883. The firm is enterprising and their business promises to be eminently successfnl. They now employ fifteen men, are adding to their machinery and increasing the capacity of their mill. The abundance of material within easy haul of their mill, and the ready demand for a good product such as they will turn out, insure their success. F. V. BALCH, of the firm of Merritt & Balch, manufacturers of staves, heading and shingles, was born in Dryden, Lapeer County, Mich., February 22, 1859, and has resided in that town until two.years ago. The last two years prior to coming to Almont he spent in the apple business. Came to Almont in 1883 and took charge of the construction of the factory and management of the business of the above mentioned firm. BIOGRAPHICAL. HIRAM C. MILLER was born in Bruce, Ml[acomb County, Mich., October 2, 1846. He was brought up on the farm opposite his present residence. In 1871 he moved upon the farm where he now lives in the southwest quarter of section 33-146 acres. He married in December, 1869, Martha King, daughter of Harrison King, one of the earliest settlers of Almont. They have three children. WILLIAM W. HEWITT was born in Canada April 9, 1833. Was brought up on a farm. In 1850 he moved to St. Clair, Mich., and was there engaged principally in farming, following also other employments. From there he came to Almont village in 1858 and was for fourteen years engaged in selling fanning-mills, also carrying on a meat market a portion of the time. Eleven years ago he bought the farm on which he now lives, southeast quarter of northeast quarter of section 20 and ten' acres adjoining. He was married in 1855 to Mary Thompson, a native of Canada, and has five children. JOHN S. ASH, proprietor of the Astor House, Almont, Mich., was born in Saratoga County, N. Y., June 1, 1837. At the age of twelve he removed with his parents to Cooperstown, N. Y., where 'he commenced working for himself on a farm. Thence after a year's residence he went to Pennsylvania and remained two years and returned to New York, residing in Orleans County, and in Charlestown. He bought a farm in Cayuga County, on which he lived five years. In 1870 he came to Michigan and bought a farm at Fenton. In 1877 he went to Toledo and ran the bar of the Burnett House, still retaining his farm at Fenton. In 1880 he sold his farm, moved to Almont and bought the Almont Exchange, which he re-christened the Astor House, he being connected by marriages with the Astors of New York, and having also been at one time employed in the Astor House of that city. Here he is doing a successful and profitable business. He was married September 19, 1855, to Miss Hannah Maria Dynehart. His second wife was Miss Mary Alice Myers, of Dutchess County, N. Y., to whom he was married in 1877. He has six children living. THOMAS C. TAYLOR, attorney at law, was born in Almont in 1843. Was educated in the schools of Almont and graduated at Ann Arbor University. Afterward had charge of schools at Leslie and Hastings. Studied law and was admitted to the bar at Hastings in 1871, and practiced there untilDecember, 1872, since which time he has been in the practice of the law at Almont. In April, 1872, he married Miss Hannah Fowler, who was his first assistant teacher at Leslie, and has six children. He has a farm of 160 acres just outside the village limits which he purchased in the spring of 1883, and is now residing upon and cultivating. This is the farm located by his father, James Taylor, in 1834. B. F. JOHNSTON, furniture dealer, was born in Geneseo, Livingston County, N. Y., March 23, 1829. At the age of nineteen he came to Almont, and learned the painter's trade with his brother. He worked at his trade summers and taught school winters here and in New York and Pennyslvania for eight years. In 1858 and 1859 he was in the cabinet business which he sold out in the spring of 1860 and worked at painting'for two years. In 1861 he helped to raise the First Michigan cavalry. August 26, 1862, he enlisted in the Fifth Michigan cavalry, which was with the Army of the Potomac the most of the war. Served under Kilpatrick and Custer. Was with Kilpatrick in the famous raid on Richmond in March, 1864. Was captured June 11, 1864, at Trevilian Station, Va., and a prisoner at Richmond, Charlotte and Andersonville nine months. Was paroled after Lee's surrender, and on his way North was blown up on the steamer Sultana, on the Mississippi River, when of 2,200 men on board, between 600 and 700 only were saved. Returned home awaiting orders, and was mustered out July 6, 1865. He then engaged in the furniture business, in which he has continued to the present time being the oldest business firm in Almont. He was married March 25, 1851, to Betsey A. Worster of Chautauqua 3 9 r j I, -,

Page  42 -& j 1". - z -I 42 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. played for innumerable balls, partie idsca thrnsnNw 42 I County, N. Y., and has three children. Mr. Johnston is prominent in the Masonic fraternity, being master of the lodge and high priest of the Chapter of Almont, and an officer of the Grand Lodge of Michigan. R. K. FARNUM was born in Darien, Genesee County, N. Y., August 8, 1827. At the age of eight he came to Almont with his parents. Here he learned the trade of carpenter and joiner. Worked on the Illinois Central Railroad for two years. In 1859 went to Marquette, Mich., and remained about ten years. Farmed in Almont about two years, and in 1870 bought his present businesssash, door and blind factory, saw-mill and flouring-mill. He is also a contractor and builder. Also built and owns the grain elevator at the Almont station of the P. H. & N. W. R. R. About twentytwo years ago married Miss Nancy Covell. His second wife whom he married in 1871 was Miss Asenath Goetchius. Has two children. A. M. ROBERTS was born in Wales, Erie County, N. Y., September 6, 1836, and remained in the State of New York until he was eight years of age, when (in '44) he came with his parents to Almont. Here he attended school and learned the wagonmaker's trade. At the age of fifteen he went into his father's store as clerk. He was afterward for about one and a half years in John Phelps & Co's store. In 1860 he worked at his trade about six months, then assisted his uncle in a general merchandise store and in the postoffice, Goodland, until the last of December, 1861, when he enlisted as private in the Tenth Michigan Infantry. March 3, 1863, he was promoted quartermaster sergeant of the regiment. December 31, 1864, he was promoted first lieutenant and quartermaster. During a large part of his service was on detached duty at regimental headquarters as acting hospital steward, clerk, etc. Was discharged in August,1865. After various other employments he came into the employ of Currier, Moses & Co., on the 20th of April, 1868, and has remained with that firm and its successors, H. A. Currier & Bro., ever since, as bookkeeper and general superintenddent. Mr. Roberts' first wife was Miss Mary Phelps to whom he was married in April, 1858. She died August 22, 1860, and on October 6, 1861, he married Miss Harriet A. Clark. Has three children, one boy and two girls. Mr. Roberts has filled the office of trustee of the corporation of the village one term, and has been secretary of different societies for several years. ADAM WATSON was born in Scotland, April 26, 1822, and was brought up on a farm. He came to this country at twenty years of age to Almont, and worked on various farms for several years. At the age of twenty-five years he bought a farm of eighty acres, one mile east of the village, which he still retains. -He also owns 320 acres in the town of Dryden. His business has always been farming and in it he has achieved success. Mr. Watson was married in 1848, to Miss Helen Hotchkiss and has three children living. He makes his home in Almont. Has until lately owned and lived upon a beautiful place in the outskirts of the village, which he has now sold with the intention of moving into the village H. F. HILLIKER, proprietor of the Harrington House, Almont, was born in Boston, Erie County, N. Y., in March, 1822. At the age of nineteen he went to Rochester, N. Y., and remained a year, being employed as a musician. In 1846 he moved to Dryden, Lapeer County, where he bought a farm in section 36, and remained two years. Then resided in Almont about two years. About 1853 he moved to St. Clair County. Kept hotel at Rich mond and Memphis. Returned to Almont in April, 1883, and bought the Harrington House, in which he is doing a business satisfactory to his patrons and profitable to himself. He was married in February, 1852,. to Miss Elmira Brinki, of St. C;laJr County, Michigan. Has two boys and two girls. Mr. H. has from the age of eighteen yeArs followed the profession of musician, and has i I i i I played for innumerable balls, parties and social gatherings in New York and Michigan. His children have inherited his musical taste and the familly form a fine musical band. W. W. TAYLOR, of the firm of Taylor & Hopkin, dealers in general merchandise, was born in Almont, June 21, 1841. Was brought up on a farm and educated in the schools of Almont. In August, 1861, he enlisted as a private in the First Michigan Cavalry: served three years, his regiment being in the Army of the Potomac; and was engaged in most of the battles of that army. Was promoted sergeant and mustered out in August, 1864, at Berryville, Va. Returning to Almont he was employed as clerk, until January 1, 1874, when the firm of Farquharson, & Taylor was formed, which continued until July 10, 1878, when Mr. Farquharson retired, and John F. Hopkin became a member of the firm. Mr. Taylor-was married in May, 1870, to Miss Mary Andrus of Almont and has two children. SAMUEL MATHEWS was born in Trumbull County, Ohio, May 24, 1831. At the age of thirteen he came with his parents to Alm oont where they settled on section 26. The journey was made by way of Sandusky and Detroit and through the Maumee Swamp. The wagon containing their household goods was drawn by three yoke of oxen, and they drove thirty head of cattle. He remained upon the farm until he was twenty-two years of age, and then went to work for himself. He subsequently bought a farm in section 6, where he now resides. In 1861, he married Miss Abigail English, of Vermont. WILLIAM MORRISON, of the firm of Morrisonf & Richards, blacksmiths and wagon makers, was born in Argyleshire, Scotland, in 1845. When he was six years old his parents moved to Canada. He served two years' apprenticeship at his present trade, and in 1865 came to Al-mont where he worked at his trade. In 1876 he established his present business, in which his success has been satisfactory. In 1879 James Richards became partner forming the present firm. WILLIAM MORGAN, of the firm of Gould, Morgan & Co., liverymen, was born in Chemung County, N. Y., in May, 1834. Worked at farming and on the canal until he was eighteen years old. In 1852 lie came to Almont and worked in a mill until 1856, when he went into the livery business in which he has continued to the present time with the exception of about two years. He also buys and sells horses. He was married in March, 1859, to Miss M. J. Beach, of Almont, and has one child. EDWIN R. GOULD, liveryman, was born in St. Clair County, Michigan, June 4, 1845. Attended school and worked on a farm until 1868, then came to Almont. For about three years he was engaged in teamingr between Almont and Detroit. He went into the livery business in 1875. He is also operating a farm southeast of the village, but resides in Allhont. He was married August 6, 1873, to Miss Ella Way, who died in October, 1874. He has one child. Mr. Gould's parents came to St. Clair County, from New York. A portion of their way to their new home was through the woods and openings, where there was lno road, and they were obliged to clear a rough road in advance of the wagons. Mr. Gould, Sr. was drowned thirty-seven years ago. His widow resides with her son in Almoont. H. A. CURRIER, of the firm of H. A. Currier & Bro., was born at Topsham, Vt., April 23, 1840. Came to Ahlnont with his parents in the year 1847, and was educated in the schools of Almont. At the age of sixteen he learned the machinist's trade in his father's shops. In 1869 he bought the business of Currier, Moses & Co., an interest in which he sold in 1870 to his brother Fred P. Currier, Jr., forming the present firm. He was married in October, 1868, to Miss Mary E. Charter, of Northport, Miih. I I I II iI i i I i i II;_ PI i I -P 719 1 —~C I I K- rim

Page  43 - J! J -1a t M G — HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 43 JOSEPH SIMON, SR., of the firm of J. Simon & Son, was born in Pennsylvania, April 28, 1826. He there learned the trade of carriage manufacturing. In 1848 he went to New Jersey, and engaged in the carriage business. Came to Almont in 1855 and engaged in the same business. In 1878 his son became associated with him, and since then they have, under the above firm name, made a specialty of building and repairing carriages, giving some attention also to wagon work. Their skillful and faithful work has secured for them a large patronage and successful business. PHILIP SMITH was born in Galen, Wayne' County, N. Y., in 1815. At the age of four years he went with his parents to Palmyra, N. Y., where he was a schoolmate of Joseph Smith, celebrated as the founder and apostle of Mormonism. In May, 1833, his parents moved to Almont, bringing with them a large addition to the population of the town, viz: ten boys and two girls, one of the girls being married. They settled in the south part of the town. At the age of nineteen he started out for himself, working by the month as a farm hand. In 1835 he located on the south half of the southeast quarter of section 31, government land. On this farm he still lives. In 1839 he married Miss Lura Ferguson, also a native of Wayne County, N. Y., and has three children. Mr. Smith is one of the few now living who were present at the first town meeting of the town of Almont (then Bristol) which was held in April, 1834. E. B. COTTER was born in Ceries, McKean County, Penn., in the year 1847. Came to Michigan at the age of ten years; learned the trade of house-painting with his father, but finding it injurious to his health, gave up the business. Bought a small farm in St. Clair County, but not being successful as a farmer, engaged in the hoop and stave business, which he followed for several years in different parts of the State. His health tailing, he went into the employ of the Agricultural Insurance Company, of Watertown, N. Y. In the year 1880 he canvassed Sanilac and St. Clair Counties, and March 15, 1883, engaged in the saloon business onl Main Street, Almont. PETER FERGUSON was born in Perthshire, Scotland, October 26, 1824. Worked on his father's farm in boyhood, and at the age of fifteen took charge of the farm, on account of the ill health of his father. In 1815 he came to this country, and to Rochester, N. Y., where he remained a few months; then came to Almont to visit and see the country. He bought the place known as the Williams farm, in section 23. After a short stay in Genesee County, N. Y., he returned in the fall of 1846 to Almont. In 1847 he bought 100 acres in section 15, and 200 in section 14. In the fall of 1848 he made Almont his home, and engaged in farming and buying and selling lands and village property. Has fifteen lihuses and seven stores in the village of Almont, and 500 acres of land in the town. He drove the first drove of cattle that was taken from the county. HIRAM SMITH was born in Monroe County, N. Y., November 25, 1823. At the age of eight he moved with his parents to the town of Bruce, Macomb County, Mich. Residing there one year, they came to L peer County. He worked on his father's farm until he was seventeen years old, then worked for himself two years at farming. At the age of nineteen he learned tailoring, in which business he has been almost continuously employed until the present time. Is now working in his son's tailoring establishment on Main Street, village of Almont. He was married in 1847 to Loretta Black, of Almont, and has four children. D. P. SMITH, son of Hiram Smith, was born in Allnont, August 8, 1852, arid educated in the schools of Almont. At the age of seventeen lie learned tailoring with his father, and has continued ill that business until the present time. His shop is on the corner of St. Clairand Main Streets, Almont. He was married August 1, 1877, to Miss Mary P. Myers, and has two children. MARK BRAIDWOOD was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, in 1804. He was for many years employed as a Brussels carpst weaver in Kilmarnock until 1842, when he came to Almont and settled on his present farm, east half of southeast quarter of section 35, 100 acres. He has added to this the southwest quarter of northeast quarter of the same section, making 140 acres. He was married in 1810 to Mary Blaine, of Newton upon Ayr, Scotland. The names of their children are: George, farmer, living in Metamora; John, farmer, living in Dryden; Maark, farmer, living in Dryden; Thomas, died August 8, 1846, in infancy; Thomas, farmer, living in Otter Lake; Jane, wife of David Borland, of Almont; William, Alexander H., and Gabriel living with their parents. JOHN HOPKINS was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, in May, 1797. He was bred a farmer, and has followed that occupation. In 1833 he came to Almont and entered eighty acres of land in section 35. He now owhs 320 acres, viz: west half of the southwest quarter of section 25; southeast quarter of section 26; northwest quarter of northeast quarter and northeast quarter of northwest quarter of section 35. He was married in 1833 to Janet Hamilton, who died in 1868. His second wife, to whom he was married in 1870, was Janet Robertson, by whom he has one child. Of the first wife's children, four are living, and three have died. JAMES REID was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, July 17, 1813. Was bred a farmer, and has always followed that employment. He came to this country in 1850, reaching Almont July 20th, and bought the farm on which he now resides. He was married in 1838 to Margaret Mikell, of Ayrshire, Scotland. Has one child, the wife of James Rattray, of Almont. Mrs. Reid died April 9, 1881. Mr. Reid's farm is the east half of east half of southeast quarter of section 24. He has also eighty acres in St. Clair County. CHARLES MORTON was born in Kincairdineshire, Scotland, March 1, 1818. His early employment was principally millwright work. He came to Genesee County, N. Y., in 1843, and was there engaged in milling. In May, 1857, he came to Almont, where he has been employed at flour milling and carpenter work. Is now working in R. K. Farnum's sash, door, and blind factory. In 1847 he married Isabel McHardy, of Scotland, who died in 1859. In 1863 he married isabel McKinnon, a native of Scotland. Has five children living. MORRIS MORTON was born April 13, 1852, at Avon, N. Y. Came with his parents to Almont in 1857. In the fall of 1870 he commenced work as a miller in R. K. Farnum's mill at Almont, where he is now employed. In May, 1876, he married Emma Porter, of Goodland, Lapeer County. They have three children. FRANK M. JOHNSON was born December 8, 1860, in Almont. Was educated in the schools of Almont, and at the high school of Flint, Mich. In 1880 he was employed six months in the office of the Flint 1)enocrat, and in 1881 became associated with his father in the publication of the Almont Herald, of which he became sole proprietor and editor, March 2, 1882. $ He was married in February, 1882, to Mertie Dickerson, of Almont. Has one child. W. S. WEBSTER, son of Elisha Webster, one of the pioneers of Lapeer County, was born in the town of Almont, April 15, 1850. Has always remained upon the old homestead, northwest quarter of section 4, which was entered by his father in 1831. In 1873 he married Lizzie James, a native of England. Has four children. In connection with his farm lie has operated until four years ago the grist-mill built by his father on a small stream which crosses the farm, and which is said to be the oldest grist-mill in the county. i i,V. -I 11 I k, I - it. I I --

Page  44 - A: II — A I __ _ I 44 HIS ~TORY OF L APEE ER COUNTY I i I I LEONARD `WILLIAMS was a native of Connecticut, born inl 1821. He remained in that State engaged in farming until 1860, when he came to Almont and engaged in meren~ntile and banking business, establishing the first bank ia 'Almont. He was compelled by the failure of his eyesight to retire partia~lly from active business, retaining, however, his connection with the bank. At the time of his death in August, 1874, be was residiing with his son on the farm. He was killed by the settling of a stone which was being sunk in the field., He was alone at the time, and when found had been some hours dead. His; son bad been severely injured by a similar accident about a mouth before. Mr. W~illiamns left a wife and four children. Onze chtild, Alice B., has since died. Thze others are Henry H., of Almont, Mrs. J. C. H~untington, of Flint, and Mlrs. W. W. Stockley, of Houghton County. Mrs. Williamns resides in the village of Almont. HENRY H.WTYILLIAMS was born in New L~ondon County, Conn., addition to th~is he owns eighty acres in the town of Berlin, St. Clair County.""'" His wife died in 1866, and in 1867 he marrie&Mrlrs. Margaret Gemmel], whose maiden name was McArthur. In? 1879 they were burned out, saving nothing —the famnily barely escaping wvith their lives. Mr. Thomson has four childrenm; two have died. Elizabeth, wife of George Bowen, lives at Imnlay; Margaret, wife of William B. Wallace, died December 8, 1880; Jatnet,..wife of Thomazs B. Wallac&, live3 at Denver, Col.; Ellen, died February 21, 1881; James WV. and Wil~liam D. are at home. CHIARLES KENNETT was born in Enaland April 5, 1800. During his youth and early manhood hp, wis empldyed at farming, and also learned and workied the trade of carpenter and joiner. In 1827 he c-.me to this country ani:worked~ at, his trad~e in Albany and Troy, N. Y., for two years. In 1829) he moved to Detroit and remained several years employed at his trade. He then kept tavern at Wyazndotte for seven years. In 1810 he came to Almont and bouoht a farm near the county linp~, northeast quarterof southwest quarter and west one-half of southwest quarter of se —tion 31. About the year 1861 he moved into the villam7 of Almo~nt where he now resides. He was married in 1821 to Sarah Paine. They reside with their soil ani~ only chrild. Mr. Kennett is still a man of remarkable vigor shiowino, but little token of his azdvancedl a~ae. eiahty-three; his mother died February 19, 1871, aged eighty-nine. Mrsa. Hallock's father died in Buffalo, N. Y., August 8', 1838, aged forty. Her mother is now livingr in Jackson, nlich., at the a~ye of eighty-thzree..ALEXANDERW.: FERGUSON,,SOUo f Charles Fergusonz, of Almont, was born in Aluaont, Septemnber 17, 18-55. WasL educated in Almont.411, I I IF I 9 -7v 4 4 L~~ 0E J md I - M7 - j % - P-~

Page  45 # —. -I - _ - -- b I 1 J ^ i HI.STORY OF LAPEER COUNTY 45 I and at Mayhew's Business College at Detroit. Was six years employed in C. Ferguson & Son's bank at Almont, and for the last two years has been engaged in farming, his farm being the southeast quarter of section 22. In January, 1881, he married Marian A. Milliken, of Bruce, Macomb County, and has one child. ORVILLE T. SANBORN was born in Almont, September 24, 1844. Was brought up on a faim. In 1867 he bought a farm of 138 acres in section 32, being all of northeast quarter except a tract of twentytwo acres in the southwest corner. In 1865 he married Lizzie Murdock. For the last two years he has resided in the village of Almont, his farm being under lease. IGIL WELLS was bornin Seneca County, N. Y., April 13, 1822. At the age of nine years he came with his parents to Bloomfield, Mich. In 1888 they moved to Almont, where his father entered 160 acres of land in section 17. He remained on the homestead until he was about twenty-two, when he commenced working for himself. His father then gave him a farm of forty acres in section 17. In 1850 he bought his present farm northeast quarter of northeast quarter of section 17, which was originally entered by Elisha Farnum. He has also eighteen acres in the west half of northwest quarter of the the same section. He married in 1846 Melissa A. Farnum, daughter of Elisha Farnum. They have five children, viz.: Mrs. Orville B. Eaton, of Almont; Mrs. Mark Braidwood, of Dryden; Nita Wells, of Almont; Mrs. Horton Thurston, of Moore, Sanilac County; Charles J. Wells, at home. One child has died. WILLIAM P. FARNUM was born in Tompkins County, N. Y., October 18, 1811. Was brought up on a farm. Came to Almont in 1834, reaching the town September 30th. There were then but two log houses in the village. His father entered the northeast quarter of northeast quarter of section 17, on which Igil Wells now lives. His present farm, which was originally entered by Elisha Farnum, comprises sixty acres, viz.: North twenty acres of northwest quarter of northeast quarter and east half of east half of northwest quarter of section 17. Mr. Farnum was married February 25, 1841, to Mary E. Wells, daughter of Leonard Wells, who settled in Almont in 1838. They have five children, viz.: Mrs. Reuben Hubbel, of Almont; Reuben W., of Sanilac County; Frank, Katie and Libbie, at home. One child has died. Mr. Farnum's father came to Almont in 1834; he died March 14, 1883, at the age of ninety-three. His mother is still living, making her home with him; her age is ninety-one. F. E. GOULD was born in Batavia, N. Y., March 3, 1831. He came to Michigan with his parents, who settled in Dryden in 1839. At about eighteen years of age he learned the trade of carpenter and joiner in Dryden. Worked at his trade and taught school for about twelve years. Came to Almont in 1862 and engaged in the saloon business for a time. Then in the spring of 1864 engaged in the livery business, in which he has continued since that time. He has also for the last eight years been employed as postal clerk on the Detroit & Bay City Division of the Michigan Central Railroad. He was married in 1854 to Jane L. Parmlee, a native of Vermont. They have three children. WILLIAM MUIR was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, August 30, 1810. His occupation was farming. He came to this country in 1848 and to Almont, where he bought the east half of northeast quarter of section 7, now occupied by his son William. He was married in 1843 to Janet Gilmore, a native of Ayrshire, Scotland. They have five children: John, William and Neil, of Almont; James living in Imlay, and Mrs. Hugh Cargill, of Burnside. JAMES M. GUTCHES, or, as the name was formerly spelled, Goetchius, was born in Ulster County, N. Y., May 10, 1817. During his infancy his parents moved to Chenango County, N. Y., where he remained until he was twenty-one years old. At the age of eleven years he commenced working for himself on a farm, and from that time supported himself. He left the farm when sixteen years of age and served an apprenticeship at the trade of blacksmith in Chenango County. There he remained until May, 1837, when he came to Michigan. He lived in Romeo two and one half years, then (December 22, 1840,) came to Almont, worked at blacksmithing about twenty years, then moved to the farm where he now lives in the south suburbs of the village. He was married December 30, 1841, to Miss Mary Bristol, daughter of Oliver Bristol, ona of the pioneers and the first supervisor of the town. They have three children living. Are living with their son, Oliver C. OLIVER C. GUTCHES was born in Almont June 20, 1846. Has worked at farming most of the time since he became of an age to work. For the last two years has operated the farm on which he lives and of which he is'part owner, his parents residing with him.:He was married in 1878 to Miss Frances Wiley, a native of Maryland, and has one child. W. R. ARMSTRONG was born in Rochester, N. Y., July 4, 1842. At the age of five years, his parents having died, he came West with Mr. Kendrick, of Dryden. Lived on a farm until the age of eighteen years. In the fall of 1861 he enlisted as private in the Tenth Michigan Infantry, serving in the Army of the Cumberland. Was mustered out in 1863. He then farmed for several years, and was special agent of the United States Treasury Department five years. Since then has been engaged in breeding and buying and selling horses, and in the pool business, controlling now the most of the latter business in the United States. He has owned among others the following well known horses: "'Ned Tester," with a record of 2:50 as a three-year-old; "Fred Hooper," record 2:23, who won thirty out of thirty-four races trotted in 1873 and '74, winning $32,000 purse money; "Mollie Morris, record 2:22; "Dan Donaldson," record 2:25; "Hardwood," record 2:24.; "Sorrel Dan," pacer, record 2:141, and "Judge Abbott," re3ord 2:50. Mr. Armstrong took to California the two well known thoroughbreds, "Joe Daniels" and "Hubbard," running horses, who won the four mile repeat running races. He has been in every State and Territory of the United States except Oregon. He has contributed largely to the improvement of horse stock in the section of country about Almont, for which he deserves and receives the thanks of the farming community. In October, 1874, lie married Emily Strobridge, daughter of Dr. Strobridge. They have two children. Residence on West St. Clair Street, Almont. HENRY B. GOETCHIUS, son of William R. Goetchius, one of the earlier settlers of Almont, was born in Almont in 1848. Has been employed at farming, and has learned and worked at various trades as carpentering, wool-carding, the ashery business, etc. He learned the miller's trade in 1868 and has worked at it about five years. Was married in 1871 to Elba C. Wells, a native of Erie, Pa., and has two children. At the time of the forest' fires of 1881 Mr. Goetchius, with his wife and children, was in Sanilac County on a farm which he owns there. They had a narrow escape, barely saving their lives by wading into Cass River. Mr. Goetchius has not yet entirely recovered from the injuries received at that time. Mrs. Goetchius' father, Nelson Wells, was at that time residing in Sanilac County. He escaped with his family into the river, where they remained four hours, almo st suffocated by the heat and smoke, from the effects of which Mr. Wells never fully recovered. He died January 23, 1882, aged sixty-five. He was for several years proprietor of the Exchange Hotel of Almont. Mrs. Wells is still living. DAVID P. Ross was born in Randolph, Vt., November 12, 1886. l " I - - - IRI I k. __-4

Page  46 II -A!j 46 HISTORY OF LAPE-ER COUNTY I I I During his infancy his parents moved to Imlay and settled on a farm near the line between Imlay and Almnont. He remained onil the home farm until 1868, except during the time of his military service. In the fall of 1864 he enlisted as private in the Third Michigan Infantry, which was in the Army of the Cumberland. He was mustered out in the fall of 1865. In 1868 he bought the farm on which he now lives, sixty acres of north half of northeast quarter of section 4. He has also fourteen acres in the town of Imlay. Was married in 1868 to Agnes Laird, a native of Canada, and has six sons and one daughter, all of whom are at home. B. R. EMMONS was born in Burlington County, N. Y., April 29, 1822. At the age of eight years lie was bound out to a farmer until he was of age. During these years of hard labor and scant privileges of education he formed the firm determination to conquer success, a determination which he has carried out. In 1854 he came to Almont and bought a farm one mile west of the village, where lie remained eight years. He then rented a farm in Dryden where lbe made a specialty of raising fine horses and stock, which he has since followed to a greater or less extent. Has had two of the largest horse sales ever held in the State. Though owning farms at various times, Mr. Emmons has generally cultivated rented farms, having at times as many as five farms under rental. He has found this method generlly more profitable than ownership. In 1878 he bought the farm on which he now resides, and on which he moved in the spring of 1882, west half of southwest quarter and south half of southwest quarter of northwest quarter of section 7. He was married in January, 1840, to Rebecca Branson, a native of New York. Soon after his arrival in Dryden he was elected highway commissioner and held the office nine years. DAVID SLEEPER, son of Josiah Sleeper, one of the pioneers of Almont, was born in Murray, Orleans County, N. Y., May 8, 1819. During his infancy his parents removed to Hamilton, Ontario County, Canada, and afterward returned to Orleans County, N. Y. In the fall of 1829 they moved to Michigan and settled in Macomb County. In 1832 they came to Almont and bought of the government the land now belonging to Elizabeth Matteson, in section 9. Here he remained until twenty-one years of age-then worked out for several years. About 1845 he bought his present farm in section 15, where he has 128 acres. He has also 120 acres in other sections of the town. Was married in 1841 to Phoebe Mathews, a native of Trumbull County, Ohio, a daughter of John Mathews, who came to Almont in 1836. STOUGHTON SLEEPER, soil of David Sleeper, was born in Almont, March 24, 1845. He was bred a farmer and has followed that employment until April, 1881. He has at intervals learned the trade of engineer, and is now employed in James Sanborn's elevator at the Almont station of the P. H. & N. W. R. R. He owns a comfortable house just within the limits of the village of Almont. He was married April 2, 1879, to Utilla Smith, of Almont. They have one daughter. SAMUEL KIDDER was born at Enfield, Tompkins County, N. Y., May 15, 1816. Was brought up on a farm. In 1837 he came to Almont (then Bristol) and went to work by the month at farming. In the spring of 1838 he bought a farm in section 14, on which he cleared about thirty acres, and remained there four years. In 1842 he bought the south half of northeast quarter of section 22, on which he now resides. His first wife was Eliza Hallock, to whom he was married in 1844. She died in 1847. In 1849 he married Eliza Mead, a native of Lansing, Tompkins County, N. Y. Has three children living; one has died. HIRAM HOWLAND was born in Middlebury, Mass., October 12, 1812. During his infancy his parents moved to Brown County, N. Y., where he lived until he was twenty-three years old when he came I I I to Almont and bcught the west half of southeast quarter of section 3, on which he remained twelve years. He then bought his present farm, east half of southeast quarter section 9. Since lie first came to Almont his occupation has been farming, and, during the winters, lumbering. In 1834 lie married Mary Bishop. His second wife, to whom he was married in 1849, was Mary M. Vosburgh. He has five children living. Mr. Howland has been town supervisor, road commissioner, deputy sheriff of the county for nine years, and has held various other offices. WILLIS HOWLAND, son of Hiram Howland, was born in Almont March 25, 1854. Was married March 30, 1877, to Lydia A. Havens, a native of Oakland County, and has two children. He is living with his parents and carrying on the homestead farm. He has also thirty acres in southeast quarter of southwest quarter of the same section, 9. VIRGIL S. PARMLEE was born in Cavendish, Windsor County, Vt., April 3, 1823. Came to Michigan with his parents in 1838. Lived in Armada four years, then moved to Alront and settled on west half of southwest quarter section 9, where Mr. Parmlee now lives. In 1854 he married Mya Webster, daughter of Elisha Webster, one of the earliest settlers of Almront. From her the town took the name of Mia which it bore for some time. They have two children; two have died. Mr. Parmlee has lost both legs below the knee by accident, one of them in 1866, the other in 1869. He is not, however, as might be expected, incapacitated fox farm labor, artificial legs supplying to a considerable extent the loss of the natural ones. In 1870 Mr. Parmlee engaged in mercantile business at Imlay, in which he continued four years. Since then has been engaged in farming. L. M. RETHERFORD was born in New York, July 6, 1841. In 1842 his parents moved to Genesee County, N. Y., and in the spring of 1843 to Almont, where his father bought a farm in section 14. At the age of eighteen he commenced working on his own account, learning the butcher's trade, which he has since followed, except during a term of military service. He enlisted in October,1863, as private in the First Michigan Cavalry, which served with the Army of the Potomac. Mr. Retherford was in forty-three engagements, and was wounded at Trevilian Station, was promoted to commissary sergeant of his company, was mustered out and discharged March 10, 1865, at Salt Lake City. He was married in September, 1867, to Janet Hamilton, of Almtont. Has two children. MILTON H. WEBSTER was born in Farmertown, Saratoga County, N. Y., August 3, 1805. His parents removed to Northumberland when lie was five or six years old. Moved from there to Seneca County, and thence to Monroe County. In 1827 he came to Michigan and settled in Macomb County. Has lived at different places in Michigan. His first wife, to whom he was married January 5, 1830, was Elizabeth Sessions. She died in 1859. July 12, 1859, he married Clarissa Coleman. who died in 1869. He has four children living. In 1880 he removed from Macomb County to Almont, and makes his home with his daughter, Mrs. McMonagle. Mr. Webster's parents resided until their death in Genesee County, N. Y. CORNELIUS MCMONAGLE was born in Donegil, Ireland. He came to this country about 1839. Lived in Pennsylvania about five years and then moved to Macomb County, where, in 1849, he mar ried Maria Webster, daughter of Milton H. Webster. In March, 1851, he moved to Almont and bought a farm in section 7, west half of northeast quarter. He died March 4, 1880, leaving a wife and five children. His widow resides on the homestead. HORACE M. BOOTH was born in Pembroke, Genesee County, N. Y., July 16, 1820. Was brought up on a farm. Lived on the old - I -1 i.AO [i r6 9 9:

Page  47 HISTORY OF LAPEER- COUNTY 47 homestead cultivating a portion of it, and worked at his trade of carpenter and joiner until 1865. January 1, 1845, he married Theda A. Curtis of Genesee County, N. Y. Came to Almont in 1865 and bought the west half of northeast quarter of section 20 on which he has since resided. Has six children of whom two, a son and a daughter, are at home. The son, Frank C., wa3 born in Genesee County, N. Y., December 27, 1855. Came to Almont with his parents in 1865. Learned the trade of carpenter and joiner with his father on the home farm, and for the last six years has worked at it continuously, making his home with his parents. JAMES MUIR was born in Scotland in 1806, and was bred a farmer. He came to this country about 1844, to Pontiac, Mich., where he worked on a farm one season, thence came to Almont and bought west half of northwest quarter section 8, where he died February 19, 1876. He was married in 1852 to Lodalma Squier of Utica, Michigan. She remains upon the homestead with.her son, Neil G., who carries on the farm. He also owns and cultivates the east half of northwest quarter section 8. He was born in Almont November 11, 1852. The other son, Gillis J., was born in Almont August 28, 1854. On division of the estate he received the west half of southwest quarter of section 5, on which he resides. He was married June 4th, 1879, to Frederica Roth, of Almont, and has one child. MATTHEW WARNER was borin in Lima, Livingston County, N. Y., April 29, 1821. Came to Michigan in 1836, and at the age of seventeen began working for himself at farming, and saw-mill work, in Oakland Co. In 1840 he went to Canada and remained sixteen years, engaged in lumber and mill business. He came to Almont in 1856, teamed for eleven years between Almont and Detroit; then kept hotel in Marlette three years, and in the town of Imlay five years. In 1861 he bought the farm on which he now lives, northeast quarter of northwest quarter section 9, on which he finally settled in May, 1881. He was married in 1844 to Sarah Ann Wilson, a native of Canada, and has three sons and five daughters. E. B. HOUGH was born in Orangeville, Genesee County, N. Y., in 1819. In 1833 he came with his parents to Romeo, Mich., and in 1834 to Almont. The journey from New York to Romeo was made by team, and occupied a month and one day. (In Almont his father located the east half of southeast quarter of section 29.) He lived with his parents until he was twenty-five years old, being employed in farm work and inll clearing land on contract. He then resided four or five years in Dryden. Returning to Altmont he bought the northeast quarter of section 32, on which he lived about twenty-three years. Sold this and bought a quarter section further east. He has bought and sold lands extensively, and now owns 245 acres in different parts of the town. He has for the past nine years resided in the village of Almont. In 1845 he married Emaline L. Johnson, who died in 1866, leaving four children, of whom one lives in Attica, and three in Goodland. In 1867 he married Mrs. Lucretia E. Myers who has two children, William E. Myers and Mrs. D. P. Smith, both of Almont. WILLIAM CLARK was born in Broome County, N. Y., October 22, 1795. Camne to Michigan in 1836. Lived at Troy, Oakland County, two years; then came to Almont, and bought a farm inll section 10, east half of northeast quarter. He settled onl his present farm north half of northeast quarter section 16, in 1849. He was first married March 7, 1827, to Alatllea Stoddard who died in 1840, leaving two children. His second wife, to whom he was married January 17, 1844, was Sarah Holmes, of West Bloomfield. Sle has two children, one has died. The children are Annis M., Rornanzo T. (who carries on the farm), Flora E., and James T., who lives at Lapeer. CHARLES WALKER was born in New Brunswick in 1829. During his boyhood his parents resided in Canada. Came to Almont in 1849, and in 1850 married Anna Deneen. He died in 1870, leaving eight children. Mrs. Walker resides with three of her children, upon a portion of the land entered in 1828, by her father, James Deneen, the first settler in the town. There are still standing some of the trees of the first orchard, the seeds of which were brought from Ohio, and planted about the time the land was cleared. Mrs. Walker was born March 15, 1829, and was the first white child born in the county. A sketch of her father will be found in another part of this work. WILLIAM CROSBY Was born in New Hampshire, July 3, 1816. At the aae of 21 he went.to Massachusetts, and was there employed as engineer. In 1840 he came to Almont and bought a farm of forty acres, to which he has added sixty acres. His farm is the west half of west half of northwest quarter section 3, and part of east half of northeast quarter section 4. In 1843, he married Catherine Elliott, a native of New Hampshire, and has two daughters, Mrs. E. J. Harrington, of Almont, and Mrs. John H. Bowman, of Imlay. URIEL TOWNSEND was born in the State of New York, in December, 1829. When he was about five years old his parents moved to Miclhigan, where he was brought up on a farm. At the age of twenty he bought a farm in Metamora (on which Clark Townsend now lives). He resided there about ten years, and then returned to the old homestead. In 1869 he came to Almont, and, with F. P. Currier, formed the banking firm of Townsend & Currier, of which C. Ferguson & Son are the successors. The firm built for the use of the bank the block now occupied by S. Smith and Taylor & Hopkin. They also engaged in the lumber business, and with remarkable success. In 1869 Mr. Townsend bought his present home (in the village of Almont), which he has rebuilt. He owns and operates a farm -of 400 acres, west half of section 19, and 80 acres adjoining in the town of Dryden. In 1853 he married Mary J. Ferguson, a native of New York. JOHN SHIPP was born at Swaffham Bulbeck, Cambridgeshire, England, in June, 1827. At the age of fourteen, he commenced working on his own account. In 1854 he came to Almont and bought a farm of eighty acres, the east half of northwest quarter section 30, of which he has seventy-five acres cleared. In 1881 he built his present residence. Was married July 8, 1855, to Louisa Plumb, of Brinkley, Cambridgeshire, England. JOSEPH SHIPP was born in Longmeadow, Cambridgeshire, England, April 11, 1831. Was brought up on a farm. He came to Almoont in 1853, and has been employed at farming. Having accumulated a competency, and being in ill health, he retired several years ago from active labor, and has ever since made his home with his brother, John Shipp, on his farm in section 30. EBERT W. LAWERNCE was born in Greene County, N. Y., January 9, 1799. His early life was spent on a farm. January 17, 1826, he married Eliza Van Wanoner, a native of New York. In 1836 they came to Almont. All of Mr. Lawrence's worldly wealth on his arrival, consisted of $2.50 in money, a wife and six children. He bought forty acres of land in the woods, southeast quarter of northwest quarter section 31, for $3.50 per acre, giving his note. Here he built a slhanty and made a home, and here they lived to the present time. Are now residing with their son-in-law, Myron D. Closson, in the enjoyment of a vigorous and happy old age. They have six children living, two in the town of Almont, one in Maryland, one in Australia, one in Philadelphia, and one in Gratiot County, Alichigaln. Three have died. Since Mr. Lawrence became of age, lie ihas voted at every election, and at the town j Iq 1- - -\

Page  48 w l G __ - 48 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 1 _ _I meeting in every town in which he resided, except during his residence in Canada. His first vote was cast in favor of General Jackson. MYRON D. CLOSSON was born in Jefferson County, N. Y., April 17, 1828. When about 14 years of age he came to Michigan and lived with his uncle in Macomb County. Came to Almont about 1852 and rented a farm near the south line of the town. In 1866 settled on a farm in section 31 and remained six years. He afterward lived four years in Kent County and moved thence upon his present farm, southeast quarter of northwest quarter section 31. He was married March 11, 1856, to Matilda Lawrence. They have three children, one son and two daughters. NELSON E. CLOSSON, son of Myron D. Closson, was born in Almont, September 10, 1860. In 1872 his parents moved to Grand Rapids, and remained upon a farm until 1876, when they returned to their former home in Almont. He is now operating a farm of eighty acres belonging to his grandfather, Ebert W. Lawrence, in sections 30 and 31. SHELDON BRISTOL, son of Bezaleel Bristol, one of the earliest settlers of Almont, was born in Riga, Monroe County, N.-Y., April 26, 1816. He came with his parents to this town in 1831, arriving May 22. when there were but three settlers in the town. His father,,located" the east half of southeast quarter section 33. When he was twenty-one years old he went to work by the month on his own account. He assumed and paid up the debts on the homestead, which had become embarrassed, and in 1842 assumed possession of it. In 1881 he bought the west half of northwest quarter of section 34, 115 acres, on which he now resides, having one of the most beautiful of the many beautiful houses of the town of Almont. He was married November 20, 1842, to Emily Ingalls, of the town of Almont. H. R. MOREY was born in Jefferson County, N. Y., September 9, 1824. His father kept hotel and dealt in stock. When he was fourteen years old his father died, and he then learned and worked at the carpenter's trade at Watertown, N. Y., where the family had moved after his father's death. When he was twenty-three years old he left home, residing in Waterloo, Niagara and other places in New York. He crossed Niagara bridge on the first train that went over. In 1855 he went to Wisconsin and was employed on the Fox and Wisconsin River improvement, and on the Manitowoc & Mississippi R. R. He came to Almont in 1858, and lived in the village of Almont until 1886, when he moved to his present residence one mile north of the village. Was married in 1857 to Caroline Richtmyer, a native of New York, and has one child. Mr. Morey has constructed and aided in constructing many of the principal buildings in Almont, among others the Stevens, Currier and Townsend blocks, and the residence of James Johnson on St. Clair Street. GARRETT SCHENCK was born in Floyd, Oneida County, N. Y., August 11, 1808. He remained there until he was twenty-seven years old, his early occupation being farming. In 1835 he came to Almont, and located the east one-half of northwest quarter section 22, which was then forest. Here he lived until the time of his death, in July, 1868, and here his widow resides. In March, 1835, he married Betsy Matteson, a native of New York. They had six children, of whom four are living: Roxy, wife of Elisha Pendleton, of Arcadia; Elden A., who lives adjoining his mother's place; Amos P., who lives with his mother; and A. D., whose farm is in section 14. F. P. CURRIER was born in Newbury, Vt., April 11, 1812. He remained there until he was twenty-one years old, most of the time upon the farm. From Newbury he went to Haverhill, Mass., and remained four years, learning several trades while there, among others the trade of machinist. Returning to Newbury, Vt., he remained several years. There he married, November 7, 1837, Mary P. Clark. In 1847 he moved to Almont, having visited the town two years previously. For several years he was employed as a millwright. In 1851 he formed with J. P. Muzzy the firm of Muzzy & Currier, consolidating the foundry and machine business of Almont in one establishment, and in 1853 erected the shops now occupied by H. A. Currier & Bro. In 1869 Mr. Currier went out of the foundry and machine business, and soon after in company with Uriel Townsend established a bank which in 1872 was transferred to C. Ferguson & Son. They built for the use of the bank the block now occupied by Taylor & Hopkin and S. Smith. In connection with the bank they also engaged in the lumber business and with signal success, an investment of $830,000 yielding, in twenty-two months, $60,000. Mr. Currier has now retired from active business, and occupies himself in attending to his landed and other interests, having four farms and other landed property in Lapeer, St. Clair and Sanilac Counties, as well as a large amount of village property. He has always taken an active interest in all public matters. To his active efforts and liberal aid is largely due the completion of the railroad (a branch of the P. H. & N. W. R. R.), which has contributed so materially to the growth and prosperity of the town. GILBERT BOSTICK was born in the town of Bristol (Almont), September 30, 1837. He was brought up on the farm on which he now lives, east one-half of southeast quarter of section 4, which was originally entered by John Walden. He was married in 1860 to Ellen Mahaffy, of Bruce, Macomb County, and has four children. His father, Dr. Elijah Bostick, died May 15, 1880. MAITLAND E. MARTIN, of the firm of Colerick & Martin, dealers in general merchandise, was born in Whitby, Ontario, Canada, in 1828. His boyhood and youth were spent upon a farm and attending school. At the age of twenty-three years he came to Almont, and in 1852 was proprietor of the Exchange Hotel. Subsequently he engaged in the livery business. He then operated a farm in section 18 (west one-half of the southwest quarter) until 1857. For nine years he was employed as clerk in various stores in Almont, then in farming for two years. In 1879 he engaged in his present business. He was married in June, 1852, to Miss Harriet K. French, of Whitby, Canada. Mr. Martin has been supervisor of the town of Almont for the last seven years, and has held other town offices. GEORGE W. ALLEN was born in Erie County, N. Y., September 15, 1813. When he was nine years old his parents moved to Michigan, and settled on a farm near Pontiac. There were at that time but three houses in Pontiac. In 1824 they moved to Macomb County, and in 1840 to Lapeer County. He' took a farm in section 34, town of Dryden. Moved thence to Oakland County, and remained one year. Then came to Almont and bought east one-half of southwest quarter section 31, where he now resides. This tract was entered at the government land office about 1834, by Mr. Beach, a brother of Mrs. Allen. Mr. Allen was married March 26, 1843, to Julia Ann Beach. They have three children. Though not one of the earliest settlers of Almont, Mr. Allen has, from his near vicinity to the town, been closely identified with its early history. In 1827 he drove the team for a party consisting of his father, William Allen, James Thorington and Levi Washburne, who cut a road northward through the center of the town to reach the pinery beyond. He also, the following year, came through from Washington, Macomb County, with James Deneen, when he made the first settlement in the town. Mr. Allen's two sons and his daughter are living with him, the sons cultivating the farm. Almon A. was born in Almont, July 7, 1847; James 0. was born I I I - IF 7w - - -- ri -rF - I* -i1l rD f

Page  [unnumbered] Z I no O 0: d (k ~1 w w IL -l a' Z 0 _ FCY)3 t m 00 IuV Ld m I I I I I i I I i z 0 Q I tV) tL To 0 uA 121 I

Page  [unnumbered] I I

Page  49 a -\ I~r. -. I iI-~- - - " -- -- - - - - - - - - - HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 49 in Almont February 8, 1853; the daughter, Caroline, was born in Oakland County, July 26, 1844. JOSEPH BRISTOL was born at Riga, Monroe County, N. Y., in 1818. In 1831 his parents came to Almont and located the east one-half of southeast quarter section 33, on which George Bristol now lives. In 1849 he bought west one-half northeast quarter and northeast quarter of northwest quarter section 34. June 13, 1847, he married Mary Ann Ingalls, daughter of David Ingalls, one of the pioneers of Almont. Mr. Bristol died December 18, 1877. His widow resides on the land entered by her father in 1830 (east one-half of northeast quarter section 33). There are six children living. MARQUIS LAFAYETTE WHEELOCK was born in the town of Thornville, Lapeer County, November 4, 1852. During his infancy his parents moved to Almont and kept the Exchange Hotel several years. Then moved to Wisconsin, and after four or five years' absence returned to Lapeer County and bought a farm near Imlay City. His father died at Nashville, Tenn., of disease contracted in the military service. At the age of fifteen he began working on his own account, and has since that time been employed in lumbering, saw-mill work and farming. In 1880 he bought a farm of fortyfive acres in the town of Lapeer. June 25, 1879, he married Emma Booth, of Almont. THOMAS SPRINGETT was born in England in 1828. He came to this country and to Almont in 1841, and for seven years worked at harness making, which had been his occupation in England. In 1858 he engaged in farming (in section 30). He subsequently sold his farm to his son, and in 1882 took up his residence in the village of Almont. He was married in 1851 to Mary Ann Winton, and has two sons, both farmers. CHARLES H. SPRINGETT was born in the village of Almont, March 7, 1856. During his infancy his parents moved on their farm in section 30, on which he has lived ever since, and which he bought in the summer of 1882. He was married December 10, 1878, to Elma Laughlin, a native of Almont, and they have one child. JAMES McRoY, or as the name was formerly spelled, McElroy, was born in County Antrim, North Ireland, June 1, 1812. Came to this country to Hartford, Conn., in 1832, and there worked at his trade of carpet weaver for seven years, and was then engaged in farming. In 1857 he came to Almont and settled on east half of northwest quarter of section 21, which he had bought of the government in 1833. He afterward bought the southeast quarter of southwest quarter of section 16, on which his house now stands. He was married in 1833 to Marry Lochead, of Kilmarnock, Scotland, and has six children. Six have died, one being killed in the army, and one dying of disease contracted in the service. THOMAS J. McRoY, son of James McRoy, was born in Hartford, Conn., April 7, 1846. Was brought up on a farm. Came to Almont in 1857 with his parents; remained with them until 1878, when he bought a farm of eighty acres, northwest quarter of northwest quarter of section 20 and southeast quarter of southeast quarter of section 16. He was married in 1878 to Mary Taylor, a native of Armada, Macomb County, Michigan, and they have one child. DENNISON E. HAZEN was born in Killingly, Conn., March 18, 1814. During his infancy his parents moved to Genesee County, N. Y., and remained four years. From there they went to Warren County, Pennsylvania. In 1834 he came with his parents to Macomb County, where they settled on a farm two miles west of Romeo. In 1843 he came to Almon't and worked for a time at shoe making and a portion of the time at farming until 1852, when with his brother-in-law, Thomas Cherryman, he engaged in general merchandising under the firm name of Hazen & Cherryman. After the dissolution of the firm Mr. Hazen continued in business alone for a time, and in 1860 sold to his son-in-law, James N. Harris. He assisted Mr. Harris until he sold out. Mr. Hazen has been actively engaged in town and county business. Has been justice of the peace in 1858, town clerk, treasurer, supervisor for four years, and county treasurer one term. In the spring of 1835 he married Rhoda A. Jennison, a native of New Hampshire. Has one child, Mrs. John N. Harris, with whom he now resides. J. W. LEARMONT was born on Long Island, N. Y., December 9, 1835. In 1837 his parents came to Almont and settled on section 27, which was then forest. He has remained ever since on the old homestead, northwest quarter of southwest quarter of section 27, to which he has lately added by purchase the southwest quarter of southwest quarter. He also has lands in sections 2 and 21. Was married in 1873 to Mary J. Fullerton, a native of Canada, and has two children. ROSWELL TAGGART was born in Dunham, Lower Canada, in 1802. When he was twelve years old his parents removed to western New York. In April, 1850, he came to Almont and bought the farm on which he now lives, the west half of southwest quarter of section 32. In 1831 he married Julia Stevens, a native of New York. They have three children living; three have died. Mrs. Taggart is still living at the age of eighty. ABRAHAM VAN ANTWERP was born in Schaghticoke, N. Y., March 3, 1816. During his boyhood his parents moved to Saratoga County, where he remained until he was sixteen years old. He then served three years' apprenticeship at the trade of carpenter and joiner, at which he worked in Saratoga County until 1854, when he came to Almont and worked at his trade four years. Then bought the farm on which he now lives, east half of northwest quarter of section 20, and five acres adjoining in section 17. In connection with farming he has been employed a portion of the time as carpenter and joiner and millwright. He was first married in 1840 to Ann M. Vandecar, who died at Lapeer in 1853. His second wife was Miranda Humphrey, to whom he was married in 1855. He has six children, of whom two, a son and a daughter, remain at home. The son, Edgar, who was born in Almont April 27, 1860, assists in carrying on the farm. W. H. WHITEHEAD was born in Wayne County, N. Y., February 8, 1830. During his childhood his parents moved to Ohio. In 1840 they moved to Addison, Oakland County, Mich., where he attended school and worked on the farm until he was twenty-one years of age. He then came to Almont and worked at farming, by the month, for about three years. Then tended bar about three years, after which he established a saloon in Almont. His present saloon on the northwest corner of Main and St. Clair Streets was established in 1879. He was married in 1858 to Polly Myers, who died July 6, 1874, leaving one child. October 29, 1876, he married Hattie Crager. M. SHOEMAKER was born in Addison, Oakland County, Mich., in 1845. Commenced work at farming on his own account at the age of twenty-two. In 1870 he bought a farm of 100 acres, six and one-half miles west of Romeo. In 1873 he bought the farm on which he now resides, west half of northwest quarter of section 28. He was married in May, 1870, to Betsy L. Beebe, and has three children. JAMES F. FERGUSON was born at East Rush, Monroe County, N. Y., May 7, 1848. The same year his parents moved to Almont. He now resides on the farm which his father bought at that time in section 15. He was first married in 1870 to Alice Carpenter, t I "- I

Page  50 50 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. [)* who died. In April, 1882, he married Margaret Cochrane. Has two children. C. E. WALES was born near Montreal, Canada, September 30, 1825. At the age of five years he went with his parents to Erie Counlty, N. Y., whence they moved in 1834 to Macomb County, Mich., and in 1835 to Alrnont, or Bristol, and bought of the United States the northwest quarter of southwest quarter of section 29 and southeast quarter of section 30. His father, Willard Wales, was one of the earliest road commissioners of the town of Almont. Mr. Wales was married in August, 1'846, to Electa Matteson, of Genesee County, N. Y., and has two children. He still resides on the old homestead, where nearly his whole life has been spent. SAMUEL E. FERGUSON was born in the State of New York in 1831. When he was eight years of age his parents moved to Oakland County, Mich., and bought a farm. This lie retained and resided on until 1878, when he transferred it to his son, and located in Almont; purchased southwest quarter of section 28 and east half of southeast quarter of section 29, which he now cultivates, making his residence, however, in the village of Almont. He was married in 1853 to Mary C. Lawrence, of Lapeer County, and has three children. HULBERT REiD/as born in Vermont in 1807. From there went to western New York. His earlier as well as later life was spent on a farm. In 1836 hie came to Almont and bought a farm of 160 acres in section 27, to which he has since added forty acres. About 170 acres are cleared. He has one of the best farms in the town, and well stocked. Mr. Reid was married in 1834 to Lydia Wheaton, and has ten children. W. E. MERRITT was born in the township of Attica, Lapeer County, Mich., in 1856, and in 1862 moved to the township of Dryden, where he remained until 1868. He then went to Oakland County, where he resided until'1872, when he returned, and in 1875 located in Dryden, remaining there until 1882, when he again made his home in Almont, where he still remains. Has been engaged in lumbering during the past five years. Was married in 1888 to Miss Adell Balch, of Dryden. GARDINER CARR, deceased, was born in Middlebury, Vermont, in 1799, and in 1836 came to Michigan and settled in the township of Almont, Lapeer County, taking up land from the government and speculators, on sections 1 and 11, where he continued to reside until his death, in 1879. He was married in 1824 to Miss Sarah Dodge, of Vermont, by whom he had a son and daughter. The son, Capt. T. C. Carr, deceased, was born in 1827, and enlisted in the Sixteenth Michigan Infantry, in which he served as captain. He was the first man killed in the regiment, at the battle of Gaines Hill. He was married in 1853, to Miss Mary Snow, who died in 1856, leaving one son, Wm. T. Carr; was again married in 1857 to Miss E. R. Romer, of the State of New York. The daughter, Miss A. A. Carr, was married in 1853, to Wm. W. Wilder, of Metamora, and settled on section 1. He enlisted, in 1861, in the Sixteenth Michigan Infantry, and was wounded in the first battle at Gaines Hill, from which he soon after died, in the hands of the Confederates, leaving a wife and four children. WM. OVENS was born in Biggar, Scotland; was clerk in a grocery store in Glasgow for a few years; came to Almont in the fall of 1862, and was engaged with Henry Stevens five years; commenced business for himself in 1867, and associated with him his brother, James, in 1872, and continued together until 1883, since which he has continued the business alone. He has the largest store in St. Clair, Macomb and Lapeer Counties, occupying 10,000 feet of flooring and carrying under one roof the largest stock of general merchandise north of Detroit. TOWN OF LAPEER. The town of Lapeer occupies a central position in the county on account of its railway connections and the fact of the county seat being within its limits. The township is bounded on the north by Mayfield, east by Attica, south by Metamora and west by Elba. December 30, 1834, the town of Lapeer was organized, including all the county of Lapeer as now organized except the townships of Almont and Imlay. The first township meeting was held at the house of E. H. Higley, April 6, 1835. Previous to this time the inhabitants of this extensive tract of country were obliged to go to Pontiac to pay taxes and attend to all judicial business. At the first town meeting the following persons were elected to the several offices named, viz.: Supervisor, Jonathan R. White; clerk, Alvin N. Hart; assessors, William S. Higley, Samuel Murlin, John I. Carr; constable and collector, Morris Perry; directors of the poor, Joseph B. Moore, Samuel Murlin; commissioners of highways, Alvin McMasters, Daniel Turrill, Paul G. Davison; constables, Aaron Brigham, Joel M. Palmer; school inspectors, Minor Y. Turrill, Oliver B. Hart, Oliver P. Davison. A wolf bounty of one dollar for each scalp was voted in pursuance of a prevailing custom at that time. February 2, 1836, the town board met at the house of Alvin N. Hart to grant permits to persons applying for license to keep tavern for the ensuing year. Oliver B. Hart made application and the record states that "Ithe board having satisfied themselves of the said Hart's ability and character, do hereby permit the said Oliver B. Hart to keep tavern at his now dwelling-house in Lapeer village for the current year." The annual town meeting in April, 1836, for the election of town officers, commenced at the late dwelling-house of E. H. Higley. The price of wolf scalps was doubled at this meeting and other town business transacted. September 12, 1836, a meeting was held to elect a delegate to attend the State convention at Ann Arbor, for the purpose of assenting or dissenting to the proposition of Congress. Mason Butts received thirty-three votes and Benjamrin Sleeper thirty-one votes. At the general election held at the house of Oliver B. Hart in November, 1836, 100 votes were polled. The division of road districts was made in 1885. Eight districts were laid out. Twelve highways were laid out between the first of May, 1885, and April 1, 1886. At the annual town meeting in April, 1836, a resolution was adopted that every section line be declared a highway of four rods wide. In September, 1840, two and one-quarter acres of ground were purchased of Minor Y. Turrill at a cost of $112, for a burying ground, which was located on the east half of the southeast quarter of section 8. March 15, 1849, the township of Mayfield was made a part of Lapeer and remained so until March, 1869. ENTRIES OF LAND. The following list shows the entries of land prior to the year 1846: TOWNSHIP 7 NORTH, RANGE 10 EAST. SECTION 1. Nathan Dickinson, William H. Imlay and George Beach, April 2, 1836. Mason Butts, September 14, 1836. i & J I

Page  51 , --- __ ] We: I: i HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 51 SECTION 1. Alvin N. Hart and Lemuel Weston, November 14 1836. Thomas Probyn, November 15, 1836. George F. Ball, March 10, 1836. Harry Waldorph, November 8, 1838. Barnard Cook, December 5, 1838. Richard J. Vosburgh, February 20, 1844. SECTION 2. James Dixon, January 9, 1835. Oliver B. Hart, February 12, 1836. John Shafer, March 24, 1836. Nathan Dickinson, William H. Imlay and George Beach, April 2, 1836. A. Rood and J. S. Munson, January 1., 1836. SECTION 3. Clark C. Carpenter, July 19, 1834. Harvey Gray, September 8, 1834. Harvey Gray, May 19, 1835. Frank Lombard, October 31, 1834. Frank Lombard, November 5, 1834. Harvey Thomas, July 24, 1835. Aaron Rood, October 8, 1835. Aaron Rood, October 29, 1835. Aaron Rood and J. S. Munson, June 13, 1836. SECTION 4. Oliver B. Hart, July 11, 1831. George F. Ball, January 4, 1832. Joel Palmer and Alvin N. Hart, February 23, 1832. Walker Booth, March 24, 1832. Joseph England and Jesse Fox, July 2, 1832. Alvin N. Hart, January 30, 1833. SECTION 5. Daniel LeRoy, September 16, 1830. Benjamin Taggart, October 30, 1830. Oliver B. Hart, July 12, 1831. Joshua Terry, November 12, 1831. SECTION 6. J. R. White, January 16, 1882. Minor Y. Turrill, October 27, 1832. Theron Simes, July 14, 1834. John Shafer, December 18, 1835. E. J. White, January 21, 1836. Simeon B. Brown, February 8, 1836. Phineas White, March 8, 1886. SECTION ' 7. Nathan White, September 26, 1833. William C. Young, July 4, 1834. Enoch J. White, September 4, 1834. George Otto, December 21, 1835. Joshua B. Chapel, February 8, 1836. Isaac Wheeler, March 8, 1836. James W. Tillman, April 12, 1836. James W. Tillman, April 20, 1836.. SECTION 8. Walker Booth, March 24, 1832. Henry K. Avery, August 25, 1832. Phineaa. White, September 27, 1832. Jonathan R. White, January 25, 1833. Jonathan R. White, May 31, 1833. Enoch J. White, March 3, 1834. Morris Perry, March 25, 1834. Isaac L. Smith, April 10, 1884. Minor Y. Turrill, September 4, 1834. Asael Hubbard, November 18, 1834. George Otto, December 21, 1835. SECTION 9. John McMaster, March 5, 1832. Daniel Terrill, June 9, 1832. iWilliam T. Higley, July 24, 1832. Aaron Rood, October 8, 1835. SECTION 10. Phineas White, May 31, 1833. Aaron Rood, May 19, 1834. Samuel Hemenway, May 24, 1834. Estes H. Higley, November 18, 1834. Estes H. Higley, May 2, 1835. Asael J. Gray, June 3, 1835. John Peters, June 19, 1835. Aaron Rood, October 8, 1835. SECTION 11. Phineas White, May 31, 1833. Ira Peck, October 30, 1835. George Gage, December 4, 1835. Daniel Wood, December 4, 1835. George Gage, May 16, 1836. Hiram Ward, May 21, 1836. Orvis W. Rood, November 25, 1836. SECTION 12. Dwight Salmon, May 26, 1836. Asa Cole, June 27, 1838. Thomas Ryan, November 16, 1840. Lewis V. R. Whitaker, December 16, 1844. SECTION 13. Francis Fowler, May 26, 1836. Alonzo Orcutt, May 26, 1836. Nathaniel C. Bullock, June 2, 1836. Mosly Stoddard, June 24, 1836. SECTION 14. Ransom Cole, January 4, 1836. Reuben Cole, January 4, 1836. James Turrill, May 6, 1836. Hiram Ward, May 21, 1836. Francis Fowler, May 26, 1836. Alonzo Orcutt, May 26, 1836. John Esmond, May 27, 1836. SECTION 15. Isaac Goodale, November 10, 1835. Israel W. Bullock, January 4, 1836. Joseph Gilbert, February 9, 1836. Henry S. Platt, May 2, 1836. Gardner Dorrance, May 2, 1836. Levi D. Coules, May 2, 1836. SECTION 16. Woodward & Hart, October 4, 1843. SECTION 17. James Dixon, August 7, 1835. Minor Y. Turrill, March 9, 1836. John Thomas, March 9, 1836. Harry S. Platt, May 2, 1836. Gardner Dorrance, May 2, 1836. James Turrill, May 6, 1836. Ira Dickinson, July 5, 1836. Margaret Dixon, July 10, 1844. SECTION 18. Rensselaer Curtis, October 28, 1833. Rensselaer Curtis, June 2, 1834. Nicholas Poss, June 19, 1834. Nicholas Poss, July 27, 1835. Nicholas Poss, October 30, 1835. Ira Howland, March 26, 1836. Ira C. Alger, April 19, 1836. Addine M. Poss, July 6, 1836. Isaac Wheeler, July 7, 1836. Enoch J. White, April 20, 1838. SECTION 19. Trumbull Carey, October 29, 1835. George Clarl, or., January 6, 1836. Rebecca Clark, January 6, 1836. Delos Davis and Thaddeus O. Martin, February 27, 1836. Henry W. Martin, May 5, 1836. William Osborn, January 17, 1836. Jabez M. Corey, January 24, 1836. I I i i I-, 0 l

Page  52 E. I I 1 i I -i 1 14I I I e) I.A- I I I W 52 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. SECTION 19. James Dixon, Miay 8, 1837. SECTION 20. Alvi1n N. Hart, February 23, 1832. Alvin N. Hart, May 23, 1832. N. Dickinson. William H. Imlay and George Beach., March 17, 1836. Thomylas Golby, July 5, 1836. H~arve~y D. Felt, July 5, 1836. Ezra Tripp, July 21, 1837. Stephen Tripp, July 21, 1837. Ezra Tripp, October 23, 1837. Stephen Tripp, October 23, 1837. Tlzomas W~alkrer, April 12, 1839. SECTION 2 1. James Turrill, May 6, 1836. Noah H. Hart, July 6, 1836. &~CTION 28. Barnard Cook, November 2, 183,5. John K~irk,, March 3, 1836. Elizabeth Kirk, MEay 3, 1836. James Turrill, May 6i, 1836. Francis G. Macey and Amon W. Langdon, M\ay 17, 1836. SECTION 28. D. Langdon, H. G. Hubbard and T. H. Hubbard, July 7, 1836. Rebecca Clark, November 10, 1836. Hosea W~oodward, May 14, 1841. Lewis V. R. Wh~itney, July 5, 1841. SECTION 29. George Clark, August 4, 1832. George Clark, March 13, 1833. John Kirk, December 23, 1833. Joseph Jackson, December 23, 1833. George Stringer, April 18, 1836. Charles and Gasca Rich, July 11, 1836. John Walker, April 12, 1839. SECTION 30. Asahel Hubbard, August 19, 1833. Sarah? H. Howland, April 25, 1836. 32. Mr. Clark has been dead manzy years but his descendants are prominent citizens of the town. About this time Alvin McMaster built a sawmrill on section 8. Estes H. Higley came from Vermont and settled on section 10 iD. 1834. A sont, George W. Higley, now lives upon the old homestead. Mlr. Estes Hligley built a saw-mill on a branch of the Flint I - ill 104, 1L I _ _

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Page  53 A: — 0 - s\..:6 - I I I 1 - HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 3 - t - vl i Pike, 1S500; G. Stringer, 1,200; M. Michael, 1,100; J. Dodds, I HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 53 River, and also a carding and wool carding factory. William Higley also built a mill near by. A school-house was built in that vicinity. All are still standing but dilapidation has fastened itself upon them. They now serve no other purpose than to remind one of days that are gone. A. J. Gray located here in 1835. He came from Wayne County, N. Y. Francis Fowler settled on section 14 in 1836. He died in 1871. Ira Peck also settled here in 1836. He was killed in a saw-mill in 1865. George Stringer located here in the spring of 1836. The Turrills and Roods were also prominent among the early farmers of the town. Soon after Mr. Clark's family located here it was reported at the village that a family had settled at the oak openings, five miles distant. The social tendencies of people in those days were greater than at a later day, and the first thing which occurred to the little handful of villagers was that the solitary family of settlers five miles away, would be likely to find their advent into this new region a lonely one. A visit was planned by the women of the village, vegetables were gathered and Captain Noah H. Hart was appointed teamster. With a pair of oxen and a heavy wagon he transported the company through the woods to the home of the new comers. The Clark habitation consisted of four posts driven into the ground, and a slight covering afforded protection from the elements. Cooking operations were carried on outside. The visit was an enjoyable one and both hosts and guests were made to feel better by the neighborly act. The Hunter's Creek settlement sprang up at an early day, and a postoffice by that name was established in the south part of the township. Harris Tripp, John Walker, 0. P. Davison and John Clark have been postmasters. The latter is the present incumbent of the office. The building of the Detroit & Bay City Railroad in 1872, elevated the settlement to the rank of a railway station and a shipping point. An elevator was built, and in 1873 Mr. John Clark erected a saw and shingle-mill. He also carries on the mercantile business in which he succeeded Oliver P. Davison. The Hunter's Creek Burying Ground Association was organized July 4, 1862. Officers: President, Thomas Clark; clerk, Oliver P. Davison; treasurer, John Clark. Changes have been made in the association, but the ground purchased is still the burial place of that neighborhood. The First Baptist Society of Hunter's Creek was organized in November, 1878. The trustees were as follows: Milton Titsworth, Malachi Tripp, Andrew W. White, James Clark, Susan C. Clark. A church building was erected and is supplied from pastors of neighboring societies. There is a Methodist Episcopal Church building, which was erected at an early day but it has not been used for some time. STATISTICAL. The population of the town of Lapeer in 1840 was 755. Census of 1874: Population, 1,156; acres of taxable land, 20,354; of improved land, 10,871; number of sheep, 3,385; horses, 419; cows, 519. Products of the preceding year: 16,633 pounds of wool sheared, 55,544 pounds of pork marketed, 61,486 pounds of butter made, 26,106 bushels of wheat raised, 25,414 of corn, 34,474 of other gris2,26fapls 2o ers 9 fceres 257o oa grains, 9,020 of apples, 92 of pears, 193 of cherries, 12,577 of potatoes, 1,948 tons of hay cut, 1,278 pounds of fruit dried for market, 329 barrels of cider made; 200 pounds of maple sugar were made in 1874. In 1877 the township produced 53,564 bushels of wheat. The farmers who raised more than 1,000 bushels were as follows: John Clark & Son, 4,800; S. Read, 1,300; Mrs. S. Clark, 1,400; 0. B. i Pike, 1,500; G. Stringer, 1,200; M. Michael, 1,100; J. Dodds, 1,300; James Clark, 1,200; M. H. Schuneman, 4,000; G. P. Chapman, 1,600; H. C. Rood, 2,500. The largest average yield was forty acres which averaged 37~ bushels. In 1880 the population was 1,166. The aggregate valuation of real and personal property as equalized by the board of supervisors in 1882 was $697,000. The annual report of the school inspectors of the town of Lapeer, for the year 1882, shows the number of school children to have been 306; number of school buildings, six. The school inspectors were William McQuin, H. F. Brown, H. A. Greeley, Andrew McGregor, L. J. Russell, James Reed. TOWN OFFICERS. 1835-Supervisor, Jonathan R. White; clerk, Alvin N. Hart; collector, Morris Perry. 1836-Supervisor, Mason Butts; clerk, Levi Vosburgh; collector, Morris Perr y. 1837-Supervisor, Alvin N. Hart; clerk, A. Hubbard; collector, Ira Howland. 1838-Supervisor, Horace N. Lathrop; clerk, John Ryon; collector, Ira Howland. 1839-Supervisor, Frank Lumbard; clerk, Orrin M. Evans; treasurer, Derrick Stebbins. 1840-Supervisor, Chester Hatch; clerk, Derrick Siebbins; treasurer, Martin Stiles. 1841-Supervisor, Levi Sawtell; clerk, Horace Hinman; treasurer, Aaron Rood. 1842-Supervisor, Alvin N. Hart; clerk, Isaac McKeen; treasurer, Joseph B. Hart. 1843-Supervisor, Alvin N. Hart; clerk, Isaac McKeen; treasurer, Samuel Tomlinson. 1844-Supervisor, Alvin N. Hart; clerk, D. Miller; treasurer, Samuel Tomlinson. 1845 —Supervisor, Alvin N. Hart; clerk, W. Loud; treasurer, Horace D. Rood. 1846-Supervisor, Alvin N. Hart; clerk, W. Loud; treasurer, Horace D. Rood. 1847-Supervisor, Alvin N. Hart; clerk, M. W. Smith; treasurer, Robert Patterson. 1848-Supervisor, Alvin N. Hart; clerk, George F. Ball; treasurer, Robert Patterson. 1849-Supervisor, Noah H. Hart; clerk, William Beech; treasurer, Robert Patterson. 1850 —Supervisor, Noah H. Hart; clerk, William Beech; treasurer, Robert Patterson. 1851-Supervisor, Noah H. Hart; clerk, William Beech; treasurer, Asahel Gray. 1852-Supervisor, Noah H. Hart; clerk, William Beech; treasurer, Asahel Gray. 1853-Supervisor, John B. Evans; clerk, William Beech; treasurer, Asahel Gray. 1854 —Supervisor, John B. Evans; clerk, William Beech; treasurer, Sylvester Shaffer. 1855-Supervisor, Horace N. Lathrop; clerk, William H. Clark; treasurer, Sylvester Shaffer. 1856-Supervisor, John B. Evans; clerk, William H. Clark; treasurer, Sylvester Shaffer. 1857-Supervisor, Henry Dodd; clerk, HubbellLoomis; treasurer, P. J. Bope. 1858 —Supervisor, E. J. White: clerk, Hubbell Loomis; treasurer, P. J. Bope. - - -I I ~ I I I It ad I _ X

Page  54 4 4 -?) __j I. i 54 HISTORY OF L APEE ER COUNTY. I I i i 1859 —Supervisor, E. J. Wh~ite; clerk, J. Henry Turrill; treasurer, Silas Wrighlt. 18600-Supervisor, E. JT. White; clerli, George S. Fletcher: treasurer, Silas Wright. I 1861 —Supervisor, Charles Rich; clerk, George S. Fletcher; treasurer, John DI. Evarns. 1862 —Supervisor, Charles Rich; clerk, Stephen S. Hicks; treasurer, Johtn B. Evans. 18M8-Suparvisor, Charles Rich; clerk, R. C. Viinceint; treasurer, L. E. Waterbury. 1864 —Supervisor, Charles Rich; clerki, Steph~en S. Hicks; treasurer, L. E.WaWtterbury. 1865 —Supervisor, Stephen S. H~icks; clerk, Williamll Arnold; treasurer, Charles M. Davis. 1866 —Supervisor, Stephen S. Hicks;i clerk, Charles Rich;; treasurer, Ch~arles M~. Davis. 1867 ---Supervisor, Johin B. Sutton; clerk, Henry A. Birdsalltreasurer, Charles MI. Davis. 1868 —Supervisor, Horace 1). Rood; clerk, Henry A. Birdsall; treasurer, Charles M. D~avis. 1869 —Supervisor, Thomas Clark; clerk, W. F. Daley; treasurer, J. W. Teller..18'70 —Supervisor, Thomas Clark; clerk, W. F. Datley; treasurer, J. Wl. Teller. 1871-S8upervisor, Thomuas Clark; clerk, Daniel Conklin; treasurer, J. W. Teller. 1872-Supervisoror Thomas Clark; clerk, Datniel Conkiintreasurer, J. WV. Teller. 1873 —Supervisor, W. B. Sutton; clerk, E. A. Higrley; treasurer, A. A. Rood. 1874l-Supervisor, W. B. Sutton- clerk, W. WV. Gardner; treasurer, Peter V. B. SchunemaRn. 18'75 —Supervisor, W. B. Suttcn; clerk, E. A. Higley; treasurer, Peter V. B. Sebuilernan. 1876-S8upervisor, George P. Chapman: cler~k, E. A. Higley; treasurer, Johzn T. Clark. 1877 —Supervisor, W.. B. Sutton; clerk, E. A. Higley; treasurer, John T. Clark.. 1878-Supervisor., William Hatlpin; clerkr, E. A. Hig~ley; treasurer, Peter V. B. Schunemann. 1879 —Supervisor, William Halpin; clerk, Peter V. B. SI~huneman?; treasurer, Robert B. Walker. 1880)- Supervisor, H. Palmzerlee; clerk, Charles F. Rilaynard; treasurer, Robert B. Walker. 1881 —Supervisor, H. Palnaerlee; clerk, Charles F. Maynard; treasurer, Walter Butterfield-. then took up at farm on section 11 in the towfnship of Lapeer and conzducted it till 1811, w~hen h~e purchased the farm he now resides upon on sjection 27. H~e has always been a farmer; but for the past fifteen years has made a specialty of hop raising, hzaving fifteen acres under cultivationz. When he -first settled on his farm be lived for a time in a, small house without windows, doors or floors, and his wife did the cookino, for the family beside a large log which was near the house. At that time bears, wolves and deer were quite plentiful. He wias married in 1839 to Miss Julia Tripp, who died in 1848. The~y hadn three ch~ildren. H~is second marriage occurred September 26, 1849, to Miss Rena Woodard, by whom he had five child~ren., GEORGEW. H IIGLEY was borii~in Vermont in 1&80 and camee with his parents to Lapeer in 183 1. His f ather took up a large tract of land from the government on section 10 in th,- townshsip of Lapeer, which b~e occupied until his death. Mr. H~ig~ley now owns a part of the original farm, and also eighty acres a mile to the south. He ha-, been engaged in farming and lunlbering, and was also a clerk in D~etroit one year. In Decem~ber, 1880, be orgalnized the ftirm of Strong & Higley for the purpose of engaging ill the sale of groceries, provisions and boots and shoes. Their store is located onl the corner of Nepessing and Mason Streets, Lapeer. Mr. Higley has held the office of highwazy commissioner for the township of Lapeer. A. J. GRAY was born in W~ayne C'ounty, N. Y., in 1818, and came to Lapeer County in the sprillg of 1835 and settled on section 3 fn the -towvnship of Lapeer, where he has since contiklued to reside. He took up a large tract of land and has always' been a farmer, doing hlis share of the hard work incident to a new country. Hze has held the offices of justice,~ of the peace, treasurer and highwayy comm~issioner several terms. Was treasurer when the entire north part of the courity was included in ~the townshrip ofLapeer., He was married in 1842 to Mdiss Jane Vosburg, who died in July, 1878. They had two cbildren-aa son and daughter. THOMIAS WVALKER, deceased, was a native of England, where he was born August 23, 1807. H~e came to Detroit, Mdich., in June 1832, and remained there till 1836, when he returned to England and spent about one year in the land of his birth. On his return to Detroit he engaged in business till 1840, when he came to Lapeer County and settled in the township of Lapeer on section 29, clearing up a large farm, whic11 be managed up to the time of his death, in 1868. He was married in 1838 to Miss Maryr Green, who wvas also a native of Engla-nd. They had a family of seven children. Ii iI I r I DAVID WALKER was born in the township of Lapeer on the old homestead in 1851, and remained on the farm until tile death of his falther in 1868, when he and his brother Robert bouxght oult the heirs, and have since been in partnership. They also bought a farm on the same section, whichi is o2~cupied by Robert. H3e was married in 1879 to Miss Belle Frenctl. They Ilave two children. R. H. READ was bornl in New Jersey, June 14, 1814, and came to Washington, Macomb County, Mich., in 1837. After travel-ing ab~out two years in Illinois, Iowa and Indiana, he located in Union, Oakland County, M~ich., and engagred in farming till 1858, when he came to Latpeer County, and purchased a farm on section 23, in the townsh~ip of Lapeer, upon which he still resides. He was marsried April 3, 1843, to Miss Anna Perry; they have a, son and datughter. SAMUEL READ was born Octob~er 19, 1843, in Orion, -Oakland Count, Mich., and came to Lapeer, with his parents in 1858, and has since remained on the farm, which lie is now managing. He wyas married Januatry 17, 1872, to Miss Ella Morris, and bas four children. IJ. W. DENNIS is a native of Canada, and was born in 1838, and is by occupation a carpenter and engineer. He came to Lapeer in 1865, and now owns ten acres of' valuable land near the city, on section 7, upon which he has good buildings.. Ultimately lie expects to devote the entire place to the raising of small fruits. W~las married in 1862, to Miss Louisa Michael, wYho is also a native of Canada. Th~ey have four children.' MATTHIIAS CALEY (decea~sed) wvas bor-i on the Isle of Man in i iL I I QD rl

Page  55 i i i HISTORY OF LA Great Britain, in 1789, and emigrated to Utica, Oneida County, N. Y., in 1828. He moved to Detroit, Michigan, in 1836, and to Lapeer in February, 1837, and settled on section 32; his farm lying on both sides of the town line road, he built his house on section 5, in Metamora, and remained there till his death in December, 1858. There were very few settlers in the township when Mr. Caley came in. He was married about the year 1809, to Mary Stephens, and had four children. THOMAS CALEY was born on the Isle of Man in 1814, and came to Utica, N. Y., in 1828, Detroit in 1836, and to Lapeer in 1837, where he remained on the old homestead, till the death of his father in 1858. Since that time has owned the old farm, and now owns 700 acres of land lying in a body, and owns in all 1,500 acres. Married in 1841, to Jane Carron, who died in 1862. Second marriage in 1863, to Sarah Looney; they have three children. ZADOCK BATES was born in Manchester, Bennington County,Vermont, in 1796, and went to Plattsburgh, N. Y., with his parents, in 1806, thence to Geauga County, Ohio, in 1820, and in 1821 went to Green Bay, Wisconsin (then Michigan), and was engaged as a clerk in a store, till 1822. He then went to St. Mary's Falls, Lake Superior, and was in the same business for another year, and in 1823 engaged in business in Oakland County, remaining there till 1828, then moved to Pennsylvania, and was engaged in farming till 1840, when he moved to Lapeer, and settled on section 31, where he has since lived. Has cleared up a large farm with the help of his sons. Mr. Bates served several months in the army during the war of 1812. Married December 6, 1824, to Eliza Webster; they have eight children. Mr. Bate;3 has been justice of peace four years in the township of Lapeer. WILLIAM W. BATES was born in Pennsylvania in 1834, and came to Lapeer with his parents in 1840, and remained on the old homestead till he was twenty-one years of age, and has since managed the farm. Married in 1860, to Maria L. Hamler; they have three children. ASA PALMERLEE (deceased) was born in Litchfield, Conn., in 1803, and in 1819 moved to Otsego County, N. Y., thence in 1830, to Franklinville, Cattaraugus County, N. Y., where he remained until 1850, in which year he came to Lapeer County and settled in the township of Lapeer, on section 31, where he remained till his death, which occurred in 1839. When Mr. Palmerlee first located in Lapeer, there were no roads laid out in his neighborhood, and he commenced in the wilderness, but with the help of his sons he cleared up a fine farm. He was married in 1825, to Lucy Seward; they raised a family of ten children. HOEL PALMERLEE was born in Franklinville, Cattaraugus County N. Y., in 1836, and came with his parents to Lapeer in 1850, and has lived on the homestead continuously, with the exception of four years spent in Minnesota; his mother resides with him. He has been supervisor of the township of Lapeer four years, and is the present (1883) incumbent. He was married in 1862 to Miss Almina Johnson, who died April 15, 1869, leaving two sons; and was again married, August 20, 1874, to Miss Frances E. Brown. ROBERT B. WALKER was born in the township of Lapeer, Lapeer County, Mich., in December, 1849, and remained at home on the farm until he became of age. In 1872 he and his brother purchased the interest of the heirs in the homestead, and in 1879 they bought the farm which Robert now lives upon, which is located on section 29. He has held the office of highway commi;sioner one year, treasurer, two years, and school director nine years. Was married in December, 1874, to Miss Agnes French; they have two daughters. JOHN G. GATES was born in Seneca, Ontario County, N. Y., PEER COUNTY. 55 in 1822. Owing to the death of his mother, he went to live with his grandfather at a very early age, and remained with him until twenty-one years old. He then went to Leroy, Genesee County, N. Y., and engaged in farming, and in 1856 came to Oakland County, Mich., where he remained until 1860, when he came to the township of Lapeer and settled on section 30, where he owns a good farm. He was married in 1849 to Miss Lois A. Wilcox, and they have seven children. ANDREW L. KINGSBURY, SR., was born in Roxbury, Delaware County, N. Y., in 1810, and in 1816 with his parents moved to Monroe County, N. Y. In 1833 he came to Shelby, Macomb County, Mich., and thence in 1844 to Lapeer County, where he located onl section 30, in the township of Lapeer, where he has since resided. He has cleared up a fine farm upon which he has erected good buildings. Mr. Kingsbury held theoffice of supervisor one year, and highway commissioner nine years, while the townships of Lapeer and Mayfield were one, and since the division, has represented the township of Lapeer in various offices, among which may be mentioned the office of justice of the peace, and was under sheriff of the county two years. He took the United States census of the township in 1880, and for eighteen years was engaged in the insurance business, in the counties of Lapeer, Genesee, Oakland, Macomb and St. Clair. When he came to Michigan in 1833, he found himself in Detroit with a wife and child to support, and with but a shilling in his pocket; but, by energy and perseverance, he now ranks as one of the substantial farmers of his township. He was married in 1830 to Miss Lucy Gillett, who was born in Greene County, N. Y., near the Catskill Mountains. They have raised a family of ten children. W. BUTTERFIELD was born in Genesee County, N. Y., in 1832, and in 1852 came to Utica, Macomb County, Mich., thence to Lapeer in 1871, and purchased the farm he now resides upon, which is located on section 9. His farm is well improved, and his buildings are substantial and in keeping. Mr. Butterfield has filled the office of township treasurer two years. Was married in 1858 to Miss Martha Hotham, they have two children. ELI COLLINS was born in Yorkshire, England, in 1806, and emigrated to the United States in June, 1850, coming directly to Lapeer County, Mich., and located on section 29, of the township of Lapeer, where he has since resided. Mr. Collins has been a hard working man, having cleared up the greater part of his farm which is now classed with the best. He was married in 1831 to Miss Fanny Nailer, who died in 1849; was again married in 1850 to Miss Elizabeth Winterburn, and they have had four daughters, three of whom are school teachers. O. B. PIKE was born in Monroe County, N. Y., in 1824, and came to Livingston County, Mich., in 1842. He followed threshing for a season, and in 1844 went to Saginaw, and was in the employ of James Fraser, who built the Fiaser House in Bay City. Returning to Monroe County in 1847 he purchased a farm, and was engaged in farming until 1852, when he went to Ohio and bought a steam saw-mill, which he operated till 1856, when he again came to Lapeer and engaged in farming. In 1865 he purchased the farm he now owns on section 17. He was married in 1846 in Saginaw to Miss Mary Ann Eastman. They have two sons and five daughters. Mr. Pike has held the office of highway commissioner for the township of Lapeer three years. WILLIAM H. LOUKS was born in Canada, in 1829, moved to Illinois in 1853 and was engaged in farming and lumbering till 1873, when he came to Otsego County, Michigan, and engaged in lumbering, and is still in that business. In 1881 came to Lapeer and bought the farm he now lives on which is on section 9. He also owns farms on sections 10, 15 and 16; lie has a fine farm and i - I V -I =t S 1C I -A I v

Page  56 I& a I - i 5G HtISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY elegant buildings. Married in 1851, to Agnes Gray; they have five children, Adam, Jane, Ellen, William and Mary. GEORGE C. TRIPP, deceased, was born March 2, 1805, in New York, came to Lapeer, Lapeer County, Micl., in 1846, and settled on section 35, cleared up his farm, and soon after came to Lapeer, built a saw-mill on his own farnm on the south branch of Flint River; be lived on the farm till his death in 1854. Married in 1824 to Harriet Beeman who died in 1843; they had eight children. JOHNL. TRIPP was born in New York, March 14, 1833, came to Lapeer with his parents in 1846, and has always lived on the old farm of 160 acres on section 35; has been engaged in farming since his father's death, and ran the saw-mill till 1877. Married April 10, 1857, to Sarah A. Dailey, who died March 29, 1883; they had two children, Libbie, now Mirs. Herand, and Frederick A. HENRY DoDDs, deceased, was born in Lyons, Wayne County, N. Y., in 1810, and came to Lapeer County in 1851. He settled on section 11 in the township of Lapeer, where he purchased a farm upon which his soil, John H. Dodds, now resides. He engaged exclusively in farming until his death, which occurred in 1874. He was married in 1834 to Miss Diantha Gray, who was born in Brandon, Vt., in 1813. They had six children, of whom Williali lost his life in the army. JOHN H. DODDS was born in Lyons, Wayne County, N. Y., in 1850, and came to Lapeer with his parents in 1851, remaining at home until the death of his father, and has since managed the farm. He was mnarried in 1879 to Miss Sarah M. Miller. The~y have one child. ALPHEus ROOD, deceased, was born in Lapeer, Lapeer County, May 10, 1889. His father, Aaron Rood, came to Lapeer from Vermont in an early day, locating land near Lapeer City to give each of his sons a good farm. Alpheus was born oil the farm where his widow and family now reside, and after becoming of age engaged in farming until his death, Julie 30, 187^5. He was the second white child born in the township of Lapeer. Wias married in December, 1863, to Miss Martha E. Goss, by whoul he had six children: Frank G., Ward O., John R., Blanche, who died in 1871, Dwight A., and Mary E. Mrs. Rood was born in Greene County, N. Y., August 18, 1838, and was the daughter of Nicholas Goss. He came to the township of Arcadia in 1837, and located 36;0 acres of land-and in 1848 came with his family to reside permanently. Mrs. Rood now resides on the farm where her husband died, on section 10..WILLIAM BROOKS WAS born in Canada in 1838, and in 1861 came to Burnside and purchased a farm, where be resided until 1870, when he camse to Lapeer and bought a farm on section 11, where he now resides. He was married in 1866 to l!iss Caroline Gage, daughter of George Gage, one of the first settlers of Lapeer, They have a family of four children. She was born oin the farm where she now resides. C. T. DEAN WAS born in Hamilton, Northumberlalld County, Ontario, in 1849, and came to Pontiac, Mfich., in 1861; thence to the village of Lapeer in May, 1862. He. resided there until 1865 when be located in the township on section 4, where he has since been engaged in farming, with the exception of one year he was in the Lapeer express office, and one year traveling for a Cincinnati safe company. He was married in February, 1875, to Miss Delia Owen, who was born in New York, and has four children. FRANCIS FOWLER, deceased, was born in Onondaga County, N. Y., October 12, 1805, and came to Lapeer in 1836. He settled on section 14, where he cleared up a farm, and also worked at the stone mason trade. He was married May 12, 1839, to Miss Laura Woodard, who was born in New York. Mr. Fowler's death occurred September 6, 1871, and Mrs. Fowler's March 9, 1874. They left six children. F. E. FOWLER was born in the township of Lapeer, May 15, 1842. He worked at the carpenter's trade until the death of his father in 1871, since which time he and his brother have worked the homestead. He was married in 1874, and has two children. A. C. RUSSELL was born in HuLntington, Vt., April 14, 1810. Moved to St. Lawrence County with his parents il 1816, where he remained until 1871. He then came to Lapeer and purchased a farm on section 14, where he now resides. February 2.5, 1831, he was married to Miss Eliza Higley who died November 15, 1873. They raised a family of eight ehildren, losing two sons il the late war. L. J. RUSSELL was born in St. Law2rence County, N. Y., in 1847, remaining there until 1868, when he came to Lapeer, and has sinee been engaged in farming and lumbering. Since 1872 he has resided on his farm on section 14. He was married in 1876 to Miss Mary Norley, and has three children. FRANCIS RUBY was born in Hume, Allegany Coulty, N. Y., in 1828, and came to Shelby, Macomnb County, Mich., with his parents, in 1835. He remained there until 1868, when he came to Lapeer City, where he was the proprietor and owner of a liquor store till 1877. He then purchased a farm and saw-mill on section 22, which he has since owned and conducted. In 1846 he married Miss Elizabeth Casler, and has three children. IRA PECK, deceased, was born in Connectictlt Decemtber 5, 1805, and when a child moved to Cortland County with his parents. He came to Oakiland County, Mich., in 1835, and the following year to Lapeer, where he settled on section 11, remaining there several years, when he removed to section 24, where be resided until his death March 14, 1865. Was killed by being caught in the belt of a saw-mill. He was married September 10, 1832, to Miss Sarah Anil Simmons, who was born in Steventown, Rensselaer County, N. Y.', April 17, 1818. They had six children, George S., who died May 11, 1856, Miles G., Jerome T., who died May 31, 1849, Sarah A., William J., and John S. MILES G. PECKwBas born in Cortland County, N. Y., February 8, 1835, and came to Lapeer in 1836. He has since been a resident of the township, and has a farm n l section 24. He wvas married in 1862 to Miss Mary Harris, and has four children. CHARLES HARRIS, deceased, was born in Liverpool, England, i 1792, and came to Hudson, N. Y., ill 1822. IHe came to Lapeer in 1841, and settled on section 26, where he remained until his death in 1856. Twenty-one years of his life he was captain of a vessel on the ocean. In 1832 he married Miss Sophia Gardner, by whom he had six children. GARDNER J. HARRIS, son of Charles Harris, was born sin HudSO11, N. Y., in February, 1839, and came to Lapeer with his parents in 1841. He managed the farm after his father's death until his own, which occurred February 4, 1882. He was married in 1861 to Miss Hulda A. Broolks, a native of Canada, by whom he had two children. David Brooks, her father, came to Lapeer' from Canada in 1843, and settled on section 24, residing there until 1860, when be went to Missouri, where he remained until his death in 1872. GEORGE P. CHAPMAN was born in C~anada in 1834, and camne to Lapeer, September, 1861, remaining a year, when he engaged in lumbering near Saginaw. In 1869 he purchased a farm on section 14, where he now resides. Since coming to the State has been engaged in lumbering and farming, and now owns a fine farm upon which there are excellent buildings. He was married in 1866 to Miss Julia E. Higley, and has seven children. P- K +

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Page  57 4 i -m_I I i i 3 a I....! -4 I I HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 57 -~~ ff -- I CITY OF LAPEER. The history of Lapeer City properly begins with the location of the county seat in 1830, as already narrated in the opening chapter. Two years previous a settlement had been made in the present town of Almont, and a few families had made little clearings and were contending for a scanty subsistence by making shingles. A chapter of early history is contributed by Miss Nettie A. Cornstock, secretary of the County Pioneer Society, which is given as follows: Early in the summer of 1831, Messrs. A. N. and O. B. Hart and J. B. Morse came to Michigan with a view of purchasing land, and making homes in what was then the far West. Mr. O. B. Hart had his mind made upon Oakland County, Mr. Morse upon what was then known as the Grand River country, just opened to settlement by the survey of a wagon road from Detroit to Chicago. Mr. A. N. Hart was ready to go to the place that seemed to hold out the greatest inducements to the settler. Meeting in Utica, N. Y., Messrs. A. N. Hart and Morse agreed to a companionship in the search for lands, and came to Pontiac, and while here, by the representations of Judge Leroy, they visited the wilderness site of the future county of Lapeer. They were charmed with the location, but wishing to see more of the country before purchasing, they returned and started for the distant Grand River country. The journey was most tiresome and they saw nothing in their travels that pleased them as well as the place they first visited. So they agreed to return to Lapeer, and this time they were accompanied by a Mr. Pratt, and Mr. O. B. Hart. Mr. Hart was as much pleased with the location as his brother and Mr. Morse had been, and they at once decided to cast their lot here; Mr. Pratt would look farther. On this visit the party encamped under a large elm, and also had the misfortune to melt the bottom from their coffee-pot. The Harts and Morse, who had decided to return and bring their families with them, very naturally wished to mark the spot. A roguish son of Mr. Morse, who had accompanied them on this expedition, and in whom Mr. A. N. Hart, who was much younger than his companions, and not at all averse to a good joke, found a most congenial companion, proposed that they should bury the useless tin at the foot of the tree with appropriate ceremonies, and this was accordingly done by himself and Mr. A. N. Hart. They raised as high a mound about it as they well could that they might know the spot when they returned. This tree is still standing on the Hart property, carefully guarded as an ancient landmark. Messrs. O. B. Hart and Morse, who had large families, and several small children, decided to postpone their removal until spring, as it was so late it would be impossible to provide the necessaries of life for them that season. Mr. A. N. Hart, whose family consisted of himself, a wife and one child, concluded to remove at once. In November, 1831, the family, accompanied by Mr. J. M. Palmer, reached Lapeer. Messrs. Hart and Palmer cut the road through from the Whittemore Plains, in Oakland County, using for that purpose an old-fashioned, two-bitted ax, which was carefully preserved by Mr. Palmer as long as he lived. This was the era of wild speculation in Western lands. Imaginary cities and towns were platted on paper, often in most impossible locations, as the middle df lakes and morasses, and literally in the howling wilderness, and these plats were often sold at immense figures. But the speculators were obliged to enter into some bona fide transactions, in order to keep the ball moving; so every inducement was held out to emigrants to settle and so open the country. Judge Leroy had purchased a portion of the present city of Lapeer, hence his efforts to induce immingration. At this time Lapeer, though one of the counties laid out and named in 1822, had no 4 i population whatever save a few isolated families in the township of Almont. As might have been expected this bubble soon burst. Soon after the return of Mr. A. N. Hart to Utica, N. Y., for his family, the Pontiac Mill Co. began to build a saw-mill on Farmers Creek, a little above where Muir's flouring-mill stood, and put up a boarding shanty for the hands. This rude boarding-house was managed by a Mrs. Potter, who was probably the first white woman to visit Lapeer. About the first of November, 1831, Mr. J. R. White came to Lapeer and bought an interest in the mill then building. This done, he returned to New York for his wife and reached Lapeer with her in December, 1831, about a month after the arrival of the Harts and Palmer. Some time during the winter, Dr. NM. Y. Turrill came with his Kvife and aged father and mother. In March, 1832, Mr. O. B. Hart arrived-Mr. Morse in May following, and about the same time Mr. Alvin McMaster and wife. *These first families were not long here'alone. In a short time J. R. White was followed by his mother, brothers and sisters; Dr. Turrill by his sisters, and their families; and the Roods, who came soon after, by a goodly number of their kindred and friends. These were all of Puritan, New England stock, and had inherited the grim resolution of their forefathers, but brought up in widely separated communities, and of opposite views in politics. Very soon disagreements arose. Interests clashed, political animosities were aroused, and these were carried to such a pitch that the prosperity of the new commonwealth was seriously compromised. Some of these quarrels were concerning what would be, in this age of the world, most trifling matters. Others were of more real consequence, as men have always shown more or less a disposition to overreach each other. Perhaps the first disagreements among the early settlers here grew out of cutting and drawing the hay from a large marsh on the town line four miles south of the embryo city. This belonged to the government and supplied an article of prime necessity to the settlers, a coarse article of hay for their teams and cows. Every man who had need cut as much hay as he could, and stacked it on the marsh to await a hard frost, which would enable him to draw it home. When it came, the first man on the ground, not more honest perhaps than he should be, took as much hay as he could, without regard to the rights of his neighbors, who would very naturally resent such proceedings. Mr. L. D. Morse relates a circumstance of this kind affecting his father and himself: In December, 1833, Alonzo, the oldest son of J. B. Morse, a promising young man about nineteen years of age, suddenly died, the first death in the settlement. The father was at Detroit working at his trade (a carpenter and joiner) when his son sickened and died, and he was obliged to return to his work immediately after the funeral to win bread for his famlily. Like their neighbors- they had cut hay on the marsh the preceding summer, but by reason of the sickness and death of the son and brother, had been unable to secure their share of the hay as soon as they should, when a neighbor, taking advantage of Mr. Morse's absence, on finding that Lorenzo, who was now the oldest son and head of the family, the father being away, was about to draw off their share of the hay, forbade him to touch it at his peril, claiming it as his own. Young Morse felt the situation keenly. Everything now depended upon his exertions, and being determined not to see their two cows starve before his eyes, he went to J. M. Palmner for aid and advice. Mr. Palmer advised him to go at once and draw off the hay, and prolmised him all the assistance in his power. Morse and Palmer inmmediately started for the fodder, each with an ox team, closely followed by the neighbor, who threatened them with all the terrors of the law if they touched as much as a spear of the hay. Nothing daunted by these menaces, on arriving at the marsh I i - r -_t *T Po1 ( I I 0 i -- + r X_____~_ --- — -----— 8 — -j -' —j1

Page  58 ----— _- - 58 I C_ 58 HISTORY OF L XPEER COUNTY. l they began the work of loading the hay upon their wagons at once. Palmer, who was a stalwart specimen of manhood, holding their antagonist completely at bay, and thus they secured the fodder. So many combats grew out of such transactions, that the marsh received the name of Squabble Meadow, which it bears to this day. Somne few years later, about 1839, or 1840, two men named McLellan and Smith, one very hot day ill July, entered into a contest to see which could cut the most hay, with terrible and fatal results, Smith dying the next day, and McLellan two days after from heat and over-exertion. Soon after the first settlement of Lapeer, a Congregational Church was formed to which the Rev. Messrs. Wells and Ruggles, pioneer preachers of Oakland County, preached occasionally, Mr. Ruggles generally walking to his appointments, of which he had as many as any Methodist Episcopal circuit rider of that day. Mr. Wells is said to have held the first service in the new town. This was followed by the organization of Methodist and Presbyterian Churches, and in time the Presbyterian Church absorbed the Congregational. The Presbyterian and Methodist Churches, with all the changes of time, have steadily grown with the growth of the town. Deacon Aaron Rood, whose praise is still in the church, was one of the leading members of the Presbyterian Church, his son, Orvis Rood, and others, of the Methodist Episcopal Church. We believe the first Methodist quarterly meeting held in Lapeer County was called some time in 1835 by Rev. E. H. Pilcher, presiding elder. There was a wonderful increase of population in those days, and county and village were consequently elated. Business houses were formed, lumbering began on a large scale for those days.' Mr. J. R. White soon bought the whole of the saw-mill, owned by himself and the Pontiac Mill Co., and Mr. Alvin McMaster built another soon after, on the southeast quarter of section 8, Lapeer Township. The era of speculation was not yet over, and great railroad lines were being surveyed all over the State, and one of these prospective lines, the " Northern," was to pass through Lapeer. This was surveyed in 1837, but six years after Messrs. Hart and Palmer cut that fourteen miles of road through an unbroken wilderness, and only five years after a road had been authorized by the territorial government from Lapeer to Rochester (1832). Wildcat money was plenty with a bank of circulation in every hamlet, and every one felt rich. It was not long before the collapse of the wildcat banks but lumbering still went on, and at one time lumber and shingles supplied to some extent the place of money, and became almost as much a legal tender in the payment of- debts as specie. So lumber and shingles became known in the adjoining counties as "Lapeer currency." Lapeer at that time consisted of two hamlets separated by a tamarack swamp, where the wolves were wont to convene of winter nights, and make the woods ring with their dismal howlings. Below this swamp was built the first court-house, which was burnt before its entire completion, and the jail, A. N. Hart's store, the present Watkins building, and on the site of Hart's block, 0. B. Hart had put a hotel of a hundred feet front. Next was a small store building, and directly on the corner O. M. Evans, a prominent business man of those times, had put up a store, a really beautiful wooden building, and finished it ready for plastering. The Evans family occupied rooms over the store. In the spring of 1840 Evans had gone to New York for goods, his wife accompanying him, leaving Miss Caroline Wheeler in charge of their rooms, and a little girl they had adopted. While matters were in this state, one Sunday morning Miss Wheeler was'suddenly awakened from her slumbers by the cry of fire. She sprang from her bed to find the building in flames, and arousing the sleeping child she managed with much difficulty to get her down the stairs and out of the building. This disaster was the financial ruin of Evans, who soon after left Lapeer, returned to the East and afterward emigrated to California. The cause of the fire was supposed to be a spark from the stove pipe catching in a heap of shavings carelessly left in an unoccupied loom in too close proximity to the stove pipe; not by any means the first or last building consumed by similar carelessness. This fire, though by no means the first that had visited the new town, was a terrible blow to its prosperity, and from this and the collapse of the wildcat banks and land speculation Lapeer did not recover for many years. The first mill built by the Pontiac Mill Co., was burned in 1833, but another was soon after put up a little below the former site, and some little time after this, the double log house built by O. B. Hart had been burnt, and almost everything in it had been consumed. O. B. Hart had kept a hotel almost from his first settlement in Lapeer, but after this conflagration he settled down to farming in which he was very successful until his death in 1841. Another prominent man of the early times was Frank Fowler, who afterwards removed from the village to a farm about five miles southeast where he amassed a large property, and died in 1871. Above this tamarack swamp, and test and south of it, was a store built on the corner near the former site of the Opera House Block, by Butts and Shafer, the houses of J. R. and Phineas White, Dr. Turrill and others, the mill and the school-house. Indeed, while the lower part of the town has always clung to the courthouse and jail, and dispensed law and justice to the commonwealih, the upper town has always held the school-house. In the early times here as in all new settlements the schoolhouse served also as church and town hall. Some time after the great fire, and about the time of the Mormon establishment at Nauvoo, a Mormon preacher named VanDusen, disguised as a Methodist minister, introduced himself into a series of meetings the Methodists were holding in the school-house. This wolf in sheep's clothing did not dare to throw off his mask until he had wrought the minds of his hearers up to such a pitch of excitement that they were prepared to accept him as an oracle acting under the direct inspiration of the Almighty, and as such, any excesses he might commit would not only be tolerated but approved by his deluded followers; and to such a pitch did he carry these excesses, that it is said it was not unusual for him to alarm everybody with the cry of fire late at night, and on being questioned as to the locality, to answer, "In hell for lost sinners." Of course the more sober portion of the community were intensely disgusted, and the irrepressible mischief-making spirit of Young America fully aroused. One evening, some time after the congregation had assembled the candles all went out one after another, each with a slight explosion, and a suspicious odor of brimstone. The meeting was broken up for that night, an investigation had, and the mystery explained. During the previous day the house had been entered and a part of each candle cut off and the candlestick filled with wet and dry powder wrapped in paper to imitate the candles, and a piece of candle carefully placed over it so that as soon as the candle had burned down to the candlestick an explosion followed. Encouraged by this success, the boys contrived to bore a hole in the floor and send paper wads filled with powder among the congregation by means of an infernal machine, rigged under and outside the house, and operated from without. On another occasion one of the young mischief makers dressed up as an old woman and came to the meeting, seating himself by the side of Miss Jane Vosburgh. Miss V., not recognizing her companion, began an investigation in which she was joined by several other young ladies sitting near. At last, becoming weary of playing at propriety, he assumed a very masculine position, and in so doing, displayed a good sized pair of stoga __ r e

Page  59 -ir~ 6 I i~ I I HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. boots. Tlis wvas followed by an attempt on the part of one of the young ladies to raise the old lady's veil, when le fled, jumping over seats and benches, no doubt, il his hasty retreat to th e door, presenting a similar appearance to Jeff. Davis in his last ditch. Although the reliable portion of the community frowned upon the pranks of young America, they were not disposed to favor the extravagance of Van Dusen and his followers, and when he threw off the mask and began to publish the dogmas of Joe Smith, many who at first had confided 'in him withdrew in disgust. Still he retained many followers, a few of whom followed him to Nauvoo. Van Dusen did not remain with the Mormons long, however; he withdrew and published an exposition of the iniquities of M ormonism which obtained a large circulation. Tile M ormon Church he organized at Lapeer soon fell to pieces, its members becoming utterly disgusted with the whole system of imposture. This was, we believe, the last appearance of Mormonis m il Lapeer. In these early times, the Indians were often extremely abusive to ti e wives of the settlers. They seldom came to the houses except to trade when the men were at home, but they would come in their absence, and terrify the women and children if they could. They seemed really afraid of a courageous and resolute woman, and reserved their taunts and abuse only for the timid and irresolute. X In 1832 a Methodist preacher named Frazie paid a few visits to Lapeer, but his delineations of hell fire were so extremely vivid, and his denulnciations of that terrible punisht ent were so unusual and personal that it gave great offense to the young men, and they treated him so rudely that he left them. He afterwurd went to Kentuckv. BIOGRAPHICAL REMINISCENCES. Alvin N. Hart was'born in Cornwall, Conn., February 11, 1804. He resided with his parents on the farni until he was fifteen years of age. He received his education in the academy of Sharon, Connecticut, and at the college in Amherst, Mass., finishing it in the latter institution. He was married il Utica, N. Y., July 8, 1828, to Miss Charlotte F. Ball, daughter of the late Dr. Benjamin Ball, of Wendell, Franklin County, Mass. Residing at Utica for three years, he then removed to the Territory of Michigan. Mir. Hart cut lis way fourteen miles through the forest to his point of destination, locating and beginning his pioneer life where the city of Lapeer low stands. He camped under a large elm tree, which is still standing, a respected landmark. His son, R. G. Hart, has placed upon it a lightning-rod to protect it from further destruction by lightning. He built the first building (a log cabin) in that vicinity, and moved into it November 11, 1831, with his family, consisting of his wife and child, the present B. E. Hart, of Lansing, and Joel M. Palmer, now dead. In the spring of 1832 Mr. Hart was appointed sheriff of Lapeer County, and at the election in the fall of 1835, in:which the constitution of the new State was submitted and adopted, lie,was elected a representative to the State legislature. In 1842 he was elected supervisor of Lapeer Township, and held the office for the succeeding seven years. In 1843 Mr. Hart was elected State senator from the sixth senatorial district, which then comprised the counties of Lapeer, Oakland, Genesee, Shiawassee, Tuscola, Saginaw and the Upper Peninsula. In 1846 he was elected the first judge of the Lapeer County court for a term of four years, and i 1847 he was again elected to the State senate to fill the. vacancy occatsioned byy the death of Senator Witherbee, and re-elected in 1848 for the regular term. He buried his wife in August, 1850, having previously turied three daughters while young, and afterward one son, I anforth A. Hart, who died April 21, 18,53, at the age of twentyone. His surviving children are B. E. Hart, of Lansing; R. G. Hart, of Lapeer; Mrs. Bell Hamlilton and Artll ur N. Hart, of Lansing. In 1856 he was again elected a justice of th e peace. In 1860 he removed to the city of Lannsina, and in 1863 was elected member of the common council, a position which h e held at the time of his death. Il 1870 0 h e was elected a representative from Ingham County to the State legislature, and materially aided in Securing the appropriation which was made for the erection of the new State capitol now almost completed. He was a n an of great energy, earnest in all his purposes, a clear and careful politician, ever holding the public interest as a sacred duty. He always took a lively interest in all matters pertaining to the development and growth of his city and county. His advice and opinions were m uch sought in the councils of both, and he contributed freely and generously to every enterprise tending to their prosperity and welfare. He was one of the projectors of that portion of the Amboy, Lansing & Traverse Bay Railroad, running from Lansing to Owosso, and was a director in the Detroit & Bay City Railroad. He was a consistent member of the Presbyterian denomination, being one of the founders of the flourishing church of that sect in Lapeer, and also of the one in North Lansing. His death occurred Augnust 22, 1874. From the many tributes to his memory that appeared in the publllc journals at that timne, we copy the following from the Detroit T7'Iee Pre.Ss, which says, editorially: i (The telegraph brought news Saturday of the death of Judge Alvin N. Hart, of Lansing, a man well known in almost every section of the State. His disease was typhoid pneumonia, and lie died within one week from the first active symptoms of the disease, though lie had not been i: good health for some time previous. -( The deceased was seventy years of age, and had resided in Lansing for nearly a score of years, cooling there from Lapeer, where lie had long been a resident. He was a pioneer in Lansing, and as such' he dic much. to hasten the growth of the city. No private character could be more blameless than his, and his public record gave satisfaction even to those who were his political opponerks. He served two terms in the State senate many years agro, and two terms in the house, his last being in 1871. It was through his efforts more than any other person that Lansing was furnished with railroad communication, and his liberalitv in making local improvements has greatly benefited the capital city. He had been a member of the common council almost uninterruptedly since the organization of that body, and death could not halve taken one who will be more missed in Lansing. He was a life-long Democrat, holding rigidly to his views without pressing them upon others, and he was well known to Michigan politicians. He leaves.two sons and a dauLlteL at Lansing, and another soll at Lapeer, and all estate worth half a tillion dollars." From a Lapeer correspondent to the TF'ee Precls: -s The funeral of tile late Judge A. N. Hart took place at Lapeer on Tuesday, and the high estimation in which the deceased stood in the community was manifested by the concourse that collected to see the last of this good man who had done so much for the city of Lapeer, where he was the first settler. His remains were brought from Lansing. The mayor and common council of Lansing and the Odd Fellows accompanied the remains to Lapeer, and a special car draped in mourning conveyed them through. T23ey were met at Lapeer by thle mayor and common council of the city, and numerous other friendcs of the deceased. The stores we're all closed and draped in mourning. The court-house which the judge built, and the strong pillars by which it is supported, were entwined in mourners' garb. State Street was crowded to excess as the long procession moved to the Presbyterian Churcl, where the service was performed by Rev. Mir. Foster. The singing was n I I i I -1 i I - I I I I Vr, -l r

Page  60 Ale, 1 Hart: Ii 60 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. most exceedirgly touching, Mrs. Vincent being the organist, Miss Hicks, S. N. Vincent, Benjamin Loder and Mr. Phillips the vocal part. The lofty tree that overlooks the city, under which the judge pitched his tent, received its full share of crape. It was here where the bears and wolves howled around him in the wilderness, and he had no road to escape until the woodman's ax could make it. The judge has now gone to his last home, where he will be rewarded for the good he has done on earth." At a meeting of the State Pioneer Society, Judge Albert Miller, of Bay City, paid the following tribute to the memory of Judge Hart: "Although we see before us so many pioneers in the vigor of health and usefulness, we must remember that time is fast thinning our ranks; the frequent notices we see in the newspapers of our State of the death of some early settler of a particular locality is a verification of this statement, and the shaft of death has fallen very near to us by removing from our midst our worthy treasurer, the Hon. Alvin N. Hart. "And here perhaps I may be indulged in relating a reminiscence of early days, referring to the time of my first acquaintance with our late treasurer. Mr. Hart settled at the county seat of Lapeer in the fall of 1831; I had previously settled in that portion of the same county which was afterward detached to help form Genesee County. Although we were neighbors (living only about thirty miles apart), I never met Mr. Hart till the spring of 1834. In the meantime I had removed to Saginaw, and the settlement of the country had progressed so that the county of Lapeer had been organized into a separate township. That portion of territory which afterward formed Genesee County had been organized into a township named Grand Blanc, and the township of Saginaw had been organized, all in Oakland County. The subject of forming a State g overnm ent had been mooted, and in April, 1834, delegates were elected to form a State constitution. At that election the town of Saginaw cast about twenty votes, and I was appointed by the board of inspectors to return the votes to the county seat and to be one of the county canvassers. I started on a pony to perform the journey of seventy miles, over or through a road that had as much depth as width. From Flint I was accompanied by Judge Snow, who had the same appointment from the town of Grand Blanc. "The board of canvassers, which met at Pontiac, consisted of seven members, who represented all the organized territory in northern Michigan (except the counties of Ma-kinac and Chippewa), and Alvin N. Hart was chosen chairman. I then formed an acquaintance with Mr. Hart which ripened into a friendship, and which lasted till time, with him, was no more. It is not necessary here to recount the many prominent positions of honor and trust which have been accorded to Mr. Hart by the citizens of Michigan, or his many acts which have served to develop the resources and promote the interests of the State, for the name of Alvin N. Hart is as familiar as household words to the pioneers of Michigan, especially those of the northern portion of the State. "In taking a view of the past at the time when this whole region of country was a vast wildernrss, inhabited only by wild beasts of the forest and the aborigines of the country, with here and there a hardy pioneer struggling to overcome the privations incident to a life in the wilderness, and then rapidly glancing to the present, seeing the same region rife with life and industry and all the appliances that conduce to the prosperity and happiness of mankind, it seems as if the whole scene had been transformed by magic; but upon taking a more detailed review of the past, I am constrained to believe that very much of the prosperity and happiness of the present is due to the foresight, energy, industry, and good example of a class of pioneers of which the late Alvin N. Hart was a type." EARLY INCIDENTS. Noah H. Hart, speaking of early days in Lapeer, says: "The happiest days of our lives were our pioneer days in Lapeer. We were all patricians and all plebeians. The latch-string of every cabin was always out. If one had pork and beans, all had pork and beans. All strangers were greeted with a welcome and cordiality unknown at the present day. To the church or social gathering s we all went in the same vehicle, and it mattered not whether drawn by oxen or horses. The fond anticipations of future improvements, prosperity and grandeur overbalanced and made easy all hardships and privations. That they were necessarily incident to a pioneer life, cannot be told, and can only be understood by actual experience. I will try to give you one or two samples. "The first battle between a pioneer and a pack of wolves was in this wise:-The name of the pioneer was the Hon. A. N. Hart, the names of the wolves I have forgotten. The Judge left Lapeer for Pontiac for supplies. Among other things he put on to his load a quarter of fresh beef. Having arrived within two and a half miles of home, although it was very dark and the road being only underbrushed out, and consequently very winding, lie was flattering himself that h e would be with his family, enjoying a delcious beefsteak, when, to his utter horror, h e had the strongest evidences in the world that a pack of wolves were after him or his beef. He urged his team with whip and yells a short distance, when he brought up against a tree. The enemy immediately surrounded him and demanded a surrender. Their 'eyes, like so many fireballs, were anything but agreeable. The Judge comprehended the situation at once. He had sagacity enough to know that the wolves would prefer the beef to himself, but the beef h e determined h e never would sunrender, for in those dlays beef was more precious than gold. The Judge resolved to throw overboard flour, feed, in short, the whole load except the beef, and make one terrible effort to extricate himself from the tree. Having discharged the load except the beef, with a crack of the whip, a yell and a haw, h e broke loose and came through triumphantly. The wolves were so astonished and taken by surprise by the performance that they retired from the field in disgust. The Judge said to me, very confidentially, a few days after, 'If you ever undertake to bring fresh beef from Pontiac, make your arrangements so as to come through by daylight.' "The necessary expenses in obtailning everything, even the necessaries of life, were tenfold greater than dreamed of by the pioneer when he left his Eastern home. For instance, I left Lapeer early one Monday morning with two pair of oxen and fifteen bushels of grain in my wagon to go to mill. I had my choice between Pontiac, Auburn and Rochester, where grinding could be done. I arrived at Pontiac about sundown the second day out, and was informed that my turn would come in about a week. I then proceeded to Auburn and was informed that they might possibly reach my case in about four days. I then made for Rochester, and, on arriving there, zreceived the gratifying intelligence that my grist should be ground within twenty-four hours, provided there was no break-down. I arrived home Saturday night and was rejoiced to learn that the family had not starved during my absence. "Joel M. Palmer, at a very early day, put on a freight line between here and Detroit. His charges were very reasonable —only one dollar per 100 pounds, and a small commission for time and trouble in filling your order. My father sent by him for a barrel of one-hog pork. I say one-hog pork, for you must recollect that we could not afford, in those days, so great a luxury as mess pork. The pork was duly delivered and the bill accompanying the same read as follows: Y_ _ __ _ __ _ _ __ __ _ b_ _ "An -- '-":07 -— V ~r r

Page  61 - L - -- 6 I I HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 61 _ " 0O. B. HART, Dr. to one barrel one-hog pork, $32.00."' On opening the barrel we discovered two heads, two tails, etc. My father very dryly remarked that he could plainly see why it cost so much; it was two-hog pork.. "Politics became an element of interest and excitement at an early day. And as another evidence of the great hardships of a pioneer life, permit me to inform you that the county of Lapeer was originally attached to Pontiac for judicial and representative purposes. For instance, soon after the county seat was established, it became necessary that a route should be selected and the trees blazed for a road from Pontiac here, and our worthy and venerable citizen, Isaac I. Voorheis, was one of the commissioners who performed that task. "The first election I have any recollection of, was a township election held at Pontiac. Col. J. R. White, having been appointed justice of thle peace by the territorial government, very naturally wanted a constable in order to make the office a paying institution. He went to Pontiac and secured the nomination of Asahel Hubbard, then a resident here, as one of the constables. I had friends there who, unbeknown to me, put my name upon their ticket and the result was I was elected. The Colonel did not exactly like this, so he hastened to Lapeer and immediately called on my mother to ascertain how old I was. She frankly told. him I was not yet twenty-one years of age. On being notified of my election I called on the Colonel to qualify. He politely informed me that he could not do it; that I was ineligible to the office. Not willing to see the will of the people defeated, I mounted my pony and went to Pontiac to qualify. Judge LeRoy signed my bond. Gideon O. Williams. Esq., administered the oath of office and instructed me to go and file my papers with James A. Weeks, township clerk. I presented my papers to Mr. Weeks and asked him to approve and file them. He said he did not know whether he would or not; that he had received a letter from Col. White, of Lapeer; that I was a minor and not eligible to the office, and asked me how old I was. I told him to ask my constituents, and again asked him if he could file my papers. He replied:,I suppose I will have to.' I discharged the duties of the office during the ensuing year, over a district of country including Oakland, Lapeer, Genesee and Shiawassee Counties and the Saginaw Valley. The pioneers to this place brought with them their religious principles. They were not unmindful of their obligations to God, in whom they put their trust and relied for life, health and prosperity. [he first religious services within my recollection took place in the open air near where the Abram House now stands. The church edifice was a pine tree. The congregation was seated on the fallen trees and a sermon was read by grandfather Turrill. The singing was conducted by Minor Y. Turrill and wife and Hon. A. N. Hart. The first sermon preached in Lapeer by a minister of the gospel, was by the Rev. Wells, of Troy, Oakland County, The singing the same as above mentioned with the addition of Asahel W. Abbott. A long metre hymn was given out, and they sang that good old favorite tune called Wells. The second hymn was long metre too, and the minister remarked, 'I do not think we can do any better than to try Wells again.' " RIVAL VILLAGES. It is not frequent that a county is so fortunate as to have two court-houses built for it by private individuals, but such was the case in Lapeer, the circumstances of which have already been told. This contest did not concern the county at large so much as the interests of two rival village sites. The White interests centered in the southwest quarter of section 5, and here they platted a village and called it Whitesville. The Hart interest was in the northeast quarter of the same section. The contest between the two interests was most determined and more or less bitter. That it should be determined was legitimate, and it was only natural that such a spirit of determination should become flavored with bitterness. It nowhere appears that the material interests of the public suffered by reason of this rivalry; on the contrary, a court-house was provided by one party and a school building by the other, and so far the public derived material benefits. The final location of a courthouse, however, decided the fates of the two aspirants to village honors, and Whitesville as an independent village ceased to be. The village of Lapeer was platted in March, 1836, acknowledgment being made by Simeon B. Brown, Alvin N. Hart, John Shafer, Mason Butts and Jonathan R. White, platting of their subdivision of west half and northeast quarter of section 5, town 7 north, of range 10 east, except so much as had been subdivided as appeared by the plats of the villages of Lapeer and Whitesville so called on record at the office of the register of Oakland County. On the 14th of March, 1836, an acknowledgement was made by Phineas White and Louisa D. White of the platting of their subdivision of the same tract, with the same exception as in the aforementioned plat. Since that time eight different additions have been made. PIONEER WOMEN. Miss Nettie A. Cometock writes of pioneer women as follows: "If the pioneer fathers exhibited the stern resolution and dogged perseverance of their sons in clearing up these fertile lands and laying the foundations broad and deep that underlie our free institutions, no less praise is due to those faithful wives who so nobly supported them in the trials of their lot. These women were ladies in every sense of the word, some of them had been tenderly reared, and were totally unused to any hardships, all were well educated and had left comfortable homes and all the advantages of good society, yet they accompanied their husbands here, exchanging luxury and comfort for the want of all things; they toiled and cared for their household as best they could; how well they accomplished their task let the present generation declare. When their husbands were weary and desponding, forgetting their own hardships, they encouraged them to persevere in hope of better days. Had they yielded to discouragements as many have done, think you that the labors of their husbands would have been crowned with success? We know they would not, and this fact is so well understood at present, that whatever a man's faults may be, if he is unsuccessful in business and has a wife, the blame is invariably laid at her door; but, on the other hand, if a man is successful in business the wife seldom receives any credit for her labors. So we seldom hear anything of these' pioneer ladies, and many of them are forgotten save in their own family circle. To show that the pioneer mothers were women of more than common stamp, we have taken pains to obtain slight sketches of some of these ladies, of whom, though their husbands have often been mentioned here, few of us have even heard the names. "Mrs. Charlotte Hart, wife of A. N. Hart, was the daughter of Dr. B. F. Ball, of Litcbfield, Conn. On her marriage she removed with her husband to Utica, N. Y., and three years later she accompanied her husband with her babe to the wilds of Michigan. The last fourteen miles of the journey to their new home was through a pathless wilderness, and Messrs. Hart and Palmler were obliged to cut their own road. It was a toilsome route, and the men, weary with their long journey, were well nigh discouraged; but weary as she was, and though tenderly reared and totally unused to labor or hardships, she was equal to the occasion, and as the spirits of her companions sunk she urged them to persevere, and seated in the wagon holding her babe she would drive until obliged to stop for a passage to be cut for the team, and by skillful repartee she cheered them in their difficult task, nor did she suc - - - JF~SI %i

Page  62 I -.0 G) A X l --- - -- a I e J li< 62 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. - cumb when on nearing their new home the wagon stuck fast in the muddy bank of the river and it was found-necessary to abandon the wagon as night had come and go on foot to the log cabin in the wilderness, nothing but a shelter, having no doors or windows, scarcely a protection from storms or the beasts of the forest. This was the spirit of the true pioneer woman, and this cheerful Christian courage a characteristic trait of Mrs. Hart. -"Mrs. Louisa Dexter White, wife of J. R. White, was a woman remarkable for courage and resolution. Her father was a ship builder of Boston, a nephew of Hon. Samuel Dexter, secretary of war -under the administration of John Adamls. By the death of her mother the family was broken up, and Louisa and a younger sister, Emeline, were adopted by a relative and removed to New York City, where they were brought up. Here Louisa married Mr. White, and her sister married a Mr. Cr omar, a wealthy planter residing near Charleston, S. C., and removed there with him. He died soon after and about the time of the slave insurrection of 1831. Mrs. Cromar was unable to leave until this was over, and when she finally reached her friends in New York her mind was so, terribly shattered by the scenes she had passed through that it was found necessary to send her to an insane asylumn for treatment. During her stay there Mrs. White emigrated with her husband to Lapeer, where she and Mrs. Charlotte Hart were for some time alone as regarded the society of their own sex. This was about the time of the Black Hawk war, and the Indians were quite insolent, especially to the women, who were generally afraid of them. This was not so with Mrs. White, who was so resolute in her refusals to their demands that they regarded her with a respect not unmixed with fear. This was before the days of the temperance reform, and the settlers thought it not wrong to sell the Indians the whisky they craved. Mrs. White had more than one combat with drunken Indians in which she invariably ca-me off victorious. One day a drunken Indian came in and declared his intention of taking up his quarters among them, and had alarmed all the other ladies of the family by his demonstrations, when Mrs. White drew a hot frying pan from the fire and laid it about him with such vigor that he was glad to retreat; after this the Indians did not annoy Mrs. White or her family. Some time after Mrs. White's removal to Michigan she returned to New York and brought back with her her sister, Mrs. Cromar, who had in the meantime recovered her reason. In 1836 Mrs. Cromar married Morris Perry, a blacksmith, who worked at his trade while in Lapeer and then took up land in Elba, where he resided until his death in 1844. After this she returned to her friends in Lapeer, and in 1849 married a Mr. Parker; two years later she and her husband went to California. In those days this was a long and hazardous journey, and one which few women dare attempt. Here they resided for some years when they returned to Lapeer. After a time Mr. Parker visited California again, leaving his wife this time with Lapeer friends. He never returned home, dying a short time after his arrival there. His wife remained with her friends in Lapeer until her death about a year since Her life was a most eventful one, and one of great changes, from New York City to a Southern plantation, then a log cabin in the wilderness, a long journey to California) a return to her friends, then a long period of suffering, and the 'weary heart at last grew still.' Mrs. White was remarkable for her courage in opposing all she deemed wrong and her hearty support for the right; she was a fast friend and a true Christian, and few were more heartily respected in life or more sincerely mourned in death than she. "Of Mrs. Alantha Turrill we could learn little; she was a true daughter of New England, but had been delicately reared and possessed none of the cheerful courage of Mrs. Hart or the stern resolution of Mrs. White; but she must have loved her early home, for although she and her husband had long since left Lapeer and formed in a new home associations more congenial to her taste, yet when death drew near their last request was to be laid near their father and mother at their early home. "Mrs. Amanda Hart, wife of 0. B. Hart, was one of those good motherly women revered by every one: she reared h large family, as was the style in those days, and was a faithful helpmeet to her husband; she always had a cheerful welcome for every one, but her world was in her husband and her home. During the sickly season of 1844 herself and her husband fell victims to the terrible malarious fever then prevalent. They sickened about the same time and fears were entertained for the result, and she only expressed the wish that if her husband must die to go with him. On his decease the family, half frantic with grief and anxiety, endeavored to conceal his death from her, but she seemed to understand what had occurred by intuition, and she sank away and died, and, was buried in the same grave with her husband. "Mrs. Betsey Look Morse was a native of Sangerfield, N. Y., a woman of intelligence and refinement, a most affectionate mother and an earnest Christian, and, though very quiet in her demeanor, was fully as resolute and courageous as the more demonstrative Mrs. Louisa White. The Indians feared her as they did Mrs.White, and for the same reason. One day a drunken Indian entered her house in the absence of her husband, and, as usual, was very abusive; Mrs. Morse quietly put the poker into the old-fashioned fireplace,' and when well heated, drew it from the embers and drove the savage out of doors. After this she was known among them as a 'bad squaw,' and consequently respected. "Mrs. White, mother of J. R., Phineas, E. J. and H. K. White, was one of those good Christian women whom 'none name but to praise.' A widow, she came in her old age to seek a home for her children and a grave for herself in the wilderness. "These are but a few of the many noble women who left all behind to follow their husbands to a new home in the wilderness. We have specially mentioned these because they were the first here, but they were only types of the women of the early times who were the founders of our society, the mothers who made those homes and trained their children to habits of industry and thrift. Did not these women leave a far deeper impression upon the present generation than their more worldly husbands? Then all honor to the pioneer women of Lapeer County; but few of them remain with us, soon all will have passed over the river 1" 'To a land unclouded, Where they need no candle or sunbeam, For our God is its changeless light; To a land celestialWhere all former things have departedThe sorrow, the pain and the tears. Where no shadow shall bewilder, Where life's vain parade is o'er; Where the ship of sin is broken, And the dreamer dreams no more; Where the love that here we lavish On the withering leaves of time, Shall have fadeless flowers to fix on, In an ever bright spring clime. There they all shall meet and rest 'Mid the holy and the blest.' " LAPEER POSTOFFICE. About theyear 1833, a postoffice was established at Lapeer and Dr. Minor Turrill was postmaster. He was succeeded by O. B. Hart. Other early postmasters were Silas D. McKeen, Col. J. R. White, Noah H. Hart, Henry Wheelock, N. B. Eldredge, R. G. Hart, U. D. Bristol. The early postoffice was a portable affair, ol,R,-R.",I T, v -1 -% Q )n

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Page  63 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY 63 and frequently inhabited the hat or coat pockets of the postmaster. The postal system was as primitive as the surroundings of its patrons; mail-carriers traveled on foot and postmasters would have found it difficult to tell at the end of the year whether their office had been a source of income or expense. In 1861, Shad. N. Vincent received the appointment of postmaster and held the office until 1883, when he was succeeded by John Abbott, the present incumbent. Mr. Abbott, upon taking the office, proceeded to equip it with all the modern conveniences that are now in use, and the people of Lapeer have thus been provided with greatly improved facilities for receiving their mail. JOHN ABBOTT was born in 1833, in Beauharnois County, C. E. Came to Lapeer in 1856, and engaged in farming and lumbering. In 1868 he was elected register of deeds, and re-elected in 1870; held the office until January 1, 1873. During the time he was register he made a complete abstract of the county records, and since then has been engaged in the abstract and real estate business, also continuing farming. Was appointed postmaster of Lapeer February 27, 1883. Married in 1862 to Alice Connell, of Utica, Mich. They have seven children living —five daughters and two sons. A MIRROR OF THE PAST. A copy of the Plainr Dealer and Lapeer County Denmocrat has survived the ravages of time and is an excellent mirror of the days of 1842. It is dated September 1, 1842, is a five-column folio, yellow with age and ancient in its general appearance. It was published by J. R. Bennett, at $2.00 a year; office, corner Pine and Park streets, and edited by A. Merryweather. There is a good display of advertisers, as follows: 0. M. Evans, A. Merryweather, merchants; Robert Green, justice of the peace, two miles south of Lapeer village; Enoch J. White, justice of the peace, Eagle Tavern; J. S. Comstock, physician and surgeon, Farmer's Creek; Horace Hinman, county treasurer, office in the court-house; John Shafer, sheriff; J. Simmons, Chester E. Hatch, master builders; P. White, keeper of the Eagle Tavern; E. Taylor, R. Gates, tanners and curriers, boot and shoe makers; Henry Haskin, chair maker, section 15, Metamora; Moses Misner, attorney and counsellor at law, office in the court-house; Samuel Tomlinson, coach, wagon and sleighmaker, office on Saginaw Street; "Our House," by E. M. Taylor; Bartow & Thompson, attorneys and counsellors at law and solicitors in chancery, Flint River, Saginaw Street; Caleb Carpenter, physician and surgeon, residence half a mile south of the village of Newbury, Bristol, Lapeer County; John W. White, blacksmith, Saginaw Street; S. 1D. McKeen, land agent, attorney and counsellor at law, master in chancery, register of deeds and justice of the peace, corner Nepessing and Cedar Streets; Noah N. Hart, attorney at law, justice of the peace and county clerk, office 67 Nepessing Street; F. and C. H. Buel, Detroit, hats and caps, furs, &c.; G. Bennett, tailoring; the American Hotel, Detroit, J. W. Van Ander, proprietor; Orion House, Richard Brownson, proprietor; Hodges House, Pontiac, S. Hodges, proprietor; A Merryweather advertised a stock of shirts, bosoms, collars and money purses, the product of the,"Female Benevolent Society," who would take in to make to order, articles of clothing as cheap as possible, and required all friends of benevolence to call and furnish work. This advertisement signed E. Hemingway, secretary. 0. M. Evans will pay taxes in any part of the State; Henry Laure offers one cent reward for Christopher Houghton, aged 15, who ran away from him. The southern mail was advertised to leave Royal Oak every Monday and Thursday at 12 o'clock m., arriving in Lapeer next day by 12 m. Leave Lapeer every Thursday and Friday at 1 p. m., arrive at Royal Oak next day by 11 a. m. Eastern mail, via Bristol and Romeo to Mt. Clemens, arrive Wednesday at 6 p. m., leave Thursday at 6 a. m. Western mail direct to Flint leave Fri day at 6 p. m., arrive Saturday, at 6, p. m. J. R. White, postmaster. We find that Mr. John Sawtell was married to Mrs. Jemima Johnson, at Nauvoo, August 24, and that on the 6th ult., E. J. White, Esq., married'Calvin Stiles to Miss MimaFarnsworth. Isaac Goodale died August 23, after a short but severe illness, aged 62 years, formerly of Northampton, Mass. In the news columns we find that Mr. Tyler was president and k"that Mr. John Q. Adams in the house of representatives, with the violent temper that characterizes the man," had "declared war" on the President because he "would not meanly submit to the Clay dictation, and sign an important bill, which is not mentioned by title," the paper further states that the "ultra Whigs seriously contemplated expelling Mr. Adams from the House for having presented a petition to dissolve the Union. It was a monstrous outrage, and would, beyond doubt, have led to his expulsion, but for considerzation of his advanced period of life and the high station he formerly held." Speaking of the August election, the result is summarized: In North Carolina the Whigs have re-elected Gov. Morehead by a diminished majority; both branches of the legislature are Democratic -last year Whig-and a U. S. senator is to be chosen in place of Wm. Graham, Whig. In Indiana both branches of the legislature are Democratic by increased majorities. In Kentucky both branches of the legislature are Whig as usual, but the newly elected members are relief men, and Mr. Clay is opposed to that measure. A United States senator is to be chosen in the place of Mr. Crittenden, Whig. In Indiana probably Democratic majority on joint ballot. Senator to be elected in place of Mr. Smith, Whig. In Illinois, Ford, Democratic governor; both branches legislature Democratic. Senator to be elected in place of Young, Democratic. In Missouri we have elected the five members of Congress; a senator is to be elected in place of Linn, Democratic. In Rhode Island it is stated that nearly 1,000 suffrage men been been obliged to leave to save themselves from arrest for no offense save that they voted for the constitution. The expenditures of the government for the first half of 1842 were $16,813,613, which is within $6,000,000 of the whole of last year's expenditures, and the people find that they have gained nothing by giving power to the Federal Whigs. But where are the men of thenation or the men of Lapeer, who controlled events forty years ago? A very few of the former are living, and of the latter "old pioneers" we see now and then one on whom the flood of years has left the furrows of time, and the activities of life have relegated to decrepitude and obscurity. But most of them have gone forward to the other side and their memories linger only with a few survivors of their generation. Oh, glorious time! it buries us all in oblivion in a brief space, and our weaknesses are forgotten with our good deeds. Forty years from now and the pomp and vanities, the work and toil, the loves and hates of this day will be forgotten like a story that is told. I LAPEER NEWSPAPERS. A local newspaper is one of the first enterprises to be established in a new community, and in 1839 the leading men of Lapeer arrived at the conclusion that a local journal was necessary to the interests of the county seat. Messrs. A. N. Hart and others joined and purchased printing material, and the Plain Dealer was started as a Democratic paper with E. H. Thompson, now of Flint, as editor. Soon afterward the Whigs thought their political interests required a champion, and the Sentinel was started with W. H. Williams as editor. I

Page  64 kz — s- -; - I f 9 I & 64 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. Tile editors of these rival organs carried on a brisk warfare, often emphasizing their utterances with ludicrous caricatures. Journalism in those days was not less precarious as a financial undertaking than at a more recent date. Mr. Thompson was succeeded by J. B. Bennett, who conducted the paper for some time, and Mr. Williams was succeeded in the -%Seti, el by R. W. Jenny. Some more lively authority than tradition is necessary to trace out the checkered career of Lapeer journalism during its first thirty years. There was the 7'Iocsil with "Bill" Ryan as its editor; the DeJ)mocrat, founded by Murvin Tinny, who died at East Saginaw. H. E. Purdy was at one time editor of the I'lain Dealer. Now and then a solitary number of the early papers, tattered and yellow, tumbles from the dust of some pigeon hole, and speaks of other days, but there are no consecutive files in existence. THE LAPEER CLARION. In 1856 a number of the leading Republicans of Lapeer united in the purchase of material for the purpose of establishing a Republican newspaper upon a sound business basis. The first number of the Lapeer I,'plulblicanlr, with the late Colonel J. R. White as editor, was issued in January, 1856. Colonel White continued the editorial management of the paper about a year, when the office was sold to George S. Fletcher, of Detroit. Mr. Fletcher conducted the paper about four years, and during that time the name was changed to the Clariion, under which name it is still published. At the breaking out of the war Mr. Fletcher sold the office to Samuel J. Tomlinson, and went into the army. Mr. Tomlinson is a son of Samuel C. Tomlinson, one of the pioneers of Lapeer, and learned the printers' trade of Mr. Fletcher. He was a young man but possessed of great energy and good business ability. He enlarged and improved the paper, and has succeeded in doing what few newspaper publishers can boast of, that of making a handsome fortune from the printing business. About 1874 he erected a brick building expressly arranged to suit the convenience of a printing business. The (Clarion is now a six column quarto, and one of the most prosperous weekly newspapers in the State. THE LAPEER DEMOCRAT. In 1872 this paper was started by J. B. Graham, now of Pitkin, Col., as a Democratic newspaper. He afterward sold it to L. J. Haddrill, G. C. Wattles and M. N. Stickney, who formed a stock company and published the paper with Calvin Thomas, now a professor in the Michigan University, as editor. They afterward sold the office to L. D. Sayle, now of Detroit, and after conducting it for a time he sold to George H. Pond, now of the Caro A4dertiser. The office changed hands several times, and was finally bought by Kudner & Phelps. Mr. Phelps soon after retired, and H. C. Kudner became sole proprietor. Mr. Kudner has brought the D1)eocrat up to a paying basis, and is making it a model newspaper and a financial success. INCORPORATION. Lapeer was incorporated as a village by order of the board of supervisors, in 1857. Notice of application was signed and published as follows: We, the undersigned, legal voters of the township of Lapeer, do hereby give notice that we will apply to the board of supervisors for the county of Lapeer, on the 12th day of October next, for an order to incorporate as a village, the whole of section 5, in township 7, north of range 10 east, in the county of Lapeer, and State of Michigan, under an act to provide for the incorporation of villages, approved February 17, 1857. William H. Cockett, Wesley Vincent, John W. Smith, W. H. Jennings, H. H. Riley, N. B. Eldredge, George C. Bidwell, Alexander McLennan, A. V. West, M. B. Smith, Orin Brown, Melvin Brewer, Robert King, Charles M. Walker, W. I. Wilson, F. S. Taylor, Harry Griswold, A. S. Hatch, George H. Swift, J. R. White, S. Tomlinson, R. G. Jennings, John M. Wattles, C. M. Davis, Isaac Broughton, R. Clark, Charles Rich, H. D. Tomer, C. S. Hicks, George H. Henderson, George B. Gregory, Lyman Jarvis, J. M. Taylor, Jr., H. Loomis. Lapeer, September 15, 1857. The officers first elected were for the year 18158. The village officers were as follows for the several years: VILLAGE OFFICERS. 1858-President, N. Buel Eldredge; clerk, Wesley Vincent; treasurer, Charles M. Davis; assessors, John Sands and Hubbel Loomis; trustees, George C. Bidwell, Charles Rich, Ward H. Jennings, John M. Wattles, Mirol B. Smith and Noah H. Hart. 1859 President, James Turrill; treasurer, Charles M. Davis; assessors, Hubbel Loomis and Alonzo S. Hatch; trustees, Miron B. Smith, Charles Rich, John W. Bancroft, N. B. Eldredge, Lester E. Waterbury, George C. Bidwell. 1860 President, Jonathan R. White; clerk, George C. Bidwell; treasurer, Charles M. Davis: assessor, Henry Wheelock; trustees, James Turrill, Harry Griswold, John W. Bancroft, Noah H. Hart, Curtis T. Dodge, John M. Wattles. 1861-President, Noah H. Hart; treasurer, Charles M. Davis; assessor, Charles Rich; trustees, Jonathan R. White, Ward H. Jennings, Alonzo S. Hatch, William Hemingway, Stephen S. Hicks, John W. Bancroft. 1862 President, Ward H. Jennings; clerk, George C. Bidwell; treasurer, Charles M. Davis; assessor, George C. Bidwell; trustees, Elias R. Emmons, William Hemingway, Rodney G. Hart, Stephen S. Hicks, Silas B. Gaskell, John W. Bancroft. 1863-President, Ward H. Jennings; treasurer, Charles M. Davis; assessor, Alonzo S. Hatch; trustees, Elias R. Emmons, John W. Bancroft, James Turrill, Stephen S. Hicks, Silas B. Gaskell, William Hemingway. 1864 President, Charles Rich; clerk, Geo. C. Bidwell; treasurer, Charles M. Davis; assessor, Geo. B. Gregory; trustees, Silas B. Gaskell, Ward H. Jennings, James Turrill, Peter Van Dyke, John M. Wattles, Henry L. Horton. 1865 —President, John M. Wattles; treasurer, Charles M. Davis; assessor, Alonzo S. Hatch; trustees, Shadrach N. Vincent Jonathan H. Hicks, James Turrill, Hubbel Loomis, Peter Van Dyke, Ward H. Jennings. 1866 —President, Myron C. Kenney; clerk, Ulysses D. Bristol; treasurer, Charles M. Davis; assessor. Stephen M. Hicks; trustees, Robert King, William Hemingway, Columbus Tuttle, Alonzo S. Hatch, Peter Van Dyke, Charles M. Hemingway. 1867 -President, Myron C. Kenney; treasurer, Charles M. Davis; assessor, Miron B. Smith; trustees, Charles M. Hemingway, Robert King, Shadrach N. Vincent, William J. Loder, Harmon D. Pike, Stephen V. Thomas. 1868 —President, Myron C. Kenney; clerk, Thomas H. Collins; treasurer, Charles M. Davis; assessor, William Hemingway; trustees, Charles M. Hemingway, Stephen V. Thomas, Alonzo S. Hatch, Oliver Nichols, Robert King, Stephen S. Hicks. 1869- President, Oliver Nichols; treasurer, Jonathan H. Hicks assessor, Rodney G. Hart; trustees, Ward H. Jennings, William W. Barber, Stephen V. Thomas, Alexander McLennan, Derastus Holmes, Robert King. Lapeer was incorporated as a city in 1869, and the officers have been as follows: -1 I I i I i - + V -I -Vs r L 4 I - - r q fll, ' Im - r

Page  65 ~;: JV: L: m -. I~: HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 65 I I CITY OFFICERS. 1869-Mayor, James Turrill; clerk, Samuel J. Tomlinson; aldermen, Rodney G. Hart, Charles M. Hemingway, H. L. White, Silas Wright, Columbus Tuttle, Lester E. Waterbury, Myron C. Kenney, Geo. B. Adams. 1870-Mayor, Jasper Bentley; clerk, Samuel J. Tomlinson; aldermen, John W. DuBois, Maynard Butts, Joel D. Kenney, William J. Loder. 1871-Mayor, Rodney G. Hart, clerk, Samuel J. Tomlinson; treasurer, Oliver Nichols; aldermen, George W. Rood, Lester E. Waterbury, Maynard Butts, Allan A. Sage, Joel D. Kenney, M. B. Smith, William J. Loder, Benjamin B. Redfield. 1872 —tMayor, Myron C. Kenney; clerk, Samuel J. Tomlinson; treasurer, Curtis T. Dodge; aldermen, John M. Wattles, George B. Gregory, M. B. Smith, Rodney G. Hart. 1873-Mayor, Myron C. Kenney; clerk, Samuel J. Tomlinson; treasurer, Curtis T. Dodge; aldermen, Lorenzo J. Haddrill, Maynard Butts, Joel D. Kenney, Alex. Mair, Harmon D. Pike. 1874-Mayor, Joseph B. Moore; clerk, Samuel J. Tomlinson; treasurer, Curtis T. Dodge; aldermen, Oliver H. Wattles, George B. Gregory, Henry K. White, John P. Roberts. 1875-Mayor, Charles M. Hemingway; clerk, J. Rollin Johnson; treasurer, Curtis T. Dodge; aldermen, Lorenzo J. Haddrill, Maynard Butts, Joel D. Kenney, Ward H. Jennings. 1876 —Mayor, William A. Jackson, Jr.; clerk, J. Rollin Johnson; treasurer, Curtis T. Dodge; aldermen, Oliver H. Wattles, George B. Gregory, Henry K. White, William W. Varnum. 1877-Mayor, Chester G. White; clerk, Stuart Gorton; treasurer, Francis R. Cutting; aldermen, William H. Stickney, J. Rollin Johnson, George R. Turrill, William F. Daley. 1878-Mayor, Chester G. White; clerk, Stuart Gorton; treasurer, Francis R. Cutting; aldermen, 0. H. Wattles, L. H. Tucker, S. T. Vincent, William A. Varnum. 1879-Mayor, Alexander McLennan; clerk, George W. Stone; treasurer, Harmon D. Pike; aldermen, J. K. Walters, Francis McElroy, James H. Vincent, Silas Wright. 1880-Mayor, William J. Loder; clerk, Norman H. Farr; treasurer, George B. Adams; aldermen, Lorenzo J. Haddrill, Lewis H. Tucker, B. A. Tuttle, William N. Varnnm. 1881-Mayor, John Heavner; clerk, William E. Johnson; treasurer, Fred. D. Johnson; aldermen, 0. H. Wattles, Columbus Tuttle, Sampson R. Wilcox, Theodore B. Odle. 1882-Mayor, William J. Loder; clerk, William E. Johnson; treasurer, Fred. D. Johnson; aldermen, Lorenzo J. Haddrill, George B. Gregory, Jonathan Houghton, William N. Varnum. - 1883 —Mayor, L. W. Hinman; clerk, J. H. Palmer; treasurer, George B. Adams; aldermen, Rodney G. Hart, Andrew M. Thompson to fill vacancy, Charles Lombard, B. A. Tuttle, James A. Hungerford. RETROSPECTIVE. A local writer, speaking of the early years of Lapeer, says: "In early years Lapeer made but slow progress in the way of improvement. It is true each year added its quota of population, but it must be remembered that the location was one remote from markets, and shut out from the advantages of transportation, save by the slow and laborious method of ox teams anal lumber wagons. There was really nothing to stimulate or encourage immigration. The principal population of the surrounding country was that of Indians, and for several years trade with these dark sons of the forest constituted no small item in the business transactions of our merchants. There were many annoyances and inconveniences to submit to, many obstacles to overcome. The mails, for instance, put in an appearance quite infrequently, and were carried on horseback from point to point; and the arrival of the postman in those times was hailed as a gala day by the inhabitants. "Yet, notwithstanding all the drawbacks, the toils and trials of the past, the town moved slowly but surely onward. Churches were organized, the Congregational being first, and those 'avant couriers' of 'the faith' were followed by others. Merchants were attracted, mechanics and all the various classes comprising the integrals of towns. "Lapeer was incorporated as a city March 30, 1869. The construction in after years of the Port Huron Railroad was a source of great good to the town. It opened up new and hitherto unapproachable markets, and placed us upon the great plane of equality with other and older cities. The more recent completion of the Bay City Division of the Michigan Central Railroad has also had the effect of a more rapid development of the county, giving us competing freights, and developing the lumber traffic of this section, which has become an important feature in the business of Lapeer. Better than all, however, was the fact that Lapeer County contained within itself sustaining force. Its soil was of the richest possible character, its forest abounded in excellent timber, and it is peopled with a hardy and industrious people. Every tree that was felled was a step towards prosperity; every acre in cultivation was a guerdon of success; and so these noble men and women toiled on, creating for the generation of to-day an inheritance time shall not dim." CHANGES OF TWELVE YEARS. Changes which are observed as they take place, do not appear as remarkable as those occurring during an absence. Any one who has gone out from among familiar scenes and returned after a lapse of years, has been impressed with the truth of this, and will be interested in the following graphic description of the change of scenes which occurred in Lapeer, during an absence of twelve years. The writer says: i "The 17th day of June, 1874, found us once more in the venerable town of Lapeer, among the 'scenes of ourchildhood,' after an absence of twelve years, and how much the place has changed since then! At that time a quiet, old appearing country village, of perhaps 400 inhabitants, with three old-fashioned taverns, a few stores and shops, with no communication with 'the outside world,' save by the old-fashioned stage coach and lumber wagon, over bad roads, with Flint about twenty miles, and Pontiac over thirty miles distant, as the nearest market. "But lo, what a change a few years have wrought! Large brick structures are seen, rows of business places, and dwellings extended on every hand, with two railroads coming in at different points, —in fact the whole place and surroundings have undergone a wonderful change l "We looked in vain for those ancient landmarks-Hoffiman's old store, the old jail on the commons, Forbes' tavern near the bridge, the old tanneries near the creek, the old blacksmith shop on the corner and Brown's shop opposite, where used to congregate such kindred spirits as John Brock, Edward Brown, John Warren, Big Joe Carpenter, and other muscular worthies of twenty years ago. But they are scattered, and these ancient buildings are known no more. One ancient landmark yet remains that looks familiar-the old elm tree just under the hill by the creek, under which A. N. Hart and family encamped in 1831, the date of the first settlement in those parts. The old tree is surmounted by a lightning rod for preservation, having been struck by lightning several times. '"The people have also changed, and comparatively few were those we knew, Uncle Forbes, Riley, Hoffman, Colonel Brant, of

Page  66 No. I I 66 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. - I Ardent memory; old Nobles the trapper, Uncle Simes, Jerry Hinman and others, have since 'gone home,' and many others of those days are dead, or scattered far and wide. Bill Ryan, the red-hot editor of the Lapeer Tocsin, fell fighting for the 'Lost Cause' on the bloody field of Gettysburg while leading on the 'Louisiana Tigers,' "Politics raged high in those days, inasmuch as Democratic women refused to' lend tea or sugar or associate with their Whig neighbors, and lice versa. ",We visited the old home just in sight of town, and it was lonely! The old house had gone to decay. The roof had fallen in; the ground hog burrowed beneath the fallen chimney; here the phoebe builds her nest and rears her young; grass grew in the yard, and waved its rank heads before the ruined windows and inl the open door; sounds of merry voices are heard no more, but desolate stillness reigns all around. "The garden fence is seen no more; the apple trees are dying with age. The spring at the foot of the hill is nearly obliterated. Two frogs jumped in at our approach. They are its rulers, now. We strolled along the creek near by. Two ducks flew up near the bend where we used to hunt them years ago, and with screams disappeared far up the stream. The thrush built her nest in the bushes near the banks, and sang her gladdening notes of old; the violets grow in the same shady nook, and the same old fence hidden with bushes skirted the brow of the hill, where wended the cow path, and wild plums grew, and we picked strawberries near the wild cherry tree in the meadow, the same spot where we had picked them twenty years before. As we passed the cat-tail swale in the meadow near the big rock, blackbirds flew upward with loud screams in defense of their young-those same looking blackbirds with red spots on their wings, we used to rob of old. "With musing thoughts on interesting spots along the way, we arrived at the old school-house, and were ushered in by the teacher, whose existence dates since we studied here. We took our same old seat, and a thousand memories of those earlier days crossed our fancied brain as we looked around upon strange faces, every one. After dwelling on familiar marks around the house we sought the woods near by, and threw ourselves under the shade of the old elm tree, where hung the swing of other days, and thought of those companions who once gathered there, and as each cherished remembrance arose, involuntary words came forth —'Ah, those were happy days!-yes, would I were a boy again!' And with feelings of lonely sadness we arose and left the spot." LAPEER IN 1872. The following article descriptive of Lapeer was written in November, 1872: "Forty-one years ago the 11th of the present month the founder of this little city, A. N. Hart, pushed his way through the woods, cutting his road as he went, until he pitched his camp beneatli a large elm, still standing and preserved with jealous care by his sons, who, to ward off even the lightning's stroke, have attached to it a lightning rod, that it may long stand as a monument to its early friend and preserver. Discovering that the Flint River and Farmers Creek here made a junction, and that there was a sufficient fall of water to be valuable for manufacturing purposes, he rightly conjectured that the power here so long wasted should not be left to pursue its quiet course unobstructed, and he at once resolved to seize this opportunity to build himself a town. For many long years has he seen his hopes of a speedy communication with the outside world by steam deferred. Lapeer, however, conI tinued to grow on, interrupted by a devastating fire, and again being rebuilt, until at last, in June, 1871, they were in communication with)the East by the Port Huron & Lake Michigan Railroad. From that time to the present the town has increased in number about 500 inhabitants. Early in the present year the people along the line of the projected Detroit & Bay City Railroad received sufficient encouragement to warrant them in letting the contract for building this road, and in the remarkably short space of seven months' time the road was opened up for traffic to Lapeer, a distance of sixty miles, and with very few exceptions is as smooth as the oldest and best road in the State. But there was no stopping to take breath. The work has continued to be pushed on by the contractors, Messrs. Briscoe, Hill & Co., of the main line, and by S. Brownell & Co., of the north branch, until twelve miles of the track toward Bay City is already completed, and the worst cut of the line-the Otter Lake cut-will be completed in twenty-five days, and the track probably will be down to Bay City by January 1st. Messrs. Brownell & Co. have more than half completed the grading from Lapeer to Fish Lake and along the lake, to which the north branch of this road is to run and stop, for the present winter at least. The mills and lumber near the terminus of this branch warrants them in constructing this line, and as a result two mills are already constructed at Fish Lake and three more, with stores, planing-mills, shops, &c., are soon to be built. Hotels are also contemplated, and the town of Stephens is to be laid out, here in the woods. "But to return to Lapeer. On inquiry it was ascertained that Lapeer contained about three thousand inhabitants. Its main street, extending east and west, is called Nepessing. It is of extreme length proportionally to the size of the place; that is, the buildings are not constructed closely in one close line, but separated often by wide spaces. This rather objectionable feature of an otherwise pleasant little city is due to the rivalry of land speculators. This street contains about twenty-one brick stores, and in all about forty business places. The various trades are represented by five clothing stores, twelve dry goods stores, five boot and shoe stores, four harness shops, one cigar and tobacco store, three heavy hardware stores, six groceries, three drug stores and one book and stationery store. The hotel business of the town is very active, and there are two good houses. The first of these, the Abram House, by James Abrams, is well known. He is now preparing to tear away the older part of the house and erect in,its place a large brick building, which will be a credit to the place and its proprietor. The Marshall House is also a good house. There is any amount of taverns where good accommodations for man or beast may be had, and other places of refreshment are very numerous. "Nearly every denomination of churches may be found here, and the Baptists are adding another edifice to the list which will be an ornament to the town. "Among the manufacturing establishments of the place may be enumerated two sash and blind factories, having all the latest improvements, besides two flouring- mills, two foundries, one woolen factory, and several saw-mills just out of town. This being the county seat, lawyers' offices as well as all the various professions are well represented. "Two weekly papers are issued-the Demlocrat, being a new paper, and ably conducted, and popular for the attention given to local matters. J. B. Graham is the publisher, and for the short time he has been established has acquired for his journal a wide circulation. The Clarion office is a model of convenience and completeness, even to steam engine and cylinder press, and the wonder is that Mr. Tomlinson has worked up the circulation sufficient to sustain so extensive an establishment; but his success is manifest, and is no more than the reward of his energy and talent, I I -je -_. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -.d V" -

Page  67 ' Ai i - - HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 67 I the paper being in every respect of superior character and influence. "The Lapeer Driving Paik is deserving of special mention, but beyond the fact of its fine half-mile track, delightful location, fine grove of trees and general improvements, space forbids further mention. "Real estate is on the point of advancing since the railroads have been completed, and farms that were sold for $50 and $60 an acre a year ago could hardly be bought for $75. Business lots on the main streets are worth $100 per foot, and dwelling lots find ready sale at $200 to $300 each, according to location. Business generally seems to be in a prosperous condition, and the future of Lapeer, with its various railroads centering here, and its fine farming country surrounding, certainly looks bright. "If any one doubts the strength of pine lands to raise wheat, they can have their incredulity shaken by asking any farmer how much wheat he raised to the acre this season in this immediate vicinity. From twenty to twenty-five bushels was no uncommon yield. it "Little towns and new settlements are springing up in every direction, and the nearest competing towns are Bay City on the north, Flint on the west, and Port Huron on the east, each from twenty-five to thirty-five miles away, and Detroit sixty miles to the south-too great a distance to steal all their best retail trade." LAPEER CHURCHES. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN SOCIETY. In a volume whose leaves have grown yellow during the fifty years of its existence, are gathered the early records of the Congregational and Presbyterian Society, which was organized under the former name but subsequently changed to the latter. Upon the first page of the volume is written the following: "( A record of the formation and proceedings of the First Congregational Church at Lapeer County site,which was organized July 21, 1833. <" On this day a number of professing Christians assembled at the house of J. B. Morse of said Lapeer, to take into consideration the expediency of forming a church. Present, the Rev. Isaac W. Ruggles and Luther Shaw, missionaries, commissioned by the American Home Missionary Society. " Joseph B. Morse, Betsey Morse, Alvin McMaster, Martha White, Alvin N. Hart, Charlotte F. Hart, Benjamin W. Ball, Lucia A. Morse and Marcia C. Morse, presented letters from other churches, and after having given publicly the reason for the hope which they entertained, entered into covenant to walk together as a church in all the ordinances of the gospel." Confession of faith and covenant were adopted, and also the Congregational mode of church government. It was voted that A. N. Hart be acting clerk of the church. The ordinance of baptism was performed upon Benjamin E. and Alvin D., sons of A. N. and Charlotte F. Hart. August 12, another meeting was held at which standing rules were adopted. May 28, 1834, a conference meeting was held at which Samuel and Thankful Murlin were admitted by letters from the Presbyterian Church at Pontiac. The baptismal ceremony was performed upon Oscar, son of J. B. and Betsey Morse. The following June, Henry M. Look and wife were admitted by letter from the church in East Avon, N. Y., and at a subsequent meeting, in the same month, John Look was admitted and the Lord's Supper administered by Rev. Isaac Ruggles. January 12, 1835, the annual meeting was held at the house of I - A. N. Hart, and the following officers elected: Moderator, Samuel Murlin; clerk, A. N. Hart; treasurer, A. N. Hart. At this meeting a resolution was adopted requesting admission to the Presbytery of Detroit, and J. B. Morse and A. N. Hart were elected delegates to attend the meeting of the Presbytery at Detroit. At that meeting the request of this church was granted. Up to the latter part of 1837 the church held meetings at Lapeer and Farmers Creek, but at that time a society was formed in Hadley and the members living in that vicinity withdrew from the Lapeer Church. The first building erected by the society as a house of worship stood near the site of the present church, and was known as the Session House. About 1850 the society adopted the Presbyterian mode of church government, and soon after erected a church, which was dedicated in 1852. In 1873, having been greatly improved and enlarged by an expenditure of about $6,000, the church was re-dedicated. The pastors of the church have been Revs. Sly, Woods, Bates, Platt, Smith, Woodruff, Tuttle, Gerrish, Bartelle, Taylor, Foster, Stoutenburgh and Frost. THE M. E. CHURCH. Lapeer was first made an appointment as a preaching place in 1834, and was included in the Farmington circuit, then under the pastoral care of Revs. E.H. Pilcher and F. A. Seaborn. The circuit being too large to be manageable, it was divided-Washington Jackson was employed to take charge of Lapeer and the territory lying around it. He preached a few times during the year at Farmers Creek. In 1835 Lapeer was returned as an appointment, and -for the first time appears in the conference minutes. No preacher was sent by the 'conference to labor at Lapeer, and the presiding elder employed Rev. Oscar F. North as its pastor. Lapeer was then a part of Oakland County. Michigan had a territorial government, and Methodistically the territory was connected with Ohio, for all the preachers belonged to the Ohio conference. In July, 1835, Rev. E. H. Pilcher held a two days' meeting in Lapeer, which was the first love feast and sacrament season ever held in Lapeer County. In 1836 the general conference organized an annual conference in Michigan and severed us from Ohio. In the fall of that year the first session of the Michigan annual conference was held, when Philip Wareham was appointed to Lapeer. As both Messrs. North and Jackson were supplies sent by the presiding elder, Mr. Wareham was the first man appointed here by a bishop. In 1837 Flavel Brittain was pastor, and in 1838 Oran Mitchell succeeded him. In 1839 Ebenezer Steele was pastor. In 1840 Duncan McGregor was appointed pastor and remained two years. In 1842 Rev. Joseph Jennings was appointed pastor. In 1843 George F. Hemingway was pastor. In 1844 Stephen C.Woodard was preacher in charge, with Nelson Barnum for assistant. In 1845 William Mothersill was pastor. In 1846 John Gray was pastor. In 1847 and 1848 Israel Cogshall. Since then the pastors have been as follows: Revs. Brown, Cawthorne, Whitemore, Allen, Borden, Stonax, Evener, Taylor, Storker, Fox, Bartlette, Armstrong, A. J. Bigelow, W. E. Bigelow, Potter, J. Venning. At a very early day services were held in the court-house on the hill and afterward in the session house. In 1843 and 1844 a house of worship was built, which is still standing and used as a furniture store. That was used until 1862, when the present church was built at a cost of about $4,000. The building has since been considerably improved. Prior to the build I 11 I <9 T, I I — d am*" I - - - - -- -- - I - W

Page  68 CIF ii i i i i i j i I 68 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. b ing of the new church, this society embraced Hunters Creek, but at that time a division took place, and Hunters Creek became a separate charge. Ttie society numbers at the present time 216 members, and the Sunday-school about 150 nmembers. THE BAPTIST SOCIETY. From the records it is learned that a meeting of the Baptist brethren of Lapeer was held at the house of Caleb S. Hicks, Saturday, May 30, 1858. There were present Hervey Roberts, Columbus Tuttle, Edwin M. Roberts, Caleb S. Hicks, Cyrus Petingal, H. Loomis and sisters, Eunice Tuttle, Sarah A. Davis, P. Watson. It was unanimously resolved that in their opinion the time had fully come when it was their duty as Christians of the Baptist faith and order to maintain public worship il the village. H. Loomis was chosen church clerk, and it was voted to invite Rev. W. H. Fuller of Oxford, Genesee County, to become their pastor for the ensuing year. Mr. Fuller consented to preach each alternate Sabbath for the sum of $100. At a meeting held the following month, the following persons were admitted into the church: Harry Griswold, D. A. C. Hungerford, Eliza Griswold, Evans. Columbus Tuttle was chosen deacon. MlIeetings were held for a time il the old Masonic Hall and also in the court-house. In 1859 steps were taken toward building a house of worship and subsequently a frame church was erected. In 1864 a formal organization was perfected with the following persons as trustees: Harry Griswold, Hubbel Loomis, Jonathan H. Hicks, Caleb S. Hicks, Lester E. Waterbury and Columbus Tuttle. The pastors since Rev. W. H. Fuller have been 'Revs. Bump, Johnson, Waldron, Little, Titus, Brooks, Curtis, Lawley and the present pastor, Rev. J. C. Rooney. During the pastorate of Rev. E. L. Little, the church enjoyed a marked degree of prosperity, and in 1872 tha society decided to meet a demand for a new and more commodious church edifice. Arnple and desirable lots were obtained on the corner of Law and Cedar Streets, having a frontage of 110 feet on the first and of 180 on the latter, which afforded ample room for the new building and for a grove and grass plat on the east, and sufficient space on the lot at the rear for sheds. The corner stone was laid with appropriate exercises, Mav 29, 1873. The following articles were deposited in a box and placed in the corner stone: The Early history of Lapeer; history of the Baptist Church of Lapeer; history of the present enterprise; a copy of the subscriptions toward the building; a business directory of Lapeer; county and city officers as already read; a United States coin, a copy of the last number of the Standard, Chicago; a copy of the last number of she xlxctiner anfd Chroonicle, New York; a copy of the Wi/atchmwa1,and a Reflector, Boston; a copy of the Herald and Torchl:ig(Jht, Kalamazoo; a copy of the Lapeer Democrat, of May 26; a copy of the TWeelkl Clarioit, of May 29; a copy of the Detroit Tribuene, of May 29; a copy of the New Testament; cards of our citizens in business; programme of the Michigan State Union Sunday-School convention, to be held this week in Kalamazoo; minutes of the Michigan Baptist State convention of 1872; minutes of the Michigan Baptist Sunday-school convention of 1872; minutes of the Flint River Baotist Association, 1872. After these arti cles had been deposited by the pastor in the box, it was hermetically soldered by Mr. Jenkins, foreman for Mlessrs. Loder & Sutton. It was then deposited in the corner stone, which was laid in its place by the pastor, assisted by the stone mason, Michael McNamara, and the brick mason, Patrick Marr. The box was cemented in the stone. The building was so far completed that tie basement story was dedicated February 3, 1874. There are, in 1883, 152 members of the church. Columbus Tuttle is superintendent of the Sundcay-school, and Henry Vincent, Gilurch clerk. The church edifice is built of brick, and is the finest in the county, costing, at the time of its construction, about $17,000. THE CATHOLIC, SOCIETY. The Church of the Immaculate Conception was organized in 1866, with about forty faniilies. A church building had been erected about eight years prior to the organization of the society, and visits were made by priests front Flint. The society at the present time numbers about seventy families. Rev. John Busche has been pastor since 1866. UNIVERSALIST SOCIETY. The first Universalist parish of Lapeer was organized March 13, 1873, with the following officers: Moderator, V. Rich; clerk, Stewart Gorton; treasurer, A. H. Toedt. A few meetings had been held prior to that tilme. The society was organized by Rev.Mr. Knickerbocker, of Walyne. The first pastor was Rev. J. H. Palmer, now an attorney at Lapeer, who began his labors in April following -the organization, and continued as pastor until April, 1877. In 1875 a house of worship was built, costing about $05,000. Mr. Palmer was succeeded by Rev. L. J. Dinsmore, who was succeeded by Rev. J. N. Pardee who remained a short time as a supply. He was succeeded by Rev. W. A. Pratt. After Mr. Pratt were several supplies, and in March, 1883, Rev. J. M. Getchell became pastor. There are at present about fifty families belonging to the parish. METHODIST PROTESTANT CHURCH. The Methodist Protestant Church, of Lapeer circuit, was organized Aug. 7, 1877, as shown by records in the office of the county clerk. The existence of this society as a religious body, dates back to about the year 1848. Meetings used to be held in the old court-house on the hill and afterward in a room once a store. About the time the Baptist society built t~heir new church, the frame church was purchased by this society. The present pastor is Rev. Kellogg. GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH. The first attempt at organizing an Episcopal society was in June of 1873, when a mission was organized under the name of St. John's Nlission. The various auxiliary organizations were perfected, and the erection of a house of worship was attempted. Rev. Charles Thorp was in charge. This organization lasted about a year and then ceased to exist. Septemter 19, 1878, Rev. Dr. Stocking, of Detroit, delivered a lecture in the Universalist Church, after which a meeting was held at the instance of the reverend gentleman for the purpose of church organization, and tlus bring the residents of the Protestant Episcopal faith as a body before the diocesan authorities in order to obtain the aid of the missionary board to secure the services of a resident clergyman. After a brief preliminary statement of the purposes to be effected and the course it is necessary to pursue, the reverend gentleman submitted a paper (a draft of an- application it is necessary to mak-e to the standing committee of the diocese to se cure this aid), which reads as follows: "To the Stalndin7,( C'olainittee of the Diocesef of3Alichiaqan: GENTLEMEN: -At a meeting of sundry communicants of the Protestant Episcopal Church, and of other persons attached to the doctrine, discipline and worship, held in Lapeer, Lapeer Connty, Mich., on Thursday, September 19, 1878, it was resolved to organize for the purpose of bringing the church people and this proposed work into some immediate and responsible relation with the consti I:::g kg:: r: Ji - g - e-t9 -

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Page  69 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 69 tuted diocesan authorities, and by such means to secure the appointment of a resident missionary. About thirty families and parts of families are pledged to assist in supporting the services of the church, and from a subscription list which will be forthcoming, it will appear that at least $400 has been pledged in a good and responsible subscription toward such service. Messrs. Fortune, Emmet and Gillispie were appointed a committee to provide a suitable place for holding diocesan service, and such furniture as may be necessary to the reverent performance of the same." September 30th the committees convened and took into consideration the subject of a fit place for holding~service together with that of finance, all members being present excepting Messrs. Williams and McLennan. After some deliberation it was decided unanimously that the several rooms in Mr. Phineas White's block, over H. Cummings' store, with little expense could be made suited to the purpose. May 1, 1882, the mission was organized into a parish. September, 1881, tlhe corner stone of the new church building was laid with appropriate ceremonies. In April, 1882, the church was formally opened. The building is of brick, and with the lot costs about $3,000. The rectors have been as follows: -In 1879, Rev. John S. Seibold; 1880, Rev. Albert E. George; 1881-'82, Rev. Frederick N. Luson; 1883, Rev. Isaac Barr. The parish numbers about 125 members, and has two out stations, one at North Branch and one at Otter Lake. GERMAN EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN. The German Evangelical Lutheran Congregation of Lapeer was legally organized August 20, 1873. The trustees were C. Simon, H. Steinhart, A. Whittstock. A church was built and used a short distance out of the city. There are also Second and Seventh Day Adventist societies, both of which have houses of worship. THE LAPEER SCHOOLS. The following history of the Lapeer schools is taken from an article prepared by Oliver G. Owen: "The oldest pioneers came to Lapeer about 1831, and the first schools among them were private enterprises. Of the places where these schools were taught, and of the teachers employed, little is now known; but in a very early day a school was kept in a building which stood near the site of the Marshall House. A building which stood on the property now owned by Benjamin Ball and another situated on the ground now occupied by White's Opera House Block, -were also used as school-houses. In the latter in the fall of 1833, Captain N. H. Hart taught a school which was attended by about thirty pupils. "With the admission of Michigan into the Union in 1837, the schools of the village came to have a more definite relation to the general law, which continued to be about the same as in territorial times. The distinctive feature of this law was the rate bill, by which the cost of tuition was equitably assessed upon the parents of the children in attendance. In this way for nineteen years, down to 1856, the schools were maintained. By the enterprise of Phineas White, the first building specially devoted to school purposes was erected. This was put up during the summer of 1837, upon the now vacant high school lot, but was soon afterward removed to the southeast corner of the adjoining block on the east; and in this house for the next seven years, schools were kept by teachers whose names are now almost forgotten, except notably that of E. J. White. "But the first school-house built at the public expense was the north part of the Second Ward school building. In the summer of 1843 the contract for the building was let to Miron B. Smith, and the structure was completed in time for a winter school, which was taught by Thomas Hanchett. After him,winter schools in this building, which was the only public school-house in Lapeer down to 1861, were successively taught by John McKean, Myron C. Kenney, Carlton Peck, Hubbel Loomis, and Myron C. Kenney a second time. Two of these teachers still reside here, Dr. Kenney and Mr. Peck, and each has taken an active part in the school matters of this county, the former serving upon the board of school inspectors from 1848 till the establishment of the county superintendency in 1866, the latter also serving on the same board from 1856 onward. To this board, which the county superintendency superseded, was intrusted the responsibility of determining the qualifications of teachers, and the province of its authority was a large part of this county. "In the fall of 1845 the interest in the schools received a marked impetts. The State superintendent of public instruction, Mr. Mayhew, made a visit to the village, which was long remembered, and many are even now heard to speak of it as forming an era in the school history of the village. But the influence to help on the schools, notwithstanding the significance of Mr. Mayhew's- visit, came not so much from within the State svstem as from without it. Rev. E. W. True, an excellent scholar, and a man of ripe experience, came to Lapeer about the same time to engage in teaching a select school; and in the three years of his residence in the town, he made an impression -which has not yet been effaced. The beginnings of our upper or high school instruction are to be found the work which he did, and not, as usually has been the case in the State, in the growing functions of the district school, whose peculiar environment at that time made large room for private schools and academies. In 1849 he closed his work here, during the last year of which he was assisted by his accomplished wife, and, having removed to Macomb County, he died there a few years since. For twelve years after his leaving Lapeer, instruction in higher branches was somewhat distinct from the common school, and was for the most part confined to the private schools which succeeded Mr. True's academy. These schools, with that of Mr. True were nearly all taught in the old court-house, a building which afterward became the property of the trustees of the Lapeer Seminary, then of the board of education, and lastly of E. J. White. It at first stood upon the site of the present high school building, but after an occupancy of thirty years as a school-house, it was removed to the block on the northeast, where it burned down in 1876. A grateful memory clings to this building, which is remembered with affection by many in Lapeer, whose school days were passed within its walls. The successors of Mr. True and other teachers of select schools may now be given: During the summer of 1849 and 1850, Miss Mary A. Clark taught a school for young ladies. In the fall of 1848, Mr. Davis Rich opened a school in the old session house, but it was soon discontinued. Rev. Wmin. Platt, assisted by Thomas Morton, opened an academy through the fall and winter of 1850-51. Mr. Morton continued the academy the following summer. Professor J. M. Ellis carried on the academy the winter of 1851-2, closing in the spring. From here he went to Oberlin College, where he has been ever since, professor of the Greek language, in the faculty of that institution. Misses Sampson next taught for one year an excellent select school. In 1856 the last rate bill was made out by Stephen S. Hicks,

Page  70 %1 D L -' - A ~~ --- ~ 14 - aI v I 70 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. who was school director at that time. Thenceforward until tile fall of 1861, the school was one of the free common schools of the State. THE LAPEER SEMINARY. An incorporation was formed in 1859, with James Turrill, E. J. White, Chas. Rich and others as trustees, for the purpose of opening and carrying on a school for secondary instruction. The school which was thus established, was known as the Lapeer Seminary, and Professor Lewis McLouth, now of the State Normal School, was its first and only principal. The seminary itself was the outgrowth of the private schools which had begun with Mr. True; and it was reserved for Professor McLouth, in the two years that he taught, to so promote the school interests as to hasten the union of secondary instruction with the public common school, in what was known as the Lapeer Union School. THE LAPEER UNION SCHOOL. When Professor McLouth left the seminary, a condition of things had come to exist which made it possible to take a great step forward in the educational interests of the place. E. L. Little was appointed to succeed Professor McLouth, but he had scarcely entered upon his work before an independent school district, under the general school law, was formed and the property of the seminary was transferred to the newly organized district. This change took place in the fall of 1861, and the Lapeer Union School, under the management of trustees elected at the annual school meeting, comprises, for the next twelve years, the school history of the town. The following is a list of the principals who successively had charge of the school: 1861-63-E. L. Little, A. B., University of Michigan; now Baptist minister at Alpena. 1864-65-Isaac Delano, A. B., Yale; now a lawyer in East Saginaw. 1864-65-Mr. Chapman, graduate of Normal School. 1865-68-James H. Vincent; living in Lapeer. 1868-72-Omar D. Thompson, now principal of Romeo Union School. 1872-73-F. M. Hamilton, A. B., University of Michigan, teaching in Urbana, Ohio. During thiis peried the old school-honse (Second Ward) was repaired and the south room added. This was in 1866. The brick school-house in the Fourth Ward was built in 1869. The total number of graduates (in three classes) of the Union School is fourteen. THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE CITY OF LAPEER. Lapeer was incorporated as a city in 1869, but it was not until 1873, when the second amended charter was obtained, that provision was made for schools which should be independent of the general school law of the State. The nature of this provision will be found in the next chapter, in the extracts which are given from the city charter. The superintendents and principals of the high school since 1873, have been as follows: SUPERINTENDENTS. 1873-77-L. C. Miller, graduate of Normal School. 1877- -Oliver Gummere Owen, A. M., Haverford College, Pennsylvania. PRINCIPALS OF HIGH SCHOOL. 1873-75 —William B. Williams, A. B., University of Michigan. 1877-79-Miss M. Estella Norton, undergraduate of University, since A. M. of University of Michigan. 1879-80-Miss Kate McNamara, undergraduate. 1880-81-James Edward Hunt, A. B., University of Michigan. 1881 ---Guy Maynard Bigelow, A. B., University of Mich igan. During these years a carefully graded system of schools has been built up, and while the grading is, in the main,,that which is found in the larger towns and the cities of the State, the care of the board of education and of the superintendents has been uniformly employed to make the schools meet the wants of our own people. In this period, two of the four school-houses, which are the property of the board, were erected; the First Ward school building, in 1873, and the high school building in 1875. Prior to 1876 the old seminary building (at first built about 1840 for a court-house) had been, from 1861, the main public school building in the place. The following list of trustees of the Union School (District No. 2, Lapeer Township,) is not so complete as could be wished, but the membership of the board of education created by the charter of 1873, is given in full. The list is instructive as showing the service of influential men of the place upon a board which is charged with a very important trust that demands for its honorable performance, qualifications of no mean order: Dr. M. C. Kenney, 1861-74; George C. Bidwell, 1861-66; E. J. White, 1861 -63; Hubbell Loomis, 1861-65; Charles Rich, 1861-63; Wm. Arnold, 1863-67; Dr. A. Nash, 1868-74; W. H. Jennings, 1868-71; Abram H. Piper, 1872-73; J. R. White, 1866-69; John Hevener, 1867-74; W. W. Stickney, 1866-74; W. W. Barber, 1865-69; Jasper Bentley, 1869-74; J. H. Hicks, 1866-69; John B. Sutton, 1871-74; J. W. Dubois. BOARD OF EDUCATION, 1874-81. 1874-75-M. C. Kenney, president; John Heener, secretary; J. B. Moore, ex-officio; Abram H. Piper, Dr. Alfred Nash, W. W. Stickney, J. W. Dubois. 1875-76-W. W. Stickney, president; John Hevener, secretary; C. M. Hemingway, ex officio; W. J. Loder, Alexander McLennan, Dr. Alfred Nash, Dr. M. C. Kenney. 1876-77-W. W. Stickney, president; E. T. Slayton, secretary; W. A. Jackson, ex-officio; Alexander McLennan, W. J. Loder, John Hevener, E. L. Little. 1877-78-Alexander McLennan, president; E. T. Slayton, secretary; C. G. White, ex-officio; W. J. Loder, E. L. Little, Dr. Alfred Nash, Dr. M. C. Kenney. 1878-79-Dr. M. C. Kenney, president; Dr. Alfred Nash, secretary; C. G. White, ex-ofticio; Dr. Hugh McColl, Dr. E. G. Douglass, Dr. W. A. Jackson, Alexander McLennan. 1879-80 - Dr. W. A. Jackson, president; Dr. Alfred Nash, secretary; Alexander McLennan, ex-officio; W. J. Loder, Dr. E. G. Douglass, Dr. M. C. Kenney, W. F. Daley. 1880-81-Alexander McLennan, president; W. F. Daley, secretary; W. J. Loder, ex-officio; Dr. W. A. Jackson, Dr. E. G. Douglass, C. G. White, Joshua Manwaring. 1881-82-Dr. M. C. Kenney, president; W. F. Daley, secretary; John Hevener, ex-officio; E. L. Thompson, Geo. N. Turrill, C. G. White, Alexander McLennan. 1882-83-Alexander McLennan, C. G. White, George N. Turrill. In 1845 the school population of the district was 110; since 1856, as follows: 1856, 224; 1857, 258; 1858, 268; 1859, 278; 1860, 308; 1861, 289; 1862, 332; 1863, 376; 1864, 379; 1865, 408; 1866, 492; 1867, 524; 1868, 501; 1869, 558; 1870, 582; 1871, 677; 1872, 784; 1873, 827; 1874, 785; 1875, 730; 1876, 740; 1877, 760; 1878, 758; 1879, 780; 1880, 804; 1881, 785. LIST OF TEACHERS. The following list of teachers who have taught in Lapeer is incomplete, though it is as full as it could be made from the local i ~ __ ___ 4-C f ~It\

Page  71 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 71 tradition. Asterisks are placed before the names of those who taught in select shools: 1832-40-N. H. Hart, E. J. White, Elmira Hemingway (Mrs. Emory) Phila Hart (Mrs. Wattles), Susan Cressey (Mrs. Judge Brown. 1840-44-*Rev. Mr. Bates and sister, John J. Cavett, Mary Redman, John McKean, Mary Paterson (Mrs. Noble). 1844-48-M. C. Kenney, Sarah Thorne (Mrs. Cady), Hubbell Loomis, Miss Beamer, Carlton Peck, *Rev. E. W. True, *Davis Rich. 1848-52-*Mary A. Clark, *Rev. Wm. Platt, *Thomas Morton, Elmira Hemingway (Mrs. Emory), *Prof. J. M. Ellis, *Misses Sampson, Susan Hitchcock, Samuel Gibbs, Sarah Hart (Mrs. Maxwell), Malvina Trumbull (Mrs. Piper), George Parcher, Mary Tomlinson (Mrs. Waterbury). 1852-56-Charlotte Hodgson (Mrs. Walker), Carlton Peck, Satrah J. Smith (Mrs. Hough), *Miary Hazen (Mrs. Hunter), Elizabeth Higley. 1856-60 —Rollin Vincent, Anna Percy, Mr. Mathewson, Elizabeth Tomlinson (MIrs. Graham), Sarah Peck (Mrs. Richards). 1859-61 — Prof. Lewis McLouth, seminary; *J. H. Vincent, *Judson Loomis *Jacob L. Green (now president Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Company), *Mrs. J. H. Vincent, Sarah J. Smith. 1861-63-E. L. Little, principal; J. H. Vincent, Park Johnson, Lizzie E. Proctor (Mrs. Strong), Miss Davis, Hannah Borden, Shubal F. White (now Judge White, A]legan); Seth Beden, Myra Tripp (Mrs. Williams). 1863-64-Isaac Delano, principal; Mrs. Bardwell, Oliver F. Davison (Mrs Butterfield), Miss Peck, Elizabeth Higley, Lucy Gerrish, assistant; Lizzie E. Proctor (Mrs. Strong), Myra Tripp (Mrs. Williams), E. B. Eldredge. 1864-65-E. A. Chapman, principal; Mrs. E. A. Chapman, Rhoda C. Walters (Mrs. Lombard), P. A. Schedd. 1865-68-J. H. Vincent, Mrs. J. H. Vincent, Lucy A. Robinson, Mary H. Henry, Emma Hicks, Hannah Butterfield, Estella Garrison, Mrs. Sarah Wilson, Mrs. Mary A. Vincent, Nellie Hemingway (Mrs. Lamb), Deborah K. Converse (Mrs. Corey), Anna Taylor. 1868-72-0. D. Thompson, principal; Mrs. Frances A. Buck, assistant; Miss Kimball, assistant; Miss Ella Hayes, assistant; Miss Hall (Mrs. Richards), assistant; Miss Mary Wells, assistant; Miss Newton (Mrs. -), Miss Amanda Dean (Mrs. Carey), Mrs. Sweet, Mary.Warren (Mrs. Johnston), Sarah J. Evans (Mrs. Vosburg), Alice Brazie (Mrs. Graham), Sophia Thomas, Mrs. Amelia Clark, Ob.; Mary Clark, Miss Carrie Hicks (Mrs. Piper), Ob., Lizzie Chalmers (Mrs. Smith), Miss Mattie Caswell (Mrs. — ), Ob. 1872-73-R. M. Hamilton, principal; Miss Vanfleet, assistant; Minnie Osmon, Miss Addie Kendall (Mrs. Case), Miss Julia Watkins, Miss Kate McNamara, Lizzie Chalmers (Mrs. Smith). 1873-77-L. C. Miller, superintendent; W. B. Williams, principal; Miss Estella Norton, principal; John Johnson, Ida Hammond (Mrs. Dickerson), Jennie Sutton (Mrs. Thomas), Ob.; Margaret Smith, Miss Emma Hulshart (Mrs. May), Mary McNamara, Miss Chamberlain, Anna Hough, Miss Sarah Hough, Hattie Hough (Mrs. -), Lizzie Foster (Mrs. Smith), Sarah Foster (Mrs. Crombie), Helen Watkins, Amelia Mandeville, Mary Rood (Mrs. Johnson) M. A. Houghton, Sarah Kelley, Mary West, Blanche Thomas (Mrs. White), Ob., Carrie Hicks (Mrs. Piper), Ob., John Johnson, Allie Mills, Ob., Mary Conorrow, Albin F. Ayers, Miss Townsend, Anna Taylor-from 1865. 1877-82 —Oliver G. Owen, superintendent; M. Estella Norton, principal; Anna Taylor, E. A. Galbraith, Abby Burrington (Mrs. Johns), Sarah E. Roberts, Phoebe J. Watson, Sarah Kelley, Albina F. Ayers, M. A. Giddings, H. D. Buckingham, Mary McCune (Mrs. Mathews), Ada West, Anna 0. Loughlin, Nellie Smith, Delia Rood, Hattie Daley, Nettie Ross, Allie Watkins, Nettie L. Taylor (Mrs. Hopkins), Mary M. Gunu, Mrs. E. B. Eldredge, Kate McNamara, principal; James E. Hunt, principal; G. M. Bigelow, principal; Frank McNamara, Anna Hough, Ella Hallock, assistant; Mary A. Houghton, assistant. TEACHERS IN 1883. Superintendent, W. D. Clizbe; principal, William Streeter; assistant principal, Miss Mary Houghton; eighth grade, Miss Anna Taylor; seventh grade, Elmer D. Gardner; sixth grade, Miss Mary Johnson; fifth grade, Miss Sarah Kelley. First Ward, first and second grades, Miss Nellie Smith; First Ward, third and fourth grades, Miss Ada C. West; Second Ward, first and second grades, Miss Hattie Daley; Second Ward, third and fourth grades, Miss Mary McNamara; Third Ward, first and second grades, Miss E. B. Eldridge; Third Ward, third and fourth grades, Miss Albina Ayres; Fourth Ward, first and second grades, Miss Delia Rood; Fourth Ward, third and fourth grades, Miss Nettie Ross. SECRET ORDERS. MASONIC. Lapeer Lodge No. 54, F. & A. M., was organized February 13, 1852, with the following officers: W. M., William H. Clark; S. W., John Barber; J. W., Miron B. Smith. In 1874 the lodge fitted up rooms in White's Block. The new hall was dedicated in April, 1874, which event was mentioned in a local paper of the following week as follows: "The formal opening of the new hall of Lapeer Lodge No. 56, F. & A. M., took place on Friday evening, with an attendance of about three hundred persons. The dedicatory exercises were conducted by State Deputy Grand Master G. H. Durand, of Flint, assisted by N. B. Eldredge, D. G. M.; John Armstrong, G. C.; William Townsend, S. G. D.; R. C. Hutton, S. G. W.; W. F. Daley, J. G. W.; J. W. Dubois, J. D.; F. H. Rankin, G. A.; W. W. Stickney, G. S. B.; S. Curtis, G. M. "After the above exercises, the members repaired to the Opera Hall, where a number of ladies and invited guests were assembled to listen to a Masonic address by D. G. M. Durand, of Flint. "After the address supper was served at the Marshall House, to which nearly the entire audience repaired. "The new hall is in White's Block, is 32x53 feet, besides four large ante-rooms and banquet hall. It is handsomely carpeted, elegantly furnished, and is an honor not only to the fraternity, but a credit to our city." Officers in 1883: W. M., C. S. Hicks; S. W., James Hungerford; J. W., William Wadsworth; treasurer, A. McLennan; secretary, George H. Henderson; S. D., Frank Jackson; J. D., S. H. Smith; tyler, S. S. Hicks. The Chapter was organized in 1873. There are at present eighty members. The officers are as follows: H. P., W. F. Daley; K., G. B. Adams; S., James A. Hungerford; C. H., Charles Saunders; P. S., F. J. Jackson; R. A. C., William Barmon; G. M. 3 V., S. H. Smith; G. M. 2 V., Adam Hoesington; G. M. 1 V., William Colerick; treasurer, A. McLennan; secretary, H. W. Hin man; sentinel, S. S. Hicks. There were fourteen charter members. First officers: H. P., N. B. Eldredge; K., John Armstrong; S., W. F. Daley; C. H., W. W. Stickney; P. S., Robert Bigger; R. A. C., L. H. Gardner; G. M. 3 V., A. B. Joyce; G. M. 2 V., G. B. Adams; G. M. 1 V., William McDonald; treasurer, R. G. Hart; secretary, A. McLennan; sentinel, Joseph W. Hammel. J I

Page  72 Ji I I I I I...A. 72 HISTORY OF L& PEER COUNtTY. The council was 'instituted November 9, 1875, and the charter was obtained in Februlary following. The first officers were as follows: T. I. M., H. K. White; D. I. M., Wy. F. Daley; P. C., John Hevener. The charter members in addition to those already named -were as follows: R. S. Hutton, William McDonald, J. R. White, D. C. Miller, L. MI. Cary, W7illiam Townsend, N. B. Eldredge, John Robinson, A. McLennan, George P. Adams, C. L. Thatcher. Officers il 1883: T. I. M., H. K. White; D. I. M., F. J. Jackson; P. C., William Colerick; treasurer, A. McLennan; recorder, H. E. Hatch; C. C., S. H. Slllith. Present membership, forty-two. ODD FELLOWS. Lapeer Lodge No. 94, I. O. O. F., was instituted January 3, 1866, with fourteen members. The principal officers were as follows: N. G., William Henlingway; V. G., John J. Watkins; secretary, A. S. Hatch; treasurer, C. WI. Hemingway. The lodge has enjoyed uniform prosperity, and at the present time has about sixty-four members. Regular meetings are held on Wednesday evenings. Officers in 1883 are as follows: N. G., Daniel W. Johnson; V. G., MI. Conklin; secretary, John E. Roberts; treasurer, E. M. Roberts, P. S., William Hemingway. lN1GHTS OF HONOR. Security Lodge No. 201 of this order was organized December 6, 1874, with twenty-five charter members. Its present ruembership is twenty-eight. Regular meetings are on the first an-d third Friday of each month. Present officers are: C. J. White, D.; R. B. Conklin, P. D.; L. H. Tucker, representative; George B. Adams, treasurer; Charles Lombard, financial representative. ROYAL ARCANUM. Michigan Council No. 24 of this order was chartered May 3, 1880, with forty members. Its present membership is fifty-seven. Its officers are: Regent, E. C. Green; vice-regent, VW. N. Copthorne; orator, Myron Snyder; secretary, J. R. Johnson; collector, S. R. Wilcox; chaplain, C. G. White; treasurer, Alex. McLennan; guide, William H. Bennett; sentinel, Fred. Lincoln; warden, George B. Adams. Past regents are W. W. Stickney, John * Abbott, R. T. Walker, A. Nash, H. A. Birdsall, J. R. Johnson, W. F. Daley and John Hevener. LAPEER BANKS. The First National Bank was started in February, 1871, and at once assumed a leading position in the monetary affairs not only of Lapeer County, but of the State. E. J. White was president and H. K. White, cashier. A change of officers occurred in 1873. The bank is operated on a nominal capital of $75,000, and officered as follows: President, H. K. White; vice-president, B. F. Moore; cashier, C. G. White. The officers and directors, with one exception, are old residents of the place; men who have been long and actively identifiedl with the business interests of Lapeer, and regarded as among the most staunch and reliable business men in this section of the State. Mr. E. J. White, one of the oldest citizens, was the prime mover in the enterprise. The Lapeer City Bank was started by J. M. Wattles and son under the firlm name of J. M. Wattles & Co. in 1874, and the business is still continued under the same name. Mr. J. M. Wattles is one of the pioneer lawyers of the county. The batik is established on a safe financial basis and does a good business. LAPEER CITY BREWERY. This brewery, which is on Calhoun Street, near Nepessing Avenue, was built in 1866 by John A. Buerger. It is run by steam and has a capacity of about 2,000 barrels per annum. The lager beer-made at this brewery finds its market in Michigan, although some of it is shipped to other States. HUNTER S CREEK GRIST-MILL. This mill was built in 1859 ol Hunter's Creek in the city of Lapeer. The creek furnishes the power which runs it. It has been enlarged and improved since it was originally built. It has a capacity of twenty barrels per day and is rut as a custom mill. It is owned by Esli R. Redfield. TUTTLE S PLANING AND FEED MILL. This establishirient is located on Monroe Street in the southwest part of Lapeer City. The original mill was built by Tuttle & Gregory in 1853. Burnt out in 1856 and rebuilt. Moved to its present location in 1871. In 1878 Mr. Tuttle bought Mr. Gregory's interest. In 1880 he added a feed mill for the accommzodation of his customers. The planing-mill makes sash, doors, blinds, etc., and also runs a retail lumber yard in connection. LAPEER STEAM ENGINE WORKS. This establishment was built in 1873 by William McDonald. At it are manufactured steam engines, brass and iron castings, machinery, etc. Employs from ten to twelve men on an average. It is situated on Mill Street, near the track of the Michigan Central Railway. Does a large State business. THE CENTENNIAL MILLS. This flouring-mill was built in 1876 by Wf. H. Jennings. He sold the property in 1878 to Mrs. C. T. Dodge, the present proprietoress. The capacity of the mill is about one hundred barrels of flour in t-enty-four hours. In addition to those already mentioned are a sash and door factory, wagon shops, etc. BUILDINGS. The business buildings il Lapeer are substantial brick structures, and impart to the city an air of thrift and stability. The Abram House was built in 1874. The White Block, built in 1879, is a large three-story brick, and contains the Opera House. It is an exceptionally fine building. The city building for the use of the city officers and firee department was erected in 1882. RAILROADS. The construction of the Chicago & Grand Trunk Railroad in 1870, the Detroit and Bay City il 1872, and the branch to Five Lakes, affords Lapeer excellent railway connections. BIOGRAPHICAL. WILLIAM B. HAMILTON, Mi. D., was born in Paisley, Scotland, September 23, 1832. He came to America with his parents in 1841, when the family settled in Berlin, St. Clair County, Mich., their farm touching the town line of Almont. Here he was brought up, receiving initiation into the mysteries of pioneer life on a farm under the tuition of his sturdy Scotch father. His early education in letters was received at the "old red school-house" in the "Scotch settlement" of Almont. At the age of twenty-one he commenced teaching district school during the winters, continuing to work on the home farm in the summer time, (excepting about six months spent at Dickinson Institute, Romeo,) till in the fall of 1859 he went to Ann Arbor and entered tlie Union School to prepare for the University, which he entered the following fall, studying the classical course with the class of 1864 through the sophomore year. Then under convictions of patriotic duty he enlisted at Romeo August 9, 1862, in Captain Keeler's Company B. Twenty-second Regiment, Michigan Infantry, receiving the rank of sergeant. After seeing some hard service he was taken prisoner, together with a large portion of his regiment, at the battle of Chickamauga September 20, 1863, being at that time second lieutenant of Com I V -I J i lip 9 -.b %

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Page  73 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 73 pany F. Then followed a rough experience in various Southern prisons till March 1, 1864, when he was paroled, returning to his regiment in May with the rank of first lieutenant, and was mustered out June 28, 1865. Before leaving the State for the war he had married Sara R. Stone, of Ray, Macomb County, then teaching in Rochester, Oakland County. At the close of the war he moved with his family to Ann Arbor and completed both classical and medical courses of study. In June, 1868, he moved to Burnside in this county and commenced practice as a physician, but remained there only eighteen months, and then moved to Columbiaville. After six years' practice in that place he went to Almont in the fall of 1875, but moved back to Columbiaville in the spring of 1877, where hle remained till January, 1881, having been elected county treasurer in the campaign of 1880. On entering upon the duties of his office he came with his family to Lapeer City, where he now resides, and is serving his second term of office. LORENZO J. HADDRILL is one of the representative business men of Lapeer County, and is probably the most extensive dealer in groceries and farm products within its limits. Mr. Haddrill was born at Orion, Oakland County, Mich., in the year 1849. When about sixteen years of age he came to Lapeer and attended school two years. Having by this time arrived at an age when he began to think about selecting some business pursuit, and having a natural taste for trade he entered the employ of his brother as clerk in his grocery store. Applying himself closely to the duties of his occupation, he continued in that position until 1870, when he became a partner, and the firm was known as Haddrill Bros. for about three years. In 1873 he bought the interest of his brother, W. H. Haddrill, and has continued the business alone to the present time, having been now continuously in this business for sixteen years, and the results show with what degree of success he has managed his operations. He carries on a general grocery store, carrying a large stock of general groceries, provisions, flour, feed, farm products, wines, liquors, tobacco, cigars, etc., and in this line is said to be the largest dealer in the county, a position which has been reached by closely applying himself to his business and so dealing with the public as to secure their confidence. In addition to the business of his store he is extensively engaged in buying and selling farm produce, and especially wool. In 1882 he handled more wool than any other dealer in the county, with one exception. He has been emphatically a successful business man. In 1876 he married Sarah Canniff, of Lapeer. They have two children, both daughters. Mr. Haddrill gives some attention to public affairs, and has held the office of alderman about nine years. RODNEY G. HART was the first child born in what is now Lapeer City, having been born in 1834. Was educated partly in Romeo and Lodi Plains, Mich. Went to the Michigan University, but was compelled to leave on account of ill-health. Has been in business of various kinds until the present. Was a banker from 1866 till 1878. After retiring from that business spent a year in Europe. Was in Paris in 1878 and visited the Exposition in company with ex-President Grant. Is now engaged in farming, having 220 acres adjoining the city of Lapeer. Has been and is an extensive dealer in fine blooded horses, swine and cattle, for which he has taken prizes at State fairs in Michigan, Missouri and Ohio; also at the Canadian Provincial Exhibition at London, Ont. Was the first mayor of Lapeer and has been an alderman for a number of years, and is at the present time alderman of the First Ward of Lapeer City. Held the office of postmaster six years. SHAD N. VINCENT was born in the village of Cold Brook, Herkimer County, N. Y., in 1831, but the removal of his father, Dr. J. H. Vincent, to Chagrin Falls, Ohio, in the followilng year, identifies the early boyhood and manhood of the subject of this sketch with the State of Ohio. He received an academic education at the Asbury Seminary and the Champion Library School, and a thorough commercial training at the celebrated college of Bryant, Lusk & Stratton, at Cleveland, Ohio, graduating therefrom in 1854, and afterward assisting as instructor in the preparatory department. He early developed a passion for the study of vocal music, and at the age of sixteen was the conductor of the Musical Society at Chagrin Falls. The teaching of this delightful branch of learning has been, with him, ever since, a labor of love, and he was, for many years, the leader of the Lapeer Philharmonic Society. His time was ever given for this purpose generously, and his services gratuitously, and many recall with feelings of gratitude the assistance thus freely rendered them in their early efforts in the tuneful art. Mr. Vincent settled in Lapeer in 1855, succeeding his brother, Dr. W. Vincent, in the drug business, which he still continues. He is the oldest druggist and merchant in the county, and has sold goods from one building for twelty-eight years. He has also been largely engaged in the manufacture of lumber and shingles, and to a limited extent in farming. He was the first Republican postmaster of Lapeer, receiving his commission from President Lincoln in 1861. He was continued in this office until April, 1883, being at the time of his retirement the oldest presidential postmaster in the State. He was appointed the agent of the American Express Company upon their establishment of an office in Lapeer, and still holds that position. He is an active member of the Protestant Episcopal Church, and engages heartily in whatever is conducive to its welfare. He has been twice married, and is the father of seven children, one of which, the issue of the first marriage, and three of the second, are living. Public spirited and generous, taking a lively interest in whatever concerns the welfare of his city or State, an active worker in politics, his aggressive temperament is so toned by a genial and persistent good nature that there are few men who have a larger list of personal friends, or upon whom the battles of nearly fifty years have left fewer scars, or in whose breasts rankle less of unpleasant memories. H. D. WEBSTER, photographer, is a native of Lapeer County, and was born in the township of Hadley May 13, 1852, on the old homestead which his father took up from the government. He studied his profession with F. G. Maitland, of Buffalo, N. Y. Worked for a time in Flint, then came to Lapeer City, and was in the employ of C. A. Kelly for a period of fifteen months prior to 1879, when he bought him out, and has since been doing business for himself. His location is in the Bank Block, and it can be said of him that he has adopted all of the late improvements used in the art of photography, including the instantaneous process, and that his work is not excelled even by artists in the larger cities. He was married May 16, 1877, to Miss Anna M. Fuller, of Otisville, Genesee County, formerly of Carlton Place, near Ottawa, Canada. WILLIAM B. WILLIAMS, a native of Lawrence County, Pa., was born in 1849. Came to Michigan in 1869 and was a student at the University of Michigan. Graduated from the literary department in 1873. From 1873 to 1875 was principal of the Lapeer High School. In 1875 returned to the university and graduated from the law department in 1877. Was appointed circuit court commissioner in 1877, elected in 1878, and held the office until January 1, 1881. In the fall of 1882 was elected prosecuting attorney. Was marriel to Miss Lucy White, a native of Lapeer, in 1879. They have two children, sons. HENnRY A. BIRDSALL was born in 1845 at Rochester, Oakland County, Micll. Was educated at the academies in Rochester and

Page  74 -L N! i I I -1% S ~ - - 74 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 74 I 1 Lapeer. Attended one term at the law school of the Michigan University. Came to Lapeer in 1856. In 1863 he enlisted in the Eleventh Regiment, Michigan Cavalry, and saw service with it until the war closed. Held the rank of orderly sergeant whe mustered out. Admitted to the bar in 1871 and has practiced law since then. Has held the following offices: In 1867 was township clerk of Mayfield and Lapeer Townships; collector of taxes in Lapeer two years; circuit court commissioner four years, 1872-'76; was elected county clerk in 1875, previous to which he had been deputy clerk for four years. Has held the office continuously since, his last reelection being in the fall of 1882. Was married in 1871 to Miss Kate E. Bentley, a native of Lapeer County. They have three children. REV. JONATHAN ALDEN WOODRUFF, who began home missionary work in the pine woods of Lapeer County in 1859, was born in Coventry, Conn., April 18, 1808. His father removed to Wayne, Ashtabula County, Ohio, when "Alden" was about ten years of age, where he helped to clear and work his father's farm, meanwhile studying winters until he was nineteen. He then entered Hamilton College, N. Y., and at twenty-two graduated with the honor of delivering the philosophical oration' At Auburn Seminary he studied theology and was licensed to preach by the Black River Association of northern New York. In 1831 he married Susanna, daughter of Rev. Jeremiah Osborn, by whom he had eight children, of whom Mrs. Marvin P. Grant Keyes, of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, is the sole survivor. In 1845 he married Aurelia, daughter of Deacon Erastus Talcott, of Coventry, Conn., by whom he had five children, of whom Mrs. Sarah Bryce, Edward T. Woodruff and Emma A. Woodruff are living and reside in Lapeer. This most estimable lady died in the fiftieth year of her age, but is still remembered with great affection by all who ever knew her. Her remains lie in Burnside with a neat marble slab to mark the place, bearing the inscription, "Her children shall rise up and call her blessed; her husband also and he praiseth her." In 1872 he married Emma Griffith, who still survives him as Mrs. J. R. Holmes, of Manchester. The first eight years of his ministry were spent in Ohio, and were divided between Warren, Madison, Kelloggsville and Wooster. In 1839 he removed to Rock Island, Ill., where he formed the First Presbyterian Church of that place. The Rock Island University was formed about that time of which he was elected chancellor. In 1845 he returned to Ohio and ministered to a church in Newton Falls two years. He was afterward pastor of a church in Conneautville, Pa., following which he was principal of the Olean Academy, supplying the pulpit in Portville, N. Y., at the same time. He next ministered to a church in Conneaut, Ashtabula County, Ohio, from which place, after spending one summer with a church he had formed in Marquette, he removed his family in 1858 to Lapeer. Here hle ministered one year to the First Presbyterian Church before entering upon his missionary work in Burnside, during which time an extensive revival took place which doubled the membership of the church. Speaking of his missionary field he says: "We are one of the pioneer families, the first having come but three years in advance. The impediments to our progress were such that we were three days reaching our forest home after having come within two miles. Only they who have had to cut their track through dense forests with much 'down timber,' crossing swamps and small streams with a loaded wagon know what it is to pass over such roads. Our usual mode of going to meeting was this-Mrs. W. and two children on our Indian pony, myself leading him with hatchet in hand, sometimes through the untouched forest, except that I cut away the limbs and fallen trees that obstructed our way. Soon we could count a little church of fifteen members, and the following spring the way was opened to the enlargement of my field of labor. In a settlement six miles south I was called to officiate at the funeral of an Irish Presbyterian who had been crushed by a pine log. This introduced me to a company of poor but faithful disciples to whom I ministered for eight years. At first they proposed to unite with the church here and five came seven miles on foot, were examined and propounded for admission at the next communion. One member of session was absent, who, on his return, objected to their reception, which was a terrible blow to our prosperity. Other opportunities for enlargement of my field of labor presented themselves, and were embraced, in the new settlements, though the task of reaching them was ofttimes herculean; but with my French pony I was equal to any emergency in traveling." Much more of his pioneer experiences could be given but the foregoing will suffice, being an ample illustration of an interesting epoch in the history of the church and of the participator. Rev. J. A. Woodruff closed a long and useful career on Sept. 26, 1876, at the age of sixty-eight years. His remains are buried in the cemetery at Imlay City where he died. Many touching instances of his patience and fortitude in his sufferings and his unflinching adherence to what he believed to be right, as well as his unqualified trust and confidence in the Master whom he tried to faithfully serve, might be given but for want of space. A favorite text he often repeated was, "He knoweth our frame he remembereth that we are dust." Fitting words to close this sketch are"Blessed are the dead that die in the Lord. Yea, saith the spirit, and their works do follow them." EDWARD T. WOODRUFF was born in Cattaraugus County, N. Y., in 1853. His parents came to Michigan and settled in Lapeer in 1858. He received a common school education in Lapeer and Flint. Has been a farmer, run a saw and grist-mill, taught school, etc. In 1880 was elected register of deeds for Lapeer County, and reelected in 1882. Married to Lena M. Van Wormer, of Lapeer City. They have two children, a son and daughter. HON. JOSHUA MANWARING Was born in the township of Springfield, Burlington County, N. J., October 2, 1824, and was of Englishl-French descent, his grandfather, John Manwaring, emigrating from Lincolnshire, England, about the year 1760, where he left two sisters. He settled on the sea coast of New Jersey, near the present village of Barnegat, Ocean County, and on the breaking out of the Revolutionary War, enlisted in a regiment of militia, and marched down to New York to oppose the landing of the Hessians. After the capture of New York, lie returned to his home and soon thereafter joined with others in forming a company to watch the Tories, who were numerous at that time, and continued in that service to the close of the war. In 1778 he married a French lady by the name of Esopus, raising a family of four sons and three daughters. Adam, the second son, and father of the subject of this sketch, was born January 8, 1783, and removed from Ocean to Burlington County, when a young man, where he married Miss Susan Platt; the fruit of this union being a family of fourteen children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the tenth, and was born October 2, 1824. With his parents he came to Michigan, arriving September 8, 1836, his father having purchased the John Sargent farm, in the township of Avon, Oakland County. There Joshua worked on the farm summers, attending the district school winters, and by dint of hard study acquired a good business education. At the age of twenty-one years he left the parental roof to seek his for tune, in the far West, poor in purse, but with the never-to-be forgotten blessing of his dear mother, who admonished hill to be honest and industrious, and that success would follow him. He went to the then unorganized county of Montcalm, and assisted in clearing the land where the flourishing village of Greenville now stands, and helped to build the first frame house in the place for Abel -[. I lI — r L I -.4. I - b r,'- w -.

Page  75 I HISTORY OF LAPEER COUN, TY. 75 French. He also engaged with the firm of Myers & Burrell in building a saw-mill, which he assisted in running, and was engaged during the summer of 1846, in rafting and running lumber on the Flatt and Grand Rivers. In April, 1846, he attended the first township meeting in Montcalm County, where he cast his first vote. The entire county at that time was organized into one township and attached to Ionia County for judicial and county purposes. The township meeting was held at the Lincoln Mills, and about twentythree votes polled, Mr. Manwaring voting the Whig ticket. In the fall of 1846, le engaged with Nelson Robinson to run the Belden Mill on Flatt River, where he continued during the following winter to the satisfaction of his employer, and in the spring of 1817, in company with Charles Heacox, engaged in rafting lumber from the mills, then known as the Dickson Mills-now Kidville Mills — which they successfully performed, but meeting with many hardships before reaching the mouth of Grand tiver. The consequences were that Mr. Manwaring was attacked with that pest of the pioneer -fever and ague-which caused him to resolve to return to his former home in Oakland County. Not being successful in getting the money for his work, he purchased a team of horses and a wagon of Thomas Myers, paying the purchase price in negotiable notes, part of which were against Myers himself. He then started on his journey, going via Lansing, where the capital of the State had been located the previous winter by the legislature in session at the old capitol building in the city of Detroit. Arriving at the new seat of government, he found parties clearing off the timber preparatory to erecting the capitol building, which has since been destroyed by fire. The place was over-run with adventurers and speculators from all parts of the State, and he found it impossible to get accommodations for the night, and was obliged to sleep in his wagon wrapped in his blankets. The following morning he left the little village of smoking huts and log heaps little thinking that thirty-six years after he would return to a beautiful capital as the honored senator from the Sixteenth District. He remt lined but a short time at home after his arrival, and in August, 1817, engaged to work on the academy or high school then building at Rochester, Oakland County. Again leaving the county he went to the township of Dryden, Lapeer County, and engaged with his brother-in-law, the Hon. John M. Lamb. in the mercantile business, which he continued for two I years when he engaged in business for himself, erecting buildings for the purpose. He was married December 5,1852, to Miss Emily E. Ross, daughter of Jacob Ross of Mason, Cass County, Mich., who has contributed, both in intelligence and industry, an equal share with himself in acquiring a competence which both of them have justly earned and now enjoy. In 1853 he decided to engage in lumbering and with that purpose in view purchased a tract of pine land in the township of Attica, Lapeer County, upon which he erected a mill in partnership with Munroe Fuller, which they continued one year when he purchased Mr. Fuller's interest and continued the business himself in the Red Mill, familiarly known as the Manwaring Mill. He continued the manufacture and sale of lumber, lath and shingles for many years, supplying the immediate vicinity as well as the adjacent counties of Oakland, Macomb and St. Clair, keeping on hand a full assortment of all kinds of lumber, until it was a common saying —" Go to Manwaring's Mill and you can get anything you want." In 1858 he rented his mill to A. Hovey of Oxford, and April 7, 1859, in company with five others started on a trip to the Rocky Mountains in search of health, wealth and adventure. The company comprised William Qutermas, William Emmrons, Dr. E. A. Hebord, Charles Brainard and Aaron Moe, all old pioneers of Dryden, Lapeer County. Going by the way of Omaha, up the Platte River by team, and across the plains, they finally, after a tedious journey, encamped on the ground where the city of Denver now stands, and were among the first to arrive there. From there they went to the mountains where Central City is now located, and returned by the way of Denver, south through the 'C Garden of the Gods," and west into the Park, where the Indians were hostile, lying in ambush to cut off stragglers, many losing their lives during 1859. After many months of tedious travel and perilous adventure in the Rocky Mountains, spiced with narrow escapes from the Indians, they started on their way home going down the Platte River a part of the way on a flat boat built for the purpose. About two hundred miles east of the mountains the water failed and they were obliged to abandon their boats in that portion of Colorado known as the Desert, and proceeded on foot, a distance of six hundred miles, to the nearest settlement on the eastern borders of Nebraska. The journey occupied six weeks, during which time they endured many hardships, interspersed with reckless buffalo hunts and narrow escapes sufficient to satisfy the cravings of the best specimens of <" Young America" desirous of going West. Arriving at Oinaha they proceeded down the Missouri River to St. Joseph, and thence by rail to Detroit and home, where they were welcomed by their families and friends. Mr. Manwaring then decided to devote his time strictly to business in future, and accordingly started a branch store at Imllay, where he furnished the lumbermen and others with supplies. He was also engage4 at the time in mercantile business in Dryden, and soon after in Imlay City, being engaged in lumbering in Sanilac County, as one of the firm of Lamb, Manwaring & Co. At the same time he was manufacturing and selling large quantities of lumber, lath and shingles at his mill in Attica. January 12, 1871, he removed with his family to Lapeer City, where he purchased land and now resides. His farm is one of the best improved in the county, and he has erected the Manwaring Block and a number of dwelling-houses. In 1874 his mills in Attica were burned, and he has since improved the land he formerly lumbered from, converting it into well tilled farms that "blossom as the rose," where heretofore were stump3 ald forests. These farms lie one mile south of the village of Attica, on the Grand Trunk Railway. He is now engaged in lumbering on the Au Sable in the county of Alcona, Lake Huron Shore. Mir. Minwaring's political history dates from his connection with the Whig party until the collapse of that party, when he joined the Republican party on its formation, and during the war was active in helping to send men to the front, contributing both time and money freely for that purpose, not forgetting the wives and children left behind. He furnished them with supplies on relief orders furnished by the authorities, without recompense for his time and trouble, and otherwise aiding the cause of his country, not being situated so as to go to the front himself. After his removal to Lapeer City he was induced to accept the office of supervisor for the First District, which he filled creditably, and was also a member of the school board. In the fall of 1871 he attended the Liberal Republican convention held at Grand Rapids, which nominated the Hon. Austin Blair for governor. The Liberal Republican party proving a failure, he, in 1876, was induced to accept the nomination of State senator from the Democrats, but was defeated. Was again nominatedin 1878, and again failed, as he also did in 1880, in a contest with the Hon. John T. Rich for representative. With characteristic determination and perseverance he ag(ain accepted the nomination from the combined Democratic and Green back parties for the sixteenth senatorial district, and was elected by the handsome majority of 800 over his competitor, the Hon. Wm. W. Andrews, of Macomb County. In the senate Mr. Manwaring has taken an interest in all measures brought before that body, and is chairman of the committee on Michigan Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, and is a member of the committees on lumber interests, )4 - e J A - ) I kS

Page  76 1 1- - i. i- ~ 76 HISTORY OF LA&PEER COUNTY. agricultural college, horticulture and public buildings. Senator Manwaring belongs to that class of eminently useful men who have helped to develop the wonderful resources that nature has so lavishly bestowed upon the peninsular State. Coming to it poor as regards this world's goods, but bringing stout hearts and willing hands, success has perched on their banners and they are surrounded with honors, friends and wealth. The great commonwealth can well be proud of such men, as through them have her great industries been developed, and upon such does her future greatness depend. Mr. and Mrs. Manwaring have five children; one son, George R., residing at Imlay City, and four daughters, Lilla, wife of Joseph Armstrong, merchant, Lapeer City; Corena, wife of H. E. Hatcll, hardware merchant, Lapeer City; Lavango, wife of Daniel W. Johnson, railroad agent, Lapeer City, and Dell. now living at home. With their children all settled near them and enjoying the comforts of a fine home, Mr. and Mrs. Manwaring canll look back over their thirtyone years of wedded life and feel that they have been well spent. As a prominent and leading citizen; as an active and representative legislator, Senator Manwaring is well known throughout the State. HON. JOSEPH B. MOORE was born in Commerce, Oakland County Mich., Nov.3, 1845, and received his education at Hillsdale College and in the law depart-ment of the University of Michigan. He came to Lapeer City in 1869 and was admitted to the practice of law in October of the same year, which profession he has since followed. He was elected circuit court commissioner for Lapeer County, and in the spring of 1874 was elected mayor of Lapeer City, and also prosecuting attorney for the county, which position he retained two years. In 1878 was elected State senator from the Twentieth District, comprising the counties of Lapeer and Macomb. ALFRED HALLOCK was born in Burlington, Vt., in 1821, and when nine years of age came with his parents to Michigan. They at first settled in Wayne County, where, after a residence of four years, they removed to Genesee County, remaining there until 1872, when he came to Lapeer and learned the carpenter's trade, which he has followed the greater part of his life. He has. for the past ten years, been engaged in the manufacture of pumps, which have found a ready sale in and about Lapeer City. In Grand Blanc, Genesee County, Mr. Hallock held the office of supervisor for eight years, and also one year in Lapeer, and has been a justice of the peace eleven years. He was married in 1850 to Miss Alice E. Smith, of Dutchess County, N. Y. They have two daughters. STEPHEN H. SMITH was born in Niagara County, N. Y., in 1830, and in early life came with'his parents to Michigan. The death of his father occurring soon thereafter, he went to live with his uncle. In 1849 he purchased a farm in Lapeer County, upon which he resided eight years, when he disposed of it and engaged in lumbering. In 1872 he commenced the manufacture of shingles, which he has" continued to the present time, having an extensive mill near Lapeer City, in which he employs, on an average, thirteen men during the year. He was married in 1857 to Miss Louisa P. Parsons, a native of Livingston County, Michigan. They have two daughters. JOHN B. HOUGH was born in Bozrah, New London County, Ct., in 1809, and lived with his parents on a farm until he reached twenty-one years of age. He continued farming in that vicinity for four years thereafter, when he came to Michigan and settled in the township of Almont, Lapeer County. He took up from the government 160 acres of land, upon which he resided until 1869, when he was elected probate judge, which position he held until 1881. He has also held other important offices, including supervisor four years, justice of the peace twenty-two years and deputy internal revenue collector and assessor. He was married in 1853 to Miss Sarah S. Palmer, a native of Connecticut. Mr. Hough settled in Almont the year the township was organized. G. F. DEMOREST WaS born in Troy, Mich., in 1847, and moved with his parents to Elmira, N. Y., when two years of age, and resided there eleven years, when he came to Michigan and located in Oakland County, where he remained till 1863. He then enlisted in the First Michigan Cavalry and served until June, 1865, when he returned to Oakland County, and commenced to learn the trade of marble-cutting, at which he worked in different localities in the State till 1870, when he came to Lapeer and worked for Mr. Wilson about six months, when he formed a partnership under the firm name of Mills & Demorest, Mr. Wilson retiring. This firm continued till 1873, when Mr. Tucker took the place of Mr. Mills and the firm was then known as Tucker & Demorest until 1883, when Mr. Demnorest assumed exclusive control of the business, which is cutting and furnishing marble and stone to order. His business place is on Nepessing Street. He was married in 1874, to Miss Susie E. Harrison, of Lapeer, and has one child, a son. GEORGE DONALDSON was born in Woodstock. Ont., in 1849, and came to Michigan in 1865, locating in Lapeer. He is the proprietor of an extensive meat market on the north side of Nepessing Street near First Nation.al Bank, and is largely engaged in droving, shipping and dealing in live stock. He also owns ninety-six acres of land two miles east of the city. He was married in 1880 to Miss Nancy McClary, of London, Ont. ROBERT B. CONKLIN was born in Stark, Herkimer County, N. Y., in 1823, and came West at an early day. He first settled in McHenry County, Ill., taking up land from the government, and subsequently purchased and resided upon an improved farm. In 1854 he came to Lapeer County and bought a farm in the township of Aimont, where he lived several years, when he removed to the township of Mayfield. In 1863 he bought a farm three miles from Lapeer City, where he resided till 1872, when he became a resident of Lapeer, where he has since lived. He was married in 1842 to Miss Rachel Chapel, of Otsego County, N. Y. At present Mr. Conklin owns 160 acres of pine and farming lands in Oscoda County. DR. E. G. DOUGLASS was born in Oakland County, Mich., in 1839, where he grew up to manhood, and where he continued to reside till 1863, when he commenced the study of his profession with his brother, Dr. I. Douglass, in Romeo, Mich. He continued his studies with him two and one-half years, when he came to Lapeer and commenced the practice of dentistry, which he has continued up to the present time. Dr. Douglass became a member of the State Dental Association in 1867, and to day, 1883, has the most extensive and oldest established dental practice in the county. He was married in 1861 to Miss J. H. Snyder, who was born in Lower Canada. They have two children, Edith G., born November 4, 1869, and Elton G., born August 9, 1876. MILTON A. VAN WAGONER was born in Oakland County, Mich., in 1844, and after attending the common schools in the locality, he entered the school at Clarkson, where he graduated. He then went to Ann Arbor, where he attended school a year and a half, when he returned to Oakland County and taught school several terms in that and Genesee Counties. He then turned his attention to the sale of musical instruments in Goodrich, Genesee County, for a short time, when he came to Lapeer, in 1874, and since that time has continued the sale of all kinds of musical instruments in this and adjoining counties. IRA H. BUTTERFIELD was born in Gainesville, N. Y., in 1812, and came to Michigan in 1838. He settled in Utica, where he en gaged in farming, milling and manufacturing. In 1866 he came to Lapeer and purchased land on Saginaw Street, upon which he still resides. About the same time he bought a grist-mill near his farm, which he owned and operated up to 1877. Mr. Butterfield represented Macomb County in the State senate one term, Lapeer I_ _ 1I3;

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Page  77 __j D -Ne A - I HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 77 County forming a part of the district, and has held the ofiice of supervisor two terms. He was married in 1839 to Miss Rachel McNeil, of New Hampshire, who died in 1816. Was again married to Mist, Alice W. McNeil, of the same State, but was living in Lowell, Mass. He has five children, three sons and two daughters. FREDERICK LINCOLN was born in Bangor, N. Y., in 1815, and came to Michigan in 1860. He first located in Port Huron, where he remained till 1873, following sailing as an occupation, when he came to Lapeer, and has been engaged in the grocery trade and milling; at present has charge of R. G. Hart's elevator and gristmill. He was married in 1874 to Miss Kate _M. Hart, daughter of R. G. Hart, and has two children, a son and a daughlter. NELSON MILES was born in Grand Rapids, Mich. When three years old he moved with his people to Schoharie County, N. Y., and three years thereafter to Watertown, N. Y. He attended the public schools anid institute, and in 1865 came to Michigan, his father buying and settling upon the farm he (Nelson Miles) now owns in Lapeer City. He was married in 1877 to Miss Florence Lawton, of the State of New York, and has one daughter. FOREST HADLEY was born in Essex County, N. Y., in 1815, and in 1850 went with his parents to Wisconsin, where they remained till 1874, when they came to Michigan and settled in the township of Lapeer, Lapeer County. In 1876 lie engaged in farming for himself in the same township, but afterward went to the township of Deerfield. In the spring of 1882 he came to Lapeer and located on Mill Street, where lie has since resided. He was married in 1881 to Miss Lizzie E. Moore, a daughter of one of the older residents of the township of Lapeer. HORACE E. HATCH was born in what is now Lapeer City, in 1852. He attended the schools in the place, and afterward graduated at Goldsmith's Commercial College, Detroit, Mich., following which he accepted a clerkship in White & Brown's hardware store, where he remained eight years, the firm changing three times during that period. He finally took the management of the business for E. C. White, whom he bought out in 1881, since which time he has carried on an extensive hardware business; is located in the Opera House Block, Nepessing, Street. He was married in 1880 to Miss Corena Manwaring, daughter of Senator Manwaring, of Lapeer, and has one child. FRANK THOMPSON was born in Lapeer County in 1861. His first business venture was in Hadley, where he engaged in hotel keeping one year. Inll 1882 he and his father (A. M. Thompson) bought out the well equipped livery stable in Lapeer, on Park Street. His father retiring in December, 1882, he then assumed full control and management of the largest business in that line in Lapeer County. He was married in 1881 to Mattie Geer, of Lapeer, and has one child. H. D. PIKE was born in Washington County, N. Y., in 1839, and came to Michigan in 1856. He stopped three years in Detroit and two years inll Oakland County, when he came to Lapeer and soon thereafter engaged in mercantile pursuits, first with the firm of Emmons'& Pike, and afterward with Pike Bros. He was next engaged in a grist-mill two years, and is at present a partner in the firm of Milliken & Co., dealers in dry goods and general merchandise. He owns 330 acres of land on sections 28 and 29, in the township of Mayfield; has held the office of supervisor three years and alderman several years. He was married inll 1864 to Miss Alice Lathrop, of Mayfield, Lapeer County, daughter of Horace M. Lathrop, one of the pioneers of that township. Mr. Pike has one son. JEREMIAH EARL (deceased) was born in the State of New York about the year 1804, and came to Michigan in 1850. In his younger days he learned the blacksmithing trade, which he followed to the end of his life. He was married to Miss Harriet Evans, of New York, whom with two sons and one daughter still survive him. His death occurred in 1854. E. K. EARL, son Of Jeremiah Earl, was born at Little Falls, N. Y., in 1845, and in 1850 came with his parents to Michigan. In early life he learned the mason's trade, which he followed till 1875, when he engaged as a clerk and traveling salesman for a Lapeer firm, with whom he continued three years. In 1877 he purchased the farm where he now resides, and soon thereafter moved upon it. He was married in 1865 to Miss Helen Shafer, who died in 1873, and was married to his present wife, Sarall Prindle, of Rochester, Mich., in 1876. They have two children. GEORGE B. GREGORY was born in Clhenango, N. Y., in 1831, and in 1851 came to Lapeer via stage froml Buffalo to Detroit and entered the employ of J. B. Hart as clerk in his general store. In 1854 the firm of Davis & Gregory was formed for the purpose of engaging in the manufacture of doors, sash and blinds and a general lumber and planing-mill business, and existed for tweinty-four years without change, with the exception of one year. when Robert King took an interest. In the meantime Mr. Gregory clerked for Mr. Jeniiings in his store from 1860 to 1865, when Tuttle and Gregory established a mercantile branch to their business, Mr. Gregory taking charge of the same. In 1878 the partnership was dissolved, Mr. Gregory taking the store and Mr. Tuttle the lumber and mill business. In 1882 Mr. Gregory sold out and retired from business. He was married in 1854 to Miss Mary E. Tuttle, of Lapeer. JAMES C. THICKSTINE was born in Crawford County, Pa., in 1837, and while a young man learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed for several years, and was also engaged inll the oil business four years. About the year 1868 he came to Michigan and located in Genesee County, where he remained two years, when he came to Lapeer and organized the Farmers' Association and Fire Insurance Company, and soon thereafter engaged in the wholesale lumber and shingle trade, with location at present near the Grand Trunk Station. He was married inll 1881 to Miss Samantha E. Smallidge, of Lenllawee County, Mich. WILLIAM LOFFT was born in England in 1837, and emigrated to Canada in 1857. When a young manl he learned the blacksmith's trade, which he has since followed. He lived in Goderich, Huron County, Ont., six years, and in 1863 came to Lapeer, where after working at his trade two years he established himself in the business of general blacksmithing, his present location being oil Fox Street. He was married to Miss Margaret Sloan, of Kingston, Ont., in 1862, and has two children. FRANCIS MCELROY was born in 1841 at Gait, Ont. His parents came to Detroit in 1847, where they lived about seven years. Afterward lived in St. Clair County, ill this State, and also at Bayfield, Wis. In 1861 he enlisted in the Fifth Michigan Infantry and served through the war. His regiment was in the Army of the Potomac, and he wears the "Kearney Cross" for gallantry in action. Came to Lapeer in 1865 at the close of the rebellion, and is now in business as a baker and confectioner. Is also engaged in farming. Married Miss Annie Carrigan, of Port Huron, in 1865. They have four children. He was the first city collector of Lapeer, has also been an alderman, and is now (1883) supervisor for the first city district, being his third term in that office. WARD H. JENNINGS was born at Leeds, about fifty miles from Portland, Me., in 1824. Had a common school and academic education. Came to Michigan in June, 1845. Engaged in the manufacture of wagons, plows, boots, shoes, etc., at Rochester, Oakland County. Returned to Maine in 1848 and remained there three and a half years, during which time he got married to Myra 4 I i rz -

Page  78 .-.., __I.V d v I I - 78 - HISTORY O)F LAPEER COUNTY. I I P. Parcher. Again came West and went into mercantile business with his brother at Rochester, Mich. In 1853 they also engaged in trade in Lapeer, Mr. W. H. Jennings making it his place of residence ever since. The firm continued until 1874. A new concern called Jennings & Son succeeded to the Lapeer part of the business. In 1876 lie built a grist-mill, and after operating it two years sold it. Had previously rented a mill which was burned down in 18-. Has been president of the village corporation, member of the council, etc. Has two children, a son and daughter. The daughter is married and lives in Massachusetts, and the son is his business partner. In addition to the foregoing he is an extensive owner of and dealer in real estate. Hon. JAMES TURRILL (deceased) was born in Shoreham, Vt., September 24, 1797. Leaving his father's farm at the age of twenty-one he engaged in a general mercantile business in his native town and in Bridgeport in the same county. He pursued his mercantile labors in the two places mentioned with very gratifying and remunerative results until 1836, when he came to Michigan and invested extensively in lands at and near Lapeer. Returning to Vermont he continued his business until 1842, when he moved his family, consisting of wife and eight children, three sons and five daughters, and located in the village of Lapeer. Here he again turned his attention to mercantile affairs, dealing largely in real estate at the same time. Success attended his efforts, and after a lapse of thirteen years he retired from active business and gave his attention to the cultivation of his farms and the management of his pine land. interests. He was for some time a member of the banking firm of R. G. Halt & Co. and was one of the directors of the Port Huron & Lake Michigan Railroad, now called the Grand Trunk, having aided largely with his means and advice at a time when others were quite discouraged in getting it completed from Port Huron to Flint. After that was done he retired from the directorship at his own request; but remained active and efficient in the work. Although Mr. Turrill was never ambitious for public life, still his fellow citizens saw fit on several occasions to place him in positions of honor and trust. He was several times elected one of the trustees and afterward president of the village of Lapeer, and upon its incorporation as a city was chosen its first mayor. He was also elected to the house of representatives of the State legislature in the fall of 1848, and served in that body during the sessioLs of 1848 and 1849. During the war he took an active part in putting down the rebellion, and his eldest son, Captain J. Henry Turrill, a brave and noble hearted officer of the Seventh Michigan Infantry, lost his life at the battle of Antietam. Mr. Turrill was a man of strict integrity, liberal in the support of religious and charitable institutions, and gave with a free hand to the poor and needy. He died July 31, 1876. GEORGE N. TURRILL was born in 1833 in Bridgeport, Addison County, Vt., and came to Lapeer with his parents in 1842, and has since been a resident of the county. In early manhood he was employed in his father's store, but since that time has been a farmer. He now owns farms on sections 5, 7 and 8 in the township of Lapeer, but resides on the old homestead in the city of Lapeer. He was married in 1862 to Miss Paulina Vosburg, who was born in Columbia County, N. Y. They have three children living. HENRY K. WHITE was born in 1820 at South Hadley, Mass. Came to Lapeer Township in 1833. His mother brought her family, consisting of five sons and three daughters, the father being dead, and they went on a farm. In his early days he sailed for a number of years, during which he was on the Pacific coast, and visited California, Washington Territory, etc. In 1871 he became the first cashier of the newly organized First National Bank of Lapeer, and of which he is now (1883) president. Previously was in the banking business with his brother, the late E. J. White. In 1861 he raised Company F, First Michigan Cavalry, and was captain of it. He was compelled to resign on account of physical disability. He was married in 1866 to Miss Jane Wrigglesworth. They have four children. MYRON B. SMITH was born in the town of Kent, Litchfield County, Conn., November 30, 1811. When but a few months old he was taken to Oneida County, N. Y., settling there in 1812, and where he remained until he was twenty-oine years of age. The year of the Black Hawk war he went West. As an assistant to an uncle of his, who was a government surveyor, he followed the old Sauk trail from Chicago to the Mississippi River. Was gone about six months. They then came to Michigan and surveyed Sanilac, Huron and Tuscola Counties before a single settler had penetrated that section of this State. Went then to Pontiac and remained eighteen months. In 1836 helped to mnake the first survey of southern Iowa, remaining about six months. He then returned and worked at the trade of a carpenter for two years. In 1839 settled in the village of Lapeer. When he passed through here first, in 1834, there were only about six houses in the place and a saw-mill. He has followed the trade of. a carpenter the greater part of his life. Has held the following offices since in Lapeer County: Register of deeds several years, county treasurer six years, deputy county clerk, justice of the peace, etc. He was married in 1844 to Mrs. Walker, whose maiden name was Mary A. Dexter. They have one child, a son, who is employed at the depot of the Detroit & Bay City Railway. Lapeer was surveyed and located as the county seat by S. V. R. Trowbridge, G. O. Whittemore and Harvey D. Parke, the latter of whom was his uncle, and who died at Pontiac in 1879. SARDIS B. MARSHALL was born in Alden, Genesee County, N. Y., in 1827. Came to Michigan with his parents in 1836. They settled in Almnont, Lapeer County, and went to farming. In 1869 he came to Lapeer village and went into the hotel business. Had kept one in Altmont, previously, besides carrying on a farm. At Lapeer he bought the "Northern Exchange" and rebuilt it, calling it the "Marshall House." Kept it two years and sold it. Rented it in 1877 and again ran it until May, 1881. In September, 1882, bought the "Abram House," and is now landlord of that well-known hostelry. Was an alderman while living in Almont. Married in October, 1853, to Celestia Smith, who died in 1860, and by whom he had two children, one of whom, an only daughter, is living. Married again in September, 1861, to Jane A. Ferguson, by whomhe has had three children, of whom only one, a daughter, survives. HON. MYRON C. KENNY, M. D., was born in Perry, Genesee County, N. Y., in 1823. Came to Michigan in 1842. Commenced the study of medicine with Dr. Dennis Cooley at Washington, Macomb County, in 1844. Attended lectures in Cleveland, O. Passed an examination before a board of censors at Almont, Michigan, and was authorized to practice. Commenced practice at Lapeer in 1846. In public life Dr. K. has held the following positions: Member of the State legislature in 1865-66; member of the constitutional convention in 1867; mayor of the city of Lapeer two years; alderman, school inspector and, for over twenty years, a member of the board of education. Was married in 1850 to Ann Eliza Turrill. They have two children living. CHARLES W. BROWN was born in Nassau, Rensselaer County, N. Y., in 1819. His parents were farmers and he was brought up on a farm. When sixteen years of age he went into a store in the village of Nassau, remaining there until he was twenty-one years of age. He then went to Monroe County, N. Y., where he remained till 1842, when he removed to Lapeer County, Michigan, where he I I { I r w-" 9i I I

Page  79 M- ------- - - HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 79 l I has since resided. Lived at Farmers Creek from 1845 to 1881. Has been a farmer most of the time, but was also in the mercantile business and manufactured potash. Was a justice of the peace and school inspector in Metamora. Elected judge of probate in 1880, and re-elected in 1882. Since holding this office has lived in Lapeer City. Married in 1845 to Susan E. Cressey, a native of New Hampshire. They have three children, one daughter and two sons. One son is a farmer in Metamora Township, the other is a graduate of West Point and is now lieutenant in the United States army. HON. LORD W. HINMAN was born in 1833, at Royalton, Niagara County, N. Y. His parents came to Lapeer County in 1835. He was brought up on a farm and was educated in the Lapeer common schools. In 1862 he enlisted in the Tenth Michigan Cavalry and served to close of the war. Was a first lieutenant when mustered out. Was a justice of the peace when he lived in Elba Township. Was elected mayor of Lapeer City in April, 1883. Follows farming. Was married to Cornelia A. Henderson, a native of New York State, who died in 1881. He has two children. ROBERT A. WHITE was born in 1811, in Romeo, Maconlb County, Michigan, and was reared on a farm. In 1861 he went into the army, and was on the staff of Surgeon-Gen. J. K. Barnes, ranking as a first lieutenant. Held the position two years, when he was made assistant surgeon of the Thirty-rinth Regiment of U. S. colored troops, with which he remained until the end of the rebellion. During the time he was in Washington, received medical instruction at Georgetown College. Came to Lapeer County in 1866, living at Almont and Attica until 1873, when he removed to Lapeer City. Is now a jobbing contractor and builder, also a dealer in all kinds of building materials. Has been married twice; first, in 1861, to Elizabeth Plant, who died in 1865, and by whom he had one child; and again, in 1866, to Caroline Mentor, of Dryden, Lapeer County. They also have had one child. JASPER BENTLEY was born in Chenango County, N. Y., in 1826, and came to Michigan in 1844, locating at Fenton, Genesee County. Came to Lapeer County in 1848, settling at Hadley. Was a builder and contractor for a number of years, also taught school. Held the office of county clerk from Jan. 1, 1865, until 1876, inclusivetwelve years. Was mayor of Lapeer in 1872-73. Was clerk of Hadlev, and has been a school inspector for twenty years. In 1875 he was admitted to the bar and has since practiced law, being a member of the legal firm of MIoore & Bentley. Was married to Julia Barnard, of' Utica, N. Y., in 1846. They have two daughters living. JOHN H. PALMER was born in 1838, at Akron, Ohio. Attended the academy at Spencer, 0., and the college at Hillsdale, Michigan; followed the vocation of a teacher in 1860-61. Enlisted in 1862 in the One Hundredth Regiment Ohio Infantry, and served until March, 1865. Ranked as a captain when mustered out. At the close of the war went to Nashville, Barry County, 'Michigan. Lived there for a number of years, during which time he was county superintendent of schools. Came to Lapeer in 1874 as pastor of the Universalist society. Afterward studied law with Moore & Bentley. Admitted to the bar in 1878. Was for a time a member of the legal firm of Moore, Bentley & Palmer. Is now (1883) circuit court commissioner and clerk of Lapeer City. Married EmilyPutnam, of Bridgewater, 0., in 1861. They have one child living-a daughter. WILLIAM A. JACKSON was born in 1816, near Scrooby, Nottinghamshire, England. Studied medicine in that country and was an assistant surgeon in the British navy. Emigrated to Canada in 1837. Practiced his profession at Montreal, and also held the office of government messenger under Lord Sydenham. Returned to England in the winter of 1840-41. Remained a year and then came to the United States. Practiced medicine at Syracuse, Cicero, Cleveland, Oswego County, N. Y. Came to Lapeer in 1856, and has remained until the present time in active practice. Was a United States examining surgeon for fifteen years. Held the office of mayor of Lapeer in 1876. In 1874 went to Europe and visited the hospitals in London, Paris, &c. Was married in 1846 to Miss Amelia Stockdale, of Cicero, N. Y. Has three sons living, one of whom is practicing medicine with him. SEYMOUR A. MANZER was born in 1847, in Huron, Wayne County, Mich. Commenced the study of medicine at Watrousville, Tuscola County, Michigan, in 1866. Commenced practice at Attica, Lapeer County, in 1871. Graduated from the medical department of the Michigan University in 1873. Practiced at Wacousta, Mich., until 1882, when he removed to Lapeer. Married Flora Elliott, of Wayne County, in 1870. They have two children, a son and daughter. WILLIAM MCDONALD was born in Kincardineshire, in the northeast of Scotland, in 1824. Learned the machinist trade at Glasgow. Came to the United States in 1848, and located in Detroit, where he worked in the machine shops of that city until he went to Romeo, Macomb County, where he was for a time in the employ of Holman & Farrar; afterward became a member of the firm. In 1866 came to Lapeer and bought an interest in the machine shop of Mr. Newton, the firm being known as Newton &(McDonald. The shops were burned down in 1872, shortly previous to which Mr. McDonald had purchased his partner's interest. In 1873 built his present place of business. Was married in 1847to Miss Margaret Shearer, of Glasgow, Scotland. They have had five sons and two daughters. The sons are all at work in their father's establishment. The daughters live in Texas. WILLIAM N. VARNUM was born in 1826, at Berlin, Waterloo County, Ontario. His parents came to Michigan and settled on a farm in Metamora, Lapeer County, in 1842. The son learned the trade of a blacksmith and followed it for twenty-five years in that township. In 1870 he removed to Lapeer and started a foundry, blacksmith and wagon-shop, to which he has added a furniture manufactory and undertaking establishment. In Metamora he was a supervisor for two years, and in Lapeer has been an alderman for eight years. Married Julia H. Russell in 1847. She was a native of New York State but a resident of Lapeer County at the time of her marriage. They have had a family of eight children, four of whom are now living. ARTHUR H. THOMPSON, M. D., was born in St. Thomas, Ont., in 1838, of American parentage. He commenced the study of medicine in his native place in 1855. From there he went to London, Ont., and was four years in the office of Dr. A. T. Bull. Afterward attended homeopathic colleges in Philadelphia and New York. Also took one course of lectures at the Michigan University. He passed the homeopathic medical board of Canada in 1862, and is member of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of that province. Previously, however, he had graduated at the New York homeopathic college. Practiced in St. Thomas and Stratford, Ont., for some years. Traveled for a time and settled in Lapeer in 1867, and has since been a successful practitioner in the city and county. Was married in 1873 to Miss Anna Dodge, a native of Vermont. They have twvo children. GREENE & RULISON, dealers in clothing, gents' furnishing goods, etc., commenced business in Lapeer in 1880. The firm is composed of Edward C. Greene, and Charles W. Rulison. They also have a branch store at St. Louis, Mich.-EDWARD C. GREENE was born in 1849, at Townsend, Middlesex County, Mass. When very young his parents removed to Red Creek, Wayne County, N. Y. He was educated in the academy at that place. He came West to West Bloomfield, Oakland County, Mich., in 1867. He taught school L I I t 6-:,-.

Page  80 Ii I i I r I I 80i. HISTORY -OF LAPEER COUNTY. one tern and then went into the employ of an auction and comlmission firm at Pontiac. Il 1869 he went to Flint, and was in the employ of Williar L. Smith & Co., Smith & Bridgeman, and N. Davidson, until 1877. In that year he came to Lapeer as manager for a branch store belonging to Mr. Dcvidson. Il 1880 he bought out that gentleman and tie firm of Greene & Rulison was organized. He was married in 1875 to Carrie E. Fairbank of Flint. She died in 1882. Two children survive her. CHARLES W. RULISON, the other memlber of the firm, was born in Jefferson County., N. -Y., in 1819. His parents ctme to Flint, Mlch., in 1849. He was educated in the schools of that city, and had one term at the Michigan University. In 1880 came to Lapeer and entered into business as a1 partner of E.C. Greene. Married in 1876 to 34iss Ella Lee, of Svra-,use, N. Y. They have one chil(l, a daughter. YORE T. HIGLEY is a native of Verrmont, and vas born at Shoreham, Addison County, il 1826. His parents came to Lapeer County in 1833, bought land on what is no7'w Lapeer Township, and cleared up a farm. The son, York T., has been a farmer:ll his days and is now living on the land purchased from the United States government by his father. Has held office as a drain commuissioner and justice of the peace. Married Cornelia D. Strong, a native of Massachusetts, but a resident of Lapeer County, at the time of her marriage, which took place in 1861. They have a family of six children living. WILLiS m R. WADSWORTH wAS bor1 March 12, 1827, in Butler, Wayne County, N.Y. Brought up on a farm in the town of Wolcott. in the same county, and followed that pursuit until 1865. In 1864 came West to Lapeer County, looating in Oreoon Township, where he farmed it for about a year, and then went to work as a carpenter and a joiner. Continued at that until 1873 when he conimenced selling fruit and orna~menltal trees. He now represents the Geneva, New York, nurseries and deals in American and imported fruit and ornamental trees, shrubs, roses, grape-vines and small fruits. Residence oln Bentley Street. Was married December 22, 1853, and has four sons, all of whoni live in Lapeer. RENSSELAER R. TENNANT was born in 1826, at Leroy, Genesee County, N. Y. His youth was passed on a farm and his education received in the district schools. In 1840 he went to Herkinier County. N. Y., and lived oil his uncle's farm for eight years. In 1848 he went to Orleans County, and kept a hotel for twelve years. From 1848 to 1877 was in the hotel business in Brockport, Oak Orchard, and Saratoga, N. Ye In 1877 he came to Lapeer. For a time he kept the Park Hotel, near the Grand Trunk Railway Depot. In 1882 leased the Donaldson House and changed the name to Tennant House. He was married in 1850 to Miss Eliza Young, of Herkimer County, N. Y. Tley have one -child, a daughter. MARTIN J.HOWARD was born il the town of Jefferson, Schoharie County, N. Y., in 1826. In 1859 went West to Wisconsin, where he was a farmer. In 1870 came to Lapeer City, where he is now in the undertaking business. Was married ira 1856 to Miss Catherine McArthur of New York. ALBERT L. GREGORY was born in 1837 at Hunt's Hollow, near Nunda, Livingstoln County, N. Y. Learned the trade of jeweler and watchmaker at Rusllford, N. Y. Was il business at Cuba in the satne State in 1861. Camue to Mlicligal in 1867. Was at Flint for a time, and in 1868 removed to Lapeer, where lie opened a watch, clock and jewelry establishment. Married to Mliss Ellen C. Osborne of Rushford, N. Y. They have one child living. ALEXANDER MCLEN.A N ATwAS born in IKintail, HRosshire, Scotland, in 1832. Was educated at the schools in that place, also oil the Island of North Uist. W7ent to the -Ulliversity of Edinburgh il 1850. I Was there two and a half years. Ctame to the United States in 1852. Lived for at time at St. Clair, Mich. After that taught school. in Canada a few months, and then went to Detroit, where he was in the employ of T. & J. Hinchman, dealers in drugs, groceries, etc. Was in a grocery business in Pontiac for a time. In 1856 came to Lapeer and engaged in general mercantile business. Was mayor of Lapeer in 1879-'80. Has also been president of the school board and member of the same a number of terins. Married to Rebecca Haddrill, a native of England, but at the time of her marria(re a resident of Orion, Oakland County, in 1856. They have five children living BENEZETT A. TUTTLE was born in '1851, in the township of Almont, Lapeer County, Mich. Was educated in the common schools of the county, and graduated at Goldsmith's Commercial College in Detroit. Il 1871 went into the employ of Tuttle & Gregory. In 1878 his father, who was the senior member of the firm, bought out Mr. Gregory's interest, and since that time the son has been manaaer of the retail lumber business. Has held the office of city collector for Lapeer, and in 1880-'81 Was an alderman. In 1883 was aaain elected. Marriedin 1875 to Miss Ellen Bennett, from near Glen's Falls, N. Y., by whom lie has one child, a daughter.;COLUMBUS TUTTLE Was born in 1829, in Cortland County, N. Y. His parents settled in 1836, in the township of Ray, Macomb County, Mich. Tle son learned the trade of a carpenter, which his father followed. In 1853 he came to Lapeer Coulty. Remained for a tine in Almost, and then came to Lapeer. Since he has lived in this city he has been in the planing-mill and mercantile business. Was at one time in partnership with Gecr-re B. Gregory. Served for a number of months in 1864-'65 on a United ~States Tunboat, on the Mississippi River. Has been an alderman several terms. In 1819 was married to MissEnuice Hough of Connecticut. They have had six children, four of whom are living. WILLIAM F. DALEY is a native of Onondaga County, N. Y., having been born in the town of Fabius in 1832. His parents came to Lapeer Township in 1838. His education was acquired in the district schools and at the Rochester academy in Oakland County. In 1854 he commenced teaching and for six years taught township schools. He then farmed in Lapeer Township until 1873, when he became a resident of Lapeer City, and since that time has been in the fire and life insurance business. Has been an alderman, member of the city school board, and also held some township offices. Married Miss Harriet A. Tripp of Northeast, Chla itauqua County, N. Y. They have one child, a daughter. ESLI R. REDFIELD was born in Onondaga County, N. Y., in 1832. Came to Oakland County in 1844 with his parents. Learned the painters' trade. Enlisted in 1861 in the Tenth Regiment Michigan Infantry, and remained in the service lntil the close of the war. Went il as a sergeant and came out as a captain. Returned to Oakland County after the end of the war. Remained there until 1879, during which time he was supervisor for Oakland Township six years. While in that county he was a farmer, but on removing to Lapeer in 1879, went into the flot-muill business. In April, 1883, he was elected'supervisor for the Second District of Lapeer City. He was married in 1866 to Miss Sarah M. Beebe of Monroe County, N. Y. They have three children. CHARLES L. THATCHER wAS born in Kendall, Orleans County, N. Y., in 1836. His parents came West in 1851,and located on a farm in Bloomfield, Oakland County, Mich. He lived there until 1853, when he went to Pontiac and remained until 1872, part of the time in business for himself. That year he came to Lapeer and opened a book, news and stationery establishment. He has now, 1883, two stores on Nepessin,, Avenue, one of which would be a II I I i - - I33 I I -F, D PI C I II I. k L -,

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Page  81 0 __ __ HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 81 _.1 credit to a much larger place than Lapeer. Was married in 1864 to Miss Sophia G. Cook of Oneida County, N. Y. They have one child, a son. GEORGE H. CARY was born in Milwaukee, Wis., in 1854. From there his parents removed to Hastings, Minn. In 1870 lie was in the employ of the Grand Trunk Railway Co., as cashier in the general office at Port Huron, Micll., where he remained until 1874. He then took a position as station master at Imlay City, Lapeer County. In 1880 he came to Lapeer City as general ticket and freight agent for the same company. Was married in 1877 to Miss Lillie B. Mark of Imlay City. They have a son and daughter. He owns a residence on the corner of Church and Franklin Avenues. JOHN 0. SMITH was born in the city of Norwich, England, in 1825. His parents came to Canada in 1831, where they lived for two years at Montreal. They afterward lived in Toronto and Chatham, also at Buffalo, N. Y. The father was a cabinet-maker, and the son learned the same trade. Lived for a number of vears at Mineral Point, Watertown and other places in Wisconsin. Some of the time in trade for himself and at other times working at his trade. He came to Lapeer in 1858, and until 1870 worked at painting and cabinet making. Went into the furniture trade then, and carries one of the largest and finest stocks in the city. In 1862 he enlisted in the First Michigan Engineers and Mechanics and served until the-end of the war. Married to Mary C. Lovejoy, of New York State, in 1846. They have five children. JOHN A. BUERGER was born in 1827 in Bavaria, Germany, and came to the United States in 1850. Lived for a number of years in East Saginaw and Frankenmuth, Saginaw County, Mich., during which he was engaged in the brewing business. In 1864 he enlisted in the Twenty-ninth Regiment Michigan Infantry. Served until the rebellion was crushed. Ranked as a first lieutenant when mustered out. Came to Lapeer in 1866 and built the "City Brewery," and the "Farmer's Home" hotel. Among beer drinkers the beer made at his brewery is considered a very good article. He has had six children, by Anna M. Szhelhms, a native of Saxony, Germany, to whom he was married in 1853. ARTHUR J. GRAY was born in Oregon Township, Lapeer County, in 1855. His father was one of the first settlers in that township. He has been engaged for a number of years in mercantile business. Is a member of the firm of J. H. Gray & Son, dealers in groceries, provisions, boots, shoes, flour, feed, &c. Was married March 28, 1875, to Eliza Storey, of Stratford, Ont. CHARLES J. YORKER, a farmer, was born in Lennox, Madison County, N. Y., in 1827, and was brought up on a farm. Came to Michigan in 1840. Worked for the late E. J. White, of Lapeer, two years and then went to the Upper Peninsula, living at Eagle River, Copper Harbor, &c. Came back to Lapeer in 1863. While at Eagle River, held the offices of justice of the peace, town clerk, constable, &c. In 1849 was married to Mary G. Cion, a native of Germany, from near Coblentz. They have a family of ten children. CHARLES L. YORKER, the son of the foregoing, was born at Eagle River in 1854. In 1864 came to Lapeer and was on his father's farm until 1878. Educated at the Lapeer high school. Is now a dealer in organs, &c. ISAAC I. VOORHIES was born in Virginia in 1799; left his native State with his parents in 1804, settling in Seneca County, N. Y., where he remained until 1818; then went to Riga, N. Y., near Rochester, remaining about six years; then came to Michigan; took up from government 240 acres of land near Pontiac; improved the same; sold it, moved into the city of Pontiac; lived about five years, then came to Lapeer in 1867, where he has since lived; was married in 1826 to Ann Merlin, of N. Y., who died in 1864; was married second time, 1867, to Jane E. Hovey, of Pontiac, Mich. When Mr. Voorhies came to this State, there were only about thirty houses in the city of Pontiac. Mr. Voorhies is one of a family of sixteen children, eleven of whom lived to adult age; he is now the only surviving one of the family. ALEXANDER W. COREY was born in Tioga County, Pa., in the year 1830, where he lived until the year 1849, when he came with his parents to Michigan, stopped a short time in Troy, Oakland County, then came to Lapeer, stayed a short time in the village of Lapeer, there being but two or three houses in this place at that time. His father then took up land three miles south of said place which he lived on until his death, which occurred in the year 1868. This farm is still in possession of the family. Mr. A. W. Corey lived on the farm until 1880, when he moved to Lapeer City and took charge of the gunsmith business located on Saginaw Street, a business he has been interested in about eight years. Was married in 1867 to Deborah R. Converse, of this city; has one daughter. JAMES A. HUNGERFORD, manufacturer of all kinds of wagons, carriages, sleighs, cutters, &c.; also keeps for sale wagons and carriages of other manufacturers and does a general blacksmith business; shop is located on Saginaw Street. Was born in Saratoga County, N. Y., in 1835, where he lived until eighteen years of age, when he came to Lapeer and established himself in his present business with his father and continued about five years, when his father retired and he took whole charge of the business, and has continued ever since. Went into the war as member of regimental band for Ninth Cavalry; remained four months; after about one year enlisted in the Second Brigade band and served until the close of the war. Was married in 1861 to Adeline Gummerson, of Lapeer City; she was born in Canada. EDWARD D. SCULLEY, of the firm of Sculley & Merson, blacksmiths, was born in what is now the township of Mayfield, Lapeer County, Mich., in the year 1813, and lived on a farm in the same place with his parents until 1861, then ctme to Lapeer, learned the trade of blacksmith, commencing with a man by the name of Wood; worked afterward with a Mr. Bristol; was last in the employ of J. A. Hungerford. In 1872 commenced business for himself with a Mr. Quinn for two and one-half years; then carried on business alone for eight years. In September, 1881, organized the present company. Owns the homestead bought by his father from government under the administration of Van Buren, now consisting of 100 acres on se3tion 27, Mayfield. His father's name was Patrick Sculley; was born in Ireland; was one of the first settlers of Lapeer County. E. D. Sculley was married in 1867, to Helen R. Bushnell, of Lapeer; has two children, a son and a daughter. IRA GREEN, proprietor of Lapeer woolen mills, was born in Massachusetts in 1832; came when quite young to the State of New York, where he remained twenty years; came to Michigan in 1853; settled in Dexter; remained two years; was two years in Ann Arbor; was three years in Jonesville, two years in Ypsilanti. Has been engaged from boyhood in the woolen business. At Ypsilanti, had charge of the Huron River mills for the firm of Wells & Bradley. In 1867 came to Lapeer, bought an interest in the woolen mills at this place, was associated with Mr. Leavenworth; the firm name was Leavenworth & Green; the mill burned in 1868, then Mr. Green built a new mill and had M. J. Mills as a partner, which con tinned three years, then Mr. G. Rood bought J. Mills' interest, then after one year Mr. Green went out, and shortly after the mill burned, then Mr. Green, in 1874, built the mill he now occupies, and lis been doing a general custom business. Enlisted in 1861 in thile Eighth Michigan Infantry; served two years and a half; was wounded in the battle of the Wilderness b)y a rifle ball, through the left lung; has never fully recovered from the wound. Was married in 1852 to Caroline Randall, who died in 1856; was married l L - -----—; — k i

Page  82 — A. A I H I S T R Y O L A P E R C U N T Y 1~~" - I 82 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. I the second time, to Susan S. Fish; has eight children, six sons and two daughters. JOEL M. PALMER wasborn in Vermont in the year 1804. Went with his parents to Pennsylvania when twelve years of age. Two years after went to Williamsport, Pa.; stayed six years; then went to Ohio, where he was engaged as cattle drover for several years, then came to Michigan in 1832. Met A. N. Hart in Detroit, came with him to Lapeer, worked for A. N. Hart six years, then settled on a farm on which he lived until his death and his widow still lives on the same farm. Was married in 1838 to Diantha Merlin, daughter of Samuel Merlin, of this county; his wife died in 1849; was married again same year to Mrs. Cady, whose maiden name was Susan Merritt, of Hillsdale, Columbia County, N. Y. Mr. Palmer chopped the first acre of land chopped in Lapeer County; the same was the site of the house of A. N. Hart. CALVIN P. THOMAS was born in the town of Pompey, Onondaga County, N. Y., in 1834; went with his parents to Wyoming County, N. Y., in 1844; came to Michigan with his parents in 1847; settled in Metamora, Lapeer County. He attended school at Romeo; studied law with John M. Goot, of Ann Arbor, for one year; was then admitted to practice. Commenced the practice of law, at Lapeer, in 1864. Was married in 1857 to Adeline E. Sherman, of Lapeer County. Has four children, three sons and one daughter. JOHN J. WATKINS was born in New York City in 1822, where, after receiving his education, he taught school from the age of fourteen till twenty-two years of age, when in 1844 he came to Michigan. After stopping a short timne in Oakland County and a year and a half in Macomb County, he came to what is now the village of Hadley, Lapeer County, and established a store-the first in the place-and an ashery and pearling works. He remained there about five years, when he sold out and bought a farm in the township of Elba, which he still owns. After living on the farm five years he removed to Lapeer City and engaged in keeping books for the Harts. In 1854 he commenced business again for himself, doing a general mercantile and lumber trade, which he continued another five years, when he went to the township of Elba and built a grist and saw-mill, and purchased a tract of land, the greater part of which he still owns. He carried on business there up to 1863, when he retired. He was married in 1843 to Miss Anna E. Scott, of New York City, and has seven children, three sons and four daughters. Two of tile sons are living in Dakota, and the other on the farm mentioned in Hadley. Mr. Watkins was one of the first organizers of the Republican party in Lapeer County, and about the year 1855 helped to start tile first Republican paper. FREDERICK L. HENDERSON was born in the township of Lapeer, Lapeer County, Mich., in 1842, and is by occupation a carpenter and joiner. He worked at his trade in Lapeer several years, and in 1864 enlisted in the First Michigan Cavalry, serving several months after the close of the war. He was with his regiment in the South and East, and after the war was stationed at Salt Lake City. In 1874 he opened a grocery store and restaurant in Lapeer City, to which he added a bakery in 1883. He married Miss Maggie Cassidy, a native of Canada, in 1873, and has three children. A. W. ABBOTT (deceased) was born in Leveret, Conn., in 1808, where he lived until twentyone years of age. He learned the tan ner and currier's trade, which he worked at one year in Connecticut and four years in Ohio. In June, 1833, he came to Lapeer and took up 120 acres of government land, to which he afterward added forty acres, upon which his family still resides. After coming to Lapeer, he for a time worked at his trade, but gave more of his time to shoemaking, being the first to engaa e in that trade in this section. He was married in 1836 to Miss Martha L. White, of South Hadley, Mass., at Lapeer, theirs being among the first weddings I I celebrated in the vicinity. His death occurred in 1873'; his widow, two sons and two daughters survive him. CHESTER G. WHITE was born in Lapeer in 1845. After attending the schools of the place, and taking a commercial course in Detroit, he followed farming for a time, and in 1869 took a position in the banking house of White & Bro,, with whom he continued two years, when it was merged in the First National Bank, and he became its cashier, which position he has since retained. He was married in 1867 to Miss Lydia Pike, of Fort Edward, N. Y., and has two children, a son and daughter. Mr. White was mayor of Lapeer City in 1877 and 1878. ENocH J. WHITE (deceased) was born in South Hadley, Mass., in 1814, and came to Lapeer County in 1833, and was for several years the government surveyor, and for a time a civil engineer in the employ of the Detroit & Milwaukee Railroad. In 1840 he engaged with his brother, Phineas White, in the hotel business in Lapeer, which they continued until 1870. In 1856 hle engaged in banking with Mr. Loomis, under the firm name of White & Loomis, which was changed on thile death of Mr. Loomis to E. J. White & Bro., and subsequently was merged'in the First National Batnk of Lapeer. Mr. White was twice married, first to Miss Elizabeth W. Gaylord, of Old Hadley, Mass., and second to Miss Haiannah Rood, who with seven children still survives him. His death occurred in May, 1878. ROGER T. WALKER was born in the city of Detroit in 1841, and came with his parents'to Lapeer in 1844. They located on a farm four and one-half miles south of Lapeer City, where he remained until twenty-two years of age, when he purchased a farm in the vicinity, upon which he resided up to 1873, when he sold out and moved into Lapeer City. He then engaged in the lumbering, furniture, and foundry business, and at present is sole proprietor of * an extensive saw-mill and bending works located on Saginaw Street, and owns an interest in the foundry and furniture factory carried on under the firm name of Varnumr & Walker. Mr. Walker was married in 1863 to Miss Harriet L. Banghart, of Almont, Lapeer County, whose parents were among the first settlers there. They have three children, two sons and a daughter. GEORGE L. SMITH was born in Camden, Oneida County, N. Y., in 1818, and in 1836 went to Lorain County, Ohio, and in 1840 came to Lapeer County, Mich. Soon thereafter he purchased forty acres of new land in the township of Mayfield, and for a few years rented a farm. He then exchanged the forty acres for eighty acres in the township of Oregon, upon which he resided up to 1865, when he sold out and bought a farm in Lapeer City, where he lhas since resided. He enlisted in the fall of 1862 in the First Michigan Engineers and Mechanics, but on account of sickness was discharged and sent home about six months thereafter. In 1843 he was married to Miss Mary T. Simms, who died in 1844, leaving one child. He was a second time married, in 1845, to Miss Harriet M. Hughson, who died about 1864, leaving three children, and was a third time married, to his present wife, Mrs. Levi Smith, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Wrigglesworth, of English birth, and by whom he has three children. ROBERT L. TAYLOR was born in Almont, Lapeer Counlty, Mich., where hlie attended the common schools. In 1862 he entered the University of Michigan and continued his studies in the literary department three years. He then engaged in mercantile business about two and one-half years, when he returned to Ann Arbor and studied law one year, and in the fall of 1869 was admitted to the bar at Pontiac, before Judge Dewey. He practiced law in Almont till 1873, was elected register of deeds in the fall of 1872, and the following year moved to Lapeer City. He was re-elected in 1874, serving two terms, and has since given his attention to the practice A i I i iI I_ — 4t Pr It 6: F1 A:v L I t - 7 1. ----

Page  83 -I HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 83 of his profession. In 1880 was elected prosecuting attorney, and served one term, declining a second nomination. He was married in 1866 to Miss Margaret J. Birrell, of Detroit, formerly of Lenawee County, Mich. Mr. Taylor also held the office of supervisor in Lapeer City, one year, and was a justice of the peace four years. STEPHEN V. GATES was born in Ontario County, N. Y., August 3, 1835, and came to Lapeer with his parents in 1837. His father, Ralph Gates, was born in Seneca County, N. Y., October 19, 1791, and June 27, 1823, married Letty Van Gelder, who was born in Somerset, N. Y., April 14, 1798. Soon after his arrival in Lapeer his father engaged in shoemaking, and established a tannery, conducting both lines of business for several years. The subject of this sketch continued with him and became proficient as a tanner and currier, and shoemaker, following the latter trade up to the present time. During the late war he went into the army as a member of the Ninth Cavalry band, and remained four months, when he came home, and a year later enlisted in the Second Brigade band, remaining until the close of the war. He was married in 1876 to Miss Nancy R. Hays, of Lapeer City, who was born in Sterling, Ont., October 23, 1852, and has one son, who was born June 30, 1880. His residence and shop are on Saginaw Street. TOWN OF HADLEY. Were the history of Hadley to be written six months later it could cover the full period of a half century. But the delay has already been too great. Many of the incidents of pioneer life which increase in interest as years accumulate have slipped from the everloosening grasp of memory and cannot be recalled. The history of Hadley begins in the territorial days of Michigan, and the township was only designated as township 6 north, of range 9 east. The following list of original land entries will show the original distribution of land in the township prior to 1841. ENTRIES OF LAND. TOWNSHIP 6 NORTH, RANGE 9 EAST. SECTION 1. John Look, May, 17, 1834. John Look, November 12, 1834. Timothy Wheeler, July 21, 1835. Almon Griggs, August 27, 1835. James Turrill, May 6, 1836. Timothy Wheeler, September 26, 1835. Almon Griggs, October 12, 1835. John Look, October 13, 1835. Trumbull Carey, October 29, 1835. Robert R. Howell. February 29, 1836. Thomas L. L. Brent, April 12, 1836. SECTION 2. John L. Morse, September 24, 1834. Eri L. Potter, September 24, 1834. Eri L. Potter, October 29, 1835. Eri L. Potter, March 30, 1836. Trumbull Carey, October 29, 1835. Thomas L. L. Brent, April 12, 1836. James Turrill, April 16, 1836. Dan Stile, May 18, 1836. Mary Hannibal, April 25, 1837. SECTION 3. Trumbull Carey, October 29, 1835. Edward Bingham, May 20, 1836. Steven Grant, April 1, 1836. Thomas L. L. Brent, April 12, 1836. I SECTION 3. James Turrill, April 16, 1836. Ralph Wright, May 25, 1836. SECTION 4. Abraham Tunison, May 20, 1885. Justus P. Wheeler, October 21, 1835. Abraham Tunison, October 29, 1835. Trumbull Carey, November 2, 1835. Daniel H. Chandler, May 2, 1836. SECTION 5. William Cramton, May 18, 1836. David Cramton, May 18, 1836. Clark Brown, May 30, 1836. Robert H. Stone, May 31, 1836. Amos Smith, June 3, 1836. Charles F. Wilson, October 23, 1838. SECTION 6. Amos Brownson, May 31, 1836. John Demond, June 2, 1836. Maria Van Nest, June 2, 1836. Alvin Haumer, June 16, 1836. John Brigham, June 29, 1836. George Townsend, June 29, 1836. Abial Townsend, October 2, 1837. SECTION 7. Thomas Wiard, Jr., May 5, 1836. John Mills, Jr., May 18, 1836. Ira Donelson, January 4, 1836. Mils Shattock, January 4, 1836. Mayhew Sanborn, January 4, 1836. Roswell L. Nurse, September 12, 1836. SECTION 8. Jonathan Cramton, May 18, 1836. Russell Cobb, May 18, 1836. Daniel W. Potter, June 1, 1836. Rowland Shadbolt, June 4, 1836. John Mills, Jr., May 18, 1836. John McKay, November 15, 1837. SECTION 9. Charles L. Campbell, May 21, 1835. William Hart, May 28, 1835. William Hart, July 6, 1835. William Hart, October 29, 1835. Jonathan Cramton, July 18, 1836. Russell Cobb, July 18, 1836. John McKay,, November 15, 1837. SECTION 10. Giles F. Gridley, May 26, 1835. Abraham Tunison, May 28, 1835. Minor Morse, August 14, 1835. B. C. Tunison, March 7, 1836. Corintha Kim'berly, April 1, 1836. James Turrill, April 16, 1836. Minor Morse, May 6, 1836. James Turrill, May 6, 1836. SECTION 11. William Farrar, October 12, 1835. James Turrill, April 16, 1836. Calvin C. Palmer, and Charles Coventry, April 29, i836. Edward Bingham, May 20, 1836. Alpha Morse, May 21, 1836. Samuel J. Tower, October 28, 1836. Auguste C. Stange, August 10, 1837. SECTION 12. Robert R. Howell, March 23, 1836. Reuben Underwood, April 12, 1836. Alpheus Cady, May 19, 1836. Nehemiah Tower, June 6, 1836. Nelson Cady, June 10, 1836. Samuel S. Hubbell, June 16, 1836. Prentiss Williams, June 16, 1836. H. N. Fowler and J. Swather, June 17, 1836. t ~9 __ _. A

Page  84 ~L —t3 _ - - I I I I 84 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. SECTION 12. Stephlen A. Goodwin, June 17, 1836. SECTION 13. Samuel S. Hubbell, June 16, 1886. John Al. Cooper, June 16, 1836. Prentiss Williams, Julie 16, 1836. H. N. Fowler and J. Swathel, June 17, 1836. Nelson G. Parmelee, June 22, 1836. John Stewart, June 28, 1836. SECTION 14. Robert HI. Stone, May 31, 1836. Garret A. Gray, June 9, 1836. Erastus H. Evans, June 9, 1836. Walter Davenport, June 15, 1836. John M. Cooper, June 16, 1836. Prentiss Williams, June 16, 1836. SECTION 15. Giles F. Gridley, May 26, 1835. -lpha Morse, May 21, 1836. Robert H. Stone, May 31, 1836. Humphrey Church, June 2, 1836. Benjanlin Morse, June 6, 1836. Harvey Riley, June 9, 1836. SECTION 17. Henry W. Hammblin, May 23, 1836. Henrv W. Haunblin, Mav 26, 1836. Stephen Cox, May 28,1836. Daniel W. Potter, June 1, 1836. SECTION 18. Michael Bower, May 30, 1836. Aaron Brigharn, June 4, 1836. John Brigham, Julie 9, 1836. Roswell Nurse, September 12, 1836. John Scott, Junle 1, 1838. SECTION 19. John Brigham, Jure 4, 1836. Charles A. Fassett, June 16, 1836. E. Stone, A. B. Merrill aend M. P.-Thomas, Jnly 5 1836. Trumbull Carey, November 12, 1836. SECTION 20. William Sbadb~olt, Julne 4, 1836. John Stewart, Julne 28, 1836. Edward G. Faile, November 12, 1836. SECTION 2 1. Alpha Mors-e, May 21, 1836. Henry J. Wilcox, May 31,1836. Smithfieldd Beden, June 1, 1836. George Ellis, June 1.5, 1836. I John1 Stewart, Junie 28, 1836. Charity TaylYor, July 7, 1836. Alp1a Morse, July 11, 1836. Alp1a MIorse, October 19, 1836. SECTION 22. Henry J. Wilcox, May 9, 1836. Alpha Morse, MAY 21, 18.36. George Ellis,.Junec 15, 1836. Walter Davenport, June 15, 1836. Jacob Miller, June 11, 1836. Daniel Haled, Junce 18, 1836. SECTION 23. Milo M. Kemp, May 23, 1836. Aaron 13. Patterson, June 3, 1836. Walter Danvenport, June 15, 1836. Adin Nelson, October- 1D, 1836. Birds-eye Braoks, November 27, 1837. SECTION'24. Horace 1). Jenesonl, Julie 4, 1836. Humphrev Church, June 2, 1836. Lewis Baker, Juie 20, 1836. Joln Stewart, June 20, 1836. SECTION 25. Asler B. Bates, Janulary 5, 1836. Joseph Sikes, May 4, 1836. Joseph Sikes, May 9, 1836. Elects MI. Wilcox, May 9, 1836. SECTION 25. Jerome B. Smith, May 23, 1836. ]Darius Bickford, May 26, 1836. SECTION 26. Jerome B. Smith, May 23, 1836. Darius Bickford, Mav 26, 1836. Darius Bickford, June 28, 1836. Adams Gibson, October 15, 1836. Israel Bickford, December 19, 1836. SECTION 27. Henry J. Wilcox, April 28, 1836. John Stewart, June 28, 1836. John McKay, June 28, 1836. SECTION 28. Jolhn Stewart, June 28, 1836. John McKay, June 28, 1836. SECTION 30. Norman Cutler, June 23, 1836. James Long, October 15, 1836. Saral Hadley, October 15, 1836. Jolln G. Randall, October 15, 1836. Peter Allen, October 1, 1838. SECTION 31. Hiram A. Stone, October 15, 1836. Cornelius Allen, October 24, 1836. Hiram Fillmore, November 15, 1837. Hiralmu Fillmore, February 2, 1838. Calvin Rose, Marclh 29, 1838. Robert Parritt, July 14, 1838. SECTION 32. Samuel Axford, June 20, 1836. Johb Axford, Septeynber 12, 1836. SECTION 33. Samuel Axford, June 20, 1836. Reuben S. Cook, October 25, 1836. Elmon Earl, August 29, 1838. SECTION 34. Reuben J. Cook, October 25, 1836. WVilliam Lyman, November 22, 1837. Richard P. Hubbard, June 12, 1838. SECTION 35. Warren Cheney, June 7, 1838. Hormer Pelton, -June 8, 18438. Charles Lane, Jllne 14, 1838. John McKay, June 27, 1838. Israel Bichford. December 19, 1838. James M. Davison, January 27, 1837. Homer Pelton, Mav 27, 1837. SECTION 36. Eh'jah Strong, Julle 117 1836. Asher B. Bates, January 5, 1836. A. Gib:bs, April 7, 1836. Peter Price, April 22, 1836. Isra-el Bickford, May 26, 1836'. Amlos J. Hines, October 13, 1836. Charles L. Campbell, Octob~er 13, 1836. Israel Bickford, December 19, 1836.EARLY HISTORY. The first purellase of land in Hadley was made by John Look, May 17, 1834, and the second by his brother-in-law, H. M. Look. both from western Newn York. Mr. Johln Look says of his arrival here: "I first came to Lapeer in 1834, and found Mr. Hart, Mr. M~cMaster and others. Onl the 9th day of May, came to locate, but 'was deferred by the forbidding appearance, of the pine around the townl; but finally concluded to settle a little further south, which I did the same year. I was nine weeks without seeing a white woman, except my wife. I found a Mr. Morse there, and finally occupied a house jointly with him for some time. I. enjoyed the wild life very much, and think the people were more social then than now." The Mr. Morse spoken of was J. B. Morse, who had located I _ L ktJ r: Aa w —7 i _ _ --- - -- -- - ------

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Page  85 4 ' I i I I I HISTORY OF LA just across the line in the township of Metamora. These families formed the nucleus of what was afterward called Farmers Creek. The Messrs. Look built houses on their land and were settled in their new homes before winter set in. These innovations by the pale faces were regarded with'extreme disgust by the cowardly red-skins, who dared not annoy the men but would take occasion during their absence from home, to visit their houses and endeavor to frighten their wives and children. As an instance, Mr. Morse had made and enclosed a clearing on a piece of ground crossed by an Indian trail. This displeased them greatly, and one day as Mr. Morse and his older sons were absent, a stalwart savage, half crazed with whisky entered, and began to abuse Mrs. Morse, finally drawing his knife upon her as she refused to accede to his demands. But at this point Mrs. Morse, who, during her parley with the Indian, had quietly placed the large shovel in the embers, drew it forth red hot, and opening the door bade the "noble red man" depart, or she would strike him with the shovel, and he obeyed, muttering curses on "the bad squaw" in Indian and broken English as he went. The next settlers were two young men, Eri Potter and John Morse, who located in the summer of 1834. They did not remain long. Eri Potter removed to Oakland County, Mich., and when the discovery of gold was made in California he went in pursuit of a fortune, but died soon after reaching his destination. His wife became insane from grief and died soon after. Mr. Morse removed to Ionia, where he became a prominent man in public affairs. In the spring of 1835, William Hart, Abraham Tunison and Charles L. Campbell, located on the present site of the village of Hadley. Messrs. Hart and Tunison removed here with their families in the fall of that year, and became leading men in the new settlement. Mr. Hart was elected county treasurerin 1838, and was a member of the first grand jury in the county. He was born in Oneida County, N. Y., about the year 1793. His entry of land in Hadley comprised 400 acres and is described as follows: West half of northeast quarter, east half of northwest quarter, east half of southwest quarter and southeast quarter of section 9. Returning to Monroe County, N. Y., where his family was then living, he came back to Hadley, July, 18.35, with his two sons and commenced work on his land clearing and building a log house. They boarded with John L. Morse, who occupied a small log house built by Eri Potter on section 2. There were also two other settlers in the town prior to Mr. Hart's coming, viz: Henry M. and John Look. Mr. Hart's family joined him in October, '35. Their house was built on the bank of the west branch of Farmers Creek, on the land now owned by J. W. Pearson. Here Mr. Hart died. Mrs. Hart, who was alsQ a native of Oneida County, N. Y., died April 4, 1883, at the house of her son Truman. Of their children, Ansel died in Iowa, Alonzo is living in Hadley, Mary Ann, deceased, was the wife of Paul G. Davidson, of Genesee County, Micli., Charles is living in Missouri, Truman in Atlas, Genesee County, Mich. ABRAHAM TUNISON, although not so prominent in public affairs as Mr. Hart, was a very worthy man, and a pioneer of the right sort. He was a zealous Baptist, and may be justly considered the father of the first Baptist church of Hadley, of which he was for many years one of the deacons. Of the entire family one dau;lghter, Mrs. A. Geer, of Elba, is the only one living. Some of AMr. Tunison's descendants still remain in Hadley and possess a goodly portion of their grandfather's energy. In the summer of 1835, Ira Griggs, his son Almon, and Timothy Wheeler, settled on section 1. They were men of energy and prominence. Mr.Wheeler was a very public spirited man and was active in all the progressive movements of the town. Ira Griggs was some| what eccentric, but a general favorite on account of his genial good.PEER COUNTY. 85 - humor. He was full of genuine wit and many of his puns and odd sayings are still related and laughed over by those who knew him. In 1836 the brothers John and Aaron Brigham settled on sections 18 and 19. Aaron Brigham was born in Lewis County, N. Y., ill 1809, and came to Michigan in 1833, and in 1836 settled on section 18, township of Hadley, where he has since resided. There were but few settlers in the township when he first came to the counlty. He cleared up a large farm and has erected fine buildings and made other improvements. Was married in 1834 to Miss Moriah Bosworth, who was born in 1813, and was also a native of Lewis County, N. Y. They have had four children. George W. enlisted in August, 1862,in the Twenty-second Michigan Infantry,and died of fever in hospital, in March, 1863. David C. enlisted at the same time and in the same regiment. Was taken prisoner at Chickamauga, and was incarcerated in Libby prison, thence to Andersonville, where he died. Henry S. is the only surviving son. HENRY S. BRIGHAM was born in the township of Hadley on the old homestead, July 10, 1853, where he has always resided, with theexception of the time he spent at school. Since his father's health failed he has managed the farm. He was married December 25, 1878, to Miss Hattie L. Stimson. They have one child, a daughter. JOHN BRIGHAM, SR., was born November 21, 1806, in Lowville, Lewis County, in the State of New York. His father, David Brigham, was of New England origin, having emigrated from Massachusetts to Lewis County about 1795, and was one of the pioneers of that section of the State. His mother was, before marriage, Sarah Veeder, daughter of Judge Veeder, who is mentioned by James R. Paulding as the Patriarch Veeder who presided over the first settlement on that portion of the Mohawk, "the advance guard of civilization." He was twice driven from his home by the Indians, and his buildings and personal effects either burned or carried away. She was therefore familiar with the hardships of pioneer life, and was a descendant of the early Dutch settlers of the Empire State. Mr. Brigham was one of the early pioneers of Michigan, he having emigrated to Michigan Territory in November, 1833. Hie brought with him only the little sum of money he had been able to save while working out by the month, and first settled in what is now the township of Atlas, Genesee County, but in November, 1836, removed to Hadley, Lapeer County. Here he cleared the fine farm of about 300 acres which is now occupied by his oldest son, Aaron G. Brigham, and here his home has been ever since thac time except about two years, from 1841 to 1843, when he lived on a farm in Atlas, Genesee County. November 21, 18388, he was married to Eliza S. Goodrich, daughter of Levi H. and Eunice Goodrich, who, with her parents and brothers had emigrated to Atlas, Genesee County, in May, 1836. She was born in the town of Sempronius, Cayuga County, in the State of New York, September 12, 1809. When she was about six years oi age her family removed to what was then known as the Niagara Frontier, and settled on a new farm in Clarence, Erie County, in the same State. Here she continued to reside till the time of her emigration to Michigan. She died of cancer, March 3, 1874, after enduring three painful surgical operations. She was a woman of strong mind, resolute will, unassuming virtues and of remarkall devotion to her family. She had six brothers, whose names in the order of their ages ae as follows: IMoses Goodrich, Aaron Goodrich, Levi W. Goodrich, Enos Goodrich, John S. Goodri h and Reuben Goodrich. All of these except Levi W. and Jolln S. are now living. Moses and Levi W. were farmers, Aaron alnd John S7., lawyers, and Enos and Reuben, merchants and men of gener.al business. Aaron. Goodrich is author of a work entitled "A History of the So-called Christopher Colurm - -F - __ I F - i — OR Z - I #I -I

Page  86 X I I I 86 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. bus and his Discoveries in America;" has been chief justice of the supreme court of Minnesota, secretary of legation to Belgium under Lincoln's administration, one of the Presidential electors of Tennessee, member of the legislature of Tennessee and has held other positions of honor and trust. Enos and Reuben have both been members of the legislature of this State, and John S. was elected judge of the Seventh Judicial District of Michigan, but died at the age of thirty-six, before entering on the duties of his office. John Brigham had four sons and one daughter, viz Aaron G. Brighllam, John Brigham, Jr., Eliza Jane Brigham, Samuel L. Brigham and Charles S. Brigham, all of whom were born at Hadley, Lapeer County, except John, Jr., who was born during the sojourn of the family in Atlas. Of these children three are now living, Eliza Jane and Charles S. having died in infancy. AARON G. BRIGHAM was born May 12, 1840, and was married to Caroline Vantine January 7, 1869. They have three sons and one daughter. JOHN BRIGHAM, JR., was born August 29, 1842, in what was then Atlas, Lapeer, but now Genesee County. He graduated at the law department of Michigan University, March 25, 1868, and was admitted to the bar at Lapeer in the summer of 1868. After graduating he returned home and remained till the spring of 1874, when he went into the law office of Hon. J. B. Moore, of Lapeer, where he remained a few months, after which he came to what was then Wenona, now West Bay City, and opened a law office February 1, 1875. He has continued to practice law, keeping his office in West Bay City from that day to the present time. In spring of 1879 he was elected an alderman of West Bay City, and is now the city attorney. He was married October 9, 1878, to Barbara M. Aitken, of St. Clair County, Mich., whose parents were from Glasgow, Scotland. SAMUEL L. BRIGHAM, junior member of the law firm of J. & S. L. Brigham, was born in Lapeer County, Mich. He graduated from the law department of the University of Michigan in 1874, and came to West Bay City in 1876, when he formedTa co-partnership with his brother in the practice of law. He is also a justice of the peace, for which position his legal attainments well qualify him. Also in the summer of 1836 came Gardner Dexter, and the following autumn, Russell Cobb, David and Jonathan Crampton and John Mills, Jr., came from central New York, through Canada, with their teams, being four weeks on the road. They settled on sections 5, 7 and 8, and were for many years among the strong men of the town. But they have all, excepting Mr. Cobb and Mrs. John Mills, gone upon the last journey to the great beyond. Late in 1836 came Nelson Cady, Harvey Riley and Smithfield Beden, all of whom were prominent citizens of the town, but none remain except Mrs. Riley. About this time, the town having been organized, the population materially increased. In 1837 there arrived John Randall, Adams Gibson, Oliver and Robert Davenport, Alanson Gray and Alpheus Cady, all of whom are now dead, except Mr. and Mrs. Robert Davenport and the widow of Alanson Gray. In 1838 came James M. Davidson, H. Pelton, John M. and William Hemingway and John B. and William Cady. In these times men, wild with the desire for land, would spend their last dollar for it and would soon find themselves without bread or the means to buy it, and wheat at $2 a bushel. Men wept to hear their children cry for bread, and some thought it a special providence to get moldy, sour wheat at $1.75 per bushel, the owner of the wheat being willing to wait for the. payment till a crop could be secured. Then to get it ground they had to go to Orion or Lakeville with ox teams, and women kept the house while their husbands, fathers or brothers, went to the mill, or for seed wheat, never blenching through the long, weary nights, though wolves howled all around them. Of those who held office during the first years after the town was organized, only Messrs. Russell Cobb, Dennis Griggs, and Alonzo N. Hart still reside in town. Johnson N. Tower resides in Marathon, Lapeer County, William Hemingway at Lapeer, an attorney and counselor at law, and John Morse, at last accounts, was in Ionia County, Mich. All the rest, so far as known, have died. Roswell Nurse came in the spring of 1837, and died the next year, and his widow a short time after his death remained alone in her cabin in the woods with no neighbor near, and not even a dog or gun to serve her in case of need for three days and nights, while her brother went for seed wheat, though the wolves made the woods around her lonely dwelling ring with their dismal howlings. This lady is still living, we believe, somewhere in Oakland County. The early settlers of Hadley were mostly men of great energy, and of marked integrity. Their wives were worthy daughters of the women of the Revolution and the war of 1812. ORGANIZATION. The town of Hadley was organized in March, 1836, and comprised township 6 north, of range 9 east, and township 6 north, of range 10 east, the latter being now the town of Metamora. The first township meeting was held at the house of Timothy Wheeler, April 4, 1836, eleven voters being present. William Hart was elected supervisor. The general election for 1836 was held according to the custom of that time, two days, and at two places. One voting place was at the house of Timothy Wheeler on November 7, and on the day following at the house of Jesse Lee. This election was held for the purpose of electing three presidential electors, three State senators, one representative, one representative to the legislature, two associate judges and county officers. There were twenty-two votes polled at this election and the Whig majority in-the township was seven, but as the Democrats carried the day, both in the county and State the vote of Hadley hlad no general significance. The record of this election, still preserved in the office of the town clerk of Hadley, is the only one in the county containing any account of the event, which was probably attended with a greater degree of excitement and anxiety than any subsequent election. There was a special election held December 6, 1836, for the purpose of electing delegates to meet in convention at Ann Arbor, to assent to the compromise proposition made by Congress to the legislature of Michigan. At this meeting twenty-three votes were cast, all for Norman Davison and Harvey Gray. In 1840 the first census was taken by Noah H. Hart. The total population was 371, of which 199 were males and 172 females. The census of 1874 was as follows: Population, 1,505; acres of taxable land, 21,389; of improved land, 14,315; number of sheep, 4,582; of horses, 646; of cows, 650. Products of preceding year, 24,172 pounds of wool; 67,026 pounds of pork marketed; 1,075 pounds of cheese, and 72,447 of butter made; 41,824 bushels of wheat raised; 31,492 of corn; 43,871 of other grain; 16,506 bushels of apples; eighty of pears; twenty-five of cherries; 11,108 of potatoes; and 2,137 tons of hay; 449 barrels of cider were made, and 6,635 pounds of fruit dried for market. In 1874, 490 pounds of maple sugar were made. In 1880 the population of the town was 1,474. The aggregate value of real and personal property in 1882, as equalized by the board of supervisors was $792,000. SCHOOL MATTERS. The first school taught in the township of Hadley or Metamora, was a private one kept by H. M. Look of Hadley, at the house I i i i i i i i I V11 i r -: 9 6 - V-en 00 1 f~ j i h 1. I. -

Page  87 w - I __ HISTORY OF LAPEE:ER COUNTY 87 I I I of his brothzer-in-law, J. B3. Morse, just over the way in Metam~ora, for the instruction of their owvn and their neighbors' children, about the year 1836. Some time in 1837i a school district was organized on the plains west of Hadley, now known as Greell's Corners. In 1838 a fractional district was formed of H~adley a2ndl Me~tamuor, and a log- school-house built in Hadley, one-half mile south of Farmers Creek. Nelson Cady was the first teacher in this building. About the same time the H~adley distric6 was formed, and soon after the one in the Hemingway and Davenport neighbo'rhood., In 1842 the organiza~tion hrnown as -~Free School District No. 1," Hadley and MR~etanbora, was broken up; the southwesviern part formed a new district, known as "Cadyville," while the rest of the dlistrict w~yitll adjacent patrts of Lazpeer and Elba formed a new district knlown as "Free School District No. 1," Hadlxiey and Metamora, Lapeer, and Elba. This still remains and is liktely to stand. The Cadyville district, in consequence of dissensionzs, ii- a few years fell to pieces, Isince that time he has resitleil withi some of his children. His wife dtied on August 11, 1846. "He enjoyed good health most of the time to his death, and on July 14, 1878, preached at the school-liouse in the neighborhood where he resided, (it being his ninetieth birthday) to at large concourse of people of several hundred. iiHis funeral was attended by at least 500 persons at the church at Htadley village, oil Sunday, Aucrust 28, 1881. At the house on the day of the funeral they had his chair that he usually sat in draped in mourning, and placed out in front of the house under the shade trees, where lie used to sit and read for hours at a time, and which lie called his parlor. In the days of Jackson he was au ardent, Ja-ckson man, but seldom voted. Since the organization of the Republica~n party he has' been a Republican but never entered into political dliscussions. "He wats a subscriber for the Chr~istian Adro1:clate of New York from the first number to the time of his death continuously. He was an ardeiit M~ethodist in his religious opinion but not bigoted. Durino, the agitation of the slavery qjuestion before the rebellion, be was ail anti-slavery man but did not 'oin the Abolition party, but was firm and decisive, in his opinions on that subject, and was opposed to slavery in all its forms. He died in full faith in the Alonzo Hart. It was at a pratyer meetings held by members of this society, after the close of their regularr business meeting, that the great, religiouslf revivnal began, which be3.Lme -lo general under the. labors of Revs. Potter, Mlitchell and Mcl~iay. This temperance soc~iety exerted a great power in the town both morally and sociatlly. i 4.2 I I -~, la -r —71 -

Page  88 Z. I — - -; O 8 HIISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. PI In 1842 this society resolved to petition for the prohibition of the manufacture and sale of intoxicating drillks. This shows that legal prohibition had its friends at that early day. Many of the members came long distances with ox teams to attend these meetings, and we can just imagine how intensely these rides and social meetings were enjoyed by the younger members. THE HADLEY M. E. CHURCH. The first sermon preached in Hadley was delivered by Rev. James Hemingway July 10, 1835. The sermon was preached ill a log shanty standing on the southwest corner of the east half of southwest quarter of section 2. The house was then owned byEri Potter and occupied by John Morse. It is said that every person then living in the town was present at this meeting. Sometime in the month of November, 1835, Rev. Oscar North orgA.nized thle first religious society in Hadley, consisting of four members, viz.: Dennis Griggs, Jemima Griggs, William Hart and Polly HIrt. William Hart was appointed the first class leader, anl office which hle continued to hold for several years. Paradoxical as it may appear, the first religious society was organized in Metamora, about ninety rods east of the Hadley line, at Farmers Creek. Metamora was at that time unorganized, anul was connected with Hadley for civil purposes. Shortly after the organization of the society anl appointment for preaching was fixed at the residence of William Hart, just at the south side of the present limits of Hadley village. Farmers Creek, however, continued to be a regular preaching place, and at some subsequent period the class was divided and the part which held its meetings at William Hart's was thenceforth known as the Hadley Class, and the other part as the Farmers Creek Class. From 1835 to 1850 Hadley was an outlying appointment of the Lapeer circuit. In 1837 the appointment was removed from William Hart's residence to a log school-house at Green's Corners. This was the first school-house built in the township. In 1838 Oran Mitchell was pastor. During his administration Hadley was favored with a sweeping revival, which commenced at a temperance meeting. At that meeting it is said that with two exceptions all the adult population was converted in the township, and the township received the title of "Pious Hadley. " During the year 1842 a church edifice was commenced on the site of the present Hadley M. E. Church. The lot was deeded to the society by Alonzo and Amanda Hart, February 15, 1842. The deed was witnessed by John M. Hemingway and Dr. J. S. Comstock. The first board of trustees consisted of James Hemingway, William Hart, Simon T. Hill, Jonathan Crampton and William Hemingway. It appears that our pioneer fathers made haste slowly, for the deed, though executed in February, 1842, was not acknowledged until Marchll 26, 1844. It was recorded about a month later. The building was a fraine, 26x33 feet. At the conference of 1819 Hadley and some other appointments were severed from Lapeer charge and formed into a new circuit, and for the first time the name of Hadley appears in the published minutes. Benjamin F. Pritchird was placed in charge of the new circuit, and remained two years. His work included Hadley, Goodrichville, Farmers Creek, Thornville, and probably some other appointments. Daring Bro. Pritchard's second yeAr's pastorate the parsonage was built. The deed of the parsonage lot was given by William and Polly Hart, and bears date November 20, 1850. The instrument was ackinowledged before Justice Chauncey S. Randall, and was witnessed by Sabrina Hart. The trustees to whom the deed was given were William Hart, James Hemingway, John M. Hemingway, Ruffls C. Potter, and Jonathan Crampton. In 1851 Henry N. Brown was pastor; in 1852, Thomas Wake lin; in 1853, John Levington; in 1851, Giles N. Belknap. In 1855 Mr. Belknap was returned to the charge. At the session of the general conference held in May, 1856, the State of Michigan was divided into two annual conferences. The Detroit conference, which included the Hadley appointment, held its first session in the month of September, 1856, at which time Thomas Seeley was appointed pastor of Hadley circuit, with Isaac Crawford for assistant. Mr. Seeley's pastorate continued two years, during which time the church edifice at Farmers Creek was commenced. The deed of the lot on which it was erected, bears date April 7, 1857, was given by Andrew White and azknowledlgedl before Dr. J. S. Comstock. The trustees were James Gark, Dennis Griggs, Isaac Thomas, William Hills and Asa Parmlee. Dr. L. D. Whitney preached the dedicatory sermon, In 1858 Samuel P. Vandoozer was pastor. During that year a noted protracted meeting was held in Hadley by anll eccentric evangelist by the name of J. B. Allen, commonly known as "Crazy Allen." In 1859 anal 1860 William Mothersill, who preached at Hadley in 1845, when it was simply an out-appointment on Lapeer circuit, was again pastor here. In 1861 Alansonl Herrick was appointed pastor; in 1862, Lewis MiLi.hell; in 1863, Curtis Mosier; in 1864, Wesley Hagadorn; in 1865 and 1866, Benjamin F. Pritchard; he will be remembered as having been the first manl stationed at Hadley after it was cut off from Lapeer, in 1850. During this second pastorate of Mr. Pritchard, the appointment at Farmers Creek was cut off from Hadley, and in connection with Hunters Creek, was under the charge of Alexander Gee. Farmers Creek was again attached to Hadley in 1867, and botlh were under the pastoral care of Lucius S. Tedman, who remained two years, and was succeededin 1869 by George W. Owen, who remained three years. During his administration the present church edifice was erected, at a cost of $4,500. The corner stone was laid May 12, 1870, by Rev. J. S. Smart with appropriate ceremonies. The following list of articles were deposited in the vault: Methodist almanac, 1870; Michigan almanac, 1870; (Th'istian.Adroc,'ate, 1826 and 1870; Northwestern Christian Atlroc;ate, 1870; Sw'bli /-S.chool.4dvocate, 1870; Bible, hlymn book, Discipline, history of the church, official list, list of township officers, 1870; five small coins, handbill for corner stone laying, and a copy of the Lapeer C(larion. The church edifice was dedicated October 12, 1870, by Rev. J. S. Smart. BAPTIST CHURCH. The Baptist Church of Hadley was organized Sept. 13, 1837, with seven members. The meeting was held in a new barn belonging to Wm. Hart. Thile first pastor was Rev. W. D. Potter. Miss Jane Hartwell, now Mrs. Howe, of Hadley, was the first member received by baptism. This society began a church edifice in 1852, which was completed and dedicated in 185-1. Its early pastors have been the Revs. W. D. Potter, Wmn. Fuller, Q. C. Atherton, N. P. Barlow, E. N. Selleck and D. W. Cronkhite. In the winter of 1858-'59, an itinerant evangelist styled "Crazy Allen," held a series of meetings in the Baptist Church, although himself a licentiate of the M. E. Church. The meetings were styled union. Thile preacher's antics and modes of procedure, were after the model of the Salvation Army. He would sing, whistle, dance and shout by turns in conducting these meetings. There was great excitment, and one unfortunate young man became demented, but no permanent good was done. THE METHODIST CHURCH. The Free Methodist society was organized in 1876, and a church built just east of Hadley. Thie first pistor was Rev. John Wetherold. He has been sumseeded by R. D. Robinson, McGee, A. F. Goodwin, D. C. Elmberg and J. B. Soule. The present mem

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Page  89 4` HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 89 - - B bership is forty-one. A lot has been purchased in the village and the erection of a church upon it in the near future is intended. POSTOFFICE. The first postmaster was John Mills, Jr., who kept the office at his house, two miles west of the village. It was afterward removed to the village. Postmasters since Mr. Mills: Luther D. Whitney, Harvey Mills, - Cummings, N. F. Hough, Theo. Taylor, M. N. Kelley, Horace Hutton and W. A. Henderson. LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. The Ladies' Library Association of Hadley was organized at a meeting held at the residence of A. S. Little in the village of Hadley, Dec. 22, 1874. Officers: President, Mrs. Carrie E. Little; vicepresident, Mrs. Vina Proctor; secretary, Miss Ella E. Hower; treasurer, Mrs. C. Button. The officers in 1883 are as follows: President, Mrs. Dr. Suter; secretary, Ella Hower; treasurer, Mrs. John Chalmers. MASONIC. Hadley Lodge No. 210, F. & A. M., was organized in December, 1866, with the following charter members: Lucius Fitch, David Mills, Herman Parmalee, Mark N. Kelley, Smith C. Williams, James H. Hemingway, Ashley Riley, Lester H. Williams, Ezra B. Mattison, John B. Proctor, John J. Sawyer, Geo. W. Nye, T. Coverdale. There are, in 1883, forty-three members. The officers are as follows: W. M., M. F. Hemingway; S. W., M. Walker; J. W., C. B. Phillips; Treas., J. Hodgson; Sec., J. A. Morton; S. D., F. G. Bullock; J. D., Ed. Cole; tyler, Jas. Sprague; stewarts, Abram Gates and James H. Hemingway. AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. The Hadley District Agricultural and Horticultural Society was organized in 1877. First officers: Pres't G. W. Cramton; secretary, Geo. Davenport; treasurer. John M. Chalmers. There has been no change of officers until 1882, when Geo. Davenport was elected president and G. W. Cramton, secretary. The grounds, covering ten acres adjoining Hadley village, were purchased in 1879, and the main building erected in 1880. The fairs have been uniformly successful, and the society is practically free from debt. Directors in 1883: Andrew Snook, Hadley; John Stewart, Elba; John Joy, Atlas; Clark Tow-nsend, Metamora; Wm. Francis, Brandon; James Kerr, Davison; Henry Brigham, Hadley; John K. Pierson, Atlas; Alphonzo Baldwin, Hadley. Business committee: Andrew Snook, Jas. Kerr, H. S. Brigham. TOWN OFFICERS. 1836 - Supervisor,William Hart; clerk, Dennis Griggs; collector, Beverly M. Brown. 1837 Supervisor, William Hart; clerk, Nelson Cady; collector, Reuben Shadbolt. 1838-Supervisor, James W. Sanborn; clerk, Nelson Cady; collector, Levy P. Miller. 1839-Supervisor, John Mills, Jr.; clerk, Nelson Cady; treasurer, Rufus C. Potter. 1840-Supervisor, William Hemingway; clerk, John M. Hemingway; treasurer, Rufus C. Potter. At this election John Mills, Jr., and William Hemingway received an equal number of votes for supervisor, and the two candidates cast lots, which resulted in favor of Mr. Hemingway. 1841-Supervisor, Nelson Cady; clerk, Smithfield Beden; treasurer, Rufus C. Potter. 1842-Supervisor, John Mills, Jr.; clerk, Nathan Greene; treasurer, Rufus C. Potter. 1843-Supervisor, Henry M. Look; clerk, Nathan Greene; treasurer, Rufus C. Potter. 1844-Supervisor, H. M. Look; clerk, Gardiner Dexter; treasurer, Rufus C. Potter. 1845-Supervisor, J. M. Hemingway; clerk, C. H. Hamlin; treasurer, R. C. Potter. 1846-Supervisor, J. M. Hemingway; clerk, J. S. Tower; treasurer, Rufus C. Potter. 1847 —Supervisor, Homer Pelton; clerk, J. M. Hemingway; treasurer, A. L. Hart. 1848-Supervisor, John M. Hemingway; clerk, Smithfield Beden; treasurer, Ansel L. Hart. 1849 —Supervisor, John Mills, Jr.; clerk, Russell Cobb; treasurer, Harvey C. Mills. 1850-Supervisor, John Mills, Jr.; clerk, Luther D. Whitney; treasurer, Harvey C. Mills. 1851-Supervisor, Joseph W. Pelton; clerk, James H. Hemingway; treasurer, Alonzo N. Hart. 1852-Supervisor, Joseph W. Pelton; clerk, James H. Hemingway; treasurer, Alonzo N. Hart. 1853-Supervisor, John M. Hemingway; clerk, Luther D. Whitney; treasurer, William Baldwin. 1854 —Supervisor, William Hemingway; clerk, Silas B. Gaskill; treasurer, George E. Scott. 1855-Supervisor, John M. Hemingway; clerk, Silas B. Gaskill; treasurer, George E. Scott. 1856-Supervisor, Jacob C. Kore; clerk, Luther D. Whitney; treasurer, Harmon Barnes. 1857-~ Supervisor, Jacob C. Kore; clerk, L. Barnes; treasurer, Orator Gibson. 1858-Supervisor, Jacob C. Kore; clerk, Jasper Bentley; treasurer, George E. Scott. 1859-Supervisor, Jacob C. Kore; clerk, Alonzo N. Hart; treasurer, George E. Scott. 1860 —Supervisor, Gardiner Dexter; clerk, Alonzo N. Hart; treasurer, George E. Scott. 1861-Supervisor, Gardiner Dexter; clerk, George E. Scott, treasurer, George Davenport. 1862 —Supervisor, Gardiner Dexter; clerk, George E. Scott; treasurer, George Davenport. 1863-Supervisor, Gardiner Dexter; clerk, Jasper Bentley; treasurer, N. M. Cole. 1861- Supervisor, Gardiner Dexter; clerk, Jasper Bentley; treasurer, Herman Palmerlee. 1865-Supervisor, Frank C. DeLano; clerk, William A. Henderson; treasurer, Herman Palmerlee. 1866-Supervisor, Jacob C. Kore; clerk, James H. Hemingway; treasurer, Herman Palmerlee. 1867 —Supervisor, Jacob C. Kore; clerk, George E. Scott; treasurer, Herman Palmerlee, 1868-Supervisor, Jacob C. Kore; clerk, George E. Scott; treasurer, Herman Palmerlee. 1869-Supervisor, Jacob C. Kore; clerk, A. Bentley; treasurer, Herman Ptalmerlee. 1870-Supervisor, Gilbert Bates; clerk, William Houston; treasurer, Mark N. Kelley. 1871-Supervisor, Gilbert Bates; clerk, A. Bentley; treasurer, Mark N. Kellev. 1872 —Supervisor, Gilbert Bates; clerk, Alvah Bentley; treasurer, Robert S. Hutton. 1873 —Supervisor, Jacob C. Kore; clerk, Alvah Bentley; treasurer, Robert S. Huuton. 1874-Supervisor, Jacob C. Kore; clerk, M. F. Hemingway; treasurer, Robert S. Hutton. 1N. II T 0 1 tI - I

Page  90 { I m __I I - 90 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. I 1875-Supervisor, George Davenport; clerk, M. F. Hemingway; treasurer, William A. Henderson. 1876-Supervisor, George Davenport; clerk, Charles Moorland; treasurer, William A. Henderson. 1877 —Supervisor, George Davenport; clerk, Charles Moorland; treasurer, Robert S. Hutton. 1878-Supervisor, Jacob C. Kore; clerk, Charles Moorland; treasurer, Robert S. Hutton. 1879-Supervisor, George Davenport; clerk, John A. Morton; treasurer, George W. Tunison. 1880-Supervisor, George Davenport; clerk, John A. Morton; treasurer, George W. Tunison. 1881-Supervisor, John M. Hemingway; clerk, John A. Morton; treasurer, Egbert Tunison. 1882-Supervisor, John M. Hemingway; clerk, John A. Morton; treasurer, Egbert Tunison. 1883-Supervisor, George W. Cramton; clerk, John A. Morton; treasurer, Charles Moorland. THE HADLEY HILLS. The southern portion of Hadley Township is hilly, and until within a few years, was regarded as comparatively worthless for agricultural purposes. This portion of the township has been settled mostly by Germans, who have made for themselves good farms, and are a prosperous community. There is a Lutheran Church in this settlement that is well sustained. BIOGRAPHICAL. FRANK GLEASON was born in Middlebury, Wyoming County, N. Y., June 4, 1843, and, with his mother, in 1855 came to Lapeer County, and settled in the township of Hadley on section 6. He remained at home until of age, when he purchased a piece of wild land, and for two years engaged in clearing it. He then sold it, and in 1866 purchased the homestead which he has owned and occupied since. Much of the clearing on his present farm was done by him before he was of age. Has now 155 acres of land, and besides farming is also engaged in handling fat cattle for the Detroit market. He was married January 2, 1865, to Miss Jennie Stewart, a native of Scotland. They have had four children. JOHN IVORY, deceased, was born near Sackett's Harbor, N. Y., in 1814, and came to Oakland County, Mich., in 1837. In the spring of 1840, he purchased a tract of wild land lying on both sides of the town line road between the townships of Elba and Hadley in Lapeer County, and moved upon it and built his first house in Elba, but subsequently built on section 4 in Hadley, which he occupied until the time of his death ill 1875. He was a hard working, industrious man, and cleared up a large farm, making many valuable improvements thereon. He was married March 10, 1840, to Miss Phidelia Doud, who died October 13, 1880. They had four children, three of whom are living. RUFUS IVORY was born ill the township of Elba, July 20, 1845, and has always lived on the homestead. On the death of his father, John Ivory, he became possessed of a part of the old farm which he still retains. Has served his township in the capacity of highway commissioner two years, and is the present (1883) incumbent. He was married March 8, 1866, to Miss Sarah J. Wilders. They have had five children, three of whom are living. E. A. BROWNELL is a native of Bethany, Genesee County, N. Y., and was born March 7, 1816. He came to Metamora, Lapeer County, Micb., in 1838, and settled on section 20, where he remained until 1872, when he removed to his present farm in Hadley, on section 25. Has been engaged in farming since he came to Michig.,n, and has cleared up large tracts of land. He now owns a fine farm upon which may be seen substantial and commodious buildings. Was elected to the State legislature in 1866 andre-elected in 1868. Has been supervisor two years, justice of the peace sixteen years, besides having held other township offices. When he came to Lapeer County the townships of Metamora and Hadley were very sparsely settled, containing perhaps nine families to each. Travel was carried on by the aid of marked trees as there were no roads cut out at that time. He was married in the spring of 1838 to Miss Emily Dowd, who was born in Massachusetts in 1817. They have had seven children, five of whom are living. HIRAM LEE was born in Metamora, Lapeer County, Michdi., June 3, 1840, and remained at home, working on his father's farm most of the time, till November, 1864, when he purchased the farm he now resides upon, which is located on section 12, in the township of Hadley. He was married in July, 1862, to Miss Jane Shippey, who was born in Oxford, Oakland County, Mich., 1841. They have three children. GEORGE W. CRAMTON was born July 8, 1842, at his present place of residence on section 4. He remained at home working on the farm till August, 1861, when he enlisted in Company F, First Mich. Cav., and served in the cavalry corps of the Army of the Potomac till July, 1865, and was in most of the battles his regiment participated in. After returning home-his father having died during his absence-he bought out the heirs to the estate, and has since owned and occupied the homestead. He is the present supervisor of Hadley, and has been president of the Hadley District Agricultural and Horticultural Society for a number of years, and is at present secretary of the same. He was married October 19, 1866, to Miss Josephine P. Osmun. They have three childern. OLIVER DAVENPORT (deceased) was born in Monroe, Orange County, N. Y., May 8, 1894, and came to Hadley, Lapeer County, Mich., in 1837, where he located his land on section 22, clearing it up and remaining upon it until his death, which occurred November 6, 1869. He was married January 4, 1827, to Miss Permelia Crosson, who was born in Orange County, N. Y.,in 1803. They had a family of six children —Catharine, Susan; who died at the age of two years, Jesse, George, William H., and Theodore. Mr. Davenport was married a second time, in November, 1849, to Miss Eliza Richards. who died October 13, 1869. GEOEGE DAVENPORT, representative from the First District of Lapeer County, was born on Hudson Street, New York City, March 23, 1833, the son of Oliver and Permelia (Crosson) Davenport. His father was born in Orange County, N. Y., May 8, 1804, of English ancestry on the paternal side, and Holland on the mother's. Mr. Davenport's mother was born January 21, 1808, also in Orange County. They were married January 4, 1827, and had six children -Catharine, Susan (deceased), Jesse, George (subject of this memoir), William H., and Theodore. Mr. Oliver Davenport was on a farm the first twenty-three years of his life. About this time lie married and moved to New York City, where lie became superintendent of a barilla factory, manufacturing barilla for soap-making. At the end of ten years, in 1837, he removed to Michigan, settling in the lonesome wilderness of Hzadley Township, Lapeer County, and entered 160 acres of land which George now owns. At that time it lay so deep in the wilder ness that Mr. Davenport had to find his way to it by means of blazed trees. They had to cut the road through the timber for twelve miles. This family is now the third oldest in the township. Mr. Oliver Davenport, with two brothers, left the remainder of the family in Troy Township, Oakland County, with another brother, and went in advance into the wilderness and erected two log cabins, taking shelter under the wagon-box during the progress of the work. 'I -t - - l 6 I re r-.

Page  91 I I~ <sI r I HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 91 a r C All thi3 land Mr. Davenport had the satisfaction of finally seeing cleared, fenced, and stocked with good farm buildings, etc. In this new country George had no opportunity of attending school until about three years after their settlement there, -when a log school-house was built, about one mile distant; and his first teacher was his aunt, Sarah A. Davenport, who is still living. On account of being so far from town,'they made their own furniture, as well as houses, and George's bedstead consisted of two-inch sticks driven into holes bored in the logs of the wall. January 18, 1846, his mother died, and three years afterward, in November, 1849, his father married Mrs. ElizaRichards, a widow lady, of English ancestry. She was a resident of Sterling Township, Macomb County, Mich. By the time lie was twenty years of age George had received a very good common-school education. In 1856 his uncle, Israel Willersdorff, desiring him as a partner in the confectionery business, in New York, lie went there; but, after working as his assistant for a year, he returned to Michigan, where, December 10, 1857, he married Miss Mary Hall, daughter of Job Hall, and born in Ashtabula County, Ohio, in December, 1841, of English ancestry. Of their five children, all born in Hadley Township, three are living, namely, Eva E., born March 12, 1860, and died July 31, 1861; George, born October 20, 1871, and died August 5, 1874; Permelia, born July 29, 1862; Cassie, April 15, 1866; Oliver G., September 18, 1875. Immediately after his marriage, Mr. Davenport returned to New York City with his wife, and after following his former employment a year, he came back to Michigan and engaged in farming, having bought eighty acres of land, which after having paid for it, he lost in litigation, but he afterward again purchased it. In Lapeer City, August 9, 1862, Mr. Davenport enlisted in Company K, Fourth Michigan Cavalry, Capt. William H. Smith. His brothers, Theodore and Jesse, also enlisted in the same company about the same time. The company was soon sent to Louisville, and engaged in active service. Mr. Davenport served three years, his regiment participating in ninety-three engagements. He was sick, however, about three months. They followed the rebels south from Louisville, and at Lebanon they had a general engagement. Jesse Davenport was wounded at Smith's Crossing, in Eastern Tennessee. George was first promoted as eighth corporal, then commissary sergeant, quartermaster sergeant, then acting first sergeant. He also participated in the capture of Jefferson Davis, and was on guard over him four days after his capture. He had charge of company as captain several months in the winter of 1864, on account of the officers being away. After his discharge he returned home and resumed farming. Theodore had been discharged at the end of a year on account of disability, and Jesse served out the three years and returned home safely. Mr. Davenport made a number of improvements on the eighty acres mentioned, and without any notice a writ of ejectment was served upon him, compelling him a second time to buy the farm, which took all the money he had saved during the war, and ran him in debt several hundred dollars besides. But this he soon paid, and added sixty acres more. He cleared about fifty acres, and finally sold for $1,150. He then purchased of the family heirsa quarter section of the homestead, on which lie has since lived, and where he now has 190 acres, 160 under good cultivation. He has a fine residence, barns, orchards, etc. Altogether, he has a very valuable and well-equipped homestead. To obtain this after so many misfortunes, has called into requisition more energy and business talent than most men possess. Mr. Davenport has been commissioner of highways about seven years, township treasurer, 1861-'.62, supervisor six years, secretary of the Hadley District Agricultural and Horticultural Society from its organization for four years, and president of the same from 1881 to the present time. He is also president of the Lapeer County Veteran Association. In the fall of 1880 he was nominated for representative on the Republican ticket, against Joel D. McIntyre, and he received a majority of 400 votes, running far ahead of his confreres. In February, 1881, he was a delegate to the State Republican Convention at Lansing, to nominate supreme judges and regents. In the summer of 1882 he was delegate to the State Convention at Kalamazoo; also, in February, 1883, he was a member of the State Convention at Saginaw City again, to nominate regents and supreme judges; and in the fall of 1882 he was again nominated by the Republicans and re-elected representative to the legislature, against Noah H. Hart, of Lapeer City, on the Fusion ticket, receiving a majority of 351. At the last legislature he introduced a joint resolution to so alter the State constitution as to add another supreme judge to the bench, and a bill relative to the equalization of t:axation by the boards of supervisors. JAMES H. HEMINGWAY was born in Chili, Monroe County, N. Y., August 26, 1822, and with his parents in 1837 moved to Rogersville, Steuben County, N. Y., and a year thereafter to Rushford, Allegany County, N. Y. In 1840 came to Hadley, Lapeer County, Mich., and settled on section 24, and in 1844 moved to his present farm on section 4, where he has since resided; has made improvements in theway of clearing up the land and in the erection of good substantial farm buildings. On arriving at the age of twentyone years he was elected school inspector, holding the office eight years; has been township clerk several terms and a justice of the peace eight years. Married June 3, 1847, to Miss Lucina Flint. They have had five children, all of whom are living except one. ELWELL IVORY was born in -Dodge County, Wis., July 2, 1848. In 1854 he came with his parents to Hadley. Was brought up to farming, and has generally been engaged in that employment. In 1872 lie married Julia A. Browning, of Hadley, a native of New York. In 183'2 he built on his farm in the southwest quarter of section 3, the tile and brick works which he is now carrying on. The clay used in these works is pronounced a fine pottery clay, the very best for pottery and terra cotta work. This is' underlaid by and in the manufacture is mixed with a fine, clear, blue clay. The engine is of fifteen horse power, carrying two Penfield machines, one for brick, the other for tile. The works employ seven to ten men, and have a capacity of 10,000 brick or 450 rods of two and one-half inch drain tile per day. Mr. Ivory deserves such active encouragement and support from the people of Hadley and vicinity as shall make his new enterprise a great financial success. J. A. HODGSON was born in Onondaga County, N. Y., September 30, 1833. Came with his parents to Michigan in 1843 and settled in Elba. In 1854 l he worked in Hauley and attended school. In 1866 lhe moved to Hadley and bought his present farm of the heirs of Chlarles Campbell. His land is the east -half of east half of northeast quarter of section 9 and west half of west half of northwest quarter of section 10. January 1, 1856, he married Susan S. Campbell, and has two children. SILAS FOSDICK was born in Dutchess County, N. Y., January 28, 1788. He was brought up to farming, which was his life occupation. November 20, 1813, he married Susannah Davis, who was born in Ulster County, N. Y., July 3, 1792. In 1855 they calme to Hadley and bought a portion of the Hart farm, viz.: 633 acres of southeast quarter of section 9. east of highway, andl west half of southwest quarter of section 10. He died in Hadley January 25, 1875, aged eighty-seven years. Mrs. Fosdick died April 9, 1881, in Hadley, aged eighty-nine. Clhildren, William Ashley, living in Dutchess County, N. Y.; Clorinda, widow of Harvey Riley, of I I I - -A - 'iII J

Page  92 At- -.VI I l I J - 92 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY Hadley; Mary Louisa, died April 30, 1846; Charles 1)., died January 12, 1855; Julia C., living on the homestead; John S., died May 9, 1831; Olive Aletta, died June 16, 1857. JULIUS KLUSS was born in Silesia, Prussia, September 24, 1829. He there learned and worked at wagon making. Came to this country in 1852 and worked at his trade eight years in Detroit. In 1861 he moved to Ohio and in 1863 returned to Michigan, living six years at Romeo, two years at Oxford, and five in Lapeer. In 1877 he came to Hadley, where he has since resided. Is now employed in Walter M. Beden's shops. He is a faithful and skillful workman. In 1867 he married Maria Steinhauser. Has seven children. NORTON T. GRANDY was born in Wayne Countv, N. Y., March 29, 1834, and was brought up to farming. In 1864 he came to Hadley and bought a farm south of the village. Went to Missouri for his health and was there engaged in farming several years. Returning to Hadley he farmed several years near his present location, then a half mile south. Eleven years ago he bought his present farm, east half of northwest quarter of section 17. Was married in 1859 to Philinda Lower. Has five children. ALONZO HART was born in Monroe County, N. Y., May 16, 1819. In July, 1835, he came with his father and brother Ansel to Hadley and commenced work upon the tract of land which his father had entered in the spring of the same year. A fill description of their settlement and work appears in the sketch of William Hart's life. In 1841 he married Amanda Griggs. In 1860 he moved to Iowa, where his wife died in 1872, leaving three children, who 'now reside in that State. After remaining there twelve years he returned to Hadley. In November, 1872, he married Julia Merwin, of Elba, Lapeer County. Resides in the village of Hadley. Employed in shoe making, having followed that occupation the most of the time for the last twenty years. N. N. GREEN was born in St. Lawrence County, N. Y., February 2, 1843. During his infancy his parents and grandparents came to Hadley, where his grandfather had previously bought a farm in sections 5 and 8, which he afterward divided among his children. N. N. was brought up on a farm which his father bought near the town line. In May, 1863, he enlisted in the Ninth Michigan Cavalry, serving with the Army of the Cumberland. Was with Sherman in the march to the sea. Was twice slightly wounded and once captured while carrying dispatches. Was mustered out July 25, 1865. In 1867 he married Alzina Heath, a native of Canada. They have six children, all of whom are at home. In 1875 he bought the farm on which hlie now resides, west half of southwest quarter and west twenty acres of south half of south half of northwest quarter of section 5, in all 100 acres. JOHN W. CAMPBELL was born in Oneida County, N. Y., December 23, 1813. He was brought up on a farm. In 1843 he came to Oakland County, Mich., and engaged in farming. In 1863 he moved to Lapeer County and bought his present farm, southeast quarter of northeast quarter and east half of southeast quarter of section 18. He also bought west half of northwest quarter of section 17, which his son now owns. Mr. Campbell was married in 1810 to Eliza Durham. a native of Genesee County, N. Y., the marriage service being performed by Rev. Lyman P. Judson. They have one son, Flavel, and two daughters, Phoebe, wife of Dr. C. P. Felshaw, of Oakland County, and Sarah M., who -is now teaching school in the village of Hadley. SILAS F'. RILEY, son of Hiram Riley, one of the early settlers of Hadley, was born in Hadley, October 25, 1812. He was broulght up on the old homestead (west half of northwest quarter of section 15 and east half of northeast quarter of section 16). In the spring of 1869 he bought the farm where he now lives. Has the southwest quarter of northwest quarter of section 16 and west fifty-two acres of west half of southeast quarter of section 17. In 1875 he married Elsia M. Wiltsie, of Fishkill, N. Y., and has three children. ANDREW SNOOK was born in Onondaga County, N. Y., April 12, 1828. When he was nine years old his parents moved to Wayne County, N. Y. In April, 1854, he canfe to Lapeer County, Mich., and rented a farm in Elba, where he remained three years, than bought his present farm. He has now east half of northwest quarter, west half of west half of northeast quarter, and northwest quarter of southwest quarter of section 15, 160 acres. January 11, 1853, he married Sophronia E. Smith, a native of Wayne County, N. Y., and has one son, Byron L., who assists in carrying on the farm, teaching school during the winter. Mr. Snook enlisted, Aug. 9, 1862, in the Fourth Michigan Cavalry; was promoted sergeant and mustered out July 28, 1865. WALTER M. BEDEN was born in Attica, Genesee County, N. Y., July 12, 1817. In 1821 his parents moved to Wayne County, N. Y., where lie learned carriage and machine work. In May, 1836, they came to Hadley and located southwest quarter of northeast quarter, and northwest quarter of southeast quarter of section 21. July 5, '36, the family moved on the lalnd, traveling through the woods seven miles, and for four miles cutting their road. On this place Mr. Beden lived until January, 1883, when lie engaged in his present business of carriage and wagon work and blacksmithing. In 1853 he built on his farm a saw-mill, in connection with which he operated a sorghum-mill, cider-mill, turning lathe, etc. Has followed a variety of employments, farming, tanning, shoemaking, carriagework, blacksmnithing, and civil engineering. He helped build the third house in the village of Hadley. March 8, 1852, he married Caroline Cramer, of Pennsylvania. They have one child living; three having died. RUFUS T. SANBORN was born in New Hampshire in 1815. The family afterwards resided in Attica, N. Y. He came with his parents to Hadley in 1836, where they located the west half of southeast quarter and*fractional southwest quarter of section 7,214 acres. In 1841 he married Mary Dowd, a native of Berkshire, Mass. He spent his life on tlhe old homestead and there died, in 1864. The surviving children are: Lucius, living in Hadley; John M., of Otsego County; Julia, wife of Jasper S. Kitchen, of Cairo, Tuscola County, and Newton R., of Hillsdale County. Mrs. Sanborn, now Mrs. John Tharrett, resides on the old homestead. HARVEY RILEY was born in Genesee County, N. Y., July 31, 18131. January 3, 1836, hlie married Clarinda Fosdick, of Attica, Genesee County, N. Y. In May, 1836, he came to Hadley and entered the west half of the northwest quarter section 15, the patent for which is dated Aug. 5, 1837. Onl this land he put up a shanty and commenced clearing. Mrs. Riley joined him here July 4, 1836. Mr. Riley was for many years deacon of the Free Will Baptist Church, of strong religious convictions and earnest and active in the advocacy of temperance and moral reform. Of the children born to Mr. and Mrs. Riley, four are living, two have died. Ashley Riley, born Nov. 17, 1836, lives in Saginaw County. He was the first living white child born in Hadley. David, born Aug. 9, 1838, living in Hadley; Harvey, Jr., born March 16, 1840, living in Millington, Mich.; Silas F., born Oct. 20, 1842, living in Hadley; Mary L., born July 20, 1847, died Oct. 14, 1865; (Geo. W., lorn Dec. 20, 1852, living in Hadley. Mrs. Riley resides on the old homestead with her son, George W., occupying the log house which her husband built in 1836. MAHLON C. TUNISON died in September, 1878, from the result of an injury received from the kick of a horse. He was the son of II I -e S I

Page  [unnumbered] ELLERY A. BROWNELL.

Page  [unnumbered] C,

Page  93 -#- Ul I I I I i i4 - p HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 93 - Abraham Tunison, who, with William Hart, were the first settlers of Hadley village. Mr. A. Tunison had a family of two sons and two daughters. The oldest son died soon after their settlement here, of a malarious fever. The oldest daughter married Cook Cramton and died about six years since. Mr. M. C. Tunison, the younger son, married the daughter of Oliver Davenport and settled at the old homestead. The younger sister married Mr. Andrew Geer, and resides in the township of Elba. She is the last survivor of the family. Tile deacons of the first, Baptist society at its institution were Abraham Tunison and Daniel Hartwell. Both held their offices until death, Mr. Hartwell retaining his over forty years, till his decease, December 2, 1881, aged 89 years. Another pioneer not mentioned in Mr. Tunison's sketch, was Win. Farrar, who came with his wife and a large family of children, and settled just south of Eri Potter and John Morse in 1837. Mr. Farrar died many years since. Mrs. Farrar was a native of Massachusetts, removed thence to New Hampshire, where she married and resided for many years. They removed from New Hampshire to New York about 1833, and remained there four years, then came to Michigan. Their youngest son, Thomas Farrar, a young man of uncommon promise, enlisted as private in Company G, Seventh Michigan Infantry, and fell at the battle of Fair Oaks, 1862, but though left desolate, she remained at the old homestead till her decense, Dec. 2, 1881, at the age of 88 years. The numerous descendants of this family in the town and county are honored citizens. TO VN OF IDRYDEN. This town, known in the government survey as township 6 north, of range 11 east, belongs to the southern tier of townships. It adjoins Attica on the north, Almont on the east, Oakland County on the south and the town of Metamora on the west. The population of Dryden in 1840 was 807. Census of 1874: Population, 1,669; acres of taxable land, 22,960; of improved land, 16,623; number of sheep, 6,362; of swine, 898; of neat cattle other than oxen or cows, one year old and more, 716; of horses, 696; of mules, 4; of work oxen, 31; of milch cows, 636; products of the preceding year, 30,486 pounds of wool, 118,584 pounds of pork marketed, 150 pounds of cheese and 64,692 of butter made; bushels of wheat raised, 45,134; of corn, 35,264; of other grain, 52,344; of apples, 18,225; of pears, 399; of plums, 81; of cherries, 875; of grapes, 4,560 pounds; of potatoes, 10,741 bushels, and of hay, 2,233 tons; barrels of cider made, 519; pounds of fruit dried for market, 18,510. In 1874, 7,600 pounds of maple sugar were made. In 1880 the population was 1,535. Aggregate valuation of real and personal estate in 1882, as equalized by the board of supervisors, was $873,000. The first annual town meeting for the town of Lomond, now Dryden, was held at the house of Daniel Smith, on the first Monday in April, 1837. John M. Lamb was moderator. The following were elected officers of the town: Supervisor, John M. Lamb; clerk, Joseph S. Gibbons; assessors, Holden Tripp, John Thonmpson, Hiram Terry; commissioners of highways, John C. Hinks, John M. Lamb, Wm. C. Baldwin; justices of the peace, Jonathan T. Walton, Joseph S. Gibbons, John M. Lamb, Peter Walker; constables, Barton J. Curtis, John C. Hinks, Edwin T. Tennant; school inspectors, Sanford Kendrick, John aI. Lamb, John C. Hinks; collector, Edwin T. Tennant; directors of the poor, Holden Tripp, Newman C. Griswold; overseers of highways, district No. 1, Benjamin Huntley, No. 2, Arick Sutherland, No. 3, Peter Moe, No. 4, Albert Wright, No. 5, Josiah Goodrich, No. 6, James E. King, No. 7, Nathaniel Terry. Voted, that a fence four feet and six inches high and four inch space between rails shall be considered a lawful fence. Iesolced, That Andrew Mattoon be pound-keeper. Ilesolved, That a bounty of two dollars be paid for each wolf killed in the town by any inhabitant thereof. Thirty-seven votes were cast. At a special town meeting held May 6, 1837, John Thompson was elected clerk in the place of Joseph S. Gibbons, who failed to qualify, and John M. Lamb, John Thompson, Sanford Kendrick and Peter Walker justices of the peace in place of the justices elect who failed to qualify. Another account states that the first town meeting was held at an old log school-house standing one mile north of the present site of Dryden village. Originally the township of Dryden was set off from Lapeer, embracing what is now Attica, and was named Amboy. This name did not give satisfaction, and at the time Attica was set off as a separate town, a new name was sought to be applied to Amboy. Some admirers of a land speculator by the name of "Lober," petitioned the legislature for that name, but by some mistake it came out in the act, "Lomond." This name was more distasteful than Amboy, and at the next session of the legislature a petition was sent in asking for the name of Richmond, but there were several towns in the State of that name, and some other had to be devised. S. D. McKeen was the representative from Lapeer County, and he wrote to John M. Lamb and Sanford Kendrick, to forward a name that would be generally satisfactory. Mr. Lamb requested Mr. Kendrick to suggest a name which he did, and the name of Dryden was selected in honor of the poet Dryden. TOWN OFFICERS 1837-Supervisor, John M. Lamb; clerk, John Thompson; collector, Edwin T. Ternant. 1838-Supervisor, John Thompson; clerk, John W. Day; collector, Edwin T. Tennant. 1839 —Supervisor, Loren Tainter; clerk, Henry LaRue; treasurer, Ethan Squier. 1840-Supervisor, Loren Tainter; clerk, Henry LaRue; treasurer, Ethan Squier. 1841-Supervisor, James Freer; clerk, Henry LaRue; treasurer, Arick Sutherland. 1842-Supervisor, John M. Lamb; clerk, Henry LaRue; treasurer, Henry Van Kleek. 1843-Sutpervisor, John M. Lamb; clerk, Henry LaRue; treasurer, Henry Van Kleek. 1844-Supervisor, John M. Lamb; clerk, John W. Day; treasurer, Henry Van Kleek. 1845 ---Supervisor, John M. Lamb; clerk, Randolph S. Bancroft; treasurer, Henry Van Kleek. 1846-Supervisor, John M. Lamb; clerk, Joseph Chamberlin, treasurer, Henry Van Kleek. 1847-Supervisor, James Freer; clerk, John D. McRoberts; treasurer, Henry Van Kleek. 1848-Supervisor, Seth Hall; clerk, John W. Day; treasurer, Henry Van Kleek. 1819 —Supervisor, N. BLel Eldridge; clerk, John W. Day; treasurer, William Quatermass. 1850-Supervisor, N. BLel Eldridge; clerk, John W. Day; treasurer, William Quatermass; number of votes, 143. 1851 —Supervisor, N. Buel Eldridge; clerk, John W. Day; treasurer, William Quatermass; number of votes, 181. 1852-Supervisor, N. Buel Eldridge clerk, JohnW. Day; treasurer, William Quatermass. 4 - - - - i - *I

Page  94 l AA, II i j:; F i I i I 1 - 94 -94 -- S [t HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 1853-Supervisor, Josiah Goodrich; clerk, Daniel W. Cole; treasurer, William Quatermass; number of votes, 220. 1854-Supervisor, Josiah Goodrich; clerk, John W. Day; treasurer, William Quatermass. 1855 —Supervisor, Josiah Goodrich; clerk, John W. Day; treasurer, William Quatermass; number of votes, 239. 1856 —Supervisor, Henry Van Kleek; clerk, Uriah Gardner; treasurer, S. H. Miller; number of votes, 270. 1857-Supervisor, Homer N. Parker; clerk, Uriah Gardner; treasurer, Miner Fuller. 1858-Supervisor, Amos Stone; clerk, Uriah Gardner; treasurer, Miner Fuller; number of votes, 312. 1859 —Supervisor, Homer N. Parker; clerk, John W. Day; treasurer, Miner Fuller. 1860-Supervisor, Amos Stone; clerk, John W. Day; treasurer, Miner Fuller; number of votes, 343. 1861-Supervisor, Amos Stone; clerk, Joseph Manwaring; treasurer, John Gray; number of votes, 277. 1862-Supervisor, Charles F. Laman; clerk, Albert Bartlett; treasurer, Joseph Darwood; number of votes, 287. 1863-Supervisor, Charles F. Laman; clerk, Albert Bartlett; treasurer, Joseph Darwood; number of votes, 292. 1861 —Supervisor, Henry Van Kleek; clerk, Joseph Manwaring; treasurer, Benjamin R. Shin. 1865-Supervisor, Charles F. Laman; clerk, William Quatermass; treasurer, John Freer. 1866 —Supervisor, Charles F. Laman; clerk, William Quatermass; treasurer, John Freer. 1867-Supervisor, ----; clerk, N. B. Eldridge; treasurer, Benjamin Terry. 1868-Supervisor,; clerk, N. B. Eldridge; treasurer, Franklin Goodrich. 1869-Supervisor, John Freer; clerk, John Weaver; treasurer, Franklin Goodrich. 1870-Supervisor, John Freer: clerk, John Weaver; treasurer, Franklin Goodrich. 1871-Supervisor, John Freer; clerk, Albert Bartlett; treasurer, Yates Ferguson. 1872 —Supervisor, John Freer; clerk, Albert Bartlett; treasurer, Franklin Goodrich. 1873-Supervisor, John Freer; clerk, Albert Bartlett; treasurer, Franklin Goodrich. 1874-Supervisor, John Freer; clerk, Albert Bartlett; treasurer, Franklin Goodrich; number of votes, 222. 1875-Supervisor, Levi L. Sutton; clerk, Joseph Manwaring; treasurer, Joseph Darwood. 187C —Supervisor, Levi L. Sutton; clerk, Albert Bartlett; treasurer, Joseph Darwood; number of votes, 258. 1877-Supervisor, John Freer; clerk, Heber McClusky; treasurer, Joseph Darwood; number of votes, 267. 1878-Supervisor, Levi L. Sutton; clerk, Albert Bartlett; treasurer, Joseph Darwood. 1879-Supervisor, Levi L. Sutton; clerk, L. B. McNeil; treasurer, Franlklin Goodrich; number of votes, 262. 1880 —Snpervisor, Levi L. Sutton; clerk, Lorin B. McNeil; treasurer, Franklin Goodrich; number of votes, 262. 1881-Supervisor, Joseph Manwaring; clerk, William H. H. Cheasbro; treasurer, Joseph Darwood; number of votes, 306. 1882-Supervisor, Joseph Manwaring; clerk, William H. H. Cheasbro; treasurer, Joseph Darwood; number of votes, 267. 1883-Supervisor, Joseph Manwaring; clerk, Perry H. Robinson; treasurer, William J. Reynolds; number of votes, 273. LAND ENTRIES PRIOR TO 1846. TOWNSHIP 6 NORTH, RANGE 11 EAST. SECTION 1. Silas Southwell, December 13. 1834. Benjamin Gould, May 27, 1835. Luke Perkins, December 18, 1835. Albert J. Southwell, May 5, 1836. Nathan Dickinson, William H. Imlay, and George Beach, May 10, 1836. Martin Quatermass, July 5, 1836. SECTION 2. Andrew Mattoon, May 6, 1834. Daniel Smith, July 29, 1834. Arick Sutherland, June 24, 1835. Onesimus T. Curtis, July 14, 1835. Abner H. Fisher, October 22, 1835. John C. Hincks, November 13, 1835. Marcus Vilings, December 18, 1835. Jenius Huntley, December 24, 1835. Andrew Mahaffy, January 6, 1836. Andrew Mahaffy, February 4, 1836. SECTION 3. Calvin Bateman, June 5, 1835. Abner H. Fisher, Octobeh 22, 1835. Amasa Messenger, November 27, 1835. Jedediah Messenger, November 27, 1835. Ira C. Day, March 3, 1836. John Stocksledger, May 26, 1836. Jesse Seeley, May 30, 1836. William Quatermass, July 5, 1836. SECTION 4. Ira C. Day, May 3, 1836. Josiah Goodrich, Jr., April 27, 1836. Josiah Goodrich, Jr., May 3, 1836. Eliza Whittaker, June 15, 1836. Eliza Whittaker, June 16, 1836. Ebenezer Draper, June 16, 1836. Walter Thompson, May 26, 1837. Samuel J. Lewis, June 2, 1837. Samuel J. Lewis, September 29, 1838. SECTION 5. Joseph Gilman and Orrin Cartwright, March 24, 1836. Lyman Wilcox, July 5, 1836. Gideon S. Wells, September 24, 1836. Jonathan T. Walton, November 29, 1836. Simeon Hodges, May 29, 1837. Jacob Eoff, September 23, 1838. Marvin Reed, May 29, 1840. SECTION 6. Jason Gibbs, July 2, 1836. John Blow, May 29, 1837. William Moe, July 15, 1837. James Blow, July 21, 1838. Russell Bishop, September 21, 1838. William Moe and Hiram Squier, March 9, 1839. John Courter, December 3, 1840. Elizabeth Courter, May 27, 1841. Luke F. Roscoe, December 19, 1843. Cassander H. Philo, June 17, 1844. SECTION 7. Peter Walker, May 23, 1836. Jason Gibbs, July 2, 1836. John Brooks, July 13, 1836. James Blow, July 23, 1838. Maria Dann, March 27, 1839. Benjamin Thorne, August 7, 1839. William Griffin, August 31, 1839. Benjamin Skidmore, October 29, 1839. r,..A 9 -A I: __ i \ r

Page  95 A_2 j L IRIl i -- I I HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 95 SECTION 8. SECTION 9. SECTION 10. SECTION 11. SECTION 12. SECTION 13. SECTION 14. SECTION 15. Joseph Gilman and Orrin Cartwright, March 24, 1836. Beriah Matteson, September 16, 1836. Paul Spafford, November 12, 1836. Peter Dusing, November 16, 1836. Jacob Eoff, September 3, 1838. Peter Dusing, May 17, 1839. Jacob Eoff, May 21, 1839. Benjamin Skidmore, October 29, 1839. Timothy Utley, April 8, 1836. Eliza Whitacre, April 8, 1836. Dewit Denton, May 20, 1836. Peter Dusing, November 16, 1836. George Sweet, December 22, 1836. Charles Wright, December 22, 1836. William Twite, August 19, 1839. Robert O. Curtis, July 22, 1835.Amasa Messenger, November 27, 1835. Oliver Lewis, April 22, 1836. John W. Day, May 11, 1836. Ezra Hood, May 30, 1836. William Hayes, June 6, 1836. Ezra B. Hazen, June 23, 1836. Joseph S. Gibbings, June 24, 1835. Charles W. Chamberlin, July 8, 1835. Ethan Squiers, December 24, 1835. John M. Chamberlin, December 29, 1835. Oliver Lewis, April 22, 1836. Luman Squiers, May 19, 1836. Hiram Squier, May 19, 1836. John W. Squier, June 17, 1836. Alfred Bacheller, October 7, 1834. Isaac Smith, May 29, 1835. Holden Tripp, November 27, 1835. Isaac Smith, December 5, 1835. Asa Huntley, February 22, 1836. Asa Huntley, February 25, 1836. David Smith, March 1, 1836. John Taylor, Jr., March 14, 1836. Nathan Dickenson, William H. Irmlay and George Beach, March 29, 1836. John M. Lamb, January 23, 1836. John M. Lamb, March 24, 1836. Nathan Dickenson, William H. Imlay and George Beach, March 29, 1836. Peter Van Every, April 29, 1836. David Lee, November 12, 1836. Henry Hawkins and Van Rensselaer Hawkins, April 13, 1837. John Frasier, December 24, 1835. Peter Desnoyers, March 7, 1836. Aaron Moe, March 9, 1836. Peter Desnoyers, March 10, 1836. Peter Van Every, April 29, 1836. Sanford Kendrick, May 19, 1836. Nathaniel C. Naramor, June 16, 1836. William Ruby, July 1, 1836. Francis Ruby, February 16, 1836. Hiram Squier, May 19, 1836. Sanford Kendrick, May 19, 1836. George Squier, May 19, 1836. Homer S. Beardsley, September 16, 1836. James R. Jackmall, October 11, 1836. Hiram Harris, January 16, 1837. I ii I I i SECTION 16. Henry Hawkins and Van Rensselaer Hawkins, Febrluary 10, 1837. SECTION 17. Perlina Wright, November 9, 1836. Isaac Parshall, April 15, 1837. James Freer, September 6, 1841. George J. Sweet, June 17, 1841. Thomas Riches, July 16, 1842. SECTION 18. Alfred Bacheller, September 30, 1836. Lodama Bacheller, December 17, 1836. David Taylor, November 10, 1836. Henry and Van Rensselaer Hawkins, April 17, 1837. James Freer, January 1, 1841. SECTION 19. Ames M. Freeman, September 14, 1836. Daniel Freeman, September 14, 1836. SECTION 20. Hollister Lathrop, September 14, 1836. SECTION 21. Miles Cady, February 22, 1837. Miles Cady, April 15, 1837. Henry Hawkins and Van Rensselaer Hawkins, April 17, 1837. SECTION 22. Cornelius R. Strong, June 13, 1836. Sarah F. Leech, October 28, 1836. Benjamin Haines, January 25, 1837. David Paddock, April 15, 1837. Cyrus Chirchill, April 15, 1837. Albert G. Southwell, June 10, 1839. Archibald Johnson, November 29, 1844. SECTION 23. Elijah Bachelor, February 25, 1836. James H. Porter, March 7, 1836. John D. McRoberts, May 30, 1836. Noah Cooley, May 30, 1836. George A. Neal, May 30, 1836. James Hines, May 30, 1836. Robert Leech, June 11, 1836. SECTION 24. Elijah Bachelor, February 25, 1836. Charles Bachelor, March 7, 1836. Robert Leech, June 11, 1836. Stephen Van Fleet, September 16, 1836. Samuel Hovey, January 19, 1839. Samuel Culver, August 12, 1839. George Jones, September 6, 1839. James W. Benjamin, September 7, 1839. Harley K. Fox, July 1, 1839. Elizabeth H. Bancroft, September 22, 1842. John D. McRoberts, July 22, 1839. SECTION 25. Noble Culver, July 27, 1835. Hiram Terry, November 11, 1835. Nathaniel Terry, May 10, 18836. George B. Meeker, April 1, 1846. Zaramba Middleditch, June 22, 1846. George H. Neal, July 13, 1846. Schuyler Irish, December 2, 1837. James Miller, December 3, 1837. James Miller, June 22, 1841. James W. Benjamin, September 7, 1841. William Hector, December 25, 1839. Daniel B. Miller, August 12, 1844. SECTION 26. George A. Neal, July 6, 1836. James Hinds, July 6, 1836. George Boyer, September 26, 1836. William C. Baldwin, December 2, 1836. Philo Atwell, June 5, 1837. Walter H. Spancer, October 17, 1838. David Atwell, December 19, 1839. I - - - I @ 95.IL - -P 6. I f 7 l, _ IX_

Page  96 r96! I I 96 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. I SECTION 27. George A. Neal, July 6, 1836. David Churchill, March 1 6, 1839. Zachariah Sage, April 1, 1839. Zachariah Sage, April 13, 1839. Nathan Galpin, February 15, 1842. James Mair, August 30, 1844. Zacharial SSage, June 11, 1840. SECTION 28. William Betts, January 21, 1836. James Allen, January 27, 1837. James S. De ming, October 13, 1837. Sanford Porter, May 10, 1839. Marvin Wilber, September 18, 1839. Marvin Wilber, November 11, 1839. Stephen Grinnell, December 7, 1839. SECTION 29. Brainard Osborn, June 17, 1836. William- Betts, June 21, 1836. William H. Farrand, June 21, 1836. Hollister Lathrop, September 14, 1836. James Alilen, May 27, 1837. Marvin Wilber, December 7, 1839. Caleb Wilber, Jr., April 23, 1841. Caleb Wilber, November 5, 1841. Corydon Wilber, November 25, 1844. SECTION 30. Stillman Bates, June 3, 1836. Horace A. Jenison, June 11, 1836. Samuel Ewell, June 17, 1836. Silas Tichenor, July 11, 1836, SECTION 31. Henry Churchill, April 20, 1836. Daniel W. Camp, April 20, 1836. Thomas Greenfield, April 20, 1836. Giles M. Boardman, April 20, 1836. William Plumb, 2d, April 20, 1836. William Humphrey, June 1, 1836. SECTION 32. William Hodkinson, June 9, 1836. Samuel Ewell, July 8, 1836. Stephen Grinnell, October 12, 1836. SECTION 33. Washington Allen, October 12, 1886. George Smith, January 16, 1837. James Allen, May 27, 1837. David Hill, July 7, 1838. John Sowles, May 17, 1844. SECTION 34. Ebenezer M. Phelps, December 20, 1836. Abel Williams, January 1, 1839. Marvin Cady, February 25, 1839. Sanford Porter, May 10, 1839. Marvin Cady, August 21, 1839. George W. Dwelle, November 19, 1840. George W. Dwelle, October 21, 1841. James Mair,-August 30,1814. SE-rION 35. Abram Robeson, September 26, 1836. Isaac Parshall, April 15, 1837. Marquis Nye, December 15, 1838. George Boyer, May 1, 1840. Edward Meeker, May 12, 1840. Ezra S. Perry, December 25, 1841. Archibald Johnson, November 29, 1844. SECTION 36. James Scott, June 4, 1836. John S. Townsend, June 7, 1836. Noble Culver, July 27, 1835. Miles J. Beach, February 17, 1836. Elias Beach, February 17, 1836. Edward Eells, May 17, 1836. Milton Beach, May 25, 1842. chptr EARLY HISTORY. In tracing the early history of Dryden there is some doubt as to the accuracy of a few dates, but the statements are generally as correct as can be made after the lapse of nearly fifty years. Most of the early actors upon the scene are gone, and those who remain are aged people wbose memories have weakened with the increase of years. A historical sketch of Dryden was written in 1876 by the late Lucius Kendrick, some portions of which are given in this chapter. The history of Dryden dates back to the year 1834, when Andrew Mattoon settled on section 2. He had come up the year before and built a shanty in Almont Township. The settlers of 1834 were Andrew Mattoon, Levi Washburne, Amasa Messenger, Jedediah Messenger and Hugh McKay. They came from Macomb County, and made their way from the northern settlements of that county by a road of their own construction, some fourteen miles through the woods. This road was known for years as the "old Messenger road." These men all settled in the north part of the town upon the heavy timber land, and what they esteemed to be the most desirable portion. The oak timbered land was held in rather low estimate by these early settlers, as land that would not pay to cultivate. Silas Southwell entered land in the fall of 1831, but never became a settler in the town. In the year 1836 the greater portion of what is now Dryden, was bouglht principally by actual settlers. In this year large additions were made to the population. John M. Lamb, Sanford Kendrick, Holden Tripp, Arick Sutherland, Ethan Squier, Luman Squier, James E. King, Isaac Smith, Dnliiel Smith, Timothy Utley, James P. Whittaker, Jason Gibbs, John Freer, Oliver A. Lewis, Deacon Elijah Look, Deacon Tainter, Peter and Aaron Moe, Jonathan T. Walton, John Thompson, James Goodenough, Henry and Andrew Mahaffy, Marcus Billings, John C. Hincks, Luke Perkins, Seth Hall, James Hodges, Martin Quatermass and Cyrus Perkins were among the principal settlers of that year; all men of moderate means but with more than the average energy of the men of those times; as evidence of which it is only necessary to refer to that and the five years that followed to substantiate the claim. Those already named were followed by the following additions which were made to the population: Mr. John Gould, Henry Van Kleeck, Rufus and Erastus Wethey, James Hines, Elijah Bartlett, Joseph Winslow, James Miller, Andrew Wood, James H. Holcomb, Ira P. Holcomb, Abel Williams, Chauncey Morgan, Bowdowine Terwillager, J. F. Jackman, Moses F. Jackman, Sanford Maynard, N. T. Taylor, Miles Cody, Augustus Hilliker, Philo Atwell, Thomas Stafford, Jacob Miller, Homer N. Parker, John Meaker, Philo Meaker, Nathan S. Beardsley, Noble Calver, Nathaniel Terry, Jas. Howard, Benjamin Kniffin, John S. Fellows, H. B. Fall and Benjamin Thorne. WHIGVILLE. In the winter and spring of 1837 and '38, quite a colony from some of the southern counties located in the southwest part of the town, chief among whom were Joel Dudley, James Allen, Washington Allen, Stephen Grinnel, John and James Phelps,'James Dem ing, Robert Townsend, Uriah Townsend and Jacob Moore. With one or two exceptions they were all Whigs, and hence the name of Whigville was given to the locality. Mr. Dudley and Jas. Alien were among the many who left this town at the first excitement as to gold in California, in 1849. Mr. Allen lived to get back, but Dudley died before reaching the much desired El Dorado. Mr. Allen died soon after his return. Mr. Uriah Townsend is the only one of all that 0 I [-, J I4~

Page  97 t-M '!L i - - - l HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 97 *I i colony who is now living, as also is his wife. Mr. Townsend is a mall of remarkable activity for a manl of his age, being as sprightly and active as a boy of twenty. He has for a number of years given - up worldly pursuits and lives in the village of Dryden. *A MEMORABLE PERIOD. The years 1836 and '37 constitute a memorable epoch in the history of Dryden, onl account of their unfruitfulness. Onl the 16th of May, 1836, there was a fearful snow-storm, and on the following night a heavy and killing frost. The forest, which was all in full leaf, in three days presented the appearance of October. All tender plants and vegetation were killed or greatly damaged, and all nature for a time seemed to put on the garb of mourning. After a while the trees put out new foliage, and nature seemed to make an effort to recover from the shock, but the season was cold and unproductive, and the new settlers suffered correspondingly. The winter of 1836-'37 was severe, both as to the intensity of the weather and the amount and long continuance of the snow. On the 1st day of May of the following spring there were quite large amounts of snow on the ground, and the ice in the great lakes did not break up so as to admit of the running of boats from Detroit to Buffalo until the 10th or 15th day of May. During all that long and dreary winter it would have been a matter of surprise to those left behind in the old llomes at the East to have seen how patiently these new settlers bore up amid all the gloomy and forbidding surroundings. During the day there might have been heard the ax of the unaccustomed chopper in all directions. His object was two-fold: first, to cut down the forest and prepare for a crop the coming year, and, second, to provide hungry and starving cattle with "browse." At night and during all its lonely hours, could be heard the dismal and wild howl of the wolf, and occasionally the shrill scream of the panther. Tilis was rather wild and unwelcome music to those who were heart-sick and homesick in the far-off wilds from a pleasant home in the East. Oftimes might have been heard issuing from those lonely cabins in the dense, dark forest in the early hours of the evening and again in the small hours of the night, the favorite words of Selkirlk while on the desolate-island of Juan Fernandes, solitary and alone, wlhen lie sang: upon a body of snow some two feet in depth, of sufficient strength to bear up a person. Taking advantage of this condition of things, the people almost all turned hunters. Thile woods were full of game but comparatively few of the settlers had been able to avail themselves of the most coveted part of it, and now that the game could be caught by dlogs with little or no trouble, each householder set himself to work to supply himself with venison. All the dogs in the country, great and small, were brougllht into service in tile chase of deer, lwhich were easily overtaken and caught. Just as soon as they started upon the bound their sharp feet penetrated tile crust and a run of a few hundred yard-s would tire them out, and their capture was easily made. In this way hundreds of them were slaughtered and the people became surfeited upon venison. Wolves fared sumptuously and the poor deer grew smaller in numbers with each succeeding day while the crust lasted, which was for some weeks. Probably there never was such a wholesale slatlugllter of the innocents in corresponding times before or since, neither has there since been so plenty of that desirable kind of game. The long and anxiously looked-for spring finally came, and with it thle labors and hardships incident to a new country and a people of limited means. SCARCITY OF PROVISIONS. It was during the spring and summer of 1837 that the greatest scarcity of provisions of all kinds prevailed, and there probably never was a time during the settlement of thile town that tile people were so poorly provided with the means of purchasing the needed supplies as during that year. Flour was held firmly at from $15 to $16 per barrel, and pork from $25 to $30; of the latter there was but little used. Wie iknow of one barrel being brought from Detroit and divided between four or five families, and this was all they had of that kind of meat for the season. At one time when it was known that every family was out of pork, a wag of a fellow made the significant remark, "It wvould be an excellent time to be vaccinated for the small-pox." During the summer flour was so exceedinlg scarce and dear, and the people so destitute of means to buy with, that the most forehallndel of the settlers 1had to take jobs to chop and clear land for $10 per acre, and sow the same with wheat, furnishing the seed themselves, tacking in paymnent for the labor and seed flour at the rate of $15 per barrel. This was very hlmiliating and taxing to these men who hiad before supposjed themselves to be quite independent. But certain speculators, seeing,and knowilng their necessity, rmade it the occasion of their opportunity, and apparently succeeded for a time, but the success vwas lmerely transitory. These slpeculaltors ladl fancied large advances in the price of their lands so improved, and the latnd they held adlacent to these improvemneents. Time demonstrated thile folly of their hopes and estimates. Thle!great crash in money matters during 1837 andcl 1888, with the effects following for several years tlhereafter, created a stagnation in all colmmercial transactions, andll mnore especially in thile sale of wild lands, that made it anything lbut agreeable or profitable to hold them. Taxes were constantly accurnmulating, and froml year to year adding to thile cost of the land, alind no sales. Very many speculators abandoned their lands altogether and suffered them to be sold for taxes, iwhile others would sell for half or three-fourths i of the purchase money, and glad of so fortunate a chance. Those wvere men wbho bought oil borrowed capital, in the hopes of being in a sllort timne vastly rich, but thle reverse w-as the result-tlley btcalme vastly poor. The colmlplanly who sold tlie dour and secured the clearing of tleir land at suclh ruinous rates to the settlers never profited by tlleir oppression; on thle contrary, their lands becalle a drag to tlhenm, antd they cursed the lday tllhat made them tlhe owners of c.f~ El I -a I -194 Society, friendship and love, Divinely bestowed upon man; Oh! had I the wings of a dove, How soon wsould I taste you again. Then from some late poet: again mighlt have been heard in a more plaintive wail one of the lonely group, these words from the disconsonr~\. tl~ i Ti rel~l' cljulv "How fleet is the glance of thle mind; Conipared with tLhe speed of its flight, Tlhe tempest itself lays belhind, And thle switft winged arrows of light. My friends-do they now and then sendl A tlougllt or a wish after me? 01h! tell me I yet have a friend, Yet a friend I am never to see." Then, takling a little more hopeful view of the situation, they would close out witll thle consoling refrain: "Bullt there is mercy in every place, And mlercy, encoullraging thollught, Gives every conditioll a grace, Ancld reconciles mailan to his lot." Never before nor since have tile people' lhd slucL sad experliences as tlhose of 1836-'37. Snowv came early atnid remcained witlh constantly accumnulati.lg volume, anud by the mlidcldle of December it had obtainedl the depth of two feet. In the monthl of January there camze on, for a few hlours, a violent andl heavy r;ain-storill accompanied T with sleet. Suddlelnly it turnedl cold, foirmling a crust -.00 [ '-' -^; w % - 1 --

Page  98 - r -I hi Ilb HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 98 ~ I ~I Michigan wild lands. The most of them have long since gone to their reward. EARLY MATRIMONY. The first wedding in town was in November, 1836-Mr. Israel Curtis to a widow Fox, at the house of Mr. Isaac Smith, by Caleb Carpenter, Esq. During the years from 1835 to 1840, the currency of the people, with but few exceptions, was one and the same, lumber and shingles; more especially the latter. Lumber was held at about from $4 to $8 per M, and shingles about $1 per M. The nearest points of trade where goods were kept in any quantity was Romeo and Lapeer, about fifteen miles to each. Ox teams, with few exceptions, were all the motive power in style, and these answered to clear the land, harrow in the grain, go to mill, to meeting, to market, and to draw the sled with the intended bride upon it to get married. The wedding tour was varied according to the means and taste of the parties, and the marriage fee was regulated by the circumstances of the case. We have in remembrance an instance where a young couple found it necessary to have the marriage ceremony said over to them, to act a little retroactively. The minister's services were secured at a certain time on the following morning, about half-past six. At the time appointed the expectant couple, with two attendants, could have been seen wending their way over and through a new fallow of burnt logs to the house of the parson. The ceremony was short and to the point; they were pronounced "man and wife," and they breathed easier. The happy bridegroom took the minister one side, and told him he was short of funds, but if he had any work to do he would be ready at any time to do it. The "first babe" of this happy couple was born in time to have played among the black stumps of the fallow crossed by the bridal party on their way to the minister's on that early Sunday morjing. The father and bridegroom in due time worked for the minister three days, clearing off his new fallow, and the fee was canceled. Another incident of pioneer marriage and backwoods wedding is iri the memory of some at least of the early settlers-a real "rustic wedding." The twain to be united were somewhat advanced in age, and practiced in economy. The officiating clergyman was one of those shrewd, sharp wits, always ready for any and all occasions-a perfect gentleman as well as a joker. The ceremony was duly performed, and a substantial dinner of boiled beef, pork, potatoes, onions, cabbage and turnips had been partaken of by the hungry party, and the minister was about to depart, when the bridegroom beckoned him one side, and in a low and subdued whisper asked him what was the fee? Taken somewhat aback the minister stood a moment in suspense as to what he should say. "Well," said he, "I have three prices: Upper ten, $5; medium people, $3; and niggers, 12 shillings." The economic bridegroom fumbled in his pockets a moment, and the minister left well paid for his day's experiences, and advanced knowledge of human nature. He entered in his diary for that day, "a good substantial dinner, and 150 cents cash, from wedding fee." EARLY EVENTS. The first frame building of any kind in town was a barn, built in 1837, by iCharles Wright, on the farm now owned by Joseph Smith, two miles east of Thornville. The first flourin(-mill built in town, was by the Messrs. Maynarl Bros., on a small spring brook one and a ha-lf miles south of Dryden village. This mill was built in 1810, passed through a variety of changes and improvements, doing quite an extensive business, until the year 1870, when it was burned down, and has never been rebuilt. It was owned at the time by Mr. Julius Lee. Tile first school-house built in town was of logs, and the first school was taught by Henry Haines. The second school-house was also of logs, and built in what is now Dryden village, and the first school taught in it was by John D. McRoberts. Daniel Smith was the first hotel-keeper in town. The building was of logs, located one mile north of Dryden. Mr. Smith saw much of affliction in the last years of his life, suffering some two years with a cancer on the face and neck, from the effects of which he died at the residence of his son in Imlay. John Blow was the first man to bring a plow into town, and he claims plowed the first furrow. The first span of horses in the town was owned by John M.' Lamb, and the second span by Seth Hall. Dr. N. B. Eldredae was the first physician that located in town, coming here about the year 1844, locating at the Corners, one mile north of Dryden village. He was a well educated and successful physician, but he soon got disgusted with the calling, took up the law, became an ardent politician and Democrat, of the liberal stamp however. In 1849 lie was elected representative from this county in the lower branch of the legislature, and served one term. Leaving this town about the year 1853, he located in what is now Lapeer City, and made the law a specialty as a profession. In 1861, at the breaking out of the rebellion, he was one of the first to respond to the call for troops to put down the rebellion, and assisted to form a company in the county which formed a part of the famous Michigan Seventh, of which he was captain; he afterward became major of the regiment, and was with the regiment at the battle of Ball's Bluff, at which Colonel Baker, of the noted California regiment, was killed. He was afterward made colonel of the Micligan Eleventh which formed a part of the Army of the Cumberland. PERSONAL REMINISCENCES. The following reminiscences were gathered from the recollections of Mr. and Mrs. John Blow and Mrs. Uttey, aged people, who settled in tile northwestern part of Dryden between the years 1834 and '37. Mr. Blow and a brother, James Blow, first came to Michigan and made locations about the year 1834. They put up at Mr. Mattoon's on this first visit. Mattoon had made a little clearing, and had a yoke of young cattle, but not a furrow plowed, tand Mr. Blow assisted Mr. Mattoon in plowing a garden spot, and this was the first furrow turned in the town. John Blow and his wife live at the old homestead; James Blow has for years been hopelessly insane, and an inmate of Pontiac Asylum. Mrs. Samuel Uttey lives with her son at their old homestead. She had a large family, triplets with all the rest, and has buried more than half her children and her husband. One of the triplets died in infancy, one was killed in early manhood by the fall of a tree, the third lives at or near Dryden village. The early settlers of Dryden were most of them very poor. Mr. John Blow, a pioneer, says that with but one or two exceptions, the people in the township were divided into two classes, the poor and the extremely poor, those included in the first class being fortunate enough to possess an ox team, the second had none, and depended upon such work as they could get to clear their land and get a living. The ox team in those days was almost an essential in getting a living, and few of the early settlers of the town were so happy as to possess one. In those days, while the land was being cleared, the only way in which one of the very poor settlers could get his land plowed, was to work for those who had teams a sufficient length of time to pay for team work to break the land, and in those days with the plows they had, they thought from three to five yoke of ca-ttle, according to the state of the ground, only just enough to do the work. Many of them ~ j a... -i: --- —--- ' -. I (

Page  [unnumbered] l ^:;?^^];^.' ^:;,'V:, 000:^';: L ';: Ida^: '-: -;: i I IS 5 - 4.Fs i i *~; 't, W000i ' b00< 0 i-^^::^-:::: e A:: 0i d% -1 -1 n r-i R ES. OFF.B.R.EMMON S ALMONTTP. LAPEERCO.MNICH. _-1.. ---~;~ — _-l~;-ri: —. -r-I --- -n —.~ -~; --- 1!.- - I -;,. I I - "'. q -- - F - - ---; — -r --- "777-1;-.i _.1 T. -r - 7,77-;Fir. l-,-.;~~ i. I-: i - i ---- - - -- I.-~ I ^**' WX - 0 X:'- < *-.'-tS^a*''::0fi. ' A b '"' — 1 - ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ - 1:;-;:*:;':!:;;;!M:~ E 0 01 l.;. S. *. L-.i,. -' ' '.''-' I t RE S. O F G W. CAOW RPEi E:NTR. M AYFELD.T LAPEER, GO.MICH. I _ _ _ I __ I. I _ I - I - I I I_ _ I _ _ 1 n- I E, D "~^\:J^ a:. 0X:::: -7, Hs 7s-N is - ABtg? w v C:0:000::E:E:f: n>L: A:0::: M-~:! L iC1 -- I: 7B c N:k L RES. OF GEO. DAVEN PO RT. HADLEY.T.P. LAPEER Co. I. I i

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Page  99 4l i J-6 _ _ _ __ _A HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 99 __ having expended their all for land had not even a cow or anything in the line of furniture, except what they made themselves. They were forced to work away. from home in the lumber camps, or any where else they could get employment, and many times their children cried for bread. When we add to this the suffering from some disease incident to a change of climate, the wonder is that anv survived, or that all did not forsake their clearings and try to find more inviting homes. Mrs. Blow relates an affecting incident whichl will show the severe suffering these pioneers endured: "One fall we had all been sick with chills and fever, John, the children, and myself. He being unable to work, we had nothing to eat but the potatoes and turnips in our garden. This was not the food we needed, but we did as well as we could, knowing that we were as well off as most of our neighbors. I had suffered so much that I got very weak and babyish, and one day I was thinking about our pork barrel that stood in the shed with some brine in it, and wondered if there was not one little scrap of meat in it; it seemed just as if there must be some there. I called. John and to please me, he went and emptied the brine out of the barrel; there was a thick laying of salt in the bottom; he put his hand into it to satisfy me, and found a piece of pork. He scraped away the salt and found a whole laying of pork on the bottom of the barrel. We both cried over that meat; it was just what we needed then, and in a little while we were able to work again." Mrs. Uttey says: "But worse than everything else, many of the men loved whisky better than their families, and the scant earnings of the father went to buy whisky for himself, instead of bread for his family." One resource was left to these poor people. In the township at the north of them, now known as Attica, there was plenty of pine timber, and they would go into these forests and take logs suitable for shingle bolts, and make shingles, not esteeming it any wrong to appropriate what they so much needed, or to cut timber on the lands of the government or of speculators. Some of the wives of these early settlers did far more for the well being of their families and society than their husbands. Another pioneer of later date, a settler in the township within the first decade of its history, locating just on the north line, was Simon Hodges, whose eccentricities though he has for years been dead, are still laughed over by the early settlers. He belonged to what Mr. Blow called the "poor class," being the happy possessor of an ox team besides his land, a wife and seven children. One story that illustrates his character is told with great gusto by his old neighbors, and Dr. Caulkins, who was one of the actors in the little scene. Mr. Homges' oldest son, a youth of seventeen or eighteen years of age, the better to assist his family, some time after his father's settlement on his new farm, went to work in the woods on Belle River, and while there was attacked with the malarial fever so prevalent in a new country. He made a desperate effort to reach his home, and succeeded in doing so; but after walking most of the way, as might be imagined, was in a pitiful condition from fever and exhaustion, and grew worse so rapidly that during the following night a messenger was hastily dispatched to Thorneville for the doctor. There was no road for much of the way except a trail that could only be followed by footmen or on horseback, and the doctor, who had but just come into the place, was perfectly ignorant of the route; but he mounted his horse, and guided by the messenger, who carried a lantern, he made his way through the darkness and rain, for it was a stormy night, as best he could, and at last reached his destination. On his arrival he found the family in great anxiety and no small alarm, with reason, the doctor thought, on a hasty examination of his patient. 'He at once took measures for J - Z. the relief of the sufferer, and sat down to watch the effect of the remedies. As he sat there watching the poor fellow who lay as pale and almost as lifeless as a corpse, noting with astonishment the huge frame before him, and considering his youth, the hard labor he had been pursuing, his overgrown bulk, and the exertions he had made to reach his home while it was possible for him to do so, he was not without grave apprehensions as to the result. The father, a keen observer, evidently divined what was passing in the doctor's mind, and at last addressed him thus: "Guess you think he's a pretty big boy." "Yes," was the reply, "a pattern cut out for a large man. How old is lie?" "Seventeen, most eighteen," replied the father; "he's a big boy and a good boy, too. Why he's worked out and bought us all the flour we've had since we've been here, and if he should die I don't know what we should do. I declare I'd rather lose my oxen!" Happily the parent's feelings were spared so severe a test, for youth and a good constitution, aided by the doctor's skill, triumphed over the disease, and the son still lives, a prominent and Wealthy citizen of Attica. The following is from the sketch of Lucius Kendrick: "Among the early settlers was the quiet, sedate, and somewhat eccentric old bachelor, Levi Washburn, known among all his acquaintances as 'Deacon Washburn,' a name given him from his very staid and quiet demeanor and his straightforward and honest mode of dealing. He was a great hunter of wild game, and also a very reliable and successful 'land looker,' and for some two or three years, from 1835 to 1838, he was employed the most of the spring, summer and fall months in showing those in quest of wild land where they could find the object of their search. On one occasion le was employed by one Deacon Dickenson, a famous land speculator, to assist him in looking up choice selections of land. Deacon Washburn led his brother deacon far into the dark, deep forest, some ten or twelve miles to the north of any settler; night overtook the two deacons in this far off place in the wilderness, and obliged them to provide for a night's rest in the woods. As luck would have it they found themselves in the midst of a hemlock grove, from the branches of which they made a couch and tabernacle for the night. As a precaution against an attack from the wolves, Deacon W. hung his old coat high up on the branch of a tree, and the twain lay down to rest; one to sleep and the other to watch. Deacon Washburn was soon asleep, while the other deacon was unable to get a bit of sleep or close his eyes. Nine, ten and eleven o'clock, and no sleep for the watchful land speculator. In the meantime the sky became overcast with murky clouds, and the muttering of distant thunder and the frequent flashes of the lightning gave quite strong assurances of an approaching storm. Added to the gloom caused by the constantly approaching storm, and to make the situation the more terrible to the affrighted deacon, the wolves commenced their midnight howl, which in a short time approached a perfect pandemonium. And still the other deacon slept as sweet as a child, totally unconscious of what was passing, or the terror of his much affrighted companion. The rain came down in torrents, and the wind blew, and the tall forest trees swayed to and fro in the blast. The affrighted deacon could stand it no longer, and he called to Deacon Washburn to awake and advise what should be done. "Do you not think," said the much affrighted speculator, "that we shall be torn in pieces and eaten up by the wolves before morning?" "No," said the quiet Washburn, "I have no such fears. I think we are perfectly safe." This did not satisfy Mr. Dickenson; he thought they should G. I -'Ip L -x r

Page  100 i i I J, 'i 't 100 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. I I i I I have a season of prayer, and called on Deacon Washburn to lead. This was a request that for the moment lie knew not how to answer, as lie was not in the habit of engaging in vocal prayer, so he replied: "You mistake me, Deacon D. I am not a deacon of the church, but of the world. All my prayers are made ill secret to Him who seeth in secret and rewards openly." Whether they had any vocal prayer or not, tradition saith not. The storm after having spent its force passed over, and the stars shone out, and the wolves, although they kept up their mournful requiem, kept a respectful distance, and in due time daylight dawned in the east and the sun came up, and it was probably the most welcome of any in the whole course of the life of one of the twain at least. They have long since passed from earth to their reward. James B. Whittaker, one of the settlers of 1836, was another of those eccentric persons who had an iidividilality peculiar to himself. He was a native of Rhode Island and thoroughly imbued with all the characteristics of the ocean coast. He was a practical digger, and a man of wonderful strength in his hands and arms. At the usual gatherings, such as town meetings and elections, he would amuse the boys in this wise: He would place himself about four rods from the boys who were provided with (a quantity of potatoes; these the boys were allowed to throw at him, two of them throwing at the same time. The feat was this: He, with the forefinger of each hand pointed toward the boys, would receive the potatoes on the end of his fingers, splitting the vegetables into fragments. This he would do almost invariably. On one of these occasions when Mr. Whittaker had been imbibing a little too freely the boys used frozen potatoes, and with such force as to nearly break his fingers. This so exasperated him that it was with some difficulty that they escaped his wrath, and it was about the last of his diverting the boys in that way. " Of the early pioneers of the town but few remain, a majority of them having passed that bourne from which none return. Andrew Mattoon and wife, who settled here as early as 1834, are still living, in the township of Attica; they having sold their original home some years since and located where they now reside. Mr. M. is probably the oldest man in this part of the county, being now over ninety years of age, He is quite infirm in health and nearly blind. His home, in the early history of the town, was always the resort of tile weary and way-worn traveler, and his table was free to such as chose to share his hospitality. In the years intervening from those early days, he has seen much affliction. From a large family over one-half have passed over the river before them, and await the coming of the parents on the other shore." AN INDIAN SCARE. During the month of March of the year 1837, reports were in circulation among the settlers that a band of some three hundred Indigns were encamped in the wilderness north of the Flint, to the northeast of Lapeer, and that their movements were such as to cause serious apprehensions as to what might be the object of the savages. The knowing ones (and there are always such in all communities), were certain from what could be learned froim the Indians that their object was anything else than peaceful. Wild stories were set afloat of the threats and declared intentions of the barbarians. Aunt Judah, a very knowing and credulous old lady, was quite voluble in all the visitillng circles, detailing the incidents of early Indian barbarities ill the olden times, most vividly remembered and touchingly described —of the nmurder -and scalping of whole families and commnunities, the burning of dwellings and everything connected withl savage warfare and human suffering by captivity and living deatli. Stories of like character found their way I - - to the remote cabin of the timid pioneer, and for a time the terrors of a savage destruction of life and property were believed to be imminent and more than probable. Here in the midst of a dense forest, liable at any time to an unseen and imaginary foe of magnified numbers and savage intent, the promptings to which on the part of the supposed savages could only be vaguely surmised by the frightened pioneer, days and weeks passed of painfulsuspense. No one could be found who had seen the redskins in person, and the most reliable news was generally third or fourth-handed from the one who had seen the Indians. One night about the middle of April of this year, after a somewhat sultry night for the time of year, there were strolng indications of a rain storm, and as it had been quite dry for a week or two, my mother was busy just before dark in arranging the various means to secure what rainwater she could from that which would fall upon the somewhat large roof of the humble log house in the woods; in the early evening the clouds which had promised a plentiful shower lifted themselves into the heavens and disappeared; scarcely a breath of air was moving, and naught was to be heard except the occasional hoot of the owl, and thie shrill whistle of the ever-present whip-poor-will, and the busy chattering of the katy-did and katy-didn't. At this time we had a boarder, whom for short we will call Mack. He was a man of considerable ability, fond of reading and music, and as a vocalist helped to while away many a lonesome hour, with a variety of songs, sacred and secular. The family retired to rest at the usual hour. There were two beds in the main room of the house, which, in fact, was all the room below. This room assumed the quadruple purpose of parlor, sitting-room, kitchen, cook-room and bedroom. In one of those beds in the corner of the room slept my father and mother, and in the other corner slept.Mack and myself. About eleven o'clock, and after the family were in the close embrace of Morpheus, they were all suddenly awakened by a loud noise —:1 crash, and by one blow from some unknown -person, or cause, the lower sash of one of the front windows was thrown nearly across the room, and the glass nearly all broken out. Mack immediately sprang out of bed and ran to the door; he said, however, before reaching the door, "This is the work of- savages." On opening the door he saw, or thought he s:tw, the form of the retreating savage pass around and behind a large brush-heap near the house-he heard his stealthy and cautious step as he passed over the dry brush; there was no mistake about it. " This," said the much excited Mack, "is the warning to something terrible. We shall, in all probability, all be massacred and scalped before morning, and we may as well prepare for the worst." It would be idle to say we were not all of us terribly frightened. Mack had surely seen an Indian and heard his retreating footsteps. My mother, who was a woman of more than common nerve and energy, was on this occassion completely overcome, and wept quite passionately. When slhe had become sufficiently composed to express herself, she said she thought it cruel that after having endured so much as she had in bringing up a large family, she should be brought here into the wilderness to be butchered by savages, and the victim of Indian ferocity. Father took things a little more cool, but was more or less excited, and expressed regrets of having come to Michiganmore especially as tlhe removal from the East had been in direct opposition to the wishes of my motlher and the most of the family. Dalnger was imminent, and something must be done, and that speedily. As good luck would liave it, we had two guns-an army nmusket and a rifle-plenty of powder and lead, but no balls at hand. A light was at once made, and the windows closely curtained, so as to shield the family from being an easy and sure mark for the enemy. It would not do tD waste time to run balls, as everything depended upon prompt action. Slugs in sufficient num I I I Ii i - iI I I i -P ff A 0::f A: tiC: f:;d At 0 are t00:: 6 An;: (: ta; 0: i:: X g i:2:D - of:: I -: f; l w DdX An:::C:0:S ant 0: ES IS t;00 S i:;.)F_ i,k I

Page  101 I iT \ - _ - I i I I I HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 101 - bers for a short battle were soon prepared and the guns loaded; the muster of the effective men showed our force to be four father, Mack, a younger brother, and the writer. My mother went into the chamber to be company for the younger childkren, with the understanding that in case we were overpowered and murdered, she and the children were to pass out of the chamber window on to the roof of the linter part, jump to the 'ground, and if possible escape to a place of safety. The next thing to be done was to dispose of the forces. The balance of the room aside from the space occupied by the beds, was about sixteen feet square. In each corner of this space was stationed one of our number; two with axes and the other two with guns. Thus disposed of, we waited in quiet impatience, mixed with mortal fear, for the attack fromn without. - The agreement was that we were to sell our lives as dearly as possible, scarcely expecting it possible to escape the wrath and vengeance of our unseen foe, supposing, of course, they were in sufficient force to accomplish any object they might have. One, two and three hours passed, and no attack; what could it all mean? We had received a warning in a shape not to be misunderstood, and Mack had seen an Indian on the retreat. Was it not enough to warrant the putting our forces on the war footing and watching for the foe? This had been done, but still the foe kept in ambush and we were all alive. As the night wore its slow hours away, the air became chilly and we felt the need of a fire, which up to this time we had not presumed to build, forfear it might give the enemy an advantage over us. With much hesitancy, we resolved to have a fire, and one was built. Cautiously and with much fear, we left our several positions and drew utip to the very cheerful fire. Each and all had their surmises and fears to express, but in low and subdued tones, not much above the whisper., We still expected an attack, and that in all probability not one of our number would see the light of another day. In that state of mind it was very natural to traverse our past lives and present moral status, and see if we were prepared to exchange worlds, and if it would be well with us should it be our fate to do so that night. Gradually, and by degrees, the restraint which had acted like a spell upon us during the hours of inactivity and alarm grew less, and we began to converse with a little more freedom. The conversation naturally turned upon religious subjects and personal experience. We were certain that if we lived we would certainly do very much better, and try hard to be good if so be we were spared this great danger. Time passed a little more rapidly and unobserved while this conversation was being had, than in the former part of the night, and on noticing the clock we found it was three o'clock-and all was well all alive and no attack. We listened for a time in hopes to catch some intimation of the position of our supposed unseen foe; all was still save the occasional croaking of the frogs in the pond near by. In the mean time the moon had risen, and was what is called three hours high, and was shining brightly on the front of our cabin. We had waited all this time and no development had 'been made, and we were quite impatient to be relieved from our uncomfortable and tormenting dilemma. Cautiously, and with much trepidation, we ventured to open the door and take a survey, as far as possible, of the situation. We looked among the heaps of brush and as far as possible into the dark forest beyond; all was still, and an oppressive silence, like the house of deatlh, was impressed on everything. As we stood there vaguely speculating upon the results of the night and its watchings, our attention was drawn to a wide board, some sixteen feet long, with one end lying directly under the window that had been so suddenly thrownll into the room, while the other end rested upon thle wash-tub, sitting under the eaves of the stoop. A rake that we used fo' rakling leaves and brush layv with one end under the eaves of the stoop and the other near the window also, and by the edge of the board. In a moment the whole thing was explained. In all probability our pet hog (we had but one) had come along and rubbing against the rake which supported one end of the board which my mother had placed under the roof to conduct the rain-water into the tub, had turned it out of position sufficiently to cause it to fall, and the rake was of the right length to bring the corner of the board against the sash, with the result as stated. The innocent cause of all our fright and alarm was doubtless frightened by the fall of the board, and was running away when Mack opened the door and saw the savage and heard his footsteps. A hearty laugh over our folly and fright, and we all retired for the few hours left of the night never to be forgottelln. On the Monday following we thought it would be well to have the guns discharged, as we supposed them too heavily loaded for any ordinary game, and the musket in particular, was so subject to recoil when fired off with a heavy load, that none of us had the courage to discharge it. To avoid all mishaps in this direction, the breech of the gun was placed against a stump and so fastened as to hold it in position, a string some sixteen feet long was tied to the trigger and pulled off, carrying the slugs about twenty feet, with a report about as loud as an ordinary popgun. This showed us what kind of soldiers we were, and how well we were provided for an Indian attack. In the course of a couple of weeks we were quite surprised to see a company of thle redskins come into our enclosure, each of whom was provided with a gun and the usual traps of an Indian. For a moment we were really frightened, as there were some ten of thlem, but they only made a halt and passed on. From what we afterward learned, this was about the whole of the three hundred supposed to be encamped, as before stated, and this was the last of our Indian experiences. EARLY RELIGIOUS HISTORY. Rev. Abel Warren, of precious memory, was the first minister to find his way to this town, and probably preached the first sermon in town. For several years did this noble veteran of the cross visit the people of the town from his home some twenty miles away in the town of Washington. It is safe to say that no minister since that time has had the love and esteem of this people more than did this faithful and devoted man. In the year 1855 he was preacher in charge on this circuit, which was nearly the last of his ministerial labors. He has long since passed to his reward, and his memory is precious with those who knew him. Elder Cannon was also a pioneer preacher in this part of the county. Meetings used to be held at the humble homes of the settlers. At one time there was preaching in Asa Huntley's new barn, just after its completion. Then the old log school-house with its wide fire-place and rude benchlies, and then the early church building. The first house of worship in the town was built by the Baptists at Thorneville about the year 1843. It was a primitive affair, and in 1817 a neat church building was erected under the leadership of Rev. Daniel Ammerlnan. Rev. Ammerman either concluded he had' missed his calling or the church had made a mistake calling him; at any rate hle left them and engaged in other pursuits, drifted fromn one tiling and calling to another, until the last that was heard from him 'he was not heard from," and probably does not wish to be. The society declined, and for many years the building has been occupied by any denomination that desired to hold religious service. During the winter of 1847-'48 the Rev. Mr. Simrmons, a Baptist evangelist, came to Dryden to hold a protracted meeting at the school-house one mile north of Dryden village. At tl'hat time there I I i I.S1. f -

Page  102 4jT.. ^-.tI -- - -- - - I F. 102 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. e) <y was quite a society in town of what was called Close Communion Baptists. Deacons Tainter, Holmes and Cu —ming were the most prominent imembers. At this time there rwas some thirty members in the church. Elder Simmons continued his Imeetings some two or three weeks, with more or less success, not, however, with the degree that satisfied tile evangelist. The church was called upon to work also as evangelists, and go from house to house, and if need be, "conmpel them to come in." A course was soon resolved upon, and that was for certain of the members and other workers in the cause to go during the day (meetiin gs were only held nightly) throughout the different neighborhoods and talk and pray with the people at their holmes. This was done with more success than could have been expected under the circumstances. One of the brethren who was assigned to the north part of the town, in the course of his round visited a man who seldom, if ever, went to the house of worship, and the visiting brother nmade up his mind that it would have been a benefit to him to have been a little more conversant with religious etiquette. Once admitted to the house, and after the usual form alities, the brother said to the head of the family that h e had come to talk with him and the family on the subject of religion, and the salvation of himself and family. Tilhe man made but little reply, but kept himself busy at work on a pair of boots upon which h e was pegging the bottoms. The brother talked and the man pegged away at his boot with all the more vigor, replying at times in a short, gruff manner, and giving our friend but little encouragement that the good seed was being sown on very promising soil. Not meeting with that success that he could wish by way of his exhortations and entreaties with the man to pay some heed to that which so immediately concerned him, h e proposed a season of prayer. "Yes, you can pray as much as you please if that will suit you," said the man.' The brother read a portion of the Scriptures, shut up his Bible, and waited for the man to lay aside his work whlile prayer was being offered, but to no purpose. The man pegged away all the more fiercely, and with an energy that indicated that the work was promised the next hour, and must be finished. The brother finally engaged in prayer, and with much fervor prayed for the man and his family. The more earnest the prayer the more zealously did the main of boots peg away; not a cessation, but one vigorous and persistent pegging. Prayer being over the brother left, quite well satisfied in tile doctrine of the total depravity of the race. That man still lives, and remains that same uncivil, unrepentant old shoemaker. Others of those who went out on the errand of mercy were more successful, and many were persuaded to give heed to the call, and quite a large number were in due time added to the church. For pleasing and persuasive address, natural eloquence, sound logic and earnestness of manner, Elder Simmons had few equals, and it is a matter of question if the noted evangelist, Mr. Moody, is in any way his superior. His sermon on the Divine sovereignty and the doctrine of election, preached during that series of meetings, will doubtless be remembered by many who listened to him on that memorable evening when Deacon Tainter adjusted the lights, and the audience received such a quiet rebuke from the speaker for the lack of interest in what he was saying to them. The sermon was one of the most novel and sensible of any we ever listened to on that subject. The text was in these words: "Work out your own salvation with fear and trembling, for it is God that worketh in you, both to will and to do, of his good pleasure." At the conclusion of the sermon the Methodists, Christians and Baptists concluded they were a unit on that subject, and no need of further controversy on the much vexed question. The next church built in town was by the Methodist Episcopals, in what is called South Dryden, in 1855, and the next at IDryden village, by the same denonmination, in 1856. Both of these churches have been remodeled and very much improved during the past few years, and are still used and occupied by the M ethodist Episcopals with respectable congregations. In the year 1874 the same denomination built a very neat and commodious church near Whigville, in the southwest part of the town, costing about $1,600. LUCIUS KENDRICK. The subject of this sketch was one of the representative men of the town of Dryden until his death, which occurred October 12, 1882. He was born at Darien, Erie County, N.Y., October 9, 1817. He was one of the early settlers of Lapeer County, coming to Dryden in company with his father, Sanford Kendrick, whose death occurred just twenty-seven years, to a day and hour, previous to his decease. Coming to Dryden before the days of railroads, they were compelled to come to their forest home with teams through Canada, and were nineteen days on the way, arriving in Dryden November 14, 1836, a family consisting of five sons and four daughters, all of whom survive the subject of this sketch, their a:ggregate ages being 612 years, the youngest now being 58 years old. Mr. Kendrick being of frail and delicate heath, his father deemed him better adapted to less rugged business than swinging the axe and clearing the land, which was densely timbered, and so advised him to engrage in teaching school. His first term was taught at Almont village. He continued teaching in various parts of Lapeer and Macomb Counties until the year 1840, when he was married to Miss Eliza Look, daughter of Deacon Elijah Look, who settled in Dryden about the stame year that Mr. K.'s father came. After his marriage he at once built him a small house and commenced the improvement of a portion of the lands located by his father and which had been duly set apart to him. He found it no small task to overcome the many hardships of the frontier woodman, and to dispel the forests, which were then the habitation in common of the wolf, deer, bear and other wild animals, which vied with each other in the discourse of free music to make night hideous, which, taken in connection with the oft repeated rumors of intended Indian attacks, added but little to the enjoyment of the homes of the settlers. But by steady and persevering industry he caused the forests to yield to the cultivated fields, and in a few years found himself the happy possessor of a beautiful farm and family of six boys to aid him in its cultivation, four of whom survive their father, James having died in the defense of his country at or near Memphis, Tenn., in the year 1865, and Edwin, who recently died at Cario. Ill., while traveling in hopes of regaining his long impaired health. Mr. Kendrick had many afflictions to encounter during his life, but none which so depressed him as the death of his wife, which occurred February 19, 1875. June 15, 1876, he was married to Miss Lucy Kendall of Alden, N. Y., who was a firm friend and schoolmate in early life. Mr. Kendrick was many times called to fill positions of trust both in the township and State, being a member of the legislature from Lapeer County in the years 1869 and 1870, and was an active member during his term. He labored diligently to procure the passage of a bill introduced by himself, the object of which was a reform in prison discipline, he, being a member of the committee on prisons and reformatory institutions, had great faith that even the most fallen could be reformed, and which was fully portrayed in the bill. He was a kind and forbearing parent and a favorite with young and old. He was successful in business, acquiring a competency of this world's goods, and being the owner of one of the finest farms in Dryden. He was an earnest worker in the Christian cause and a liberal contributor to the M. E. Church, of which he has been for many years an active mellber. The funeral was largely attended J Ri 1 _ - - ----------------- Tf^

Page  103 a4C, K _ Zb I I - i HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 103 - by many of his associates of former years, evincing their sorrow and high respect by.kindly aiding in the services. THORNVILLE. The venerable Benjamin Thorne died at Thorn ville in 1882, at the advanced age of eighty-nine years. He was a native of Milan, N. Y., and came to this county in 1839, and settled on the land now occupied by the village of Thorntville, clearing it from its primeval state. He built mills-still in operation there-and was an active, industrious and thrifty business man, until the infirmities of age necessitated well earned rest and repose. He was the father of nine children —five girls and four boys-seven of whom, with his wife, aged eighty-three years, still survive. William Thorne of Thornville, and Gilbert Thorne of this city, are his sons. The mills are now owned by John Morton. Dr. Caulkins, Samuel Dirstine and John and William Steele, also settled in this part of the town. Dr. Caulkins and John Steele are the only ones left of the early settlers of Thornville. Benjamin Thorne was the first postmaster here. The present postmaster is Thomas Revnolds. AN AFFLICTED FAMILY. LUMAN SQUIERS and family were pioneers of Dryden, and few families have suffered severer afflictions than was their lot. In the spring of 1855 their oldest son, who was at the time away from home at work, was brought back sick, and to all appearance with some malignant disease. Drs. Strowbridge and Caulkins attended him. In a few days the disease developed in a true case of small-pox. As might well be imagined, the family and community were very much alarmed. There were ten children, not one of whom had ever been vaccinated. As soon as the case was fully known the children were all vaccinated, with but little hopes that it would avail anything in warding off the much dreaded disease. For a few days the prospect of the recovery of the young man was quite probable; everybody kept aloof from their dwelling, and the family with the help of a heroic young lady to whom the young man was pledged in marriage, were left to their fate by the much affrighted neighbors. In a few days, however, the disease put on a malignant type, became confluent and in about eight days, on a, gloomy and dark night about eleven o'clock, the young man died-no one pres ent but the family and the young lady. The father went to the house of a near neighbor and called to them and announced the sad news that his boy was dead. The neighbor responded. Mr. Squiers requested him, Rev. Mr. Bartlett, to secure and send a coffin to, or near the house and get some one to dig a grave back on the farm on a certain rise of ground. Mr. B. did as requested, and in about two hours Mr. Squiers was notified by some one calling to him that the coffin, or box, was ready and the grave prepared. He called for them in this, the most trying hour of his life, for help, but was refused; asked them to let him have the use of the horse and light wagon that had brought the box, but this was refused. The men who dug the grave stood at a respectful distance and explained as well as they could, where the father might find it, but utterly refused to let him come near them. He says to them, "You must help me. I cannot perform this last duty to the departed boy." But all to no purpose. They left him, and the father and two younger brothers performed the triple duties of undertaker, sexton and mourners. After placing the body in the coffin or box, the father and two brothers carried it, a few rods at a time, a dist ance of some one hundred rods. The men who dug the grave, not understanding Mr. Squiers as to the spot indicated by him, had prepared it some twenty-five rod* beyond. When they came to the spot where they expected to find the grave, it could not be found; for nearly an hour they traversed about in the dark before it could be found. The burial services over, the three returned to the sorrow-stricken family to alone talk over their sorrow. Nothing was more natural than to expect that all the family would, at the proper time, come down with the same dreaded disease; strange to say, not one was attacked with it. The vaccination for the kine worked in each and all, showing the efficiency of vaccination beyond a doubt, and that it will work in the system faster than the virus or contagion of the smallpox. A few years later a younger son, on his thirteenth birthday, had made all arrangements for a birthday party and supper. During the fore part of the day he had accompanied his father into the woods where lie was felling trees for wood. As one of the trees was about to fall, the father saw the boy in what he thought a dangerous position and called to him to get out of the way of the falling tree. The tree fell and the boy was killed. A small limb at the extreme end of the tree struck him on the head and the result was almost instant death. The festivities of the birthday were changed to the drapery and sadness of a charnel house. It were idle to attempt a faint portrayal of the grief of the deeply stricken parents, brothers and sisters. Another son fell while in defense of his country. SCHOOL REPORT. The annual report of the school inspectors of the town of Dryden for the year 1882, shows the number of school children to have been 559; number of school buildings, nine. The school inspectors for the ensuing year were J. W. Cole, Lyman Talmage, Robert Booth, Timothy UJtley, Win. B. Sutton, Samuel Ellsworth, Jason Allen, R. C. Ellsworth, Wm. M. Lawrence. ] DRYDEN VATILLAG-E. The village of Dryden has but little history distinct from the town. It is located on sections 11, 12, 13 and 14, and surrounded by the finest agricultural country to be found in Lapeer County. A short time prior to 1840, Jonathan Sweet built a store at this point and carried on a mercantile business. The old red building is still standing in the village, and of late years has served a variety of purposes. About 1846 the late John MA. Lamb purchased the property of Mr. Sweet, and his business operations laid the foulldation of the village. For some time the place was designated as Lamb's Corners. Both Mr. and Mrs. Ltamb were representative pioneers, and their biographies constitute an important part of this chapter. Both did their work and did it well, and have gone from this earth. MR. AND MIRS. J. M. LAMB. JOHN MERRITT LAMB was born August 11, A. D. 1808, in the township of Springfield, Burlington County, New Jersey, of Quaker parents. His grandfather was an Englishman and settled on a tract of land in the State of New Jersey, deeded to him by King George the Fourth prior to the war of the Revolution. Three brothers, John Lamb, Jacob Lamnb, and Joseph Lamb, settled on this tract of land, improved farms, raised families, and were loyal subjects to the British crown, which then held dominion over the people of its Americlan provinces. John Merritt Lamnib in his youth was' noted for his candor, modesty and sobriety, being of a mild disposition, and in youth gained many dear friends; was very obedient to his parents and loved his mother with an affection that left this sphere only when lie dropped to lifeless clay. He had the advantage of a common school education, and profited well by its privileges. Later in youth he attended a select school, where he finished, but finished well, a common course of studies. He was married in 1831 to ElizLbeth D. Manwaring and lived in Juliustown, New Jersey, for l r r I t 9 -~ W-n - R 6

Page  104 :; y1 -I I 104 HISTORY ()F LAPEER COUNTY. four vears, when he moved to Michigan in 1834, via New York, Albany, Buffailo, thence by steamboat to Detroit. He then rented a house on Jefferson Avenue, and commenced to look about for a home; was offered a forty acre lot near Campus Martins for the sum of $400,00, but like many others could not see that value in land in that locality, at that time. He then with a friend, Mr. Whitcomb, started up the lakes and landed at or near Lexington, which was but a small place at that time, then he took a direct line for Bairds' Mill on Black River, at this place learned that a man was at work on a mill near the head waters of Belle River; he then took a course for this mill through swamps and woods, and with the aid of his * surveyor's compass came out to the place and found Mr. Webster at work on his dam. During this voyage through the wood, it being quite late in the fall, a heavy snow storm came on; his companion came near freezing, but by the use of a whip his friend was made to exercise and cut wood to keep warm with. " When I awoke in the night," says Mr. Lamb, "I was so numb that it was with the greatest effort that I could stand on my feet. I chopped wood and built a fire, then turned to see the condition of my friend, and found him nearly frozen. I rolled him and jerked him around and all I could hear was a low groan, but with the aid of a whip he recovered so that he could eat a piece of broiled salt pork, and cut wood to warm by. It was the most lonesome night of my life; my companion I thought would die. The wolves howled the most dismal dirge in all directions. After this long dreary night, morning came and we started on our course. The deer were very thick, but the rifle wet, and they seemed to realize the fact by their being so tame." At Mr. Webster's he could not get any information in regard to land; they regarded the compass and chain that he carried as emblems of the ' land shark," and eyed him suspiciously, withholding the information he required. From Webster's Mill he returned to his family in Detroit, and lived there during the winter of 1835 and 1836. In the spring of 1836 he moved to Rochester, Oakland County, and in the fall of 1836 he came to Lapeer County; selected 160 acres of land, on section 13, in1 Dryden. Then with family moved in the log house after Christmas in 1836. Mother says: "It was very cold, and I had to wrap my children in the shawls, blankets, and quilts, until the fire was built. After we got warm John danced with joy, and said he was the happiest man living. 'For,' says lie, '1 have a nome now.' Surrounded by woods on all sides, on every hland, a dense wilderness presented its front. A small clearing was made to the southwest of the house, and in the spring a patch of potatoes planted, and a patch of turnips sown. The Indians came —always hungry-first a few squaws and papooses and were fed, then larger squads would come and would eat so ravenous. They emptied the larder, ---"For," says mother, "I did not desire their ill-will, and fed them all the flour I had. John was away to mill, and did not get back when expected, and I lhad to grind wheat in my coffee-mill to maklie cakes for nay babies. We fed the Indians through fear, and when John come home hlie went and got Isaac Smith who could talk Indian, and he told them that they should not come any more." The wolves were very thick, and used to make the nights hideous with their howling noise. Other wild game was plentiful, and several deer was shot from the ladder window, while they were on the turnip patch. Anl orchard was planted, the trees coming from Ypsilanti, a few at a time. Quite a little land was cleared and planted, when the cold storm of snow and frosts came and killed wheat and corn and froze the leaves on the trees. We were so disconraged," said father, "that I would have moved out of the country had nlot poverty compelled me to remain." Chopping, logging, clearing, and fencing, were the order of the day. Settlers demanded his services to survey out lines, tiand in payment would chop or work as compensation. In 1838 he was elected justice of the peace, and remained in the office for the term of four years. At a town meeting when the township was organized, he suggested the name of Dryden, which was adopted by the few settlers. While logging in the year of 1840 lie received a letter from his brother in New Jersey, containing the sad news of his mother's death, and on going to the house lie penned his grief in these few sacred lines: We may not say, my dearest brother, We do feel ourselves aggrieved; But rest in peace, dear sainted mother, Deserving of the joys received. Thou hlast been a heavenly blessing Unto all thy children dear, In faith, and love, and hope caressing, During all our tender years. And when to man's estate arriven, Thy example still hath shone, Pointing out the way to heaven, Walking steadfast and alone. Blessed be my sainted mother, Peaceful be her rest above, Bless her too, my dearest brother, For a parent's truest love. Say not we have lost a treasure By our mother's going home, We may rest with her in pleasure, Hark, the Savior's voice says, "Come!" "Come to me, ye sons and daughters Of the dying race of man; Drink ye freely of the waters; Truly, if ye will ye can." In his mother's old letters she writes so kind and good, seeming to know the wants of people in a new country-saying —"Thee wilt need a grindstone, to sharpen thy ax. Thy iron crank, thy scythe, and thy sickle are here, and if I can send them to thee I will; Friend A — says he intends to go to Michigan, and I will send them to thee. But my dear children so far away from me. My heart is so full, and the big tears fall on the paper, so that I cannot write." Well he might say, "sainted mother." In the spring of 1846 he purclhased a" store at what was then familiarly known as Lamb's Corners, and continued in trade until the year of 1854. Also manufactured potash until 1858. Was also in trade at Dryden, and a member of the firm of J. C. Lamb & Co., Lamb & Bacon, Lamb Bro. & Co, when he retired from business as a merchant, in the year of 1868. He served two terms in the State legislature, three terms in the State senate, serving on prominent committees, viz: Committee oil asylum for deaf, dumb, and blind; internal improvements; divisions of towns and counties; salt productions, etc. In 1867 was a member of the State constitutional convention. In his politics hle was quite independent. Was a rabid abolitionist, and in o-,te-bellum times, advocated universal suffrage. His motto on this subject was, "I would not deny to any human being, any privilege that I would desire myself." He also aided with all his efforts the adoption of the free school system, although a heavy tax-payer, —saying if he owned the whole State it would be to his benefit to. have his tenants well educated even though at his expense. He served in the State senate in 1863 in the "dark days," and was ever loyal to the principles of right. Quoting from a speech: "The country must be one country, the States as one State. if it takes our children and their children to accomplish it. The country must be staved." His religious belief was universal. Although 1 MRd -- I I I ~I I_~ ~ _~_~ I __ _ _ -i -v-,I D

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Page  [unnumbered] I/^ /A MRS.J.M. LAMB,

Page  105 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 105 a. member of no religious society, lie thought that nature could not be so extravagant as to condemn the larger portion of her children. He wished, and it seemed to be his greatest desire, to simply live by the dear old "rule" that has stood the test of ages. In addressing any peron it was "thee and thou," owing to his Quaker training of earlier days. He often remarked that it was man's duty to leave the world better than he found it. We canll truthfully say that he fulfilled this declaration by reviewing his labors and efforts in improving. About 400 acres was brought into a state of cultivation, and nearly all fenced with cedar rails; a large portion ditched and underdrained with cobble stone; building twenty-three buildings, houses and barns, of permanent structure. He believed in doing well whatever he undertook. Was over particular that everything should be made permanent. He considered man only a temporary possessor of what he occupies, and that it was man's duty to do well and he would be rewarded by his labors. He wearied not in well doing until the fall of'1871, when looking after a pine interest in Lamotte, Sanilac County, Mich., being there at the time the great fires swept over that portion of the State in the month of October so destructfnlly, in endeavoring to save some buildings that were in danger of being consumed by the flames, he over exerted, and taking cold it settled on the lungs, and he died of congestion November 3, 1871, leaving an invalid wife and nine children grown to manhood and womanhood, many friends, neighbors and acquaintances to mourn his departure to the better land. Elizabeth D., wife 'of John M. Lamb, died October 6, 1882. She was born in Springfield, Burlington County, N. J., in 1811, and was married to John M. Lamb in 1831, and in 1835, with her husband and family, moved to Michigan, landing at Detroit. In 1836 the family, consisting of Mr. and Mrs. Lamb and three small children, moved into the "old log house" half a mile east of the now village of Dryden-then a wilderness with a winding woods road leading to the southeast, known as the "messenger road." Here the many cares pertaining to the pioneer household were calmly met and expeditiously overcome. A farm was hewn out of the dense forest and made to yield an abundance, in which the industrious hands of a mother nlobly assisted. During her residence in this township she has seen the forests disappear and hundreds of happy homes brought forth that now dot our beautiful country. The winding trails have disappeared, save here and there they may be traced through groves of timber, and the broad highways have taken their place. The pioneer's log house has been replaced by others more commodious, ornamental and convenient. Villages have sprung up and many of them have grown into cities; railroads have traversed our country and spanned the continent; her life was lived in a progressive age. Wars have visited our country, slaves have been made freemen, and on several occasions the "runaway" was cared for and comforted by the hands that are now folded in rest. Eleven children called her mother-five sons and six daughters, all grown to woman and manhood. Three daughters preceded her into the great beyond. Left a widow November 3, 1871, shle lived in her home well and cheerful until November 9, 1876, when she was attacked with paralysis for eleven months. She kept around her house until the second stroke reduced her to a helpless condi tion on October 6, 1877. For five years she lingered, until the evening of October 6, 1882, when she passed quietly to the sleep that brings rest to the wearied form.. She was taken to her last resting place October 8, followed by a large concourse of friends and relatives. The funeral was held at the home, and Rev. Mr. Steele made a few very appropriate remarks. At close of services, the lines which were composed by her husband upon receiving the news of his mother's death, over forty years ago, were sung. ilhe children who died were as follows: Sarall died in 1850; Caroline in 1866 and Mary in 1874. There are eight living, four of whom, Joseph L., William H. H., Lydia L. and Clayton J. are in the West; J. Merritt and G. Franklin in Dryden; Mrs. D. C. Bacon, of the Twin Elm House, in this village, and Mrs. Henry Bartlett, of this town, are the eldest of the family, and are ladies of rare merit, both of whom are active workers in the Ladies' Literary Society of the village. Mrs. Bacon is a woman of rare literary taste, and writes more or less for the public journals of the day. THE OLD LOG HOUSE. The following article is from the pen of Mrs. Emma L. Bacon, a daughter of the late John M. Lamb, and has reference to the old family home in Dryden. We give it herewith: "Once again standing onil the broken door sill, a witness of the desolation, seeing the logs falling down, the roof that storms beat through, rafters giving way, doors gone, windows out, tile plaster falling, the floor torn up, sills rotting, cellar caving in and a pile of brick and mllortar. Squirrels have here a home unmolested; birds build their nests undisturbed; spiders are everywhere. A strange stillness is here. The wind comes and goes as it pleases through the empty house, sounding as if it was sighing. Perhaps it was I that sighed. Well do I remember the coming to this house, of father, mother and three children; how mother was afraid with only a quilt hung up at the door; how the new pine board floor plagued the tidy housekeeper before it wore off smooth; how father stood at the foot of the ladder leading to the attic, dancing a jig and singing, "such a getting up stairs I never did see;" how we almost suffocated with smoke the day the first brush heaps ware burned about our new log house. There is the window from which one moonlight night father shot at a deer feeding on his turnip patch. Those were the days when we borrowed fire of our neighbors; when the howling of the wolves made us frightened children, tremblling in-the trundle bed, cover up our heads. Those wolves killed the sheep; bears caught the pigs running in the woods; deer went bounding past, and by the smoke curling up among the trees we knew the Indian camp fire, and looked for squaw visitors loaded with baskets to trade for food. There where the old bricks lie, I see again a fireplace with its trammel and hooks; a "mantel piece" with grass candle-sticks, books, hats and mittens on it; a tin bake oven on the hearth; brass andlirons; big backlogs and a blazing fire giving light and warmth as we sat and watched it curl and flash among the sticks of wood, changing them to coals and ashes. Around the hearth children cried about their troubles and were rocked to sleep; the boys' cold toes were warmed; work was done; tricks played; stories told; friends entertained; pipes smoked, and ague fits shook out. What histories and life experiences these old walls could tell if they might speak! Stories of toil and pain, work and rest, grief and joy, right and wrong, births and deaths, hopes and ambitions. It takes such a complication of things added together to make the total of life. Onil the whitewashed wall one brother asks this question: ' What is the use for man to strive To try to keep his works alive?' And another has written: ' With lonths and years time has rolled away And brought this old homestead to decay. Brothers and sisters are gone, far and near, But all to my heart, seems very dear. Sisters have crossed to the golden shore, Where is rest and peace forevermore. On us is stamped the hand 'decay' And written on all is, 'passing away.' i 9 tq

Page  106 IlIIIIII- I 106 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY I "There are no more peaceful slumbers in the old chamber; young faces are gone, voices are silent, laughter is hushed, busy feet are elsewhere. The first barn, the big stumps, the old well and 'sweep,' the winding, trodden paths are gone. A jessamine still clings to the wall where young hands trained it, and a corn lily, planted years ago, summer still finds blooming. Not here are the young forms that went romping over the fields, climbing the wild cherry and plum trees, going with baskets after berries, gathering wild flowers, running down the lane, drinking at the ' iron spring,' skipping through the woods, swimming in the river, visiting the pine grove, and welcoming the maple-sugar times. "Only a few years more and no logs, boards, beams or rafters will tell to the transient traveler of an old house here. The strong young man who planned and built it sat in the shade of the trees he planted; his hair grew white, his children came to men and women, the clay was heaped over his form, the rain washed his footprints away, his feet tread these paths no more. Viewing this decay the sighs will come! Why should they? It is here just as all nature's changes are-a beginning, an ending. Commenced and finished. All alone in the log house and this is tile story it told me." EARLY MOVEMENTS. Mr. Sanford Maynard, one of the settlers of 1840, and one of the original proprietors of the mill of Maynard & Bro., selling out to his brother his interest in the mill in 1846, located for a time ill Dryden, and built the first hotel in that place, and also the first blacksmith shop, and carried on both branches of business for a few years, sold out and went to Washington, and from there to Brandon, Oakland County, and engaged in farming. In November of 1862, while out in company with his son chopping wood, and while cutting a tree and before it was supposed to be ready to fall, it was suddenly blown down by the wind, which was blowing a gale at the time, and falling in a manner unexpected by the parties, struck Mr. Maynard on the head and shoullers, killing him instantly. The tree, which was of oak, and about a foot in diameter, lay upon the dead father, and no one near but the son, a young man of about twenty years. With superhuman strength that boy lifted the tree and laid it one side, placed a coat under the head of his father, and ran for help. Tile remains were brought to South Dryden and buried by the side of a former wife. In 1854 the Dryden Exchange was built by E. H. Baker, and has had numerous proprietors. Recently it has been refitted and is now kept by John Garlick. The Twin Elms House was built in 1874 by Joseph Dowd. In front of this house are two elms which have grown to large size from sprouts within the recollection of the present proprietor. William Emmons and L. D. Van Kleek were proprietors, until Mr. D. C. Bacon purchased the property and is now its proprietor. Mr. Bacon is a pioneer of 'Almont and Dryden and Mrs. Bacon was a daughter of the late John M. Lamb. D. C. BACON was born in Oneida County, N. Y., in 1818 remaining there until 1834, following which he spent two years in Ohio and Kentucky, then came to Lapeer County, Mich., and located in Bell River in the township of Almont. Removing in 1838 to the village of Almont he engaged as salesman in store for the finn of John & William Steel and afterward with Shaw & Dyar. In 1840 he built the first house on section 16 in the township of Almnont and established the first stage line between Almont and Royal Oak via Utica and Romeo. In 1845 he returned to Almont, remaining two years, when he went to the township of Imlay and set up for the firm of Imlay, Beach & Co., the first steam engine brought to the county. He then returned to Almont and took up land from the government on section 18, which he improved and lived upon three years, when he came to Dryden and was in the employ of John M. Lamb for two years when he formed a partnership with him under the firm name of Lamb & Co. He afterward went to Almnont and purchased the National House which he conducted five years, and then located on a farm on section 21. In 1873 he returned to Dryden and engaged in mercantile business, the style of the firm being Bacon, Emmons & Co., which was continned up to 1875, when he purchased the hotel in Dryden which lie has since carried on. In 1839 he married Miss Jane Hall, eldest daughter of Seth Hall of Dryden. She died in 1854, leaving one daughter-Francis 0. He was again married in 1856 to Miss Emma Lamb, eldest daughter of John M. Lamb. Mr. Bacon was supervisor in 1873. Was one of the originators of the P. O. & P. A. Railroad and gave thie ground for the station. THE VILLAGE CEMETERY. The first burying ground in this part of the town is located a mile north of the village, and is now thickly dotted with graves. The ground was purchased by the Dryden Interring Society, which was organized in April, 1842. The ground was purchased of Mr. Seth Hall. The officers of the society first chosen were as follows: President, Henry Van Kleek; clerk, Joseph Chamberlain; collector, Holden Tripp; treasurer, Ethan Squier; sexton, John Gould. About 1870 the Mount Pleasant Cemetery Association was formed and ground purchased of John M. Lamb for a village cemetery. Improvements are being made and the grounds made fitting for the object for which they are set apart. DRYDEN LADIES' LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. Th!ere is, perhaps, no society of like character in the county that has become more noted than the one bearing the above name. Its early history is very fully given in a paper written in 1876, by Mrs..Emma Bacon, which we give as follows: "In March, 1871, a company of ladies living in this place, were enjoying social visits. One suggested forming some kind of a society; others encouraged the idea; they met at the house of Mrs. L. Sessions, March 29. Mrs. Joshua Manwaring, nominated to preside at the meeting. It was decided the society shall be a Ladies' Library Association; the object to furnish reading at a small cost to all that would accept the privilege. Officers were chosen as follows: "President, Mrs. J. C. Lamb; secretary, Mrs. Joseph Manwaring; treasurer, Mrs. N. B. Eldredge. "Active members to consist of married ladies only; admittance fee $1; meetings weekly. Mrs. Jesse Emmons and Mrs. Joseph Manwaring were appointed to construct by-laws. "Our first books were "Ik Marvel's" "Farm at "Edgewood," Holland's "Letters to the Jones's," and "Goldfoil," given by Mrs. J. C. Lamb. X "Our first book-case was a little box nailed to the wall, with room on its one shelf for six books. Mirthfulness called it a "famous affair," and proposed a white curtain to improve it. Having books, Mrs. Sessions became librarian, and Mrs. Brophy vice-president. "An anticipated carpet called together an assortment of rags to cut and piece; add to these a cup of tea with picnic suppers, and the weekly meetings, Wednesday afternoons, passed pleasantly away until June 14th, when the approved by-laws were signed by Mrs. J. C. Lamb, Mrs. Joseph Hodson, Mrs. N. B. Eldredge, Mrs. John Porter, Mrs. William Eggleston, Mrs. Joseph Manwaring, Mrs. J. J. Lamb, Mrs. James Brophy, Mrs. Jesse Emmons, Mrs. George Clark, Mrs. Henry Bartlett, Mrs. Miller Fuller. "This afternoon a building was rented for the use of the society. After completing business, each lady took her chair; I 41 - 40

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Page  [unnumbered] S ISTERS. p%^^~

Page  [unnumbered] I I I I I I i i I I I I TWIN ELEMS HOTEL, D.C. BACON, PROPRIETOR, DRYDEN, MICH. r ~-' I /...:! — *aI~f _Xt '

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Page  107 o - I - i; - XI H I S T O R O F IAE R C O N Y.~ HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 107 others carried tlle rags; another carried the books, LOW four in others carried the rags; another carried the books, now four in number, and the library was moved to the rooms since then occupied by the association. "More months were gone, September came, and the 'hit or miss' rag carpet was tacked upon the floor. Visitors came, leaving ten cents, and partook of the social supper. Strawberry and ice cream festivals picked up the change, and the 'wee bits' gathered in the treasury. "Many will remember the terrible fires of October, 1871; how fearfully it raged in the northern counties of our own Michigan; how the uncontrollable element made want and destitution among new settlers. With the rush and roar of a tornado, it swept through the heavy timber, leaping from top to top of those large pine trees. Hemmed in by fire in every direction, it is no wonder some of those poor souls "thought the end of the world had come." And then we worked for the homeless; quilts were made; busy hands filled boxes with clothing and provisions for sufferers forty miles north of us. "By November 29th, $50 were expended, and we counted forty-three volumes. To-day each member drew a book. How bright and new they are. Beautiful books, we know your worth! More ladies joined the society: Mrs. H. Porter, Mrs. Joshua Manwaring, Mrs. S. Rockhill, Mrs. L. Sessions, Mrs. A. Tappen, Mrs. R. Gage, Mrs. S. Manly, Mrs. William Rogers, making in all twenty-three active members, and twelve silent ones, the husbands of the ladies. February 24th. at the last meeting of the first year, our prospects were better than we had dared to hope for. "Another year began and the officers elected were: President, Mrs. J. C. Lamb; vice-president, Mrs. Seth Hall; secretary, Mrs. J. Manlwaring; treasurer, Mrs. Henry Bartlett; librarian, Mrs. Jesse Emmons. "Donations of books were thankfully received. A. J. Squiers, S. E. Randolph and Jesse Emmons gave books valued at $4 each. Also legislative documents by J. C. Lamb and 0. D. Conger. The latter, though seldom read, have their work to do, making a good appearance, filling vacant shelves, and containing information we, as women, ought to know, if we do not vote yet. Additional members were added to the association as follows: Mrs. O. Lewis, Mrs. William North, Mrs. J. Darwood, Mrs. J. Rupert, Mrs. A. Bartlett, Mrs. N. Wells, Mrs. B. F. Randolph, Mrs. A. J. Squiers. "Vigilant work continued. Money came from socials at our homes; we got up sluppers and paid 10 cents to help eat them; our furniture improved; we possessed 169 books, and the second year finished with $26 in the treasury. i:The months of the third year passed away with officers as follows: President, Mrs. J. C. Lamb; vice-president, Mrs. J. Rupert; secretary, Mrs. J. Manwaring; treasurer, Mrs. Seth Hall; librarian, Mrs. Jesse Ermmons. " Mrs. A. H. Curtis and Mrs. F. Iaman became members. We had now 300 volumes at the rooms, and $100 in cash. Energetic financiering and faichful diligence established a literary institution. "Time went on with silent steps. Sorrow's cloud was over us. Death came, for the first time, am ong our number, and claimed Mrs. Jesse Emmons. We lost an earnest member; missed a cheerful companion; separated from a friend, and imourned her vacant chair. Members performing official duties at this time were: President, Mrs. Seth Hall; vice-president, Mrs. J. Rupert; secretary, Mrs. J. Manwaring; assistant secretary, Mrs. H. Bartlett; treasurer, Mrs. J. C. Lam b; librarian, Mrs. A. Bartlett; assistant librarian, Mrs. J. Darwood. "Among our living workers we welcomed Mrs. J. M. Slhumnar and Mrs. William Booth. At the close of the year our secretary reported a gift of Swedenborg's works worth $50. There were e ------ r.. tlhen 400 volumes in the library, $100 in the treasury, and "Progression" our mnotto. "Tlhe fifth year found the officiating members nearly the same as the last, and the following new members: Mrs. B. McNeil, Mrs. G. Robinson, Mrs. D. C. Bacon, Mrs. R. Squiers, Mrs. P. Ulrich. "On Wednesday afternoons, business and the usual cup of tea; visitors are gladly entertained, their 10 cents undisturbed. We have gratitude for the support men have given our undertaking, and for the money they have contributed to our treasury. "We began the sixth year with officers as follows: President, Mrs. Seth Hall; vice-president, Mrs. H. Bartlett, secretary, Mrs. G. Robinson; assistant secretary, Mrs. D. C. Bacon; treasurer, Mrs. J. C. Lamb; librarian, Mrs. A. Bartlett; assistant librarian, Mrs. J. M. Shumar. "In our financial book, since the first year, there is written the names of forty-five book renters. On our shelves there are 468 volumes. We have $100 at interest, $450 insurance; greenbacks remaining, and our credit good. "When selecting books we aimed for variety-theology, histories, biographies, romance, poetry, juvenile (and miscellaneous works. Fiction is read the mlost. These get soiled and worn, but are mended and made to last as long as possible. "Our years have been celebrated by anniversaries with music, speaking, charades, tableaux, dancing and suppers. Combined exertion, good attendance, interesting entertainments, and pleased attention, resulted in satisfaction to performers and spectators. "Launched boats do not always find smooth sailing. Our enterprise has its critics, but we believe true what 'Aunt Mary' quotes from Lorenzo Dow: 'If stones are tlhrowed, it is a good apple tree'.,"There is a strong attachment for the little brown building among the trees. Our Centennial maple is near the door. Hope was planted with it, love is around it, and we have faith our tree will live. "Here is a 'thank you' for those who have appreciated and assisted our women's work. May there always be some blessings in life for them." Since 1876 Mrs. A. M. Rupert and Mrs. H. J. Lamb have been secretaries, the latter being the present incumbent. Mrs. Seth Hall has been president since 1875. In 1881 Mrs. Joseph Manwaring succeded Mrs. J. C. Lamb as treasurer. Libruarians since 1876, Mrs. A. Bartlett and Mrs. B. Breden. The building owned by the society was built for a saloon in 1858, by a Mr. Goodrich. It was afterward rented for a shoe shop, and then two ladies purchased and moved it to its present position, from the opposite side of the street. They occupied it as a millinery store until the library society first rented and then purchased it. The society L has a surplus fund of about $300, and the library contains about 700 volumes of books. There are twenty members and forty book renters. The annual anniversary is celebrated with somet form of social entertainment, which is an important event in the social annals of the town. Of the charter members there are now remaining, as members, the following persons: Mesdames J. C. Lamb, R. Emmons, J. Hodson, J. Manwaring, J. Porter. FRUIT DRYING ESTABLISHMENT. The principal business enterprise of Dryden is the fruit drying establishment of Darwood & Lamb. Mr. Darwood established this business in 1876, and carried it on alone till 1881, when the factory was burned. It was rebuilt the same year and has since been operated by the firm of Darwood & Lamb. The factory in size is forty by eighty feet, two stories in height and has a capacity of 350 bushels every twenty-four hours. The benefit of this enterprise to I a.... A A I - K --- VW l\r k - i ^ e('y J

Page  108 - 108 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. the town and vicinity is apparent, as it furnishes to the farmer a ready market for his apples, which are a considerable product of this section. FREE AND ACCEPTED MASONS. Dryden Lodge No. 150, F. & A. M., was chartered Jan. 14, 1864, with N. B. Eldredge, master, and Jacob C. Lamb, senior warden, and eleven charter members. The officers for the present Masonic year are as follows: Thomas W. Williams, W. M.; Elijah Bartlett, S. W.; W. J. Reynolds, J. W.; Yates Ferguson, Sec.; James Brophy, Treas.; Edward B. Lemmon, S. D.; William H. H. CheasLro, J. D.; Peter C. Snover, tyler. Regular meetings the Saturday evening on or before the full of the moon. INDEPENDENT ORDER OF ODD FELLOWS. Dryden Lodge No. 89, I. O. O. F., was chartered Jan. 16, 1866, with the following charter members: Clayton B. Randolph, Joseph B. Hodson, Peter C. Snover, Darius Alger, Jacob C. Lamb, B. P. Randolph and Joseph Darwood. Its first principal officers were, Clayton Randolph, N. G.; J. Hodson, V. G.; Jacob C. Lamb, Sec. The lodge has a present membership of nineteen. Regular meetings every Saturday evening. The present principal officers are, J. Merritt Lamb, N. G.; William Goodenough, V. G.; William Ball, Sec.; D. Edgerton, Per. Sec.; Joseph Darwood, treasurer. KNIGHTS OF THE MACCABEES. Tibbal's Tent No. 84, Knights of the Maccabees, was instituted March 1, 1883, with sixteen charter members; one has since been added. The officers of the tent are as follows: Sir K. P. C., Jos. Manwaring; Sir K. C., Wm. H. Alcott; St. C., Willis B. Joslyn; Rec. K., Wm. Brumby; Fin. K., John Heenan; Prel., James D. Brophy; Phys., Drs. Braddon and Stearns; Sergt., William H. H. Cheasbro; M. at A., D. Edgerton; first M. of G., Robert B. Gooding; second M. of G., Julius A. Porter; Sen., William E. Ridley; picket, John Stearns. PATRONS OF HUSBANDRY. Dryden Grange No. 396, of the Patrons of Husbandry was incorporated April 16, 1874, with twenty-two members. William North was master, J. C. Lamb, secretary and E. Whittaker treasurer. The present membership is thirty. Regular meetings Friday evening on or before the full moon. The present officers are as follows: Master, Elijah Bartlett; overseer, Geo. B. Terry; lecturer, E. B. Lemmons; chaplain, Enoch Squiers; steward, Austin Atwell; lady assistant steward, Miss S. Baker; Ceres, Miss Whittaker; Pomona, Mrs. Geo. B. Terry; Flora, Mrs. Timothy Utley; gate keeper, Samuel McClusky. In 1870 a. graded school was established in the district, which includes the village of Dryden. A beautiful and commodious school-house was constructed the same year on an eminence just north of the center of the village, at a cost of about $4,000. The school is now in charge of Chas. E. Parmlee, assisted by Annie J. Ridley. The number of scholars in the district is 136. There is one church building in the village, belonging to the M. E. society, a history of which has already been given. The building of the Chicago & Grand Trunk Railroad through the county, built up Imlay City, and Dryden village contributed liberally of its population. Mr. Joseph Manwaring was the only merchant left in the village. After a time the village recovered from the fever of emigration, and, in 1883, the completion of the Pontiac, Oxford & Port Austin Railroad, which passes through Dryden, promises to give new impetus to the business of the village by the facilities of transportation which will be afforded. The first postmaster at the village was John M. Lamb. He was succeeded by William Quatermass, and lie by Joseph Manwaring, the present incumbent. BIOGRAPHICAL. SETH HALL, a pioneer of 1836, was, during his life, a highly respected and influential citizen of Dryden. His death occurred April 4, 1878. He was born in Connecticut in the year 1801. When about three years of age his parents removed to the State of New York where he, early in life, married Miss Lucy Quatermass, who died in 1841, leaving nine children, all of whom, except one, are dead. In 1836, Mr. Hall came to Michigan and settled in -the town of Dryden. May 8, 1842, he married Charlotte Hincks, daughter of James C. Hincks, who came into Dryden from Macomb County. They had eleven children, six of whom are living, viz: Seth, Marth, Frederick and Nellie, now living in Almont, and Lucy and Clarence Edwin who live in Dryden. Theron, Seth and\Wesley served in the army during the war. Abner Hall, son by the first wife, is living at Imrlay City. Mr. Hall field the offices of supervisor and justice of the peace and was known throughout the county as "Squire" Hall. Mr. Hall was a member of Dryden Lodge No. 150, F. & A. M., and upon his death the following resolutions were adopted by that body: Died April 4, 1878, A. D. 5878, Brother Seth Hall, aged seventy-seven years. WHEREAS, It has pleased the Supreme Ruler of the universe in the dispensation of his Divine Providence to call from this life our worthy and beloved brother, Seth Hall, and WHEREAS, We deem the occasion appropriate to express the sentiments of affection entertained for him by every member of this order who enjoyed his acquaintance while living, and especially those of Drvden Lodge, to which he belonged, and of which he was a faithful and active member; therefore be it e.eso(lred, That in the death of our aged Brother Hall we recognize that inscrutable wisdom, which, while it removes from our midst an esteemed brother, from the family circle a kind husband and indulgent father, from society a valuable citizen and good neighbor, admonishes us not only of the uncertain tenure of life, but of the utility of the practical virtues which he exhibited in his daily intercourse with the world, and in his attachment and devotion to the principles of his profession as a man and a Mason. eso.lrced, That in this dispensation of the great Father of Life which has deprived us of a brother and friend, we are reminded of the solemn injunction, "In the midst of life we are in death." Resolr'ed, That while we regret our own loss we tender to the bereaved relatives and friends of our deceased brother our deepest sympathy for their bereavement. Fcsolred, That in token of our respect we will attend the funeral of our deceased brother wearing the usual badges of our order. I:esolrel, That the foregoing preamble and resolution be recorded on our books and that a copy be presented to the widow of the deceased, and that a copy be sent to the county papers for publication. By order of the lodge. THOMAS WILLIAMS, W. M. J. C. LAMB, Secretary Dryden Lodge No. 150, F. & A. M. Apiil 6, 1878, A. D. 5878. ' He was a thorough and successful farmer and accumulated a handsome property during his life. He did much to improve the region in which he lived, and always manifested a lively interest in the welfare and prosperity of the town. Mrs. Hall occupies the homestead in the village and is an active member of society. She has been president of the Dryden Ladies' Library Society since the year 1875. BENJAMIN TERRY, deceased, was born in Livingston County, N.. Y., in 1816, and when sixteen years of age, came to Michigan, and located in Waslltenaw County, where he remained till 1835. He then came to Dryden with his parents and took up 160 acres of land from the government, on section 25, which he cleared and resided upon until his death in 1878. He was married in 1842 to Miss Sarah Ferguson, of Oakland County, by whom he had two ( - I j. i 4-1 w-Z

Page  109 F I - s - 1 II% i II I HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 109 1 sons who are now living. W. H. Terry was born on the homestead, in 1843, and in 1879 purchased 116 acres of land on section 26, where he now resides. He was married in 1868 to Miss Bell Watson, of Dryden. Geo. B. Terry, the youngest son, was born on the homestead, in 1847, where he has since resided. He was married in 1875 to Miss Sarah E. Bakier, of Dryden, and has one child. JOHN HEENAN was born in New York City in 1852, and came to the township of Imlay with his parents the following year. He remained at home until fourteen years of age, when hie started out in life for himself, first as a chore boy at the Imlay Hotel, and afterward as clerk, remaining there one year. He then went to Black's Corners aud engaged as a clerk in the hotel there, which position he held till April, 1871. In that year he came to Almont and engaged in the same business for D. C. Bacon, going from there to Flint, and ill 1874 came to Dryden and engaged as a salesman with the firm of Bacon, Emrmons & Co., acting in that capacity till November, 1878, when he formed a partnership with the firm of Lamb, Emmons & Co., which hlie continued until 1879. They then formed a partnership with J. C. Lamb and Emmons, and purchased a stock of goods at Imlay City, where they opened a branch store under the name of Lamb & Co. and Emmons & Co., which they conducted till October, 1881. Mr. Heenan then purchased the Dryden branch and sold his interest in the Imlay store. He is doing anll extensive business. In 1876 he married Miss Rachel Austin, of Romneo; and has one child. RICHARD BREDIN, M. D., was born inll Lanark County, Ont. He graduated from the academy at Perth, received a diploma from the Toronto Normal School inll 1864, attended the Toronto School of Medicine, from which he graduated in 1869, and also received a certificate from the Lying-in Hospital of that city the same year, and a certificate for instruction in eye and ear deseases from M. F. Miltendorf, of New York. In 1870 he came to Dryden, and has a very extensive practice inll his profession. He was married in 1875 to Miss B. Morrison, of Canada. JAMES D. BROPHY WaS born in the province of Quebec, Canada, in 1833, remaining there until 1813, when hlie went to Ontario, where he resided until 1856. He then came to Michigan and located in Almont, where hle remained but a short time, when he removed to Attica, and after a year's residence there came to Dryden and engaged in the shoe business, which he carried on until 1878, since which time hlie has been engaged in farming. He was married in 1860 to Miss Melvina Squier, daughter of E. Squier, of Dryden, and has one son. JOHN GORDON was born in Scotland, in 1808, remainlling there until 1837, when he came to Canada and settled in Oxford County, Ont. Inl 1856 hie came to Lapeer County, and after a three years' residence in the township of Almont came to DIyden and purchased eighty acres of land on section 19, where lie now resides. He was married in 1835 to Miss Maxwell McWilliam, of Scotland, and has eight children. JOHN BRAIDWOOD was born in Scotland, in 1842, and the same year came with his parents to Michigan, who settled in the township of Almont. In 1864 he went to Metamora and worked that year on a farm, returning to Almont, and inll 1868 went to Wisconsin, where he remained but a few months, again returning to Almont. He spent 1870 in the township of Lapeer, and the following year moved to section 13, in Dryden, where he remlained up to 1879, when he purchased eighty acres of land on section 24, where he now resides. He was married in 1873 to Mliss Mary Taylor, of Metamora, and has two sons. WILLIAM MATHEWS was born in Niagara County, N. Y., in 1828, remaining there until 1840, when he came to Michigan with his parents. In 1845 lie went to Bruce, Macomb County, and( remained until 1852, when he came to Dryden and located on section 23. He remained there until 1863, when he removed to section 25, where he purchased eighty-four acres of land, upon which le still resides, also owning fifty-four acres inll Almont. In 1852 he married Miss Mary E. Ferguson, of Oakland County, and has two children. GEORGE W. FISHER, deceased, was born in Vermont in 1816, remaining there until 1839, when lie came to Michigan and settled in Dryden onl section 36. He purchased wild land, which he improved and resided upon until his death, which occurred in 1882. In 1838 hle married Miss Eliza Brown, by whom he had thirteen children, five of whom are now living-Lois N.; George H., who married Miss Lucy Mitchell, daughter of Rev. L. Mitchell; Sally A., who married B. Snyder, of Macomb County; David E., who married Lewis McCollins, of Macomb County; and Caroline I., who married L. Soules. JAMES HINES, deceased, was born in Massachusetts in 1782, and in 1836 came to L:peer County and settled in the township of Dryden, onil section 23, where he remained until his death in 1856. He was married in 1808 to Miss Phoebe Hill, by whom he had seven children. SAMUEL ELLSWORTH was born in New York in 1843, remaining there until 1852, when he moved to Ohio with his parents, residing there till 1855. He then came to Dryden and staid one year, thence to Attica, and in 1862 to Indiana, where he remained till 1870. He then came back to Michigan and located in Oakland County, and two years thereafter came to Dryden, where he now resides, on section 30. He was married in 1873 to Miss Alice M. Shaw, of Dryden, and has one son. NATHANIEL SMITH, deceased, was born in Monroe County, N. Y., in 1788, remaining there until 1833, when he came to Michigan. He stopped the first year in Macomb County, then came to Lapeer County and located in Almont, on section 32, where he took up land. After remaining there two years he removed to section 33, and in 1853 to section 28, where he resided with his son until his death in 1856. He married Miss Ruth Pettis, of New York, by whom he had twelve children. ETHAN SQUIER was born in the Province of Quebec, Canada, in 1804, moved to Vermont in 1811 and a year later to Oxford, Ontario, where he remained three years. He then resided near London until 1817, when he came to Michigan and located near Utica, Macomb County. In 1836 came to Dryden and took up 160 acres of government lard on section 11, where he remained until 1879. He then removed to the village of Dryden, where he now resides. In 1830 he nmarried Miss L. Huntley, of Macomb County, who died in 1858 leaving two children. Was again married in 1860 to Miss Lucinda Churchill, of Almont, who died in 1874, and has since married Miss Churchill. JAMES FREER, deceased, was born in Ontario County, N. Y. in 1798, remaining there and in Genesee County until 1839, when lihe came to Dryden and built the first grist and saw-mill in the township. He held the office of supervisor and associate judge at the time of his death in 1848. In 1824 he married Miss Lucretia Dexter, of Genesee County, N. Y., by whloml he had fourteen children, of whom three are now living. CHANCY MORGAN, deceased, was born in Vermont in 1794, and from there went to Caada where lihe remained until 1835 when he carme to Michigan. He located in the township of Almont and in 1840 came to Dryden and settled on section 26, where he remained until his death in 1873. About the year 1826 he married Miss Sylvia Burdick, of Canada, by whom he had nine children. She died in 1880. I IK - j I - I I I I I I I t 11 I\ '"I iA I

Page  110 d I I* i.1 110 HISTORY )F LAPEER COUNTY. - - - JOHN BLOW was born in Herkimer County, N. Y., in 1810, remaining there until 1828 when lie went to Tioga County. In1 1834 he came to Michigan viewing, and in the followilng Spring locating in Almolnt with his falllily, where he resided one year, going from there to Rochester, Oakland County. He remained there until 1841 whien he came to Dryden and settled on eighty acres of land on section 6 wlhich lie took up from the government in 1837, and where he now resides, having added forty acres by subsequent purchase. He was married in 1833 to Miss Chfarity Herringtol, of Otsego County, N. Y., and has five children, four sons and one daughter. Mr. Blow, it is claimed, struck thle first furrow in the township. H. H. TERRY Was born in New York in 1836 and when about two years of age came with his parents to Michigan and settled in Macomb County. In 1843 removed to Oaklalnd County and in 1850 returned to Macomb where he remainaied till 1860. In 1862 he carne to Dryden and after remaining a short time returned to Macomlb County and in 1865 came to Dryden and settled on wild land on section 35 where he still resides. He was married 1859 to Miss Lucy P. Ferguson, of Addison,'anld has one child. HON. FRANK KENDRICK, deceased, was born in Waterford, Maine, in 1843 and came to Michigan with his parents when six years of age. He received an academic education and engaged in teachiling. In 1861 lie enlisted in the Fifth Michigan Cavalry and served to the close of the war, being discharged in 1865. During his service lie participated in upwards of forty battles and was wounded three times, returning home in poor health and with a broken constitution. He engaged inl fcarming, but had to abandon it on account of the state of his health, and engaged in teahlling which he followed for three years when his health failed completely and lie had to abandon that and all other business pursuits. In 1880 he was elected justice of the peace and in 1881 a member of the State Legislature by the Republican party, and died before his term of office expired. He was married in 1866 to Miss Phidelia Foote, daughter of J. H. Foote. They had three children. JOHN H. FOOTE, deceased, was born in Washington, Mass., in 1806 and remained there till 1827. Up to 1832 he spent most of his time in Salisbury County, going from there to Niagara County, N. Y., where lie purchased a farm and resided until 1837. He thllen came to Michigan and located in the township of Almont remaining there till 1844 when he came to Dryden and settled on section 23 where he lived up to 1878, when lie gave up the farm to his son and moved across the way on section 27 where he died two years later. He was married in 1832 to Miss Sarah Mercer who died in 1844, leaving a son and daughter. Was again married to Miss Salley Hines by whom lie had three children. P. H. FOOTE, the only son of J. H. Foote, was born on the old t homestead on section 23 where he now7 resides. He was married I in 1869 to Miss Maria L. Gray of Dryden and has four children. Mr. Foote has held the office of commissioner of highways. WILLIAM F. LAUGHLIN was born in New York in 1837, remaining there until 1853 widen he went to Canada. In 1860 hle came to Alichigan iand in 1863 settled in Dryden on section 27 where lhe remained three years. He then went to St. Clair County where he resided up to 1868, going from there to Almont, where he located on section 17. In 1879 lie came to Dryden and purchased 240 acres of land on section 26, where he now resides. He was married in 1860 to Miss Lucinda Zavits of Canada and has seven children. R. C. ELLSWORTH was born in DeKalb County, Ill., in 1838, remaining there until 1858 when he came to Michigan. He has resided in Lapeer County generally since that time, and in 1861 located on section 22 in Dryden where he now resides. In 1868 he married Miss Laura A. Watson of Dryden, and has two children.,-..._ _. --- —--- Mr. Ellswortl was elected a justice of the peace in 1882 which office he still holds. J. IMILLER, deceased, was born in New York in 1794, remaining there until 1839, when he came to Michigan. After his arrival he spent one year in Macomb County and then came to Dryden, where he settled on section 25 and resided until his death, which occurred in 1873. He was married in 1815 to Miss Elizabeth Bloomer, of New York, by whom he had eleven children. J. N. MILLER, third son of J. Miller, deceased, was born in 1832, and remained at home until 1854, when he purchased wild land on section 21 in Dryden, which he cleared and improved, and resided upon until 1872, when he returned to the old homestead, where he now resides, his farm containing 180 acres of land. He was married in 1853 to Miss Electa Morgan, and has three children. Mr. Miller has held the office of justice of the peace for the past four years. EDWIN SMITH, son of Nathaniel Smrith, was born in Macomb County in 1834, and came with his parents to Lapeer County, where he settled in Almont and resided in that; township up to 1863. He then came to Dryden and located on section 26, remaining there till 1870, whell he purchased fifty-six acres on section 24, where he now resides, and to which lie has added forty acres. In 1851 he married Miss Mary A. Balch, of Almont, and has three children. GEORGE W. MILLER, son of J.. Miller, was born in the township of Dryden in 1853, remaining at home until 1875, when he moved on section 22, where he had eighty acres of land, and to which lie has since added 220 acres. In 1882 he removed to section 15, where he now resides. He was married in 1878 to Miss Florence Cooley, daughter of D. Cooley, of Dryden. J. W. MILLER WaS born in Greene County, N. Y., in 1830, and remained there until 1840, when he came to Michigan with his parents. They stopped the first year in Macomb County, then came to the township of Almont where they resided up to 1845, when they removed to Dryden. Mr. Miller remainei at home till 1848, and from that time till 1853 worked on a farm. He then went to Maconlb County, and in 1855 returned to Dryden and purchased 100 acres of land on section 21, where he now resides. He added largely to his farm by subsequent purchases, and after giving each of his sons a farm still retains 180 acres of the old homestead. He married Miss Sarall C. Powell, of Macomb County, in 1853, and has two sons and one daughter. HENRY SCHANCK was born in Washltenaw County, Mich., in 1835, and in 1842 moved to Macomb County, where he remained until 1856. He then came to Dryden and located on section 29, where he purchased land, and has subsequently increased his original purchase to 240 acres located on sections 29 and 30. Mr. Schanck has one of the finest improved farms in the township, and one that for good buildings and valuable improvements has but fewr equals in the county. He was married in 1860 to Miss Euphemia Cheney of Macomb County and has one son and one daughter. ROBERT SWAIN was born in St. Lawrence County, N. Y., in 1799, and remained there until 1852, when he came to Dryden and took up eighty acres of land on section 30, which le cleared and improved and has since resided upon. Although Mr. Swain has passed the allotted time of threescore and ten, lie is still robust and active, and bids fair to enjoy several years yet of useful life. He was married in 1839 to Miss Margaret Connell, of New York, who died in 1842, leaving one son. Was married a second time to Miss Mercy Cooper, of New Jersey, by whom he had two sons, both of whom are dead. JOHN M. ANGLE was born in New Jersey in 1834, remaining there until 1860, when hle came to Michigan and located in Addison, I I r.~ I ) __ = s

Page  111 Ad- - 4 -- -3;. - ]L ~111 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. where he resided till 1866. He then went to Oxford, remaining there one year, thence to Orion, where he resided lup to 1872, when he came to Dryden and settled on eighty acres of land on section 31, where he still resides. He was married in 1865 to Miss N'aancy J. Gaton, of Addison, and has four children. R. B. GOVAN was born in New Hampshire in 1836, remaining there ltntil 1842, when he came to Michigan with his parents who settled in Macomb County. He resided there till 1844, removing then to Oakland County, and in 1869 came to Dryden and purchasecd 190 acres of land on sections 31 and 32, where he now resides. He was married in 1869 to Miss Euphemia J. Moore, of Dryden, and has three sons. ISAAC NEWTON, deceased, was born in Vermont in 1806, and when about ten years of age, moved to New York with his parents. He remained there until 1833, when lie came to Michigan and settled in AMacomb County, where he resided up to 1840, when he came to Dryden and settled on wild land on section 30, which he cleared, fenced and improved, residing upon it until liis death in 1881. He was married in 1829 to Miss WVhitbeck, who died in 1830, leaving one son. Was again married in 1834 to Miss A. Goff, by whom he had one son. Mr. Newton held the office of justice of the peace many years. FRANCIS NEWTON,. second son of the late Isaac Newton, was born in Macomb County in 1835; came to Dryden with his parents, and has since resided onil the homestead. He has held the office of constable five years. In 1857 he was married to Miss A. Swain, of Drvdeni, and has two children. ALLEN HOSMER was born in Monroe County, N. Y., in 1824, and at eighteen years of age came to Michigan and located in the township of Washington, Maconb County, where he remained until 1819. He then came to Dryden and took up wild land on section 32, which he improved, and still resides upon, having added to his original purchase until he owns 260 acres on sections.1 and 32. He was married in 1845 to Miss Jane Schauck, of Macomb County, and has three children-Orrin G., married Miss Hannah Miller, of Dryden; Richard N., married Miss Eva J. Whitbeck, of Dryden; and Retta still remains at ihome. Mr. Hosmer hls held the office of commissioner of highways for three years. EBENEZER KITTRIDGE, deceased, was born in Vermont in 1780, and about 1812 went to Canada, where he remained until 1818, when he came to Michigan and settled in Romeo, Macomb County. In 1831 he came to Lapeer County and settled in the township of Alnont, remaining there until 1846, when he removed to St. Clair County, residing there until his death in 1864. He married Miss Dina Washburn in 1814, by whom he he d tenll children. Harriet, the youngest daughter, was born in Macomr b County in 1825, and in 1841 married Sey-mour Carpenter, who died in 1847, leaving one daughter, who is now Mrs. Joshua Gillings. In 18-9 she was again married to Thomas Hogan, who died in 1875, and in 1877 married her third and present husband, Norman Fuller, and now resides on section 21 in Dryden. NELSON ZAVITS was born in Canada in 1845, remaining there until 1862, when he came to Michigan and settled in St. Clair County. After remaining there a short time he removed to Ionia County, where he resided until 1869, when he came to Dryden and lived in Thornville one year. He then purchased 130 acres of land on section 28, where lie now resides. In 1870 he married Miss Maria A. Wood, of Dryden, and has six children. IMr. Zavits added forty acres to his farm on section 27 in 1879. SANFORD C. ALLEN, deceased, was born in CayugA County, N. Y., in 1815, and came to Michigan in 1837 and settled in the township of Almont, where he remained until his death in 1852. He married Miss Mary Atwater, of Cayuga County,'N. Y., who died in 1846, leaving four children, and was again married to Miss Helen Stone, of Macomb County, by whom he had three children. Jason Allen, the eldest son, was born ill the township of Almont in 1839. remaining there until 1852. He then went to TMacomb County, residing there till 1864, when he returned to Almont, and in 1867 came to Dryden. In 1878 he purchased 110 acres of land on sections 27 and 34, upon which he now resides. He was married in 1862 to Miss Margaret J. Murray, of Ohio, and has five children. JOHN DEL.ANEY was born in Ireland in 1836, and when four years of age came to New York withi his parents. He afterward went to Vermont and remaiined till 1854, when he came to Macomb Comity, residing there the greater part of the time up to 1866, being engaged principally in staging. He then came to Lapeer County and resided in Almont till 1870, going from there to La:peer, where he remalined twvo years; then came to Dryden in 1872 and settled on section 26. He then p-urchaseed eighty acres of land, which he has greatly improved, and still resides upon. In 1867 he married Miss Mary Ferguson, of Oaklanil County. JOHN FREER, farimer on section 18, was born in Ontario County, N. Y., in 1831, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1839. Inl 1818 lihe returned to the State of New York and en"gaged in milling till i854, when he again came to Michican and followed milling in Mracomb and Lapeer Counties until 1862, when lihe located on section 18 in the township of Dryden, where he now resides. In 1870 lie elngfafged in mercantile business in Thornville, which lie carried oil until 1880, holding the office of postmaster lurin(g the greater part of the time. Mr. Freer served his township in the ca: pacity of supervisor from 1866 to 1876 and as treasurer in 1861 and 1865.. He wa3 married in 1858 to Miss Rebecca I Wallis, of London, England, by whom he has four children. Tia?)_rAS RICHES was born in England in 1814 and remained there until 1836, wheni he came to the United States and located near Rochester, N. Y. After remaining there one'. vear le came to Michigan and settled in Macomb County near Romeo, and took up from the governinent 102 acres of land in what is now the township of Berlin, St. Clair County, which he soon thereafter sold. In 1812 he took up two forty acre tracts on section 17 in the township of Dryvden, and after spending the winter of 1812-'43 in Almont he settled on the land, where he has since resided, and to which he has added by subsequent purchase until he now owns 160 acres, 100 acres of which is cleared. Mr. Riches lhas m:ltle many valuable improvements on his farm, among which may be mentioned a wheat barn 31x46 feet and a hay barn 21x60 feet, besides other out-buildings. He was married in 1837 to Miss M try Twite, of England, who died in 1811, leaving two daughters. Eliztbeth, the eldest, married John Van Kleek, and Mary is the wife of James Lee, of Metamora. Mr. Riches was again milrried to Mrs. Sarall Chapj man, of St. Clair County, Mich. WILLIAM C. DAY was born in Otsego County, N. Y., in 1812, and in 1814 with his parents moved to Chlut tiquqa County, where they remained until 1825, when they removed to Pennsylvania. He remained there until 1838, when he c~mnl to Michigan and settled on section 9 in the township of Dryden, Lapeer County, taking up from the government eighty acres of land, upon which he still resides, andl to which lie has aided, until he now owns 169 acres. In 1812 he was married to Miss Emma Phelps, of Steuben County, N. Y., who died in 1852, leaving four children. In 1853 he was again married to Mrs. Lucretia Sprague, of New Jersey, daughter of Adam Manwaring. Mr. Day now holds the offige of justice of the peace. His eldest son, George C., was born in 1813, and still remains at home; Virginia N. was born in 1846 and Caroline V. in 1850, who is now the wife of George Lamb, of the township of Lapeer. 40 -- = M <17 -

Page  112 - Pz~ 112 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY HENRY BARTLETT was born in Canada in 1825, and ill 1839 with his parents moved to Genesee County, N. Y., where they remained until 1840. In that year they came to Michigan and settled in the township of Dryden, Lapeer County, where they remained until 1845, when they removed to Oxford, Oakland County. In 1852 lie went to California, remining.there four years, when he returned to Michigan and again beallle a resident of Dryden, locating on his present home on section 15. He first purchased eighty acres of land, but subsequently added to it until lie now owns 198 acres. He was married in 1858 to Miss Eliza Lamb, of Dryden, and has three children-two sons and one daughter. AUGUSTUS DITTAIAN was born ill Prussia in 1839, remaining there until 1855, when he emigrated to the United States, locating ill Macomb County, Mich. In 1861 he enlisted in the Ninth Michigan Infantry and served until the close of the war, being under General Thomas most of the time. He was married in 1866 to Miss Maria Kohler, of Macomb County, and has a family of three children. JOSEPH MANWARING was born in New Jersey in 1829, and in 1835 came to Michigan with his parents, who settled ill Orion, Oakland County. In 1852 he came to Dryden, and engaged in the mercantile business, which he has since continued. Inl 1867 lhe was married to Miss Ella S. Snover, of Oakland County, and has one daughter. Mr. Manwaring has held the office of supervisor since 1880; and the office of town clerk at various times. Was appointed postmaster in 1861, and has since had charge of the office. JOSEPH DARWOOD was born in Burlington County, New Jersey, in 1822, where he remained until 1852, when he came to Michigan, and located in the village of Dryden. Mr. Darwood is an architect by profession, and has done a large business in building in his vicinity, besides being interested in other branches of business. He was one of the promoters of the P. O. & P. A. R. R., and is at present a member of its board of directors. Has also held the office of township treasurer for ten or twelve years. Was married in 1847 to Miss Mary H. Randolph, of Burlington County, N. Y. J. MERRITT LAMB, son of the late John M. Lamb, was born in Dryden in 1843. In 1862 he enlisted in the Eighth Michigan Cavalry, and served luntil the close of the war. Was promoted to sergeant, and afterward received a lieutenant's commission. Returning home after the war he engaged in mercantile business in Dryden, and for a time was also engaged in lumbering, besides dealing extensively in real estate. He was married in 1868 to Miss Helen Hemilingway, of Lapeer, and has one son. In 1869 he engtgaei in f arming on section 12 where he now resides. ALPHONSO CLARK was born in Ontario County, N. Y., in 1810. He moved with his parents shortly afterward to Genesee County, N. Y., where they remained until 1823, when they removed to Monroe County, N. Y. Remained there until 1829, when he came to Michigan, and located in Macomb County, in the township of Bruoe, moving again in 1838 to the township of Berlin, St. Clair County, taking up land fronm the government, which he improved and resided upon until 1848. In 1850 he came to the township of Dryden, and located on section 17, where he now resides, owning a farm of 145 acres. In 1837 he married Miss Emily Bannister, of Alinont, and l'has six living children. JosHuA GILLINGS was born in the State of Illinois, in 1839. WIen three years of age he camle with his )parents to Lapeer City, Micll., and shortly after moved with them to Pontiac, Michll., where they resided seven years. They then returned to Lapeer County, and located in the township of Lapeer, where they remapined one year, coning at the end of that timle in the spring of 1851 to the town ship of Dryden. In 1855 he took up forty acres of wild land on section 16, which he has improved and added to until he now owns 197 acres on sections 16 and 17, where he resides. He was married in 1860 to Miss Calfernia Carpenter of Dryden, and has one daughter. MRS. MARTHA WEBSTER was born in England in 1814. Coming to America she first located in the State of New York, where she remained two years, then went to Illinois. In 1842 she came to Michigan and now resides with her son, Joshua Gillings. She has been twice married, first to Abraham Gillings, of England, who died in 1840, and second to Isaac Webster, who died in 1872. GEORGE H. KENDRICK was born in Vermont in 1810, remaining there until about 1831. From that date until 1848 he was in Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and New York, when he came to Michigan and settled in the township of Dryden, Lapeer County. He located on section 22, where he remained until 1880, when he removed to his present place on section 15. In 1836 he was married to Miss Abigail W. Proctor of Cambridge, Mass., and has two children. D. COOLER, farmer, on section 15, was born in Niagara County, N. Y., in 1819, renmainin'g there until 1832, when he came to Michigan with his parents and remained in Macomb County with an elder brother till 1844, when he came to the township of Dryden, Lapeer County, and settled on section 23, where he now resides. He at first purchased 160 acres of land, to which he has made additions until he is the owner of 340 acres on sections 23, 20, 16, and 15. He was married in. 1844 to Miss Fidelia M. Hills, of Macomb County, Who died in 1856, leaving two daughters. He was again married in 1857, and by her has two daughters. JAMES BLOW, deceased, was born in Herkimer County, N. Y., in 1806, and about 1827 moved to Tioga County, N. Y., where he remained until 1838. In that year he came to Michigan, and settled inll the township of Dryden, Lapeer County, taking up 160 acres of land from the government on sections 6 and 7, which he improved and lived upon until his death, which occurred in 1883, alnd had added to his first purchase until his farm comprised 220 acres. He was married in 1839 to Miss Maria Gibbs, daughter of Jason Gibbs, of the township of Dryden, and has four sons and one daughter. Alonzo and Otis reside in Metamora, while Perry, Norman and Lydia, remain on the old homestead with their mother. WILLIAM H. BLOW, son of John Blow, was born in Tioga County, N. Y., and came to Michigan with his parents as above described. In 1856 le engaged in farming on the old homestead and in 1857 went to Illinois where he remained until 1859, when he returned to the township of Dryden, and the following year purchased eighty acres of the old homestead where he now resides. He was married in 1863 to Miss Lois Parker, of Flint, Mich., and has five sons. Mr. Blow has held the office of constable for nine successive years, has been highway commissioner and has held other minor offices. EZRA EOFF was born in Erie County, N. Y., in 1828, and in 1838 with his parents moved to Evans County, N. Y., and about 1843 camle to Michigan and settled in the township of Dryden on section 7, taking up 120 acres of land from the government upon which lie still resides. He was married in 1850 to Miss Nancy Seelye, of Dryden, by whom he has one son, and five daughters. Anna Maria was born in 1851, and married Charles Grinnell, of Dryden; Mary E. was born in 1853, and married Wallace Sanburln, of Drvden; Estelle was bornl in 1857, and married James Wentworth, of Macombl Counlly; Huldah was born in 1862, and married George Morrison, of Canllada; Henry and Jennie still reside at horn. e. I k r\ s

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Page  113 s t It, m a. — - I I i I I I i I I I A * -- - L HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 113 I JACOB EOFF, deceased, was born in the State of New York, in 1793, and came to Michigan in 1843. He settled in the township of Dryden, Lapeer County, on section 7, where he remained until his death in 1876. He mlarried Miss Polly Sutherland, of New York, by whom he had sevenbchildren. ALBERT HILLIKER was born in Erie County, N. Y., in 1836, and the following year came with his parents to Michigan. They first located in Macomb County, where they resided but a short time when they came to Lapeer County, and some time afterward purchased wild land on section 3, in the township of Dryden, which they partly improved, but subsequently sold and purchased land on section 7. In 1861 the subject of this sketch purchased land on section 9, where he remained until 1870, when he purchased his present place of eighty acres on section 5, where he new resides. He was married in 1860 to Miss R. Conley, and has one son and two daughters. G. P. EMPEY was born in Canada in 1836 and the following year moved with his parents to the State of N. Y., where after a short residence they removed to Michigan and located in Macomb County. In 1858 they came to the township of Dryden and purchased eighty acres of land on section 8, remaining there until 1865 when he sold the farm and returned to Macomb Coulnty. The year following he came back to Dryden, and once more located on the farm he had previously occupied, where he has since resided. In 1857 he married Miss Ann L. Snover of Macomb Comunty, and has a son and two daughters. MARSHAL MAHAFFY was born in Oneida County, N. Y., in 1832, and in 1833 came with his parents to Michigan. They settled in the township of Bruce, Macomb County, taking up land from the government on section 24, where they engaged in farming up to 1863, when he came to the township of Dryden and purchased 120 acres of land on section 7, where he now resides. He was married in 1861 to Miss Mary L. Bostick, of Almont, and has seven children living-Byron M., Myron C., Carrie, Cassie, Marcia, Mary and Lydia. In 1864 Mr. Mahaffy was elected justice of the peace, holding the office until 1880; has also held the office of highway commissioner. JOSEPH SMITH was born in the township of Almont, Lapeer County, in 1838, and remained there until 1866, when he went to Lake Superior and worked at blacksmnithinlg one year. He then came to the township of Dryden, and settled on 160 acres of land on section 17, and to which hle has made an addition of forty acres on section 8, where he now resides. He is a son of the late Joshua Smith, of Almont. PERRY ARNOLD was born in Macomb County, Mich., in 131,, remaining there until 1853, when he went to California and engaged in mining till 1857, when he returned to his old home, where hle resided until 1864. He then came to the township of Dryden and located on section 4, where he remained four years, then returning to Macomb County he remained there one year, and then returned to Dryden and settled on sections 5 and 6, where he now resides. He was married in 1858 to Miss Lucy Wentworth, of Oakland County, and has two children-a son and daughter. TIMOTHY UTLEY, deceased, was born in Connecticut in 1797, and in 1837 came to Michigan and settled in the township of Dryden, Lapeer County, taking up 160 acres of land from the government on section 9, which he cleared, fenced, improved and lived upon until his deathl in 1857. In 1836 he married Miss Mary Loree, of Pontiac, by whom lie had five children, three of whom are living. Tirmothy, the eldest son was born in 1839 on the old homestead, where he still resides. He was married in 1858 to Miss Mary C. Lewis, of Dryden, and has four sons and one daughter. JAMES HINKS, deceased, was born in the State of New York in 1804 and came to Michigan in 1837, and settled in the township of Dryden, where he remained until 1846, when he went to Illinois. In 1851 he returned to Dryden, where he resided until his death, which occurred in 1874. He was married in 1823 to Miss Lucy Swift, of New York, by whom he had nine children, five of whom are living. Charlotte, the eldest, married Seth Hall, of Dryden, in 1842. and had eleven children, six of whom are living. Of her children, Martha (the eldest) married Jacob M. Sherman; Seth J. married Miss Maria Wells; Fred married Miss Clara Manley; Lucy married Mark D. Billings; Nellie married Willis Dodge, and Clarence E. still remains at home. Mrs. Hall had three sons in the army. Theron and Wesley were in the 8th Michigan Cavalry, and the following winter after his enlistment Theron died. Seth J. enlisted in the Tenth Michigan Cavalry, and served two and one-half years. ELIJAH BARTLETT was born in Canada in 1837, and in 1889 with his parents moved to Genesee County, N. Y., where they resided one year previous to coming to Michigan in 1840. They located in the township of Dryden, Lapeer County. He remained there until 1858, when he removed to Pontiac, and in 1860 went to California, where he livedl until 1864. He then returned to Dryden and settled on sections 9 and 16, where he has since resided. In 1859 he was married to Miss Ellen Dutton, of Oakland County, and has one son and three daughters. J. J. RUPERT was born in Canada in 1831, and remained there until 1857, when he came to Lapeer County and located in the township of Attica, at Mattoon's Corners. In 1865) hlie came to Drvden and engaged in blacksmithinlg, which he still carries on, having worked at the trade since 1850. He was married in 1858 to Miss Mary J. Johnson, of Attica, who died, leaving a son and daughter. In 1865 he was again married, his second wife being Miss Anna M. Randolph, of Dryden, and by whom he has had one child. Miss Martha E. Rupert is engaged in school teaching, and Arthur E. Rupert is at Reed City, Mich., in the employ of the G. R. & I. R.R. He married Miss Dora M. Filkinls, of Imlay City, and has one child. WILLIAM H. H. CHEASBRO was born in Erie County, N. Y., in 1842, and during that year came with his parents to Michigan. They settled in the township of Elba on section 29, where he remained some time, then went to the townlship of Lapeer, and resided with his grandparents for five years. He then spent one sunmmer near Hunter's Creek, and from there went to New York, where hle spent some time, and then returned to Lapeer County and settled onl section 34, township of Elba, remaining there until 1858. He then went to Hadley and learned the shoemaker's trade, and in 1866 came to Dryden and worked at his trade for James D. Brophy until 1871 when hlie purchased the business, which he still continues; his present trade is in boots, shoes and harness. He was married in 1868 to Miss Mary J. Everton, of Altmont. During the years of 1881-'82 Mr. Cheasbro held the office of township clerk, and was elected justice of the peace in 1882. JAMES WHITAKER, deceased, was born in the State of Rhode Island in 1800, remaining there iuntil 1832, when he came to Michigan and settled in Wayne County. He remained there until 18836, when he came to Lapeer County and took up 320 acres from the government on sections 4 and 9 in the township of Dryden, which he improved and lived upon until his death in 1872. About 1830 he was married to Miss Eliza J. Utley, of Connecticut, by whom he had seven children. ELISHA WHITAKER, son of James Whitaker, was born on the old homestead in 1810, and is still a resident of it. He enlisted in the Fourteenth Michigan Infantry during the late war, and was with Sherman's command in his celebrated " marlch to the sea," serving I I j li.A

Page  114 .4 - - 1 - - - 114 114 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. _ till the rebellion was ended. He was married in 1866 to Miss Bella Dickelnson, of Almont, and hlas four children. J. T. PHELPS was born in Elgin County, Canada, in 1844, remaining there until 1865, when he came to Michigan, and engaged in the lumber business in the township of Oregon, Lapeer County. He continued the business till 1868, and in 1869 purchased a farm on section 6 in Dryden, where he has since resided. He was married in 1870 to Miss Harriet Lanlder, of Almont, and has three children. JOSEPH WINSLOW. deceased, was born in Vermont in 1788; went to New York in early life, and afterward came to Michigan and settled in Oakland County, residing there about five years, when he came to Dryden and settled on section 11, where he remained until his death in 1858. He was married in 1827 to Miss Polly Hait, by whom he had four children, of whom Wesley Winlslow was one. Mrs. Winslow died in 1877. WESLEY WINSLOW was born ill Clyde, N. Y., in 1833, and the same year came with his parents to Michigan and settled in Oakland County, near Romeo. In 1838 they removed to Dryden and took up eighty acres of wild land, upon which Mr. Winslow still resides. He was married in 1857 to Miss Eleanor Weaver, of Canada, who died in 1881, leaving three children. WILLIAM J. REYNOLDS was born ill New Jersey in 1842, and in 1852 came to Michigan with his parents and settled in the township of Dryden. He resided there until 1878, when he removed to Imlay and purchased a farm, residing there three years, when he returned to Dryden and located on section 10, where he now resides. In 1866 he married Miss Harriet Lewis, daughter of O. A. Lewis. They have five children. Mr. Reynolds is the present (1883) township treasurer. OLIVER A. LEWIS was born in Middlesex County, Conn., in 1813, and about 1815 moved with his parents to Pennsylvania, remaining there until 1819, and thence to Erie County, Ohio, where he remained until 1836. In that year he came to Dryden and took up from the government on section 10 one hundred and twenty acres of land, where he now resides. He was married in 1837 to Miss Eliza J. Howe, of Dryden, who died in 1879, leaving seven children. Eliza J. married James Alverson, of Dryden; Harriet, W. J. Reynolds, of Dryden; Esther, Charles Hodges, of Dryden; Alice, Frank Scott; Marian, Amos Hanlon. Florence and William still remain at home. HOLDEN TRIPP, deceased, was born in New York in 1800, where he remained until 1837, when he came to Michigan and settled on wild land on section 12 in Dryden. tie remained on the land which he cleared and improved until his death, which occurred in 1867. When he first came to Dryden there were but two or three families in the township. He was married to Miss Julia Butterfield' of New York, by whom he had five children, three of whom are living. L. H. Tripp, the youngest son, was born in the old homestead in 1840 and still resides there, having improved the place to the extent of making it one of the finest in the township. He was married in 1864 to Miss L. Baker, daughter of E. H. Baker, of Dryden, and has one son. WALDEN CLARK was born in St. Clair County in 1844, and in 1849 came with his parents to Dryden, where he remained till 1864. He then enlisted in the Fourteenth Michigan Infantry, and was in General Sherman's command, participating in the battle of Benton ville, siege of Savannah and several minor engagements, serving until the close of the war. From 1865 to 1869 was engaged in the lumber business, and in 1872 purchased land in section 2, remaining there till 1876, when he located on section 1, where he now owns a farm of 180 acres. In 1876 was married to Miss Jane Ball, of Dryden, and has four children. WILLIAM REYNOLDS was born in Scotland in 1811, moved to Ireland in 1830, and in 1832 came to America. He landed in New York, and remained there and in Neff Jersey till 1842, when he came to Michigan and settled in Dryden on section 7, taking up new land which he has cleared, fenced, and otherwise improved and still resides upon. He was married in 1833 to Miss Margaret Flemning, of Ireland, who died in 1869, leaving five children, and was again married in 1872 to Mrs. Sutton, of Lapeer. Mr. Reynolds' son, Robert, enlisted in the Tenth Michigan Infantry, and after serving nearly three years was killed in the battle of Buzzard's Roost. JAMES MORE, deceased, was born in Scotland in 1816 and came to America in 1841. He stopped in New York until 1851, when he came to Michigan and located in the town of Almont, remaining there until 1853, when he removed to Metamora and settled on section 1. In 1857 he was elected sheriff of Lapeer County and removed to Lapeer City and resided there until the expiration of his term of office. He then returned to Metamora, making that his home until 1865, when he removed Lo Thornville, where he resided until his death in 1870. He was married in 1851 to Miss Cynthia Richmond, of New York, by whom he had six children. JOHN COURTER, deceased, was born in New Jersey in 1798 and remained there until 1840, when he moved to New York and resided there until 1843, when he came to Michigan and settled in the township of Dryden on section 6, where he remained until his death in 1882. He was married in 1835 to Miss Elizabeth Smith, of New York, and by whom he had three children. WILLIAM H. COURTER, SO1 of John Courter, was born in New York in 1837 and came to Michigan with his parents and nowresides on the old homestead in Dryden. In 1860 he married Miss M. Cunningham, of Dryden, and has four children. J. W. COLE was born in Jefferson County, N. Y., in 1838, and in 1849 moved to Canada with his parents, where he remained until 18-59, when he came to Michigan and located in Dryden, where he has since resided. He has been quite an extensive dealer in real estate, having owned nine different farms in the county, and now owns 210 acres on sections 12 and 13. In 1875 he took a trip to California and spent the winter. He was married in 1861 to Miss Louisa Fancher, of Attica, and has one son. JOHN H. PORTER, deceased, was born in Oneida County, N. Y., in 1800, remaining there until 1836, when he came to Michigan and settled in Macomb County, taking up land from the government. He resided there till 1853, when he came to Dryden and settled on section 12, remaining there until his death, which occurred in 1881. He was married in 1828 to Miss Sarah Price, of Maryland, by whom he had seven children, four of whom are living. JULIUS A. PORTER, son of John H., was born in Macomb County in 1841, came to Dryden with his parents, and now resides on the old homestead. In 1863 he married Miss Anna E. Van Kleek, daughlter of Henry Van Kleek. PETER ULRICK, deceased, was born in Germany in 1807, and came to America in 1838. He landed in New York, and the following year came to Lapeer County and settled in the township of Metamora on section 12, taking up 120 acres of wild land. A few months thereafter he was murdered by a neighbor by the name of Henry Daum. Mr. Ulrick was twice married in Germany. PETER ULRICK, son of Peter Ulrick, deceased, was born in Germany in 1837 and came to Michigan with his parents, but remained at home but a short time after the shooting of his father, but went to reside with Andrew Farrell, with whom he remained until 1855. He then went to Macomb County, where he remained a few months, and the following winter attended school in Metamora. The next A, w

Page  115 ' - y i I i"~ J ei L1 I HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 115 - v year Ihe spent in Oakland County and the lumber woods, when he returned to Metalllora and followed well digging. The year 1858 he spent in Dryden and South Branch, and in 1859 engaged ill farming in Dryden, and the same fall purchased eighty acres of land on section 28, where he remained till 1874. He then purchased forty-six acres on section 14, and in 1876 a tract of forty acres adjoining. In 1878 he purchased a farm of 120 acres on section 11, where he now resides. He was married in 1855 to Miss Samantha Townsend, of Dryden, and has two children. YATES FERGUSON was born in the State of New York, in 1847, and when quite young moved with his parents to Canada, and about 1853 came to Michigan and settled in the township of Dryden. In 1869 he engaged in the meicantile business in Diyden which he continued up to 1872, when he went to Imlay and remained until 1876. He then returned to Dryden and settled on a farm of 120 acres on section 15 where he now resides. He married Miss Anna B. Sargent, ill 1876, and has three children. WASHINGTON MAYNARD was born in Canada in 1832, and in 1844 came to Michigan with his parents and settled in DI)yden taking up wild land on section 23. In 1854 he purchased eighty acres on section 22, upon which he has since resided. He was married in lb54 to Miss Julia Ann Townsend, of Macomb County, and has four children, two sons and two daughters. C. F. Maynard, the eldest, married Miss A. Loomis, of Lapeer, Caroline married Fred Kendrick, of Dryden, while Elmer and Lillie are still at home. HORACE BARTLETT was born in Whitby, Ont., in 1827, and in 1840 came to Michigan with his parents, who settled in Dryden. In 1848 lie went to Oxford and worked on a farm, going from there to Avon, where he remained until 1852. In the spring of 1853 he came to Dryden and purchased sixty-six acres of land on section 14, where hie resided until 1863, then changed to 100 acres on the same section, and in 1873 purchased eighty acres on section 15, where he now resides, and owns 180 acres on sections 14 and 15. He was married in 1853 to Miss Adelaide Whitaker. of Oakland County, and has six children, Eliza A., Mary Ellen, Frank, Adelbert, Carlotta and May. J. S. KENDRICK, son of G. H. Kendrick, was born in Maine in 1837, and came to Michigan with his parents and settled in Dryden. He remained on the homestead until 1871 when he purchased sixty acres of land on section 16, where lie remained tell years. In 1881 lie purchased his present place of eighty acres on section 22, where he has since resided. He was married in 1861 to Miss L. J. Hubbard of Macomb county, and has one son and daughter. TOWNVN OF -iMETAMORA. This is one of the southern tier of towns and is bounded on the north by Lapeer, east by Dryden, south by county line, and west by Hadley. The township was set off from Hadley, and organized into a town in 1838. The first town meeting was held June 25, 1838, at the house of Tobias Price and seventeen voters were present. The town meeting and the Whig and Democrat caucuses met the same day and at the same house. The log house having but one room, after the fashion of those days, the two parties agreed upon a crack in the floor as a line of division, the Whigs taking the end nearest the I door, and the Democrats the other, in which was the hage oldfashioned fire-place. The following is a true copy of the proceedings of this town meeting, which was conducted on purely Democratic principles, the officers being elected by ballot: First town meeting for township of Metamora, held at the house of Tobias Price, June 25, 1838. The board consisted of Tobias Price, chairman, and James W. Sanborn, clerk, and proceeded as follows: On the first ballot Andrew Farrell was chosen supervisor; on second ballot, Jonathan Salisbury was chosen town clerk; on third ballot, the following persons were chosen assessors, viz: J. B. Morse, Asa Griggs, and Tobias Price; W. C. Tower was chosen collector. On fourth ballot the following persons were elected overseers of the poor, viz: Enos Sailisbury and Abram Van Gelder; on fifth ballot, M. A. Porter, A. Dalby, and S. Perkins were elected highway commissioners; at sixth ballot, the following persons were elected school inspectors: S. S. Lord, P. B. Webster, and Samuel Redmond; at seventh ballot the following persons were elected justices of the peace: Leonard Russell, for four years; S. Redmond, for three years; Levi S. Lilley, for two years; P. B. Weston, for one year. At eighth ballot, the following persons were elected constables: William C. Tower, David Hendrix, and A. Dalby. Voted, that we now adjourn this meeting to the next annual township meeting, to be held in April, A. D., 1839. (Signed) TOBIAS PRICE, Chairman. J. W. SANBORN, Clerk. William C. Tower, who was elected constable at this unique town meeting, afterward married and settled in Hadley. He was killed a few years after in the lumber woods, near Port Huron, by a log rolling over him. David Hendrix was an old man, and died soon after, and A. Dalby removed to Goodrich, Genesee County. None of these persons seem to have made any location in town. LAND ENTRIES PRIOR TO 1846. TOWNSHIP 6 NORTH, RANGE ~0 EAST. SECTION 1. Davis Taylor, June 11, 1836. John Swathell, June 18, 1836. Davis Taylor, April 20, 1836. Firman Burch, August 19, 1841. SECTION 2. John Swathell, June 18, 1836. D. Headley and George D. Phelps, June 28, 1836. Thankful L. Dewey, November 5, 1840. Horace Hinlman and Elisha Webster, superintendents of the poor, November 5, 1810. SECTION 3. James Hilliard, April 20, 1836. David D. Parmlee. April 20, 1836. William D. Starr, April 20, 1836. SECTION 4. John Swathell, April 20, 1836. Stephen M. Shaddick, April 20, 1836. 'William H. Niles, April 20, 1836. Mica Sill, April 20, 1836. John Swathell, June 18, 1836. SECTION 5. John Curran, May 28, 1836. Matthew Caley, May 28, 1836. John Chauncey, June 18, 1836. Samuel Sage, June 18, 1836. John Coverdale, July 18, 1836. John Coverdale, July 13, 1836. Abraham Noyes, January 16, 1837. SECTION 6. Joseph B. Morse, May 23, 1833. Joseph B. Morse, June 28, 1833. John A. Hopkins, October 16, 1834. Trumbull Carey, October 29, 1835. Henry W. Hamlin and John S. Wright, May 9, 1836. John A. Merritt, October 11, 1836. Lemuel Covill, January 1, 1838..A I -I -r i I now rI -4 - Is - - i I_ F M P.)I I'

Page  116 14 - I t-.... -- ip - I..A, 116 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. SECTION 6. Lemuel Covill, May 9,1839. - SECTION 6. Lemuel Covill, May 9, 1839. John A. Merritt, February 7, 1839. SECTION 7. Nehemiah Tower, June 10, 1836. Reuben Underwood, Junie 16, 1836. N. Bouch and Rice Orcutt, August 25, 1836. Henry M. Look, October 11, 1836. Joseph B. Morse, October 19, 1836. John B. Cady, February 28, 1837. Alpheus Cady, June 18, 1839. SECTION 8. Samuel Perkins, July 6, 1836. George S. Hopkins, July 15, 1836. Newman C. Griswold, July 15, 1836. Andrew Merritt, September 24, 1836. SECTION 9. James M. Plumb, April 20, 1836. Horace Johnson and Horace E. Boardman, April 20, 1836. Timothy Boardman, April 20, 1836. Alexander Keith, April 20, 1836. SECTION 10. Josiah Danforth, April 20, 1836. Elijah H. Roberts, April 20, 1836. Frederick Treadway, April 20, 1836. SECTION 11. Eppiphus Isham, May 9, 1837. Harry F. Perkins, June 9, 1837. Henry Daum, July 10, 1837. Nath. B. Miller, October 5, 1837. Nath. B. Miller, February 23, 1838. Henry Groff, June 1, 1838. Henry Groff, September 30, 1840. SECTION 12. John M. Lamnb, March 24, 1836. David Taylor, June 8, 1836. J. Steele and Thos. Clubbs, June 14, 1836. Peter Ullrich, September 4, 1837. Balsar Neuman, September 4, 1837. Asal Bachellor, January 1, 1838. Harry F, Perkins, March 26, 1839. Nath. B. Miller, February 23, 1838. SECTION 13. Samuel Dirstine, May 30, 1836. David Taylor, Junle 8, 1836. Charles D. Burr, June 8, 1836. Thomas Clubbs, June 14, 1836. John Steel, June 14, 1836. William Steel, June 14, 1836. Samluel Dirstine, September 21, 1836. SECTION 14. Thomas Clubbs, June 14, 1836. Elisha P. Davis, July 14, 1836. Eppiphus Isham, May 9, 1837. Harry F. Perkins, June 9, 1837. Henry Daum, July 10, 1837. Nathan B. Miller, October 5, 1837. Robert Gourlay, April 22, 1845. Mercy Ann Bancroft, October 4, 1845. SECTION 15. Elisha P. Davis, July 9, 1836. Ralph Chipman, July 9, 1836. Elisha P. Davis, July 14, 1836. Hudson F. Benedict, November 9, 1836. Samuel Axford, November 12, 1836. n Henry Hakins, May 28, 1839. Colonel Salisbury, May 19, 1841. SECTION 16. Eber Barrows, November 7, 1842. Thomas G. Omans, November 19, 1844. John D. Keith, October 6, 1845. William Henderson, November 17, 1845. SECTION 17. John S. Selden, June 6, 1836. I I I i SECTION 17. Newman C. Griswold, July 15, 1836. N. Bouch and R. Orcutt, August 25, 1836. Paul Perkins, February 10, 1838. 'SECTION 18. D. Hoadley and George D. Phelps, June 28, 1836. Josepli Coffin, August 25, 1836. John B. Cady, February 28, 1837. Robert Earl Crawford, April 2, 1839. Ephraim J. Earles, April 10, 1839. SECTION 19. Egbert G. Derming, April 28, 1836. Samuel Axford, June 20, 1836. D. Hoadley and George D. Phelps, June 28, 1836. SECTION 20. Joseph W. Sanborn, May 7, 1836. John S. Selden, June 6, 1836. Esther Phelps, June 13, 1836. D. Hoadley and George D. Phelps, June 28, 1836. Berzail Shippey, November 14, 1836. SECTION 21. Alfred Southlmaid, April 20, 1836# Enoch Ferre, April 20, 1836. Alien May, April 20, 1836. James C. Beebe, April 20, 1836. William Humplhrey, June 1, 1836. B. IHoughton, H. G. Hubbard and T. H. Hubbar July 9, 1836. SECTION 22. Robert H. Stone, May 28, 1836. Tobias Price, July 6, 1836. Elisha P. Davis, July 9, 1836. D. Houghton, H. G. Hubbard and T. H. Hubbai July 9, 1836. Uriah Srmith, November 14, 1836. John Hudson, November 22, 1836. SECTION 23. Benjamin L.Perkins, June 10, 1836. John Wylie, June 10, ]836. Robert Wylie, June 10, 1836. John Hudson, November 22, 1836. Jeremiah Hunt, March 18, 1840. SECTION 24. Benjamin L. Perkins, June 10, 1836. Theodore E. Hunlt, November 15, 1836. Leonard Russell, November 15, 1836. William Tann, April 15, 1837. Abel Dalby, April 15, 1837. Freeman Fellows, October 20, 1837. SECTION 25. Samuel G. Hulbert, April 20, 1836. Luke C. Lynian, April 20, 1836. William E. Hulbert, April 20, 1836. Ebenezer B. Tompkins, April 20, 1836. Francis E. Boyden, June 10, 1836. Horace A. Jenison, June 11, 1836. Benjamin L. Perkins, April 15, 1837. Darius J. Coville, July 21, 1837. SECTION 26. Reben Griggs, lMay 20, 1836. Elisha Salisbury, June 8, 1836. Benjamin B. Knight, July 7, 1836. Levi S. Willey, June 8, 1836. Chauncey Wisner, November 24, 1836. James Redmond, December 23, 1837. SECTION 27. Andrew Farrell, May 20, 1836. James Scott, June 4, 1836. D. Hoadley and George D. Phelps, June 28, 1836. Emma Price, July 6, 1836. Tobias Price, July 6, 1836. SECTION 28. Ephrainm Crofoot, April 20, 1836. Joseph Hall, April 20, 1836. Milo Mason, June 7, 1836. rd, rd, i3 - I -V ) — b e I -= l, II K (9 r

Page  117 - -, \ L - 1 to I i I.N. I _ HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 117 I__ Tobias Price, July 6, 1836. Horatio N. Fowler, April 20, 1836. SECTION 29. Joseph L. Kelsey, May 7, 1836. Berzail Shippey, May 11, 1836. John F. Clark, June 7, 1836. Ebenezer Knight, July 7, 1836. SECTION 30. Asher B. Bates, January 5, 1836. Asa Price, April 22, 1836. Jael Wellman, May 7, 1836. D. Hoadley and George D. Phelps, June 28, 1836. Justin N. Butler, January 12, 1839. SECTION 31. Ebenezer Rush, October 12, 1835. Asher B. Bates, January 5, 1836. Daniel H. Chandler, May 2, 1836. Joel Wellman, May 7, 1836. John F. Clark, June 7, 1836. John McKay, June 24, 1836. John McKay, June 25, 1836. SECTION 32. John Wetmore, June 4, 1831. Levi P. Miller, May 4, 1836. Price B. Webster, May 4, 1836. Stephen S. Lord, May 7. 1836. John Q. Taylor, May 11, 1836. John F. Clark, June 7, 1836. Oliver Martin, July 11, 1836. SECTrON 33. John Wetmore, June 4, 1831. Jesse Lee, May 28, 1832. Peter Ploss June 16, 1835. Smith Shippey, January 14, 1836. George Gillum, April 20, 1836. Darius A. Ogden, September 15, 1836. Jacob Shaver, September 24, 1836. SECTION 34. Douglas Houghton, March 21, 1836. Levi S. Lilly, May 20, 1836. Lucy Stevens, July 16, 1836. Chris. G. Persons, September 13, 1836. Jesse Lee, May 8, 1837. Catherine Rogers, February 20, 1839. Ephraim F. Earls, April 10, 1839. Oliver Earls, April 10, 1839. SECTION 35. Jacob Lamb, March 31, 1836. Levi S. Lilly, May 20, 1836. Willett C. Jones, May 31, 1836. Orson E. Hall, June 3, 1836. James Jenkins, October 15, 1836. Smith Shippey, February 7, 1837. Samuel S. Hubbell, May 29, 1837. Samuel S. Hubbell, October 1,1839. Samuel S. Hubbell, February 1, 1840. SECTION 36. Levi LeRoy, November 17, 1832. Isaac Fifield, April 6, 1836. George Gillum, April 20, 1836. Wantor Ransom, April 20,1836. John C. Birdzell, April 1, 1836. Robert S. Craig, November 23, 1836. EARLY HISTORY. The early history of Mletamora is given by Miss Nettie A. Comstock, as follows: "The first building put up in the town was a shingle shanty, built by Parker & Rogers, about 1829 or 1830, in a cedar swamp in the southeast part of the town. These men did not locate, how ever, and left as soon as they had stolen timber sufficient for what shingles they wanted. "The first land located by an actual settler, was taken up by Jesse Lee, on section 33, some time in 1831. The next spring he removed his family West, his wife remaining at her father's in Oxford, Oakland County, while he put up a log house on his land, and in September, 1832, they moved into their own house, the only one in the county south of Lapeer and west of Almont. A son, James Lee, born here in January, 1834, was the first white child born in the town. In May, 1836, Mr. Lee erected a frame barn, the second built in the town. "Mr. and Mrs. Lee were the parents of seven sons, five of whom are still living, one having died a soldier in the late civil war and another, a few years since, at his home." JESSE LEE was born in Greene County, N. Y., in 1807, and in 1815 went to Schoharie County with his parents, where he remained until 1825, thence to Genesee County, where he resided till 1831, when he came to Michigan. The following year he settled in Metamora, onl section 33, taking up 160 acres of land from the government, on which he resided forty-eight years. At the time of his arrival in the township it did not contain a single wagon road and his nearest neighbor was ten miles away, and for blacksmithing, milling and family supplies, Rochester, eighteen miles distant, was the nearest point. The distance was often covered on foot by Mr. Lee, carrying log-chains, plow-points, &c. He was married in 1827, to Miss Mary Ann Rossman, of the State of New York. The following poem was composed by Mrs. E. Clark on the fiftieth anniversary of their wedding day: Just fifty years have swiftly fled Since this aged pair were wed, Who stand before us here to-day, Their once bright leeks now silver gray. They left their home in manhood's prime; Left friends and dearest ties behind, To make a home in a distant land, In the forest wilds of Michigan. Their chosen home they loved full well; With strangers were content to dwell; The howling wolf, the Indian wild, Their lonely hours did oft beguile. They braved those perils, hushed their fears, Success did crown those early years; With willing, hearts and hands to toil, With the ax and plow to till the soil. Sometimes the way seemed dark and drear, And oft bright hopes were lost in fear; But fortune smiled and flowers bloomed, And fairer grew their forest home. A daughter was their first-born child; Had scarcely on its parents smiled, Ere the sweet spirit took its flight To dwell in worlds of endless light. Seven noble sons, in manly pride, Did cluster around the fireside, And did, like jewels, bright and rare, Reward them for their tender care. And when rebellion's fearful hand Did threaten to destroy the land, The youngest son did meet the strife, And for his country lost his life. Five years ago their eldest son Was summoned to the unknown home, And now but the remaining five With the aged parents yet survive. j l I -- v - -A

Page  118 ~ t 118 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. Now all is changed; their toils are o'er; Those forest trees are known no more; Witll health, and wealth, and many a friend To cheer their pathway to the end. Although the bloom of youth has passed, And time his silvery shade has cast Upon the brow with marks of care, Yet fond remenmbrance lingers there. They oft look back witli joy and pride * On that happy day, when side by side They first began life's rugged way, Just fifty years ago to-day. Four children are now living; James, the eldest, owns a farm adjoining tile homestead; Leander resides in Saginaw, Hiram in Hadley and Henry resides in Mayfield. Mr. and Mrs. Lee have been living in Oakland County the past two years, but both declare that another spring will find them back on the old place once more. The next location, as far as we cal learn, was made by Joseph B. Morse, who emigrated from Eaton, Madison County, N. Y., in the spring of 1832, and settled at Llpeer in the fall of 1833, on section 6. The next spring he made a clearing on it and erected and enclosed the frame of a dwelling-house, and into this skeleton of a house, John Look, who with his brother-in-law, H. M. Look, had located land on section 1, in what is now the township of Hadley, removed, May 18, 1831. This solitary family was joined on the 11th of July following, by the families of Messrs. Morse and H. M. Look, and they all lived under the same roof until fall, when the Messrs. Look moved into houses on their own land. This house is still standing, occupied as a barn, by Mrs. E. G. Cady. In 1835 Mr. Morse built a frame barn, the first in the town; it is still standing, occupied by Mr. C. H. Brown. In December, 1835, Mr. Morse's infant son died —the first death in town, and on January 1, 1837, his daughter Lucia was marred to Reuben Underwood, by Rev. Mr. Ruggles, who walked from Pontiac to perform the ceremony, for which he received a fee of five dollars, which in those days was regarded as a most liberal one. In 1838 the Farmers Creek postoffice was established-the first in town, with J. B. Morse as postmaster. Mrs. Morse died in May, 1853, and Mr. Morse in April, 1854, at their first location. We cannot learn that there were any locations made in the township of Metamlora during the year 1835, although several families located in Hadley that year, but in 1836 mamn families came in and made for themselves homes in the wilderness. Matthias Caley, his sons, William and Thomas, and John Cairn, who emigrated from the Isle of Man in 1828, and settled at Utica, N. Y., where they remained for seven or eight years, located on section 5 in May, 1836. In October, 1836, a log house was put up on J. Cairn's land, and in February, 1837, one on Matthias Caley's. This, with its immense chimney of yellow and red bricks, is still standing, as a memorial of those early times, although but one of the family it sheltered still survives —Mr. Thomas Caley, who occupies the farms located by his father and Mr. Cairn. The following year, 26th of June, 1837, Mr. Cairn died; his funeral was attended by Rev. Mr. Sly, a Presbyterian minister. His widow afterward married Thomas Caley, and died July 2, 1862. She was for years an invalid, and her ill-health produced insanity and suicide. She was a most estimable woman, and was for many years a worthy member of the M. E. Church. William and Thomas Caley were mechanics, andi worked from home whenever they could find employment; Thomas Caley having assisted in building the first court-house and jail erected in Lapeer. In February, 1839, William Caley died, from the effects of a wound from an adz with which he was at work. His funeral was attended by Rev. Ezra Tripp, a pioneer Baptist minister. Mrs. Mary Caley, wife of Matthias Caley, died on December 26, 1858, at a great age. Mr. and Mrs. Caley were most excellent people, and their two surviving sons are among our most substantial citizens. About the same time, Levi Lilley and Asa Griggs located on section 36, and Andrew Farrell and Harry Van Wagoner on section 26. Asa Griggs cast the first vote polled at the first town meeting held in the township of Metamora-a Democratic ticket. He was followed by his brother-in-law Levi Lilley, who cast a Whig vote. These eim-igrants came from the State of New York. Levi Lilley died on February 1, 1855. Mrs. Mary Lilley, his wife, died on November 12, 1862. They left no children. Asa Griggs died on July 23, 1856; his widow still survives, residing at Conway, Livingston County, Mich. Harry Van Wagoner still resides on his first location. He was well known to all the early settlers as a well-digger, and plied a flourishing business at his trade. On one occasion, however, he came very nea'r losing his life, being buried in a, well he was digging on the farm of Jacob Henderson. They had reached the depth of eighteen feet, and the soil being loose had been obliged to curb it, when all at onc'e, Van Wagoner being at work in the well, all caved in, but the curb lodged above his head in such a manner that he was not crushed to death by the falling mass, and was enabled to breathe, and after a hard night's work onl the part of a number of excited laborers, he was released from his terrible prison with no other injury than. a sprained ankle and a few bruises. Andrew Farrell remained in town some years, when lie removed to Columbiaville, Marathon Township, where he built and long kept the Farrell House; he died in 1872. David Hodge located oni section 22, and built a house which was occupied by a family named Salisbury, with whom he boarded, he being unmarried. This family remained in town some years, and in the winter of 1838-'39 Colonel Salisbury, one of the family, taught a school in town. We could learn nothing of their subsequent history. Mr. Hodge afterward married. Tobias Price located on section 27. Being a man of much energy and ability, lie exerted great influence in the affairs of the town, of which lie was for years the supervisor. A. Bachellor located on section 12, near Thornville, land now occupied by Mrs. Lamb; he removed to Dryden, where he died about 1865. James W. Sanborn, on section 20, now owned by J. Shook. He was a very prominent man, and represented Lapeer County in the legislature; remained in town about ten or twelve years, and removed to Port Huron, where he engaged in the lumber business. He held many offices of trust with honor to himself, and. died about 1870. Price B. Webster located on section 29. He was elected school inspector and justice of the peace at the first town meeting held in the township, June 26, 1838. He was first postmaster of a postoffice established in 1840, and known as the Metamora postoffice. He resided in town about twelve years, and removed to Illinois where he still resides. Levi Miller located on section 32. He removed to Shelby, Macomb County, Mich., where he still resides. Noah A. Porter, on section 29, now occupied by Mrs. Sage. He resided there for some years, when, after the death of his wife, he removed to Van Buren County, Mich., where he died, and his remains were brought back and buried by his wife, in the Oakwood cemetery. Eliezer Lundy emigrated in tilhe spring of 1836 from New Jersey; was married December 1, 1838, to Miss Ann Van Gelder, by Rev. Abijah Blanchard. Died November 12, 1873; his widow still survives. I J 1 ~__~__ ~_i

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Page  119 (C i h, do _~ 'I _ _ - - T " I HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 119 1 3 --— w I I Reuben Underwood settled on section 7. In 1838 he removed to Vermont, where he and his wife died, 1836-'40. Jonathan Coverdale first located on section 5, which he sold to A. Van Gelder, in the fall of 1837. He located a second time on section 36, Elba. Died in California, 1851, a victim to the gold fever. His widow afterward married James Gark, and removed to North Branch, where she still resides. RMr. Tower, in the winter of 1836-'37, on section 7. He was a justice of the peace for the town comprising the townships of Hadley and Metamora. Died at Fort Wayne, Ind., about 1852. His wife died in the winter of 1859. Their descendants are among our most respected citizens. One of his grandsons is Hon. H. H. Wheeler, of Ludington, judge of the nineteenth judicial circuit, captain in the late civil war, and formerly State senator from Bay County. In 1837 Freeman Fellows located on section 24. He now resides near Metamora village,' and is engaged in the practice of law. 1838-This year the town was settled even more rapidly than the previous one. Leonard Russell, who was chosen justice of the peace for four years, at the first town meeting, located on section 24, where he died some years since. Benjamin Perkins located on section 15, near Thornville. He afterward removed to Portsmouth, Bay County, where he died. Francis Boyden also settled near Thornville, and afterward removed to Attica. We could learn nothing of his subsequent history. Henry Daum, a German, located on section 13, in the fall of 1837; sold his farm in 1838 to Wm. Marshall, and removed to Ohio, where he was hung for murder, about twenty-five years ago. Before his execution he confessed the murder of six individuals, one of whom, Ulrich, also a German, was his neighbor in Metamora. Ulrich came soon after Daum, and located one hundred and sixty acres on section 12, now owned by W. R. Thorn, B. Y. Wilder, and J. S. Calkins. Daumn and Ulrich had been neighbors in Germany, had quarreled there, and Daum had sworn revenge, but when Ulrich became his neighbor in his new home, the better to consummate his fell purpose, he received him with professions of friendship, which were warmly reciprocated. One day in the autumn of 1838 Daum and Ulrich went hunting together. Daum returned alone, and explained Ulrich's absence to his family by saying that he must have gone to Detroit to work. Suspicion rested upon Daum at the first, which was increased by his conduct on his return from Detroit, where he went, as he pretended, to hunt up Ulrich, as he informed one person that Ulrich must have gone back to Germany, and another that he was sure that Ulrich was dead. The whole surrounding country was scoured in search of the missing man, but to no purpose. Soon after the search was discontinued Daum removed to Ohio. A year passed and the affair had gone from the mind of the public, when one morning in the fall of 1839, as Messrs. B. Thorne and Elias Dirstine were hunting on the bank of a little lake, they found first the skull, which had rolled down the bank and lay on the water, and higher up on the bank the skeleton of the unfortunate Ulrich, which they recognized by marks on the gun and game bag, which lay beside it. A coroner's jury was summoned as quickly as possible, and on examination it was found that he was shot by some person behind him, as the bullet entered the back and passed through the breast-bone. A warrant was at once issued for the arrest of Daum. He was found at his new home in Ohio, arrested and brought back, and lodged in Lapeer jail, by M. Y. Turrill, sheriff of the county. The grand jury found a bill of indictment against him for murder in the first degree, and he was finally brought to trial in August, 1840, before Judge Morrell, the first judge who held a term of circuit court in the county of Lapeer. But the evidence aga-inst him was wholly circumstantial, and the death penalty being still exacted in the State, the jury brought in a verdict of not guilty, although against their own convictions of justice. It is said that while Daum lay in jail at Lapeer expecting conviction, like many another rogue in the same circumstances, he became violently religious, and spent his time in prayer and singing hymns. His religion, however, speedily vanished on his acquittal, as he was unable to depart without giving the sheriff a piece of his mind in the shape of a volley of most terrible curses. Years after his death, his wife, who, after his terrible expiation for his numerous crimes, had become insane, and wandered from place to place, seeming to have no one to care for her, visited her former home in Michigan, where she was kindly received by scme of her old neighbors who recognized her. Her fate is unknown. Mrs. Ulrich afterward married Philip Harbor, and still resides in town, and the children of Ulrich are among our most respected citizens. Andrew and John A. Merritt emigrated from Pennsylvania in May, 1837, and located on sections 6 and 7. J. A. Merritt and wife still reside at their first location; Andrew Merritt has removed to Metamora Station; his farm is occupied by Messrs. Foot and King. They are enterprising and well-to-do citizens. Lemuel Covil emigrated from Fabius, Onondaga County, New York, to Lapeer, Michigan, in 1836; located on section 6, Metamora. He, with his excellent wife, to whom he was married Nov. 20, 1818, more than forty-six years since, still resides on their first location. Their children seem to inherit somewhat of their pioneer spirit, three of them having gone to the West to carve out their fortunes in a new country. Abram Van Gelder emigrated from Castleton, New York, in November, 1837, and purchased land on section 5, of Jonathan Coverdale. He and his wife were aged and the following year, June 25th, 1838, Mrs. Van Gelder died; Mr. Van Gelder survived her three years, dying September 18, 1841. They were the parents of Mrs. Schunemran and Mrs. Gates, of Lapeer. Alanson and John Bliss located on section 26. Alanson Bliss died here in 1865. John Bliss removed to the northern part of the county, where he still resides. Stephen G. Lord located on section 33. He was elected school inspector at the first town meeting, and justice of the peace at the second, which office he held for many years. He was also postmaster of the Metamora postoffice for a long time. This postoffice was removed into the town of Oxford and known as the North Oxford postoffice. It is now known as Thomas postoffice. Squire Lord removed to Goodrich, Genesee County, about 1850, where he died in the fall of 1856. Willet Jones emigrated from the State of New York, and located on section 35, where he still resides. Ivory Bosworth on section 35. IIe died in 1854, at the age of eighty-four. His wife survived him a year, dying from the effects of a fall, at the age of seventy-five years. These excellent old people were the parents of Mrs. Asa Griggs, and Mrs. Levi Lilley. James Jenkins on section 35. He was a prominent man inll town, and held the office of school inspector at the time of his death, in 1842. He died from injuries received by a fall from a load of hay. James Redman located on sections 25 and 26. He was an old man and remained in town only about five years, when he sold his farm and removed to the State of New York, where he died. 1838 —H. Y. Perkins located eighty acres on sections 11 and 14, now occupied by A. and D. Thomas and J. W. Doan, and removed here from Soathfield, Mich. A few years after he sold 7 -D1 r -to

Page  120 Ota- e I I5 -A i 120 HISTORY OF L& PEER COUNTY. this farmxi and bought on sections 11 and 12, one-half mile west of the village of Thornville, where he still resides. Moses Porter and wife, step-father and mlother of Mr. Perkins, came with them. Mr. Porter died on May 8, 1840, aged eighty-one. He was a soldier of the Revolution, and an excellent man. Mrs. Porter, his wife, survived him some years, dying July 12, 1848. Four of her children are still living in this county-Mrs. Wilder and H. F. Perkins, of Thornville, and Mrs. Eber Barrows and Mrs. G. W. Pitcher, of Metamora. The children of such par-,tnts as these may justly be proucl of their ancestry. Harry Banker located land on section 15, where he remained a few years, sold out, and purchased a farm in the township of Lapeer, of S. B. Knapp, where lie remained ten or twelve years, when he sold again and removed to North Branch where he cleared Ianlother farm. In 1872 he removed to Knox County, Tenn. Benjamin White, brother-in-law of H. Banker, also located on section 15, where he died, April 22, 1848. His widow, two years after, married a Mr. Carpenter and removed to North Branch where she died a few years ago. Henry Haskins located on section 15. He did not remain here long before he married Miss Nellie Van Gelder. With the families of Harry Banker and Benjamin White, came James Banker, wife and daughter. James Banker was a Revolutionary soldier. In that war he served as drummer in an artillery regiment, known as the La Fayette Life Guards. He was a man of wonderful activity, frequently walking from his home to the postoffice, a nmile and a half distant, when 104 years of age. He died October 5, 1848, at the great age of 105 years. Mrs. Phoebe Banker, his wife, survived him but six weeks. dying Nov. 7, 1848. But two children of this family remain -.Harry Banker, of Knox County, Tenn., and Mrs. H. F. Perkins. N. B. Miller located on section 14, now owned by J. C. I Annin and J. N. Thompbon. Mr. Miller died in 1862. Ephesus Isham, on- section 11. He mlarried a daughter of Mr. N. B. Miller inll 1839. Died, September, 1817. J. A. Church, onl section 11, now owned by his son, Marion Church, where he died, July 3, 1853. He was a manl of ability and inlfluence. His widow afterward married Luke Peaslee, Esq., and resides at Thornville. Samuel Dirstine located onl section 13, land now occupied by his sonl, Thomas Dirstine; and the village plat of Thornville. He diedhere about 1845. William Woodurnl, onl section 13. He removed to Southfield, Mich., where lie died. William Marshlll bought the farm of Damn. He removed to Southfield, Mich., where both lie and his wife died. Williaml and John Steele located on section 12, where they kept a grocery store for some time. John Steele died about twentyfive years ago, and soon after his brother William mysteriously disappeared, and has never been seen or heard of since. There have been many conjectures as to his fate, but as yet it remains a mysetry unsolved. H. Wildemot settled near Thornville, in 1838. He removed to Detroit inll 1845. Rev. Abijhtl Blanchard located on section 6. He was a Pres-! byterian minister and founded a Presbyterian church at Farmers Creek, of whiclh he was pastor two years, but dissensions arising in the church, he resigned his pastorate and returned East in 1840. Samuel Redmlond located on section 6; was elected justice of the peace at the first town meeting for a term of three years. He died in the summer of 1841, and was buried somewhere on his farIm. 1838, and bought land of J. W. Sanborn on section 20. He removed to the town of Hadley in 1874. In 1838 or 1839 John Merritt, Jr., located on section 7. The first house on this farm was destroyed by fire in 1842, and the second shared the same fate in 1862. Mrs. Merritt died in the summer of 1865, aged eighty-five years. Mr. Merritt died the following year, aged ninety-one years. In 1838 or 1839 I. C. Smith bought land of Reuben Underwood, and for some time worked at the blacksmiths' trade at Farmers Creek. James W. Pitcher located on section 9, where he and his wife lived to a good old age. Berzail Shippey located on section 21 and afterward put up a hotel. In the spring of 1858, NMr. Alvin Porter lost his barns and hay stacks by fire under circumstances which proved the hand of an incendiary. Suspicion fastened on Shippey, as he and Porter had been long at variance, and Shippey had declared that he would be revenged. He was arrested, tried and found guilty of arson, and sentenced to two years in the penitentiary. After serving his time, he, with his family, removed to Kansas. About this same time a family named Stone settled on section 29. This family consisted of the parents and eight children. Six of the famlily died within two years; the mother and four children of fever, and one son was drowned in Loon Lake in April, 1840. The father and surviving children then left the place. J. S. Comstock located at Farmers Creek in 1839 as a physician, and has resided in the neighborhood ever since. He was married to Miss Elizabeth C. Morse, daughter of J. B. Morse, September 16, 1840. Mrs. Comstock died May 16, 1875, aged fifty-six years. EARLY MOVEMENTS. In 1839 four school districts were organized, only one of which was entirely within the town limits. Fractional District No. 1, Hadley, Metamora, Lapeer and Elba, organized May 6, 1839, Fractional District No. 2, Oxford and Metamora, May 26, 1839, by J. W. Sanborn and S. S. Lord, inspectors of Metamora, and E. Burdick and Robert McKay, of Oxford. Fractional District No. 9, Dryden and Metamora, June 24, 1839, J. W. Sanborn and S. S. Lord, inspectors of Metamora, Elijah Look and J. M. Lamb, of Dryden. District No. 6, known ever since as the Webster District, August 31, 1839, by Price, Lord and Sanborn, inspectors. It is thought that the first school taught in these districts, was taught by Miss M. C. Morse, in Fractional District No. 1, in the summer of 1839. The first school in the town was a private school, taught by H. M. Look, at the house of J. B. Morse, in the winter of 1837-'38. The first highway district in town was formed May 17, 1839. The only grist-mill in town was built by B. Thorne, on the Flint River, at Thorlnville, about 1840. It is now owned by J. Morton. The first saw-mill was built on section 24 on Wolf Creek, sometime between 1845 and 1850. The dam was built and frame put up by a man named Horsnell, who then ran away. The work was then completed by Walker & Earle, who ran it for some time. The first hotel was built by Eber Barrows, at Metamora, in 1848, known as the Northern Exchange. The first stump speech delivered in the town was made by Hon. N. H. Hart, in the canvass of 1810, from a stump still standing in the grounds of Mr. Ackerman, between the house and barn. In April, 1840, a sad event occurred in the southwestern part of the town. A party of boys and young men were returning from church one Sunday, and as they were passing a little lake on their way home, three of them, Leonard Brownell, Simon Stone I I i IJ J e I qo I Ellery A. Brownell emigrated from the State of New York in I Ia

Page  121 I- t WI I I I I i I I I i I i i i I I I I I i I I i I —,A. I - H ISTORY OF LAPEER COUN TY. 121 I and Peter Price, got into a boat for a pleasure ride. When fairly out upon the water they began scuffling and rocking the boat, and capsized it. Stone and Price attempted to swim to shore, but the water was so cold they were soon benlunbed and sank. Brownell escaped by clinging to the boat until assistance could reach him. Thle bodies were recovered, and at the funeral which wis held at the Webster school-house, and attended by the Rev. Robert Mcblay, a large crowd collected. Tley were buried in a small grave-yard laid out neartthe suhool-hlouse; when this was abandoned some years after, their remains were removed to the Hadley cemetery. The lake is situated oil the.farnm of Ellery A. Brownell, anld known as Loon Lake, and it is said;1 that there Ihas never beenl a boat oil the lake since and although the lake abounds in fish, it is very seldom that any one visits it even for the purpose of fishing. About 1850 or 1851, a singular circumstatnce happened at Earle & Walker's mill. One of t le enployes had been suffering from fever and ague, and had been told by some knowing one that if lie would swallow the gall of a rattlesnake he would be thoroughly cured, and believing -the prescription to be genuine, he sought a rattlesnake, killed it, and actually swallowed the gall. He survived four days, dying in the greatest of agony. with all the symptoms of most virulent poison. It will be seen lby this sketch, the pioneers of this township were for the most part people of sterling worth. Mlost of them have passed front earth, but the fruits of their labor rerain. Honor then, to tie early pioneers, and especially to the pioneer women, who so nobly stayed the hands of their hlusbanlds il the lerculeann task of subduing a liew country, renote from market and far removed from all the comforts and refinements of civilized life. EARLY RELIGIOUS HIqTORY. The first religious society formed in town1, so far as -known, was the First Presbyterian. Church, of Farmers Creek, by Rev. Abijall Blanchard, who was its pastor from 1838 to 1840. Unlfortunately, the members of this church cotlld not agree among themselves, consequently the chllrch went down, and a Congregational Church was formned uponl its ruins by Revs. Messrs. Taylor and Ruggles. Previous to 1847 this chulrcll was supplied b~y Revs. Messrs. Mattoon, McDowell anld Bates. In 1847 Rev. D. L. Eaton became its pastor, and while he remained the church flourished greatly, but after his departure it declined, although the church maintained occasional services till within the past few years. A Baptist Church was organized at a very early day in the eastern part of the, town, and supplied for a1 time previous to 1840 by Rev. Ezra Tripp. They erected a church at Thornville, but this organization long afro became extinct. In 1840 Rev. Mr. Osborne, of Lapeer, formed a Cllristian Church at the Webster school-house, which was supplied for a long time by himself, Rev. Mr. Cannon, of W~ashingtonl, and Rev. Mr. M~cInltyre, who3 preached to this church but a week previous to his death. This ehllrch at last b~ecame extinct. In 1857 a Protestant Methodist C:hureh was formed, which sustained preaching for several years, and shared the fate of its predecessor. An M. E. Class was formed at Metamnora, many years since, and this appointment has been at different times a part of Dryden, Hunters Creek and Hadley circuits. It now again belongs to Dryden Circuit, and in 1874 this church erected a nreat and commodious building. A Methodist Church was formed here about tell years ago by Rev. Mr. Clark. We have not been able to learn the date of the organization of these churches or who was the first pastor of the M. E. Church. A Methodist Church was formed in Fractional District No. |2, in 1860, by Rev. Mr. Angell, pastor of the church at Lapeer. It has sustained occasional preaching ever since. Rev. Robert Mc~ay, a licentiate of the Presbyterian Church, who located in Oxford, was the first preacher il this part of the town, blt never organized ally religious society. The chiircll erected by the Baptists at Thornville, after the death of that society, became a Free Clurch, and is occupied by anv minister of aly denomination who llay choose to lave an appointment there. Thornville seems niot to be a good place for a religious society to fiourish. Since the Baptist C:llurc quarreled itself out of existence, services have been held there fromn tinie to time by ministers of the Methodist Episcopal, Christian and Congregational Churches, but there lias been no strong or stable or ganization. The Methodist Church formed ill Fractional District No. 2, still exists, and is known as the Thomas Methodist Chlurch. VILLAGE OF METAMORA. After the opening of the road from Lapeer to Rochester via Pontiac, now known as the Territorial Road, and the establishment of a stage line between these points, various hotels sprang lp along the route, alid as at that time any one who could raise $18 license tax, and could afford two spare beds and stablillg for two teams could obtain, a license to keep "a house of entertainment for maia and beast," it is not surprising that there were nore tllhii enourgh ready to enter upon the business. About the year 1841, a log tavern was built by a -ani named Phillips, on what is now H. Rossmcan's farm. He soon sold it to al Frenchman1 named Marintete, wl'o builtu a blacksmitl shop across the street, and managed by plying both occupations to live as lie desired. This rilde hotel was burned, and it was satid the only loss the proprietor mourned was that of his whisky. He removed to Sanilac County, where he died a few years since. Inl 1843 Mir. Eber Barrowvs came'and took ulp landt oni section 16, and built a log shanty, where he furnished entertalinenelt for travelers. Tl-is was the iluclells of the old " Northern Exeliange." After a time ca postoffice was estcablislled llere, known {as the Etna Postoffice. Ill course of time, as Metamora and the hotel became widely linownl, and well patronized, and ill proportion as its popularity inlereased, so its atccommnodationls wvere extended. Here parties of young people used to meet and "trip thef light fantastic toe" till the "wee smal hours of morning came," andl after a timne it became a center for the town business, but for years there was bu t little dolle here but what was conanecte('t with thle hotel and postoffice. About the tithe Mr. Barrowvs established himself here, al. maill named Lollcks settled oll section 16, and WMr. Fricke, father of the Fricke Bros., located onl the opposite side of the street, at present the residence of the late Alvin Porter. Mr. Louceks built a tannlery, which Lle managed for some time, then sold his farm to Alvin Porter and the tannery to Mr. Fricke, who rall it for some years, then sold it to Page & Brooks. Page enlisted in the late civil war, and died in tile army, and the business was left in the llands of Brooks, but in a short time the establishment was burlled, supposed to be the wtork of all incendiary. It was never rebuilt. About the year 1847 Berzail Shilppey built a large house on laled now a part of the farm of William Hendersoll, and opened a hotel with a grand flourish. This building was just north of the present site of the D. & B. C. R. R. bridge. But Shippey, after a few years, fell into bad habits and disagreements with his neighbors, that culminated at last after the destruction of Alvin Porter's house by fire, in his arrest and conviction of arson, followed by a sentence for a term of years to Jackson State Prison. After his term expired, lie removed with lis faluily to one of the northern i I la( I _ (.1 d6-; - - - - I -I lw, rI -

Page  122 1 I I -I,;I. 122 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. towns of the county, and after a time he emigrated to the far West. The hotel he built passed through several hands, was dismantled and removed to the farm of D. Stocker, where it now does service as a barn. Some little time before the war, two shanty taverns were put up on the farms of Freeman Fellows and Alvin Porter, and christened respectively "Pike's Peak" and "Idaho." These were afterward cleaned out by irrepressible Young America, and soon after collapsed. The first store building at Metamora Village was built in 1850, and the establishment managed by D. Ammerman, first as agent, then as proprietor. He carried on an extensive business for a time, but sold it out to H. Griswold, now of Bay City, who kept it for some time, then sold it to Goodrich & Perkins, who ran it about a year, then sold it to S. D. Hoard, who afterward enlarged the building and fitted it up for a hotel. This was probably the third store building in the township; the first was built by the Steele Bros. at Thornville, near the Dryden line, about 1839 or '40; the second was established by Weston Frost in a wing of the hotel built by Mr. Morse, on the Hadley line, about 1842 or '43. Mr. Frost conducted it for some years, when it passed with the hotel into the hands of C. H. Browne. About the time the store building was put up, Messrs. Varnum & Swain opened a blacksmith shop on the corner now occupied by Stone's brick block. Swain did not remain here long. Varnum built a stone shop on the site of the old one, and this he kept for many years, until his removal to Lapeer, where he is now the head of the firm of Varnum & Walker. In 1861 Mr. Barrows sold the Northern Exchange to B. P. Ackerman, who kept it till about the year 1875, when he sold it to Richard Morse and removed to Oxford. It has never been occupied as a hotel since Ackerman left it, as the building of the D. & B. C. R. R. diverted all the custom from the old stand to the one built by Hoard on the corner. Since the building of the railroad great improvements have been made. Two churches and a fine school-house have been built. The old stone blacksmith shop on the corner has been removed for a brick block of stores. Other store and shop buildings and many dwelling-houses have been added. Miss Hattie Ackerman, daughter of B. P. Ackerman, who kept the Northern Exchange from 1861 to '75, went to Chattanooga, Tenn., about 1869, where she engaged in teaching. She was a woman of much resolution and courage, and when the yellow fever epidemic broke out in that city in August, 1878, instead of returning to her friends at the North, she remained to nurse the sick, and died at her post of duty September 30, 1878. The postmasters since Mr. Hoard have been Henry Townsend and John Barden. The latter -is the present incumbent, and also agent of the express company. J. O. Perkins has been proprietor of the hotel since 1880. The only brick building in the village was built by Dr. D. F. Stone in 1879. Drs. D. F. & George Stone and Richard Mors have the finest residences in the village. The lawyers in the village are George C. and Freeman Fellows. The latter is the oldest lawyer in the town, having been in practice since 1837. The early physician in the village was a Dr. Sharp, who remained about a year. In 1867 Dr. D. F. Stone located here, and was joined a few years later by his brother, Dr. George Stone. They are the only physicians in the place, and are among the most prominent physicians in this part of Michigan. The principal of the schools, which are graded, is R. A. McConnell. In 1880 the M. E. Society at Metamora with that at South Attica was taken from the Dryden circuit, and a new circuit formed called Metamora circuit. Rev. S. Bird was the first pastor. L. B. Moon is the present pastor. In March, 1878, just about a year after the Congregational Church at Farmers Creek had disbanded, and after an extensive revival in the M. E. Church conducted by Rev. A. R. Hazen, then its pastor, the Pilgrim Congregational Church was organized by Revs. Messrs. Breede and Brown. The same year this society built a church which was dedicated during the fall or winter of 1878-'79. Rev. M. A. Bullock was its pastor till January, 1883. His successor is the Rev. H. S. Jenkinson. THE METAMORA BEE. In April, 1883, Mr. Charles A. Fricke, son of John F. Fricke, one of the pioneers of Metamora, started a printing office in the village of Metamora and issued the first number of the Metamora Bee April 5. The Bee is a seven column folio, and thus far its patronage has been satisfactory. CHARLES A. FRICKE was born in Oakland County in 1839. He spent three years at school in Rochester, then went to Detroit and graduated from the Commercial College. In 1865 he engaged in mercantile business in Metamora, which he continued five years, since which time he has been handling agricultural implements quite extensively. He started in April, 1883, the first newspaper in Metamora. In 1870 he married Miss Nettie A. Stevenson and has two children. METAMORA LIBRARY SOCIETY. The Metamora Union Library Society was organized at the school-house in District No. 4, April 18, 1874. Officers: President, G. W. Stone; vice-president, Ella V. Thomas; secretary, Mollie L. Homerdien; librarian, Mrs. J. Harp; treasurer, Helen M. Townsend. The library is still maintained at the village. KNIGHTS OF THE MACCABEES. ' Bassett Tent No. 79, Knights of the Maccabees, was organized at Metamora village in February, 1883, with twenty-four members. Officers: P. K. C., John Campbell; Sir K. C., Charles A. Fricke; Sir K. Lt. C., H. D. Haines; record keeper, John Barden; finance keeper, Amos Predmore. The village is charmingly situated in the midst of a rich agricultural region and draws the trade of a large area of country. Its geographical location on the railroad makes it the distributing point of several townships. TOWN OFFICERS. 1838-Supervisor, Andrew Farrell; clerk, Jonathan Silsbury; collector, William C. Tower. 1839-Supervisor, Andrew Farrell; clerk, Noah A. Porter; treasurer, Tobias Price. 1840 Supervisor, Andrew Farrell; clerk, Tobias Price; treasurer, James W. Sanborn. 1841 Supervisor, Tobias Price; clerk, James W. Sanborn; treasurer, Henry F. Perkins. 1842 —Supervisor, James W. Sanborn; clerk, James P. Pitcher; treasurer, Tobias Price. 1843-Supervisor, James W. Sanborn; clerk, James P. Pitcher; treasurer, Tobias Price. Fifty-nine votes polled. 1811-Supervisor, Stephen S. Lord; clerk, James P. Pitcher; treasurer, Tobias Price. Seventy-six votes polled. 1845-Supervisor, James W. Sanborn; clerk, James P. Pitcher; treasurer, Tobias Price. Ninety-four votes polled. 1846-Supervisor, Lewis C. Townsend; clerk, James P. Pitcher; treasurer, Tobias Price. j e

Page  123 ATs-. I-N a&i I I - -- -— v, - HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 123 1847-Supervisor, Gustavus A. Griffen; clerk, James P. Pitcher; treasurer, Harry F. Perkins. 1848-Supervisor, Gustavus A. Griffen; clerk, James P. Pitcher; treasurer, Moses G. Porter. 1849-Supervisor, Tobias Price; clerk, James P. Pitcher; treasurer, Joseph A. Church. 1850-Supervisor, Tobias Price; clerk, Orville M. Lord; treasurer, William R. Lambertson. 1851-Supervisor, Tobias Price; clerk, Orville M. Lord; treasurer, William R. Lambertson. 1852-Supervisor, Tobias Price; clerk, E. P. Barrows; treasurer, William R. Lambertson..1853-Supervisor, Tobias Price; clerk, E. P. Barrows; treasurer, William R. Lambertson. 1854 —Supervisor, Tobias Price; clerk, A. B. Coryell; treasurer, William R. Lambertson. 1855-Supervisor, Simon Mathews; clerk, A. B. Coryell; treasurer, Henry Townsend. 1856-Supervisor, Tobias Price; clerk, George Price; treasurer, Henry Townsend. 1857-Supervisor, Henry Groff; clerk, Egbert C. Goodrich; treasurer, Henry Townsend. 1858-Supervisor, Norman B. Blood; clerk, E. P. Barrows; treasurer, Addison Griggs. 1859-Supervisor, Norman B. Blood; clerk, E. P. Barrows; treasurer, Addison Griggs. 1860-Supervisor, Norman B. Blood; clerk, John Hahller; treasurer, Addison Griggs. 1861-Supervisor, H. C. Babcock; clerk, R. C. Plass; treasurer, Addison Griggs. 1862 — Supervisor, Tobias Price; clerk, R. C. Plass; treasurer, Carlos Hill. 1863- Supervisor, Abraham Hunt; clerk, Henry Townsend; treasurer, Carlos Hill. 1864 — Supervisor, Abrahaim Hunt; clerk, Henry Townsend; treasurer, A. S. Cowan. 1865-Supervisor, William N. Varnum; clerk, B. P. Ackerman; treasurer, M. B. Pitcher. 1866-Supervisor, E. A. Brownell; clerk, Philo Isllhan; treasurer, 0. P. Morse. 1867-Supervisor, Abraham Hunt; clerk, E. Barrows; treasurer, 0. P. Morse. 1868-Supervisor, Abraham Hunt; clerk, E. P. Barrows; treasurer, 0. P. Morse. 1869 — Supervisor, Isaiah C. Smith; clerk, Henry L. Baker; treasurer, Harvey Butler. 1870 ---Supervisor, Abraham Hunt; clerk, Henry L. Baker; treasurer, Justin H. Butler. 1871-Supervisor, Abraham Hunt; clerk, Henry L. Baker; treasurer, Henry Townsend. 1872-Supervisor, Abraham Hunt; clerk, Henry L. Baker; treasurer, Henry Townsend. 1873-Supervisor, Abraham Hunt; clerk, Henry L. Baker; treasurer, Henry Townsend. 1874-Supervisor, E. P. Barrows; clerk, Henry L. Baker; treasurer, Henry Townsend. 1875-Supervisor, E. P. Barrows; clerk, Henry L. Baker; treasurer, Henry Townsend. 1876-Supervisor, E. P. Barrows; clerk, Henry L. Baker; treasurer, Henry Townsend. 1877-Supervisor, E. P. Barrows; clerk, Henry L. Baker; treasurer, Frederick Price. 1878-Supervisor, E. P. Barrows; clerk, Henry L. Baker; treasurer, Frederick Price. 1879-Supervisor, Clark Townsend; clerk, Henry L. Baker; treasurer, Mark N. Kelley. 1880-Supervisor, William Park; clerk, Heman Kelley; treasurer, John Barden. 1881-Supervisor, William Park; clerk, Heman Kelley; treasurer, John Barden. 1882-Supervisor, William Parh; clerk, John Barden; treasurer, Heman Kelley. 1883-Supervisor, Mark N. Kelley; clerk, Rufus E. Wilder; treasurer, George C. Morse. STATISTICAL. In 1840 the population of Metamora was 351. Census of 1874: Population, 1,814: acres of taxable land, 21,428; of improved land, 13,418; number of sheep, 5,284; of horses, 600; of milch cows, 590. Products of preceding year, 26,978 pounds of wool; 63,322 pounds of pork marketed; 290 pounds of cheese, and 59,030 of butter made; 84,075 bushels of wheat raised; 24,923 of corn; 38,723 of other grain; 14,668 of apples; 404 of pears; seventy-six of plums; 785 of cherries, 4,140 pounds of grapes; 991 bushels of melons and garden vegetables; 10,559 bushels of potatoes, and 1,484 tons of hay; 437 barrels of cider were made, and 8,373 pounds of fruit dried for market. In 1880 the town had a population of 1,384. Aggregate value of real and personal property, as equalized by the board of supervisors in 1882, was $810,000. The annual report of the school inspectors of the town of Metamora for the year 1882, shows the number of school children to have been 430, number of school buildings, six. The inspectors for the ensuing year were: E. F. Conner, George C. Moore, Thomas Mitchell, Jerome C. Walton, M. Johnson, Thomas Dirstine. BIOGRAPHICAL. DAVID F. STONE, M. D., was borin in St. Lawrence County, N. Y., in 1843, and in 1864 began the study of medicine at Toronto, Ontario. In 1867 he came to Metamora and after practicing two years returned to Canada, and was graduated at the Toronto University in 1870. He then camne back to Metamlora where he has since enjoyed an extensive and lucrative practice. During 1874 he visited London and Paris, continuing his studies to the end of the year, his brother, Dr. George Stone, taking charge of his practice until his return, with whom he has since been associated, both in his practice and the drug business. In 1877 he married Miss Elizabeth Griswold, of Bay City. W. WILDER, of the firm of Wilder Bros., general merchants, was born in Prince Edward County, Ontario, in 1857, and in 1878 came to Michigan and for a short time engaged in carriage nanufacturing in Detroit. He then came to Metamora, and continued -the same business until 1880, when he engaged in farming which he continued till 1882, when he formed a partnership with his brother for the purpose of carrying on a general mercantile business. He was married in 1879 to Miss Virginia Price, of Metamora. R. E. WILDER, of the above named firm, was born in Prince Edward County, Ontario, ih 1853, and in 1872 engaged as a sales man in Detroit, where he remained until 1882. He then came to Metanmora and opened a general store in connection with his brother. B. F. WILDER, farmer on section 12, was born in Ontario County, N. Y., in 1824, remaining there until 1835 when he came i 4-2 r k - oft4 -I

Page  124 - - - ] J 124 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. -! to Michigan and settled in Wayne County. He remained there ten years when he removed to Bloomfield, Oakland County, thence to White Lake, where he resided seven or eight years, then came to Metamora and took up wild land on section 12, where he now resides. He was married in 1858 to Miss Maria Shippey, of the township of Oxford, Oakland County, and has four children. TOBIAS PRICE, deceased, was prominently identified with the early settlement of Lapeer County. He was born in Monroe County, N. Y., in 1804, and came to Macomb County in 1828, where he took up eighty acres of land from the government one half mile east from the present village of Romeo. He returned to Monroe County, N. Y., in 1829, and was there married to Miss Emma Fellows, of Mendon, and again came to Michigan with his wife and settled in Shelby, Macomb County, where lhe resided till 1837. In that year he came to Metamora and took up 320 acres of land, which he improved and resided upon, until his death in 1879. Mr. Price held many of the township offices including that of supervisor, for many years. He ha three daughters of whom two are now living-now Mrs. Govan and Mrs. Fellows-who reside on the homestead which is one of the finest farms in the county. Julia M. Price the eldest daughter, married J. Orren Govan, of Metamora, in 1857, and Ervilla Price married David Fellows, of Metamora, in 1873. The first, second, and third town meetings were held in Mr. Price's house, the first sheep brought to Metamora were purchased by Mrs. Price in Troy, Oakland County, from the sale of socks and mittens, knit by her from wool which she brought from her old home, as filling in comfortables. WILLIAM SAGE, farmer on section 28, was born in Brant County, Ontario, in 1816, and in 1822 came to Michigan with his parents, locating in Oakland County, where he remained until 1829. He then returned to Canada and in 1832 removed to Monroe County, Ohio, residing there one year when he again made Oakland County his home until 1835. Iln that year he went to St. Joseph County and a year later returned to Oakland County. In 1842 he came to Metamora and settled on wild land on section 29, which he improved, and in 1857 removed to section 28, where lie now resides. He was married in 1840 to Miss Lorinda Gillet, of Rochester, and has two sons and seven daughters. ORVIL SAGE, fanner on sections 29, 31 and 32, was born in Monroe County, Ohio, in 1844, remaining there until 1849, when he came to Michigan with his parents and settled on the farm where he now resides. He enlisted in 1865 in the Eleventh Michigan Cavalry. In 1866 was married to Miss Mary Fellows, of Metamora, and has two sons. EDWIN SAGE, farmer on section 29, was born in Monroe County, Ohio, in 1834, remaining there until 1850, when he came with his parents to Michigan andlcsettled on section 32 in Metamora, where he remained until 1856. He then removed to Hadley and purchased a farm on section 13, where he resided till 1865, when he came to Metamora and located on the farm where he now resides. He was married in 1856 to Miss Francis Cady, of Hadley, and has one daughter. SAMUEL ERLES, deceased, was born in New York in 1820 and about 1830 came to Michigan with his parents and settled near Pontiac. In 1841 he came to Metamora and settled on wild land on section 33, where he remained until his death, in 1871, with the exception of three years he spent in Pontiac engaged in the marble business. He married Miss Esther Hible, of Pontiac, by whom he had two sons and two daughters. Edward, the youngest son, remains at home and carries on the farm. JAMES H. LEE, Son of Jesse Lee, who was one of the pioneers of Lapeer County, was born in the township of Metamora in 1835, and when twenty-one years of age purchased a farm adjoining the homestead where he now resides. His farm contains 105 acres and he has become known as one of the most successful wheat growers in the county, his crops of that grain aggregating 19,000 bushels in the past thirteen years, the principal part of which he has drawn to Pontiac. He was married in 1863 to Miss Mary Riches, of Thornville, and has two sons and two daughters. ADAM WINEarAR, deceased, was born near Albany, N. Y., in 1806, and at an early day came to Michigan. He worked at the wagonmakers' trade in Avon, O.akland County, until 1850, when lie came to Metamora and settled on section 20, where he engaged in farmning and resided until his death in 1881. He was married in 1843 to Miss Lucinda Ruby, of Macomb County, by whom he had two children, who are now living. Henry resides on the homestead with his mother and sister. Mr. Winegar held the office of justice of the peace twenty-five years. D. STOCKER was born in Ontario County, N. Y., in 1822, and moved to Niagara County with his parents, where they resided until 1828. They then went to Canada and settled in Holton County, Ontario, remaining there till 1843, when he came to Metamora and settled on section 21, where he now resides. He was married in 1839 to Miss L. A. Varnu.n, of Holton County, Ontario, and has five sons and six daughters living. Willard, the eldest, married Miss Tena Lee, of Almont, and is living near Metamora. William N., the second son, married Miss Sarah Dunkel, of Clinton, where he now resides. John B., the third son, married Miss Rosa Palmer, of Metamora, and is now living in Hadley. Z. D. and G. W. still remain on the homestead. The eldest daughter, Ropena, married R. Stimpson, of Metamora, and now resides in Genesee. Julia married Geo. W. Simpson, of Isabella County, where they now reside. Martha married James Palmer, of Metamora, where she resides. The Misses Hester, Lotta and Vira are unmarried and remrain on the homestead. WILLIAM PARK was born in Scotland in 1830 and came to America with his parents in 1836. They settled in New York, where they remained until 1842, when he came to Michigan with an uncle and located in Lapeer County, where he took up 200 acres of wild land. After a residence there of five years lie engaged in railroad contracting in Ohio, Illinois, and other States until 1862, when he returned to his farm where lie now resides. He was married in 1835 to Miss Ellen P. Shanks, of Missouri, and has tell children living. Was one of the contractors on the Missouri & Pacific Railroad. He was elected supervisor for three terms in Metamora. His farm now consists of 314 acres located on sections 13, 23, and 24. HIRAM ROSSMAN, farmer on section 21, was b: rn in Macomb County-in 1833, went to Oakland County at an early age with his parents and remained till 1857. He then came to Metamora and on the farm where he now resides. In 1859 he was married to Miss Sarah N. Porter, of Oakland County, and has two sons and three daughters. Carrie, the eldest, married George Morse and now resides in Metanmora. JOHN MARSDEN, dealer in grain, salt, lilme, etc., was born in Yorkshire, England, in 1841, and came to America with his parents in 1842. They settled in the State of Wisconsin, where he remained till 1862, when he enlisted in'the Twenty-fifth Wisconsin Infantry, serving until the close of the war. He then returned to his old home and attended school one year when he engaged in mercantile business in Platteville, Wis., where he remained until 1867. The next four years he spent in Kansas and then came to Metamlllora and purchased the Kelley grain elevator, where he handles grain, salt, lime, etc. He was married in 1870 to Miss J. M. Smith, of Franklin County, Kansas. CLARENCE E. BROWN was born in Columbus, Wis., in 1860, and in 1861 came to Saginaw with his parents and when nine years of ~4m..-.... 4 < -— r

Page  125 6 I 4 I4 I I I I - HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 125 age went with them to Flint. From there they went to Kipp's Corners, near Goodrich, where his father died, and afterward went to Canada where he engaged in the manufacture of cheese, which he continued for five years. He then returned to Flint and engaged as a salesman with Wetherell & Bro. with whiom he continued two years, and the next three years was with F. H. & E. Pierce. He then came to Metamora and purchased a stock of goods of L. D. Campbell and is doing an extensive business. He married Miss Jessie Campbell, of Flint, and has one son. MARK N. KELLEY was born in Troy, Oakland County, in 1831, and came to Lapeer County in 1844. He attended the district school at Hadley, and when twenty-one years of age went to Louisville, Ky., where he remained six months, and then returned to Lapeer County and engaged in farming on the homestead. In 1868 he formed a partnership with Robert Hutton for the purpose of carrying on a general mercantile business, from which he retired in 1870. He then came to Metamora and built a large grain elevator, engaging in the grain trade until 1881, when he sold his business to John Marsden. He was married in 1875 to Miss Mary Henderson and has four children, three daughters and one son. Mr. Kelley was elected supervisor in 1883. He still owns the old homestead on section 1 in Hadley. O. C. THOMPSON was born in St. Clair County, Mich., in 1846, and afterward moved to Detroit with his parents, where lie attended school until sixteen years of age. He then went to Oberlin, Ohio, where he attended school for a time, and in 1862 joined the Christian commission at Alexandria, remaining there two years, when he enlisted in the army and served to the close of the war. He then engaged in farming in Wayne County, which he continued till 1875, when he removed to Spring Lake, Ottawa County, and engaged with A. Bilz of that place in the hardware trade, where he remained two years. He next went to Davisburg, Oakland County, where he engaged in the same business, which he continued till 1879, when he came to Metamora, where he is also engaged in the hlardware trade. He was married in 1868 to Miss Annie Sconigall, of Oakland County, and has two children-one son and -one daughter. Mr. Thompson is a son of the Rev. 0. C. Thompson, of Detroit, one of the pioneers who came to the State while it was a Territory, and at so early a day that there were no roads west of Jackson. JOHN A. HARP was born near Albany, N. Y., in 1830, and in 1860 went to St. Louis, and the following year came to Lapeer County and engaged in wagon making, which he continued till 1869. He then went to Murfreesboro, Tenn., where lie resided until 1881, when he came to Metamora and formed a partnership with J. H. Lewis, and they are now engaged in the manufacture of wagons and carriages, doing general blacksmithlllg and dealing in agricultural implements. Mr. Harp was married in 1868 to Miss Harriet A. Price, of Metamora, and has one child. WILLIAM HENDERSON was born in Jefferson County, N. Y., in 1819, in the town of Henderson, which was named after his grandfather, who was one of the pioneers of that coulnty. He remained there until 1836, when he went to Canada with his parents, who settled on wild land, remaining there till 1839, when they went to Monroe County, N. Y. They remained there until 1844, engaged principally in farming, when they came to Michigan and took up school and government land in Lapeer County, township of Metamora, where lihenow resides. Few men know more ot the hardships of pioneer life than Mr. Henderson, having passed through all its different phases. He was married in 1842 to Miss Phoebe E. Munger, of Monroe County, and has one daughter —Mrs. Alvah Townsend, who resides on the homestead. Mr. and Mrs. Henderson's first experience in housekeeping in their forest home was precipitated by the unexpected arrival of Mrs. H. while the log house was in that progressive state representing four solid walls without windows, doors or roof. The first night they had to climb over the walls to reach the inner compartment, and for a roof put some boards over one corner. H. C. BABCOCK was born in Jefferson County, N. Y., in 1830, and in 1831 moved from there to Rome, Oneida County, and afterward to Oswego, where he remained until 1841. He then made Rochester his home until 1843, when he returned to Oswego, residing there till 1848. In 1851 lie came to Michigan and settled in Macomb County, and in 1853 came to Metamora and located on section 18, where lie now resides. He has held the office of supervisor and other minor offices. In 1854 lie married Miss Rosetta C. Morse, of Metamora, and has four children. CLARK TOWNSEND was born in the township of Bruce, Macomb County, in 1843, remaining there until 1861, when he came to Metamora and settled on section 8, where he now resides. He has just completed one of the finest farm-houses in the county; has held the office of supervisor. In 1866 he was married to Miss J. Blair, daughter of John Blair, of the township of Lapeer. I. C. SMITH was born in Mercer County, Pa., July 8, 1815, remaining there until 1834, when le went to Trumbull County, town of Kinsman, Ohio, and engaged in an edge tool manufactory as an apprentice, where he remained until 1837. He then returned to Mercer County and worked at blacksmithing for a year and a half, and in 1838 came to Metamora. In 1840 he went to Canada and spent the winter, returning to Metamora and settled on section 7, where he now resides. He was married in 1844 to Miss Lucinda Wadsworth, of Lapeer County, who died in 1882, by whom he has a son and daughter. In 1869 he was elected supervisor, and has held the office of justice of the peace eight years. In 1870 he took a trip through the Southern and Western States as far West as Leavenworth, Kansas, remaining about three months. In August, 1882, he made a trip to the Lake Superior copper region, and the fall following made a trip with his son to Dakota, also visiting Nebraska and other Western States. RICHARD MORS, the subject of this sketch, was born in Saratoga County, N. Y., in 1816, and in 1832 moved with his parents to Buffalo where he learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed for several years. In 1843 he came to Metamora and took up 120 acres of wild land, which he improved and increased by subsequent purchases to about 400 acres. In 1877 he came to the village of Metamora, where he now resides, the homestead being occupied by two of his soilns. He was married in 1843 to Miss J. Cooley, of Wyoming County, N. Y., and has five children-four sons and one daughter. GEORGE C. MORSE, attorney at law, is the eldest son of Richard Mors, and w.is born in the township of Metamora in 1847. He remained there until 1869, when he commenced his studies in Olivet College, from which he graduated in 1876. He then went to Detroit and read law with Trowbridge and Dowling, afterward with George E. Halliday, remaining with the latter until 1878. He then went to Lansing, where he was admitted to the bar, and then returned to Detroit and formed a partnership with J. Bassett, the title of the firm being Bassett & Morse, which was continued until 1879, whenl he came to Metamora, where he has since resided. He was married in 1882 to Miss Carrie B. Rossman. In 1880 was elected justice of the peace, also holds the office of township treasurer and school inspector. H. F. PERKINS was born in Genesee County, N. Y., in 1810, and at three years of age moved with his parents to Ontario County, where he resided until 1837. He then came to Lapeer County, taking up land from the government on section 12 in Metamora, where he now resides. Of his early residence in the township, Mr. i I i 1, o" I -n I, -~L

Page  126 A T e I I 12" I i I 1 12 _C^ _I HISTORY O)F LAPEER COUNTY. ),6 section 19, relaainill until 1863, when he removed to his present Perkins can recite many interesting pioneer experiences, few more interestingly than he. He often had to go to Birmingham, Oakland Co., on foot for plow points. He has served the township as treasurer, highway commissioner and in other minor offices. In 1834 he was married to Miss Mary Ann Pomroy, of Bristol, Ontario County, N. Y., who died in 1835, leaving one child; was again married to Miss Paulina Banker, of Metamora, by whom he has five children. MASON PORTER, Son of tile late Alvin Porter, was born in Shelby, Maomb County, in 1839, and in 1843 came to Lapeer County with his parents, and settled in the township of Metamora. In 1859 he purdlased 130 acres on section 16, where he has since resided, and which he lhas materially improved and added to until he owns 210 acres. He was married in 1859 to Miss E. J. Price, of Metamora, and has two daughters. The eldest married Sidney Copeland, of Oxford, Oakland County, where they now reside. A. A. PITCHER, son of M. D. Pitcher, one of the pioneers of Lapeer County, was born where he now resides, on section 33, in 1846. His farm contains 143 acres of land. In 1877 he was married to Miss Alice V. Simmons, of Oxford, Oakland County, and has two sons. ALBERT PORTER, farmer on section 21, was born in Niagara County, N. Y., in 1830, remaining there until 1834, when he came to Michigan with his parents, who settled in Macomb County on wild land. They remained there for several years, then removed to Shelby, same county, where they resided until 1843, when they came to Metamora, and settled on the farm, where he now resides. In 1855 he went to SaginAw County, and located on 83 acres of government land, where he lived till 1871. In 1862 lie enlisted in Company,D, Twenty-Third Michigan Infantry, and served two years, when he received his discharge. In 1871 he returned to Metamora, and settled on section 27, where he remained until 1882 when lie again took up his residence on the old homestead. He was married in 1853 to Miss Ann M. Allen, of Genesee County, and has two sons and two daughters. ALVIN PORTER, deceased, was born in the town of Rush, Monroe County, N. Y., in 1807, and in 1816 moved to Genesee County, where he remained two years, then went to the town of Stafford, Monroe County, where he resided until 1824. He then removed to Niagara County, and in 1834 came to Michigan, and settled in Macomb County, taking up land from the government, residing there until 1813; in that year he came to Metamora, where he resided until his death in 1882. While in New York, lie was married to Miss Samantha Goff, who died soon after coming to Michigan. He was again married to Miss Mary Ann Ruby, of Macomb County. NATHANIEL REED was born in Oakland County in 1841, remaining there until 1871 engaged in farming. He then came to Metamora and settled on sections 21 and 28, where he now resides. He was married in 1872 to Miss Rudema Porter, daughter of the late Alvin Porter. Thley have two sons. F. P. LAWRENCE was born in the township of Addison, Oakland 'County, in 1842, remaining there until 1876, when he moved to Oxford, making that his place of residence until 1882. He then came to Metamora, and located on section 26, where he now resides. He was married in 1870 to Miss Phoebe D. Porter, daughter of the late Alvin Porter. They have one son and one daughter. A. S. COWAN, farmer on section 25, was born in Oneida County, N. Y., in 1836, and when six months of age came with his parents to Michigan. They settled near Troy Corners, Oakland County, where they remained ten years, when they removed to Bloomfield, where lie remained until 1858, thence to Shiawassee County, and from there came to Metamora in 1860. He settled on section 19, remaining until 1863, when he removed to his present place on section 25. He was married in 1860 to Miss Adelaide Porter, daughter of the late Alvin Porter, and has four sons. He has held the offices of township treasurer and commissioner of highways. SYLVESTER GARK, farmer on section 26, was born in Jefferson County, N. Y., in 1828, and when three years of age moved with his parents to Canada. He remained there until 1855, when he came to Michigan and settled in the township of Elba, Lapeer County, removing in 1857 to North Branch and a year later came to Metamora. Two years thereafter he returned to North Branch where lie resided until 1862 when he again came to Metamora and located on sections 21 and 22, removing in 1868 to section 26 where he now resides. He was married in 1856 to Miss Mary Ann Thomas, of Mietamora, andd has two sons and one daughter. E. ISHAM, deceased, was born in Batavia, New York, in 1804, remaining there until 1835 when he came to Michigan. After residing two years in Macomb County he came to Metamora and took up land from the government on section 11, where he remained until his death in 1847. He was married in 1840 to Miss Julia Miller, of Metamora, by whom he had'two sons and one daughter. Philo, the eldest son, was born in 1842, and in 1877 married Miss Mary Watkins, of Lapeer County. He now resides on the homestead and has held the office of township clerk. J. H., the second son, was born in 1843 and in 1880 married Miss Erva White, of Metamora. Jane, the daughter, married George Barber. S. D. GROOVER was born in Sussex County, N. J., in 1821, remaining there until 1861, when he came to Michigan and settled in Oakland County. He resided there until 1881, when he removed to the township of Hadley and in 1883 came to Metamora and located on section 14, where now resides. He was married in 1842 to Miss Harriet F. Sutton, of New Jersey, and has eight children. ROBERT DUDLEY was born in Oakland County in 1829, where he remained until twenty-one years of age, when. he removed to Addison and resided there until 1815. He then came to the township of Dryden and 1857 to Metamora, locating on section 14 where he remained till 1865, when he removed to section 15 where he now resides. He was married in 1852 to Miss Maria Thomas, of Metamora, and has three sons and one daughter. ALBA THOMAS was born in Ontario County, N. Y., in 1804, and at four years of age removed with his parents to Monroe County. He remained there until 1844, when he came to Michigan and settled in Metamora on section 12, removing two years thereafter to section 14 where he now resides. He was married in 1827 to Miss Selinda Harding, of Genesee County, N. Y., by whom -he has one son and two daughters. David M., the son, was born in 1836 and in 1867 was married to Miss Harriet Buxton, of Lincolnshire, England; Anna married C. R. Chapman, who now resides in the township of Metamora; Maria married Robert Dudley, also of Metamora. ELI LUNDAY, deceased, was born in New Jersey in 1811, remaining there until 1837, when he came to Michigan and settled on section 8 in the township of Metamora, where he resided until his death in 1873. He was married in 1838 to Miss Ann Van Gelder, of New York. Of their children three sons are living: A. V. G., the eldest, was born in Metamora in 1838 and now resides in the village. He was married in 1868 to Miss Adeline Carpenter, of Almont, by whom he has two children. Samuel, the second son, was born in 1840, remaining in Metamora until the present (1883) year, when he moved to Dakota. He was married in 1862 to Miss Mary McGregor, of Metamora, who died in 1865; was again married to Miss Melinda Bullock, of Elba. Franklin, the youngest, was born 1842, remained in Metamora until 1868, when he moved to the township of Lapeer where he now resides. He was married I I I I i. }L -11 -..I* l 9__ -I 4-~ I ______ - -- W - 1 Vy

Page  [unnumbered] ALVI N PORTER, D eceased.

Page  [unnumbered] I:: iI

Page  127 I e HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY 127 in 1871 to Miss Edna Hall, of Metaniora, who died il 1881; was again married to Miss Stella Loornis, of Dryden. JAMES 0. PERKINS, proprietor of the Hoard House, Metamora, i was born in the township in 1843. He was proprietor of the Farrell House in Columubiaville from 1868 to 1870, when lie returned to- Metamora and engaged in farming until 1874, when lie toolk charge of the Hoard House one year. In 1875 he went to Almont and enaaged in farming until 1879, when he became proprietor of the Harrington House, remaining in charge two years. He then came to Metamora and took charge of the Hoard House where lie has since remained. In 1866 he was married to Miss Caroline Thomas, of Metamora, who died in 1871 leaving three clildren. He was again married in 1872 to Miss L. Hoard, of Metamora, by whom he has one daughter. JAMES L. MORE, son of the late James More, was born il the township of Mfetamora in 1856. He has since been a resident of the township, his principal occupation being farming; his farm is located on sectioa 12. He was married in 1876 to Mliss Rosa B. Farrar, of Genesee County, and has one child. C. J. SMITH was born in the township of Addison, Oakland County, il 1812. In 1878 he purchased 18() a-res of land in that township on section 7. He afterward purchased 100 acres in Albee, Saginaw County, and soon tIereafter 160 acres in Addison, upon which he remained one year, when he came to Metamora and settled on forty acres on section 25 where he now resides. He was married in 1867 to Miss Caroline McKenlley, of Dryden, and has four children. Mrs. L. PRICE, daughter of James Scott, deceased, was born in Oxford, Canada, in 1811, where she remained until 1818, when she came with her parents to Michigan. They settled in What is now Utica, Macomb County, and came oil a scow On the'River Tilames from London to Lake St. Clair, where they were frozen in, having to remain until teans could cross the lake. They took up land from the government-being the first settlers in Utica which they improved and which Mr. Scott resided upon until his death in 1853. She was married in 1830 to George Price, of Monroe County, N. Y., and remained in Macomb County until 1854, when she and her husband came to Metamora and settled on section 22 where he died in 1872, leaving four children. Mrs. Price still resides on the homestead. NELSON CADY, deceased, was born in Chatham, N. Y., in 1799, remaining there until 1836, when he camne to Lapeer County and settled in Hadley on section 13. He rematined there -until 1858, when he came to Mletamora and remained until 1862, when he removed to Oakwood, Oakland County, and a year thereafter to Flint where he died in 1863. Mr. Cady held the office of justice of the peace for several years. ANDREW JOHNSON, farmer on section 35, was born il Cayuga County, N. Y., in 1820, remaining there until 1844, when he came to Michigan. He engaged in farming summers and teaching school winters until 1848, when lie settled on the old Jenkins homestead, where he now resides. He was narried in 1848 to Miss Sophia J. Jenkins, and has three children. Mr. Johnson has been school inspector for years, beside holding other minor offices. PRESCOTT VARNIJM, deceased, was born in Middleses County, Mass., in 1796, removing from there to Genesee County in 1816, thence to Canada, where lie remained until 1848. He then came to Michigan and took tip new land in Aletamorna ol section 36, where he resided until his death. He was married in 1820 to Miss Elizabeth Clemmons, of Genesee County, N. Y., by whom he had six children. Elvira was born in Canada in 1835 and came to Michigan with her parents, still residing on'the old homestead. F. PRICE, farmer on section 22, was born il Maconli County I i in 1833, where he remained until 1854, wheel he calrze to Metamora with his parents who settled on the farm where he now resides. He was married in 1856 to Miss Sarah E. Thomas, of Metamora, and has one son and one daughter. Virginia E., tlhe daughter, married J. WVT. WATilder, of the firm of Wilder Bros., Mfetamorla. THOMAS STEVENSON, farrlner oil section 22, was born in Scotland in 18193, and emigrated to America in 1838. He settled first in Macomb Coulity, where he rernained until 1866, when he came to Metamora and located onl the farm where he now resides. In 1841 lie married Miss Agnes Grant, a native of Scotland, who died in 1849, leaving four children. Was again married to Miss Annie Howard, of MIaoomb County. JOHN A. WVILLIAMIS is a native of Canada, anld was born ill 1831. He rernained there until 1857, when he came to Michigan and settled in MaIcombh County, residingy there until 1862. He then removed to Marlette, where he remrained till 1881, when he came to Marathon and settled on section 26, where he now resides. He has been twice married, first ill 1856, and second in 1882 to Mliss Scamantlla Porter, dauyhter of Albert Porter. His first wife died ill 1881, leaving a family of eight children. DAVID LAMIONT, farmer on section 12, was born il Scotland ill 1828, and ill 1857 came to Michigan. He at first located in the township of Almont, Lapeer County, and after a few months' residence there removed to _Nlacolmb County, two years thereafter to Oakland County, ancl a year later returned to Macomb County. He resided there until 1867, when he camrle to Metamlora and settled on section 12, where he now resides. In 1859 be mlzarried Miss Janet Morton, of Almont, and has three soles and four daughters. THOMAS PALMER was born in Kent County, Emygland, in 1813, and in 1821 moved with his parents to Surrey, where he remained until 1844, where he came to Michigcan and located in St. Clair County. He resided there until 1864, when he came to Metamora and settled on section 26, where he now resides. His first purchase of land was eighty acres, to which he has since added until he is now the owner of 330 acres. He Maarried Miss Phoebe Wells, of England, and has three soi1s and three daughters. JAMES E. PALME, R, soil of Thomas Palmer, was born in the township of Almont in 1849. Resided in St. Clair County with his parents till 1864, when he came to Metamora with them and settled on section 26. He was married in 1876 to Miss Martha Stocker, daugahter of D. Stocker, removing to section 32, where they now reside. C. R. CHAP]NAN, farmer o11 section 11, was born in England in 1818, -end in 1834 came to New Yorlk, where he remained two years. He then came to Michigan and settled ill the township of Almont, when after a few months' residence he removed to Romeo, Macomb County, residinb there until 1848. He then removed to Dryden, remaining there till 1853, when he came to Mietamora and settled on section 11, where he now resides. He was married in 1842 to Miss Eleanor Woodbeck, of Macomb County, who died the following year. In 1849 he was again married to MIiss Anna D. Thomas, of Metamora, and has one son and three daughters. He has held the office of commissioner of highways several terms and was a constable in Dryden. JACOB S. HENDERSON was b)orn in Washington County, N. Y., in 180X, remaining there until six years of age, when he moved Iwith his parents to Jefferson County, town of Rutltand, afterward removing to the town of Henderson, where he remained until 1818. He then went to the town of Lime, remaining there until 1837. i when lie went to Canada, where he remained two years. His next I move was to Monroe County, N. Y., remaining until 1844, whet he came to Metamora, takinlgf ulp wild land on section 15, where he I I I i f -II I l I -L m -1 - -— I

Page  128 <s I I I 12 18 HISTORY OF LAPEE 1 COUNTTrY. now resides. He -was married in 1818 to Miss T. Case, of Jefferson County, N. Y.! who died in 1876, leaving five sons and five dauglhters, all of whllom are still living. E. P. BARROWS was born in Livingston County, N. Y., in 1827, and in 1835 came to Michigan, locating in Oaklalnd Coullnty, whlere he remained until 1842, -when lie caime to wThat is nO\V Metamora village. He settled on section 8, remaining there until 1865, and in 1867 removed to section 17, where he now resides. He was elected supervisor in 1874, hlolding the office five years; has also been town clerk many years, beside having held other minior offices. In 1854 he married Miss Ervilla Griggs, of Metamora, by whlolml he hlas one daughter. EDWARD GROFF, farller on section 15, was l orn in Oneida County, N. Y., ill 1833, and while young moved with his parents to Ontario County, whllere they remained until 1843, when they camle to Michigan and settled on section 2 in Metamora, taking up land from the government. They resided there till 1847, remioving then to Livingston County, where they remained till 1853, when they returned to Metamlllora and located on section 11. He relmained there until 1859, when he returned to Livingston County, and in 1865 came back to Metamora and located on section 22. In 1872 hle removed to section 11, and in 1876 to section 15, where he now resides. He was married in 1859 to Miss Marcia M. Henderson, of Metamora, and has two children. JOHN A. MERRITT, deceased, was born in Monroe County, Pa., in 1811, remaining there till 1836, when he cattle to Michigan and settled in the township of Hadley, Lapeer County, where he resided two years. He then came to Metamlora and made a settlement on sections 6 and 7, taking up land from the government, upon which hle resided unltil his death in 1881. He was married ill 1883 to Miss E. KElingingsmith, of Mlonroe County, Pa., by whom hlie had one son and one daughter. A. B. Merritt, the son, was born onl the homestead, where he now resides. In 1864 he enlisted in the Thirtieth Michigan, and served to the close of the war. He was married in 1856 to Miss Dorcas Thomas, who died in 1869, and by whom he had three children. He was again married in 1872 to Miss E. Darling, of Oakland County, by whom lie has three children. Miss C. Merritt, daughter of John A., married Leander Lee, son of Jesse Lee, and is now living in Saginaw. JAMES JENKINS, deceased, was born in Columbia County, N. Y., in 1799, and about 1820 moved to Buffalo, where hlie worked at the carpenters trade until 1831. He then moved on a farm in Erie County, remaining there till 1838, when hie came to Michigan and settled in Metamora, taking up 200 acres of land from the government on section 35, where he resided until his death in 1841. He was married in 1822 to Miss Polly Dale, of Cayuga County, N. Y., by whom he had two children who are now living. Sophia, now Mrs. Johnson, resides on the homestead, and Lester E. resides in Iowa. WILLIAM CLARK was born in England in 1816, and came to Michigan with his parents, locating at Hunters Creek, where he resided until 1840. He then took up new land in the township of Elba, on section 24, where he now resides. He was married in 1840, to Miss Irene Perry, of Genesee County, and has one son and one daughter. B. W. CLARK, son of William Clark, was oorn in the township of Elba, in 1841, remaining there until 1865, when he moved to the township of Lapeer. He resided there until 1867, when he returned*to Elba and settled on section 25, where he remained until 1873, then went to Hunters Creek, remaining till 1876; he then came to Metamora, where he now resides, but intends removing to Lapeer City the coming fall. In 1867 married Miss N. Grow, of Canada. A. C. BROWNE was born ill the towcnship of Metamora in 1849. In 1869 lie Xwent to Wayne County, N. Y., and attended school thllere one year, when he returned and engagel in teaclhing school wintelrs nlnd farming sullllmers, which he continued until 1873. He then wpnt to Lapeer and engaged in the groceey business, remaining there one year, whllen he retlrned to Metamuora and located on section 6, where lie now resides. In 1876 hle married MIiss Esther M. O'Brien, and has one son. ANDREW MAIR was bIorn inl Scotland i 1823, andcl i 1845 camne to America and located in Lapeer County. About 1850) he ecamle to Metamora, and took up wild land on section 8, where hle now resides. He was nmarried in 1855 to Miss Marianl Stepllhens, of Scotland, and has four cllildren. JAMIES FRENCH was bornl inl Scotlalnd iln 1818, remaining there until 1844, w\hell hlie caille to Lapeer Coulnty and settled in Metamora, on section 4, takillg up wild land, Twhich le has improved allnd upon which hle has since residled. He was lmarried to Miss Jane Stephllens, of Scotland, in 1843, afind las five sons and five daughters. ALEXANDER STEPHENS, farmer, on sectionl 4, was born in Scotland in 1833, and came to Mi;liganll with his parents in 1843, and settled in Metamora on the farmll where he now resides. He was married in 1861, to Miss Cornelia, Schllunelaln, of the township of Lapeer, and has two sons. CHARLES F. MORSE was born ill MadiSOln Counllty, N. Y., in 1825, and in 1835 came to Micigan with his parents and settled in Lapeer County, where he remained until 1855. He then removed to Genesee County, remaining till 1869, whllen hle went to Illinois and located in La Salle County, making that his Ihome until 1873. He then removed to Kalamazoo Countv, Mich., whllere hle resided till 1880, whenl he came back to Metamora and has since resided onl the old homestead. In 1855 he was inarried to Miss An1na Langland, of Pontiac, and- has three sons and one daughter. JAMES MCGREGOR was born in Scotlald in 1816, where lie remained until 1841, wllen lie came to Miclhigan and settled in Macolmb County. He remained there till 1846, wlien hle came to Lapeer County and located in thle township of Metamora, on section 3, where he now resides. He was married in 1834, to Miss A. McGregor, of Scotland, and has two sons living. A. B. CORYELL, farmer on section 28, was bornl in Seneca County, N. Y., in 1821, and in 1823 moved to Steuben County with his parents, vwhere they renainled until 1827, when they remnoved to Livingston County. II1 1844 lie came to Michigan, and in 1848 settled in Metamnora, taking up wild land on section 28. He was mnarried in 1847, to Miss C. Hammer, of Oalkland County, anld has two sons and two daughters. ORRIN LEE, deceased, was born in New York, in 1829, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1832, locating in Metamora, where he remained until 1852, when he settled on sections 33 and 34, taking up 161 acres of land which hle improved and resided upon until his death, in 1870. He was married in 1850 to Miss Amanda M. Deming, of Oakland County, by whom he had two sons and one daughter, Alice, who married Morris Stanton, of Detroit, the sons remaining on the homestead. OLIVER MoSES was bomn in Livingston County, N. Y., in 1842, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1846. They settled in the township of Hadley on section 24, taking up wild land, upon which they resided until 1857, when they came to Metamora and settled on section 19, where he now resides. He was married in 1863, to Miss L. Sage, of Metamora, and has four children. W. L. BAYLEY was born in Clinton County, N. Y., in 1813, remaining there until 1833, when hlie went to Ohio, thence, in 1837 to Indiana, and from there came to Metamora, in 1857, and located on I ii I i I r -1 416f I f L I II - 'I --- -- I,;-f - f L T-^qF- - e- 0

Page  129 ytL-i (rF \1 4 - ---- -- - E HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 129 I section 21, removing four years thereafter to section 17, where he now resides. He was married, in 1836, to Miss Selinda Hoard, of Yates County, N. Y., by whom he had six children. Mrs. Bayley died in 1860, and in 1862 he was again married to Mrs. Anna West, of Canada. LOREN TAINTER, deceased, was born in Connecticut in 1799, remaining there a short time when he moved to Jefferson County, making that his home until 1834. He afterward resided in Livingston County two years, when he came to Lapeer County and settled in Dryden, on sections 3 and 4, taking up land from the government, upon which he resided till 1856. He then went to Missouri, where he remained until the beginning of the war, when he removed to Minnesota, residing there until his death, in 1863. He was married in 1821, to Miss Ruth C. Graves, of Watertown, N. Y., by whom he had eight children. Mrs. Tainter died in 1834, and the following year he was again married to Miss Mary Forbes, of Lester, N. Y., by whom he had eight children. BENJAMIN D. TAINTER was born in Watertown, N. Y., in 1822, remaining there until 1834, when he moved to Livingston County with his parents. In 1836 he came to Michigan with his parents and settled in the township of Dryden, where he remained until 1852, when he came to Metamora and settled on new land on section 1, where he now resides. He was married in 1849, to Miss Nancy Hillard, of Connecticut, and has five children. MRS. JULIA ANN PEASLEE was born in Connecticut in 1814, and in 1818 moved to New York with her parents, where she remained until 1833. She then returned to Connecticut, remaining there until 1837, when she came to Michigan and located in Lapeer County, stopping the first year and a half in Almont. She then came to Metamora, and settled upon section 12, where she resided until 1870, when she removed to Thornville, where she now resides. In 1839 she married J. A. Church, of Connecticut, by whom she had four children. He died in 1854, and in 1856 shie was again married to Luke Peaslee, of Canada. L. H. READ, farmer on section 4, was born in Sussex County, N. J., in 1810, remaining there until 1837, when he came to Michigan and settled in Macomlb County, where he remained until 1860. He then came to Metamora and settled on section 4, where he now resides. In 1840 he was married to Miss Elizabeth Perry, of Oakland County, and has one son and three daughters., THOMAS DIRSTINE was born in Pennsylvania in 1826, and at four years of age moved with his parents to Genesee County, N. Y., where they resided until 1840, when they came to Lapeer County. They took up land from the government on sections 12 and 13, upon which he still resides. He was married in 1851 to Miss L. J. Barrows, of Metamora, who died in 1863, leaving one child. Was again married in 1866 to Mrs. M. M. Colson, by whom he has two children. -SAMUEL DIRSTINE, deceased, was born in Montgomery County, Pa., in 1789, remaining there until 1830, when he moved to Genesee County, N. Y. He remained there until 1840, when he came to Lapeer County and settled in the township of Metamora, taking up land from the government, upon which he resided until his death in 1845. He was married to Miss Ann Horning, of Montgomery County, Pa., by whom he had ten children. HIRAM TRAVIS was born in New York in 1803; moved at an early age to Wayne County, Pa., where he resided until 1836, when he came to Michigan and settled in Oxford, Oakland County, where he took up land from the government. He was married in 1825 to Miss Lodency R. Jacks, by whom lie had eleven children. AUSTIN TRAVIS, soil of Hiram Travis, was born in Wayne County, Pa., in 1827, remaining there until 1836, when he came to Michigan with his parents. In 1851 he came to Metamora and settled on section 9, where he now resides. He took up new land, on which he cleared a place for a house, and within six days from the time he cut the first tree, had erected a house and was living in it. He was married in 1851 to Miss C. Lombertson, who died in 1863, leaving three children. Was again married to Mrs. E. J. Whidden, of Dryden, by whom lie has three children. He has held the office of commissioner of highways for three years. GEORGE W. PITCHER, farmer on section 9, was born in Cattaraugus County, N. Y., in 1818, and in 1825 moved to Niagara County with his parents, and to Genesee County in 1833. He came to Michigan in 1837 and settled in Oakland County, where he remained until 1839, when he came to Metamora and settled on his present home, taking up wild land. In 1841 he was married to Miss Sophronia E. Porter, who died in 1881, leaving two sons and three daughters. As a township officer, he has served as commissioner of highways and constable. His first residence in the township was known as "Pitcher's shanty" from Lapeer to Detroit. JOHN READ, farmer on section 3, was born in Scotland in 1812, where he remained until 1842, when he came to Michigan and located in Macomb County. He resided there until 1849, when he came to Metamora and settled on section 3, taking up wild land, where he has silice resided. In 1842 lie was married to Miss Stephenson, of Scotland, and has six sons and one daughter. DAVID HODGE, farmer on section 25, was born in Jefferson County, N. Y., in 1810, remaining there until 1845, when he came to Michigan. In 1853 he returned to Jefferson County, and the following year came to Lapeer County, and finally settled in Metamora on section 25, taking up new land which he improved, and where he now resides. He married Miss Hannah Carpenter, of Jefferson County, N. Y., and has four sons and four daughters. E. L. CONNER was born in Joliet, Ill., in 1843, where he remained until 1861, when he enlisted in the Twentieth Illinois and served two years, participating in the battles of Fredericktown, Britton's Lane, Fort Henry, Fort Donelson, Big Black River and Vicksburg. He had three brothers in his company, one of whom was killed at Atlanta, and another died soon after his discharge. After leaving the army he came to Michigan, and was in Macomb County for a year, when he came to Metamora and located on section 22, where he now resides. He was married in 1867 to Miss Harriet Price, and has one son and two daughters. EARLY HISTORY OF FARMERS CREEK. This place is located on the line between Metamora and Hadley and occupies territory of both townships. Its glory has departed, and it is chiefly important now as a historic point. The following sketch of its early history is made from the recollections of Mr. John Look and Mrs. E. C. Comstock: In the fall of 1833 J. B. Morse, then residing at Lapeer, located land upon section 6, in what is now the township of Metamora, and the following spring made a clearing and erected and enclosed a frame for a dwelling. Early in May, 1834, Mr. John Look, who had just arrived with his family from western New York, moved into this skeleton of a house, and lived there alone, Mrs. Look not seeing the face of a white woman for several weeks after their arrival till the first of July following, when Messrs. Morse and H. M. Look moved here, the three families occupying one house till the Messrs. Look could put up houses of their own. These families were closely connected by ties of kindred and marriage. Mr. H. M. Look and Mrs. Morse were brother and sister, John Look their cousin, and the Looks had married sisters: John Look, Ann Hopkins, and H. M. Look, Charlotte, daughters of Solomon Hopkins, long a resident of Flint, Mich. This was A* — - z

Page  130 J l 130 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. i 4 about the time of the Black Hawk war, and- they were not without apprehensions of Indian troubles, and Mrs. Morse was the only woman of them who was not afraid of Indians. These families lived here alone for a year, shut in on all sides by a wilderness, the nearest settlement being at Lapeer, aLnd the wolves were all around them, and so bold that they would come around the houses at night. It was very evident the savages watchled their mlovements with a jealous eye, and were sometimes very insolenlt. One day, while the three families were living togetlier, the men of course being all from homne, a large masculine looking squaw came to the house and demanded provisions. She was promptly refused by Mrs. Morse, when she had recourse to threats, telling them if they did not yield to her demanlds they would be murdered that night, at the same time brandishing her knife. These threats failed to produce the desired effect, and she finally left; but her words and manner greatly terrified the younger members of the household, and created some excitement among the older ones. Tile gunl was quickly loaded, and everything collected that could serve as a weapon cf defense, a great fire built in the huge old-fashioned fireplace, and several large kettles of water hung on the crane, withl a view of giving the savages a warm reception should they make an attack upon them; but just before nightfall the hearts of all were gladdened by the return of the husbands and fathers, and no Indians were of course to be seen that night. The next year, 1835, other emigrants came. The following is a list of the settlers in the vicinity from the first settlement of the place up to 1840: J. B. Morse located in the fall of 1833 on section 6, Metamora. Removed here July 11, 1834. Died here April 24, 1854. H. M. Look, on section 1, Hadley, reached here July 11, 1834. Removed many years since to Rochester, Miich., where hlie still resides. John Look, on section 1, Hadley, reached here May 18, 1834. Removed in 1877 to Lowell, Mich. Ira Griggs and Almon Griggs, on section 1, Hadley, October 14, 1835. Ira Griggs died here November 16, 1859. Almon Griggs removed to Howell, Livingston County, Micdi., where he died in 1882. Reuben Underwood in 1835 located first on section 36, Elba; afterward on section 7, Mletamora. Removed to Vermont, where he died about 1840. About this time Messrs. Hart, Tunison and Campbell located on the site of Hadley village. Jonathan Coverdale, February, 1836, first located on section 7, Metamnora; afterward on section 36, Elba, the land first taken by R. Underwood. Died in California, 1851. Andrew Merritt, fall of 1836, on section 8, Metamora. Still living; resides at Metamora village. Augustus Davison, winter of 1836-'37, onl section 35, Elba. Diecd hiere in 18t63. Nehemiah Tower, winter of 1836-'37, on section 7, Metamora. Died at Fort Wayne, Ind., in 1852. Matthew Caley, 1837, section 5, MAetamora. Diedl here December 26, 1858. Nelson Cady, 1837, section 12, Hadley. Died August 2, 1868, at Flint, Micll. Lemuel Covil, 1837, section 6, Metamora. Died October, 1877. William Halpin, 1837, section 30, Lapeer. Died here August, 1862. Eliezer Lundy, 1837, section 5, Mletamora. Died here September, 1873. Samuel Perkins, 1837, section 8, Metamora. Died at Lapeer about 1865). Abram Van Gelder, 1837, purchased of Coverdale his location on section 5, Metamora, and died here September 18, 1841. John A. Merritt, 1838, section 7, Metamora. Died at Lapeer, December, 1881. Alpheus Cadcly, 1838, section 12, Hadley. Died January 1, 1864. John B. Cady, 1838, section 12, Hadley. Died September 29, 1846. Samuel Redmollnd, 1838, section 6, Metamzora. Died in 1842 or '-43; buried on his farm. Rev. Abijah Blanchard, 1838, section 6, Metamnora. Returned to the East ill 1840. Died in Wyoming County, N. Y., about 1865. I. C. Smith, 1838, purchased of R. Underwood on section 7, Metamlora. Dr. J. S. Comstock, May, 1839. Still resides here. John Merritt, Sr., 1840, section 7, Mletamnora. Died February 2, 1866, a(red ninety-one years. Zadoc Bates, 1840, section 31, Lapeer, where he still resides. The first death in the place was that of an infant son of J. B. Morse ill Deceimber, 1835. The second, an infant son of Ira Griggs. The first marriage was Mir. Reuben Underwood to Miss Lucia A. Morse, January 1,1837, bv Rev. Mr. Ruggles, who walked from Pontiac to perform the ceremony. In these days the young people attended evening entertainments in their own carriages, heavy lumber wagons drawn by oxen. Maple sugar parties and quiltings were in vogue, and at the latter pumpkin pies and cookies were the usual evening refreshments, often served from huge platters, the nimble fingers of the guests being fork and plate; and often those wcho were so ulnfortunate as to fall under the ban of public displeasure were treated to Callithumpian serenades. These were served out impartially to all those who had offended, no respect being paid to age or station, the reverend clergy and the outcast from society being alike saluted. These too were the days of wild cat money, when every hamlet had its bank and every other man was a bank official, and everybody was immensely rich-in paper-and of the inevitable crash that followed these wild speculations leaving the country poorer than before. Farmers Creek was a place of some note in an early day. About the time of the founding of the Michigan University, and when it was proposed to establish preparatory schools for that institution at convenient points throughout the State, an effort was made to induce the State to found such a school at Farmers Creek. So an academy was started with James R. Taylor, a man of liberal education, as principal, in 1837-'38. A building put up by Mr. Morse for a shop, but afterward used as church and nall, was occupied as the academy building. This school was for a time quite I flourishing institution, and pupils gathered from all the settled towns of the county, Lapeer, Dryden and Almont. Among these were Miss Ann Rood, now Mirs. Cephas G. Woodbury of Lapeer Township, and Mliss Phllila A. Hart, afterwards Mrs. J. M. Wattles, of Lapeer City, Messrs. Iucilus Kendrick and Farnhamr, of Dryden, and many others now prominent in society. But this did not last long. Some of the people thought it putting on too much style for a backwvoods hamlet, and the academy, failing to get the aid ex pected from the State, soon died a natural death. About this time the school district here was formed, known as Fractional No. 1, Hadley and Metamora, and the log school-house built as described in the history of the town of Hadley; but before this was finished and after the collapse of the academy, three terms were taught for the district in the shop, church, hall academy building, by Miss Marcia C. Morse, Mr. Adams Gibson, and Miss Laura E. Red-lond, daughter of Salmuel Redmond. Miss Redmond afterward I I I I I I I I I I -1 I Al i _i) i A I - a

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Page  131 i- - _ M:.Lt - HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 131 I married Daniel Wheeler, youngest son of Timothy Wheeler, and died about two years after, leaving all infant son, Mr. Wheeler was almost crazed with grief and survived his wife but a few months. Their son survived the father a few years, when he was laid by the side of his parents in the cemetery. John C. Clark and his brother Hezekiah, were musical notabilities of that day. J. C. Clark trained the singers here, holding singing school in this same historical old building. In the winter of 1842 a Mr. Loomis attempted to teach a term of school in the log school-house, but the large boys were so numerous and turbulent that he was glad to leave. Then an old feud, growing, we believe, out of some church trials of a few years before, broke out afresh, and the result was a general disorganizing, and the organization of the Fractional District No. 1, of Hadley, Metalmora, Lapeer and Elba, which has ever since been known as the Farmers Creek School. Among the men of note here, long since gone to their reward, were Ira Griggs, Timothy Wheeler and J. B. Morse. Mr. Griggs was a very strong man physically, extremely witty and somewhat eccentric. He had a large family of children, most of whom have gone the way of all the earth. Mr. Dennis Griggs, who married Adeline, daughter of Timothy Wheeler, resides oil the Wheeler homestead. His sister, Miss Abbie M. Griggs, resides at Damon, Ogelmawv County, Mich., the rest of th6 family are dead or living in distant parts of the country. Nehemiah Tower was the chief justice of the peace in these early times, and was a mall of considerable native talent and of excellent judgment. He had several sons and two daughters. J. N. Tower, his sole surviving son, resides in Marathon, Lapeer County. M. T. Tower married Harriet, daughter of Timothy Wheeler, and died about ten years since; his widow survives him. Timothy Wheeler was also a very public spirited citizen. He had two sons and three daughters, all grown to manhood and womanlhood when he emigrated to Michigan. His daughters are all living, the wives of John Collins, Dennis Griggs, and the widow of M. L. Tower; his two sons are both dead; Shepherd, the elder, married Miss Mercy Tower, daughter of Nehemiah Tower, Esq., antd died at Ludington, June 7, 1879. His son, Hon. H. H. Wheeler, waIs a captain in the late civil war, and has since held many offices of trust with honor to himself. Daniel, the younger, married Miss L. E. Redmond, and both he and his wife died mrany years ago. J. B. Morse had also a large family, ten sons and daughters. He was a very public spirited citizen, prominent in cllhurch and society. His wife was a superior woman. Of their large family but five are now living: L. D., C. F., and 0. 0. Morse,and Mrs. David Ernbury. of Grand Blanc, and Mrs. H. C. Babcock, of Metamora. Alonzo M., oldest son, died at Lapeer the year following the removal to Michigan. Lucia married Reuben Underwood, and died in 1838, at the home of her husband's father in Vermont. Orlando married Jane Hartwell, of Atlas, and died about 1850, and Elizabeth married Dr. J. S. Comstock, and died May, 1874. H. M. Look was a man of superior education and fully equal in natural ability to his neighbors. His family showed uncommllon talent, but most of them died young. The only survivor, H. M. Look, Jr., has a considerable reputation as a speaker and writer. The oldest son, Geo. H. Look, went to Kentucky and thence to Indiana, where he practiced law, and at his deatlh, though not over thirty years of age, was attornley-general of the State. The oldest daughter was a most successful teacher. She married Wim. H. Small, a native of Maine. He died of consum ption a few months after their marriage, and she did not survive him three years. Their son, born after the death of his father, was taken, after the death of the mother, to AMine by his paternal grandfather, and died in early manhood. The youngest daughter, a girl of brilliant intellect, died at fifteen years of age. Mrs. Ann Look died in 1830 and Mr. Look married Mrs. Jane Baldwin, of Rochester, and removed to the latter place a few years after. Mr. John Look had also four children; of these, the two oldest, Orson H. Look, of Lowell, Michigan,,anld Helen M., married to the Rev. D. L. Eaton, are dead. Of the two surviving children, the daughter resides in St. Louis, Mo., the son in Lowell, Mich. Rev. Abijah Blanchard, who resided at Farmers Creek for two years as a pastor of a Presbyterian Church organized there in 1838, was a singular character. He was an old-school teacher, and seems to have endeavored to govern his church as lie had been wont to govern the boys of his New England academy. He did not find the experiment a success, for it was not long before the church was rent in twain by internal dissensions and church trials were the order of the day. One of the brethren was tried, and we believe expelled from the church, for returning home on Sunday morning from Lakeville or Orion to mill. He had been overtaken by a violent storm and was unable to drive home with his grist on Saturday night, and had no money to pay his expenses over Sunday; but it was a breach of the commandment and he was brought before the bar of the churc-h. Of course a trial for an alleged offense committed under such circumnstances created much feeling, and was not at all lessened when one of the deacons of the church was tried for the grave charge of having said that he considered a certain young lady of his acquaintance "no better than she ought to be." He did not deny the charge and proceedings were had at great length. At last the church was dissolved. Mr. Blanchard went back to the East, not, however, until lie had been "charivaried" by tile indignant young men of the community, who followed him several miles with guns, bells land horns. Of course this latter proceeding caused a good deal of feeling in the community, and it was many years before these foolislh quarrels were forgotten. Mr. Blanchard had a son who who s a soldier in the Mexican War. He was no doubt a good man, but had been too long a teacher and had too high an idea of the prerogative of the ministry, to succeed as a missionary in the Western1 country. In 1849-'50, three men in this leighborhood: Jonathan Coverdale, Q. P. Bruce and Curtis, left their families and homes to seek gold in California. Mr. Ccverdale died in a few months, and not long after Mr. Bruce was reported to have died. Somue time after, Mrs. Curtis, who was somewhat notorious for many peculiarities, took her children and joined her husband. They have both since dfied. Mrs. Bruce died December 25, 1881. Mrs. Coverdale afterwards married Jamnes Gark, was a second time widowed and died at North Branch about two years since. TO WNi OF ELBA. Elba, known as township 7 north, of range 9 east, belongs to the western tier of towns in Lapeer County. It is bounded on the north by Oregon, east by Lapeer, south by H'adley and west by Genesee County. The Chicago & Grand Trunk Railroad traverses the northern portion of the township. Farmers Creek is tile principal stream and Lake Nepessing the principal body of water. The population of Elba in 1840 was 100. Census of 1874: Population, 1.108; acres of taxable land, 22,991; of improved land, 7,738; number of sheep, 3,282; of horses, 492; of cows, 491; pounds of wool sheared, 17,849; of pork marketed, 18,178; of butter made, 28,8395; bushels of wheat raised preceding year, 33,564; of corn, 19,330; of apples, 4,654, of potatoes, 6,630; tons of hay cut, 1,838. i - - I - _ D

Page  132 * 7- f E I i I I 'A I 132 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. According to the census of 1880, the town had a population of 1,291. The aggregate valuation of real and personal property as equalized by the board of supervisors in 1882 was $549,000. ENTRIES OF LAND. The following list shows the entries of land prior to the year 1841 TOWNSHIP 7 NORTH, RANGE 9 EAST. SECTION 1. Anastasia Thayer, November 6, 1835. Robert McMillan, February 12, 1836. Oliver B. Hart, February 12, 1836. Increase Van Deusen, March 24, 1836. James Turrill, May 6, 1836. SECTION 2. Chas. R. Griswold, April 3, 1836. Darius Lamson, April 11, 1836. Darius Lamson, April 20, 1836. Thomas O. Hill, April 21, 1836. Moses Dole, May 16, 1836. SECTION 3. Ira Davenport, May 25, 1836. SECTION 4. James Turrill, May 6, 1836. Francis G. Macey, May 23, 1836. O. E. Maltby and A. W. Langdon, May 23, 1836. SECTION 5. James Turrill, May 6, 1836. Henry Isaacs, May 25, 1836. SECTION 6. Henry Isaacs, May 25, 1836. Wain-ge-ke-shick, May 13, 1846. George Bradley, November 3, 1848. Missionary Society of the M. E. Church, November 3, 1848. SECTION 7. Henry Isaacs, May 25, 1836. Francis G. Macey, July 16, 1836. SECTION 8. Gersham M. Williams and Peter Deyenoyer, April 9, 1836. Charles and Gasca Rich, May 12, 1836. Henry Isaacs, May 25, 1886. Francis G. Macey, July 16, 1836. SECTION 9. James Turrill, May 6, 1836. George Otto, May 10, 1836. Francis G. Macey, May 23, 1836. Charles Curtis, August 4, 1845. Arzy Smith, October 7, 1850. SECTION 10. PeterG.DesnoyerandFrancisDesnoyer,April 12,1886. George Otto, May 10, 1836. Oliver E. Maltby and Amon W. Langdon, May 10, 1836. Francis G. Macey, May 10, 1836. Reuben R. Shadbolt, November 8, 1847. SECTION 11. Nathan Dickenson, William H. Imlay and George Beach, April 2, 1836. SECTION 12. Morris T. Allen, August 12, 18338. Nehemiah M. Allen, August 12, 1833. Trumbull Carey, March 22, 1886. James Turrill, May 7, 1836. SECTION 13. George F. Porter, April 19, 1833. Ira Howland, March 8, 1836. Trumbull Carey, March 28, 1836. James Turrill, May 6, 1886. Jabish M. Corey, January 24, 1837. SECTION 14. Minor Y. Turrill, June 28, 1832. Trumbull Carey, March 22, 1886. Ira Howland and Isaac Wheeler, March 20, 1887. SECTION 15. George Otto, May 10, 1836. Francis G. Macey, May 10, 1836. Oliver E. Maltby and Amon W. Langdon, May 11, 1836. Francis G. Macey, May 17, 1836. SECTION 17. Charles and Gasca Rich, May 12, 1836. Newell Kinsman, July 16, 1836. Francis G. Macey, July 16, 1836. SECTION 18. Newell Kinsman, July 16, 1836. Francis G. Macey, July 16, 1836. Isaiah Eggleston, May 2, 1839. Willis F. Eggleston, May 2, 1839. John Loudon, November 1, 1839. John Lamoreaux, August 1, 1850. SECTION 19. Francis G. Macey, May 10, 1836. Francis G. Macey, May 23, 1836. Sophronia Farnham, September 11, 1839. John Loudon, November 1, 1839. Thomas M. Slayton, September 25, 1847. John S. Winters, October 11, 1847. SECTION 20. James A. Vandyke, April 23, 1836. Oliver E. Maltby and Amon W. Langdon, May 10, 1836. Charles and Gasca Rich, May 12, 1836. Newell Kinsman, January 16, 1836. SECTION 21. Francis G. Macey, May 10, 1886. Francis G. Macey, May 23, 1836. SECTION 22. Francis G. Macey, Aay 10 and 23, 1836 Oliver E. Maltby and Amon W. Langdon, May 23, 1836. SECTION 23. Julius Beardsley, July 10, 1834. Francis G. Macey, May 23, 1836. Eleazer Lundy, October 25, 1836. Charles McNeil, Jr., December 13, 1839. Sylas Moor, December 16, 1839. John C. Meacham, February 19, 1840. David C. Wattles, December 31, 1841. Henry Stringer, January 15, 1842. SECTION 24. Henry M. Look, October 18,1832. Julius Beardsley, July 10, 1884. Trumbull Carey, October 29, 1835. William Moore, March 26, 1835. Ira Howland, March 26, 1835. James Turrill, May 6, 1836. Center Lamb, July 16, 1836. Calvin Carter, August 26, 1836. SECTION 25. William Moore, March 26, 1836. Calvin Rose, March 26, 1836. Daniel H. Chandler, May 2, 1836. William S. Bird, June 6, 1886. Smith Titus, Junle 23, 1886, Nathan Seely, July 6, 1886. SECTION 26. Francis G. Macey, May 23, 1836. James Bullock, August 26, 1836. SECTION 27. Francis G. Macey, May 23, 1836. Oliver E. Maltby and Amon W. Langdon, May 28, 1836. Joshua B. Chapel, August 27, 1836. Joseph Hoffman, October 28, 1837. SECTION 28. Charles and Gasca Rich, May 12, 1836. Levi Bishop, Jr., July 6, 1836. Isaac Wheeler, July 6,1836. * Harvey Bordman, October 12, 1836. tl - w I~ — i0v

Page  133 A -,.-! -- I HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 133 i _I Isaac Wheeler, November 22, 1836. Joseph Hoffman, November 23, 1836. Francis G. Macey, December 19, 1836. Joseph Hoffman, October 28, 1837. SECTION 29. Andrew Turk, May 5, 1836. Francis G. Macey, May 11, 1836. Harrv Bordman, October 12, 1836. SECTION 30. Daniel H. Chandler, May 2, 1836. Oliver Maltby and A. W. Langdon, May 10, 1836. Francis G. Macey, May 10, 1836. O. E. Maltby and A. W. Langdon, May 23, 1836. John Starkweather, October 13, 1836. SECTION 31. O. E. Maltby and A. W. Langdon, May 10, 1836. Francis G. Macey, May 10, 1836. Charles and Gasca Rich, May 12, 1836. Francis G. Macey, May 23, 1836. SECTION 32.. E. Maltby and A. W. Langdon, May 10, 1836. Francis G. Macey, May 10, 1836. William D. Potter, Oct. 12, 1836. SECTION 33. Stephen Grant, April 1, 1836. Charles and Gasca Rich, May 12, 1836. Henry I. Wilcox, June 17, 1836. Loren Benedict, October 14, 1836. John McKay. N vember 8, 1837. John Hersey, October 23, 1838. SECTION 34. Francis G. Macey, May 23, 1836. Henry I. Wilcox, June 17, 1836. Joseph Fiefield, January 18. 1838. James R. Van Vranken, July 6, 1841. SECTION 35. Charles Hannibal, July 23, 1835. John Davison, June 6, 1836. Ezekiel Skinner, July 13, 1836. Samuel Davenport, August 26, 1836. SECTION 36. Trumbull Carey, October 29, 1835. C. C. Palmer and Charles Coventry, April 29, 1836. Thomas Battans, April 29, 1836. Daniel H. Chandler, May 2, 1836. Rufus Cram, December 20, 1836. Philip Crankshaw, October 15, 1850. Thomas Shortall, October 15, 1850. EARLY HISTORY. The first settlers in the town of Elba v ere Hozial Howland and his son Ira, the latter the oldest living settler in the town. They located on section 24, in the year 1835, the entry of land being dated March 26, 1835. Hozial Howland was a native of Rhode Island, where his son Ira was born. He moved thence to Connecticut, and from there to Tioga County, Pa. In 1835 he came as has been stated to Lapeer County. He died in September, 1865, aged eighty-four. The same year with the Howlands, came William Sherwood and William S. Bird. In 1836 came William Ross, Augustus Davison, Almon Brookins and Richard Pemberton. The next year came Lewis Bullock, James Bullock, Jonathan Coverdale, and Alanson Hammond. In 1838 William Nowell, Morris Perry, Chauncey Nye and Perry Parker. From 1839 to 1846, the following persons settled in the township: Silas Moore, Daniel Horton, Sidney Creagor, Alvin WicMaster, Calvin Carter, Benjamin Horner, William D. Potter, A. S. Hatch, I. P. Bruce, Robert Rozier, David C. Wattles, Henry Bronson, John Ivory, Samuel Bird, C. P. Goodrich, John Hannan, William Beach, Asa Preston, James Hodgson, G. W. Davis, Samuel Davenport, J. D. McIntyre, R. C. Shadbolt, Tobias Reeser, John N. Briggs. Of the persons named in this sketch, only Silas Moore, Ira Howland, Alanson Hammond, Sidney Creagor, Samuel Davenport and John N. Briggs, are known to be living in town. Win. D. Potter, J. D. McIntyre and C. P. Goodrich have removed to Hadley, and most of the others have gone to the regions of the dead. Hozial Howland was a very prominent citizen of the town and county; was judge of probate at an early day. He had a large family all grown to manhood and womanhood, when he emigrated to Michigan. Two of his sons, Thomas and Ephraim Howland, who married Harriet and Mary Ann, daughters of Henry Bronson, were long engaged in mercantile business, and speculations of all kinds, and finally became bankrupt. Afterward uniting with the Protestant Methodist Church, they became acceptable ministers of that denomination. Both died of consurmption. Another old pioneer of Elba, Richard Pemberton, had six daughters, three of whom became the wives of Silas Moore, Alanson Hammond and Ira Howland, and one son, who became insane in early manhood. and was for many years an inmate uf the Michigan Asylum for the Insane at Kalamazoo, where he died a few years since. The first school in the town was taught in 1836 in a log school-house on section 19. There were about seventeen scholars. One of the earliest and perhaps the earliest was Robert McKay. The first marriage was John Shafer to his second wife, Mary Loisa Wait, by Ira Howland, J. P. The first birth was Hozial, son of Benjamin Horner. He was named for Hozial Howland. The town of Elba was organized in 1838. First township meeting held at the house of William S. Bird, May 5, 1838, with Lewis Bullock as chairman; Augustus Davison and Almon Brookins, clerks; Lewis Bullock was elected supervisor; Philander P. Parker, clerk; HozialY Howland, Augustus Davison, Charles Hannibal and Almon Brookins, justices of the peace; William Bird, Morris Perry, and Ira Howland, highway commissioners; Hozial Howland, Augustus Davison, and Calvin Carter, assessors; Thomas Howland, constable and collector; Charles Hannibal and Calvin Carter, constables; Hozial Howland, Morris Perry, and Augustus Davison, overseers of the poor. The records of the town from the date of organization to 1846 are missing. TOWN OFFICERS. The following is a list of town officers since 1846, the records prior to that time being lost. 1846-Supervisor, William Beech; clerk, Reuben R. Shadbolt; treasurer, Thomas Howland. 1847-Supervisor, Chancy S. Randall; clerk, J. P. Bruce; treasurer, William Clark; number of votes, 35. 1848-Supervisor, William H. Clark; clerk, Lewis Bullock; treasurer, William Clark; number of votes, 32. 1849-Supervisor, William H. Clark; clerk, Joel D. McIntyre; treasurer, Chancy Merwin; number of votes, 44. 1850 Supervisor, William H. Clark; clerk, Joel D. McIntyre; treasurer, Chancy Merwin; number of votes, 38. 18tl —Supervisor, Thomas M. Slayton; clerk, John J. Watkins; treasurer, Joseph Treadway; number of votes, 40. 1852 —Supervisor, Thomas M. Slayton; clerk, Alanson Hammond; treasurer, Joseph Treadway. 1853-Supervisor, Charles Rich; clerk, Oreb Vilas; treasurer, Chancy Merwin. 1854 —Supervisor, William H. Clark, clerk, Oreb Vilas; treasurer, Chancy Merwin. L _I 0 - 1

Page  134 LI - 134 HIS TORY OF LXPEER CO)UNT-Y. -. 1855-Supervisor, Charles Rich; clerk, Oreb Vilas; treasurer, Chancy Merwin; number of votes, 69. 1856 —Supervisor, Charles Rich; clerk, John Alien; treasurer, Chancy Merwin; number of votes, 94. 1857-Supervisor, William D. Potter; clerk, Alanson Hammond; treasurer, Alexander Hofiman. 1858-Supervisor, William D. Potter; clerk, Alanson Hammond; treasurer, Alexander Hoffman; number of votes, 108. 1859-Supervisor, Alexander Hoffman; cleri, Joel D. Mcintyre; treasurer, Benoni Bullock, number of votes, 184. 1860 —Supervisor, Stephen V. Thomas; clerk, Joel D. Mclntyre; treasurer, Benoni Bullock; number of votes, 157. 1861 —Supervisor, Stephen V. Thomas; clerk, Joel D. Mcintyre; treasurer, Benoni Bullock; number of votes, 129. 1862-Supervisor, Stephen V. Thomas; clerk, Joel D. Mcintyre; treasurer, Benoni Bullock; number of votes, 138. 1863 —Supervisor, Stephen V. Thomas; clerk, Lewis Bullock; treasurer, Abram B. Gates; number of votes, 181. 1864 —Supervisor, Joel D. Mcintyre; clerk, Lewis Bullock; treasurer, Benoni Bullock; number of votes, 125. 1865-Supervisor, Joel D. Mcintyre; clerk, Martin P. Moor; treasurer, Reuben H. Slayton; number of votes, 126. 1866 —Supervisor, Joel D. Mcintyre; clerk, Martin P. Moor; treasurer, Reuben H. Slayton; number of votes, 151. 1867 - Supervisor, Joseph Treadway' clerk, Sackett Ostrom; treasurer, John Selby. I 1868-Supervisor, William H. Clark; clerk, Sackett Ostrom; treasurer, John Selby; number of votes, 218. 1869-Supervisor, John T. Rich; clerk, Sackett Ostrom; treasurer, John Selby. 1870-Supervisor, John T. Rich: clerk, Sackett Ostrom; treasurer, Alanson Hanmmond. 1871-Supervisor, John T. Rich; clerk, Warren Perry; treasurer, Alanson Hammond. i 1872 —Supervisor, John T. Rich; clerkli, Warren Perry, treasurer, Alanson Hammond; number of votes, 234. 1873 —Supervisor, Joel D. Mcintyre; clerk, Sackett Ostrom; i treasurer, Henry Gibson; number of votes, 209. 1874-Supervisor, Joel D. Mcilntyre; clerk, Sackett Ostrom; treasurer, Henry Gibson. 1875-Supervisor, Joel D). Mclntyre; clerk, Sackett Ostrom; treasurer, Henry Gibson; number of votes, 254. 1876 —Supervisor, Joel D. Mcintyre; clerk, Sackett Ostrom; treasurer, F. G. Bullocll. 1877-Supervisgr, David Godfrey; clerk, Martin P. Moor; treasurer, F. G. Bullock. 1878-Supervisor, Frederick G. Bullock; clerk, Martin P. Moor; treasurer, Sackett Ostrom. 1879-Supervisor, Frederick G. Bullock; clerk, Martin P. Moor; treasurer, Sackett Ostrom. 1880-Supervisor, Frederick G. Bullock; clerk, Martin P. Moor; treasurer, Melville Inman. 1881 —Supervisor, Frederick G. Bullock; clerk, William Howland; treasurer, Robert Stewart. 1882-Supervisor, Frederick G. Bullock; clerk, William Howland; treasurer, Robert Stewart. 1883 —Supervisor, Frederick G. Bullock; clerk, William Howland; treasurer, Morris R. Moor. SCHOOL REPORT. The report of the school inspectors for the year 1882 of the town of Elba, shows the number of school children to have been 466; number of school buildings, 10. The inspectors for the ensuing year were Charles A. Bullock, John Halpin, Peter Piper, John W. Kile, John B. Hainmond, R. Misner, B. F. Kingsbury,' P. J. Cranklishaw, Enos M. Woodard, Joseph Baxter. ELBA STATION, When the Chicago & Grand Trunk Railroad came through, the settlement of Elba Station sprang up, and has become a business center for that immediate neighborhood. It is a small village, containing a pbstoffice, stores, etc. BIOGRAPHICAL. WILLIAM HOWLAND was born in Lapeer Township, Mich., December 7, 1852, and has been a continual resident of the county since his birth. He now resides on section 13, Elba Township, and is the present township clerkli. Married in 1876 to Anna Stalker, who was born in England in 1858. Two children-Robert N. and Kate. His father, Ira, was born in Connecticut about the year 1810, and settled in Michigan in about 1836, and has held nearly all the offices of trust or honor in his township, and resides on the same section with his son. JOHN STEWARTWaS born in Argyleshire, Scotland, in 1799; married Janet Cook in 1829, who was born in Argyleshire in 1804. Settled in Canada in 1854, and in Elba Township, Lapeer County, Mich., on section 31, in 1856, where they still reside, having passed their fifty-fourth wedding anniversary. They lave six living children-Agnes Black, John, Marian McDougall, Catherine Fraser, Robert, Janet Gleason. They have lost two by death. They reside in their old age with their son Robert, who was born in 1841, and who has been identified as one of Elba's prominent citizens by having held several township offices. HENRY N. POTTER was boirn on section 32, Elba Township, in 1842, where he now resides; married in 1866 Enmma Gleason. Has five children-Arthur, Lillie, Edwin, Otis and Duane. His father, Rev. W. D. Potter, was one of the very first settlers in the county, mention of which is minade elsewhere. MYRON SNYDER was born in Wayne County, N. Y., in 1829, and settled in Lapeer County, Mich., Elba Township, in 1866, on section 11, where he now resides and owns 400 acres of land, which he keeps under a fine state of cultivation. He also deals largely in stock and horses, shipping as far West as Dakota. Married in 1851 Sarah J. Hoyt, who was bornii in Wayne County, N. Y., in 1830. They have three children-Adella, Minnie and Charles. His father, Peter, settled in Michigan in 1869 and died in 1876. Mother died in 1874. WILLIAM HAMMOND was born in Elba Township in 1847; is a farmer of 160 acres, residing on section 17; unmarried. His father, Alanson, was born in Rutland County, Vt., in 1815, and settled in Oakliland County, Mich., at a very early date. WILLIAM BECKMAN was born in Pennsylvania in 1828; settled on section 22, Elba Township, in 1869. Married in 1850 Elizabeth Geesey, who was also born inl Pennsylvania in 1828. They are the parents of seven-children-Charles, Mary, Jane, Elizabeth, Ella, John, Emma. JOHN WINSHIP was born in Dutchess County, N. Y., in 1825, and moved with his parents to Livingston County, N. Y., in 1830, thence to Atlas, Genesee County, Mich., in 1836, where he remained until 1859 engaged in farming. In that year he went to California, remaining till 1862, when he made one of a party of 100 men who volunteered and paid their own expenses to New York City, where they were mustered into service in the Second Massachusetts Cavalry, in which he served to the close of the war in the cavalry corps of the Army of the Potomac. After being discharged, he returned to Atlas, where hlie again engaged in farming till 1872, when he came to Elba Station and built the store he now occupies, in J 0-~ - I_?

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Page  [unnumbered] JOSEPH TREADWAY, ELBATP.,LAPEER Co.,

Page  [unnumbered] -:`:: ucr,-;~;!~i i~' wt 6L: de ~;.. -:~:-~ ~-~; i-f i —i ~;::t MRS. JOSEPH TREADWAY. ELBA TP., LAPEER COD.

Page  [unnumbered]

Page  135 -I F i I I I I I i I I I i I I i! I I I I I I I 135 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. which he keeps a stock of general merchandise. He is also postmaster. Was married in 1865 to Miss Sarah Hyde, who was born in Niagara County, N. Y., in 1840. They have four children. JOSEPH TREADWAY was born in Shorehanm, Addison County, Vt., November 24, 1818, and in 1847 came to Elba, Lapeer County, Mich., and purchased a farm on section 8. He now owns 480 acres of land, upon which he keeps 200 fine wool sheep. He has, undoubtedly, one of the best stock farms in this part of the State. Mr. Treadway was married in 1848 to Miss Mary Reeser, who was born in New York. They have six children. JOHN R. HAMMOND was born in Clarendon, Rutland County, N. Y., in 1824. In 1844 lie came to Elba, Lapeer County, Mich., and settled on section 16, where he has since resided, with the exception of the time he spent in the service of the United States. He enlisted in 1868 in Company C, Tenth Michigan Cavalry, and served under General Thomas in the Army of the Tennessee. Was married to Miss Amy Ann Thornton, of Rutland County, Vt., where she was born in 1824. They have had seven children, of whom four are living. JEROME COMPTON waS born in Monroe County, N. Y., in 1845, and in 1862 came to Elba, Lapeer County, Mich., andl settled onil section 6, where hle engaged in farming till 1881, when he purchased the hotel at Elba Station, which he has since kept and also managed his farim. October, 1874, he married Miss Addie Price, who was born in Glen Falls, Saratoga, County, N. Y. They have three children. SILAS MOORE was born in Tiog;a County, Pa., in 1813, and came to Lapeer, Lapeer County, Mich., in 1836, and settled on section 18, where he remained till 1839, when he moved to the township of Elba and located on section 13, thence to his present home on section 17 in 1846. He has engaged in farming exclusively as a business since he came to the county; but during that time has represented his township il the offices of supervisor, justice of the peace, township clerk, treasurer and highway commissioner. He was married July 17, 1836, to Miss Caroline Pemberton, and they have had a family of eight children. MORRIS R. MOORE was born in the township of Elba, Lapeer County, Mich., March 17, 1847, and is a son of Silas Moore, whose farm he is now managing. He was married April 22, 1875, to Miss Minora A. Lyons, who was born in Elba. They have two children. LEWIS BULLOCK, deceased, was born in Sand Lake, Rensellaer County, N. Y., December 1, 1810, and came to Lapeer County, Mich., in 1837. He took up a large tract of land from the government, and settled in the township of Elba on section 26, clearing up his farm and living upon it until his death, September 26, 1872. He was married May 12, 1836, to Emily L. Davis, who was born inll Lewiston, Niagara County, N. Y., March 5, 1821. They had a family of nine children, of whom four are now living. FREDERICK G. BULLOCK, son of Lewis Bullock, was born in Elba December 16, 1841, and has always resided on his farm on section 26, which en pas.sa;nt is a very fine one, with buildings to compare. In official position Mr. Bullock has served as school inspector two years, township treasurer four years, and supervisor five years, which office he still holds. Married November 11, 1869, to Miss Elizabeth AM. Pelton. They have six children. A. B. GATES was born, in Sene-[., OntLrio Coulity, N. Y., Nov. 23, 1826, and came to Lapeer with his parents in 1836, and learned the trade of carpenter and joiner, which business he followed for a number of years. About the year 1857 he settled on a farmn located on sections 18 and 14, in the township of Elba, and in 1864 moved to his present home on section 27. He was married in 1851 to Miss Jane Smith, who was born in Almont, Mich., and died in 1863. He was again married, in 1864, to Mrs. Martha L. Bullock. HON. JOHN T. RICH was born in Conneautville, Crawford County, Pa., April 23, 1841, and moved with his parents in 1846, to Addison- County, Vt., and in 1818, came to Elba, Lapeer County, Mich. He received a common school and academic education, and is by occupation, a farmer; owns a fine farm in Elba on section 19, and is engaged quite extensively in breeding short-horned cattle and fine-wooled sheep. He l.has been elected four times, in a township that usually gives a Democratic majority. Was elected to the State legislature in 1872 and re-elected in 1874-'76 and 1878. He was chosen speaker of tihe legislature in 1877 and renominated in 1879. In the first two terms of his legislative service he acquired influence by close attention, sound commnon sense and personal affability, servir!g on important committees, while, as speaker, none of his decisions were ever reversed and very few ever appealed from. As a presiding officer his ability, promptness and fairness earned for him the respect of all parties, and he introduced several improvements into the methods of business pursued by the house. He was elected to the State senate in 1880, and at the Republican State convention in 1880, Mr. Rich receive(l a strong support as a candidate for governor, his vote steadily increasing till the tenth ballot, when the vote went to David H. Jerome. The Republican convention for the Seventh Congressional District on Mcarch 11, 1881, nominated Mr. Rich by fifty-two out of sixty-five votes, as the successor of Mr. Conger, who had been promoted to the U. S. senate. Mr. Rich w-s married in Marchll, 1863, to Miss Lucretia Winship, of Avon, N. Y. EBENEZER W. POWELSON was born in Groveland, Oaklalnd County, Mich., Aug. 31, 1843, and came to Elba, Lapeer County, Nov. 18, 1868, and purchased a farm on section 22, whlere he remained engaced in farming until his death, which occurred in 1878. He was married March 25, 1868, to Miss Mary Ramsey, who was born in Stark County, Ohio, in 1843. They had two children. Mrs. Powelson now owns a good farm of eighty acres. TOWNV, (O)F' MARAITHIION. This town is the northernmost of the western tier of townships, and is bounded on the north by Tuscola County, east by Deerfield, south by Oregon and west by Genesee County. hlle north and south branclles of the Flint River unite in section 23, and the main stream. continues in a southwesterly direction across the township line. Tle township was originally largely covered with pine, and extensive logging and lunebering operations were carried on here at an early day, and are still continued to a limited extent. The Detroit and Bay City branch of the 'Michigan. Central Railroad traverses the southwest portion of the township. In 1840 the population of the town was 52, and in 1880, 1,667. The State census of 1874, gave the following information: Population, 1,308; acres of improved land, 5,581; number of sheep, 941; of swine, 385; of neat cattle, other than oxen and cows, one year old and over, 429; of horses, 313; of mules, 16; of work oxen, 109; of milch cows, 411; products of preceding year, 3,882 pounds of wool; 15,301 pounds of pork marketed; 38,252 pounds of butter made; 12,204 bushels wheat raised; 13,375 pounds of corn; 28,043 of other grain; 2,120 of apples; 6,251 of potatoes, and 1,212 tons of I hay; 47 barrels of cider were made. In 1882 the equalized valuation of real and personal property in the township was $540,000. ORGANIZATI3N. The town of Marathon was organized in the year 1889, the present towns of Oregon on the south and Deerfield on the east be-!. II i I I I II I i - r I I i i - I r i 4 - - - l I r: e* I f..

Page  136 136 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. ing incorporated with it. Silas D. McKeen, then running a sawmill near the present site of the McKeen bridge and a member of the legislature at the time, named the town Marathon, after the famous Greek battlefield. The first town meeting was held at the house of Abijah Willey on the first day of April, 1839. The list of officers elected contains twenty offices and only twelve names. Those were rare times for office seekers. Horace N. Lathrop was first supervisor, S. D. McKeen, town clerk, and Martin Volentine, collector. Mr. Volentine states that during this and the following year he never took any money except what seemed a silver dollar, and that tlrned out to be bogus. Almost the only currency to be found in town was town and county orders. At this first township meeting Silas D. McKeen was moderator, and Richard Bronson, Abraham Hollenbeck, Andrew McArthur and Alonzo Davis were inspectors of election. Two hundred and fifty dollars were appropriated for improvement of highways. The sum of five dollars was voted as wolf bounty. The annual report of school inspectors of the town of Marathon for the year 1882 shows the number of school children to have been 672; number of school buildings, seven. The school inspectors for the ensuing year were A. W. Monroe, A. Willey, Peter Hagle, Nelson Sweet, A. C. Robertson, John Wilson, W. C. Cummings, Bradford Johnson. LAND ENTRIES PRIOR TO 1841. TOWNSHIP 9 NORTH, RANGE 9 EAST. SECTION 4. Aaron Rood, November 25, 1836. Calvin C. Waller, December 19, 1836. Charles Linsley, December 19, 1836. Reuben A. Lamb, December 19, 1836. Minor Y. Turrell, December 19, 1836. Almon Brookins, December 19, 1836. Alva Bishop, January 23, 1837. SECTION 5. Aaron Rood, November 25, 1836. Cavin C. Waller, December 19, 1836. Reuben A. Lamb, December 19, 1836. Aaron Rood, December 19, 1836. SECTION 8. William G. Stone, August 24, 1836. Henry Wheelock, December 19, 1836. William Holdridge, Jr., September 6, 1837. SECTION 9. Albert Lester, September 15, 1836. George Rood, November 25, 1836. SECTION 10. Henry K. Sanger, January 16, 1837. SECTION 11. Henry S. Platt, May 2, 1836. Henry K. Sanger, January 16, 1837. SECTION 12. Henry S. Platt, May 2, 1836. SECTION 13. Nathan Dickinson, William H. Imlay and George Beech, April 2, 1836. Nathan Dickinson, William H. Imlay and George Beech, April 7, 1836. SECTION 11. Henry S. Platt, May 2, 1836. James B. Hunt, January 16, 1837. SECTION 15. Herry K. Sanger, January i6, 1837. SECTION 17. David Burritt, June 29, 1836. Josiah Snyder, June 29, 1836. George W. Willianms and James Fraser, March 28, 1837. Horace B. Harrison, August 4, 1837. SECTION 18. Stephen I. Payne, April 15, 1837. SECTION 19. Edward G. Faile, November 24, 1836. George F. Ball, March 10, 1837. SECTION 20. David Burritt, Janiuary 29, 1836. Oliver Olmsted, January 22, 1836. Julius B. IHart, October 17, 1836. Abijah Willey, November 14, 1836. George F. Ball, March 10, 1817. Simon Aurand, October 13, 1838. Truman Farrand, March 27, 1839. SECTION 21. John Shaefer, June 6, 1836. David Vosburgh, June 11, 1836. Aaron C. Williams, June 11, 1836. Asahel Wise, June 11, 1836. Abraham Hollenbeck. June 11, 1836. SECTION 22. Jarvis Hurd, April 6, 1836. Abraham A. Post, April 20, 1836. SECTION 23. Lewis Goddard and Jonathan R. White, February 13, 1836. Nathan Dickinson, Williaml H. Inrlay and George Beech, April 7, 1836. SECTION 24. John R. White, February 25, 1836. Nathan Dickinson, William H. Imlay and George Beech, April 7, 1836. SECTION 25. Lewis Goddard and J. R. White, February 15, 18836. Lewis Goddard and J. R. White, February 13, 1836. Nathan Dickinson, William H. Imnlay and George Beech, April 7, 1836. SECTION 26. Lewis Goddard and J. R. White, February 13, 1836. N. Dickinson, William H. Imlay and George Beech, April 7, 1836. SECTION 27. Horatio N. Fowler and Asahel Hubbard, April 6, 1836. Nathan Dickinson, William H. Imnlay and George Beech, April 18, 1836. SECTION 28. Horatio N. Fowler and Asahel Hubbard, April 6, 1836. Sylvanus P. Germain, April 7, 1836. Abijah Willey and Evart Clute, May 27, 1836. Christopher Logan, Junle 6, 1836. Henry Waldorph, June 11,1836. Oliver B. Hart, June 13, 1836. Edward G. Morton, June 14, 1836. SECTrIoN 29. Abijah Willey and Evart Clute, May 27, 1836. Amasa Nash, June 6, 1836. Samuel Volentine, October 15, 1836. Justus B. Hart, October, 17, 1836. Asa Phillips, June 3, 1839. Nelson Volentine, October 26, 1839. Shubal Volentine, October 26, 1839. Shubal Volentine, November 16, 1840. SECTION 31. Conckling Carr, February 17, 1837. Nelson Volentine, March 1.3, 1838. SECTION 32. Delos Davis, May 21, 1836. SECTION 33. Cullen Brown, February 27, 1836. Gershom M. Williams and John Winder, March 7, 1836. Thomas L. L. Brent, March 9, 1836. Eurotas P. Hastings, March 9, 1836. Sylvanus P. Germain, April 7, 1836. Abijah Willey and Evart Clute, May 21, 1836. SECTION 34. Thomas L. L. Brent, March 9, 18386. Homer Foote, April 18, 1836. Abraham A. Post, April 20, 1836. I f a:: A9 I I 12::~ fff f f D0::

Page  137 - I! at J HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 137 SECTION 34. SECTION 35. SECTION 36. Ira Davenport, May 19, 1836. Oliver Wiswall, May 2, 1836. J. B. White and Lewis Stoddard, February 15, 1836. Nathan Dickinson, William H. Imlay and George W. Beech, April 7, 1836. Eurotas P. Hastings, May 17, 1836. Moses Dole, May 21, 1836. EARLY HISTORY. Dr. William B. Hamilton furnishes the following chapter on the early history of Marathon: "The love of country is a common and a noble feeling; there are but few minds insensible to its influence. It is a grand passion implanted in the great heart of humanity for the wisest purposes. It renders possible thile arrangement of nmalnkind into national coinmunities, bound together by powerful ties and securing to their memlbers all the blessings wich arise from law and order, and their resulting civilization, personal protection and general diffusion of knowledge. "Akiln to this feeling is the love of holne. The word 'home' brings a thrill to the coldest heart. There are few who do not feel a tender regard for the spot that witnessed their advent to life; that was the scene of their early toils and struggles, joys and sorrows, trials and triumlphs. "We of this new world have a peculiar history, ard a peculiar mission. Hardly a generation has passed awdy, since in this and other localities the pleasant land we inhabit was in a state of nature, inhabited by savage men, and scarce more savage beasts; and utterly unfitted, f rom its wilderness condition, to be the homlle of civilized and enlightened people. To drive back those savage foes, both brute and human, to subdue the forest and make the wilderness blossom as the rose, was a task that required in those who undertook it, no small development of the elements of heroism. Those gallant men who led the way must need have stout hearts and iron frames. The noble women who accompanied theln in those arduous labors, added to the usual feininiie virtues, a more than comlmon courage and devotion. The dangers they enCountered, the privations thev endured, the work they accomplished should never be forgotten. Savage mlen and brutes were not the olly etiemies they had to encounter. The howling denizens of the forest were trivial foes, compared with the gaunt wolf of hunger. The dreaded red man made fewer victims than the ghastly specter of lmalaria. Some perished early in the strife and richly earned thle palm of martyrdom. To the few who still survive belongs the laurel chaplet. "The first white menp of wholl we call find anly record or tradition as having 'crossed over Jordan,' the Flint River, into the prcmised land of Marathon,with a view to settlement, were Ephraim Clute and Abijah Willey. In the spring cf 1836 Mr. Clute and Mr. Willev followed an Indian or hunter's trail down the South Branch of the Flint River, to near the point where Columlbiaville now stands; and crossing with some difficulty followed up the creek which comes in here from the northwest, until they reached a point just back of the present site of the Willey school-house. Tllere they pitched their canmp and proceeded to spy out the land. While by day they tore their way through thickets, and scrambled over fallen^ timber inI prosecuting their search, by nlight they cooked their frugal rations and slept thle sleep of the weary to the music of such a serenade as has not been heard for manly years in Marathon. "The wolves in hungry droves filled the woods with terrible howlings, approaching so near the brushwood hut of the sleepers as to scratch up the leaves behind the log against which they had _i built their evening fire. It seems that the result of the search was satisfactory, and unlike the cowardly Hebrew spies we read of, they found no giant difficulties in the way in comparison with which they likened themselves to grasshoppers, but like Caleb and Joshua of old, men of truth and valor, they told their families that they had seen a goodly land and urged them to go down and drive out the inhabitants thereof and possess it. And they did. Not after forty years' wandering in the wilderness,, but the very next spring these two men commenced clearing land on the locations they had chosen; Mr. Clute on the west half of section 33, and Mr. Willey on the southwest quarter of section 27. Here they burned the brush, stirred the soil a little and planted corn among the logs. They also peeled bark for roofing to the shanties which they expected to build in the fall. In September they returned having with them Mr. Willey's son Seth, and Lyman Phillips. They brought a yoke of cattle and a wagon, cutting a road from one-half a mile north of Lapeer, keeping on the west side of the river. They were several days engaged in this work, sleeping under the wagon at night. Then they built their shanties, small affairs thirteen by eighteen, covered with bark. October 12, 1837, Mr. Clute moved in his wife and one child, now Mrs. Wiilialn Peter. When they reached the point on the river where they wished to cross, they had no Moses with them to part with his sacred rod the turbid waters and let themr cross on dry ground. Mr. Clute had to wade the river, swimnling his cattle and wagon across; then at several relays, with the aid of a float of logs and a pole, got over his wife and child, two pigs and a cow. The next day, October 13, Abr.lhamn Hollenbeck moved in and the lext week Abijlah Willey, both bringing large families, who still, for the most part, reside among us. "As an instance of the difference between the past and the presI ent when we are possessed of so many modern conveniences in the way of roads, bridges and mills, it is stated that late in this fall, M Mr. Clute went to the. nearest mill, that of Mr. Hemingway, five miles beyond Orion, a distance of nearly forty miles, to procure flour; not over an elegant turnpike with convenient bridges and comfortable stopping places along the route, but througmh an almost unbroken wilderness, fording difficult streams and struggling over the worst of roads. Whlile out on this trip a terrible rain storm came on, and on his return the Flint River had risen, covering the flats froll bank to bank. Here was a dilemma. By dint of great exertion he succeeded in crossing on a float himself with enough flour to lmeet the wants of his family; but the team and cargo had to be left until next day, the cattle being fed nith a few corn stalks. Then with infinite pains, with the aid of Mr. WVilley, he got one of the oxen on the raft and poled him over until he thought he would swim for home and then dropped him. But what was his chagrin to see Buck wheel about and paddle back to his mate. Their work had to be done over again, but next time they took Bright in tow and got them bothl safely over. Shortly after this, ice a foot thick formed all over the river and flats, while the river fell leaving a deep depression and wide fissures in the ice. Across this Abraham Hollenbeck, who had moved into town the day after Mr. Clute, attempted to pass; but his cattle broke through and but for the lucky circumstance that his sleigh caught and hung on a stump they would have slipped under the ice and been drowned. With the energy and haste of despair he procured the aid of Clute and Willey and their wives, and with axes and levers they'succeeded in rescuing the much valued oxen from their perilous position in the water; but not until the last one out had become so chilled that he could not stand up for a considerable time. "Abraham Hollenbeck had bought the northwest quarter of section 21 in 1836, in which year about three-fourths of the township had been bought up by speculators and those intending settle [ I — O d --- m -l. -.00 m i!J

Page  138 I 138 HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY ment, but he did not move in until the fall of 1837. Mr. H. was a pious man; in fact, his neighbors say he was for some years the only pious man in town. For a while public worship was coinducted by him at his own house, and that of Mr. Andrew McArthur; ahd here also and under his care was organized and conducted the first Sunday-school. This was probably under the auspices of a Mr. Morse, a Presbyterian minister located at Lapeer, in the fall of 1838. To this same denomination Mr. Hollenbeck belonged. "David Burritt moved in on the 28d of February, 1838, and settled on the northeast quarter of section 20. During this summer several more families were added to the population. Martin Volentine came September 28, and September 29 Andrew McArthur, whose son Reuben had come the previous year with Mr. Hollenbeck. Mr. McArthur was very fond of hunting and made great havoc among the bear, elk, deer, wolves, etc., with which the forest abounded. He was known among the Indians by the name Ne-joshon-ton-e-get, or Big Hunter. He caught in one winter forty-seven wolves, when the bounty was sixteen dollars a head. On his first visit to the lake now known as Otter Lake, he saw five otters swimming in it, one of which he shot. From this circumstance the lake took its name. "The families of Asa Phillips and Harvey Perkins also came about this time. "In 1838 occurred the first birth and death among the white people in the town. On March 6th was born Edwin Clute who died July 2d of the same year. The second person born was Alonzo Volentine, November 17, 1839, who still lives. John Willey and Charles McArthur were born soon after in the order named." In 1839 the families of Belnjamin Niles, Amasa Wood, A. J. Richards and Chauncey Phillips settled in the town. Mrs.- Phillips died within the year, and was the first adult person buried here. In these times, and for many years subsequent, it is not to be supposed that the settlers rolled in luxury to any great extent. The roads were bad at the best, and at certain seasons almost or wholly impassable. Mills were distant, and if there had been stores there was little or no moniey with which to buy. Stories are related of families living for weeks on hulled corn and leeks or salt and potatoes. In sickness manv distressinig cases occurred from the difficulty of procuring early help, and mand may a midnight tramp-has been taken to Lapeer after a doctor, over roads obstructed by fallen trees through the dense pine forest. Mr. Hollenbeck built the first barn, a log one, forty feet long, and it was raised by eight men. Verily, "there were giants in those days." He also built the first corn-crib of small logs, which is still stanlding in full view of the road, a very fine specimen of backwoods architecture, showing Mr. H. to have been a man of ingenuity and enterprise. The little archer, Cupid, paid his first recorded visit to this towni in the fall of 1839. Through his influence, no doubt, John B. Evans and Sarah Willey walked up to the hymenial altar, and were united in the bonds of wedlock by S. D. McKeen, Esq. The next couple to join heart and hand for life were Jabez Loomis and Harriet Collins, married by the father of the bride. This was in the spring of 1840, and in the following year Richard Clute and Lueretia Phillips took the same important step. This being the third wedding, would hardly have been entitled to mention, but for the fiact that an incident occurred on this occasion, which, as it marks one phase of development, ought not to be passed unnoticed. Three young gentlemen and three youlng ladies formed themselves into the first musical associlation in town, and greeted the happy couple in the dead hour of night with a lively serenade on tin pans and horns, cow-bells and goose-quill squeakers, with a running ac companiment on the pocket pistol. The performers at this primitive concert, not desirous of personal fame, modestly desire that their names be withheld, and therefore historical accuracy must be sacrificed to private confidence. It is but just to the young ladies to state that they declare that they took no part in the music, but stayed behind and listened. The next three years were marked by a very remarkable epidemic-an epidemic of matrimony. So many of the young people of the settlement fell victims to this usually agreeable disease that personal mention must be omitted. Something less than a dozen marriages occurred about this time, linking together most of the old families in the closest ties of relationship. During these years and up to 1847, as might have been expected, by immigration and otherwise, the population of Marathon increased rapidly, and meany prominent names were added to the citizenship of the town. Among those were Colonel Needham Hemingway and his two sons, Henry and Isaac; the Aurand family, George, Jacob, Andrew and Daniel; the Lawrence family, Dennis, and afterward his brothers, Joseph and Levi; Chauncey Maxfield, B. J. Harris, W. W. Wagner, Abram Purdy, Edwin Richmond, W. W. Brown, George and Leander Levalley, and soon afterward Mortimer F. Levalley, David Haskell and James Petteys. In 1840 Dennis Lawrence helped cut the present direct road to Lapeer. Previously the route was by Brunnson Lake. In 1841 the first school-house was built on Hollenbeck's Corners near the cemetery, and the first school teacher was Miss Sarah Hart. W. W. Wagner, assisted by Duncan Lawrence, built the first water saw-mill, which later became and still remains the property of the latter. In 1850 John Pierson built the first steam saw-mill at Piersonville, and the same year lumber was first rafted down the Flint River. Not until 1864 did the town contain a grist-mill, viz., the one built by Richards Bros. on the stream at Columbiaville. Nearly all the patriarchal heads of the old pioneer families have now crossed another river than the Flint. "Slow, one by one they cross, that pilgrim band, And fnd beyond another Promised Land; Nor do they fear the dark and troubled tide, But listen calmly to some angel guide, Who leads them safely to the farther side. There, 'stead of lonesome forests wild and stern, Fair gardens blush and bloom at every turn; Instead of rough log cabins, low and mean, Tall heavenly mansions deck the glorious scene; No howling savage brutes inspire with fear, Sweet tones from loving voices charm the ear. Hunger, disease and death no more they feel, The tree of life will nourish them and heal; There with the loved and loving ones of yore, They settle down upon that peaceful shore, A happy colony forevermore." LUMBERING IN MARATHON. There was a grea. deal of pine in this township, and it was for years more a lumbering than a farming community. Among the early lumbermen were S. D. McKeen, John Shafer, Rufus Pierson and Henry Niver. McKeen built near what has ever since been known as McKeen's bridge across Flint River. This was burnt and never rebuilt. Niver and Shafer operated at what is now known as Columbiaville, and the lhamllet for a long time was known as Niverville. Their successor was William Peter. Mr. Pierson established himself at what was known as Marathon village, a place of no importance now, the railroad having passed it by. Columbiaville on the D. & B. C. R. R. in the south part of the town, and Otter Lake, on the west line of the town, also on the railroad, where Fox & IC\ 4m^ - ----- * -X'l --,

Page  139 do —.A -] i I I Ie L1 I.1 An I HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 139 - - - I Begole and Page & Benson had their lumbering establishments, are now the important places in the township. VILLAGE OF COLUMBIAVILLE. This is anl incorporated village located on the Flint River, and on sections 28, 27, 33 and 31. The first settler on the site of the village, was Levi D. Cutting, who is still a resident of the place. Mr. Cutting was born in the town of Nashfield, Vermont, in 1820. When fifteen years of age he moved with his parents to Junius, Seneca County, N. Y., and afterwards to Hartland, Niagara County. In the fall of 1847 he removed with his family to Marathon and settled where Columbiaville now stands. Mr. Cutting was married in 1842 to Eliza IM. Warner, of Niagara County, N. Y., who died in Columbiaville, January 29, 1872, leaving one son. He married his present wife, Abigail AM. Hopkins, November 12, 1875. Mr. Cutting's journey to his new home was attended with | severe hardships. Their only child was sick and the latter part of the journey was brought upon a pillow, and carried in its father's arms. The last twelve miles lie travele i on foot carrying his precious burden. Bridges were then unknown in this region and with his child in his arms he waded across the Flint River. When he arrived here, a solitary shanty, which had recently been built by a mau named Fineout, was the only sign of human life that was visible. Fineout remained but a short time and then left the place. Mr. Catting built a shanty and thus established the first home in the locality. Here he has remained to the present time, and has now a home in a pleasant residence in a thrifty village. The next movement in this locality was the erection of a sawmill on the bank- of the river. George and Henry Niver had located a large tract of pine land in this region, and planned to manufacture it into pine lumber. They lived at Copac, Columbia County, N. Y., and Palmer Niver, as their agent, came here to build a mill. The firm afterward became Niver & Shaffer. The mill was built in 1848-'49. It was a water mill and is sll l standing, but its wheels have ceased to revolve, and its days of activity are probably in the past. The operation of the mill called together a few men and a little settlement WAS begaa. Tlhe Nivers kept a few groceries for the accommodation of their men, and a blacksmith shop was started. About this time, a young man named William Peter was working on a farm in Columbia County, near where the Nivers lived. He was receiving four dollars a month for his labor, and the probabilities of accumulating a fortune at that rate did not satisfy his ambition. He was a young man of industrious habits, and had an idea of seeking better chantces for matking money than he then had. He engaged with the Nivers to come to Michigan and work in their saw-mill, which he did. In 1852 he concluded to engage in business for himself and built a store building, which is now occupied by Henry Hurt & Co., hardware merchants. In that building he opened the first store in the place. _Mr. 'Peter married a daughter of Ephraim Clute, and their pioneer residence is described by Mr. Peter as being a house with a kitchen, sitting room, bedroom, parlor and pantry, all in one room. This wats the beginning of Mr. Peter's business career which h Ls silne been remark-able in its continuous success. The entire proprty at Columbiavlille filnally passel into his possession, and his business interest3 hIlve largely built up the villtage. In 1870 he removed to Toledlo, whlere he now resides, altllough his interests here continue. From a laborer at four dollars a month he hais become one of the wealthy men of the land, his fortune reaching into mill ions. This but shows- the possibilities that are offered to young men in this free land, where the race for fortune and fame is open to all. Soon after Mr. Peter started his store, Alfred Pettit built a small wagon shop and worked in it for a short time. Not long after this Reuben MArthllur erected a building for a store but did not use it. It was sold to John and Peter Van Dyke, who 'enlarged it and fitted it up for a hotel. They kept it awhile and sold to a man named Farrel, and it was called the Farrel House. The name wavs afterwards clhanged to the Columbiaville Exchange. It is still kept as a hotel, the present proprietor being Elson Wait. About 1854 a postoffice was established, and the name Columbia was suggested by the Nivers, after their native county. There being another postoffice by that name in the State, some other title had to be given. Determined not to part with the one first suggestecd, they added the ville and thus secured for the place a patriotic and ponderous title. The first postmaster was Chancy Maxfield. He was succeeded by L. D. Cutting. Postmasters since then have I been L. H. Congdon, Dennis G. Lawrence and J. L. Preston. For about twelve years Mr. Peter's store was the only one in the place, and but little change occurred in the general complexion of tihe neighborhool. The next step forward was in 1834, when Richards Bros. built a grist-mill, the first one in the town of Marathon. This was a water mill and was operated by them a number of years. It is now standing an idle companion of the old saw-mill on the bank of the river. Soon after this, Thomas MeDowel built a store and carried on general merchandising, and was followed by Dr. L. H. Congdon. About 1865 the Protestant Methodists began to have regular worship and built a parsonage. The first resident prelcher was Rev. Warren. In 1880 this society erected a neat house of worship. A Baptist society was next formed but they have never built a church, and do not hold regular meetings. The Marathon Association started in.1869, and the first preacher was Rev. Mendenhll11. Ill 1890 a house of worship was begun which has recently been completed, and is called "The People's Church." Rufus Pierson is president of the association and E. A. Brown, treasurer. The first physician in the village was Dr. John Deming, who came from Oakland County. The next was Dr. L. H. Congdon now retired from practice and living near the village. Dr. W. B. Hamilton, present county treasurer, practiced here several years. Drs. Chamberlain and A. W. Carey were here a short time. The present physicians are Drs. John Wilson and Chester Carey. The first school in tile village was taught by Eliza Griggs in a little shanty on thie hill, called the Norwegian shanty. SOCIETIES. _Etna Lodge No. 301, I. 0. O. F., was!noved from Otter Lake to Columbiaville. It was instituted in 1877. Meetings are held every Saturday evening. Officers: N. G., S. M. Colvin; V. G., Geo. E. Taylor; R. S., Andrew Brown; P. S., N.J. M. Iarkle; Treas., WN. H. Hurt. Columbia Council No. 39, Order Chosen Friends, was organized in March, 1882, with forty members. First officers: P. C. C., E. W. Gilbert; C. C., Harris Edgerton; V. C., Henry Bristol; Sec., A. A. House; Treas., Dr. -John Wilson. Present membership, - forty-eight; officers: C. C., Alex. Johnston; V. C., John Cox; Sec. Geo. E. Taylor; Treas., Dr. John Wilson; prelate, A. M. Cutting. - K. O. T. M., Security Tent No. 70, was organized January 5, 1883, with twenty-three members. Meetings are held the first Tuesdtay evening in each month. Officers: Commander, J. L. i I I I I i I -V 4 - I i - -) P'y

Page  140 - \ - -__ — 140 HISTORY OF L APEER COUNTY. Preston; F. K., W. H. Hurt; Lt. K., Geo. E. Taylor; R. K., W. H. Swift; Seargt., N. J. Marlde; P. C., Elson Wait. RIVERSIDE CEMETERY ASSOCIATION. March 16, 1883, the above named association was formed and the following officers elected: President; E. W. Gilbert; vice-president, A. Johnston, Sr.; clerk, E. A. Brown; treasurer, Ephraim Clute; directors, Wm. Peter, R. Pierson, John Clark, Geo. E. Taylor, C. H. Clute. The grounds chosen are to the northeast of the village of Columbiaville about half a mile, and are beautifully situated. Nature has done much in the way of delightful shade trees, and the undulating nature of the ground adds greatly to its attractions. J. J. Watkins, surveyor of Lapeer, has surveyed out the lots and laid out the walks, drives and avenues in such a manner as will render the cemetery the most attractive in Lapeer County. INCORPORATION. The village was incorporated by act of legislature in 1879. Hon. J. B. Moore of Lapeer, representative at that time, had the matter in charge. The first meeting of trustees was held Marcl 24, 1879. The first president of the village was George Reed, who held the office two years. He was succeeded by Robert Armour, still in office. The clerks of the village have been as follows: I). A. Brown, Harris Edgerton and George E. Taylor. Trustees in 1883: Alexander Johnstonll, Sr., E. W. Gilbert, E. A. Brown, Dr. John Wilson, A. L. Peabody, William Hollenbeck. The Rescue fire company completed its organization in August, 1883. Alexander Johnston, Sr., is chief of the department,William McKerwin, assistant; Dr. John Wilson, secretary. GENERAL PROGRESS. Cokumbiaville has enjoyed its greatest prosperity since about the year 1878. In 1877 Mr. Alexander Johnston erected a sawmill whieh is employed in cutting lumber for William Peter. In 1879 Mr. Peter erected a large steam grist and flouring-mill, near the railroad track, with a capacity of about one hundred and thirty barrels of flour a day. In 1880 he erected a handsome two story brick block, which is occupied with his store and business offices. The Columbiaville planing-mill is located on First Street in the village of Columbiaville, and was built by Alexander Johnston. Jr., in 1882. It is a brick structure, has a frontage of one hundred feet, and a depth of eighty. Its motive power is steam, and about fifty employes are engaged in the building. Sash, doors, blinds, moldings, flooring, siding, ceiling, etc., are manufactured. The products of the factory are shipped to the East and up the northern extension of the M. C. Railway. For shipping purposes the establishment is very conveniently located alongside the track of the D. & B. C. Railway, with which it is connected by side tracks. THE COLUMBIAVILLE NEWS is a well edited local newspaper, started by John R. Beden in August, 1883. Mr. Beden is a journalist of many years' experience, and his paper bears evidence of ability and enterprise. It is an eight column folio, and is publlshed Thursdays. The business of the village in September, 1883, may be summarized as follows: Two saw-mills, one of them employing fifty men; two planing-mills and sash, door and blind manufactories; one stave, shingle and heading manufactory; one flouring and custom mill; one grist-mill; one foundry and machine shop; one brick yard; four dry goods and general stores; one hardware store; two drug and grocery stores; one furniture store; two hotels; two wagron shops; one agricultural implement store; one bakery and grocery store; one harness shop; three blacksmith shops; three shoe shopv; three millinery stores; one fancy goods store; two meat ma'rkets; one photograph gallery; one barber shop and one printing office and weekly newspaper. Besides these there are two doctors; one insurance agent; three painters; seven carpenters; three secret societies; one band; one fire company; one architect; one justice of the peace; two notary publics; two sewing machine agents; four dressmaxkers and five stone iIasons. Plans are perfected for the erection of a large woolen-imill, which is expected to be in operation during 1884. BIOGRAPHICAL. EPHRATM CLUJTE, the first actual settler in the township of Marathon, was born in 1804 in the town of Saratoga, Saratoga County, N. Y. He was raised oil a farm and lived in various parts of the State until 1836, when he camen to Michigan, locating in Marathon, where he had bought land of the United States government. His farln comprises 160 acres, is in sections 32 and 33, township 9 north, range 9 east, and is one of the finest in the township. In 1878 he became a resident of the village of Columibiaville, but still continues the managemlent of his farm. He served two ternms as supervisor, and was town treasurer a number of years. He is now, 1883, treasurer of the village, also treasurer of the "People's Church" association, and the Riverside cemetery. He was first married in 1833 to Miss Adelia Phillips, of Wayne County, N. Y., by whom he had three children, one only of whom, a daughter, is now living. She is the wife of William Peter, Esq. The first Mrs. C. died in 1842, and in 1843 he was again married to Miss Maria Gifford, a native of eastern New York. They have two children, a son and a daughter. ALFRED BURGESS was born in 1831 in the County of Essex, Englanld. He learned the trade of fanning-mill mlaker. Was engaged in that and the furniture business at St. Osvth, near the city of Colchester, England. In 1856 emigrated to the United States, worked for a tirme in Schenectady, N. Y., and then went to Burford, U. C., now Ontario. In 1858 bought some land in Watertown, Tuscola C(ounty. Farmed there and in Kingston, same county, also manufactured fanlinig-mills. In 1860 he came to Marathon Township, where he engaged in fain g far and was also a fanning-mill maker. Was in the butchering business for some fifteen years, relinquishing that to his son, who now carries it on in Columbiaville. In 1876 he opened a cabinet making, furniture and undertaking establishment in the village. He was elected a justice of the peace in 1877, and re-elected in 1881. When the village of Columbiaville was incorporated in 1879, he was elected assessor, and every year thereafter, has been re-elected, his last re-election being in the spring of 1883. Has been married twice, the first time to Miss Sarah Barton, of Bentley, England, by whom he had four children. She died in 1874. In 1875 he was again married to Miss Susan Parkhurst, of Deerfield, Lapeer 'County, Mich. ROBERT ARMOUR was born in the County of Armagh, Ireland, in 1827. His parents left that country when he was a few months old, and went to Glasgow, Scotland, where he lived until he was thirteen years of age. In 1840 they emigrated to Canada. They rem fined in Montreal a year, and then removed to Mount Vernon, ill Brantford County, Ontario. In 1870 he left there and came to Lapeer County, residing for a couple of months at North Branch, and then making Columbiaville his home. While in Mount Verlon he learned the trade of a shoemaker, which calling he has since followed. In 1881 he was elected president cf the village of Colunmbiaville, and re-elected in the years 1882-'83. Is a married man and has a family of nine children, two of them, however, being the children of his present wife by a former husband. e L ^^-I- - 1 -- - A. a s...

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Page  141 m% -- _ _ L I -A — I HISTORY OF LAPEER COUNTY. 141 ALEXANDER JOHNSTON, JR., was born August 21, 1851, at Chatham, Ontario, ard came to Michigan with his parents in 1863. He lived for the better part of the time up to 1877 at Lapeer. ~ In 1877 he had a shingle-mill near Elrm Creek in Deerfield, of which township he was clerk for two years. Was in a sash, door and blind factory, at West Bay City for over two years, and built and operated a sirnilar establishment at Oxford, Oaklaitnd County. Came to Columlbiaville in 1882, where he has built a large brick, sash, door and blind factory, in llwhich are employed some fifty men. He was married in 1881 to Miss Mary Warren, a native of Illinois, but a resident of Lapeer at cllht time. They have had two children, only one of whom, a son, is now living. Mr. Johnston is a live, stirring business main, and as an employer and otherwise does much to aid in the growth and prosperity of the village in which he lives. JOHN WILSON, M. D., was born in Northamptonshire, England, 1830. He commenced his medical studies in Stamford, England, before emigrating to the United States, which lhe did in 1849. He at first went to Wisconsin, and lived for some time in Milwaukee and Grand Prairie. He left that State and went to Syracuse, N.Y., graduating from the Syracuse Medical College in 1853. The doctor also graduated at the New York Medical College in 1854, and Philadelphia Medical University in 1855. In 1863 he walked the Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, England. He practiced there and was also principal business manager of the American College of Pharmacy in that city. In 1856 he removed to Fond duLac, Wis., where he remained until 1860. In the latter year hlie returned to England and followed his profession in the city of Nottingham until 1875. In June of that year he returned to the United States, and came to Lapeer, Mich. He remained in that city until 1879 when he removed to the village of Columbiaville. He holds the following village offices: member of the board of trustees, director for the schools and health officer; is also school inspector for the township of Marathon. In 1849 he was married to Rosanna Revill, of Donnington, England, by whom he had six children, all of whom are living. She died in 1876 and in 1881 he was married to Lizzie Hollinshead, a native of Marathon Township. EDWIN W. GILBERT was born in Cayuga County, N. Y., in 1831. He received a common school education. In 1819 he went to Flint, Mich., and until 1865 followed the trade of a carpenter and joiner. In 1865 he engaged in the cattle business, which he continued at until 1867 when he became a merchant at Mount Morris, Genesee County. He remained there until 1874 when he entered the employ of Page & Benson, afterward Tanner & Sherman, at Otter Lake, Lapeer County. In 1880 he came to Columbiaville and took the management of William Peter's extensive mercantile establishment. He was elected a justice of the peace inll 1880, and is a member of the board of trustees and one of the directors of the schools of the village. He was married in 1851 to Miss Frances Martin, a native of New York State. He is a gentleman who has gained the esteem of the community in which he lives by his courteous treatment of all with whom hle has either business or personal intercourse. VILLAGE OF OTTER LAKE. This village is situated in the extreme western part of the township of Marathon, and upon the south and east bank. of Otter Lake, from which body of water it derives its name. It contains a population of about four hundred and is rapidly growing both in population and business. The Detroit & Bay City branch of the Michigan Central, and the Otter Lake division of the Flint and Pere Marquette Railways cross at this point. EARLY HISTORY. The land upon which Otter Lake village is built was originally owned by the late Gerritt Smith, and was a part of a tract of 6,000 acres of pine land. This tract was purchased by C. B. Benson, of Oswego, N. Y., and the firm of Page & Bensoin was formed for the purpose of manufacturing the pine into lumber. In the fall of 1871 Mr. S. O. Sherman, still a, resident of the village, arrived upon this site with a crew of men for the purpose of commencing operations. He came here to superintend the work and as the business representative of Page & Benson. He commenced at once the work of clearing and also putting in logs. In February the construction of a saw-mill was begun. In the meantimle about 6,000,000 feet of logs had been put inl. The lill was completed and put in operation the following July. THE VILLAGE IN 1873. Otter Lake village was described, in 1873, as follows: Otter Lake, the new town in the wilderness, is the'present terminus of the Flint River Railroad, and the point at which 'it intersects with the Detroit & Bay City Railway. The town is situated on the little lake, by the same name, just across the line of Genesee County, inll the township of Marathon, Lapeer County. The town has been platted with streets 100 feet wide, running north and south and east and west, into twenty-five blocks, and some fractional portions.1 The [blocks are oblong in shape, 200x400 feet, and divided into eight lots 100 feet square. The town thus presents all oblong square, with its side to the lake. Page & Benson will begin the sale of lots inll May. The town contains the extensive saw-mill, store, boarding house, shops and numerous cottages of the workmen, all built and belonging to Page & Benson, and the Flint River Railroad engine house, a part-of which is used at present for a depot. All the buildings are neatly finished and painted. Messrs. Page & Benson intend to immediately erect a school-house, and have a school therein this season. The principal street (Sherman Street), named after Mr. S. O. Sherman, Page & Benllson's manager, is the one upon which the mill and store are situated. The only fault that any one could find with the little place, is the way in which it is cut up by the railroads, crossing at righlt angles nearly in the center of the town and extending diagonally across the blocks, one going on one side of the lake, and the other on the opposite side. Page & Benson's store is a neat two story building, 24x75 feet in size, with a most excellent cellar. The first floor and cellar are used for store and office purposes, the second floor is used by Mr. Sherman as a residence. The building is fitted up with all the conveniences of our best city stores and residences. An addition 14x15 feet is now being added for more store room. Hay scales have recently been put up near the store. Page & Benson are entirely rebuilding their mill this winter and spring, and have it nearly completed. It will then be two stories high, 70x140 feet, with a boiler house 34x60 feet, and a filing room 20x30 feet. Their machinery consists of one stock gang-40 saws, one stock gang-32 saws, one of Stern & Co's largest circulars, one muley, one panel machine, one gang lath machinlie, one picket machine, two slash saws, two butting saws, one gang slab cutter and two of Munn & Co's patent gang edgers. These gentlemen own 6,000 acres of pine land about Otter Lake, and only ablout 500 of it is cut. They have employed 250 men and 70 teams in the woods and about their mill this winter, and have put in 13,000,000 feet of logs, or in other words the entire surface of Otter Lake-estimated to contain 100 acres-is covered with logs so that you can walk from one end of the lake to the other on them. Messrs. Page & Benson with characteristic liberality, and in 3 a Ik t a i i i ~: i! i i i' i ( i i i I __1 --- __ __ I\ - ---- ' r4 -^1g

Page  142 _ G 1 JI II I Ii i i i i I i 0 i I I I 11, I I I II i i i i I I i i Ii I I I i iI I i I i I i I I I I I i I I j i. I I i I i I i - 142 HISTO RY OF LAPEER COUNTY I I order that tile educational wants of the children may be immnedii ately attended to, have commlenced to build a school-house 30x46 feet in size, the estimated cost of which is $1,500. Religious services are held here every Sunday, the dining-hall of the boarding-house being used for that purpose. RECORDED PLAT. The plat mentioned was only a preliminary one, the permanent one being made in 1874, and recorded in June of that year. This covered about forty acres, in the north fractional half of section 7. Ea-rly in 1878 a postoffice was established, and Normanll M. Stark was appointed postmaster. lHe held the office until April, 1880, when he was succeeded by E. J. Tanner. the present incu1mbent. In 1872 the Otter Lake division of the Flint & Pere Marquette Railroad was built, and the Detroit & Bay City Road about a year later. In 1874 Mr. C. B. Benson succeeded the firm of Page & Benson. He sold the store to Tanner Bros. in 1876, and the mill to W. C. Cummings in 1880. July, 1888, he sold his entire remaining interests to S. O. Sherman. The store is now owned by the firm of Talnner, Sherman & Stark. In 1879 W. C. Cummings moved his saw-mill from the town of Millington, Tuscola County, to Otter Lake, which he still operates. He has converted the Page & Benson mill into a planingmill. The first hotel in the village was the Benson House, built in 1875, by S. J. Lewis. It was burned in the fire of April, 1881. Mr. Sherman manufactured, at this point, about 70,000,000 feet of lumber. The pine was of a very choice quality, and the lumber manufactured of a high grade. About 1876 the sale of cut-over land, for farming purposes, began, although there was not much sold prior to 1879. Since that time nearly the whole tract has been sold that is suitable for agricultural purposes, and good farms are being made. April 2, 1881, the village was visited by a destructive fire which threatened to blot out the entire village. It originated in a pile of lumber, and before it could be checked, had consumed about 70,000 feet of lumber and nine dwe