Illustrated historical atlas of the county of Wayne, Michigan
H. Belden & Co., Charles Shober & Co.

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Page  3 TO WAY.46.. ATLAS. History of Wayne County, Early Settlement, ete...................... 61-72 TOWNSHIIPS, VILLAGIE PLATS, ETC, Page. Belden, Plat of,............................. 27 Belleville, Plat of........................... 52 Brownstown Township.,................ 38, 39 Canton Township...........................47 Dearborn Township.......................... 17 " Dearbornville, Plat of....................... 31 Delray, Plat of......;............ 53 Denton's, Piat of........................... 23 Detroit, City of..........................50, 51 Eastern Hemisphere........................ 63 Ecorce Township.....................30, 31 Flat Rock, Plat of...... 52 Grand Port, Plat of.......................... 53 Greenfield Township...................... 9 Grosse Point Township...................... 7 Hamtramck Township..........1...........4, 15 Huron Township.............................. 27 Livonia Township...................... 41 * Michigan, State of............ 54, 55 Monguagon Township........................ 25 Nankin Township......................... 35 New Boston, Plat of.... -................ 52 Norris, Plat of............................... 52 Northville, Plat of............................ "43 Plymouth, Plat of............................. 23 Plymouth Township........................ 43 Wayne County................... Wayne, Plat of.......................... Western Hemisphere........................ Wyandotte, Plat of......................... rIEWS. A llen, C. C................................ A llen, D. D..................................... Backus, W. W................................. Barbour, F. W. (Horse "Bay Morgan").. Barker, Isaac F............................... Berry, Thomas................................ Blue, Alexander.......................... Boehle,.John............................. Bouchard, Constant........................... Bour, N........................ Breitmeyer, Albert.................... Breitmeyer, John............................. Brown, L. R., "Locust Grove Farm ".... Brown, Perrin........................... Buger, Jacob.................................. B uhl, F.................................... 10, Burgess, S. K. (Res. and Tile Yard)...... C able, D. C.................................... Carstens, John H....................... Chapin, W. WY............................ Chapman, A. L............................ Clippert & Daniel's Brick Yard and Manufactory.................................. Collord, G. W................................. Connor, R. B............1#646............. Cooke, John.................... Cooke, T. D,.................................. Coon, Joseph.............:................. Cottrell, E. W.'s Maple Lawn Fruit Farm......................... County Asylum and Poor House........... Crawford, William............................. Crosby, Mrs. C. L......................... Dingman, William.......................... Dort, Titus........................ Duffield, Dr. S,............................. Eliot, C. and 0. H......................... Ellair, Peter..................... Ellis, Myron H............................. Featherly, D. A.................. Ford, William............................... Forster, Frank................... Gautherat, Frank (Store and Res.)........ Gravier, John B.............................. Greiner, M ichael..................1............ Gulley, A. Bv..................... 5 52 62 53 Handleser, Emil.............................. 42 Hanford, H. 0................................ 42 Harrison, Marenus............................ 44 Hebestreit, Charles W....................... 60 Hebestreit, Gottfried.......................... 60 Hebestreit, John D........................... 60 Hebestreit, W................................ 32 Hobbins, Thomas............................ 26 HIosmer, William S........................... 37 Howard, Edgar................................ 60 Huston, Oscar................................. 56 Hutton, L. W................................. 44 Robinson, C. W............................... 34 Ruthruff, Wram.................................. 8 56 42 29 57 20 6 28 24 37 8 8 8 45 60 44 11 42 44 34 37 44 60 37 24 32 57 40 32 48 45 36 36 60 32 28 57 37 45 34 34 32 57 8 56 Salliotte, A. M................................ Shoemaker, Wm............................... Simmons, Morell............................ Smith, Thos. D................................ Smith, J. B........................... Speier, Fred....................... St. Mary's School and Priest's Residence Starkweather, Sam'l1.......................... Steaker, Martin (Brickyard)............. Stevenson, John............................. Stewart, James (Flouring Mill)............. Sunderland, Geo........................ Swift, H on. G. W............................. Thayer, N. P................................. Thompson, Johni J..................... Tinham, Alex................................. Tremont House, Wayne, D. B. Newkirk, Proprietor.............................. Tucker, Chas.............................. 37 57 36 32 36 34 16 44 34 44 56 8 44 24 20 56 57 60 Joslin, Lyman................................ Joyce, Charles F..........................:... Keith, A. T........................... Kerby, Rufus M.....'....................... Keveny, Michael.............................. K ingsley, S. R................................. Kloenhammer, C.............................. Lafferty, Clement........................... Langley, T. (Ingleside Res.)........ Lapham, Charles.............................. M abley, C. R................................ Maiden, David................................ Markey, Peter.............................. Maxwell, George S......................... McBride, Mrs. C.............................. McPherson, John.-z........,............... M eldrum, L.................................... Merrill, H. W............................ Miller, George................... Miller, J. P............................. Moore, G. W.................................. Morey, W. S. (Res., Store and Hall)...... Morhous, William....................... Mylius, August................................ Newkirk, D. B....................... Norris, Birdseye View of................... Nowlin, William............................... 36 26 56 8 57 24 34 13 57 56 18 36 34 56 24 24 36 37 42 42 60 40 32 8 57 21 42 Vanassche, P. F.............................. 24 Rawsonville, Plat of.......................... Redford Township............................ Robkwood, Plat of,.......................... Romulus Township......................... South Trenton, Plat of............. Springwells Township..................... 22, Sumpter Township.................... Taylor Township.............................. Trenton, Plat of............................... 19 12 31 33 31 23 49 19 19 Waffle, Capt. L................................. Wagar, John.................................... Wallaceville............................. W allace, J. A............................., Wallace, John B.............................. Wallace, John R.............................. Waltz, Joseph............................... Waterman, R. B.............................. Westlake, George......................... Wilcox, Julius................................. Winslow, G, M.............................. PATRONS' DIRECTORY, Brownstown Township.,-.................. Canton Township............................ Dearborn Township........................... Detroit City..................... Ecorce Township.............................. Greenfield Township.......................... Grosse Point Township........................ Hamtramck Township...................... Huron Township............................ Livonia Township............................ Monguagon Township...................... Nankin Township............................. Plymouth Township............... Redford Township...................... Romulus Township........................... Springwells Township.......................... Sumpter Township........................... Taylor Township............................... Van Buren Township....................... 24 32 18 18 18 24 37 44 44 36 45 76 76 73 72 77 73 74 79 75 77 75 78 78 74 77 76 75 79 78 Otis, Amos....................... 32 Pardee, Andrew E........................... Parmalee, William R........................ Pattengell, Hon. 0. R...................... Pearl, Hon. Perry D....................... Perin, F.................................... Perry, James D.......................... Poor House and County Asylum......... Power, A. D............................... Pullen, A. J............................... 44 44 42 45 34 57 48 36 24 United States............................58, 59 Van Buren Township...................... 46 Waltz, Plat of.......................... 27 W aterford, Plat of............................ 53 Ranspach, Chas............................ 56 Reaume, Daniel............................... 56

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Page  16 5W,........................................ II II 'IF' 1i 11 -, w 4 [f MM 4U1Jiii ____________ TM m"SSC H0 L. PI V S 0USECRO0G H ANlm"ST[2)ET RTM[C,I. I - L- mm-_ loam= F,

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Page  18 18Q I,........ RESIENCOF Y, ODWRD VE ETROIT..ICHIGAN. 11 IFARM RE:SI'DE NC E OrFJOH H NBALLAC E, UWALLAC-EVILLE.WAYNE CO.,MICH. 2,POST OFFICE. & GROCERPY STORE, 3,RESIDENCE OF J.A.AL~LACIE, 4,TENANT HOUSE.

Page  19 19 f 1 III~~1 = 9 Rec/ Z. -./1071, Q3;"";N % _a m 4- N X 'g. C.~7f ýjC ýC) 75 59?596 5945 1W adee 7 4994 aonjc 1177. ~ j ~ raae~~I __ ___ 99,5' _ _ _ _ _ too_ *~ L___K __ ___ ___a_ W-90_N _ _ _ _ _ _ T5.SA.7t7&68. 4f. Scale 4O~ods to/Int. LIý6M, WL.LLJ~iSQUARCEJL0 W.AS H111117N ST. IHK I.yjj 14,01[3917 1 31577f.PROSPAMTST. ['919512 59ý!5P 5 '44 56 57F9-159ý 67'j;7 6g9 f65 F RA NKLIN2S T..90 9,0 95 96 1., '9 9j 9 2. 295 297 219 I,.A. 68124 'S9j 1/08 219 h W L6' ' l29 125 01U212. 017 T '96' 19i.R / 02 a 29 22, 27 19 UAE s 27 T39 2 12 15 * 09 -/207 25 292 ~J'9 966669A5094~ [2971 2900 77-0 26 -16248 16-1 "94 279~~678 6 o 27 VAN'7U? EN ST oft 12W ý 4, 7 T o5Rrderac) -Q617f K.6 77m& * '9 ZAO 6134 614 /P. stZoftT 0 'N 'A NN co U I -Bl - eiero -I$ o 4e zo art4 77 - N03 1ý m - aiell CS 0 ~ ite:, ats- Wia ncs Ktee 0 I'. Fl, / z X~ffffrdi~, -/0/a 23 ic/c> 90/52 JWas IAeN.1C 1 2P afip,! 40 4La1#04,ifeg HILL ___ * 7zTH, os& gel. jC-AO/ rA~~~ 17 he 7-/. 5:5~T U~T Ir I C. u, * _RV 256'9 *f 11.i,50, 160 U 4-0 C. 9/orve-safi d. -50 r Ito 'j i. -i ha erism..0 ýý'el/f L4 ky-r- I. C.1Cecc-It tv 30au/ te0a jv 509KK; -Y, -,7#0 20 N 3 2 20 I 410 'p C'" '4./fl 7/. "..-<.?, U k0 0> I 2flurplz.r BsA. 0 -AAM TO: 4ýp0 4ý0 fey. 6'0 13 )J7711 a 5.11/i/k. 48 ff7"Sch;rw c-jr7 EwiSIC. /60T 40 60 I Jwa SN3-A 4 Ct'S. f/w80 c717T"R iluack-7'410ioo i 90anSt =L+sx1 71,'. * 0 04 *319sxz #0409 0%N W/ arci4 0~ 0 -W '"0 'yec Bc/ie. 8 1 ~ s/a$c.. LiteA Z ~ 'j/t/n>"e -1 40 C" ~E aih -1/1a.a.;0A P 2 C/ate. "8 '890640 NP 4,7 an./10 X?.ill <, ý3 C/at/&. it1 ""M *..7 6 -; _____J.7. 299 994 082, 292 02 -jL91 LJ(7 254 2852 F]) L Ln 0 6 t18fr9]796171,2 19 /0 ~ 22 799 110 2003 7196 1o1 g190.1061 =0 4 1 8- 5 9.9 O0 T07 2046 195 99 g 100 1050 2-07 Ia 90 '79 78 liii 06' 5 -36' 0-9C 77 20-9 1,-0 69' (91 M o-i 10 /7r9 69, 82 '75 11 ý 175"?,66 9z? 70 L-Ji 212 /1785 9a]= 5629 721&j LE5 794 91 flr9E71 1 -3-ý101 76 '7 166 1 064. HIAJ 1,2157 172 69 0 1 9 19-T- -i' 10 169 f,550.53 90 5.1 36 991/ 611 2 1 -16 57 90 -141 15922.51' 2 551 7Y.6 21229 0 69k450, 95T 9 Jo.9 59 720 GrsOSE PH AVE>1 7""" 9 57124e 0-5 36 12 61 Zk96 /f0/- 620951290 ZZ.9.690249 249i999 bL5 k%ý*9 C) 43218 Q% 4z) 4~k9 9 6 56V 196 M 3-1391 99 4, -T9 68 '92Y 39 f 4,052 7 70 -A14 1 AMPLE S: 505 289 2~9'76 2664~ / 5' p 6 96 2792 6 Yard5 21 298 29 966 H84 294L2f 7j 2 69-I ir 76-6 -.s: *-a 110 3? I / / 5; K *1 5' S ) 35 K 090/9318 L, I NV 7' 9' 'I

Page  20 .20 ',:7,iý- K77; VIA 'j, & A v.7 ~ ~ -.4 - M-4-.1,,J ~~, - A17 j _.,Yý&, FT6W =F,iwt~wAi:t-M&- t w~J$ L S tkk W ityon 1u~~C ~ - ~ W-1an-,, ~~%~AkW.4...-V.t....... FA RM RES IDEN CE OF ISACCFORE lLVNift ANEC r ~. -4 "-14 -F-'~~~~ --7~---4t-t j44t---44--~ w - 4-# 4-~WEE4~"YE4A4-7A"" 4 v A-4.f4 ygm:~~4~? --- ~ 1-- - > 4v;- # tz ~ 4 4 ~ +s ~ 4 t-4 1 2 ~ ~ A.4zA4~ -'.-- 2~-''let;' 4 -- -4 f2 WNfutt'tkkil.,A ~L%-au 4-- ~~ ~* 4 &54, -,-;g--, MA ICH ---4-- -4- - -4 -44---- j~1 - --- 4--.4 -- -4 4- ~-------~44-S~ 4-_;-4-- vw I- -' -a-,R-.4-i-4 -' 4-2: A. NA4'4-4-?~-4-4444 -F2t4v~ 444-4~~ ---- W 1 FAR REIEC.PJ1p LMUH ~WYEC V,' 4-- --~t':-t 4 - 7~~4-.~ ---- s ----C H *4-s.?

Page  21 -r----~. I -~ II' ~'_~i 48~-- ~y-~ ~:...:.i~ --v '7'~ ~i`:c; ~,~:::I.~.~: ~r.i~~:-; -:::: I"'~:*::'~.~I~i~.....i::i,:~: 6;'~ 45 r06:B:~1~;I; ~~~;I~.I~i: ~. II Z IL "~~~ *E:..~r'::.1::.~`~ -:-~...'..;.;; :'' ~-~?:;`:,:w I~~ i'i~. ~-~~ ~~ --; i - --.:ii i:1T-~iY ~:;:_::~~-IYr;~: ~~i: n ~ r L,,, 8 '~w,,:,-,~~ (O w~a*v:1 ~~.:;~~ Z:rg ~' sC~:~: I I r 1--~;~::,;:j~!V...:-. :,-:~n ~~-;; ~.: ~~~: ~~.r ~ sp ;'"''':~~:~:~~~~.~:; ::;j.a ~~i.:: ~~~~ cri,.I.~.... I A VE. ""::::";-:a -rrZi::?. ~~;~1:~ ~.~~~:~::.~i sp I:~ ~::~::~i '~ ~I~?'i ' ";.~, I-~~?i'3 P:i::-:: -;i.~!.I iiij i'""I";:.:~..ii~~~ ~~:~'"....l;li.....:......;:;:.:.:: ii:'-~.~1?..~C;: i!:~. EE;jir.cnuiniu',,* G:."~~.:: "';: ~~~.::; ~: ~ '' II Nr qR ":, v....................VI full.3110I 1 -MOM~ /ell tn" ~kz I "",, ii F-.4 -4 Lu, I AC V 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 80. Luth. Church. WV. A. Ennis. P. W. Norris. W. R. Newkirk. H. Holley. P. 0. & H, Holley's Store,. Norris' Blacksmnith Shop. C. Starkel's Hotel.C'* Starkel's Shoe Store. Harness Shop., Toll Gate. B. A. Norris' Tenement. 13. 14. 15. 17. 19. 20. 2x. 22, 23. 24. Loair's; Meat Market. 0. Mobley. H.. Martens. H. Holley's Hotel. Poffder's Shoe Store. flaws& Deyerlein Wagon Shop. E. flax a.Ws W. N. Dixon. Dixon's Carpenter Shop. Parsonage. 1. W. Andrew. C. Airnont. BIRDS.. EYE VIEW OF WAYNE CO,.MICH. 25. 27. 28. 29. 30. School. L. B. Andrew..P. W. Norri's' Tenemenit.P. W. Norris' C. Marsh. Grist. 31. P. W. Norris' Tenement. 32. French. 33. Mf. Orton. ý34. Orton's Circus Barn. 35. Morrison. 36. Asylum Officers' Resideztee. 37. W. A. Ennis' Tenement. 38. Geo. la~rworth. 40. H. Shuff. 41. P. W. Norris' Tenement. 42. -Pam6'inke. 44. 45-' 46. 47, 48. 49, so. S1. 52. 53.1 54 - W. Dawuling's Tenement. M. Bacon. School.. 3. Campbell. M.,Hays. F. Methnier. B.,'flays' Tenement. B. Hays' B. Hays. B. Carberry., P. W. Norris' Tenemnentý P. Bose. -- -I rrm naura;ia rrrana ~anrra aSii*;Lb~rrr-. a

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Page  23

Page  24 I THAYER~ ousE, PROPERTY oFNP.THAYE RN EwBosTO N k IIC H. RESIENC -oF PULLE ROULUS TP,,WAYNE'CO.,MlCH* 'RESIDENCE OF MRSCMFBRlDE.RomULU,5Tp-.)WAY NE CO.,M ICH~ RE~sD1ENCE OF S.R.KV NGSLEYRI0MU LUS TPI AVNE CO.,MICN If IESOFR?.5.CO NOR.GROSS E POI NTWAYN E Co0. M I CNH.- ARM RE:S.oFJOHN R.WALLACE)E'So.D*EARsoRNTR,.WAYNECQIC(RSOJH M01 PH ERSO JAYLORTRWAYN E CO. LRlES.0F~ R EVAN ASSCH EGROSSEt PO I T.WAY NE- Co011M I CH. RES. OFCAPTIL I FFLE.GPEEN FIELD ThANC. MIC RSOF N ELEorET,WAYNECo.M:H I OOEHLE.FCO RC E7'Tp. WAY N E C O.,M'l C H

Page  25 ""J, Icto 17,eesAVY 77, T,40' S. R4-40 E ~Spar~r - ______P C.Y o. ~ K ice. o~4 ~ ]KB.ibiY614_ I S1 Spa l~~ti H ~ 4: SIAir -4, //-LA 45 4))) (i{fI / ( - lw S-v ~ 7e 1,z~J}0I // azzef.. 50 o c scz-17cle-rg. CHrCAGO CANADA 5- 0 0 T 14ERN,? GEPOTT to -55 FS 0 e. rA Vloc -U-rlzl AF -Lo A -Y lip J"i (Y4 -N.) ýx - 160 PCP07prrt ~ >I~4i >-9I y~k/ PI e 0

Page  26 26 FAR~. ESIDENCE OFCHARLES F.JYCE ESQ.,RE oFoRD T.,AY NI. C0.iH FARM RESIDENCE: OF THOAS H0 INS. Esc.,REDFORD Tp.,W A.YNF.C O.,M IC H TAIL -------- --

Page  27 27 e yr7-x-->. Q0 N ' 6. Ta iAr 87Z0 IV: jxn;esi 10 S K 4,0 40 -Tio yd. 40 40 'it #0 12. ileJ f 420 ar. A itte #0 670 20 m A3 (I 7b Q) 251 5 9 ~ 7 co; D exter i-f" FIH Xrabs, Scott. HU1?CP. 4-0W 9 4-0 29!C-r--s. On= 4-- 4 ~1 >.4kzou~e2~~~ A.f~nrzam 6700 kn60 -35 'oet, - ______ ___lom t - __o 4 1 MRWW, I/m ------------- L- - -, II 160 IN\ JjTi it ----j -&can 1K 1: U 4-114h I K__ Hmr I s~-< ii ~ >t--rlitt 1? a'nsej;9.2 r Bt 20zod 40 -*0 -71 go 40 (it, a Pt 0 Ba 4,0 4-0 77,, -it 1' Cb If I K7 -017-t go 1%12 Y.5 a N IICfi.Co e. C. VZI- ze -rp -Ya n571-yFr rL crarm 1&E XLa ur a-.?1 0 - 60t C. KiCpp. SIc-ann& 4-0 40 -- 33 N -49 #F - ~ 26c I&it40 rw-7w7k fiI~Lt a?7 a. 80 ol Sý Lr-d 1 ils.S gfari/s U -e ty-fi' 9KA I ii a $ - lt a Wodo d7;at86 &tt&te a. cit. 1 80 -160 8/0 -1 82 JlCno-t 80 Iand. 80 80 cz go a 0 Atlw-/ to IF I I 1 51 1 idEas 'N 534' 80 4.I - *.1. J.V/n/mg. 160 0 3k N N LIWThing Ci. &Son- - aWing 4,0 4,0 16.0 -r * 1 -. WT At4 80 #-0 40 40 V 40 -Ic. I /ttlc * 40 40 ""r 40 j.80 A.A.Ht7!e. IS 2641 66ý *31 *-1 4-0 -I -1-b-A------------ f - I - 31wig 1J~.-. '4 Pa/tee2- #0 UJ 11/ dhards , 80 iM7atc-z-<a80 RI! -I /60 I' -I YJ ltre. IcLil /ncF KObI-n-- w40a1-uo 40 40 /130 S K 1ff. Sill/I/Ar 40 ~ Reed. #0 -t 4 - I80 /60 80 _ _ _ 4 Fl ittI 410 an a-. 80 3 As/i-- -Nsf. 80. U Yost __ _ 4-I A. sit40 40 6.14? C.0 d., c 72 e '1~ K A-i K * A. Lmd#%'. 80 -A' U N N9 99 9 Si it. Pelt. 75 ft 3 N. - k TFY (ga7o. 39b LL A--- I #0 '3 --J477 Aspe i;-strait. * 40 20 far)? sit. 20 WI. -LIT T Ckap/nij #0 o A.5-I $ i RI #0140 4. 800 4 #0 -4 *IcTotty410# 4 4,0 am6JtroianY7zooC-4O2 ~ 4 -a 17-.---- 80) LZL _:c SI 41' ii1, 80 80 16 639 CTLO 8/t, 850 4o -K# 0 JrxoeSi. Cooer y TStopl -A--O. 4 -16 0 160 #'4-10 a7z 80 a-tv -K,E 80 11 80 I I i - - i or C.A I-. "-D. ba-b/ance il- I _______ - - _______ - ______ - -ata -"T 0.77za N40 v/a/k 0 N.5. fl 40 I. tare7d 80 8~ 80 160 I I II' ott 80 N 9 A) A dci -sort. #0 /20 410 0 7T / I -A. a rW 'i~'.2-I - l~ fC 7 F-3----'----iI- 5;Alb - --4 jj;7 I" t 1. Farce. oitW Via/f ii-. 80 I Bayer #8 >19 I.. N - 9 - -9 ---I * V arty. * \2U 40 -. 4-0 L---j -rm rr___ ___ ___ ___ ______ _______ I - _______ ________ iL-1 ___ F' 'I ['F 1'97tT -- I ______ ______ _______ ______ ______________ ________________ U P Kawc-/st #0 40 4 0 N K.9 1 Hi//U. 40 Schif g4ai, 80 TOW/I7. 22.CraatY -0 20 * 1 Q5 40 W-ar/len, 80 - 5. 1 - 6 2 -80 Ol a cji AL 80 I'S 1 k41-i-Th---4 F-H' 1* t t- 41m '1-i -. i>7 h /liT TIt1 0 A VA -J-R I/ r 5. I LW Viles 25 862 - -- U U l~ThIj - I 1t~.......12-U 0T1II>573 U1 _al_ _I_ WN,,,LLLL to

Page  28 FA~m ESDENE F L.EX DE R BL UE.ESQ.,LVOI AN co-ym I CH. FAR M RE.SIDENCESOF IMESSRS., &..ELIOT.,L1VcON1A'.TP,W'AY NE C'o"., pm

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Page  61 /., --.--:- -.... -_ J:- - -.- - -- --. =:- --. - --........ -,,.,,..... -.......... -,..,,.....,,x_.- = =-._.. _ o..... .- _-: S. ~...,......... HISTORY W A ' -, 0.~ T T Y7 STATE OF MICHIGAN. MHIS COUNTY is among the oldest in the "territory northwest of the' fL River Ohio." It was organized by Winthrop Sargent, Secretary of the Northwestern.Territory, on the 11th: of August, 1796. The -Northwestern Territory had been organizIed at Marietta, Ohio, under Governor Arthur St. Clair, in 1788. IHere the first county in the Northwestern Territory, named Washington, was laid out, in which magistrates and civil officers were appointed. In January, 1790, the government of the Northwestern Territory was removed to Cincinnati, where, in that year, the county of Hamilton was,formed. W~inthrop Sargent then proceeded to Illinois, and, in the latter part of 1790, the county of St. Clair was organized at Kaskaskia. It was established for the purpose of extendi-ng the civil government of the United States over the settlers (chiefly French) residing at Kaskaskia,, Cahokia and that region. The next county formed was that of Knox, at Post Vincennes, also by Winthrop Sargent, in the year 1790. Says Burnett, in his Notes: "In the spring of 1796, there were four counties in the Northwestern Territory, each of which was sufficiently extensive to form an independent State. They bore the names of Washington, Hamilton, St. Clair and Knox, in honor of the distinguished Revolutionary patriots after whom they were called, and who, in public estimation, stood in the, scale of merit in the order in which they are here named. The seat of" justice of the county first named was established at Marietta, that of the second at Cincinnati, of the third at Kaskaskia, and of the fourth at Vincennes. In each of the counties, courts of Common Pleas and of General Quarter Sessions of the Peace were established. The General Court consisted of three Judges, appointed by the President, with the advice and consent of the Senate, each of whom received a salary of $800 a year from the Treasury of the United States. It was the highest judicial tribunal in the Territory, and was vested With original and appellate jurisdiction. in all civil and criminal cases, and in capital cases; and, on questions of divorce and alimony, its jurisdiction was exclusive. It was, however, a common law court merely, without chancery powers, and it was a court of dernier resort. It had power to revise and reverse the decisions of all other tribunals in the Territory; yet its own proceedings could not be reversed or set aside even by the Supreme Court of the United States. It was held at Cincinnati in `Na c, -t7"ae.Mach, at Marietta in October, at Detroit, Kaskaskia and Vincennes at such times in each year as the Judges saw fit to designate. In conjunction with the Governor, or, in his absence, the Secretary of the Territory, the Judges were constituted a legislative body, and vested with power to. adopt any law in force in any of -the original States; and it was made their duty to report all laws so adopted to the Congress of the United States for their approval." Prior to the establishment of Wayne County' Gen. Anthony Wayne had achieved his great victory over the British and the Indians in the Maumee Valley, and had negotiated the famous treaty of Greenville. This instrument, ceding large quantities of land to the United States in Ohio and on the southeastern border of Indiana, wassigned on the 3d day of August, 1795. The British still held the posts at, Mackinaw and Detroit, and by that means had been able to foment most of the Indian disturbances which had preceded the' successful campaign of Gen. Wayne. Several questions of no little interest had sprung up, wlhich excited unfriendly feelings between the two nations, and governed their policy. Debts due by Americans to British subjects, the payment of which had been guaranteed by the treaty of 1783, were not paid; some of the States had passed laws repudiating these debts; on the other hand, slaves belonging to American citizens had been taken away by the British officers, and had not been restored. In consequence of this unsettled state of things, when the Baron Steuben was sent by Gen. Washington to Sir Frederick Haldimand, at Quebec, to arrange matters for the occupation of these posts, with instructions to proceed to Michigan and along the line of the lake frontier for the purpose of taking possession of them, he was informed that they would not be given up, and was refused passports to Niagara and Detroit. In connection with the retention of the posts by the British, a new and powerful Indian confederacy. was evidently organizing in the West. As early as December, 1786, a grand council of the different tribes was held near the mouth of the Detroit River. At this council were delegates from the Six Nations-the Hurons, the Ottawas, the Miamis, the Shawanese, the Chippewas, the Cherokees, the Delawares, the Pottawatomies, and from the confederates of Wabash. The principal subject of discussion at this council appears to have been a question-of boundary. It was centended by the Indians that the United States had no rigit, to cross the Ohio River, but they advised a pacific line of policy, so long as there~ was no actual encroachment upon their territory. The design of this 'discussion undoubtedly was to create a belief that the Americans intended to drive them from their lands, and, as was said, "to kindle their council fires wherever they thought proper, without consulting the Indians." The American Government., indeed, considered that the treaty of 1783 invested them with jurisdiction over the Indian territory,a claim which the native occupants were by no means disposed to admit. Amo.ng other things, as a plea for retaining the western posts, it was pretended by the British t~hat, the extensive and valuable country in which they were situated had been ceded away through some oversight on the part, of the Commissioners, or from their ignorance of the geography of the country. But the real motives by which they were actuated are sufficiently' manifest. They had already succeeded in exciting hostile feelings among the Indian tribes, and this they were detlermined to take advantage of for the purpose of preventing this broad and fertile region from passing out of their hands. Many of the half-breeds were also active in seconding the views of the English, not only by inflaming the minds of the Indians, but by promising to take up arms in their cause, from a belief that if they did not thus side with them they would not afterward be. suffered to trade in their territory. Meanwhile, Alexander McKenzie, an agent of the British Government, visited Detroit, painted like a savage, and stated that he had just returned from the remote tribes of the upper lakes, who were all in arms and prepared to oppose the claims of the Americans to the western lands; that large bodies of warriers had already assembled, and that they were about to attack the infant settlements of Pennsylvania and Ohio. The artifice practiced by McKenzie succeeded to his wish, and he could the better operate upon the prejudices and passions of the Indians, as he spoke their language perfectly. Elliott and the notorious Simon Girty were no less active in exciting the savages to war. In 1794, an agent was sent from_" the Spanish settlements on the Mississippi for the same object, and, to hasten the organization of the Indian Confederacy against the United States. --.Children," said he, to his savage auditors, "Iyou see me on my feet grasping the tomahawk to strike them (the Americans). We will strike together. I do not desire you to go before me in the front, but to follow me. Children, you hear what these distant nations have said to us, so that we have nothing to do but put our designs into immediate execution, and to, forward this pipe to. the three warlike nations who have been so long struggling for their country. Tell them to smoke this pipe and to forward it to all the lake Indians, and to their Northern brethren. Then nothing will be wanting to complete our general union from the rising to the setting sun, and all the nations will be ready to add strength to the blow we are going to strike." Excited by these various influences, bands of savage warriors, armed with tomahawk and scalpingknife, were seen hastening toward the lake posts, and another great Indian confederacy was formed, consisting of the Ottawas, Pottawatomies, Wyandottes, Miamis, Chippewas and Delawares. * As early as 1785-86, the hostile Indians had occasionally sent their war parties against the feeble frontier settlements in Kentucky, and along the banks of the Ohio,. where a few enterprising emigrants from Virginia and New England had erected their little clusters of log cabins. These border incursions, which clearly appear to have been countenanced and aided by the British, induced the American Government, in 1790, to send. into that quarter Gen. Josiah Harmar, an accomplished and able officer, to put a stop to them. IHarmar advanced against the hostile tribes with a force amounting to fifteen hundred men; but, imprudently dividing his army, he was taken by surprise and defeated by a body of Indians led by that famous warrior Little Turtle. His expedition was followed by that of Gen. St. Clair, in 1792, which was also defeated. Gen. St. Clair fell into an ambuscade which had been laid.forý him by the Indians, who, firing from behind their breastworks of fallen trees, carried destruction into the American ranks, and soon covered the ground with their dead. On account of these disasters it became necessary to increase the army. Gen. Washington exerted himself to the utmost to effect this object, and in due time a force was raised and placed in command of Gen. Anthony Wayne. Wayne began to move his army in 1793. Advancing through the forests of Western Ohio to the spot which had been rendered memorable by the defeat of St. Chair, he erected Fort Recovery on the scene of the former carnage. He passed on to the rapids of the Maumee, and erected Fort Deposite about, four miles above the British fort, in which he placed his baggage and stores. This British fort had been established on.American ground, and fortified by a garrison from Detroit the preceding spring. The Indians looked upon it as their last refuge in case they were defeated by the A1mericans. It, however, afforded them no succor. Both the Indians and the British seem to have been overawed by,the fame and formidable army of Gen. Wayne, and the fort was cautiously kept closed all the time the fierce battle was raging under the immediate range of its guns. The Indians feared Gen. Wayne, whom they called JBlacksnake, on account of his supposed cunning. The American army con-.sisted of three thousand men; the Indian force was supposed to be about the same. Most of the savages were naked and painted for.,battle. In the action that ensued, there was actually engaged on the'side of the savages a force from Detroit, headed by a prominent individual of that place, whose name the historian has been charitably or prudently disposed to conceal from the public. Gen. Wayne made short work with the savages. Enticing them by strategem toward the main body of the army, which lay concealed in the underbrush, while the savages were rushing in pursuit of a small retreating force which had been sent to decoy them, and making the wilderness hideous with their yells of supposed victory, the main body of the army rose at the word of command from their lurking places, and, dealing a close fire, pressed them so hard with {he bayonet as to allow them no chance to escape They began to break and retreat toward the British fort, Miami. General Wayne gained over them a decisive victory, and soon the shattered remnants of the Confederacy were ready to make peace with him in the treaty of Greenville, and to cede to the.United States a large tract of those lands, which, but a short, time before, they had solemnly determined not to surrender. The recent great victory of Gen. Wayne had made ].im the most popular man in the Northwest, and when the first county in. Michigan was organized it was named in his honor. The county of Wayne, as we have said, was organized in 1796. This was one year after the treaty ofGreenville, and a few weeks after the surrender of the garrison at Detroit by the British. The settlements in Michigan up to this period, had advanced but slowly. The French Canadians had extended their farms to a considerable distance along the banks of the St. Clair; on the Detroit River there were a few straggling French settlement~s outside of Detroit; also on Otter Creek, and on the tRivers Rouge, Pointe au~x Tremble, and other small streams flowing into Lake Erie. Desultory agriculture and the fur trade constituted nearly the entire occupation of the inhabitants. Detroit and Frenchtown were at this time the only places of much importance. The former was merely a small cluster of rude wooden. houses defended by a fort, and surrounded by pickets, and formed,' as it had long done, the principal depot for the fur trade, The population, independent of the soldiers of the garrison, consisted principally of Scotch, French and English merchants, who had removed here after the conquest of the country, for the prosecution of the traffic in furs. The goods required here were obtained from Montreal, and bills of credit for small sums, payable at that place or at Quebec, were allowed to be issued by the merchants, on condition of their giving security to double the amount. Frenchtowan,-on the River Raisin, now a place of considerable importance, consisted at that' time of only a few log cabins, erected by the French on either bank of the friver. Two Indian villages, one 9ccupied by the Ottawas, the other by the Pottawatomies, stood on the present site of the city of Monroe. It being a depot for the Northwestern Company, the surrounding- Indians periodically resorted thither to exchange their furs and peltry for articles of merchandise. The French settlers in the vicinity also disposed of their corn here in exchange for goods, and from.thence it was transported to the upper lakes, for the use of northern traders. While the French were in possession of this country, there was but little.coin for circulation, and accounts were kept in beaver skins or other furs, reduced to their current value. The price of a beaver at. iackinaw, in 1765, -was two shillings and six pence per pound, Mackinaw currency; otter skins were six shillings each, and marten skins one shillinig and six pence. Ten beaver skins were given for a strond blanket, eight for a white blanket, two for a poundof powder, one for a pound of shot or ball, twenty for a gun, two for an axe of. one pound weight, and one for a knife. The notes and coin of Quebec were sometimes seen at the lake posts, but not in sufficient quantity to be relied on for a uniform currency. The character of this fertile but uncultivated country was not soon materially changed after it came into the possession of the United States. As the effect of transferring the jurisdiction from France to England had been little more than to change the garrisons from French to English, and to give the Hudson's Bay Company a monopoly of the fur trade, so -its surrender to the United States.produced but little alteration in its general features. As the Indian title was not fully extinguished, no lands were brought into market, 'and consequently the settlements proceeded but very slowly. At its organization, in 1796,.the county of Wayne embraced the whole of the territory included between the present eastern boundary of the State and the Mississippi River, extending as far north as the line of the British Possessions. Within this vast territory there was no other political organization for many years, and the county, for the most part, was an unknown and unexplored wilderness. The seat of government of this vast wilderness empire was at Detroit. To the government of the county of Wayne all the scattering settlers and traders throughout its limits were amenable, and hither all had to come for justice. That some who deserved to have been brought here escaped the "meshes of the law " through the good opportunity afforded by the extensive wilder-ness to " evade the officers of justice," there can be but little doubt, It is seriously believed that some escape even under the vastly improved facilities for the administration of justice at the present day. The county of Wayne was represented in the first Legislature of the Northwestern Territory which convened at Cincinnati on the 16th of September, 1799, and also in the subsequent meeting of that body at Chillicot.he, Ohio.. Solomon Sibley, Jacob Visgar and Charles F. Chobart de Joncarre were the Representatives. Measures were taken by. this Legislature to 1)rocure for the people of Detroit a confirmation of their right to a tract of land adjoining the town, which they had used from the first settlement of the county as a public common. After the first session of the Legislature, Congress passed an act removing the seat of government from Cincinnati to Chillicothe, Ohio, and on the first Monday of Noyember, 1800, the Legislature convened at that place. In the year 1800, the Northwestern Territory was divided, forming the Territories of Ohio and Indiana. The former was admitted into the Union in 1802, and Michigan was included in the Territory of Indiana till its erection into a. separate Territory on the llth of January, 1805. The third session of the Legislature of the Northwestern Territory met at Chillicothe on the 24th of November, 1801, and adjourned in January, 1802. These were the only sessions in which Vayne County was represented in the Legislature of the Northwestern Territory, for, before the next session, the State of Ohio had been formed and admitted into the Union. The same act for the admission of Ohio made Michigan a part of Indiana Territory. This was a great disappointment to the people of Detroit, as they had reason to believe that a new Territory wvould be immediately formed, with its seat of government at that town. Wayne County was never rerpresented in the Legislature of Indiana T~erritory, at Vincennes, for the reason that no such Legislature existed till after the Territory of Michigan wa~s set off by itself, the former Territory aot having attained sufficient population to entitle it to the second grade of territorial government. The first Legislature of Indiana Territory convened at Vincennes July 29, 1805; Michigan was erected into a separate Territory by act of Congress, approved January 11, 1805. From this period, Michigan dates her independent, existence. William Hull (the noted General Hull) was appointed Governor of' the Territory, and Augustus B. Woodward, Frederick Bates and o-hn Griffin, Judges. Gov. Hull arrived in Detroit to find the city in ashes, the grea~t fire of June 11, 1805, which left but a single dwelling standing in the city," having occulrred on the day previous to his arrival. On the second Tuesday of July, 1805, the oath of offce was administered to the various Territoriai officers. On the 10th of October, 1805, Gov. Hull and Mis assoeia~tes communicated to the Secretary of State of the United States an off~icil -statement. of the ruined condition of the city. At its next session, Congress passed the following act: "Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States, in Congress assembled: That the Governor a-nd Judges of the Territory of Michigan shall be and they are hereby authorized to lay out a town including the whole of the old town. of Detroit and ten thousand acres adjacent, excepting such parts as the President of the United States - 1 1 Pil I

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Page  64 64 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. shall direct to be reserved" for the use of the military department, and shall hear, examine and finally.adjust all claims to lots therein, and give deeds for the same. And to every person, or the legal representative of every person, who, not owing or professing allegiance to any foreign power, and being above the age of seventeen years, did, on the llth day of June, one thousand eight hundred and five, when the old town of Detroit was burnt, own or inhabit a house in the same, there shall be granted by the Governor and Judges aforesaid, -br any three of them, and where they shall judge most. proper, a lot not exceeding the. quantity of five thousand square feet. "Sr"Sc. 2. And be it further enacted, that the land remaining of said ten thousand acres, after satisfying claims provided for by the preceding section, shall be disposed of by the Governor and Judges aforesaid, at their discretion, to the best advantage, who are hereby authorized to make deeds to the purchasers thereof, and the proceeds of the lands so disposed of shall be applied by the Governor and Judges aforesaid toward building a court house and jail in the town of Detroit; and the said Governor and Judges are required to make report, to Congress, in writing, of their proceedings under this act." The "1Journal of Proceedings of the Board of Governor and Judges of the Territory of Michigan" contains the following entry. " Pursuant to the above act of Congress, the Governor and Judges of the Territory of Michigan convened at the house of Governor Hfull, on Saturday, September 6, 1806. Present: William Hull, Governor; Augustus B. Woodward, Chief Judge, and Frederick Bates, Senior Associate Judge. Peter Andrain was continued Legislative Secretary, and Asa Jones was appointed Sergeant-at-Arms, with a compensation of twenty-five dollars a month..After the business of organizing had been dispatched, the act of Congress was read, and referred to Judge Woodward, as a Committee, with instructions to report from time to time, by bill or otherwise." At the next session, September 8, 1806, Judge Woodward presented the following resolutions ~ " Resolved, That. it is expedient, immediately to lay out and survey a town, under the said act of Congress, and to adjust the titles and claims to lands and lots therein. ~ "Resolved, That the basis of said town be an equilateral triangle, having each side the length of four thousand feet, and having every angle bisected by a perpendicular line upon the opposite side, such parts being excepted as, from the approximation of the river or other unavoidable circumstances, "may-require partial deviations. " Resolved, That it will be expedient to allow and convey to individuals having legal claims the lots within their respective limits, reserving so much as shall be necessary for public squares or spaces, avenues, streets, and lanes, the increased value of the property as lots being coifsidered as more than an equivalent for the same, excepting in some partichlar cases, where, the proprietor having but a small quantity, the whole or the greater part may be taken up, in which case special indemnification will be necessary; and, reserving also, to those hgaving legal rights, and who may not think the benefit greater than the damage, the right of having their damage ascertained according to law. "11 Resolved, That it will be expedient, in adjusting the titles and claims, to allow to every person the quantity to which he may have'a good title; and when a person h"s been in possession of a farm with a good title, to allow him the quantity he wvas in _possession of in front, by nine thousand feet in rear, provided.thaat encroachment on public land, unusual and unjustifiable under the circumstances of the country, be not comprehended therein. " Resolved, That it will be expedient to make deeds immediately to proprietors and purchasers, securing all sums due to the public by mortgages and bonds. " Resolved, That it be requested of Mr. Joseph Watson to prepare deeds, mortgages and bonds which may be necessary, at the following charges, to be-paid by the party receiving the title: that is to say, for a deed, one dollar; for a mortgage, one dollar; for a bond or other writing, twenty-five cents. " Resolved, That the Committee on this subject be instructed to report a bill or bills to carry into execution the preceding resolutions, and that the Committee be further instructed to collect a list of all claims, and from time to time report an opinion on the respective claims. "" Resolved, That. it will be expedient, immediately t~o incorporate the said town of Detroit as a city, and to provide by law for the government of the same." The bill above called for appeared" under the title of "An Act Concerning the City of Detroit." It was passed unanimously, on the 13th of September, 1806. Jefferson and Woodward avenues and some of the streets near the river were immediately surveyed. The adjudication of claims went oR rapidly. Early in 1807 the whole survey was completed. The triangle around the fort was the military reservation, and was not divided into lots till 1826. SAD..act was passed January 10, 1812, abolishing imprisonment for debt, entitled, "An Act for the Relief of" Poor Debtors.". On the 16th of August, 1812, Governor IHull surrendered Detroit and all Michigan to the Britis!, Commandant, General Brock. Articles were entered into, by which Fort Detroit, with all the troops, regulars as well as militia, were surrendered to the British, and both were considered prisoners of war, except-such of the Michigan militia as had not joined the army. Pub-- lic property of every description was. given to the enemy. The Americam soldiers marched out the fort at 12 o'clock, on the 16th of August, and the British forces took possession. The regulars of the United States army were taken prisoners to Quebec. General Hull was taken prisoner to Montreal, and was afterward exchanged. In October, 1813, General Lewis Cass accepted, from President Madison,.the appointment of Governor of the Territory of Michigan. The Government felt it a duty to bestow some distinguished evidence of approbation upon one who had rendered the country such signal service in time of need. Nothing seemed more appropriate than the bestowment upon him of civil authority over the Territory in whose defence he had periled his life. Early in the winter of 1813, General Cass removed, with his family, from Ohio to Detroit, and at once entered upon the administration of the goverment. The extinguishment of the Indian title in the Territory was a matter of great importance, and was conducted in a skillful and statesmanlike manner, by Goverhnor. Cass and his predecessors. When the Americans came into possession of the 'Territory, the Indians had relinquished their claim to only six miles in width a long the Detroit River, from the River Raisin to Lake St. Clair, This had been ceded first, in the treaty of Fort McIntosh, confirmed in the treaty of Fort Harmar, and reconfirmed in the treaty of 1795, made by General Wayne, at Greenville. By the treaty of Detroit, made by General Hull, November 17, 1807, the following territory was added to it, and is thus described in the treaty: "Beginning at the mouth of the Miami River of the lakes (the Maumee), and running thence up the middle thereof to the mouth of the great Au Glaize River; thence running due north until it intersects a parallel of latitude to be drawn from the outlet of Lake Huron, which forms the River St. Clair; thence running northeast,' the course that may be found will lead in a direct line to White Rock in Lake 'Huron; thence due east, till it, intersects the boundary line between the United States and Upper Canada, in said lake; thence southwardly, following the same.boundary line, down said lake through the River St. Clair, Lake St. Clair and the River Detroit, into Lake Erie, to a point due east of the aforesaid Miami (Maumee) River; thence west to the place of beginning." On the 21st of November, 1815, Wayne County, by proclamation of Governor Cass, was made to coincide, in its boundaries, with this territory, to which the Indian title had been extinguished, except that portion of it lying in the State of Ohio. Wayne County, as thus reduced, embraced the territory included in the present counties of Lenawee, Monroe, Wayne, Washte7 naw, Livingston, Oakland and Macomb, and the eastern parts of Jefferson and Ingham, and the southern portions of Shiawassee, Lapeer and St. Clair. We here insert the proclamation of Governor Cass, which sounds rather autocratic to republican ears, but the reader must remember that the Governor exercised only the authority conferred upon him by the fundamental territorial law--the Ordinance of 1787. In the first stage of Territorial Government, under this famous Ordinance, there was no Legislature, but the Governor and Judges made the laws, or, rather, were authorized to select such from the codes of the older States as they found adapted to territorial purposes. When this edict of Governor Cass was passed, the Territory of Michigan had not passed to the second stage of Territorial Government, as provided by the Ordinance of 1787. With these remarks, we introduce the proclamation respecting the re-establishment of Wayne County. It, is as follows: LEWIS CASS, Governor in and over the Territory of Michigan, ^" - TO ALL TO WH1o3M THESE PRESENTS MfAY COME, GREETING: Know ye, that I do hereby lay out that part of th. Territory of Michigan, to which the Indian title has been extinguished, into a county to be called the County of Wayne, and the seat of justice.of the said county shall be at the City of Detroit. "And for the execution of an act entitled ' An act concerning highways and roads,' I do hereby divide the said territory into as many road districts as there are militia company districts; and I do hereby make each militia company district a road district. " I do hereby abrogate and repeal all acts of the Executive of the Territory inconsistent with this act. "In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand, and caused the great Seal of the Territory to be affixed, at Detroit, this twenty-first day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifteen.."LEWIS CASS." Governor Cass was by no means an autocrat, although trained in early life in a school of military experience, which required firm decision and prompt action. The people never had a more unselfish and generous advocate of their rights and liberties than those of Michigan Territory found in their able and successful Governor. His policy, public speeches and messages all testify to this fact. Take the following, for example- from one of his special messages to the Council: "At the late session of Congress an act was passed, extending to the citizens of Florida and Arkansas the privilege of choosing almost all the officers holding their offices under territorial laws, and authorizing the local Legislature to appoint the few not eligible to the people. I see no reason why the principles of this act should not be extended to this Territory, and I submit for your consideration the expediency of an application to Congress for that purpose. It wiU be found that appointments to office thus made will be more satisfactory. than when they are made upon the nomination of a single individual. The people in their respective counties are better acquainted with the qualifications of candidates for county offices than an executive magistrate can be, and more,.competent to determine upon them. This measure would give to the people a direct and proper influence "in the management of their affairs-an influence which at all times ought to be exerted in a republican form of government, and which will be more fully exerted in that change in our political condition to which we are rapidly approaching." By proclamation of General Cass, October 18, 1816, "1the district of Michilimackinac " was, annexed to Wayne County, for the execution of an act entitled " An act to adjust the estates and affairs of deceased persons, testate and intestate, and for other purposes." October 4, 1814, the Governor was authorized to appoint three Auditors, " whose duty it shall be to inquire into and liquidate all debts due to the Territory, or to the former county of Wayne, and these Auditors shall take an oath of office." On the 1st of January, 1822, was published the following act of appropriation, for the Sheriff of Wayne County}: ".Be. it enacted by the Governor and Judges of the Territoryf of M3ichiglan, That there be appropriated and paid out of the treasury of the Territory of Michigan, to Austin E. Wing, Sheriff of the county of Wayne, the sum of one hundred and seventy-six dollars and fifty cents, for services rendered_ by him in the Supreme Court of said Territory, and for executing a certain Indian; and that there be advanced to Thomas Rowland the sum Of thirty, three dollars and eighty-eight cents, for so much money by him expended, for erecting a gallows for the execution of a certain Indian, to be refunded by the said' Thomas Rowland when the same shall be received from the treasury of the United States; and that there be appropriated and paid to John Stockton the sum of twenty-five dollars, for services heretofore rendered by him as Secretary of the Legislative Board." " The same being adopted from the laws of one of the original States,.to wit, the State of Ohio, as far as necessa~ry and suitable to the circum stances of the Territory of Michigan." In 1818, Courts of Probate and Registers of wills and deeds were appointed in the counties. By proclamation of Governor Cass, September 10, 1822, the county of Wayne was reduced to the following dimensions: " Beginning in Lake St. Clair,.on the boundary line between the United States and the British Province of Upper Canada, at a point due east from the intersection of the base line with Lake St. Clair, and running thence west to the line between the seventh and eighth ranges east of the Principal Meridian; thence with the said line south to the line between the townships numbered four and five, south of the base line; thence with the said line between the said townships four and five to the middle of the River Huron of Lake Erie; thence with the said river, keeping the middle thereof, to its mouth; thence east. to the boundary line between the United States and the Province of Upper Canada; thence with the said boundary line to the place of beginning." This reduced Wayne County to its present limits. By the same proclamation, the boundaries were fixed to the counties of Monroe, Ma3comb, Oakland and St. Clair, which had been laid out previously, and six new counties were formed.. The following are the dates of the formation of ten counties of Michigan Territory, up to September 10, 1822: The county of Monroe, established by executive act, July 14, 1817; Macomb, January 15, 1818; Oakland, January 12,1819; St. Clair, March 28, 1820. September 10, 1822, the following counties were laid out: Lapeer, Sanilac, Sauinaw. Washtenaw, Shiawassee and Lenawee. At the time of tthe laying out of these aounties it'was declared "that the six counties herein laid out, to wit, the counties of Lapeer, Sanilac, Saginaw, Shiawassee, Washtenaw and Lenawee, shall be organized whenever, hereafter, the competent authority, for the time being, shall so determine, and that, until then, the said counties., shall be attached to and compose parts of the counties now organized, in the following manner: "The counties of Lapeer, Sanilac, Saginaw and Shiawassee shall be attached to and compose a part of the county of Oakland. "The county of Washtenaw shall be attached to and compose a part of the county of Wayne. " The county of Lenawee shall be attached to and compose a part of the county of Monroe. "And all the country not included in the,oundaries of any of t.e b. - fore described counties, to which the Indian title was extinguished by the treaty of Saginaw, shall be attached to and compose part of the county of Oakland. " And all the country within this Territory, to which the Indian title was extinguished by the treaty of Chicago, shall be attached to and compose a part of the county of Monroe." In 1818, through the agency of Governor Cass, the question of changing the civil authority from the first to the second grade of Territorial government was submitted to the people, who voted against it. The change was not attained till 1828, when Congress passed an act abrogating the legislative power of the Governor and Judges, and establishing a Legislative Council consisting of nine members. These members were appointed by the President of the United States, with the concurrence of the Senate, out of eighteen candidates elected by the people of the Territory. The Council thus formed and the Governor of the Territory were invested with the same powers which had been before granted by the Ordinance of 1787 to the Governor, Legislative Council and House of Representatives of the Northwestern Territory. The first Legislative Council of the Territory of Michigan convened at Detroit June 7,.'1824. In 1819, Michigan had been authorized to elect a Delegate to Congress. In 1825, the Legislative Council was increased to thirteen members. EARLY COURTS IN WAYNE COUNTY. Upon the original organization of Wayne County, courts were immediately established at Detroit, under Judge Symmes, one of the Judges of the Northwestern Territory. Hon. Jacob Burnett, then a distinguished member of the bar, gives us some interesting reminiscences of these early courts at Detroit in his " Notes on the Northwestern Territory." A large proportion of those engaged in the business of the courts, either as suitors, witnesses or jurors, being unable to speak the English language, it became necessary to employ sworn interpreters. This rendered the proceedings very tedious and, in some respects, uninteresting, as everything said in the progress of a cause, by the Court, the bar, or the witnesses, had to be interpreted sentence by sentence, as it came from the lips of the speaker. Previous to the establishment of American courts at Detroit, -ll matters of controversy among the inhabitants had been settled in a summary way by the Commandant, to whose decision the people had been accustomed to submit. They had been habituated all their lives to this summary, expeditious mode of settling their difficulties and disputes, and, consequently, were very much dissatisfied with the slow and tedious progress of American courts, against which they complained loudly. One of the immediate consequences of a change of government and of the establishment of judicial tribunals 'was the commencement of a large number of suits, many of them to test the correctness of the former decisions of commandants, particularly in cases involving the titles to real estate, The docket was soon crowded with cases, and the practice of law became lucrative. The result was similar to that following the establishment of the Territory of Mississippi in 1798, and it was broughl about by the same causes. INTERNATIONAL. Soon after the town of Detroit came into the hands of the Americans, many of the merchants who had been engaged in the fur trade removed and established themselves at Sandwich, on the opposite Canadian shore. Here it was the universal custom to celebrate the birthday of the King of England. The General Court of the Northwestern Territory being in session at Detroit, on the 4th of June, 1800, which was the birthday of His Majesty George III, the.'Judges, and Bar, and officers of the garrison, with many of the principal citizens of Detroit, were invited to be present and participate in the festivities. The invitation was accepted and about a hundred Americans went over. A spacious building, which had been erected for a warehouse, was so arranged as to accommodate between four and five hundred persons with seats at the table at the same time. The entertainment was splendid. The tables were richly and elaborately furnished, and abundantly supplied with everything which appetite or taste could desire. The loyalty of His Majesty's subjects was evinced by every expedient in their power, and if a moiety of their prayers in behalf of their royal master had been granted, he nmust have lived a thousand years, and his shadow never have grown less. During the evening much deference was paid by the managers to the feelings of the American.guests. Next to "the King, the President of the United States was toasted, and among the many toasts several were dran]k to distinguished American statesmen. Although wine was freely indulged in, as was the custom of the day, the company broke up late at night with the utmost harmony and good feeling. The American garrison at Detroit consisted of two regiments, commanded by Colonel Strong, who, in consideration.of his great responsibility, and to relieve from duty as many of his officers as practicable, declined to be a guest., and remained at his post in the citadel. At this party the Court and Bar became acquainted with the British officers stationed at Fort Maiden, and received a pressing invitation to visit them and spend a night at their quarters. They concluded to do this on their way back to Cincinnati, at the same time Captain Currie, of the John Adams, an armed United States yessel, politely offering to convey the party to Malden, and thende to Maumee Bay. They had a very delightful time at Malden, enjoying the hospitalities.of Captain MdMullen, and by going in the government vessel, escaped the misery of wading through.the Black Swamp on their return to Cincinnati. THE PRESENT COUNTY OF WAYNE. Wayne County, as at present constituted, is bounded north by Macomb and Oakland Counties, east by Detroit River and Lake Erie, south by Monroe County, and west by the county of Washtenaw. It is dividedl into eighteen civil townships, as follows: 1. Grosse Point. 7. Canton. 13. PRomulus. 2.. Hamtramck. 8. Nankin. 14. Van. Buren. 3. Greenfield. 9. Dearborn. 15. Sumpter. 4. Redford. 10. Springwells. 16. Huron. 5. Lavonia. 11. Ecorce. 17. Brownstown. 6. Plymouth. 12. Taylor. 18. Mouzuazon. The topography of the county is generally level or rolling, with slight, depressions occasioned by the streams which course their way through it in various directions. The Detroit River, one of the most beautiful straits in North America, washes its whole eastern boundary, receiving its tributaries from different parts of the county. The height of this river, above the ocean, at Detroit, is 568 feet, and it runs with an average current of about two miies per hour. The Huron Rtiver forms a portion of the southern boundary of tU1 county, and. the River Rouge passes through its entire breadth from west to east, emptying into the Detroit at the southern boundary line of Springwells. Its north and south branches form a junction in Dearborn Township. At the time of the first settlements, the county contained a good deal of swampy land,.which, at that time, was thought to be unfit for cultivation. Indeed, such was the opinion respecting the Territory in general. So unfavorable an impression prevailed upon tile, subject, that in 1816 the Government, by an act of Congress, substituted two million acres in Illinois and Missouri for the supposed worthless soldiers' bounty lands in Michigan. This action was based on the report of the Government Surveyor, who represented the lands generally throughout the peninsula as being unfit for cultivation. The report gained credence/ and for a time seriously retarded immigration. Whatever may have been the motives for such a report, the

Page  65 65 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. facts have sufficiently demonstrated the contrary. The country was soon undeceived through the energy of G-eneral Cass.. Exploring parties were sent out, who discovered vast tracts of beautiful rolling prairies and oak openings, stretching in all directions through the interior of the Territory, the best wheat and fruit lands in the world, and all along the border of the lakes and rivers were fertile stretches unsurpassed for productiveness and easy tillage. Immigration of the hardy, intelligent and enterprising people of New York and New England began to flock in, under whose intelligent and thrifty management the wilderness has been converted into a fruitful field. To facilitate immigration and settlement, the lands were surveyed and brought into market. From 1818 to 1820, surveys were made in the district of Detroit, and Wayne and the adjoining counties began to increase in population. To an indolent and spiritless class of people the swamps in some localities, and the unhealthiness caused by stagnant water, might have been an insurmountable obstacle, but to a people of energy and resources, such as were the early settlers of Michigan, they were comparatively no barrier. It was soon discovered that drainage and cultivation of the soil were the sovereign remedy at once for poverty and the malarious diseases incident to the climate. Ague and intermittent fevers are becoming almost entirely unknown in Michigan, save as matters of past record. This remedy has been nowhere better applied than in Wayne County. The swampy portions have been at once rendered arable and healthy, by a thorough system of drainage, by means of ditches into the principal streams. Artificial water courses have thus been created, draining off the surplus water from the soil, and rendering nearly the whole surface of the county dry porous land. It is the office of the Drain Commissioners of the county and of the several townships to keep these drains open. The unhealthfulness of using surface water at Detroit, aa the early settiers were obliged to do, on account of the impervious blue clay subsoil, early prompted to the establishment of the Water Works. Now the people rejoicingly drink of the crystal fountain opened for them in Lake St. Clair, and pride themselves in their robustness of health. We subjoin a section of the geological formation underlying the ciy of Detroit, taken from the report of the sinking of an artesian well, at the intersection of Wayne and Fort streets, by the Hydraulic Company, in 1829 -30; depth, 160 feet: From 0 to 10 feet, Common Alluvium..................... 10 feet. "10 " 128 " Plaster Clay............................. 118 " "128 " 130 " Beach Sand and Gravel............... 2 " "130 " 250 " Helderberg Limestone................. 120 " "250 " 252 " Gypsum and Salt....................... 2 " "252 " 260 ".Niagara Limestone.................... 8 " The increase of population in Wayne County, including the city of Detroit, has been as follows: In 1854, it was 64,709; in 1864, 83,292; in 1870, 119,068; in 1874, 144,903; showing that it has considerably more than doubled in the last twenty years. The agricultural statistics show the amount of taxable land in the county to be 377,109.33 acres. In 1878, 14,330 were devoted to wheat, 119,939 acres to corn; the former yielding 12.73 bushels per acre, the latter, 84.16 bushels. But in 1873 the wheat crop in the county was very light. In 1852, the average yield was 15.03 bushels per acre. The potato crop, in 1873, was 262,338 bushels; hay, 39,849 tons; wool sheared, 141,600 pounds; butter, 92,333 pounds; cheese, 258,035 pounds. The amount of pork marketed was 1,226,637 pounds. By an act alproved March 3, 1831, provision was made for the establishment of a County Poor House, in Wayne County, and on the 1st of March, 1834, the Board of Supervisors of the county were authorized to appoint a Superintendent of the Poor House, and to allow him a suitable compensation out of the county funds. March 11, 1861, the County Poor Farm was organized into a school district, and the Superintendent of the Poor and County Auditor were made the officers of the same. Fort Wayne, in Wayne County, was ceded to the United States by an act of the Legislature, approved March 26, 1867. COUNTY OFFICERS FOR 1876. Cornelius J. geilly, Judge of the Circuit Court; Ray Haddock, Clerk" Jared Patchen, County Judge"; Albert H. Wilkinson, Judge of Probate; Edgar 0. Durfee, Register of Probate";George H. Stellwagen, County Treasurer-; Charles Dupont, Register of Deeds; John G., Hawley, Prosecuting Attorney; Jared A. Sexton, Sheriff; Lucius D. Harris, County Surveyor; Norton B. gowley, James Cahill, Coroners; William Sales, Thomas Gr. Lirabroker, James Hollihan, Board of County Auditors; Wellington Ellis, Drain Commissioner. THE CITY OF DETROIT. There is a tradition that the site of Detroit was first visited by a French explorer as early as 1610-only two years after the founding of Quebec by Champlain. This is highly probable, inasmuch as the Franciscan friars at that early period had extended their missions along the St. Lawrence as far as the waters of Niagara. In the brief account of the journey of Le Caren to Lake Huron, in 1616, it is said that he "reached the rivers of Lake Huron from the land of the Mohawks, on foot and paddling a bark canoe." The " land of the Mohawks " was then along the eastern borders of Lake Ontario, and, as the Franciscans are known to have had missions south of this point, along the waters of the Niagara, it is quite likely that Le Caren. followed that direction. Brown, in his History of Illinois, says: "Before Quebec contained fifty inhabitants, Le Caren, with other priests of the Franciscan order, had labored for years as missionaries in New France and among the numerous tribes then residing on' the waters of the Niagara." It is probable that this strait was visited by ýhe French before the hostility of the Iroquois had closed the passage by the lower lakes. Parkman gives the origin of that hostility thus: "It was an evil day for Canada when, on the 28th of May, 1609, Samuel de Champlain, impelled by his own adventurous spirit, departed from the hamlet of Quebec to follow a war party of Algonquins against their hated enemy, the Iroquois. Ascending the Sorel and passing the rapids at Chambly, he embarked on the lake which bears his name, and, with two French attendants, steered southward with his savage associates toward the rocky promontory of Ticonderoga. They moved with all the precaution of Indian warfare; when, at length, as night was closing in, they descried a band of the Iroquois in their large canoes of elm bark approaching through the gloom. Wild yells from either side announced the mutual discovery. The Iroquois hastened to the shore, and all night long the forest resounded with their discordant war songs and fierce whoops of defiance. Day dawned, and the fight, began. Bounding from tree to tree, the Iroquois pressed forward to the attack; but when Champlain advanced from among the Algonquins and stood full in sight before them, with his strange attire, his shining breast-plate, and features unlike their own-when they saw the flash of his arquebus, and beheld two of their chiefs f&1l dead, they could not contain their terror, but fled for shelter into the depths of the wood. The Algonquins pursued, slaying many in the flight, and the victory was complete. "Such was the first collision between the white man and the Iroquois; and Champlain flattered himself that the latter had learned for the future to respect the arms of France. He was fatally deceived. The Iroquois recovered from their terrors, but they never forgave the injury." At a later period, the Iroquois learned from the English the significance of such a spectacle as first met their terrified gaze on the shores of Lake Champlain. The English put firearms into their hands, and excited their fierce and deadly hatred against the French, particularly against the Jesuits, whom they were taught to regard as cunning intriguers for French aggrandizement and the spread of the Roman Catholic religion. This infusion of an insidious poison. into the Iroquois mind by the English trader inflamed the old grudge, and in the end became more than a match for all the shrewd plans of the Jesuits; it was the root of all those wars which for a hundred years harassed the French colonies and spread desolation among their Indian allies from the St. Lawrence to the Mississippi. It is well known that the hostility of the Iroquois along the eastern borders of the lower lakes and their connecting rivers was the cause of the exclusion of the French for many years from this great natural highway to the Northwest, and that, in consequence, the Jesuit missionaries were obliged to make their way to Lake Huron, to the Sault Ste. Marie and to Michilimackinac by the way of the Ottawa River, leaving the St. Lawrence in the neighborhood of Montreal and passing up the Ottawa and its portages to Lake Nepissing, and thence by other portages to the Georgian Bay. The Hurons first opened the way for the Jesuit missions to the Northwest in 1634. At this period the Jesuits Brebouf and Daniel, meeting with a party of Hurons at Quebec, who had descended thither by the Ottawa River, resolved to return with them by that safe and secluded route, and establish a mission among them. They accordingly embarked, and after undergoing untold suffering and privation, arrived at Lake Iroquois, a bay of Lake Huron, where they built the first house of the Society of Jesus, and soon two villages-St. Louis and St. Ignatius-sprang up in the Huron forest. This was the first among those many Jesuit missions destined soon to spread over a large extent of country. The French had now found an "1inside track," so to speak, on the English and their Iroquois allies, and it became their policy through this channel to bring as many of the northern tribes as possible into alliance with them, extend their influence south' keep back the Iroquois and to erect as many barriers as possible between the latter and their Indian allies of the Northwest. The Huron mission gave to the world a knowledge of the water courses of the St. Lawrence, a map of which was published in Paris in 1660. From the Huron mission.the Jesuit fathers passed westward to the Falls of St. Mary. Leaving the Bay of Pentagushine in a bark canoe, Fathers Jouges and Raymbault arrived at the great Indian council at the Falls of St. Mary, in May, 1641, and were seventeen days in performing the journey. There they learned more than was ever before known of the Indians of the Northwest and of the character of the country represented by the different tribes. Raymbault commenced at the Falls of St. Mary the first Jesuit mission within the bounds of Michigan, but, owing to his sickness and death from consumption the following year, the mission was abandoned, till Claude Allouez and Marquette reestablished it in 1668. This mission is conceded to have been the first permanent settlement begun by Europeans within the present limits of the State of Michigan. The next was the Mission of Marquette, at Mackinaw, founded by that devoted missionary and famous discoverer of the Mississippi, in 1670, to which a fort and trading house were added by La Salle in 1679. Marquette had separated from Allouez at the Sault, and had gone to the Chippewa mission, on Lake Superior; there falling in with a branch of the Hurons, who had wintered on Mackinaw Island the winter previous. He concluded to return with them and make that the center of his missionary operations. The site he regarded as a good one, on account of the fine fishing in the strait, which was also the key to the passage south, as the Sault Ste. Marie was that of the passage north into Lake Superior. Meanwhile the great natural passage to the Upper Lakes was held by the vigilant and remorseless Iroquois, till checked by the daring genius of the Chevalier de La Salle. La Salle conceived the grand scheme of opening up this magnificent water communication to navigation and commerce, connecting it with the Mississippi, which Marquette had just discovered, and of thus extending the power and commerce of France from the Gulf of the St. Lawrence to the Gulf of Mexico. As the first movement in this direction, he explored Lake Ontario, erected Fort Frontenac at the site of the present Canadian town of Kingston, obtained there a grant of land from the French Crown, became Commandant at the fort, beat back the invading Iroquois and cleared the passage to Niagara Falls. Making it safe to attempt a hitherto untried expedition, he prepared his force and his outfit, arrived with them in a vessel of ten tons at the Fails, and carried them past to the place selected for the construction of the first ship that ever sailed the great lakes. On the 22d of January, 1679, the keel of the Griffin was laid; on the 7th of August, she set sail up the Niagara, and, reaching Lake Erie, passed smoothly over its broad bosomu; thence up the Detroit River and Lake Huron to the strait of Mackinaw, by which he entered Lake Michigan and at length cast anchor at Green Bay. It is not our purpose to follow La Salle in his further movements, but simply to note the fact of his arrival in the vicinity of Detroit, as the first European whose expedition has furnished Us with anry positive knowltedge of this beautiful channel upon which now stands the City of the Straits. Father Hennepin, who was the journalist of the expedition, thus describes the islands and the strait (Detroit): "11 They are the finest in the world. The strait is finer than Niagara, being one league broad, excepting that part which forms the lake that we have called St. Clair." These few lines were probably the first ever penned on the natural beauty of Detroit River; but since then how many thousands have seen it and given utterance to their admiration. The scenery of the strait, from the earliest period of our knowledge of it, has always seemed to impress the visitor with its beauty. Romance and poetry have lent their charms to throw over it that placid air of enchantment like a scene in fairy-land, with which it probably impressed its first beholder: " That river, clear and broad and bland, The charm of all this western landIts lucid waters quiet rolled, Its gem-like islands seemed to float, Its heavy forests bloomed on high, Its grasses waved beneath the sun; Its pendant vines on every hold, Its winding banks, like rising, moat, Its wild game flapping in the sky; Its whole-a paradise begun." It is not to be wondered at that the Indians should have selected so lovely a place as the site of Teuchse Groudie-their ancient village. For history informs us that when the present site of Detroit was first visited by Europeans it was occupied by an Indian village of the above name. ORDERS TO ESTABLISH A POST AT DETROIT. The situation of Detroit, as the key to the navigation of the great lakes, was long regarded as important by both the French and the English, during that struggle for empire which made enemies of the two nations and their respective Indian allies for so many years. As the English traders gradually extended their influence westward, it became a question as to which party would first seize upon and occupy the situation as a military post. The French, being already in command of important posts on the Upper Lakes, and in, nearer proximity to the coveted situation, secured it in advance of their rivals. The first movement to establish a post here was made in 1686, when M. du Shut, then Commandant at Mackinaw, received instructions through the Special Commissioner, M. Durantaye, to proceed to Detroit and establish there a military post. In obedience to this order, M. du Shut proceeded to the foot of Lake Huron and fortified a point intended to command the entrance of that lake from the River St. Clair. The fort which he erected was named St. Joseph, and stood on the site of the present Fort Gratiot. It was the design to proceed thence and erect the works at Detroit, but the breaking out of the Iroquois war in Canada frustrated that purpose; England and France became involved in a protracted war; and nothing further was done toward establishing a post here till after the peace of Ryswick, which was consummated September 11, 1697. The experiences of the war rendered still more apparent the necessity of a fort at Detroit, and efforts for its erection were renewed. The Six Nations were invited to a council at Montreal; a proposition was made them to cede the land on the strait to the Canadian Government, but they declined, saying that a similar offer had been made them by the British, but that they would not dispose of the land to either party. The Governor replied that it belonged to France already by right of discovery, and if he wanted to take possession of it he should not ask that privilege of the Indians. Antoine de Lamotte Cadillac, a man of great energy and ambition, who had been several years in command of the post at Mackinaw, was then at Montreal, and desired to undertake the enterprise of establishing the new post on the strait. Fearing that he could not accomplish his object by correspondence, he resolved at once to visit Versailles in person, and lay his plans before the Compte de Ponchartrain, then Colonial Minister, which he lost no time in doing. The Count was at first unwilling to accede to his proposition, but he managed his case with signal ability, and finally succeeded in winning the Colonial Minister to his plans. After a long conversation on the subject, the Compte said: "If the King approves this project, I will give you two hundred chosen men, of different trades, with six companies of soldiers, in order that the place may be in condition to hold the Iroquois in subjection in time of peace, and to destroy them if they wish for war; and particularly that our allies may be secure under this protection. Therefore, prepare yourself to return to Canada, and commence the establishment of Detroit." FORT PONCHARTRAIN ERECTED. The project of Cadillac was approved by the King; Count Ponchartrain presented him with a commission as Commandant of the fort which he was authorized to build, and a grant from His Majesty Louis XIV of a tract of land fifteen acres square, "1 wherever on the Detroit the new fort should be established." Cadillac returned to Canada, arriving in Quebec on the 8th of March, 1701; thence he proceeded to Montreal, where he was engaged till June, in making the necessary preparations for the expedition. On the 5th of June, he left La Chine with 50 soldiers and 50 Canadian traders and artisans. His officers were M. de Tonti, Captain, and Messrs. Dugu(. and Chornacle, Lieutenants. A Recollet priest accompanied the troops as Chaplain, and a Jesuit went as Missionary to the Indians. According to instructions received from the Governor, Cadillac proceeded to Detroit by way of the Ottawa River. On his arrival, his first work was to erect a fort which he named "Fort Ponchartrain," in honor of the Colonial Minister, who had encouraged and authorized the enterprise. FIRST LAND GRANTS AT DETROIT. As early as 1705, Louis XIV invested Cadillac with power to grant lands about Detroit, in small lots, to actual settlers. Some of the conditions upon which these lands were granted are curious and interesting, as shown by article " Public Lands," in American State Papers, V. 1, 261. By the conditions of a grant made by Cadillac, at Detroit, in 1707, the grantee was bound to pay a reserved rent of fifteen francs a year to the Crown, forever, in fealty, and to begin to clear and improve the lands within three months from the date of the grant. All the timber was reserved to the Crown, wherever it might be wanted for fortifications or for the construction of boats or other vessels. The property of all mines and minerals was reserved to the Crown. The privilege of hunting rabbits, hares, partridges and pheasants was reserved to the grantor. The grantee was bound to plant, or help to plant, a long May-pole before the door of the principal manorhouse, on the first day of May, in every year. All the grain raised by the grantee was to be carried to "the mill of the manor to be ground, paying the tolls sanctioned by the custom of Paris. On every sale of land a tax was levied; and, before a sale, the grantee was bound to give information to the Government, and if the Government was willing to take the land at the price offered to the grantee, it was to have precedence as a purchaser. The grantee could not mortgage the land without the consent of the Government. For a term of ten years, the grantee was not permitted to work, or cause any person to work, directly or indirectly, at the profession and trade of a blacksmith, locksmith, armorer or brewer without a permit. All effects and articles of merchandise sent to or brought from Montreal were to be sold by the grantee himself, or other person who, with his family, was a French resident, and- not by servants, or clerks, or foreigners, or strangers. The grantee was forbidden to sell or trade spirituous liquors to the Indians. He was bound to suffer on his lands such roads as might be thought necessary for public use. He was bound to make his fences in a certain manner, and, when called upon, to assist in making his neighbors' fences. Such were the conditieons on which the first French settlers at Detroit obtained grants of land from the Commandant at that post, in 1707. ANTOINE DE LAMOTTE CADILLAC. Antoine de Lamotte Cadillac, the founder of Detroit, was a native of Gascony, in France. At what date he came to Canada we are not informed. From 1695 to 1699, he held command at the post of Mackinaw,-at the close of which he went to France, to procure-authority and assistance for the building and garrisoning of the fort at Detroit. In 1,712, he was appointed Governor of Louisiana, and from that period till 1717, he was a partner with Anthony Crozat, a wealthy merchant of Paris, who had obtained, by royal charter, the exclusive control of the commercial interests of Louisiana. Several authorities say that Cadillac died in Louisiana, the year following the close of his administration as Governor. The American Encyclopedia says that he died in 1719, without saying where he died. These dates are evidently incorrect, for Cadillac's commission as Governor of Castlesarrasy, in the Province of Languedoc, France, bears date December 31, 1722. In this commission of Louis XV, Cadillac is described as "our faithful friend and chevalier of the Military Order of Louis," and his abilities, experience and virtues are highly commended. It appears from the prohibition of the sale of intoxicating liquors to the Indians, found among the conditions of land grants at Detroit, in' the year 1707, that Cadillac had changed his views on that subject, after his experience at the post, of Mackinaw; for while there he was a strenuous advocate of selling brandy to the Indians, and involved himself in considerable difficulty with the authorities. It is to be hoped he saw the evil consequences of the practice, and earnestly sought to exclude it from the new post and settlement at Detroit. It may, however, have been imposed onhim as a condition, by the French Government. The practice had borne such bitter fruits at all the frontier trading posts and missionary stations, that the priests had unanimously raised their voices against it; had declared!t the great curse of the trading posts, and the demon that counteracted all their efforts to civilize and Christianize the savages. They had great influence with the government, and had brought their complaints so repeatedly E

Page  66 66 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. before the authorities, that the latter were compelled to listen to them, and restrain the traffic wherever it was practicable. Still, the cupidity of the traders was such that this could be effectually done in but few instances. Among the curious collections of the Pioneer Association at Detroit, is found a, deed by the widow and heirs of Antoine de Lamotte Cadillac, conveying the site of Detroit, with all the rights and property thereunto belonging, to one Bernard Maicheus, a merchant of the city of Marseilles. This deed was procured by Levi Bishop, Esq., of Detroit, from the Rev. J. C. A. Desmoyers, of St. Pie, in the Province of Quebec, in November, 1873. It bears date August 27, 1738. We have had permission to copy it, as follows ~ THE DEED. "Deed of land of Detroit, of which one-half belongs to the widow of the late Lamotte Cadillac, made at Marseilles, by Joseph de Lamotte Cadillac to Mr. Bernard Maicheus. " In the name of God, Amen! On the twenty-seventh day of August, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and thirty-eight, of the reign of the very Christian and very august Prince Louis the Fifteenth by name, by the grace of God King of France and Navarre, Count of Provence; before us, Royal Notary of Marseilles, there being present Mr. Joseph de Lamotte Cadillac, of the city of Castlesarrasy, Province of Languedoc, in the judicial jurisdiction of Toulouse, who, as well in his own proper name, as in virtue of a special power of attorney from Madame Maria Theres Gulon, his mother, and from the Honorable Francis de Lamotte Cadillac, his brother, by act passed before Mr. Ajun, Royal Notary of the City of Castlesarrasy, the eleventh day of July last, which act, in the original, was present before us by said Monseiur Joseph de Cadillac, who certified to its authenticity in our presence, and in the presence of -the undersigned witnesses, in order to remain annexed to the minutes of these presents. The said Madame, and the said gentlemen, her sons, in quality of heirs and successors of the deceased Antoine de Lamotte Cadillac, her husband, and the father of her said surviving children, Counselor of the King, and formerly Governor of the said city of Castlesarrasy, of the free will of said Joseph de Lamotte Cadillac, and in the presence of the persons before named in their official characters; by these presents were sold and wholly given up, purely and simply, without any reservation, tacit or express, to Mr. Bernard Maicheus, merchant, resident at Marseilles, now present, and assenting and agreeing hereto; that is to say, all the property generally left by the said deceased Antoine de Lamotte Cadillac, and which the said Madame and her said sons, in consequence of his death, possess at Detroit, upon Lake Erie, in North America, consisting of cleared lands, 40 arpents in depth, with the buildings and animal stock together, in title and enjoyment; with the right of fishing and hunting granted on the 19th day of May, A. D. 1722, by the Council of State of His Majesty for the benefit of said deceased; with the right of quit rents and arrearages of such rents in stock and other movable property, which appertains thereto, and in such quantity and consistence as belongs thereto, in said Detroit. Including in this sale all that may belong to said vendors in regard to said lands, fruits, farms, leases, buildings, stock arrearages and rents, wherever they may appear; with authority in the purchaser to render account, thereof to Mr. Merrill, the attorney of the vendors, duly appointed at Quebec, and to such other persons as they shall appoint, and of such sums as said attorneys shall require in such capacity, of the rents, leases and other revenues of said property; making, by virtue of sale and by the names and qualifications aforesaid, cessions and transfers of all their rights and actions to said purchaser, hereby accepting and putting him in theiri place and stead. Which sale and concession are made for the price and sum of 50,000 livres; on account of which the said Joseph de Lamotte Cadillac, by the name and qualities aforesaid, acknowledges to have received, a short time ago, from said Mr, Maicheus, the sum of 25,000 livres in current money, as the parties have declared, and which said 25,000 livres the vendors hereby release. And the said purchaser obligates himself and promises to pay the remaining 25,000 livres of said purchase price in one year from this day, to be carried, counted and delivered in the said city of Castlesarrasy, at the risk and expense of said purchaser, and, in conformity with said attorneyship, as follows: that is to say, 16,000 to be paid to the said Madame Guion, 5,000 livres to the said Francis de Lamotte Cadillac, and the 4,000 remaining to the said Joseph de Lamotte Cadil-ac, to whom the said 4,000 livres only shall be paid; and in case the vendors shall direct, the whole shall be paid in the current ringing specie coin, without any kind of paper money of whatever nature it may be, even if it shall be made current by virtue of any proclamation of the King. "It is understood and agreed expressly, that the above named property, with the said rights, arrearages and other details, sold as above, generally and without reserve, the said Joseph de Lamotte Cadillac, vendor as aforesaid, by said name and qualities, does hereby transfer and deliver to the said Maicheus, the purchaser aforesaid, ceding and remitting the same to him, with all rights appertaining thereto of whatever nature the same may be, even if their value on account of the nature, distance and situation of the property should exceed the one-half remaining unpaid of the price thereof, as aforesaid; and other wise, for certain good considerations, making the whole over to him, the said purchaser, and all that may be necessary thereto, in full transfer and abandonment, substitutin him in the place and stead of said vendor, with the proper means for the transfer of domains and other property existing and in contingency, and other requisite rights, and such as are customary in such cases, in order to enter upon the possession and enjoyment thereof from this day, by virtue and force of these presents; and that said purchaser may have the power of enjoyment and disposition of the same according to his will and pleasure, with the agsurance that he shall have, hold and enjoy said property, and that the same shall be held and remain to him, not only by the names and titles before mentioned, but also of the proper and private name of said Joseph de Lamotte Cadillac, making him, the said purchaser, sure and strong in these conditions, also by his said mother and his said brother, for whom he renders himself principal obligor in the present sale, and as surety for the payment of the 25,000 livres yet to be paid, together with all the clauses, promises and conditions in this instrument contained; wishing in all things to be the one first bound, with a full renunciation of the law of principal and surety, and of all exceptions to the contrary. "And for the observance of what is herein contained, the parties bind their property and rights which they may now possess and those which they may acquire in future, the said vendor binding those he represents according to his authority so to do. And the said Maicheus, in addition to what is before provided, binds the lands and other property, when sold to him, and agrees to hold them in the name of the vendors, and upon conditions, at all events until the full and entire payment of said purchase price. "And having duly sworn the two parties, he, the said notary public, directed them to sign this sale and purchase by their own act, according to the laws of the country where the property is situated. "Done and published at said Marseilles, in our office, in presence of Conrad Begue, and Messrs. Francis Bandouin-a priest resident in said city -and Mr. Claude Francis Sello, a citizen thereof; all signed as requisite with the parties to the original. Received one hundred and nine livres and four sols. "Compared and registered. " Signed, CHAMBIN, HAZARD, Notary.. THE FOX SIEGE, 1712. Detroit had been formed only eleven years when that fierce and warlike tribe of Indians known as the Ottagamies, or Foxes, attempted its destinuction. It has been truly remarked that the history of Detroit is most intimately connected with the history of the whole Northwest, as its settlement dates among the first on the American continent. Founded in the strife for sovereignty between the English and the French governments, it became at an early day a point of central influence, importance and action. No place in the United States, it has been observed, presents such a series of events, interesting in themselves, and permanently affecting, as they occurred, its progress and prosperity. Five times its flag has been changed; first, the lily of France floated over its fortress, then the red cross of England, and next the stripes and stars of the United States, and then again the red cross, and lastly the stripes and stars. Three different sovereigns have claimed its allegiance, and since it has been held by the United States its government has been thrice transferred, twice it hias been besieged by the Indians, once captured in war, and once burnt to the ground. Fire has scattered it; the tomahawk, scalping knife and war club have been let loose upon it in the hands of an unrelenting savage foe. It has been the scene of one surrender, of more than fifty pitched battles, and twelve horrid massacres. In 1749, emigrants were sent here from France at the expense of the government. Here, in 1763, that daring warrier, Pontiae, the great head of the Indian race of that period, entered upon a bold plan of driving every white man over the Alleghanies and destroying all the English posts in the Northwest simultaneously on a fixed day. These consisted of thirteen well garrisoned forts stretching from Niagara and Pittsburgh all along the lakes to the Mississippi, and on the Wabash River. So secret were his plans and so prompt was he in their execution that ton of these forts fell in a single day, and their inmates were massacred; but he himself met with a signal defeat at Detroit. During that year it was ceded by the French to the British Crown. In 1778, Fort Shelby was erected by the British Commandant, Major Le Noult. and called Fort Le Noult, till after the war of 1812, when it was named in honor of Gov. Shelby, of Kentucky. It was located at the intersection of Fort and Shelby streets, and was removed in 1827. In 1796, it was evacuated by the British, and Capt. Porter took possession of it with a detachment, of United States troops, and hoisted the first flag bearing the stripes and stars in the Wolverine State. The Ordinance of 1.787 was then extended over this part of the Northwest Territory, which was governed by its first magistrate, Gen. Arthur St. Clair. The first Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons in Detroit was organized at the house of James Donaldson, under the sanction of the Grand Lodge of Canada, December 19, 1794, which was styled "1Zion Lodge, No. 10." James Donaldson was the first W. M The Territory of Michigan was formed in 1805, and William Hull was appointed the first Governor, with a judiciary composed of Augustus B. Woodward, James Griffin and Francis Bates, Judges, who organized a government at Detroit in July of that year. On the 11th of June previous, the town was almost entirely destroyed by fire, one house only remaining. Shortly after the catastrophe, an act of Congress was passed directing the Governor and Judges to lay out a new town, including the site of the one destroyed and 10,000 acres of adjacent land. In 1807, Judge Bates resigned and James Witherall was appointed in his place. In 1809, Rev. Gabriel Richard published the first newspaper printed in the city, styled the MJchigmn.Es:-,ay or Impartial Observer, James M. Miller, printer. January 19, 1811, at a meeting of the Governor and Judges, Augustus B. Woodward, one of the Judges, himself clothed completely in American manufacture, moved the following resolution: "W1EiWEREAS, The encouragement of American manufactures is a duty imposed on the good citizens of the United States, by the duties of benevolence as well as by the injunctions of patriotism, and " W1ER EAS, The consumption of domestic manufactures is at the same time the most simple and efficacious encouragement of them, and " WHEREAS, It is at all times becoming that those who receive both honors and emoluments from the execution of public trusts should exhibit themselves foremost in examples of utility, therefore, " Resolved, That it be respectfully and earnestly recommended by the legislative authority of the Territory of Michigan, to all officers of the Government, to appear clothed in articles of the manufacture of the Continent of North America, at all times when engaged in the execution of any public duty, power or trust, from and after the '4th day of July, 181;-." Which was passed unanimously and a copy thereof signed by the members and attested by the Secretary, in order that it be deposited in the office of the Secretary of the Territory; and the Secretary to take such measures for the further publication and communication of the same as he may judge expedient. January, 1812, at a meeting of the Governor and Judges, a committee to whom was referred a communication from the Commissioners of Internal Navigation in the State of New York reported as follows: " WHIEREAS, The Commissioners of Internal Navigation in the State of New York have addressed to the Governor and Judges of the Territory of Michigan a communication relative to a canal in the State of New York, which being considered, resolved, unanimously, that, in the opinion of the undersigned, the canal contemplated by the Commissioners of Internal Navigation in the State of New York, from Black Rock to Rome, would not be so desirable as a canal around the cataract of Niagara, and another by the falls of the Oswego." The report was adopted and, at a subsequent meeting, the Governor and Judges signed a letter addressed to Governor Morris, De Witt Clinton, William North, Thomas Eddy, Robert R. Livingston and Robert Fulton, Esquires, Commissioners of Internal Navigation of the State of New York, enclosing a copy of the above resolution. Reuben Atwater, Acting Governor, A. B. Woodward and James Witherall, Judges, composed the meeting. Tecumseh, the great Shawnee Chief, participated against Detroit and the Americans of the Northwest, in all the conflicts from the defeat of I1armar, in 1790, to the battle of the Thames in 1813, where he lost his life. On the 16th of August, 1812, Detroit fell into the hands of the British. It was retaken by the American army in 1813, and the Territorial Government re-organized in the fall of that year by the appointment of Gen. Lewis Cass as Governor, who immediately took up his residence at Detroit, which remained his home till the day of his death. Eighteen consecutive years he faithfully governed the Territory of Michigan, till called to fill the post of Secretary of War under Gen. Jackson. The President of the United States, James Monroe, visited Detroit in the month of August, 1817. His arrival was celebrated by the firing of cannon, a public dinner 0nd a grand illumination of the city at night. He was on an excursion for personal observation of the country, having passed through the New England States and visited many important points along the St. Lawrence, Lake Ontario and Niagara River to Buffalo, where he embarked for this city in a sail vessel, and visited various points upon Lake Erie. The citizens of Detroit presented him with a span of horses and a carriage, with whichb he returned to Washington by land, visiting all important points in Ohio;, P"enusylvania and Maryland. Mr. Monroe was the only President of the Ckt4d States who ever visited Detroit during his official term. In 1817, John P. Sheldon published a newspaper called the Detroit Gazette, which. was the first successful newspaper printed in Michigan. With every natural facility for becoming a place of importance, the condition of Detroit for many years depended on the precarious support afforded by the fur trade, the disbursement of public moneys while a military post and the liberal appropriations by Government for public objects. The impulse and effect produced by the settlement and. cultivation of the surrounding country Was wanting, till about the year 1830, when immigration, which had previously been small, rapidly increased, and farms and small villages began to thicken along the lines of the turnpike roads, whichhad been constructed by the General Government. These were the Chicago, leading to Illinois; the Saginaw, to the head of Saginaw Bay; the Fort. Gratiot, to the foot of Lake Huron; and the Grand River, to Lake Michigan, at the mouth of Grand River. DETROIT IN 1778.-INTERESTING NARRATIVE, The compiler is indebted to Hon. Alexander D. Fraser for the following very interesting sketch: "<( The following narrative was taken down from the lips of James May, Esq., my father-in-law, who died in January, 1829. He was an Englishman who came to this place when a young man, in 1778. tIe was Chief Justice of Common Pleas, established here immediately after Gen. Wayne took possession of the country under Jay's treaty; lie was Colonel of militia, etc. When the American flag was hauled down by the order of" Gen. Hull, in 1812, at the time of the surrender, he got hold of it and kept, it till Gen. -arrison arrived, when it was again hoisted. A. D. F." * My Note Book, 1823. In the year 1778, after a passage of four days from Fort Erie, I arrived by the brig-of-war General Gab'e, al the settlement of Detroit. No vessels at that time navigated upon the lakes, on account of the revolutionary war, which then raged, excepting those of His Majesty; not even the smallest craft had this permission. Previous to that time, but few vessels ever visited the lakes, and those very few and of an inferior class; indeed, no merchant vessel had, as yet, plowed the waves of the lakes. The old town of Detroit comprised within its limits that space between Mr. Palmer's store (Conant Block) and Captain Perkins' house (near the Arsenal building), and extended back as far as the public barn, and in fi-ont. was bordered by the Detroit River. It was an oblong square; and covered about two- acres in length, and an acre and half in breadth. It was surrounded with oak and cedar pickets about fifteen feet long. The town had four gates, east, west, north and south. Over the first three of these gates were block houses. Each of these had four guns (six pounders each). The first of these was in that space intervening between Palmer's shop and Judge Door's house (opposite Ives' Bank). The west block house was before the ground on which Captain Perkins' house now stands. The third block house was at the north gate, which was inside of a small bridge that is on the road to the fort, and near the public magazine (Mr. Austin's house, Congress street). There were, besides, two six-gun batteries fronting the river, and in a parallel direction with the block houses. 'There were four streets that ran east and west; the main street was twenty feet wide, and the rest fifteen feet wide. There were three cross streets running north and south, from ten to fifteen feet wide. At that time there was no fort, but there was a citadel, on the ground on which Perkins' house now stands (northwest corner of Jefferson avenue and Wayne street), the pump of which still remains there. The citadel was picketed in, and within it were erected barracks of wood, two stories high, sufficient to contain ten officers, and there were barracks sufficient to contain from throe to four hundred men; a provision store built of brick. There was also within the citadel a hospital and guard house. In the town of Detroit, in the year 1778, there were about sixty houses,, most of them one story high, and a few of them a story anq.a half, but none of them were two stories. They were all of logs, some lhewn and some round. There was also a building of a splendid appearance called the King's Palace. It was two stories high. It, ý.s situated near the east, gate. and stood where Conant's new building (Beecher's store) now stands. The pump, which now stands behind the building, stood in the rear of the Government House. Attached to this house was a large garden extending toward the river, which contained many fruit trees. When I came here, it was occupied by Governor Hamilton, for whom it was built. He was the first Governor here, commissioned by the British Government, and was here about three years before I came. There were four companies of the Eighth Regiment, two companies of Butler's Rangers, and one company of the Fourth Regiment. The latter was under the command of Captain Aubey, the former under Captain Caldwell, and the Eighth R~egiment, commanded by Major Leverault, who was also commanding officer of the post and its dependencies. All these constituted about five hundred troops. There was a guard house near the west gate and another near the Government House. Each of these guards consisted of twenty-four and. a subaltern officer, who mounted regularly every morning between nine and ten o'clock. Each of these guards furnished four sentinels, who relieved every two hours. There was also an officer of the day, who did strict duty. All these gates were shut regularly at sunset, and even wicket gates were shut at nine o'clock regularly, and the keys were delivered into the hands of the commanding officer. They were opened in the morning at sunrise. No Indian whatever, or squaw, was permitted to enter the town with any instrument such as a tomahawk, or even knife. It was a standing order that the Indians should deliver these, before they were permitted to pass, into the hands of the sentinel, and they were restored when he returned. No more than twent~y-five Indians were allowed to come into the town at the same time; they were permitted to come in only at the east and west gates. At sunset, the drum beat and all the Indians were compelled to leave town instantly. It was always the signal; strict search was made by the soldiers, that none might be concealed; and it it was discovered that even a squ.aw was secreted but for a night, severe reprehension was sure to follow. There was a Council House for the purpose of holding Council with the Indians. It was near the water side, in rear of the Government House. There was a Rwuoian C-atholic Church situated where~ Payne's brick house now stands (near the Masonic Hall), The priest was then Peter Simple, an aged and infirm man, and aljoining it wa's the priest's house and burying ground~ '{?h.l church was 60 by 40 feet, one story high, with two steeples and two bells. The population of the town was sixty families, in all about two hundred males and one hundred females. They-the men-were chiefly bachelors. There was not a marriagen the place for a number of years, until I broke the ice. Twenty of these persons were traders and kept retail stores. Of the population, there were 80 Scotchmen, 4 Englishmen and 15 Irishmen. The extent of the settlement up the Detroit "River reached about 1-1 udson's house (now Fisher's), not a house above that place in this countxy till you reached Michilimackinac, where there was a, small settlemnelt. Below Detroit it was settled on the banks of the river as far as Springwells, but no"t below that. These settlements were entirely confined to the bank.-of the river, and there was no settlement or improvement in any other part of.-this Territory than that in the immediate vicinity of Detroit. These settlers were all French Canadians, and the whole population of the settlement, exclusive of the military, might be about 700 souls. It was at that time considered a journey to go from Springwells into the other extremity of the settlement. The Indian trade was then excellent. There was much public money in circulation here, for the troops and Navy Department were then strong here. This post was established by the' British to keep the Indians in check, of whom they were afraid; and this was the reason why the Old Town was built so compact, that it might in case of urgency be more able to defend it against the assaults of the Indians. The different tribes were Hurons, Wyandots, Chippewas and Pottawatomies, Tawas and Moravians. Frequently, between four and five hundred of these could be seen at a time during the revolutionary war. The civil department consisted of two Justices of the Peace; one of these was the/late Thomas Williams, Esq. (father of the late IM M Ml I S..... =.'.C" -I,,,-. u

Page  67 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 67 Maj. Gen. John R. Williams), and the other was the Governor or commanding officer for the time, The Orderly Sergeant was the Constable. The Justice kept the peace, and the commanding officer took cognizance of all cases under ~ 10 York. For all sums above this, writs came from -Montreal, addressed to Williams, who got his bailiffs to execute them. In case of small debts, on a complaint to the commanding officer, he sent his orderly to the debtor, requesting his immediate attendance upon that officer. He would then hear the parties and make his determination accordingly; if against the defendant, he would order him instantly to pay the money, or send him to the guard house until he complied, and sometimes would give a little time to pay; there was no process or cost in the cases. If the debtor, however, had no property, the party was set at liberty. One Granchin owed me a debt. I complained to Governor Hamilton, who sent for him. He came, and being asked if he had anything to say against the debt, said no. He then ordered him to give me an old negro wench in payment, and she served me twenty-five years. 1779.-The Governor, getting tired of administering justice, proposed to the merchants to establish a Court of Trustees, with jurisdiction extending to ~10 Halifax. Eighteen of these Trustees entered into a bond that three of them should be a weekly Court in rotation, and that they should defend any appeal that might be taken to Montreal. This Court lasted for about eighteen months, and none ever appealed from it. It was considered as a Court of Conscience. They had certain forms of process; they rendered judgment, and issued executions. They had a. Constable and a Clerk, and imprisoned their prisoners in the Guard House. Our goods were imported from Montreal. The only mode of conveyance was by the King's ship, who delivered them here free of freight. When an Indian committed a depredation on the Canadians, they generally rose in a body and hung the Indian, without any ceremony. The citizens depended principally for eatables on the Indians, who supplied them with the quadrupeds of the forest. A milch cow was then generally sold for one hundred dollars, and a pair of steers would sell for two hundred and fifty dollars. The circulating medium in the country consisted chiefly of paper money issued by the merchants, from six pence to twenty shillings, and purported to be payable to the bearer. Permission was given by the Governor to strike off so much money in shinplasters as a person had property to redeem in that month. The property was valued by appraisers, or a bond was given with security to redeem. On the day of payment, each trader exchanged with him who had his bills, and this was found to answer every purpose of trade, and seldom or never any loss accrued from this mode of dealing. At this time the Indians used to spear the fish and sell them here for rum and whisky. The citizens all lived then like one family-had Detroit assemblies, where ladies never went without being in their silks. The people dressed very richly. Assemblies were once a week, and sometimes once a fortnight. Dining parties were frequent, and they drank their wine freely. DETROIT IN 1805-BEFORE THE FIRE. The old town previous to the fire occupied a site embraced within the following limits: Griswold street on the east, and Cass street on the west, and extending from the river to Larned street, secured by Stockade on the west and east, running from the river to Fort Shelby (present north line of Congress street). In the rear of the fort was the Royal Military Garden, on the east the Commanding Officers' Field, and east of the Stockade, on the bank of the river, was the Navy Garden. Where Woodward avenue now is, and between Woodbridge and Atwater streets, was the Navy Yard. The names of the streets in the Old Town were St. Louis, St. Ann, St. Joseph, St. James, St. Honore and L'Ernean. The width of the widest (St. Ann) was but twenty feet, at either end of which were gates forming the only entrance into the city. A carriage way, which was called Chemin du Ronde, encircled the town just inside the palisades. A large creek, called "River Savoyard," bordered by low, marshy grounds, separated the high ridge upon which the Old Town was built from the high grounds along the summit of which runs at present Fort street. This creek extended from the river near the lower line of the Cass farm along a line between Congress and Larned streets, to Woodward avenue, and across Congress street and Michigan avenue into Fort street; thence east along the line of Fort street. That part. of the town not required for public use was subdivided into fifty-nine lots. The names of freeholders in the Old Town were: Askin, Abbott, McDonald, McDougall, Meldrum, Parke, Grant, Chagrin, McGregor, Campau, McKea, Cadney, Macomb, Roe, Howard," Tremble, Sparkin, Leith, Williams, Ridley, Fraser, Haines, Dolson, Jager, Lefoy, Thebauld, Duhamel, St. Cossno, Belanger, La Flam, Cote, Scott, La Fontaint, Bird, Starling, Andrews, Harfoy and Ford. The destruction of the Ohld Town was so far fortunate that it led to the adoption of a plan better adapted to a city, such as Detroit has become. THE NEW TOWN. The site of the city is an elevation of about thirty feet along the river front, rising, farther back, to about sixty feet, affording the most perfect drainage, covering an area within its corporate limits of 8,868 acres, about one-third of which is closely covered with buildings. The telegraph line was completed to Detroit and dispatches were received from the city of New York for the first time March 1, 1848. The Governor and Judges who laid out the new town seemed to anticipate the future importance of the city, and to their foresight, good taste and judgment are we indebted for the reserves of the Grand Circus, Campus Martius, East, West, Center and Capitol Parks, and the numerous wide avenues, from 120 to 200 feet in width. It is in contemplation to embellish these parks and circuses with public fountains. Detroit was incorporated as a city by an act of the Governor and Judges in 1815, seven years before Boston bore the name and privileges of a city, and the government was vested in five Trustees. This act was suspended in 1824, by a new charter, passed by the Legislative Council, when the late Gen. John R. Williams was chosen Mayor. Section 1, of the Act of 1815, reads as follows: " Be it enacted by the Governor and Judges of Michigan, that so much of an I Act to repeal all acts of the Parliament of England and of the Parliament'of Great Britain, within the Territory of Michigan, in the United States of America,' and for other purposes, as repeals an I Act to incorporate the town of Detroit,, enacted by the Legislative Council and House of Representatives of the Northwestern Territory, in General Assembly, approved at Chillicothe on the 18th day of January, 1802, be and the same is hereby repealed." Hon. Solomon Sibley was Chairman of the first Board of Trustees, and Thomas 'Rowland, Secretary. In 1816, the Board consisted of George McDougall, Abram Edwards, Oliver W. Miller, Peter J. Desnoyers and Stephen Mach. George McDougall, Chairman, and Thomas Rowland, Secretary. The first public market house was erected in 1816, by Capt. Benjamin Woodworth, under a contract with the Trustees, at a cost of fifteen hundred dollars. It was built in the center of Woodward avenue, a little south of Jefferson avenue, and covered a space of about 30 by 70 feet, one story high, composed merely of a roof supported by posts, and enclosed with slats three inches apart, and served as a public whipping place till the law inflicting that kind of punishment was repealed. The culprits were placed outside with their hands thrust through the slats and tied on the inside, when the officer would apply the lash on the bare back of the victim. When Detroit was first incorporated as a city, the only road leading out of it was the one up and down the river. The mail was brought around the lake, through Ohio on horseback, and when the road was very bad a man carried it on his shoulder through the Black Swamp. The first line of carriages between Detroit and Ohio was established in 1827.!The location of the city is pleasant, commanding a fine view of the surrounding country, with Canada in the foreground, and the river for miles above and below until intercepted by beautiful islands. It was originally selected by the natives of the forest, with their usual sagacity, as a site for their villages, and was thus occupied before the lake country was discovered by Europeans more than two hundred years ago, and for about ninety years afterward, or till the year of our Lord I701, when it was taken possession of by the French, as already described, who erected Fort Ponchartrain for the purpose of establishing a fur trading post, and protecting the traders. Mr. Robert R. Roberts, to whose " Sketches of Detroit " we are indebted for much of this article, thus gives his experience in early Detroit life: "The compiler of these sketches first visited this city in 1827, without any intention of permanently locating here, but a short residence sufficed to render his attachment enduring, and it has ever since been his home, he having never been from it more than a few weeks at a time, visiting Eastern cities, and at each successive return he has hailed with delight his approach to the good old City of the Straits, up its beautiful river of purest water. There is no other de troit like it, with its elevated shores, lined with villages, villas, stately mansions, French farm houses, wind-mills and pear trees of more than a century's growth; its broad stream, deep and clear, with no veto I sandbars' or 'snake heads' to interrupt, and no fleet of ' steam tugs' and ' lighters ' to aid navigation." Detroit, in 1827, was the only municipal corporation in'the State of Michigan. It contained a population at that time of about 2,000 souls, which was about one-tenth the population of the whole Territory, who were settled along the lakes and rivers from Monroe to St. Clair, Mackinaw and Green Bay; and but little was known of the interior of the Territory, which was, for the most part, a wilderness of forest and prairie, though a few scattered settlements had been made in Washtenaw and Oakland Counties, with here and there a log house. The city at that time was little else than a military and fur-trading post. The inhabitants were principally native French, though there were a number of families here from the Eastern States, but not more than a dozen from any foreign country. The buildings were mostly constructed of wood, one or two stories high, with steep roofs and dormer windows. The banks of the river within view of the city were studded with wind grist mills, and flour was brought to the city and sold only in sacks. Since that time great changes have taken place, and scarcely a vestige of the old city remains. A great portion of the then limits of the city has been swept over by fire, and rebuilt with substantial business buildings and palatial residences. Then the steamboat arrivals were three or four a week, now they are eight or ten a day. Then there were but three or four wharves, at which vessels could unload; now its docks extend for miles up and down the river. Then there w'ere but two or three turnpike roads leading from the city; now there are plank roads sand railroads in every direction. Then a mail from the East arrived once or twice a week; now we have a dozen mails from the East daily, and the telegraph wires extending in all directions, permitting instant communication with every part of the country. Then the fronts of the residences of James Abbott, Colonel Anderson, General Larned, the brothers Cote, Mrs. Deveraux and Dr. Hurd, situated on the west side of Woodward avenue, between the river and Congress street, were shaded by an almost continuous row of stately trees There was the old meat market on Woodward avenue, below Jefferson, and the old wooden Presbyterian Church, corner of Larned street and Woodward avenue; the residence of Robert Smart, Esq., south of the church, and at the corner of Woodward avenue and Woodbridge street was the Godfrey House; nearly opposite was Smith's tavern. Where the "National" now stands, there was a small yellow house in the center of a large potato lot, and beyond was a vast common; the jail where Center Park now is, the Methodist Church, a little to the east of Cliff's tavern near the Grand Circus, General Williams' barn, and an occasional shanty. These were all that intercepted the view of the forest beyond. In Judge Sibley's field, west of Woodward avenue and north of the residen'ce of Dr. Duffield, was a small fort called 11 Fort Croghan," which had been thrown up by the citizens and mounted with a few pieces of artillery for the purpose of protecting the inhabitants against the incursions of the Indians, who came from the woods and drove off the cattle that, were feeding on the commons, and murdered the inhabitants. On Jefferson avenue, west of Woodward, there were in the first two blocks a number of small stores, interspersed with dwellings, and those extended to the line of the Cass farm just below Cass street. The " Cass Farm" was then a farm, with but the farm house, barn, etc., and an Indian storehouse and distillery on the lower line, and an ox mill on the river front. "The first block in Jefferson avenue, east, of Woodward, was occupied on either side by small stores, and on the northwest corner of Bates street was the store and dwelling of Peter J. Desnoyer, Esq. On the southeast corner the store and dwelling of General J. R. Williams, east of which was Pat. Palmer's tavern, and the residences of John Whipple, Judge Chipman and Barnabas Campau, Esq., and on the corner, the Masonic Hall and Council House. Crossing Randolph street, on the site of the " Biddle House'," was the brick residence of Majzor John Biddle, constructed by General Hull, in 1807, and it was the first brick house built in the city, and next the residence of Hon. E. P. Brush; opposite was the brick residence and extensive fruit garden of Judge Sibley. On the northwest corner of Randolph street was the "Bank of Michigan," formerly occupied by the " Detroit Bank," chartered in 1806, and broke in 1810; and west were the residences of Major Kearsley, Dr. Brown and Thomas F. Knapp. All these buildings are now gone, and have been replaced by very different structures. Jefferson avenue, till about this time (1.827) terminated at the line of the Brush Farm, when it was opened up as far as Russell street, but with stern opposition from the owners of the farms. There were then no buildings to obstruct the view of the fields and woods beyond, from the avenue in thevicinity of Brush street. The only road at the time to Hamtramck and Grosse Point was on the river beach, to gain which from the avenue down Randolph street, you passed the Steamboat Hotel, the principl tavern in the city, kept by Captain Benjamin Woodworth, brother of the author of the " Old Oaken Bucket." Captain Woodworth emigrated to this city in 1806, and afterward removed to St. Clair. Nearly opposite the hotel was the residence of Dr. McCoskry, uncle of the Episcopal Bishop of the Diocese of Michigan. Dr. McCoskry came to Detroit with Wayne's army in 1796, of which he was the surgeon. Turning from Randolph into Atwater street, on the south was the carding and full cloth factory of MNlessrs. French & Eldred; and just beyond, at the foot of Brush street, was the smith shop of Harvey Williams, in front of which Che-minck, son of the notorious Indian Chief Kish-ka-go, killed an Indian. Kish-ka-go and son were arrested and lodged in jail. Kish-ka-go supposed that he was detained for the murder of some white man, he having killed several, and he could not be persuaded to the contrary, though informed of the fact by Colonel Beaufait. His reply to the Colonel was, "No, the hats never forgot." Kish-ka-go called himself the " son of thunder." He sent a messenger to Saginaw with instructions to summon his band together and hold a wa-bino, to importune thunder (his father) to come and throw down the jail and liberate him on a particular day he named. The chief waited patiently and sullenly for the day when he was to be liberated. The day came, but thunder did not, and he committed suicide by taking poison furnished by his squaw. Che-minck escaped from the jail and was not retaken. East of Randolph street, extending along the front of the Brush, Beaubien, Moran, Rivard, Mullet, Gouin and Dequindre farms, were extensive old pear orchards of Centurial trees, they having been transplanted there from that enchanted garden of Europe, "La Belle France," by the early French immigrants, who brought the young trees with them. In front of these was a green lawn, with a gentle slope to the beach of the river. Annually, in the month of June, thousands of Indians came from the upper lakes on their way to MaIlden to receive presents from the British Government, who stopped and lined the beach with their birchen canoes and pitched their tents beneath the shade of these trees. On recalling the memory of those old pear trees, and the green lawn beneath and in front of them, the many pleasant hours spent in rambling Sthere, eating of their delicious fruit, we contemplate with regret the changes. Scarce half a dozen of the old trees remain; the iron rails are stretched, and the fizzing and rumbling of the iron horse is heard where they were. On turning down the river to the other line of the city, and recalling the delightful promenade along the high banks of the river, which at this point formed a beautiful bay across the fronts of the Cass, Jones, Forsyth, La Brosse, Baker and Woodbridge farms, and sweeping down past the residences of Robert Abbott and Judge May, and reflecting that this, too, has been sacrificed and leveled low to accommodate commercial and railway facilities, still more does it cause one to regret that the Star of Empire in its westward flight visited the City of the Straits. It makes one almost sigh for the ancient habitans at the remembrance of those times when the city was visited by" an occasional steamer to bear away the furs, fish and sugar brought, hither in the birch canoe from the lake country above, and wish for the return of the good old days when the Indian canoe, the French calash, carryall and charrette were the only vehicles of conveyance. But few of the buildings of that day now remain. The most compact part of' the city was between Jefferson avenue and the river. Fort Shelby was removed in 1827-8, and the earth was used in filling up the embankment then being constructed along the whole water front of the city, by order of the authorities, the expense of which was assessed on the adjoining property. This was done as a sanitary measure, and the health of the city, which for a year or two had been bad, was very much improved. The following gentlemen have held the office of Chief Mfagistrate of the Cit~y, and were elected as follows": John R. Williams, elected in 1824; John R. Williams, elected in 1825; Henry L. Hunt, 1826; John Biddle, 1827; John Biddle, 1828; Jonathan Kearsley, 1829; John R. Williams, 1830; Marshall Chapin, 1831; Levi Cook, 1832; Marshall Chapin, 1833; Charles C. Trowbridge, 1834; resigned in August, and Andrew Mack elected to fill the vacancy; Levi Cook, 1835; Levi Cook, 1836; Henry Howard, 1837; Augustus S. Porter, 1838; resigned in the fall, and Asher B. Bates, Recorder, elected; De Gramo Jones, 1839; Zina Pitcher, 1840; Zina Pitcher, 1841; Douglas Houghton, 1842; Zina Pitcher, 1843; John R. Williams, 1844; John R. Williams, 184.5; John R. Williams, 1846; James A. Van Dyke, 1847; Frederick Buhl, 1848; Charles Howard, 1849; John Ladue, 1850; Zachariah Chandler, 1851; John H. Harmon, 1852; John H. Harmon, 1854; Oliver M. Hyde, 1854; Henry Ledyard, 1855; Oliver M. Hyde, 1856; Oliver M. Hyde, 1857; John Patton, 1858; John Patton, 1859; Christian H. Buhl, 1860; Christian H. Buhl, 1861; William C. Duncan, 1862; William C. Duncan, 1863; Kirtland C. Baker, 1864; Kirtland C. Baker, 1865; Merrill I. Mills, 1866; Merrill I. Mills, 1867; William W. Wheaton, 1868; William W. Wheaton, 1869; William W. Wheaton, 1870: William W. Wheaton, 1871; Hugh Moffatt, 1872; Hugh Moffatt, 1873; Hugh Moffatt, 1874; Hugh Moffatt, 1875; Alexander Lewis, 1876.

Page  68 m 68 "HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. s cH110OELs Or, DERT ROIT. EARLY SCHOOLS. The following sketch of the early schools in Detroit is from the pen of Horn B. F. H. Witherall, found in Roberts' sketches: "11It is difficult to trace in detail the efforts ma-de more than half a century since (18,54), for the education of our people, shut out., as they were, from the rest of the civilized world by hundreds of miles of pathless forests, and scattered along the margins of our rivers and lakes, of whom some few hundreds only were gathered about the hamlet of Detroit, then only a trading post with a garrison to protect it. On inquiry of some of the I old settiers,' I learn that sometime during the latter part of the last century, Monsieur geeours, and afterward, Mr. Balpour, taught I the school,' and after them, about 1799 to 1803, a Mr. Burrel wielded the ensign of authority; lhe kept on St. James street, in the rear of the present Freemasons' tHall. After Burrel came Dr. Donovan. He taught at the Park House, between St.. Louis street and the river, in rear of Palmer & Whipple's stationery store. "IIOnt the I11th of June, 1805, in the naorning when the fire burst out (which consumed every house in town but one), one of the scholars tells me that he was in school. Hearing the alarm, the boys all rushed forth to see the fun; but while in full career, they -were suddenly arrested by a cask of tamarinds, thrown into the street from a burning store, on which they feasted till the fla~mes drove them off. Teacher and scholars in a few minutes found themselves hatless and bookless--all were consumed--and, the whole town being in ashes, none could be got. But the old French fashion of making,% turban of a handkerchief answered the purpose. ". Old John Goff, the old sage, with his drab breeches and long blue stockings, followed Donovan. He kept I the school' for several years after the fire. The boys say that lie had not the fear of the MNaine law before his eyes, but daily got a little corned in the forenoon and licked the boys, and in the afternoon kissed the girls. At last the old man passed away from mortal ken, having taught as long as he could stand on his legs. He first opened his school on the west side of the I River Savoyard,' near the old residence of the late Col. D. G. Jones, and his last school was kept opposite B. Thompson's livery stable. I'I,'The River Savoyard,' somewhat noted in the annals of our city, was nothing more than a large creek, draining the common back of the town and a few farms lying above it. It was sometimes a large stream, and I have known it necessary to take people living along its margin out of their windows in a canoe and carry them as'hore. This was after long continued rains, but our modern subterrannean rivers have done the work for I the Savoyard;, its glory is departed--it is among I the things that were, but are not.' ".1 It obtained its name from old Peter Berttell (the grandfather of those yet among us); he kept a pottery on the west side of its mouth, near the outlet of the present grand sewer. lie bore the nickname of I Savoyard,' probably because he or his ancestors were from Savoy; he always went by that name. Mrs. Sheldon has in some way transformed it to I Xavier,' -which it never bore. " Old father Berttell went to Montreal, and in days when stoves were a scarce article, bought up a large number, and let them out for from three to ten dollars each per winter, and by this and other operations became the wealthiest man in Canada. Hle died about thirty years ago. M ais revenon a nos mnoutons. "Daniel Curtis kept I the school' a,l while in 1810-11. He was then appointed can officer in the army, and a righ~t brave and gallant soldier he was. He and a brother Lieutenant, in spite of the orders. of a dlrunken Captain, held out for many days against a large body of Indians -who besieged the fort, until relieved by a body of Gen. Harrison's light horse. "Old Mr. Rowe next entered the field. after the war was over, and taught 'the school," in a little wooden building which stood in the rear of ires' broker's office, on Griswold street, belonging to Joseph Campau. Here the -sciences flourished under the influence of the old man's birchen rod. There was a little cupola on the edifice, the only one of the kind west of Lake Erie. The young ideas rapidly expanded under its shadow. Rowe slept with his fathers, and, as all things must have an end, so did the cupola. Griswold street was to be -widened. Mr. Campau refused his assent, and, deeming the offered compensation insufficient, he refused to remove the building, and the agents of the city sawed down through it, and sold that, part that was in the street to John Farmer. "4The good old Father Richard, the only Catholic clergyman in the 6ounty, whom none knew but to respect, was anxious to educate his people, and about. the year 1811, sent to France and procured M. Le Salliere to come over as a teacher. He taught a short time, but the war came on and his school ceased, There are yet. (1854) several men among us who owe in-Lch of their scholastic knowledge to Father Richard's personal attention as their teacher, but his clerical duties ~occupied too much of his time to leave as much as he desired for educational purposes. "Among the well educated men (natives of the country) in the olden time was that sterling old patriot, Captain Charles Moran, the father of the Judge. When quite a young man, he was employed in the office of Captain Phillip de Jean, so well known, and who figured so largely in the history of Michigan some eighty years since. De Jean was an emigrant from France, and was appointed a magistrate by the British Lieutenant Governor Hamilton, undrer whose orders he, on the 18th of March, 1776, tried John Contencinan for stealing some beaver, otter and raccoon skins from Abbott & Finchly, and AunnWylie, formerly a, slave of Abbott & Finchly, on a charge of stealing, or being accused of stealing, a purse contaidning six guineas, etc. T]he sentence of Justice De Jean was that they I'be hanged, hangred, hanged, and strangled till they be dead, on the King's domain' (the Common). And they were hanged. Gov. Hamilton and De Jean soon after left on a military expedition to 'the Illinois,' where they were made prisoners by Gen. George Rogers Clark, whom the State of Virginhi had sent -over the Alleghanies with a, small force to protect th-e infant settlements of the SWest. "1 Ha-milton and de Jean never returned; had they clone so, they wiouild have been tried for murder,,is the Governor General and Chief Justice hiad caused warrants to be issued from Quebec for their arrest.'. COMMON SCHOOLS. The Common Schools of Detroit, where every child in the city can obtain the elements of a good English education, fr'ee of* charge, are the pride. and boast of the city. Common Schools were first established in) 1842. Previous to this time, but little interest had been manifested in the cause of general education, and the first to take the initiatory steps toward the establishment of a system of general education was Dr. Zina Pitcher, who, while Mayor in 1841, called the attention of the Common Council to the great need of Common Schools in the city. A report was subsequently made to the Council, which showed there were twenty-seven English schools, one French, and one German school in the city, and the whole number of pupils about. 700, whille th ere were upward of 2,000 children of the proper school aye in the city. Measures wvere immediately taken to establish an additional number of schools, and seven others wvere soon opened. In 1842, an act was passed by the Legislature incorporating the various schools of the city into one district und(er the style of "1 The Board of Education of the City of Detroit." The Board is composed of two School Inspectors from each wvard, one of whom is 'Innually elected for the term of two years. Dr. Pitcher had, in the late Hon. Samulel Barstow, an able and devoted coadjutor, who, from the establishment of the free schools up to the time of his death (July 12, 1854), was unwearied in his efforts, devoting much of his time and talents to perfect the system and establish the schools on a permanent basis. To the persistent., unwearied and united exertions of Dr. Pitcher and Mr. Barstow, the system in a great degree. owes its present perfection. Other members of the Board deserve honorable mention for their early efforts in behalf of the cause of education; among whom are George Plobb, D. Bethune Duffield, Eben N. Wilcox, James V. Campbell, and Charles Byram, Esqs. Dr. Barstow was President of the Board for many years, and was succeeded by Levi Bishop, Esq., an able and efficient incumbent, in whom Mr. Barstow had a worthy successor. The Board of Education, in 18,54, on motion of Levi Bishop, Esq., passed the following resolutions: " WHEREA.S, The late Samuel Barstow, Esq., once President of this Board, was from the beginning one of the most efficient and active promoters of the Free School Systena of Detroit, and its present state of prosperity a~nd increasingr usefulness are ina, large measure due to his untiring zeal and selfdenying labors; therefore, " Resolved, That the newly enlarged school building in the, Seventh Ward be named in his honor I The Barstow UnJion School,' and that the Building Committee cause a, marble tablet to be inserted in the vacant. panel in the front of said building, inscribed wvith the words I BARSTOW UNION SCHOOL.'" T--OWNSHIP HT-ISTORIES, HISTORY OF H-AMVTRAMCK TOWNSHIP. In 18 127, while Michigan was yet a Territory, this township was formed, being named after Col. John Francis Hamtra-mck, -who fought through the the revolution and afterward, while in command of the left wving of Gen. Wayne's army, greatly distinguished himself in the Indian wars that were waged in this State, principally along the Detroit River, Thus it wiV~ll be seen that Hamtramck, with the other border townships, is possessed of interest as being the scene of some of the mnost desperate -fighting known to the early settlers. The township adj oins Detroit on the east, and has been diminished several times by portions being added to the city. It has a fr'ontag-e of three miles on the river and extends back to the boundary of Macomb County, a distance of eight miles, and comprises 23,773 acres of land. It was primarily occupied by the French, but its very early settlement, and the fact that no records have been kept, precludes the possibility of naming any of the original settlers. An inspection of the town books, however, gives us the following list of officers. for the year 1833: Supervisor--Peter Van Every. Clerk-Elias Jeruck. Assessors-Dennison Rose, Jacques Compau, Abraham Cook, Louis Beaufthit. Collector--John terly. Commissioners of Schools--Dennison Rose, Henry Vaches, Jacques Compau. Inspectors of Schools-Antoine Compau,. Elias 3 ewvett, Peter Van Every, Jacques Tuxbury. Director-Michael guard. Treasurer of the Poor-Francis guard. Constables--George La Purge, Win. B. Smith, George Prus-au, Gilbert Duhen.. Also a Pound Master and seven Highway Directors. The Supervisor at that time operated a distillery on the precise spot where Detroit's new water works are being built. He afterward increased the capacity of his mill by borrowing of the township school. fund. Originally, marsh lands predominated throughout thle town, but a perfect system of drainage has reclaimed most of them, many of the largest and most highly cultivated farmns of to-day being situated on the lowlands of earlier years. The higher grounds were heavily timbered with hickory, basswood and maple. With the end in view of giving each settler a piece of river front, the township was primar'ily divided into long slips running from the river back, and although this form of' division has proved inconvenient latterly, it has remained unaltered. The principal products of Hamtramck are hay and garden produce, its immediate proximity to Detroit rendering the cultivation of the latter very pro-fitable. No more grain is raised than is absolutely needed by the inhabitants. The manufacturing interests of this township are deserving of more than passingr notice. In 1850, a blast furnace was established on the river bank a short distance above Detroit, and around this has gathered one industry after another until the amount invested in various branches of the iron trade has reached $3,000,000. A railroad connects these institutions with Detroit. The population of the town at present is about 4:,000, of which two-thirds are natives and the other third foreigrners of all nationalities. The school census shows 1,800 pupils, and for them are nine public and two private schools. Within the limits of the township are two regularly organized villacres--Norris and Leesville 'whose inhabitants are interested largely in gardening, and, to a small extent, in manu factures. That part of Hamtram ck which has availed itself of the gas, water and social privileges of Detroit, is now coming into repute as one of her suburbs, many fine residences having been erected therein during the past few years. The officers of the town for 1876 are as follows: Supervisor--J. A. Visger. Clerk--Christopher Daniels. Treasurer--J ohn Damits. Superintendent of Schools-Henry Russell. Inspector of Schools--James Holihan. Commissioner of Highway s.-TIichael Rilclins. Justides of the Peace-J. M. French, Peter Sculler, John Revery, J. A. Visger. Drain Colnmissioner-John Ryan. Constables--Charles Ryan, James Clarrady. THE VILLAGE OF NORRIS. The plat of the suburban village of Norris, recorded in August, 1873, though one of the latest in the county, is the first wholly plattfed with the cardinal points of the compass. It is upon Section 9, Township I South, ",Range 12 East, in the township of Hamtramck, partially between the 10,000-acre tract and the old Marsae French grant at the forks of Conner's Creek, and about six miles nearly due -north of the City Hall of Detroit. The low but fertile glades and blue joint prairies between them were alike the chosen hunting grounds of the prehistoric Mound Builders and Tndians; pastures for the countless ponies of the pioneering Frenchmen, and, with thorough drainage, are fast becoming, ever to -remain, the most valuable meadow, pasture and garden lands in the State. The famous Prairie MNound, of some four acres, was ever a chosen haunt for the Indians, trappers and herders; the site of countless' broils and revels, and probably the torturing of prisoners-eertainly a bone tumulus of the unknown dead. Tradition -relates that the old French land claims embraced a frontage of as many I"Iarpents " as the occupant or his ancestors had picket--fenced and planted with a zigzagr row of pealr trees, and from as far as he could wade in the river to as far back. over Lhe ridge as lie or his pony could wallow in the sw-amp, which a special commission of United States officers ultiinately decided to be about three miles; and also that the adjacent country was a worthless, irreclaimable morass and swamp; that it would be an outragfe for a grateful republic to donate it to the surviving soldiers of the war Of 1812; and, as now, they doubtless received good pay and promotion for their sagacity, integrity and love of soldiers. This ludicrous report, joined to the swampy appearance of the country, doubtless saved Detroit fr'om strangulation by a cordon of non-taxpaying soldier land grants; gave the 10,000-acre tract of land to the sufferers by the great Detroit fire of 1805 and for the erection of public buildings, and also unfortunately retarded small purchases of farms, and encouraged h~eavy purchases by Eastern capitalists, of -which about 11,000 acres due north of Detroit, around and beyond the Prairie Mound, held' by the late Shubael Conant in trust for the Conner's Creek Land Company, was the -principal, and which, for nearly half a century remained, as in the days of Pontiac, a more pasturage and hunting ground. Except Some laudable and successful efforts by March, Carpenter, Holbrook and others to drain and c-dlitivate some of the eastern portions of Mound Prairie, it thus, remained until the chancery partition of the Conner, Creek Company lands in the fall of 1864, when Col. P. W. Norris returned from the service as agent and trustee for heirs of his fallen comrades in arms. Having over thirty years before camped upon the Prairie Mound, while hunting and herding ponies upon the blue j oint meadows near it, and from a long, active and successful frontier experience formed a high opinion of their prospective value, he, by venturing a careful survey of M~iound Prairie and adjacent lands, soon dispelled old notions and -ascertained the real facts of the case. He promptly purchase -d all lands adjacent to the Prairie Mound, and, during 186.5, built a log cabin upon it and commenced improving and draining to connect with E. N. Wilcox, Esq., who had commenced above. In 1866, in connection with R. C. Smith, Col. Wallace and the Jeromes, who had also purchased largely, he projected, and, aided by them and a, few other spirited owners, and by removal from Ohio and personally sup erintendcing the work, has completed the most extensive, thorough and successful drainage enterprise in Michigan. 'By heavy assistance in time, right of way and means, he secured the De/troit & Bay City Railroad, and, at a cost of $23,000, completed the Detroit and Prairie Mound plank road. He also, by liberal do-nations of land and means, secured the location and construction of a large, beautiful, -well-arranged and well-managed fourstory brick Lutheran Deaf and Dumb Asylum. Desiring the village, as well as the plank road, should be called "Prairie Mound," Col. Norris placed upon the railroad depot a large sign so calling it; but, before recording his village plat, Seymour Brownell, Esq., of Utica, then a contractor upon the rail-road, induced its managers to call it "IINorris." Hence its name. Though doubtless mei,:ited for his spirit and improvements in the country, it still failed to convince the Colonel that Prairie M'ound would not have been more appropriate and beautiful, though the station and village are nearly a mile from the miound. Although but little over three years since platted upon the brushy terrace, the village, beside the Grand Trunk and Bay City Railroads completed, has strong assurances of the speedy extension of the Transit Railroad from the Iron Works upon the Detroit River through Leesville direct, to a connection with the railways at Norris, and also extension of tbe Russell Street Railway to the BoulevardFand village. Besides the Asylumn, the Lutherans have a good church and strong society. The Methodists worship in the school house. Mr. G. Mobley had a good steam saw-muill, and Mr. 11. Holley a planing-mill and lumber yard. Miles Orton's circus-training barns and gymnasium are It -rge and well managred. There is also a. post office and two daily mails, variety store, hardware and tin shop, mneat market, two hotels, blacksmith, -wagon, shoe and other shops; brick yard, one mile of sidewalks, etc., beside the sprightly Norris Suburban, a weekly newspaper, to represent the interests of its 2,50 thrifty inhabitants. The site, though not a, hill, is a dry, sandy plateau, gradn-aly sloping in all directions save the southwestern terraces, with summit some thirty or forty feet above the forlks of Cominer's Creek, and has more thorough drainage, more undulating, fertile h-md, more beautiful sandy mounds and terraces for suburban residences, public institutions or mnanufactories, and yet u reater supply of good, dur,-,ble wellwtebtr and more accessible picnic groves and site for permanent fair grounds than any other location near Detroit. All streets and avenues ar e seventy feet wide, with a row of shade trees, ele-ven feet on each for sidew'ttks, except the Boulevard to Woodward avenue, which is 100 feet wide,, with two rows of trees upon each side. On all the avenues u~nig. an south no buildings are allowed less than fifteen feet fromn front fox' yard and ornamental purposes on residence m

Page  69 r _, HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 69 blocks, while both the yard front and sidewalks are for extra carriage-way fronting business blocks. There are also over 100 acres in from three to ten acre out-lots between the railroads for residence and garden plats, and tiers of bioks not subdivided, for sale cheap or for donation to manufacturing, religious, educational or benevolent improvements, when the proprietor is well assured of their merit and permanency. With such growth and prospects, the success of this suburb of Detroit seems well assured. HIISTORY OF GREENFIELD TOWNSHIP. Greenfield Township is situated in the northeastern part of Wayne County, and is bounded on the north by Oakland County, on the east by Hamtramck Township, on the south by the city of Detroit and Springwells Township, and on the west by Redford Township, and was originally a part of Springwells Township. There were few settlers in Greenfield Township previous to the year 1829; among those who settled here about this time we find Myron Otis, who came to this State in 1829. He came from Scoharie, Otsego County, New "York. His father, Asao H1. Otis, took up a tract of government land, in the central part of the township, receiving his deed with the signature of President Jackson. I-e was a delegate to the convention for the adoption of a State Constitution, in 1836, and was a member of the State Legislature in 1850. The only man who settled previous to 1829, of whom we have any definite record, was John Strong, an Englishman, who came to this county, and settled in Greenfield Township, as early as 1826. Among those who settled within a few years of that time are Job Chaffee, who came from Rutland County, Vermont, in 1830; James Smith, who settled in 1831, and Harmon Snyder, who came from Otsego County, New York; and about the same year came Rodman Stoddard, Thieodore Holden, James and Joseph Messmore, and Luther Scoville. Previous to the organization of the township, land was taken up from the United States Government, by Carpenter Chaffee, Solomon Hyde, Amos Chaffee, John Kennedy, James M. Reed, James Ward, Garry Bloss and Jacob Barger. At this time, the whole township was a vast wilderness, each settler being obliged to cut his way through the forest to his own land, there being no settlements beyond a distance of ten miles from the city of Detroit, in the year 1832. The territory now known as Greenfield Township was set apart from Springwells Township, and Greenfield Township was organized in the year 1832, Carpenter Chaffee being the first Township Clerk. There are no villages in the township, the township post office being located at a hotel, on the Detroit & Lansing Plank Road, known as the "Eight Mile House." The land is nearly level, being very slightly rolling. The principal occupation of the inhabitants being agricultural pursuits. The present population of the township is about 2,000; and it contains about 500 voters. The following is a list of the present officers of the township: Supervisor-George F. Pillard. Clerk-William nKnapp. Treasurer-James F. Turner. Justice of the Peace-John B. Price. Commissioner of Highways-George F. Higgins. Drain Commissioner-Patrick Whalen. Superintendent of Schools-E. W. Cottrell. School Inspector-John Sprague. Constables-Joseph Black, William Hall, William Ford, Oliver M. Dicks. HISTORY OF REDFORD TOWNSHIP. The township of Redford is about in the center of Wayne County, from east to west, and is bounded by Greenfield on the east, Dearborn on the south, and Livonia on the west. It is on the northern side of the county, and borders on Oakland County. It was originally one of four townships which went to compose the town known as Buckland, the other three being Greenfield, Livonia and Dearborn. The first settlement of the town was made in 1818, by a man named Bell. From that time till 1825 there were but few new comers; but about'this time several new settlers came in, most of them from the State of New York. Thomas Geldard, an Englishman, settled in the town in 1825; George Norris came from Geneva, New York, in 1828, and settled in the western part of the township; Benjamin and Joseph Green came from Ontario County, N. Y., in 1827; William Lyon came from New York in 1828; George Farrington came in 1829, coming from Steuben County, New York; Noah Benedict came from Ohio in 1831, and settled in Farmington; S. K. Burgess came from Birmingham, Oakland County, Mich., in 1832; he came with his father, Harmon Burgess. Among the other settlers who came about this time are Lewis Cook, from New York; George Boyce, from England; Hiram Wilmaarth, Noah Peck, from New York; Ralph and Benjamin Bell. The township was organized in 1833. The Grand River road was opened through the township in 1833, previous to which time there were no roads except an Indian trail, known as the Shiawassee trail, running through the township to Detroit. The road from Farmington to Dearborn was opened previous to 1832. - The first death in the township occurred in October, 1830, and the second, that of a Mrs. Pastor, wvho came from Vermont, in October, 1832. The first marriage ceremony was performed in the western part of the township, by Justice of the Peace Fox, in 1830. Tradition says that the name of Redford was given to this township from the fact that the River Rouge, whose name, being French, signifies "red," has a ford within the township limits. Other traditions say that it was suggested by the fact that the red men forded the Rouge there on their annual pilgrimage to Maiden, Canada, where the Shiawassee tribe received a pension from the British Government, for services rendered during the war of 1812. At the time of the settlement of the township, this tribe, to the number of about 300, made an annual trip from what is now Shiawassee County to Detroit, and thence to Maiden, to receive this pension. There are several villages in Redford Township, among which are Redford Center, Fisher Station, Duboisville, and Oak Post Office. The principal business of the township is agriculture, although there is one tile factory, one glue factory, and, also, one or two saw and grist-mills inside the township limits. There are three churches in the township. The present officers of the township are as follows: Supervisor-John M. Lee. Clerk-Charles D. Collins. Treasurer-Hugh Hauk. Superintendent of Schools-Emmett Minock. Justices of the Peace-Alvin C. Pierce, George Morris, Flavius J. Smith, and Edwin Sackett. School Inspector-F. U. Nardin. Drain Commissioner-Enos Beckel. Highway Commissioner-Alfred Harris. Constables-Henry Cronner and George H11. Lee. HISTORY OF LIVONIA TOWNSHIP. The township of Livonia is situated in the northwestern part of Wayne County, and is bounded east by Redford Township, south by Nankin Township, west by Plymouth Township, and north by the county line. Among the first settlers in Livonia Township are Daniel Blue, who came fromh Oneida County, New York, with his son, Alexander Blue, and settled in the eastern part of the township in 1832; Alexander McKenney, who came from Ireland, in June, 1832, and settled in Redford Township, but soon afterward moved to Livonia Township. About this time came Thomas Hammond, who came from New York; Joseph Morse, from Steuben County, New York; Reuben Glass, Peter Mielden, George Ryder, Erastus Everett, Nathan K.ingsley, Gilbert Martin, Solomon Lambert, who came in 1831 ~ James Gunning, Jamnes Grace, Nehemiah Weston, Gabriel Deane, John Cahoon, Adolpmhus Brigham, Pardon Briggs and John G. Welsh. The township of Livonia was organized in 1835, the following officers being chosen at the first meeting of the citizens of the new town: Register of Deeds-Theodore Williams. Treasurer-David French. Coroner-Benjamin Woodworth. Clerk-Silas Joslin. Inspectors of Election-A. Brigham, Silas Joslin, Thomas Harper. In 1837, the township was divided, into school districts; Benjamin Stephens, Archelaus Harwood and Harvey Durfee being the first School Inspectors.,George Farrington was the first member of the Legislature from this township, when the capitol of the State was at Detroit. Among the other old settlers who have held important offices we find the name of Alexander Blue, who held the office of Justice of the Peace for a term of twenty-eight consecutive years. The present town officers are as follows: Supervisor-William T. Rattenbury. Clerk-William T. Ewing. Superintendent of Schools-Marvin Arnold. School Inspector-Benjamin Passage. Treasurer-Avery Chillson. Drain Commissioner-Dougald Blue. Highway Commissioner-Homer Moore. Constables-John F. Creiger, Augustus Arnold and Charles Bentley. The principal occupation of the inhabitants of the township is farming, although there are at present four or five butter and cheese factories, and one or two saw and grist mills inside the township limits. HISTORY OF ]NANKIN TOWNSHIP. The first settler in Nankin Township was a man by the name of Geo. M. Johnson, who came to this part of the county in 1824, and built a log house on the ground now occupied by Hammon Bros'. boot and shoe store, where he furnished entertainment, liquid and solid, to the few travelers through this section until the year 1826, when he sold out to a man by the name of Simmons, who kept up the hotel business for three years. In a fit of drunkenness he killed his wife, for which he suffered the death penalty by hanging, in 1830. It is believed by many that this is the only instance of legal hanging in the history of the State. In 1831, Ezra Derby bought out the Simmons heirs and immediately began to make improvements. This was the only house in Wayne until in 1832, when a man by the name of Rulo moved in and built near George Goldsmith's present residence. He was followed soon after by Street and Krider, who have lived here ever since. About this date, the township became settled quite rapidly; and, in the northern part, many were already making for themselves homes for the future, among whomn were Glode D. and James F. Chubb, who settled here in 1826. The earliest official record dates back to the year 1827, at which time all that tract of country lying between Springwells and Ypsilanti was known as Township No. 1, and called Bucklin. The first road in this township was laid by Geo. M. Johnson and Harvey' Tuttle, Commissioners of Highways, on the 11th day of July, 1827. The township of Nankin was formeddn the year 1830, and embraced what is now known as Nankin and Livonia. The first township meeting was convened at the -house of Henry Wells, and adjourned to the school house in Schwartzburgh, where, after passing sundry unimportant resolutions, they adjourned to meet at the same place for the next annual meeting. James F. Chubb was the first Town Clerk and G. D. Chubb the second. The first Supervisor was Rev. Marcus Swift. He was re-elected for several successive terms, and had the entire confidence of the people in this locality. Mr. Swift came from Newx York in the year 1825, and settled in the north part of the town. Being the first Minister of the Gospel in these parts, his labors were arduous and but ill paid, yet, with much to discourage him, he labored faithfully and efficiently in his vocation. In 1833, the M. E. Church organized a conference and he took charge of the Oakland circuit, which embraced 125 miles within its limits. This circuit he made once in four weeks, preaching thirty-one times a month, for which he received $120 per year. The first Justice of the Peace in this township was James F. Chubb, holding that office by virtue of a commission from Gov. Lewis Cass. While Michigan remained a Territory, the office of Justice of the Peace was not electiye, but was held by appointment. The first attempt at making a village of Wayne was in 1834, by Ezra Derby, who made the first plat and called it Derby's Corners. The first school house in Wayne was built in 1832, by Ezra Derby and a man by the name of Parker. In this year, Win. Hawley settled here, who was followed the next year by Kilborn and Perkins. Mr. Kilborn was the first blacksmith in this section, and is still liv ing. The shop in which he worked was erected on what is now known as the public square, by Ezra Derby, in 1833. In 1834, Mr. Derby built the first mill in Wayne. This year was also made celebrated by the birth of the first white child in Wayne-Miss Maria Krider-afterward wife of J. D. Bunting. In 1837, the first Quarterly Meeting of the M. E. Church was held in Street & Krider's barn, Elder Hur, of Ohio, presiding. The first church built in this place was dedicated by the Congregational Society in 1850. Since that time, the Methodist, Universalist and Catholic societies have each built commodious places of worship. The first wagon shop in Wayne was built in 1853, by W. R. Corlett & Brother. The village of Wayne was incorporated in 1869, and held its charter election at the Union Hotel, April 12, 1869, H. N. Collins and C. T. Barnard being Inspectors of Election and Win. M. Hastings, Clerk. The first village officers were elected almost unanimously, as follows: President-W. R. Corlett. Recorder-Wmin. M. Hastings. Treasurer-Ammon Brown. Trustees-Jacob D. Bunting, Frederick Marker, Sr., Thomas Morrison, Israel Bell, John J. Palmer. The Council met and organized April 20, and appointed A. L. Chase, Street Commissioner, and Stephen T. Curtis, Marshal. The village lock-up was built the first year of its incorporation, and the work of building sidewalks, street crossings, etc., begun. The Union school building of Wayne was erected in 1870, at a cost of $19,000, and furnished a little later, at a cost of $3,000. In the fall of 1871, it was ready for use and J. M. Boyd was engaged as Principal with an annual salary of $1,000. The last charter election of the village of Wayne was held on Monday, March 20, 1876, and the following officers elected, viz.: President-W. ItR. Corlett. Recorder-George McGuire. Treasurer-Jolhn S. Egeler. Trustees-J. O'Connor, W. A. Pettingill, C. H. Cady, S. W. Walker, Jr., James R. Hosie. W. R. Corlett being the first and last presiding officer of the Council. This year, the village has put up street lamps on all the principal thoroughfares, and other improvements will follow as needed. HISTOUY OF SPRINGWELLS TOWNSHIP. This township derives its name from a few large springs that flow from the foot of a hill near the site of old Fort Wayne. It wnas first settled by the French, and dates its occupancy back to the first settlement of Detroit. Like the neighboring township of Hamtramck, the records throw but little light on its first Organization, and give the names of but few of the actual American settlers who came within its boundaries prior to 1830. Joseph Barron was undoubtedly the first Justice in the township, being appointed by Governor Cass, while Michigan was yet a Territory. Later, he held several other offices, and is believed to have been the first Supervisor. Governor Woodbridge was also one of the early Supervisors, and, if we are correctly informed, held the office two or three terms. Since the township was first laid out, its boundaries have been several times changed on the east and north, quite a portion having been added to Detroit. Its present size is about 4x5o miles, and is joined on the north by Greenfield, east by the city, south by Detroit River, and west by Dearborn Township and River liouge. The township is generally level, the predominating quality of soil being clay. In the southeastern part, howevei-, may be found a small section of sandy loam. It is well watered, having, besides the two rivers above mentioned, several fine creeks within its limits. The farms are generally small, well tilled and for the mostn part devoted to market gaidening, dairy purposes, etc., and, on account of their proximity to the city, are exceedingly valuable. Any one journeying in this direction on the principal thoroughfares radiating through the city will be struck with the village-like aspect of the w-hole township. Its population is about 5,500. Present officers are: Supervisor-Conrad Clippert. Town Clerk-August Sink. Justices of the Peace-C. F. Campau, Samuel Ludlow, John Streater and Leonard Sink. HISTORY OF TAYLOR TOWNSHIP. That division of Wayne County known as the township of Taylor was formerly a part of Ecorce, which being very large, and the greater part of its trade having centered at or near the river, those residing in the western portion were greatly inconvenienced, by having to travel almost the entire breadth of the township when public affairs demanded their attention. Accordingly, in the winter of 1847, a petition was forwarded to the Legislature, setting forth the advisability of dividing the township. This resulted in an act, approved March 16, which, from the lands lying west of a line running east of Sections 3, 10, 15, 22, 27 and 34, constructed the township of Taylor. It then had 150 inhabitants. The first lot of land transferred in this part of the county was an eighty acre piece, in Section 28, being purchased of the government by Peter Coan, in 1830. Two years later, with the assistance of his brother Edmund, he built him a house, and took up a permanent abode. Edmund afterward moved into Brownstown, but Peter has tarried in the township ever since, and may, therefore, be considered pre-eminently its pioneer. Then came in rapid succession John Hayden-who afterward went West, however-George Brundrit, John Moat, James and William Sutliff. In 1850, Augustus Coan, father of Peter, who had fought in the war of 1812, came into the township. Among the other early settlers were W. N. Steward,Lucius Parmely, Josiah Johnson, Clark Wells, Isaac Combs, Joseph Clark, and Elias Vreeland. Charles Freeman, who afterward became world-renowned as a pugilist, split rails for the latter gentleman, for some months. After them came Elder Patteo, a man of God of the Methodist persuasion, who preached the first sermon, and tied the initial matrimonial knot. In accordance with the act by which the township was erected, the first town meeting was held at the house of Richard Sutliff, on the 5th day of April, 1847. The number of votes cast was forty-four, and the election resulted in the choice of the following officers: Supervisor.-Jared Sexton. Clerk-Charles Steward. Treasurer-W. W. Fletcher. Justices-Jared Sexton, W. N. Steward. Highway Commissioners-William Sutliff, William Shipman. School inspectors-Chandler Wells, Jamies Silverwood. Constables-O. Ri. Robbin, Chandler Wells. Overseers of the Poor-Josiah Johnson, Samuel Brass. The greater part of this township is very level and low, and in-former years was covered to a considerable extenta with surface water. This, combined with the fact that large tracts were held by speculators, caused the progression of the township to be somewhat slow, when compared with others. But under the present excellent system of drainage, extensive sections, remarkable for their fertility, are being rendered easily available, and Taylor will soon be, agriculturally, a prosperous town. Its educational privileges are good, it having five school districts. Its nearest railroad facilities are at Wyandotte, about four miles distant, where the major proportion of its produce finds a ready market. SThe town has no properly called business centers, although the post office with two stoies, a saw mill, and several dwellings pass by the name of " Taylor Center." The population of the township is now about 900, of which 500 are natives and 400 foreigners; the latter being mostly Germans. Its present officers are: Supervisor-J. J. Vrooman. Treasurer-Henry Fritz. Clerk-R. H. Sutliff. Superintendent of Schools-G. C. Putnam. Drain Commissioner-Frederick. Racho. Justices of the Peace-Peter Coan, G. C. Putnam, James Evens, John McPherson, V. N. Smith. Constables-Peter Schloff, Joseph Boltz, John Brest. HISTORY OF CANTON TOWNSHIP. Canton is bounded on the north by the township of Plymouth, on the east by Nankin, south by Van Buren, on the west by Superior Township. The west line of Canton is the county line between Wayne County and Wash tenaw County. Canton was organized in 1833. It was formerly included in the township of Plymouth. The first election was held at the house of John Chaffee, in 1833. Mr. James Safford was elected Supervisor; Amos Stevens, Justice of the Peace; Thomas Hooker, Clerk. The first delegates to the county convention were Amos Stevens, Moses Bradford, Pary Sheldon. The first settlers were Amos Stevens, David Cady, William Smith, Pary Sheldon, Childs Downer and brother, in the year 1825. Among the present officers are: Supervisor-John Huston. Clerk-Mark Sines. Treasurer-William Sales. Justice-Samuel Joslin. Canton is well supplied with living water. The Rouge River runs through the center fromra west to east. It has several overflowing wells, which supply abundance of water to the farmers around. The soil in the northeast is sandy, and also along the west line. The balance of the soil is mostly of a clay loam, and very productive. The timber through the center portion is elm, black ash and oak. The timber on the sandy soil consists of oak open c

Page  70 i I= REMS I J I 70 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. ings. It is considered the excelsior township in Wayne County, for general farming purposes. Sheldon Corners, situated in the township of Canton, consists of two stores, two blacksmith shops, shoe store, two churches, school building, wagon and carriage shop, cheese factory and cider-mill. MNlost of the farms are in a high state of cultivation. County ditches are numerous. Fences and buildings are kept, in good order, and everything indicates an intelligent and prosperous community. Considerable attention is given to the rearing of fine blooded cattle and horses. According to the last statistics, there were 1,024 milch cows; 600 horses; 1.500 other cattle; 2,397 hogs; 5,33C sheep' fruit, cash sales $25,600" 15,360 bushels of wheat. Population in 1876, 2,168. HISTORY OF ROMULUS TOWNSHIP.! ~ The first man whose hardihood and daring spirit led him to settle in the howling wilderness of marsh, forest and wolves now reclaimed and known to the world by the name of Romulus, was a French Canadian by the name of Samuel Polyne, who located here just -fifty years ago this Centennimal summer. He settled on Section 2, on the northern limits of the township, the soil tilled by him being now a part of the fine farm of William B. Thomas. After the advent of other settlers, the migratory instinct came upon him once more and. took him hence, and where he or his descendants are now none of his old associates know. Two or three years after his settlement, Solomon Whittaker, one Charles and Joseph Pulcifer came into the township. Pulcifer left nearly forty years ago, and the others died soon after his departure. In 1883, Jenks Pullen, with his six sons, who afterward became -substantial and leading men of the township, located at the corners still honored with his name. Then, in order up to 1840, came Warren Blair, John Simpson, the genial Dr. John F. Smith, who died fifteen years ago; John Carr, A. P. Young, Hiram Fisk, Mr. McBride, George Dykeman, C. C. Bort, Peter De Lanicy, Phillip Reynolds, Benjamin Smith, Orange and Orion Brown, William Hale, James Bateham, Ira Hall, Abraham Thompson, William Lane, Richard Bird, Isaac Bird and Peter Bort. This township, with Van Buren and Sumpter, was originally a part of Huron. In February of 1885, the Legislature passed an act providing that all that part of Huron distinguished as Town 3 South, of Range 9 East, should be set apart as a separate township, to be known a.s Romulus, and that the first town meeting be held at the house of Joseph Y. Pullen. The population was then 125, of which number twenty-five were voters. In harmony with the act, on the 6th day of April an election was held, and it resulted in the choice of the following officers: Supervisor-D. J. Pullen. Town Clerk-John Simpson. Assessors-Joseph Y. Pullen, Hale Wakefield, George Dykeman. Highway Commissioners-Samuel Polyne, F. G. Jaspar, Alexander Simpson. School Inspectors-John F. Smith, John Carr, Jenks Pullen. Poor Masters-Warren Blair, Benjamin D. Smith. Constable and Collector-Jenks Pullen. When the second election was held, it was discovered that the expenses of the town for the fiscal year had been but $39.25, which speaks weli for the frugality of our predecessors, to say the least. In those early days, a village existed on the banks of the Huron, known as Mount Pleasant. It comprised a saw-mill, a hotel and store combined, and several dwellings. It became a great resort for a gang of counterfeiters, some years after its founding, and many thousanids of dollars have been stamped beneath the trees and underbrush surrounding the village. Upon the arrest and conviction of the leaders, in 1839, the gang betook themselves to safer quarters, and from that time the village went into rapid decay, nothing being left of it at the present day but the old hotel, which is simply an agglomeration of worm-eaten timber and moss-covered clapboards. This township was greatly infested with wolves in those days, children and cattle being unsafe away from home. The old settler relates many stirring adventures with these savage brutes; and for some years a bounty of two dollars a head was paid for all that were killed. Romulus was, in former years, greatly troubled with surface water, but this disadvantage has been materially obviated latterly by an excellent system of drainage, the soil of the northern and western parts of this township is light and sandy; that of the central and eastern portions of a clayey nature. The development of Rqomulus has been slow, comparatively, the rich lands further west, particularly in Wisconsin, Iowa and Illinois, serving to draw men on to where the fruits of their labor could be sooner reaped. The: *advantage of living in the shadow of a great metropolis like Detroit has come to be recognized in later years, however, and the township is now rapidly filling up with good, substantial farmers. The day is not far distant When it. will be ranked, agriculturally, as one of the most fertile and pros-| porous towns in the State.I The population of the town is now about 1,700; and the school census shows 640 pupils, who have excellent opportunities for receiving instruction, in nine substantial school buildings. The only church edifice is that of the Methodist society, at Pullen's Corners, though there are other religious organizations in the township. There are no business centers in Romulus, although S. R. Kingsly deals in general merchandise, at Pullen's Corners. The town officers for 1876 are as follows: Supervisor-William Whittacre. Town Clerk-D. J. Pullen. Justices of the Peace-A. S. Temple, James Bateham, A. P. Young, Edward Bingel. Commissioner of Highwatys-J. R. Warner. Treasurer-R. C. Bird. Superintendent of Schools-William Whittacre, School Inspector-A. P. Young. Drain Commissioner-Justice R. Warner. Constables-D. B. Fisk, A. S. Merrill, Glover Rawson, Albert Bateham. HISTORY OF DEARBORON TOWNSHIP. Dearborn is in the second tier of townships from the east side of the county, and has Eedford on the north, Springwells and Ecorce on the east, Taylor on the south, and Nankin on the west. The center of the township is about ten miles from the county seat. Dearborn was originally organized in 1828. A. J. Buckland was the first white settler. At one time this town was known as the town of Peken, called so by the early settlers. The present officers of the township are: Supervisor-John Cosboy. Clerk-Hubbard Hidden. Treasurer-Jacob Fox. Justices of the Peace--William Daly, William M. Holton, James Thompson and Charles N. Brainard. Dearborn village is sit-uated on each side of the Michigan Central Railroad. It contains five churches, four general stores, a post office, one hotel, and some fine residences; among these are the residences of Dr. E. S. Snow, David Sloss, E. D. Howe, and J. A. Sexton. The village contains a popula tion of about 500. The Michigan Central Railroad depot is situated her-e. Three passenger trains stop daily each way. The early history of Dearborn would be equally interesting with other portions of the county, but we have been unable to obtain anything of importance. HISTOY- OF BROWNSTOWN TOWNSHIP. This township is siuated in the southeast part of the county, and is bounded on the east by the Detroit River, on the south by the Huron River, west by the township of Huron, and on the north by Monguagon and Taylor. It is twenty miles from Detroit, the county seat. That portion of the town lying on the Detroit River was settled at an early periodin the history of the Northwest., and is described in the old geographies as being one of the principal towns in the Michigan Territory, from the fact, perhaps, of its having been the seat of several great Indian Councils held between the years 1786 and 1806. That at the latter date was held by Gen. Hull, who was at that period Governor of the Territory. The township was organized on the 5th day of April, 1827, when Moses Roberts was elected Supervisor; James Vreeland, Town Clerk; Jacob Knox, William Hazard and David Smith, Assessors; Elias Vreeland, William Fletcher and Isaac Taylor, Commissioners of Highways; Isaac Taylor, Constable and Collector; Freeman Bass, Pound Master; Arthur Ruark and Garret Vreeland, Directors of the Poor; Hiram Hecox, Clode Compau, William Fletcher, Isaac Thurston, John Conrad and Thomas Long, Fence Viewers; George C. Clark and Isaac Taylor, Overseers of Highways. Some of its early settlers were B. F. Knapp, George C. Clark, William Munger, John Forbes, Michael Vreeland, his sons, Jacob Garret, Elias James, R. Ransom, Dr. John Leteur, Colonel Nathaniel Case, P. T. Clark and Henry Woodruff. The Huron. River bounds the township on the south; the land is level, and composed of several varieties of soil, as clay, loam, sand and gravel, and is generally productive, and affords large numbers of living springs of water, as also numerous artesian wells. An excellent stone quarry has been opened on land belonging to Mr. W. Littlefield. The township has two business centers, Flat Rock and Gibraltar; at the former place is an excellent water power, which has been in part utilized by the erection of two excellent flouring mills. It also has several other manufacturing establishments and several mercantile establishments, prominent among which may be mentioned that of W. S, Morey. It has three churches, Methodist Episcopal, Congregational, and Baptist; and also a commodious union school edifice, which cost some $1,400. Gibraltar is quite a business center, having an excellent harbor, a shipyard and several other business establishments. The Canada Southern Railroad passes through the township, touching Flat Rock; population of the township about 2,500. The Michigan Southern & Lake Shore Railroad also passes through the town, as does a branch of the Canada Southern Railroad, running from Detroit to Toledo. HISTORY OF VAN BUIREN TOWNSHIP. Van Buren Township is situated in the western part of Wayne County, and is bounded by Canton, Romulus and Sumpter Townships and Washtenaw County. The oldest settler of whom we have any record was Nathan Wilcox, who settled in 1821, on what is known as the Stufflett farm. About the same time, a man named Snow settled on the bank of the Huron River, at what was afterward called Snow's Landing. The next settler was Matthew Wood, who came in the spring of 1822. Harvey Hubbard came to the State in 1818, but resided till 1823 in Trenton, when he moved to this township. Amariah Rtawson settled in 1824, and the site of his first residence is now called iawsonville, after him. During the same year, Erastus Coy came and settled. George Jewett came in 1827: and among the other old settlers were Henry Cameron, Eli Bradshaw, Lucius Corkins, Leander Ferguson, Adolphus ialrymple, David Dalrymple, Lewis and David Freeman, who settled on the north bank of the Huron, opposite where Belleville now stands; and John Price. The territory comprising Van Buren Township was, together with Romulus and Sumpter, a part of the old township of Huron. It was set apart as a township and organized in the year 1836, the following persons being elected to fill the offices of the new township ~ Supervisor-Ebenezer Ea~ton. Clerk-Job Smith.~ Treasurer-Alexander Buchanan. Assessors-Arba Ash, John M. Hiller and James:Vaughn. School Commissioners-John Buchanan, W/aterman Convis and Miner Savage. School Inspectors-David Fell, Harvey Douglass and Eli Bradshaw. Highway Commissioners-Benjamin Brearly, Isaac Otis and Daniel Douglass. Overseer of the Poor-James Melntosh. Constable and Collector--Amos Bradshaw. Constables-David Fell, John M. Hiller andAdlhsDlype The first school house was built as early as the year 1822; the first teacher of the school being John Price. The first white child born in the township was Anson Corkins, and this incident occurred about the year 1826. There are at present four villages in the township-Rawsonville, Belleville, Denton's and Sheldon Station. The following are the present township officers; Supervisor-William E. Warner. Clerk-William A. Haak. Treasurer-S. D. Denton. Superintendent of Schools-Franklin Robb. Commissioner of Highways-Alexander Robb. Drain Commissioner-William S. Gordon. School Inspector-Albert Day. Justice of the Peace-William E. Warner. Constables--Andrew J. Smith, John Zibbell, William Cotton and Palmer Edwards. HISTORY OF PLYMIOUTH TOWNSHIP. Along the northwesterly limits of the county of Wayne lies the township of whose history an epitome we have now to give. The first purchase of land in this section was made in the summer of 1824, by one Alanson Aldrich, who, however, never settled here. O.ther tracts were taken up in the fall of the same year by Erastus Hussey and Abraham Spears, the former becoming a resident after two years, but the latter never. The first actual settlers were William and Allen Tibbitts, who purchased 800 acres of land in April o'f the following year and moved upon it forthwith. During the same year came Geriit Houghtailing, Samuel Gates, Edwin Stuart, Erastus Starkweather, ILerman Stowe, Daniel Baker and Luther Lincoln. The last named erected a saw-mill on the River Ro'uge early in 1827. In the same year, a small store was opened about a half mile south of where the village of Plymouth now stands. It proved a great convenience to the pioneers, who, before that, were obliged to go to Detroit for all their merchandise. Then came John Miller, who bought a piece of land now covered by the village of Northville, Finding thereon a large boulder, he conceived the idea of building a grist-mill, and after a considerable amount of labor succeeded in fashioning the rock into a mill-stone, and soon thereafter had his machinery in almost constant operation. Subsequently, a large flouring mill was erected by Lincoln on the Rouge, but hardly had it commenced work ere it was destroyed by fire, and upon being rebuilt was burned a second time. For several years after that, all the gristing in the township was done by Miller with his improvised run of stones. Years later, the man sold his mill property and moved a few miles further north, where he died in 1860, leaving six sons and four daughters. The names of William Starkweather, Daniel Phillips, Warren Stowe, J. J. Andrews, Rosvell Root, G. P. Benton, Pilts Taft. and Daniel Cody will probably complete the list of men who, fifty years ago, took up their abodes in the continuous wood with which the township was covered, and hewed out the way for coming generations, who todny. in the luxuriant growth of a wealthy, prosperous and highly cultivated section of country, gaze upon the fruition of their fathers' hopes. In 1826, the settlers gathered together, and for the first time in several years listened to the expounding of the Word, by Elder Hickox. He preached for several years off and on, and wa-s finally superseded by Elder Swift. In February, 1827. a public meeting was held at the house of William Tibbitts, which resulted in the erection of the township of Plymouth. Three months later came another meeting, at which the following officers were elected: Supervisor-William Barton. Clerk-Allen Tibbitts. Collector-A. B. Markham. Assessors-Erastus Starkweather, Rosvell Root, Henry Lyon. Justice of the Peace-Philo Taylor. There were forty-two votes cast at this election, and it was resolved, by a majority of two, to "raise $150 for necessary expenses during the ensuing year." -About this time a company of soldiers was formed, being afterward increased to a battalion. The organization was preserved intact for several years, but was finally disrupted by the repeal of the law that called it into being-the Michigan Militia act. The first physician was Dr. J. D. Davis, and the first Postm::,ster Gideon P. Benton-both of whom have long been sleeping the sleep that knows no waking. The soil of Plymouth varies from a light loam in the east to a heavy clay in the west, with here and there long gravelly ridges. Being well watered by the River Rouge and tributaries, the land has always been remarkable in its fecundity, and has brought the township agriculturally to the front rank. In early days, a yield of from thirty to forty bushels of wheat to the acre was nothing unusual. Fruit culture is now receiving considerable attention. When Michigan was admitted into the Union, an impetus was given to immigration, and the full share of this that Plymouth received, added to her auspicious commencement, gave her a rapid and substantial growth, which has continued without intermission to the present day. She is favored with a network of excellent roads, unsurpassed railway communications, good bridges, very superior schools, and in fact all the advantages that would naturally accrue to a population so industrious, intelligent and straightforward. The town has now upward of 4,000 inhabitants, about a third of which are congregated in the two thriving business centers-Northville and Plym outh. Among its present town officers are: Supervisor-Winfield Scott. Clerk-James K. Lowden. Treasurer-Charles W. Bradner. Superintendent of Schools-James Bruduar. Justice of the Peace-H. W. Baker. HISTORY OF GIROSSE POINT TOWNSHIP. This township was originally a part of Hamt.ramck, and its settlement was almost cotemporaneous with that of Detroit. All of the first inhabitants were French, and the most prominent of them came over in 1701 with Antoine de La Motte Cadillac, the illustrious founder of the "City of the Straits." Notable among these, and whose descendants are here to-dach.y., were the Beaufaits, St. Bernians, Vermices, Morains, Cadiways, Troubles, Chovies, St. Aubins, Proncusals, Rivards, and Gouines, who took up land here and began to improve it at once. We learn of no other arrivals of particular importance, until eighty-two years afterward, when Michigan was ceded to the United States; then the Kerbeys, Grants, Martins, and Cunnios moved into this region from the East. It is supposed that these wore the first Americans that located here. In 1796, the great grandfathier of" the present. Rufus M. Kerby bought 120 acres of land from one Donaldson, paying therefor ~120. He also paid ~50 for a negro named Pompey, who was one of a number of slaves that were owned in the township in those years. A l'ttle traffic used to be done, also, in white prisoners that were brought in by the Indians, but these were generally set fr'ee. The red men were a constant source of fear and annoyance to the settlers. They used to land here in coming over from Canada, and, passing through the township, would confiscate anything and everything that~ they might want. Whole droves of cattle have been driven off by them, and horses taken every year. The tribes were then so powerful that the pioneers never dreamed of offering resistance. In Pontiac's war, and that of 1812, Grosse Point figured conspicuously, two of the most sanguinary conflicts of the latter war being fought within her borders. The histor'y of the township in those years is fraught with interest, and many a chapter could be written filled with the stirrinng adventures of the early settlers. The Indians used to bury their dead on the field of battle, and their bones are not infrequently plowed up, even now. Pottery and different implements of warfare are also found now and then. One of the Grants above mentioned was a retired naval officer. He built a large log house which he dignified by the title of castle. He was of a tyrannical, contumacious disposition, and the greater part of his work -was done by seamen formerly under' him, whom he actually forced into his service. He seemed to have gained a complete ascendency over them, and they never thought of disobeying his commands, although he never paid them for their labor. His farm eventually passed into the possession of. George Moran, within whose recollection much of this early history is. Pierre St. George, another of the pioneers, is still living at the great age of 102 years. There are a goodly number of aged Frenchmen living here; their long lives are doubtless attributable to the abstemious and careful habits of their fathers and themselves. The growth of the town was slow for some years after the war of 1812, but when peace was assured, there was a large influx of Belgians and Germans, and since that day the population has been multiplying in a much greater ratio than that of the natural increase. Grosse Point was set apart from Hamtramck in the year 1846, and among the first town officers we find the following: Supervisor-George Moran. Clerk-Robert Baiton. Treasurer-Dagobert Juriff.i Assessors-John Gouine, Ji`., James Baiton. School Inspectors-John Gouine, Sr., George Githrie. Justices of the Peace-Francis Van Antwerp, Frank Juriff, Daniel Corby, George Martin. The climate of Grosse Point is very salubrious, and conducive to longevity; the land is rich, rolling, and in a very high state of cultivation. In early days there was, comparatively speaking, no market for grain and other produce, but the great and growing demand created by the city of Detroit in later years has br'ought the greater portion of the township under cultivation. It has also proved an incentive to market gardening and fruit culture. The population of the to6wn is now about 3,000, of which 500 are children, who have the best of educational advantages. Besides superiorities in the way

Page  71 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 71 of good roads, excellent drainage, and splendid timber, we have others incidental to a proximity to a large city. Being thus situated, many elegant and costly residences have been erected here in late years as summer homes for business men. Our centennial town officers are as follows: Supervisor-David Trombly. Clerk-F. W. Connor. Treasurer-Xavier Buigard. Superintendent of Schools-Richard Richer. Justices of the Peace-Richard Lamb, Robert Mailter, George MIartin. HISTORY OF ECOORBE TOWNSHIP, Ecorce Township is known as Township No. 8 South, of Range No. 11 East, and is a fractional township. It was formerly annexed to the township of Taylor, but afterward divided into two townships, having enough population. Two rows of sections from the east side of Taylor were added to Ecorce in order to make an'equal division of the two townships, Ecorce being bounded on the west by the townships of Taylor and Dearborn, on the south by the townships of Brownstown, Monguagon and the city of Wyandotte, on the east by the Detroit River and on the north by the River Rouge. Among the early settlers were Elijah Goodell, Jean Baptiste Rousseau, Joseph Bondie, Alexis Discompte Labidie, Louis Le Due, Alexandre Jandron, and others. This township, at one time, was famous for having a large Indian burying ground on the Detroit River, where Ecorce village now stands, and is supposed to be the resting place of the Wyandottes. Among its present officers are H-yacinthe F. Riopelle, Supervisor; Noah S. Le Blanc, Clerk; M. P. Roulo, Treasurer; Hyacinthe F. Riopelle and Joseph Salliotte, Justices. There are two large streams in this township, viz.: the Rouge River, on the north boundary of the township, and the Ecorce River, about central, both emptying into the Detroit PRiver. The township is generally level and gently undulating. The timber is white oak, redl oak, maple (both hard and soft), hickory, white and black ash, elm, white wood, cotton wood, sycamore and black oak, which are found mostly about one mile back and along the banks of the Rouge and Detroit Rivers. The business center of this town is Ecorce village, with two railroads, viz.: the Michigan and Canada Southern Railroads, and a very good place for shipping, and two saw-mills. Of live stock, it shows 1,036 horses, 944 milch cows, 828 young cattle, 2,744 hogs, 248 sheep, 4 head of work oxen. Of other products, it has 6,660 bushels of wheat, 38,432 bushels of corn, 37,140 bushels of oats, 8,816 bushels of potatoes, 3,224 tons of hay, 744 pounds of wool, 36,024 pounds of butter, 1,944 bushels of barley, 504 bushels of rye, 2,660 bushels of buckwheat., CITY OF WYANDOTTE. This young and flourishing city bears the name of the old Indian Chief, Walk-in-the-water, which was also the name of the first steamboat that ever crossed Lake Erie. Wyandotte is situated on one of his favorite hunting grounds, on the bank of the Detroit, ten miles below the city. It is the second city in limportance in Wayne County. In October, 1854, the Eureka Iron Company was organized, consisting of E. B. Ward, President; T. W. Lockwood, Treasurer; George S. Thurber, Secretatry, and of the following stockholders: Eber B. Ward, Harmon De Graff, Silas N. Kendrick, U. Tracy Howe, Silas M. Holmes, Philip Thurber, Elijah Wilson, Thomas W. Lockwood, Francis Choate and Sylvester Lamrned. In 1854, the company purchased the site of Wyandotte of Maj. John Dibble, the proprietor of the land, who had built a residence on it near the bank of the river, and, in that year, laid out the town. It included, at that time, 2,200 acres, but since then about as much more has been added. The Eureka Iron Company erected their furnace and commenced operations in 1854, their object being the manufacture of pig iron from the Lake Superior iron ore. Froni that time forward the enterprise has been very successful. The capital stock of the company at the beginning was $100,- I 000, in shares of 825 each, of which $117,500 was paid in. The profits increased so rapidly that the amount of surplus, over and above the dividends paid to the subscribers, was sufficient to pay up the whole capital stock in 1873, when the stock was declared all paid up. A large proportion of the pig iron manufactured by this company is shipped, the balance being used by the Wyandotte Rolling-Mill Company, which was organized in 1855, and has proved a very successful enterprise. The report of the Detroit Board of Trade, for 1876, shows that the iron ore and pig iron shipped from the different mines and furnaces of Michigan amounts to 2,944,524 tons. Wyandotte has two railroads-the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern (Toledo Branch) and the Canada, Southern. It has a good dock and excellent facilities for shipping by the lakes, and is a thriving town of about 4,000 inhabitants. Besides the important manufactures above referred to, it has a silver smelting works, for the smelting of silver ore mainly brought from the famous mine of Silver Islet, Lake Superior, and some from the Western mines; a yard for the building of iron vessels; saw and planing mills; six churches, and five school buildings with graded public schools. Wyandotte publishes a weekly newspaper, the Wt yandotte Enterprise. TRENTON Was laid out in 1850, by George B. Truax, G. B. Slocum and Sophia Slocum, whose names are attached to the plat in the Recorder's office. Among the first settlers were A. C. Truax, G. B. Truax, Giles B. Slocum, A. L. Bird, Capt. S. F. Atwood, Capt. Arthur Edwards, Capt. Robert Wagstaff, Capt. Ira Davis and others. It was formerly a ship-building and lumbering point, and still retains a ship yard and lumber mill belonging to A. C. Turner. It has a plow-handle and cheese-box factory and other manufacturing interests. Trenton is quite an important point, being situated on the Detroit River, sixteen miles below Detroit, and at the junction of the Canada Southern and Toledo Branch of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railroads. It is an incorporated village, having been incorporated under the act of 1876. It publishes a weekly newspaper, lately started. The remainder of the villages in the county were platted and recorded as follows: Northville, 1840; William Dunlap and D. L. Cady. Plymouth, 1837; Henry B. Holbrook. Waterford, 1837; Dyer Ranmsdell. Norris, 1873; P. W. Norris. Delray, 1856; Elisha Chase and wife. Dearbornville, 1833; Paul D. Anderson. Wayne, 1835; Ezra Derby. Denton's, 18066; Samuel Y. Denton. Rawsonville, 1836; Mathew Woods, A. Rawson and Abraham Vorhees. Belleville, 1848; George D. Hill, Daniel L. Quirk and R. P. Clark. Gibraltar, 1837; Beniij. B. Kerchival, Joshua Howard and Peter Godfrey, Trustees of the Gibraltar and Flat Rock Company. Flat Rock, 1838; same as Gibraltar. Waltz, 1872; Josiah Waltz. Belden, 1871; Francis T. Belden and wife. Grandport or Ecorce, 1836; Simon Rousson, A. Labode, L. Bourassau and P. White. HISTORY OF MONGUAGON TOWNSHIP. This township is one of the eastern towns of Wayne County, and embraces the Islands of Grosse Isle, Celeron, Sugar, Hickory, Stony, Manima Juda, and Grassy Isle. The first settlement was made about the year 1812, and the first township organization was May 25,1827, and the election was held in the house of Abram C. Truax, when the following officers were elected: Supervisor-A. C. Truax. Town Clerk-James Chittenden. Commissioners of Ilighways-John A. Rucker, James Chittenden, Joseph Pulsifer. Assessors-Artemus Hosmer, Manoah Hubbell, Gardner Brown. Collector-James Street. Overseers of the Poor-A. C. Truax, Richard Smith. Constables-Horatio Lud, Hurl Warren, Samuel Hickock. Fence Viewers-Manoah HIubbell, Artemnius IHosmer. Commissioners of Roads-Benjamin Chittenden, Joseph Pulsifer. Pound Keepers-A. C. Truax, James Chittenden. These men were the first settlers, and laid the foundation of the present. prosperous township. The only village in the township is Trenton, which has a population of over 1,500. inhabitants. It is situated on the banks of the Detroit Liver, and in the early days contributed greatly in assisting the early pioneers in clearing up their lands by having a market for their wood, as steamboats called regularly for that commodity. The village of Trenton was laid out by Abraham C. Truax in the year 1834, and was called Truaxton, and after a few years was changed to Truago. It is said this name originated from the fact that the early settlers were afflicted with the genuine ague, hence the name of True Ague. In a few years, again the name was changed to Trenton, which it still bears. Owing to its close proximity to Detroit., its growth has not been very rapid. Some years since, almost the entire population gained a livelihood by sailing on the lakes, a large marine interest at one time being owned here; among them were the splendid palace steamers Southern Michigan, Northern Indiana and other boats, giving employment to hundreds, but as the railroads began to encircle the lakes and encroach upon the immense business, large numbers engaged in other pursuits. The Canada Southern Railroad enters the township from Canada to Stony Island by ferry boat, from Stony Island to Grease Isle by bridge, and from Grosse Isle across the west channel of Detroit River to Slocum's Island, thence to main land, passing through the southern portion of the township. The railroad bridge is about three-fourths of a mile below the village, and on Grosse Isle are located the railroad machine shops, round house, cattle yards, offices, etc., and give constant employment to a large number of persons-most of the men residing in the village. The Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad passes through the township, from north to south, and is doing an extensive business. The Toledo & Canada Southern Railroad runs parallel with the Lake Shore Railroad, and has also its share of patronage. There is a prospect, at an early day, that a tunnel under the river will be constructed, which, when completed, will make this the great railroad center of Eastern Michigan. The islands are all under cultivation, and large amounts of fruit are raised and shipped to the various markets daily. Also, on the islands are the far-famed Detroit River white fisheries. Although the fishing season is short, there are thousands of barrels packed, which find ready sale in Eastern cities. In the northern part of the township, and on the line of railroad, is an immense deposit of limestone, which, being near the surface, is easily worked. In connection with this quarry are several improved lime kilns for the manufacture of lime. These give employment to a large working force. The lime and stone are shipped in large quantities East and West by rail, the lime being of a superior quality and the stone much sought after for building purposes. The splendid growth of large oak trees in this vicinity caused at an early day the establishment of a ship yard, and while in existence hundreds of vessels were built here, persons desirous of building boats giving this locality the preference over all others on account of the superiority of its timber. Before the panic, it gave daily employment to over 200 persons. The entire township is level and of a clay soil, and, when properly tilled, very productive. Plenty of good water can be had by boring, and by going down to the rock a flowing stream of sulphur water can be procured, which will not be likely to freeze during the winter months. In the township there are over sixty fine places of business, embracing all the different classes of trade. During the late panic there was not a single failure or suspension in any branch. There is, also, a large mill for the purpose of manufacturing cheese hoops, the material used being elm. The log is sawed the desired length, placed in vats, where it is steamed, and, when sufficiently cooked, it is taken out and placed in a lathe, where the entire log is unrolled, with the exception of the core, when it is cut, dried and packed into bundles ready for shipment. It finds a ready sale in Eastern and Western States, large quantities even being sent to California. This mill also employs a large working force. The village of Trenton was incorporated some twenty years ago, and the charter went by default. At the last session of the Legislature, a new charter was granted, and the present officers are as follows: President, William Duddleson; Recorder, Arthur Turner; Trustees, Er. Cady, Reuben Burns, Frank Burk, Moses Perry; Marshal, Isaac C. Saunders. Among the present officers of the township are: Supervisor-Daniel Reaume. Clerk-William. Templeton. Treasurer-Willianm Sanders. Justices of the Peace-John S. Smith, George W. Crook. The Government offices are held by the following gentlemen: Postmaster, John E. Hall; Deputy Collector of Customs, John S. Smith. HISTORY OF HUPON TOWNSHIP. This township was organized lMay 28, 1827. It is situated in the southern part of Wayne County, and though its first settlement was somewhat retarded, it has of late years shown rapid progress, and from present appearances is soon destined to become one of the best townships in the county. Its first officers were: Prosper Lawrence, Supervisor and Justice of the Peace; Town Clerk, Dr. John F. Smith; Assessors, Warner Corkins, Chancy Morgan and Geo. Jewett; Highway Commissioners, Mason Clark and Henry Dutcher; Constable, John F. Akinls. Jonathan Fay, a voter at the organization, is still living, and a resident of the township. Among the first arrivals and early pioneers may be mentioned Artemnus Hosmer, Nathan Wilcox, Math. Woods, Win. Nowland, Simeon Drenn, Amos Howe, Sam'l Wing, Abner Johnson, Timothy F. Wallace, A. Rawson, Gee. Hubbard and Adolphus Dalrymple. The present population"is about 1,200. Its principal business points are New Boston, Belden and Waltz; the former contains about 500 inhabitants, and has three churches-a Baptist, Roman Catholic and. Methodist Episcopal-three general stores, flouring mill, saw-mill, graded school, etc. The other two places named are flourishing villages,. situated on the Flint and Pere Marquette R. li. The Huron River courses through the township from northwest to southeast, and, with its tributaries, furnishes an abundance of water. The soil is generally sandy, and in the southern portion bordering on the river heavily timbered. In the northern part oak openings prevail. Formerly a branch of the Wyandotte Indians were located on the eastern line of the town, purchasing on both sides of their reservation about 5,000 acres. They sold out, however, to the General Government in 1843, and moved beyond the Mississippi River. Taken as a township, in the matter of thrift, energy and enterprise, Huron ranks among the foremost that Wayne County contains. It had the good fortune to be settled by a good class of citizens, who have handed down an industrious and thriving posterity. Every available opportunity that leads to ultimate prosperity to a community is embraced by its people for the betterment and advancement of their interests, and this brings its own reward. BI RIO xRA.P-IAL SKETCHES. JOHN STEVENSON, of Dearborn Township, dates the history of his family back to a period preceding the settlement of Iceland, more than one thousand years ago. Throughout the record appear the names of many of the ancient sages of Norway, Sweden and Iceland, and the dates and incidents correspond with the printed histories of those countries. His later ancestry came from the Spanish colony to Ireland, in the year 1700. He was born in the town of Sheetrim, County Monaghan, Ireland, January 1, 1804, and removed with his parents to County Tyrone, in 1812, where he remained until 1829. At this time he married Susan Campbell, born of Scotch parents, in the same county, and emigrated to America in the ship Nimrod, arriving at Stillwater T'ownship, Saratoga County, New York, after a voyage of five weeks and three days. Here he remained until 1831, when he removed with his wife to Detroit, then in the Territory of Michigan, where he at once located a farmn nine miles west of the city. Here he still continues to reside. Mr. Stevenson is the father of ten children, six sons and four daughters. Hle has now been a resident of the county for over 45 years, and though nearly 73 years of age, is still an active, well preserved man. Having but little of this world's goods to commence with, he has been quite successful, and is now the owner of a fine farm containing 185 acres. NATHANl J. BROWN, the subject of this memoir, was born near Newport, I. I., December 1, ] 801. He was of Scotch and English descent, his father coming from one of the first families of Scotland, and his mother, Anna Cooper, being an English lady anid a near relative of the celebrated novelist, and also of that champion of American independence, John Han cock, who figured so conspicuously in the struggle for liberty in the early history of the colonies. His father early espoused the cause of liberty, enlisting at the age of 16, and participating in the battle of Bunker Hill. During the war, he was in a score of other hard fought battles, besides wintering at Valley Forge and suffering all the privations and hardships incident to that terrible canmpaign. At the close of the war, he was married to Anna Cooper, and by her had eight children-five sons and three daughters. He was drowned in the Unadilla River, Otsego County, New York, having emigrated to this locality a few years before. At. this time, Nathan J., the youngest member of the family, was seven years of age. After the death of his father, the subject of our sketch, then only 13 years of age, commenced the battle of life alone. Want of space forbids a mention of the many trials and difficulties under which hlie labored. Suffice it to say, he surmounted all obstacles and showed that same indomitable will and perseverance which characterized his after career. At the age of 25, he married Lydia Butts, and for the succeeding ten years was extensively engaged in the manufacture of dairy ware, in Otsego County, New York. In the year 1835 (September 5), ihe gathered together his effects, and, with his family, consisting of a wife and four children, comnmenced a journey of 700 miles through Western New York and Ohio, with a team and covered wmagon, crossing the Maumee River near where Toledo now stands, on a ferry, arriving at his point of destination, Prince Bennetts, six miles south of Ypsilanti, Michigan, October 6, the samne year. The country was then but a vast wilderness, with only here and there the rude habitation of some brother pioneer; but, nothing daunted, he located eighty acres of land, purchased a cow, and began his labors. After this outlay, his balance in hand amounted to t2.50. Three children were born to him in his new home; and, without assistance, except what little aid the present owner of the estate, L. R. Brown, then a lad of 9 years, could render, he began clearing up the farm. That he was a model farmer, the acres improved, buildings erected and rapid progress made soon testified. In the year 1861, having become enfeebled, he died while on a journey through Kentucky for the purpose of regaining his health, in the sixtieth year of his age. Hle was one of the early pioneers of Wayne County, and will long be remembered as an enterprising and public spirited citizen, a man of strict integrity and sterling wortlh. JOSEPH COON, of Dearborn Township, was born in Ontario County, State of New York, September 11, 1814. He came to this county on the 10th of June, 1832, with his father, who purchased 560 acres of land on Section 9, in the tovwnship of Dearborn; built a log house and settled on his new farm, between the branches of the River Rouge. At that time this part of the country was a howling wilderness, bears, wvolves and Indians being his nearest neighbors. Mr. Coon, Sr., after rearing a family of six sons and six daughters, died August 15, 1850, at the age of 90. In the year 1838, Joseph Coon bought 80 acres of land, bordering on the River Rouge. The following winter he hired out as laborer on the Michigan Central Railroad, which was then being constructed. In the spring of 1839, he built a saw-mill and repaired an old grist-mill, and operated them both. The first lumber sawed at his saw-mill was wooden rails for the Central Railroad track. He also furnished the lumber for many buildings in Detroit, among which was the once noted "Andrews Hotel," which stood on the ground now occupied by the Opera House. In 1856, he built a new saw

Page  72 11 1 1: M==O imýmgmjm 72 H mill, and in this mill was sawed th-ejumber for the "Napoleon," the first boat that run on the Upper Lakes. In 1858, he rebuilt his grist-mill, the old one having burned down the year before. Mr. Coon now owns 800 acres of land, and continues to live where he first settled, having, in 1860, erected a fine farm residence (see half page view in this Atlas). At the commence"ment, of the war, he had ninety head of horses of his own raising, and supplied the army with a large number. Mr. Coon has been twice married. By his first wife he had four children, viz.: Orrin, born in 18386; Warren, born in 1842, and died in 1859; Lydia, born in 1842, and Josephine, born in 1857. His first wvife dying October 16, 1858, he married his present wife, by whom he has three children, viz. Harly J., born in 1859; Ida, born in 1861, and Edwin S., born in 1864. JAMES D. PERRY-, a resident of Redford Township, was born in Sandgate, Bennington County, Vermont, August 7th, 1815. His parents emigrated to Williamston, afterward changed to Marion Township, Wayne County, N. Y., in the following year, and remained there until November 7th, 1835, when the father and two sons, Benjamin and James D., removed to Mt. Clemens, Macomb County, Michigan, where they engaged to a Mr. Stevens during the winter, the father, in the meantime, locating 160 acres of land in RayTownship, and returning with Benjamin to New York State the following spring. Returned again to Michigan with his family in September, 1836, and located in Oakland County. James D., the subject of this sketch, was married December 24, 1836, to Grace Wells, and removed with his wife on an ox sled to the farm where he now resides, which he worked ISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. on shares for six years previous to purchasing it. They have had born to Sthem nine children, of whom eight are still living, namely: Fannie (now Mrs. Charles Andrews), Cassendana (now Mrs. Asa Wilmot), Mary Eliza (now Mrs. Francis Ward), Robert W., Mary Elizabeth (now Mrs. Thomas Johnson), Alma Louisa (now Mrs. Wm. Apling), William B. (deceased), Ira F., and Margaret (now Mrs. Harris). Like many of the early settlers of this county, Mr. Perry has suffered all the privations and hardships incident to pioneer life. When he removed to Redford Township hisa nearest and almost only neighbor was more than a mile distant. He- has taken an active interest in all the progressive developments around him, and by his industry and perseverance secured for himself one of the finest homesteads in the county. With a " start" of $100, borrowed money, he now owns 234 acres of land. The buildings are substantial, well adapted to their use, and the farm is in perfect order and under the highest state of cultivation. A view of the same can be seen on another page of this Atlas. COL. AMBROSE P. YOUNG, was born in Phelpstown, near Oaks Corners, Ontario County, New York, on the 23d day of May, 1814; his father was a native of New York, having been born in the city of New York, in 1782. His grandfather was a soldier of the Revolution, being one of Washington's life guards, and was at the surrender of Burgoyne; after the Revolutionary War was over, he emigrated to Western New York, where he purchased a large tract of land of the Holland Purchase Company, covering what is now known as Oaks Corners, in Ontario County, New York. IiHis mother was born in the State of Connecticut, on the 31st day of January, 1770, near Guilford Court House, from which place she came in company with Surveyor General Field's party to Phelpstown, riding the whole distance on horseback, then but 17 or 18 years old, and being one of the first white women in that hitherto unbroken wilderness. Owing to the extremely low price of wheat, only one shilling per bushel, and the bad state of the roads to get it to market, at the now city of Geneva, his grandfather was compelled to sell the larger portion of his landed purchase to meet payments on the balance, which he did, at one shilling per acre, and this, too, was in the very garden of the State; much of it being worth from $100 to 8150 per acre in less than twenty-five years after. The subject of this sketch learned the trade of wagon and carriage making at Oaks Corners, after which, in the war of 1883, being then only 19 years of age, together with an elder brother and two neighbors' sons, he emigrated to the then Territory of Michigan, where he spent the summer in traveling over the county, returning to York State in September of that year; here he remiained, working at the wagon business, until the spring of1836, when he agmain removed to Michigan, and settled at Romulus; about two years after, in February, 1838, he married Miss Eliza Anna Dylyeman; the marriage took place at the bride's father's house in Ypsilanti, on the 22d of February, 1838. For several years after, he carried on, in company with his brother, who was a blacksmith, the wagon and blacksmith business in Romulus, but this was found in the present state of the county (all being new settlers with limited means) an unpaying business, consequentlW the shop was abandoned for the fairm, in which business he has been engaged ever since. -VrA.T'K s I R -E WA) M--:[C]:-TIIGAN, DETROIT CITY. 500 NAME. LOCATION. SECTION.. BUSINESS. NATIVITY.. ' 30 Allardt, M. H...............'6 Williams Bl'k...............Real Estate and Insurance........ Germany....................... 1875 Anciaux, T.....................................................Priest of St. Ann's Catholic S| Church............................................................... A m erican National Bank Griswold st..................................................................................................... Arndt, A. F. R..............!126 Jefferson av.............. General Agent Berkshire Life! Insurance Co........................................................ Antisdel, W. W............Michigan av.............. Proprietor Antisdel House....... New York.....................1856 Auscher, Charles........... 1402 Michigan av........ Saloon Keeper....................... Canada.......................1861 Adair, William..............19 Jefferson Av.............. Nurseryman and Florist.......... Scotland..................... 1834 Alien, R. F..................Cor. Grand River I av. and 16th st........... Groceries and Provisions........ Michigan..................... 1875 Albro, Clark................ 941 Grand River av............ Farmner and Gardener.............. Vermont.....................1836 Brennan, P. & Co..........C Cor. Farmerst. and | Gratiot av................ Palace Boarding, Livery and Sale.I Stables..................................................... Brennan, Peter...............|187 Griswold st......... Real Estate Dealer........................................................ Baker, H. E.................!Lamrned st. West.............. Business Mangr. Detroit Tribune................................. 1885 Borgess, Rt. Rev. C. ff...94 Washington av.............................................................................................. Baker, J. D.................. iCor. Jefferson av. Sand Griswold st............ Proprietor Detroit Book Bindery................................. 1875 Bunting, W. D..............88 Henry st.....................Physician............................. England..................... 1872 Benoit, W. & Bro........... 251 & 253 Croghan st.......................... Machinists and Brass Founders.. Michigan....................1852 Boost, Charles.............. 660 Woodbridgest............ Harness Maker..................... England..................... 1852 Brooks, David W.......... 583 Woodward av....................................................... Ohio...........................1861 Brennan, Margaret........ Antoinette av............................................................ Ireland.............................. Butler, William A......... Griswold st..................... Mechanics' Bank.................... New York...................1836 Burt, Horace E........... 11 Moffat Block.............. Attorney at Law.................... Macomb County, Mich.....1855 Bishop, Levi...................................................... Attorney at Law.................... Massachusetts.............. 1885 Baugh, J. B................ Foot of Clark av......... Baugh's Steam Forging Co........ England......................... Bartenbaugh, George A... 232 Croghan st............ Tanner and Currier................. Germany.............. Breitmeyer, Albert........ Gratiot Toll Gate.. P.C. 182 Gardener.............................. Germany..................... 1851 Blanke, Joseph................................ P. C. 182 Gardener............................. Germany..................... 1852 Berry, Thomas.............. 1100 Jefferson av............. Wholesale Varnish Manufacturer England..................... 1855 Black, John.................j715 Fort st.............. Plumber.............................. Canada....................... 1854 Brown, Daniel..............1682 Grand Riverav................................................. Scotland..................... 1848 Buhl, F., Newland & Co..4146 & 148 Jefferson av............................. Manufacturers, Jobbers and Importers of Furs..................................................... Cullen, John W. A. S...... 69 Seitz Block........... Attorney at Law........................................................... Cameron, Charles.................................. Seedsman............................ Scotland..................... 1870 Coots, Walter H.............. Butcher................................ England.................... 1854 Cooper, David............... 21 icih. Grand av,............................................. M ontreal..................... 1799 Chene Bros.................. 139 Griswold st............... Real Estate Dealers................. Mlichigan.................... 1851 Cullen, John, James andi Andrew.................. 165 Grand Riverav........... Wagon and Carriage Makers...................................... 1850 Clough & W arren Organ Co.....................................................................................................1850 Caplis, James............... 23 Seitz Block................. Attorney at Law................................................... 1859 Cicott, Edward V.............................................. Attorney at Law..................................................... 11810 Cooke, Jacob................. Moffat Building......... Clerk U. S. Revenue officce...... Michigan..................... 1836 Clarke, Fred W............ IMoffat Building............ Attorney at Law............ Michigan.......................... Chipman, J. Logan..................... Attorneyat Law............. ichigan................................ 1830 Campbell, James............................................. Justice of the Peace.............. Michigan......................1845 Carlisle, Fred............................................ Owner of Street Railway........... New Jersey.................. 1861 Copp, James............7..... 771 Grand River av........... Groceries and Provisions........ England..................... 1865 Campbell, James T.........73 & 75 Jefferson Sav...........................l.. (Farrington, Campbell & Co) Wholesale Teas,- Coffees and Spices.............................. Scotland..................... Clark, Walter Y............................... Laundryman...................................1871 Dupont, Charles........................................... Wayne County Register of Deeds...........................1844 Daly, James.......... Adelphi al............ Real Estate and Insurance....................................... Detroit Savings Bank..... 82 Griswold st............................................................................................1849 Dunlap, William H........ 35 Bates st..................... Merchant Tailor................. New York................. 1840 Dickinson, J. G............ 5 Bank Block.................. Attorney at Law.................... New York.................... 1865 Dipel, W.................. 388 Gr'd River av............!Carriage and Wagon Maker...... G ermany.................. 1857 Daly, James W.......... 109 Washington av............ Attorney at Law................. Detroit, Michigan.......... 1846 Desnoyers, Peter........... 119 Congress st.................................. Detroit, Michigan.......... 1800 Douglas, S, T............................................... Dusmng & Chase.................................I............ Attorneys at Lawi.................................. DETROIT CITY-CONTINUED. NAME. LOCAiTION. SECTION. BuSINEss. NATIVITY..tJ a?'a Dewey, J. S............ Seitz Block..................... Attorney at Law...................... New York.............. 1873 Dahlheimer, Emil................................ Real Estate.......................... Germany...................... 1865 Daley, C M.................. 74 Laf-yette av................ Supt. Grand River St. Railway.. Connecticut........................ Dumontier, A. C............ Mt. Hoe st..................... Foreman Lumber Yard............ Canada........................ 1864 Dorcy, Charles............................................. Railroad Fireman.................. Pennsylvania............... 1865 Delaney, William........... 836 Beaubien st............... Drayman.............................. Ireland........................ 1863 Detroit Tribune................................................................................................................................ S D etroit Free Press......... G risw old st................................................................................................. 1835 Detroit Young Men's Society........................ M errill Hall............................................................................................... Ellis, Charles H............. Room 14, Abstract Building..................... Civil Engineer....................................................... Engel & Markham...............................................Attorneys at Law....................,................................. Early, F. A.................. Hodges' Blk, Gris-1 wold st........................ Insurance..................................................... Esser, William.............. 42 Monroe av.......................................................... Germany..................... 1869 Endriss, G. F............... 42 Maple st................... Bottling Works....................... Germany..................... 1853 Eisemlord, N................ 594 Cass av......... L............ News Dealer.......................... Mihigan..................... 1856 Elliott, C. F.......... 973 Michigan av............... Drayman and Cooper............... Massachusetts............... 1871 Friedland, Rev. J. F.......................................... Pastor St. Joseph's Church....................................... 1862 First N ational Bank....... Jefferson av................................................................................................ 1863 Feldman, Fred............. 603 Michigan av............... Harness Maker...................... Germany..................... 1869 Ford, H. P.................. 785 M ichigan av............... Florist........................................................................ Ford, John.................. Michigan ar.................... Florist and Nurseryman..........................................1838 Ferry, D. M. & Co......... Woodward av................. Seedsmen............................................................... 1856 Germain, D.................. 108 Griswold st.............. Real Estate and Loan Broker........................................... Garlock, J. H................ 9 Moffat Block................. Attorney at Law........................................................." Gray, Dr. W illiam......... 108 Farm er st.................. Physician...............................................................' 1871 Goodman, A................. Cor. Grand hiverI av. & Griswoldst............ Proprietor "Goodman House,".. England...................... 1830 Gallegher, Patrick......... 470 Grand Riv. av............ Ex-Alderman.................................................... Galster, Jacob.......................................P. C. 182 Farmer and Gardener.............. Germany..................... 1845 Greene, Thomas E.............................................. With Peninsular Iron Co.......... Maryland..................... 1855 Gordon, John................................. Stove Finisher........................ Canada........................ 1865 Greusel, John............... 235 Third st.................... Brick Maker.......................... Germany...................... 1883 Hosmer, Albert.............. Brownstown.................... Deputy County Clerk................New York.................... 1851 Haddock, Ray................................................... Clerk of Wayne County............................................ Hastings, W. A............. 109 Gratiot st..................R Real Estate............................................................ 1815 Heffron, John............... 218 Jefferson av............... Fruits and Oysters...................................................... Howell, J. W................8 uoi.............................Cad.................Canada.............1861 Heims, Peter................ Gratiot Toll Gate......... Gardener.....................,..... France........................ 1852 Hill, N........................ Grand River av.......... Station Agent -Hill's Station...... Canada........................ 1858 Holbrook, D. C..................................... Attorney at Law..................... New York.................... 1832 Innes, Thomas....................................... Stone Cutter.......................... England....................... 1874 Johnson, F.................. 253 Grand [liv. av..................................................... Canada........................ 1872 James, W. V. & Son...... 52 Grand iver av.................................................. New York..................... 1857 Jerome, F. HI............... 109 Washington av....... Lawyer................................ Detroit, Michigan..........1846 Kaiser, Augustus........... 442 Gratiot av.....,.... Physician............................. Germany.....................' 1872 Kuhn, J....................... Congress st................ Insurance and Real Estate.......................................... Kaple, J. H................................... Postmaster................................................................... Kilroy, R ev.W illiam...... 353 Jefferson av..........................................................................................1845 King, Wendell R........... 537 Fort st..................... Illinois Leather Company......... Illinois........................ 1871 Kirchner, Sebastian........ 488 &490 Gratiot st............ )ry Goods, Haots, Caps & Clothing G ermany..................... 1832 Kling, P., & Co.............. Fliamtramck.................... Brewers............................... Germany..................... 8"6 Kilroy, W.................... efferson av........................................................ Ireland....................... 1874 Keyser, W................ Coingress st,East.............. Carriage Manufacturer............ Michigan................... 1871 Kohner, W.................. 149 Elmwood av............... Engineer, Engine No. 7........... Germany...................... 1868 Lincoln, George V.......... 11 Fisher's Block............ Real Estate Agency and State7 Employment....................... England.................... 1878 Lewis. Alexander,........... 456 Jefferson av............... Mayor City of Detroit................................................... Loniasny, Win. Mackay.. 98 Michigan av...........Catholic Bookn, eht..................Ireland................... 1870 Lemphe, Frederick.8... 69 Grand River civ.........GBlacksmithl.............. Germany................. 1856 Lingemana, T.............Car. G-ratiot cav. & * Orleans it................................ Germany................. 1845 Lovett & Lamb............. 90 Griswold st........ Collection ant el Estate Ag'ts.................... 1847 Ludden, H. D................ City Hall............. City Surveyor........................ Michigan..................... 1836 Lillibridge, W. M........... Mofftt Building......... Attorney at Law.................... New York.......................... Lane, S. G........... 970 Michugan cv......., Plumbing and Gas Fitting... New York.................. 1883 Loranger, Joseph........... 829 Woodbridge st..... West......................Michigan......................1811 t I p

Page  73 PATRONS' DIRECTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 73 DETROIT CITY-CONTINUED. u NAME LOCATION. SECTION. BUSINESS. Lafferty, Clement.......... 572 Fort st..................... Real Estate Agent.................. Lyon, E....................... Detroit................. Propr. Michigan Exchange Hotel Minock, Edward........... 4 Telegraph Block............ Law and Collection Office......... Merchants' & Manufac-, turers' Bank.............. 82 Grisw old st........................................................... Meyer, Martin.............. Tribune Building............. Insurance and Collection Agent.. M ichigan State Retreat... M ichigan av........1...................................................... Macadam, Alexander........................................Groceries, Provisions, Oysters! and Fish........................... M ann, Jacob................. 30 M aple st.......................................... I.................... Mills, M. I................ 193 & 195 Jefferson av........................ Tobacconist........................... Moore & Moore........... 16 & 17 Moffat SBuilding..................... Attorneys at Law.................. Moore, William A........ Moffat Building.............. Lawyer............................... Mylins, August.............. cor. Mack & Mt. Elliot avs...................................... Mack, John M.............. Gratiot Toll Gate.............. Justice of the Peace............... McHugh, John............... 1173 Jefferson av............. Groceries and Provisions......... McLaughlin, Joseph...... 98 Seventh st.................. Carpenter............................ Moran, James................ 994Grand River av.............................. Nicholson, P................. 31 Ledger st.......................Builder and Jobber.................... Nelson, Stephen............ 108 Fulton st.........................b................. Near, John L............................................ American Consul at Windsor..... Newberry Bros........... Miami av.......................... Manfrs. and Dealers in FurniIture and Upholstery Goods... Noah, Andrew.................................................. Tanner and Currier................. Nolon, L. E................................Lawyer.............................. Owen, William E.......... 7 C. H. Market............... Butcher................................ Plumer, S. A............. Moffat Building......... Real Estate and MIoney Broker, NATIVITY. ^S >, 0) I GREENFIELD TOWNSHIP, NAME. LOCATION. SECTION. BusINEss. NATIVITY. CC'a I Michigan.................... 1818 Vermont....................... Wayne County, Michigan 1843................................. 1869 Michigan..................... 1866..................................1861 Scotland..................... 1871................................. 1848 Hartford Co., Connecticut 1845 S................. I................ 1 5 Michigan.................... 1858 Vermont...................... 1822............................... 1857 Michigan..................... 1852 Ireland...................... 1852 England..................... 1830 England..................... 1871 New York................... 1834 Michigan.................... 1875 Germany..................... 1850................................. 1852 New York.................. 1856 New Hampshire.................................................. 1876........... o............................. Ayris, John................ Yew................. Behmer, Casper............ Greenfield........... Brownell, S................. Detroit............... Boussneur, John........... Greenfield........... Bossardet, James........... |Greenfield........... Bristow, George R......... Greenfield............ Bahan, Patrick.............. Greenfield.......... Bench, William............. Greenfield........... Boinay, Henry.............. Greenfield........... Coon, Myron................. Greenfield........... Chaffee, Job................. Greenfield............ Carey, George L. Yew............ Yew.................. Cox, William............... Greenfield......... Capler, Paul............... Greenfield.......... Cabet, Henry.............. Greenfield........... Dicks, Samuel P........... Greenfield........... Daniels, Israel.............. Detroit............... P. C. Dormoy, Louis.............. Greenfield........... I Doran, Valentine........... Greenfield........... P. C. Doran, Thomas.............. Greenfield........... P. C. Davison, William H........White Wood....... Esper, Jacob................. IGreenfield........... Elsner, Fred................ Detroit............. Edwards, Robert........... Greenfield........... Earnshaw, John............ Detroit...............P. C. Ford, George............... Greenfield........... Fox, John Frederick..... Detroit............... P. C. Ford, William............... White Wood........ Ford, Samuel............... Yew.................. Gates, Terry................. Greenfield........... Gautherat, Frank......... Greenfield........... Goldenbogen, William..... Detroit............... Grix, John................ White Wood........ Hall, Frederick. Yew............ Yew................. 31 Blacksmith.......................... Wayne County, Mich...... 1854 6 Farmer................................ Prussia....................... 1850 32 Milk Business........................ Montgomery Co., N. Y... 1845 29 Farmer and Carpenter.............France........................ 1854 29 Farmer.................................France....................... 1849 19 Farmer......................... England..................... 1855 18 Farmer..............................Clare County, Ireland...... 1832 20 Farmer................................IEngland..................... 1852 19 Carpenter and Joiner.............. Ireland....................... 1868 29 Farmer................................ New York.................... 1831 33 Farmer................................ Vermont..................... 1830 31 Farmer................................ England..................... 1850 2.8 Hotel Proprietor....................!Ohio........................... 1857 19 Farmer.............................France........................ 1840 19 Farmer............................. France....................... 1843 4 Farmer............................... Wayne County, Mich......11816 260 Farmer................................ Portage County, Ohio..... 1841 30 Farmer................................ Wayne County, Mich.... 1854 47 Farmer................................ Wayne County, Mich.....!1841 47 Farmer................................ Ireland....................... 11829 5 Farmer................................ Wayne County, Mich..... 1846 5 Farmer................................ Prussia.......................' 1843 13 Farmer................................ Germany..................... 865 20 Farmer................................ Wales...........................1828 45 Farmer................................ England....................'.1849 6 Farmer and Stock Dealer......... Wayne County, Mich..... 1845 28 Farmer and Gardener.............. England.................... 1849 16 Farmer and Butcher............... Wayne County, Mich.....1841 31 Farmer................................ Wayne County, Mich..... 1836 33 Farmer................................Oakland County, Mich... 1854 19 General Store........................ Wayne County, Mich..... 1843 36 Hotel Proprietor..................... Germany..................... 1854 11 Farmer................................ Germany..................... 1855 31 Farmer................................ Wayne County, Mich..... 1854 People's Savings Bank.. Perkins, W. R.............. Preston, David & Co...... Cor. Congress and Griswold sts..... S.................. Gen Sec. Y. M. C. A., Farrer st. Bankers............................. Patchen, Jared........ 52 & 53 SeitBk....... Attorney at Law..................... New York................... 1830 Horger, John............... Detroit 5 Farmer......... Palmer, T. W.............................................. Lumber and Real Estate Dealer................................ Huber, Andrew.G3............ Greenfield. 3 Farmer................ Prentis, Geo. H....... 12 Mechanics'Hall............ Attorney at Law...................................................... 1843 Humbert, Fred.............. Greenfield 19 Farmer......... Posselius, A................ 412, 414 & 416 Hensien, Chris............. Detroit.............. P. C 45 Farmer................ Gratiot av.............. Furniture Dealer.................... Belgium...................... 1857 Harland, William.......... Detroit.............. 14 Farmer and Butche: Pulford, Lorenzo L............................................ Real Estate Broker................. England..................... 1870 Korte, Peter.................3 Yew.................. 32 Farmer................ Payment, Richard C........................... Druggist............................... Detroit, Michigan.......... 1842 Knapp, H. A............... Greenfield........... 33 Farmer and Stock Pulte. A. & Son........... Farmer st.................... Wholesale Groceries and Liquors Michigan..................... 1836 Knapp, William........... Greenfield............ 33 Pump Manufacture Prucha, Frank.............. 1009 Michigan av........ Butcher................................................................. 1871 Kennedy, William. Greenfeld......... Greenfie28 Farming and Milk I Plass, Henry, Jr........................................ Lawyer................................ Detroit, M ichigan......... 1851 Lerchen, John G........... Greenfield........... 33 Farmer................ Quigley, William........... Fort st................................................. New York.................... 1854 Langley, Thomas.. Greenfield 33 Farmer......... Randall, James A......... Griswold st..................... Attorney at Law........................................................... Lattmyer, George.Greenfeld......... Greenfie.. 13 Farmer................ Rielly, C., D. D........................................................................................................Lumken, John............. Greenfield........... 33 Blacksmith........... Rogers, E. H................ Merrill Block.................. Attorney at Law............ New York...........1843 Lathrop, Luther.G............ Greenfield........... 14 Farmer................ Rush, Peter................. 539 Gratiot av....t................................................... England....................... 1870 Lanco, Henry............... Greenfield.......... 33 Wagon M aker........ Ruebelmann, Charles..... 352 Gratiot av............ Peninsular Wire Works.......... Michigan............... 1875 Lamarre, Paul.............. Greenfield........... 19 Farmer and Carpen Robinson, Eugene....................................... Surveyor.............................. New York.................... 1839 Langdon, John............. Detroit..............5 Farmer................. Russel, Henry.............. 48 Seitz Block............ Attorney at Law.................... Detroit, Michigan............ McFarlane, James........ Greenfield........... 32 Farmer................. Reeve, L..................... 48 Michigan av......... Proprietor "Prospect Stable,"' Messmore, A. SD............ Detroit............... Butcher.......... Livery, Sale and Boarding........................................ ' McGee, Thomas........... Greenfield........... 8 Farmer......... Russell, Alfred........91 Griswold st............ Attorney at Law......................................... 1852 Neal,..... Detroit..Sailor................... Romeyn, Theodore................................. Attorney at Law................. New Jersey.................. 1835 Otis, Amos...........Greenfield 33 Farmer......... Richter, Charles........... 252 Croghan st................. Tanner and Currier................. Germany...................... 1871 Otis, Byron.................... Yew.................. 32 Farmer................. Roediger, C.................. Woodward av......... ilkman...........ilkman.................. Germany...................... 1851 Pennely, Thomas........... Greenfield........... 33 Famer................. Robinson, C. W................ Nurseryman and Seed Grower... Canada.......................1863 Petrequin, Elisha. Greenfield........... 3 Farmer........... Robinson, R. D.............................................................................. New York........... 1851 Peirson, John......... Greenfield........... 8 Farmer................. Speed, J. J.................. Moffat Building............ Attorney at Law.................... Tompkins County, N. Y... 1848 Pillard, George F..... Greenfield........... 33 Farmer and Super Stellwagen, G. II............................ Treasurer of Wayne County...............................field Township.... Skinner, E. C. & Co........ Abstract Building............ Abstracts of Titles, established in................................ 1872 Petrequin, Abel............ Greenfield........... 19 General Store. Sacred Heart............... Jefferson av............................................................................................. Pillard, Frederick......... Greenfield 33 Farmer......... Superior of St. Mary's Cor. Antoine & Cro- Palmer, William............ Greenfleld. Farmer and Hotel K Church.................. ghan sts......................................................................................... Ruthiruff, William......... Greenfeld 33 Pump Manuacture: Southwiek, George E....... 12 Rotunda Bldg........ Real Estate Dealer..................................................... Reed, Lewis................. Yew........... 32 Farmer......... Second National Bank... 89 Griswold st.......................................................................................Roberts, E. S............... Detroit.............. Farmer......... Swales, C. E........... GriswoFd st................................................................................................... Radfoerd, Robert............ Greenfeld 4 Gardener........ St. Mary's Hospital........ Clinton st............................................................................. 1844. Strong, John........... Greenfield........... 4 Farmer................. Schrage, Jacob..............5 Gratiot a...........Manfr. of Harness, Saddles etc.. Germany..................... 1856 Schlaff, Nick................ Greenfield........... 5 Farmer......... Sowden, George.............5 39 Gratiot av.................. Flouring Mills....................... England...................... 1850 Scovell Brothers............ Detroit............. 2 Seed Growers. Sibley, F. B. & CoE......... 340 Atwater st.......... Lime and Stone Dealers.............................................. Seebabolt, Fred............. Detroit.......... C 53 Milk Business....... Schelle, Anthony........... 174 Labrosse st.............Carpenter.................................................................... Schultz, F................... Greenfield........... Carpenter.............. Schober, Emi.......... 7 Fort st., West.................Printer and Binder................. Germany...................... 1852 Snyder, Emmet....... Greenfield 21 Farmer.............. Swan, Thomas................................................ General Dealer in Fruits, Wines Simons, Howard A......... Greenfield...........I Farmer................. and Cigars......................... Scotland.....................1862 Sweet, Philander. Greenfield Farmer......... Sullivan, John J............ City Market........ oni............Confectioner...............Michigan............... 1858 Schueneman, August...... enfeld. I 29 Blacksmith........ Schow, Fred T.............. Cor. Elmwood & I Suterlet, Joseph............ Greenfield 17 Farmer......... Gratiot avs....... me and deer........................armerand Gardener........Denmark........... 1867 Smith, Thomas.............. Detroit............... P C. 45 Gardener........ Stadler, MichaelT........... 08 Ninth st.................. Engineer, Engine No. 7........... New York..................... 1865 Smith, James............... Detroit............ armer.............. Smith, William............. 157 & 159 Wood- Turner, James F............ Greenfield.. 28 Farmer and Milk I.......... ~nn...S..... Sbridge st............. Butcher and Stock Breeder...... England...................... 1853 Theisen, Antoney.......... Greenfield........... 6 Farmer................. Scovell, Daniel J...................................... Farmer and Gardener............... Vermont..................... 1823 Tireman, Allan............. Greenfield........... C 52 Farmer................. Stoll, D....................... Grand River a ilkman.............................. England...................... 1866 Tyler, A. G................. e i........... 16 Farmer........... Tylior & Galloway........ No. 3 Music Hall.............. Attorneys at Law........................................................... Trombley, A.......... Detroit.............! 5 Farmer........... Trempler, Fred............. 347 Gratiot av...........................................................ar......... 1853 Tyler, H. A..................16 Farmer......... Teare, Robert.............................. Bookseller............................ Isle of Man.................. 872 Tuson, Roger............... Detroit. Missionary. Tefft, W. H...................................................... Detroit Stove Works.........New York.................... 1855 Villerot, Alfred...........Greenfield........... 30 Farmer........... Trowbridge, L. S........... Moffat Building............... Attorney at Law................... Michigan........................... White, Patrick.............. Detroit............. 32 Farmer.............. Toms, Robert P............Moffat Building............... Attorney at Law.............. New York............. Walton, Robert............ Whitewood 36 Blacksmith. Tietsort, Perry A........... 95 Leverett st.................. Clerk Michigan Central Railroad Michigan............ 832 Vahey, John J.............. 11 Lafayette ax........... Real Estate and Insurance........................ 75 Voigt, E. W.................. Grand River a........... Milwaukee Brewery...................................1865 ' DEARBORN TO NS. V an Dyke, Rev. E......... W ashington ax..................................................r............................................ Van Baalen, A. E.......... 38 Michigan av............... Pawn Broker..............................................1. Vieloener, Fred........ it. Elliott a.............. Gardener.......................Q....... ermany....................... leT.. Dearborn.......P. C. 615 Farmer......... Vil o n r r d......Tt lit v... romleye, Carles.............Dearborn........ ar e........ VTalin, N.................... 723 Jefferson av................ Stone Cutter......................... Canada....................... 1853 i rsenmacher, M.... Dearborn............ 12................. Van Dasin, A........................................ Wholesale Druggist & Physician..........................Brainard, C. N........Dearborn 8Farmer......... WatrmnIV J. riwod t. 1 'ea sat I '.......IolBriushd, Joseph.......... Dearborn9Famr.... W aterman, W. JR............ Griswold st...................... Re l Estatel........................................................... 18 Brush, Josephr............... Dearborn............ 9F ar y........... Wayne Co. Savings Bank Congress st., WM.................................................................................1811 aorker, J................ WiDte wo... 19 Farmer and Dealeri Ward & Palmer.......42 Seitz Block........... Attorneys at Law tural Implements. Wirts, J. B........... 6 Michigan............... Hardware................. Kentucky..................... 18 Joshua.........Inkster.............. 31 Farmer......... Welch, C.............. 245 Jefferson av............................................................................ 1856 Bedlston, J......... Dearborn.......P. C. 177 Farmer......... Watson,. B. & C..................... Subscription Book Dealers and Coon Joseph.........orn............ 9 Farmer............... n D A......B ook B inders..................... D rug gist 1 Cooc,.................1872 C r en............ D earborn 9.F arm er.......... Williams, John C.......6 Williams Block............. Real Estate....................... Detroit,......................... Clay, Amos............... Dearborn............. 29 Gardener............ W illsen, R. C........... G............................. Real Estate................................................... 1864 Clay, James................. Dearborn............. 29 Farmer.......... Waltz F.oe.................................................................Germany...............1847 Cl Samuel...........Dearborn............ 29 Farmer........... Warner, William G.........Grand River ax.............. Gardener...........................................i............ 18)8 Coglwell, Samuel. Inkster.............. 31 Farmer........... W dbridge, Wilia.mL.....n. C 9th 1oward,............ R Estate...........................uMichigan............... 1817 Clinton, Richard........... Dearborn............ P. C. Farmer.......... W elke, &. Kent.............. 245 Jeffe s nat Bul i g............ A t r e s a a..................j........................i.........:.............. 1837 Bieadlestn J.an............. Dearborn............ P. C.61 Farm er................. Walkerf& Kent. 18...... M ndi Aiey a Law n18) c, Frarn................. Dearborn............ 61 Farmer................ Waterfall, John C........257 6Wiimsec lond t..)....... BidradReal Estate.............. De troiEtlan......................... Daly, Willia..........Perboinn..............20 Farmeer............................ Bavaria....................... 1839................ Wayne County, Mich.... 1839................ France........................ 1833................ France........................ 1852 r.............. England..................... 1842................ Prussia...................... 1847 )ealer......... New York.................... 1863 r............... Oakland County, Mich... 1863 3usiness...... Wayne County, Mich...... 1854................ New York................. 1843................ New York.................. 1832................ Germany..................... 1852................ Germany..................... 1852................ Vermont..................... 1845................ Prussia.......................1857 er............. Quebec, Canada............ 1830................ England..................... 1839................ Glasgow, Scotland........ 1857................ Wayne County. Mich..... 1849................Tyrone County, Ireland-. 1880................ England.................... 1838................ New York.................. 1829................ New York............ 1849................ New York............ 1875................ France..................... 1868................ England...................... 1850 visor Green-................ France........................ 1848................ Wayne County, Mich...... 1853................ France....................... 1848 eeper......... Michigan............... 1829 ri............ New York.................... 1865................ Wayne County, Mich...... 1842................ kland County, Mich... 1863............. England...................... 1837................ England..................... 1826................ Wayne County, Mich...... 1856................ Wayne County, Mich...... 1845................ Germany.......v.......... 1854................ Germany..................... 1865................ Wayne County, Mich...... 1846................ Wayne County, Mich...... 1839................ Washington County, N. Y. 1863................ Germany................... 1871................ Switzerland...,........ 1843................ England................... 1849................ England..................... 1831 3usiness...... Canada................... 1852................ Michigany..................... 1867................ England...................... 1833................ Detroit, Michigan.......... 1847................ Canada..................... 1836................ New Hampshire........ 1888................ England................... 1870................ Wayne County, Mich...... 1852................ Ireland..................... 1851................ England.................. 1871 IIP. lip................. Detroit, Michigan......... 1851................ Germany s.................. 1865................ Wayne County, Michigan 1821............... Germany..................... 1856 in Agricul-................. Wa York........ut M h...... 1833.........New York................. 1837..... laNew York.................. 1856................ New York.................. 1832................ Wayne County, Michigan 1837................ Wayne County, Michigan 1 838................ Wayne County, Michigan 1833 N................ Ne York.................. 1827................ New York.................... 1832 ~..... Ireland................... 1859 r............... Prussia..................... 1856.......... Ieland..................... 1837 B

Page  74 Zs= 74 PATRONS' DIRECTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. DEARBORN TOWNSHIP-CONTINUED. go NAME. LOCATION. SECTION. BUSINESS. NATIVITY. Dort, Titus................. Dearborn............ P. C. 69 Farmer................................ Vermont..................... 1824 Duffield, Samuel P........ Dearborn............ P. C. 629 Physician and Manufacturing Chemist............................. Pennsylvania............... 1840 Foster, Henry.............. Wallaceville........ 7 Farmer........................... Albany, New York............... Ford, William............... Yew.................. 7 Farmer............................... Ireland..................... 1832 Ford, James................. Yew................. 7 Farmer................................ Michigan................... 1842 Ford, George............. Yew.................. 7 Farmer................................. Michigan..................... 1835 Ford, Henry................. Yew................... 7 Farmer....................I............ reland....................... 1832 Forsyth, James............. Dearborn............ Farmer................................ England..................... 1832 Fox, Jacob.................... Dearborn............ 17 Farmer................................ Germany..................... 1847 Gulley, A. B................. Dearborn............ 1 20 Farmer................................ New York.................... 1835 Gauld, James............... Dearborn............ 13 Farmer................................ Scotland..................... 1831 Gauld, John................ Dearborn............ 13 Farmer............................ Scotland..................... 1832 Gardner, Richard......... Dearborn............ 12 Farmer............................... England..................... 1828 Howe, E. D.................. Dearborn......................... Agent M. C.K. R. & Am. Ex. Cos. New York.................... 1864 Hidden, Hubbard......... Dearborn........................ Farmer and Town Clerk........... Vermont.................... 1846 Harris, Allin T............. Dearborn............ 8 Farmer................................ New Jersey................. 1844 Hebestreit, John D........ Dearborn............ 16 Farmer................................ Saxony..................... 1852 H ebestreit, G................ Dearborn............ * 16 Farmer................................ Saxony....................... 1852 Howard, Edgar.............. Dearborn............ 12 Farmer............................. Massachusetts.............. 1836 Hamilton, William......... Dearborn............ 5 Farmer................................ Germany................... 1863 Hill, C. H.................... Dearborn........................ Painter.............................. Tennessee.................... 1839 Hebestreit, William........ Dearborn............ 16 Farmer................................ Germany..................... 1852 Hebestreit, C. W........... Dearborn............ 15 Farmer.............................. Saxony, Prussia............ 1852 Jameson, William........... Detroit............. 9 Joiner and Wagon Maker......... England..................... 1860 Keveny, Michael........... Dearborn............ 28 Farmer............................... Ireland...................... 1836 Morhous, William......... Dearborn............ 9 Farmer.............................. Newark, N. J............... 1835 Maxwell, William H...... Dearborn............ 9 Farmer.............................. Canada....................... 1838 Maxwell, G. S....5........ Dearborn........................ Farmer and Blacksmith........... Wayne County, Mich..... 1832 Mundinger, Jacob......... Dearborn............ 17 Farmer................................ Bavaria....................... 1828 McGarvey, Richard........ Wallaceville......... 8 Farmer................................ Ireland........................ 1855 Mundinger, Abram........ Dearborn............ 19 Farmer and Carpenter............ Michigan...................... 1833 Nowlin, William............ Dearborn............. 33 Farmer................................ New York.................... 1834 Olbrich, Albert............ Wallaceville......... 7 Farmer................................ Germany..................... 1871 Penny, E. G................. Dearborn............ 82 Farmer................................ New York.................... 1844 Powers, Michael............ Dearborn............ 34 Farmer................................ Ireland...................... 1841 Purdy, George.............. Dearborn............ 32 Farmer.............................. New York................... 1835 Ruff, Francis............... Inkster.............. 30 Farmer................................ Detroit, Mich............... 1795 Reycraft, William.......... Dearborn............ 111 Farmer................................ Ireland...........o....1....... 833 Robinson, A................. Dearborn............ I Farmer............................... Scotland...................... 1831 Sloss, David................ Dearborn...................... Dealer in General Merchandise Ireland........................ 1830 Sommers, J. C............... Wallaceville......... 6 Farmer and Painter............... Germany.................... 1866 Snow, Edwin S.............. Dearborn........................ Physician and Surgeon............ Ohio........................... 1846 Stornbro, Jacob............ Inkster.............. 30 Farmer............................... New York.................... 841 Seaman, A.................... Dearborn............ 33 Farmer................................ Pennsylvania............... 1874 Stevenson, John............ Dearborn............ 12 Farmer................................ Ireland........................ 1831 Schaeker, Rev. M. H...... Dearborn........................ Catholic Priest....................... Holland...................... 1874 Stevenson, James H....... Inkster........................ Proprietor Inkster House......... Ireland........................ 1850 Ten Eyck, William......... Dearborn......... P C 317 Farmer............................. Detroit, Mich............... 1816 Tuttle, Abner............... Wallaceville......... 5 Farmer............................ Wayne County, Mich..... 1836 Trowbridge 0............. Dearborn............ 20 Farmer................................ New York.................... 1849 Troup, George.............. Dearborn.............. 14Farmer............................. Dearborn, Mich............ 1854 Thiel, Crist.................. Dearborn............. 16 Farmer................................ Germany................1.... 869 Wallace, J. B:................ Wallaceville......... 5 Farmer and Lumberman........... New York.................. 1832 Wallace, J. A............... Wallaceville......... 5 Farmer............................... Wayne County, Mich..... 1851 Wickem, Thomas........... Dearborn............P. C. Farmer................................ Ireland........................ 1865 Wohloke, Wilhelm......... Dearborn............ 834 Farmer................................ Germany..................... 1873 Wallace, John............... Dearborn............ 18]Farmer................................ Canada........................ 1860 Ziegler, John............... Dearborn............ P. C. 117 Farmer................................ Germany..................... 1854 REDFORD TOWNSHIP. NAME. LOCATION. REDFORD TOWNSHIP-CONTINUED. Jackson, Matthew......... Jackson, J. J................ Kuhn, F...................... Knapp, Seth H............. Lyon, William............... Lee, J. M. & G. W......... Maiden, William........... McIntyre, A. P............. Minock, John............... Mettetal, Peter.............. Miller, G..................... Miller, J. P................. Norris, George............ Nacker, Frank.............. Nelson, J. W............... Pierce, A. B................. Prindle, J. M.............. Perry, George............... Perry, J. D.................... Pierce, 0. 0................. Prindle, Edgar.............. Race, Mary A............... Rocheleau, Peter........... Rowley, George............ Smith, Dr. C. C............. Smith, Eugene............... Smith, F. J.................. Smith, 0. J.......... Schifferly, Joseph...... Sperry, Ira................... Seward, B. W............... Stuckey, George............ Smith, William A.......... Smith, John B................. Simms, Henry................ Sackett, Frank..............I Sackett, Edwin.............. Simms,'Benjamin............ Spencer, E. M.............. Schroeder, H................. Smith, Mrs. P...............( Smead, D..................... Trevis, Thomas............ Teagan, William............ Tucker, Charles............ Vetal, Jr., Peter........... Woodruff, A. S............... Wait, Luther P..............I Wight, KR..................... Weigle, Mary............... Wallace, James.............. Westlake, George........... Westlake, Thomas......... Ziegeler, F................... Oak................ Oak................. Oak.................. Redford.............. Beech.............. Redford............. Farmington........ Redford.............. Beech............... Greenfield........... Redford.............. Redford.............. Beech............... Beech......... Beech.............. Redford Center... Beech'.............. Redford.............! Redford.............. Redford.............. Beech................. Redford.............. Redford.............. Yew.................. Redford Centre... Beech................ Redford.............. Detroit.............. Greenfield........... Plank Road.......... Redford.............. Redford............. Redford.............. Beech................. Greenfield........... Beech................. Oak.................. Yew.................. Oak............... Greenfield........... Greenfield........... Redford.............. Beech............. Yew.................. Greenfield........... Greenfield........... Redford.............. Beech................ Redford............. Greenfield........... Plank Road......... Redford.............. Redford.............. Redford.............. SECTION. BUSINESS. NATIVITY. 3 - 34 Farmer............................... England................... 1832 341Farmer................................ Wayne County, Michigan 1839 28 Farmer............................... Prussia.................. 1860 2 Farmer................................ New York.................... 1868 18 Farmer.............................. Yorkshire, Encriland........ 1829 8 Farmer................................ New Jersey................ 1852 6 Farmer................................ England..................... 1826 9'Farmer and Hotel Keeper........ Madison Co., New York.. 1845 19 Farmer................................ Wayne County, Michigan 1841 24 Farmer............................... France...................... 1833 13 Farmer.............................. Wayne County, Michigan i1847 13 Farmer................................ Wayne County, Michigan 1845 17 Farmer, oldest settler in Township now living.................. Geneva, New York......... 1829 29 Farmer.............................. Germany................. 1854 S 29 Farmer................................ New York..................1847 21 Supervisor and Teacher........... New York.....................18-)9 20 Farmer N Y..................... New York............... 1836 2 Farmer................................ Ireland........................ 1875 22 Farmer.............................. Vermont.................. 1837 17 Farmer................................St. S.Lawrence Co., N. Y... 1833 301Farmer................................h Wayne County, Michigan 1850 51Farmer...............................Scotland.............. 1854 4lFarmer............................... Canada...................... 1863 35 Farmer............................. England...................... 1852 20 Physician............................. New Hampshire............ 1855 8 Farmer................................ Wayne County, Michigan,1842 16 Farmer................................New York............ 1. 845......... Route Agent......................... Michigan......................1845 24 Farmer................................ Switzerland................. 1852 6 Farmer..................... New Haven County, Conn. 1845 9|Physician, Treatment of Cancers and Carcinomatous Ulcers a Specialty........................... New York.................... 1865 8 Farmer................................ Michigan..................... 1844 7 Lawyer...............................Ontario Co., New York... 1858 29 Farmer.............................. Rhode Island............... 1866...... Farmer................................ Wayne County, Michigan 1852 19 Farmer................................ Wayne County, Michigan 1843 28 Farmer...............................Wayne County, Michigan1840 35 Farmer................................ England.................... 1852 34 Farmer................................ New York.................... 1845 25 Farmer.......................... Germany................... 18-56 26 Farmer................................ New York.................... 1826 11 Farmer................................ New York................. 1833 29 Farmer................................ England.............. 1862 36 Farmer................................ Cork County, Ireland..... 1846 24 Farmer and Drover........... England..................... 1849 26 Farmer....................... France....................... 1850 9 Saw Mill and Lumber business... New York.............1859 19 Farmer........,..................... Michigan..................... 1841 16 Farmer...................Ohio................ 1834 23 Farmer................................ Pennsylvania............... 1855 6 Moulder.............................. Scotland..................... 1845 11 Farmer................................ England..................... 1848 111Farmer............................... Michigan..................... 1855 9'General Storekeeper, Duboisville Germany..................... 1854 GROSSE POINT TOWNSHIP. Allen, Horace............... Greenfield........... Allen, Harvey W.......... Redford.............. Ashcroft, Charles........... Beech............... Bilewski, C.................. Redford.............. Burgess, S. K............... Redford............ Bryant, William.'.......... Oak.................. Bigelow, Hiram.......... Beech................ Brown, John............... Yew.................. Becker, E.................... Oak....-.......... Churlton, Thomas........ Redford.............. Cranson, M. L.............. Plank Road......... Crandeli, George........... Redford.............. Cowling, Joseph............ Redford.............. Cross, George H............ Redford.............. Churches, Edward......... Redford.............. Chavey, P. J................. Redford.............. Carr, L. D.................... Redford.............. David, E..................... Greenfield........... Dubois, E. M................ Redford.............. Dubois, Isaac F........ Redford.............. Dolph, Anson........... Redford.............. Dicks, Henry.............. Oak................... Dains, Sabria.............. Oak..........;. Davis, G. L.................. Oak.................. Dunning, J.................. Beech................ Fisher, Aaron H............ Beech................ Fisher, George H........... Beech................. Franklin, John D.......... Yew................ Form, C..................... Greenfield........... Griffin, W. P................. Oak................... Gordon, George C.......... Redford Center.... Gittins, George.............. Plank Road....... ' Gleason, James............. Oak................... Gagnier, Dorick........... Yew.................. Grebe, W...................... Wallacefield........ Guillory, F.................. Redford.............. Gaffney, Thomas............ Redford.............. Houk, W. E...................Redford Center.... Hendryx, James W...... Beech................ Hobbins, Thomas........... Beech............... Houk, Hugh.......... edfod.......Redford............. Harris, Alfred............ Oak.................. Humbert, Jacob............ Redford.............. Hosteller, Christ. Yew.......... Yew.................. Hendryx, Alexander...... Yew................. Haley, 0..................... Greenfield........... Johnson, T. H.............Oak.................. Joyce, C. FP...................Oak.................. 12 Farmer................................ New York.................. 10 Farmer............................. Michigan.................... 31 Farmer................................ Vermont..................... 4 Farmer................................ Germany..................... 10 Farmer................................ New York.................... 29 Farmer................................ England.................... 32 Farmer.............................. Wayne County, Mich..... 36 Farmer................................ Cork County, Ireland..... 27 Farmer............................. New York.................... 17 Farmer............................... Ireland........................ 7 Farmer............................... New York.................... 4 Tile Maker........................... New York.................... 5 Farmer [Oldest settler in County] Devonshire, England...... 9 Farmer................................ New Jersey.................. 1 Farmer................................ England..................... 15 Physician.............................. rance........................ 31 Farmer............................ Vermont..................... 24 Farmer............................... France..................... 4 Farmer.............................. Wayne County, Mich..... 4 Miller, Duboisville.................. New York..................... 5 Farmer and Drover............... New York.................... 29 Farmer.............................. Wayne County, Mich..... 30......................................... New York.................... S33 Farmer................................ G ermany.................... 33 Farmer................................ New York.................... 7 Farmer............................ Canada........................ 31 Farmer................................ Wayne County, Mich..... 35 Farmer...................... Wayne County, Mich. 12iFarmer................................ Switzerland................. 33 Farmer. (Farm for sale)......... Oneida County, N. Y...... 17 Farmer.......................... Canada........................ 6 Farmer................................ England..................... 28 Famer................................ Wayne County, Mich..... 25 Farmer................................. Canada........................ 32 Farmer................................ Prussia................................... Farmer.........&................. [France........................ 11 Farmer................................!Ireland....................... 20 General Store........................ Michigan.................... 7 Farmer................................ New York.................... 18 Farmer and Stock Dealer......... England.................... 16 Farmer................................ Wayne County, Mich..... 22 Farmer............................... Canada..................... 6 Carpenter............................ France........................ 36 Farmer...................... France............................... Farmer................................Scotland..................... 11 Farmer................................ Ireland...................... 22 Farmer............................... Wayne County, Michigan 29iFarmer...............................'New Jersey.................. 1832 1865 1850 1875 1832 1850 1847 1833 1842 1871 1832 1869 1826 1836 1848 1865 1845 1848 1848 1864 1866 1830 1830 1856 1885 1838 1844 1848 1850 1833 1844 1862 1837 1832 1860 1852 1856 1846 1835 1854 1843 1836 1833 1833 1838 1846 1842 1852 Alt, Joseph.................. Allard, Louis............... Allard, Moses............... Ackerman, Michael........ Ackley, William............ Bringard, Joseph........... Backus, William W........ Baur, N....................... Beufait, Louis L............ Chene, George............... Connor, R. P................ Chauvin, Charles B........ Connor, R. B............... Curty, William.............. Chauvin, Richard.......... Diegel, Anthony............ Durussel, Jules............. Despoor, C................... Demyers, Dennis........... Dery, E. I.................. Derasse, Pius............... Dingemann, P............... Ellair, Peter................. Girard, Christopher....... Greiner, Michael........... Groll, August............... Grant, John.................. Girard, Peter............... Gordon, Henry H......... Gouin, Francis............. Gravier, John B............ Hindt, John................ John, George............... Kelley, John................ Kerby, K. M............... Keils, Gerhard.............. Kracht, John............... Lang, Joseph............... Lamay, Richard........... McCormick, James........ Michie, Alexander........ Moran, Charles............ Conner's Creek..... P. C. Weaver............... P. C. 656 Weaver................P. C. 656 Conner's Creek..... 2 Leeville.............. P. C. 120 Conner's Creek..... 1 Detroit............. P. C. 240 Grosse Point....... P. C. 264 Grosse Point........ P. C. 156 Leeville.............. P. C. 26 Leeville............. P. C. 120 Detroit............... P. C. 641 Grosse Point.................... Grosse Point........ 126 Grosse Point........ P. C. 570 Conner's Creek..... P. C. 123 Conner's Creek..... 12 Detroit................ P. C. Detroit............... P. C. 120 Detroit...................... Leeville.......................... Grosse Point.................... Weaver.............. P. C. 165 Conner's Creek..... 12 Conner's Creek..... 12 Conner's Creek..... 13 Conner's Creek..... P. C. 617 Conner's Creek..... P. C. 618 Detroit...............:P. C. 26 Grosse Point........ P. C. 239 Detroit........................... I I i Farmer............................... Farmer............................... Farm er................................ Farmer................................ Farmer.......................... Farmer................................ Real Estate Dealer, 10 Lincoln av Farmer............................... Farm er............................... Farmer............................... Traveling Agent.................. Farmer.............................. Farmer............................... Farm er................................. Farm er................................ Farmer............................. Gardener............................. Farmer................................ Farmer............................... Carpenter and Joiner.............. Farmer................................ Sash and Door Manufactory...... Farmer................................ Farmer....................... Farmer and Merchant............ Farmer...i........................... Farmer................................ Farmer...............................I Farmer................................ Farmer................................ Real Estate Dealer, 782 Jefferson av............................ Farmer................................. Farmer................................ Farmer.................................. Farmer........................ Farmer................................. Farmer............................ Farm er............................... Farmer............................... Jeweler............................ Farmer............................. Farmer............................. Farmer.!............................. Farmer................................ Farmer/.................................. Farmer................................. Farmer and Carpenter & Joiner Carpenter and Joiner.......... Miller:............................... Farmer................................. France........................ Michigan..................... Michigan.................... Michigan..................... England..................... France....................... Michigan.................... France.................... Michigan..................... Michigan..................... Michigan.................... 4iichigan..................... Michigan..................... Prussia................... Michigan................... Germany................... Canada................... France...................... Belgium.................... Canada........................ Michigan.................... Holland....................... Michigan................... Germany..................... France...................... Germany..................... Michigan.................... Michigan...................... England.................... Michigan..................... France...................... Germany..................... Germany..................... Scotland...................... Michigan.................... Germany.................... Germany..................... Michigan..................... Michigan..................... Ireland........................ England..................... Michigan.................... New York.................. Germany..................... Michigan..................... Michigan.................... Michigan..................... Michigan..................... Michigan..................... Michigan.................... 1846 1827 1828 1844 1833 1852 1836 1834 1808 1811 1874 1832 1847 1846 1835 1832 1865 1850 1835 1865 1853 1854 11823 1843 1831 1854 1808 1841 1842 1812 1847 1866 1860 1850 1823 1872 1863 1835 1845 1869 1838 1842 1824 1857 1855 1827 -1836 1835 1835 Conner's Creek..... Conner's Creek..... Conner's Creek..... Grosse Point........ Conner's Creek..... Conner's Creek..... Conner's Creek..... Tnafv" f 13 S12 P. C. 231 P. C. 404 11 12 12 v e [1tx J........................... Conner's Creek..... P. C. 38c Detroit,.............. P. C. 122 Detroit............. P. C. 50C Martin, George............. Grosse Point........ 127 Piper, John................. Grosse Point........P. C. 126 Peltier, George............. Conner's Creek.....- 11 Peters, Tusant.............. Leeville.............P. C. 687 Peters, Charles............. Leeville......... P C. Peters, Louis................ Leeville............. P. C. 393 Riley, J........................ Conner's Creek.... 12 Reno, Benjamin............ Weaver............... P. C. I

Page  75 PATRONS' DIRECTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 75 GRIOSSE POINT TOWNSHIP-CONTINUED. MiONGUAGON TOWNSHIP-CONTINUED. NAME. LOCATION. Rhein, John...........Conner's Creek..... Ruebuenach, Anton........ Conner's Creek..... Reno, Robert................ Weaver...............I Robinson, George. Le.......... Leeile.............. Rivard, Ferdinand C...... Grosse Point........ Salter, John................. Conner's Creek..... Salter, Caspar............... Conner's Creek.., Shuetz, Anton.............. Conner's Creek..... Schiner, Paul.............. Conner's Creek.... Schoenher, John............ Conner's Creek..... Susieck, Herman........... Detroit...............I Shoemaker, William....... Detroit...............I Sunderland, George....... Leeville.............. Trombla, James............ Conner's Creek..... Taylor, William B......... Leeville.............. Tromnbley, Louis............ Grosse Point........ Trombly, David............ Leeville.............. Tremble, F. Barnabas..... Detroit................. Trombly, P.................. Detroit...............I Turner, Charles............ Detroit............... Ternes, Fran................ Conner's Creek..... Voorkes, John.............. Leeville.............. Vernier, Jerry.............. Grosse Point........! Vernier, Giibert............ Grosse Point........I Vanassche, P. F............ Grosse Point........ Van Dervene, John B..... Grosse Point........ Vernice, Gideon............ Grosse Point........ Wegant, Henry............ Conner's Creek.... Woodbridge, D. B.......... Detroit................i Weaver, P. B............... Grosse Point........ Wortman, M................. Grosse Point........i Young, Anthony............ Conner's Creek..... Young, Stephen............ Conner's Creek..... Young, Joseph, Jr......... Conner's Creek.....I Young, Nicholas, Jr....... Conner's Creek..... Young, J. N................. Conner's Creek..... SECTION. BUSINESS. NATIVITY. ifU 13 Farmer........ Germany..................... 1852 11 Farmer................................. Germany..................... 1851 P. C. 4Farmer..................................Michigan..................... 1829 P.C. Fr e.................Mcia........... 1857 P. C. 8 Farmer................................. England......................1857 P. C. 299 Farmer.................................iMichigan.................... 1810 6 Farmer................................Germany...................... 1836 P. C. 618 Farmer................................. Germany...................1.. 836 6 Farmer................................. Prussia...................... 1866 12 Farmer................................. Michigan.......... ".... 1839 11 Farmer................................. France........................ 1836 P. C. 322 Milkman.............................. Germany..................... 1853 P. C. 688 Farmer................................. Michigan..................... 1836 P. C. 128 Farmer......................... Michigan..................... 1845............ Farmer................................. Michigan..................... 1825 12 Gardener.............................. England...................... 1862 P. C. 585 Farmer................................ Michigan.................... 1839 P. C. 388 Farmer and Supervisor............ Michigan.................... 1847 P. C. Farmer................................ Michigan..................... 1848 P. C. 379 Farmer...............................Michigan..................... 1811 F............ armer, 102 Eighteenth st........ England...................... 1834 P. C. 621 Farmer............................... Prussia........................ 1845 11 Farmer................................. England..................... 18551 P. C. 156 Farmer.................................. Michigan..................... 1834 P. C. 156 Farmer................................. Michigan...................... 1857 P. C. 184 Farmer................................. Belgium...................... 1856... Farmer.............................. Holland....................... 1855 P. C. 240 Farmer.................. Michigan..................... 1824 6 Farmer............................... Germany..................... 1837 P. C. 577 Farmer................................T Michigan..................... 1827 P. C. 241 Hotel Proprietor..................... New York..................... 1864 P. C. 5211Farmer................................ Mibchigan..................... 1837 12 Farmer................................. Michigan..................... 1837 12 Farmer................................ Michigan..................... 1849 P. C. 261 Farmer................................. Michigan..................... 1843 P. C. 221 Farmer................................ France.................... 1835 12iFarmer.................................IMichigan..................... 1833 NAME, LOCATION. SECTION. BUSINESS. NATIVITYr. Smith, C. R.................. Trenton.........................Engineer.............................. New York......................... Slocum, Giles B............ Trenton.......................... Real Estate.......................... Saratoga Springs, N. Y... 1831 Teobock, M. S............... Grosse Isle................... Claim 551............................. New York.................... 1860 Vreeland, James H........ Wyandotte......... 1i Farmer.............................. Michigan..................... 1842 Vreeland, J. R............ Wyandotte......... 2 Farmer................................ Michigan............ 1824 Wright, J. H............... South Trenton................Express Agent...................... New York................... 1875 HURON TOWNSHIP. SUMPTER TOWNSHIP. Burnap, Job................. Belden............... Brotherton, Henry......... Martinville......... Corkins, Anson............. Martinville......... Compton, John.............. Martinville......... Curtis, Charles B.......... Belleville........... Curtis, Rhoda S............ Belleville.......... Eickerson, F. J............ West Sumpter...... Dickerson, David........... Ypsilanti............ Denmark, George I....... Martinville......... Ellis, Wellington........... West Sumpter..... Elwell, Joseph.............. Belleville............ Freeman, C. L........... West Sumpter..... Hayner, Loren.............. Hath, Lewis............ Hewitt, H.................... Hooker, Chester E......... Leonard, William........... Martin, T. P................. Merritt, William............ McClair, J. H............... Northrup, Horatio......... Bell.ville............ Martinville......... Martinville......... Belleville............ Martinville......... Martinville......... West Sumpter...... Martinville......... West Sumpter...... 23 Real Estate Dealer and Farmer.. 2 Farmer.................. 16 Farmer........................... 24 Farm er................................. 2 Farmer................................. 2 1.................................... 17 Farmer................................ 6 Farmer................................. 29Farmer................................. 20 Drain Commissioner Wayne Co.. 3 Farmer................................. 20IDry Goods, Groceries and Gen.eral Merchandise............. 4.......... w................................ 2 Farmer.............................. 3 Farmer............................ 9 Farmer............................. 9IFarmer............................. 15 Supervisor, Notary, Dealer in Dry Goods and Groceries......,18,Farmer......................................... Farmer and Blacksmith........... 20 Dry Goods and Groceries, Farmer, Saw Mill, etc.................. 6 Gardener and Blacksmith......... 5 Member of Legislature and Justice of Peace...................... 11 Postmaster, Dry Goods and Groceries.............................. 15 Carpenter and Joiner............... 4 Farmer......................... 9 Farmer................................ 9 Farmer................................. 5 Farmer................................. 6jFarm er................................ 15 Farmer.......................... Montgomery Co., N. Y.... 1857 Genesee County, N. Y.... 1866 Wayne County, Mich............ Middlesex County, N. J.. 1875 Scioto County, Ohio........ 1865 Scioto County, Ohio........ 1865 Calhoun County. Mich... 1866 Yates County, N. Y........ 1855 Livingston County, N. Y..1838 Essex County, N. Y........ 1867 Wayne County, Mich............ Ingham County, Mich.... 1860 Orleans County, N. Y.....11757 Wayne County, Mich............ Wayne County, Mich............ Michigan......................1874 Wayne County, N. Y...... 1861 Windham County, Vt...... 1845 Litchfield County, Conn.. 1856 Livingston County, N. Y..1870 Genesee County, N. Y..... 1854 Madison County, N. Y..... 1852 Broomfield County, Me... 1835 Vermont...................... 1855 Washtenaw County, Mich. 1865 Oswego County, N. Y...... 1848 Cayuga County, N. Y...... 1856 New York.................. 1863 Oswego County, N. Y......1845 Yates County, N. Y........11870 Down County, Ireland.....118352 Ash, Lyman................. Ash, John.................... Aspinwall, Alva C.......... Biddelcomb, Isaac......... Billings, S. D............... Bonker, William............ Belden, F. J................... Brining, Jacob.............. Baker, Charles H............ Curtiss, George A.......... Cook, Charles E. V....... Chamberlin, E. A.......... Cahours, Edward.......... Compo, Henry.............. Compo, Charles............ Chapin, W. WV.............. Craft, S. E................... Curtiss, Ira WV.............. Cook, MA. V.................. Cottrell, Joseph............ Clark, John W.............. Deamid, Samuel............ Dean, George............... Dennis, Charles....I....... Damn, Charles............. Dutcher, T. J............... Ellis, M. H-.................. Ernst, L...................... Evans, Joseph.............. Everetts, Russell........... Felt, J. D..................... Fuller, William A.......... Felt, F. S.................... SFair, George................ Gardner, C. W.............. Gillett, Harrison........... Greaves, W. V.............. Goodyear, Austin........... HIosmer, W. S............... Hauber, Martin........... Hurd, Chancy............... Haight, Charles E......... Hale, S....................... Hale, Erastus............... Kelley, Dennis.............. Kittle, David.............. Look, George B........... Lewis, Benjamin........... Lubzke, C.................... Lewis, Peter................. Lor, Frank................ Lor, Mary.................. Merrell, John............... Martin, Amos............... Marshall, A. WI........... Maes, Chester............... McClure, John.............. Nowland, M. R.............. Nowland, H. R............. Norton, A. J................. Outhwait, Robert........... Outhwait, Thomas........ Outh wait, Fannie........ Parks, Thomas Haines... Pattee, George H.......... Pattee, James B............ I Ruggles, Charles........... Richards, Ransom......... Ryan, E. E............. Riffenborg, Napoleon...... Stewart, James.............. Sands, Frank............. Supple, John............. Sims, Stephen............. Smith, G. W............... Scran, Andrew WI........ Smart, John............... Slinger, John............... Slinger, Jacob............... Strouse, James.............. Sutton, Lester H............ Stoflet, H. L........ Surtman, Robert.. Belden.............. Waltz................ Flat R-ock........... Belden.............. New Boston........ Belden............... Belden............... Belden.............. Waltz................. Belden............... Waltz................ Flat Rock........... Waltz................. Belden.............. Belden.............. Fiat Rlock........... Flat. Rock........... Belden.............. Waltz................ New Boston......... Wali z................ W altz................. Waltz................ New Boston....... Waltz................ Belden.............. New Boston......... Waltz................ New Boston......... Waltz................ Waltz................. Belden.............. Belden.............. New Boston........ Waltz................. Belden.............. Belden.............. Flat Rock............ New Boston...... Waltz................ Belden.............. Belden............. New Boston........ New Boston........ Waltz................. New Boston........ Waltz................. Belden.............. Waltz................. New Boston........ New Boston........ New Boston........ Waltz................. New Boston........ New Boston........ New Boston........ New Boston........ New Boston........ New Boston....... Belden............... New Boston........ New Boston........ New Boston........ Belden............. 'New Boston........ Belden.............. Belden............ Belden............. New Boston........ New Boston........ New Boston........ Waltz............... Waltz............... New Boston........ Belden............. New Boston........ 11W altz................. Waltz................ Waltz................. Waltz................. Waltz................. Flat Rock........... Waltz............. 29 32 23 29 8 29 29 29 22 29 33 26 33 29 29 29 32 6 32 32 6 32 82 31 29 29 17 32 8 32 0')29 29 29 18 32 29 29 26 7 32 29 29 15 8 32 22 38 29 32 6 6 6 32 17 8 16 28 8 7 27 8 17 17 29 17 27 29 24 8 6 8 32 32 S 29 29 32 32 32 32 32 27 32 29 8 27 32 32 29 32 21 8 25 Farmer and Goldsmith............ Wayne County................... Farmer............................... Wayne County.................... Farmer................................. Wayne County.................... Groceries and Boots and Shoes England...................... 1866 Farmer................................ Saratoga County, N. Y... 1855 Attorney and Justice of the Peace Washtenaw County,Mich. 1857 Farmer................................ Rutland County, Vt....... 1870 Constable and Carpenter and Joiner............................. Germany................... 1854 Mechanic............................... Wayne County, Mich..... Lumber Mfr. and Merchant..... New York.................... 1856 Carpenter anid Joiner.............. Washtenaw County, Mich. 1858 Farmer............................. Seneca County, N. Y...... 1846 Farmer............................... New York City............. 1858 Well Digger.......................... Wayne County, Mich........... Farmer............................... Wayne County, Mich........... Sailor and Farmer................. Madison County, N. Y.... 1854 Farmer............................... Monmouth County, N. J. 1863 Lumber Dealer.................... New York....................1856 Saddle and Harness Mfr.......... Wayne County, Mich........... Farmer.............................. St. Clair County, Mich... 1870 Meat Market........................ Wayne County, Mich........... Boot and Shoe Manufacturer..... Erie County, N. Y.........1857 Proprietor of Hotel................. Washtenaw County, Mich. 1857 Lawyer................................. New York....................1861 Farmer................................ Germany.....................1852 Blacksmith........................... Lenawee County. Mich... 1873 Gen'i Merchandise, Farmer and Mfr. of Lumber and Charcoal Washtenaw County, Mich. 1871 Farmer............................... Germany.....................1847 Farmer................................ Stafford County, N. H... 1837 Cooper and Stone Cutter........... Fairfield County, Conn.. 1855 Wagon Maker........................ Wayne County, Mich..... Stave Manufacturer................ Washtenaw County, Mich. 1872 Stave Manufacturer................. Washtenaw County, Mich. 1860 Farm er.............................. Germany........................... Physician and Surgeon............ Livingston County, Mich. 1875 Cooper............................... New York....................1866 Farmer.............................. Onondaga County, N. Y... 1872 Farmer................................ Cayuga County, N. Y...... 1866 Justice of the Peace...............Wayne County, Mch Mechanic........................9..... Lenawee County, Mich... 1873 Farmer................................ Ontario County, N. Y......1832 Saw Mill.............................. Monroe County, Mich..... 1870 Farmer.............................. Wayne County, Mich..... Propr. Meat Market............... Wayne County, Mich..... Carpenter and Joiner.............. Canada......................1869 Farmer.............................. Saratoga County, N. Y.....1842 Railroad Agent and Operator... Wayne County, Mich............ Farmer.............................. Canada.......................1841 Homoeopathic Physician and Surgeon............................ Germany.....................1869 Farmer and Collector.............. Montreal, Canada.........1843 Farmer............................... Detroit............................. Farm er.............................. Detroit............................. General Blacksmithing........... Ontario County, N. Y..... 1850 Manufacturer of Lumber......... Franklin County, -Mass... 1848 Grocery Store........................ Wayne County, Mich............ Farmer................................ Genesee Count, N. Y......1854 Farmer................................ St. Lawrence Co., N. Y... 1867 Propr. Grocery Store, Farmer and Lumber Merchafit............... Yates County, N. Y........1833 Deputy Sheriff....................... Seneca County, N. Y...... 1833 Town Treasurer and Farmer...... Broome County, N. Y...... 1834 Blacksmith.......................... Wayne County, Mich........... Farmer............................... England................ 1832 I.......................................... W ayne County, M ie...... Dealer in General Merchandise and Notary Public.............. England.............1865 Farmer.............................. Wayne County, Mich...... Farmer.............................. Wayne County,.Mich...... Blacksmith.......................... Reading, Pennsylvania.. 1875 Farmer.............................. Wayne County, Mich......... Saloon............................... Orleans County, N. Y......1836 Farmer.............................. St. Clair County, Mich... 1875 Propr. Flouring Mill and Justice of the Peace.................... Scotland...................1852 Propr. Meat Market... Monroe County, N. Y.....1870 Lawyer.............................. Onondaga County, N. Y.. 1876 Town Clerk and Dealer in General Merchandise............... King's County, Ireland... 1840 Farmer................................Wayne County, Mich.... Wagon Maker...................... Canada.................... 864......................................... Scotland.................... 1830 Farmer................................ York, Pennsylvania........ 1834 Farmer................................ Wayne County, Mich............ Propr. Cider Mill.................... Snyder County, Pa......... 1868 Engineer.............................. Kingston, Canada......... 1855 Farmer................................ Seneca County, N. Y......1853 Boot and Shoe Manufacturer and Dealer...................... Germany.....................1851 Wood Contractor.................... Montreal, Canada.....'.....1848 Propr. Cooper Shop & Cider Mill Germany.....................1859 Farmer.............................. Seneca County, N. Y......1853 Engineer, Fireman and Musician Ontario County, N. Y.....1854 Farmer................................ Wayne County, Mich............ Carpenter and Joiner............. Belleville, Canada......... 1864 Clerk.................................... New Haven Co., Conn........... Farmer................................ Germany....................1851 Proprietor Thayer House......... Wayne County, Mich............ Farmer............................... St. Clair City, Mich........1849 Niles, Solomon R.......... Rawsonville......... Pearl, Perry D.............. Belleville........... Randall, Stephen........... Martinville......... Sherman, Jos. L............. Smith, F..................... Spink, Jane C.............. Seaman, Albert.............. Thurston, Obadiah........ Tuttle, Rachel E............ Wightman, John........... Martinville......... Belleville............ Martinville......... Belleville............ Martinville......... Rawsonville........ Martinville......... NONGUAGON TOWNSHIP. Anderson, Joseph......... Trenton......................Merchant and Bakery........... Scotland..................... 1870 Alvord, N. C................ Trenton. 24Farmer.............24 Farmer................... Massachusetts.............. 1835 Alexander, A. M........... Grosse Isle.................. Farmer; Claim 549................. Michigan........................... Ballard, John............... Grosse Isle...............Farmer; Claim 551................. New York.................... 8130 Button, William............ Wyandotte......... 12 Farmer................................ Michigan................... 1842 Brow, Paul.................. Grosse Isle................... Farmer; Claim 551]................ Canada....................... 1858 Campbell, L............... Trenton......................'. Tinsmith.............................. New York..................... 1866 Duddleson, W illiam........ Trenton.................................................................... Ohio........................... 1838 Dudgeon, Mrs. A........... Grosse Isle............................................................. Dodge, Walter............... Trenton.......................... Carpenter and Joiner............... New York...................1865 Finncan, C. J........... Trenton..................:Boot and Shoemaker............... England.....................1861 Garth, Philip................ Trenton.............. 19 Railroad Business.................. Germany..................... 1874 Crop, Louis.................. Trenton..................... Farmer; Claim 554................. Prussia...................... 1853 Godbout, T................... Trenton.............. Hardware, Tinware and Stoves... Canada....................... 1866 Gray, Horace.............. Slocum Junction....... Farmer; Claim 552................. New York................... 1829 Ives, Mrs. W................. Grosse Isle......... Claim 560.................Michigan................. 18S64 Knapp, James M........... Trenton......................... Carpenter and Joiner........... Canada........................ 1862 Keith, Alexander T........ Trenton.......................... Dealer in Coal, Wood and Sewer Pipe; Claim 549................ Michigan..................... 1825 Keith, Mrs. Julia A...... Trenton.......................... Claimn 560............................. Michigan..................... 1860 Lorie, Paul.................. Trenton.......................... Lime Kiln............................. Canada............................. Lister, James I............. Trenton.......................... Farmer; Claim 556................. Canada....................... 1846 Nellis, John C............... Trenton............... Manager Burrell, Ives & Co.'s FManufactory....................... New York.......................... Paine, G. S................. Wyandotte......... 5 Farmer and Stock Dealer......... England.................... 1826 Reaume, Daniel...................Trenton...... Lumber Dealer....................... Michigan................ Scheirle, C. J.............. renton............. 24 Farmer...................................Germany.............. 1860 Stawell, J. A................ Trenton............................Carpenter and Joiner.............. New York.................. 1861 Stanton, R. L............... Trenton.......................jFarmer; Claim 555................. New York.................... 1859 Sulliville, D........ Beden......... elden............... Scholtz, G. C..................New Boston........ Stoflet, C. E.................. Flat Rock........... Sutton, J. HI................ Waltz................. Shelden, Charles W........ Waltz................. Tripp, W. F................ Belden............... Tibles, Charles E. alt........... Waltz................. Trixfel, Michael........., New Boston........ Thayer, N. P............... New Boston........ Thompson, H. H.......... Flat Rock...........

Page  76 76 PATRONS' DIRECTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. HU NAME. LOCATION. V ogler, F..................... W altz.......... Yandecar, M. G............ New Boston. Van Liew, John I......... New Boston. Waltz, Joseph......... Waltz.......... Weaver, Martin............ Waltz.......... Weirick, John.............. New Boston. Wisert, Mathias............ Belden........ Winne, Stephen T......... Belden........ Wait, Louisa................. Waltz.......... Westervelt, John...........Waltz. Warden, Rachel............ Waltz.......... Wagar, Henry.............. Flat Rock.... Watson, R. C................ New Boston. Waltz, Adam................. Waltz.......... Ziegler, Robert......... Waltz.......... Artley, Frank M...:.......!Denton........ Boldman, B.......... Sheldon....... Bartlett, George S........ 'Plymouth...... Bradford, Benjamin...... Plyimouth...... Boice, J. C.............. ypsilanti...... Butterfield, John...........:Plymouth..... Couch, Jeremiah........... Denton......... Dingeldey, Philipp. ICanton......... Goodell, Pike............. psilanti Huston, John, 2d.........Ypsilanti....... 'RON TOWNSHIP-CONTINUED. SECTION. BUSINESS. NATIVITY. NA....... 32 Proprietor Hotel..................... Germany..................... 1865{ Larkin, Thot 29 Railroad Employe.................... Wayne County, Mich........... Lange, Will........ 17 Farmer..........................NMonroe County, N. Y..... 1871 Lumley, J. I....... 82 Supervisor, Notary, Justice of1 Markey, Jot the Peace and Dealer in Gen-! I Markey, Pet eral Merchandise.............. lWayne County, Mich... Markey, Pa.......I 32 Farmer...................[Onondaga County, N. Y.1873 Marsh, J. W 8 Proprietor. Hotel, and Brick Mason, Johr Manufacturer............ Germany.................. 1852 1 Meade, Edw....... _21Brick Manufacturer................. Germany.....................1860.... 29Cooper................................ Schoharie County, N. Y. 1867 Oneaill, P. 1.......I 82,Teacher................................ Monroe County, Mich......... Peterson, H(.......I 32|Lumber Mfr. and Dealer......... Dutchess County, N. Y...1872 Rieden, Fre( 3Farmer................................ Essex County, N. J........ 18335' Rieden, Mic: 36.. Farmer................................ Rensselaer County, N.Y.. 1865 Ranspach, C....... 17......................................... Ilike County, C. W......... 1864 Riopelle, 1. i.......| 82|Fariaer................................IW ayne County, M ich................... 8!38Carpenter and Joiner.............. Wayne County, Mich............ Riopelle, H. Boehm, Chri Sink, Leonoh CANTON TOWNSHIP. Sink, Angus Stecher, Ma __--.-------.- Simmons, W:....... 29|Farmer................................ Wayne County, Mich........... Speier, Fred....... 27lPropr. Cheese Factory & Farmer Steuben County, N. Y... 1835 Swai, J. N.. 9Farmer................... Vermont.................... 1838 Travers, Wit S.Farmer................... Wayne County, N. Y...... 1828 Teagan, Jona....... 18 Farmer............................... Seneca County, N. Y...... 1854 Therry, Jan. 10Farmer and D)rover................. Canada........................ 1857 Verdon, Lav...... 19 Farmer................................ Cornwall, England......... 1871 Wloodworth, 26 Farmer............................... Germany..................... 1850 11 Wilson, Mrs........ 19 Farmer................................ W ashtenaw County, lich,...... 18ISupervisor, Justice of the Peace, j I Dry Goods Mer., Farmer, etc..iMonroe County, N. Y..... 1835 i SPRINGWELLS TOWNSHIP-CONTINUED. AME. LOCATION mas............ Springwells....... dam............ Springwells. E. W........... Springwells........ in............... Springwells. er............. Springwells........ trick,.......... Springwells.......................... D elray............................... Springwells........ ard............ Detroit.............. H............... Ft. Wayne........... enry........... Detroit.............. i............... Springwells........ hael. Springwells........ harles......... Springwells........ A............... D elray............................... D elray.............. istian B....... Detroit.............. ard............ Spriagwells........ tus R......... Detroit Junction... rtin............ Springwells. illiam......... Detroit................................. Detroit......................... D etroit.............. liam H. Detroit.............. athan......... Detroit.............. oes.............. D etroit.............. Nrence......... Detroit.............. Alfred........ Springwells.-.... T A. S......... Detroit........ SECTION. BusINESS. NATIVITY.;z4 P. C. 719 Farmer...................... Michigan,.................... 1845 P. C. 583 Machinist............................. New York........... 1855............ Teacher.............................. Canada....................... 1869 P. C. 60 Brick Maker........................ Ireland...................... 11849 P. C. 60 Brick Maker........................ Michigan.............11850 P. C. 60 Farmer................................ Ireland................... 1852 P. C. 45 Physician and Surgeon........... Canada..................... 1875...Painter, McKinstry ax............ Virginia............... 11872 P. C. 77 Carpenter and Joiner, Indiana.. av..............x..................... Ireland......... V............ 1854............ Lake Captain.........0...... Ireland....................... 1855 P. C. 45 Carpenter and Joiner............. Scotland.................... 1851 P. C. 60 Farmer................................ Germany.................... 1845 P. C. 40 Farmer and Justice of the Peace Germany................... 1847 P. C. 268 Grocer................................. Michigan.................... 1850 P. C. 4:5 Custom House Collector and Port-, i master.............................. Michigan............... 1822 P. C. 340 Farmer................................ Michigan.................... 1807.Farmer.................... Germany................. 1835...... Justice of the Peace, Michigan av..................... Germany................ 1851............ Postmaster and Township Clerk Michigan.................... 11843............ Brick Maker................ Germany.................... 1863............ Engineer at Gas Works............ England....................,11871 P. C. 260 Carpenter and Joiner............... Germany..................... 1854 P. C. 77 Lumber and Real Estate Dealer.. New York................. 1830............ Druggist, 1398 Michigan ax...... Port Huron, Michigan... 1851 P. C. 60 Farmer................................ Ireland....................... 1834 P. C. 77 Mechanical Engineer.............. France........................ 1848............ Carpenter and Joiner......... Ireland....................... 1842 18 Farmer................................ New York.................... 1832............ Dlr in Groceries and Provisions Virginia.................... 11872 Horner, H. F...............Ypsilanti............. 18 Master of No. 68 GrangeW..........aWyne County, Mich............. Hanford, H. 0..............!Plymouth............ 8Farmer and Stock Breeder........ Monroe County, N. Y..... 1850 BROWNSTOWN TO_ Huston, Reuben............ Ypsilanti............. 19 Farmer................................ Monroe County, N. Y..... 1835! _~ Huffman, William A...... Plymouth............ 12 Farmer............................... Canada....................... 1875 Alford, H............Gihbaltar...............General Aesch, Huston, Oscar........ Canton............... 15 Farmer............................... Wayne County, Mich........ Butler, C. WRc............Propr. Aeat Ma Hayden, Lester............. MYpsilanti.......3.......3 Farmer............................... ichigan............ 5 BMerchant... Jones, Henry............... lanton............... 33 Mason and Builder................. Encland.................... 1851 F Blakely, J. A.........Giraltar............ 17 Farmer. Knaggs, James.............. 19 Farmer.......................M........ Monroe County, Mich....11862 Bird, Joseph H........ Flat Rock 19 Farmer and Stoi Lohr, Christian............. Wayne............... 25 Farmer................................ Wayne County, Mich.........Chase, W. J................. Flat Rock 33 Farmer. Alurray, Hiram............ Plymouth 6 Farmer................................Wayne County, Mich.. Cooke, John.Flat Rock. Farmer. Pooler, Nelson.............. 'Plymoth.71Farmer.................... Somerset County, Me.....57IFt Rock 31 Farmer. Pattengell, 0. R. Plymouth............ 01Secretary F.?I. Ins Co, of Mon- Chase, George...............Harness Maker roeand Wayne Cos.and Fa.mer Vermont..................... 1845 Cohoon, William A........ Trenton.............16 Farmer and We] Peters, Eliza..............IPlymouth 7 Farmer...................Schoharie County, N. Y... 1840 Clark, Jason................. Flat Rock..............Farmer. Penney, William........... Canton............... 21 Farmer................................ Orange County, N. Y......1854 Clago, B..................... Trenti 15 Farmer and Sto Roach, William............ Denton............... 30 Farmer................................ Cornwall, England......... 1874 powling, Jesse..............16 Farmer. Strause, illiam...... Canton............. 34 Postmaster, and Dlr. in Grocg-1 Dresser, Peter............... Flat ROck..............Farmer. ries, Hardware and Crockery. Pennsylvania.........1867 Erving, H. P............... lat Rock 29 armor. Savage, James M........... Canton............... 27 Carpenter and Farmer............. Kingston, Canada.......... 1855 Goodhue, George H....Flat Rock 16 Horse Trainer... Smith, CharlotteC............ Can 27 Farming............................... New York.................... 1850 Guilfoil, Ezra.........Fronton............... Sittington, Henry......... Canton............... 27 Carpenter and Farmer............. England..................... 1840 Green, F. RH............ FlatHarness aker.. Suggit, WR...........anton.............. 33 Farming and Well Boring......... Wayne County, Mich........... Garretson, G............... Flat Rock..............Shoe Maker. Yintou, William. Plymouth........... 9 Farmer................................. Chenango County, N. Y... 1839 Garretson, F.........Flat Rock.............. Boot and Shoe Vick, F...............Canton............... 26 Farmer................................ Germany..................... 1853 ship Clerk. * Wiles, James................iCanton............... 23 Farmer and Blooded Sheep RaiserlYorkshire County, Eng...1848 Hendricks, Daniel....Flat Rock..............Carpenter and S Hall, Benjamin... Flat Rock $ Farmer. Hurst, Amanda............. Flat Rock 8 Farmer. Hall, E...................... Gibraltar. Attorney at Law SPERINGWELLS TOWNSHIP. Hanchett, S. C.............. Trenton 4 Farmer. ____________________________________ ____________ ______________________________ Hooper, W.H............... Flat Rock................ Proprietor ". Ho Hearsey, Edwin............ Trenton....... 21 Farmer. Burns, Peter................. Springwells. P. C. GOFarmer and Brick MaSker......... New Yoik.................... 1837. Knight, Jamesf.............. rn14 Farmer. Button, Harry.............. Springwells........ P. C. 6lIFarmer, Cooper and Justice of Knapp, B. F................ Wyandotte 4 Farmer. I the Peace........................... New York.................... 1837' Long, William S)........... Wyandotte. Farmer. Burdeno, John.............. Delray.......... P. C. 45IEngineer............................. Michigan..................... 1843 Lindsay, John L............ Wyandotte 4 Farmer. Beaubian, Richard........ Detroit.............. P. C. 563 Dealer in Ice, Stone, Wood and Linn & Craig................ Gibraltar. F..Ship Builders, r J w Sand..............d................... M ichigan.................... 1822 and Proprs G Burger, Jacobp............... Springwells....... 7 Farmer................................ Germany................ 1864 Lobdell, Hiram W.................Physician and h Campau, Frederick F...... Detroit....................... Justice of the Peace, Canmpau st.,, Lindsay, James............. Wyandotte.Farmer.. West................................ Michigan.................... 1842 Morey, V. S................. Flat Rock..............Dir. in General Clark, J. P..................Detroit............... P. C. 583 Prop. Dry D)ock and Ship Builder New York.................... 1818 Moores, S...................... Dir, in Grocrie Clippert, Conrad........... Detroit Junction... 11P. C. 719 Brick Maker, and Supervisor of ' Munger, WilliamF........... FlatFarmer. Springwells Township........... Germany....................11850 |] Metier, N. H............... FlatMiller. Carstens, John H........... Detroit............... P. C. 2681Gard'ener and Saloon Keeper, op- A ' Metier,- G. W. & Son. Flat Rock..............Millers. "posite Ft. Wayne............... Germany..............|18o4 I Mathewson, J. B.-... Trenton.............. 34 Farmer. Campau, Samuel........... Detroit....... P. C. 5653Carpenter and Joiner.............. Michigan.................... 1835 Mattevia, John...............i 22 Farmer. Campau, Louis A...........jSpringwells.................... Wood Yard, MeKinstry av........ Michigan.................... 1854 McCourt, John..............27 Farmer. Carter, Richard............ Springwells..Engineer at Clark's Dry Dock... Michigan.................. 1848 Silliman, Mrs. Thetis..... Fla..... Daniel, Jacob......... Springwells........ P. C. 30 Brick Maker............... Germany DO..............I0 McDonald, George......... Wyandotte. 3 Farmer. Durmen, Michael.......... Springwells. P. C. 60 Carpenter and Joiner and Res- McKee, A. T................Tresshoop lake taurant Keeper.................... Germany.................. 1850 McIntosh, Samuel......... Flat Rock..............iPropr. Meat Si De Lisle, P. B............... Delray............... P. C. 67 DIr in Groceries and Provisions. Michigan..................... 1846 Munger, T. MS............Prop. Meat Slam Ewers, William............ Springwells........ P. C. 719 Farmer............................... Michigan...................... 1830 Monroe, Edwin........Rockwood............... Physician and I Fields, Charles.............. Springwells........ 17 Farmer................................ Canada'....................... 1831 Northroup, LewisF........... FlatFarmer. Forster, Frank.............. Springwells........ P. C. 270 Practical Architect, Contractor ' O'Leary, T........... Flat Reck 20Farmer. and Builder........................ Bavaria.................... 1854 Olmstead, N. F............ Flat Rock 4 Fanner and Sto Ferrand, E.................. Detroit.............. P. C. 77 Nurseryman and Florist, Vine-. ' Peters, J. H................ Flat Rock S Farmer. wood ave........................... France.......................11863 FPinch, XWickton............. Flat Rock I33Farmer. Ford, William............... 'Springwells....... 18 Farmer and Stock Raiser........ Ireland....................... 1847 Pinch, Mary................. Flat Goeldner, Karl............. Springwells..................... Brick Maker, Wagon Maker and Parsons, B. F............... Gibraltar 17 Farmer. Blacksmith........................ Germany................... 1852 Quick, Thomas............. Trenton......... 27iFarmer. Gray, Alexander............ Springwells..................... Furnaceman in Copper Works... Scotland..................... 18541 Ransom, R...........F... Flat ostmaster. Grosfield, A................. DetroitD...............i........... D r. in Groceries and Hardware, Reed, J. PR................... Rock 983 Michigan av................ Germany................. 1863 1 Raume, F..................... Flat ock. I 10 Farmer. Godez, Rev. G............... Springwells..................... Catholic Priest St. Alsphonsus' I Simpson, G. D................ Dealer in Agrie Church............................................................. 184.3 Simons, C. R................. Rockwood............. ation Agent... Haggerty, Henry........... Springwells......... P. C. 60 Farmer............................... New York.................... 1581 Sanborne, Abraham. Flat Rock... 1 Farmer. Handleser, Emil.......Spigingwolls......P. C. 216 Farmer...........................Germany................. 1864I Sanders, John............ Trenton..............! 2o]Farmer...... Hyns, Francis............ Springwells..... 719 Cattle Broker.............................................I J847 |I Swift, George H.......Flat Rock... I.....i.....i.Dea~ler in Hard' Higgins, F. XV............ Detroit............ P. C. GO Landscape Gardener and Supt. '| Stotlet, Williasn........... Flat Rock...... 0~jFarme...... IWoodmere Cemetery......'. Jefferson County, N. Y...18517 Stone, George W.......Flat hlock............................... Flumes, XWilliam........Detroit...................... Engineer Gas Works, 133 2Otk st. England........*...,.1869 I Stofiet, William F........Flat Rock...... 4 Farmer and Sto'.Hubbard, B.............. Detroit...................... (Iushard & King) Lumber and | [uiner, Robert, M. B....Flat Rock................... Physician and S Real Estate Dealers........... New York................il83o Xincent, J. X............. Flat Rock....................Miller....... Kotcher, A. J.............Springwells.....P. C. 30 Forenman at Copper Works.....Pennsylxania............J1853 Van Riper, Henry 1I....Fiat Rock...... 32 Farmer....... Kloenhammer, Charles... Spriagnolls.....P. C. 171| Propr. Restaurant............... Germany................. 1853 Varney, G. A............ Rockwood...............Proprietor i"Ye SKnoch, Cohrsin FE.....Spigel....... P. C 60Farmer and Gardener........... Germany................. 1850 Van Cleoot Jacob.......Flat R>ock...........| '.4 Farmer...... KnohChisia........Springwells......I.P. C. 41'Farmer and Gardener-...........'Germany.... '... 1...1850 5 iceland, Alice.......... Flat Rock......I 29 Farming...... /NSHIP. andise......... Michigan................... 1836 rket................ Michigan.................... 1843................. Canada.......................................... New York..................1. 136 ck Raiser........Seneoca County, N. Y...... 1857...................... Mich igcan............. 1845 Michiga................... 1836......................M ichigan..................... 1834...................... ' M ichigan..................... 1848 1I Borer............ New York............. 1836......................Wayne County, Mich...... ck Raiser..........iSt. LawrenceCo., N. Y... 1846......................England.......................i1845.................... Michigan.....................1871..................... New York....................11851...............I..... New York...........|1872.................... ichigan...............1854...................... Canada.......................11867................ New Jersey...........1835 )ealer and Town-..................... New Jersey........ 1838 upervisor......... Michigan..................... i........................... New York.................... 1833..................... New York.................... 1844..................... New York................... 11833..................... New York1.................... 837 loper House;'... New York.................... 1861..................... M aine........... 0..... 1867..................... England489.......................11............... New York.........#.......... 1820..................... M ichigan..................... 1838 M.................... Michigani...................11842 Lumber Dealers eneral Store..... Scotland.....................11841 'ruggist...................................................Michigan....................11839 Merchandise. New York............... iand Provisions New York.................... 1869................ New York..................182"......................New York.................!854..................... I Pennsylvania..............;1871.......................New York.................................... Canada1...5..................... 1 53..................... Ireland....................... 1854..................... New York........... 1........J8321.............. Scotland..................... 1853 r.................... New York.................... 1865 rket................. New York1....................l871 rket................ Michigan1.....................J839 ýurgeon........... Montreal, Canada.................................... New York1....................J818....................... M aine.....................1...l850 3k Raiser......... Washtenaw County Mich.11854............... New York..................... 1834...................... O hio.........1................. {1840................ | Michigan..................... 1860 M................ ichigan.................... 1836......................Canada....................1845...................New York...................................New York............ 1857..................... Canada..................... 1830 Itu'l Implements Michigan............... I.................r...... M ichigan..................... 1873..................... Canada........................1860.'..........England.................t.so85 ware............SMichigan........... '1855............... New York..........11825............Now York.... 1.....|875 ck Raiser......New York..........18.53.urreon..........Canada................N.......... Nw York...... 1...J857..;....-...Near Jersey......... |1834 racy House'>... Michigan.................1l842............New York.......... 1846............Michigan........... 1850 I

Page  77 ffl2wý aneninrmnnma PATRONS' DIRECTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 77 JBDROWI SN'STOWN TOWNSHIP-CONTINUED. NAME. LOCATION. SECTION. BUSINESS. NaTIViTY. a Van Horn, Joseph......... Trenton.............. 26Farmer............................. New York.................... 1883 Van Horn, Barton......... Trenton............. 23 Farmer................................ Michigan.....................11839 Wagar, John................. Flat ok........... 9Farmer................Fme............... New York................ W olven, J. A. B.............Flat Rock........................|Bending W orks.................... New York............. W ood, John.................. Rockwood........... 8|Farmer................................ IScotland.................... 1836 W ood, Irving T.............. Rockwood....................... Farmer.............................. 'M ichigan..................... 1839 Walker, James H...........'Flat Rock........... 17:Farmer................... icgn............. Michigan..................... 1846 Wells, Miss Mattie.........Wyandotte................... Teacher..................... Mihigan............ ichi.. 1855 Wisdom, Clayton.... |Flat Rock.......... 30IFnrner................... Michigan.............1 i845 Wells, John.................. Flat Rock....... 4 Farmer and Dealer in AgriculI i tural Implements................. Germany..................... 1865 ROIULUS TOWNSHIP. - - --...-.- -~m l s...........^ q----- Bibbins, Samuel............ Romulus............. 20 Clergyman............................!New York.............1....... 1883 Bird, Richard...............J Romulus............ 20 Farmer............England........... Enla.... 1834 0 Bateham, Joseph. Romulus 360 Farmer.........,England........1840 Bateham, Joseph........... Romulus............. 30 Far. er................................ England..................... 1840 Bower, Livingston......... Taylor Centre......' 14 Farmer.................................New Yorkl............. 1836 Carr, John................... New Boston........ 31 Farmer............................. Scotland......................1i834 Cawood, H. B............... New Boston........ 31 Farmer..............................18Enland........... 56 Cook, Fels................lInkster.............. 1 Farmer............................... Germany.....................1854 ot, llham..................... ew or k y............1854 Cory, William.............................. Wayne.......... 4 Farmer...................New York...................1845 Clark, John D............... [Romulus........... 23 Farmer and Thresher.............. -Michigan................... 1846 Cheney, D.................... Wayne............... 22 Farmer...............................|New York.................... 1846 Dean, Lewis J............. Romulus........... 19 Farmer............................... Delaware.................... 1856 Downer, Eliza B........... Wayne............. 6......................................... England.....................!1836 Delmas, Richard M........ Wayne............... 5 Farmer............................... Michigan..................... l853 Downing, Thomas.......... Romulus........... 7 Farmer................................ England..................... 1841 Dunn, James...............IWayne...............' 16 Farmer.................... Ireland....................... 1846 Dunn, Michael.............. Wayne............... 10 Iron Worker and Farmer......... Wayne County, Mich...... 1843 Dunn, James.......... Wayne...... Wane........ 16 Farmer.................... Michigan............1 Michigan 840 Horning, J. M............. New Boston......... 28 Farmer............................... New York.............'. 1864 Kingsley, S. R.............. Romulus........... 19 Postmaster and General Store..INew York............. 1852 Leonard, Amos.............. New Boston........ 31 Farmer, Carpenter and Thresher Pennsylvania............... 11866 Louden, S................... y.............W a ne.............Farmer................... Ireland....................... 1838 Morris, H. G.......... Romulus......... 29 Farmer............................... New York........................ 1849 Merrill, H. W............... Romulus........... 30 Farmer................................ Massachusetts.............. 1845 McBride, W. H............Romulus............ 18 Farmer.................... New York.......... 1885 McVicear, J. B...............Wayne............... 6 Farmer..................................New York............... 1874 Moore, Andrew.............Wayne............... 10 Farmer.................. Ireland..............t. 832 McBride, Alexander......Wayne............... 16 Farmer...................M........ iohigan........5......... 2 Newington, James.........iWayne.................................... 27 Farmer.......... Enland..................... 1837 Oakley, F. W................ Romulus............ 21 Farmer................................ New` York...................1. 1856 Parry, G.....................'IRomulus............ 20 Carpenter and Joiner............... Wales..........................1855 Pullen, A. J.................. Romulus............ 20 Farmer................................ New York............... 1832 Rowell, William............'Romulus............. 27 Farmer................................ Canada....................... 1849 Songo, Benjamin............|Wayne................. 9 Farmer................................ Delaware.....................1864 Vealy, Philip............... Wayne............... 8 Farmer................................ New York.................... 1832 ' Whitacre, William......... Romulus............ '22 Supervisor and Farmer............ Maine........................ 1840, Young, A. P.................iRomulus............s 19 Farmer.......................... New York................... 1833, LIVONIA TOWNSHIP. Arnold, Loyal............... Nankin.............. 32 School Superintendent............. Vermont..................... 1862 Arnold, Marvin............ Nankin............... 32 Teacher............................... New York.................... 1862 Allyn, Geo. W. & Chas. B. Nankin............... 32 Prof. Natural Science and Doctor of Medicine........................ Michigan..................... 1845 Armstrong, Thos. Albert.. Nankin............... 30 Farmer................................. New York.................... 1844 Amrhein, John............ Nankin.............. 30 Farmer................................. Germany..................... 83 Blue, Alexander............ Elm................ 23 Farmer................................. Oneida County,.*...... 832 Bennett, Thomas.......... Nankin.............. 33 Farmer.............................. England.................... 1834 Brown, Misses............. Nankin... 32 Merchants............................ England........1858 Bovee, N.................. Nankin.............. 31 Propr. Vinegar and Cider Mill... New York............ 1859 Bennett, E................ Livonia Centre..... 21 Farmer.............................. Michigan.................. 839 Baur, John C............... Nankin.............. 20 Farmer............................. Germany.............. 1836 S Barker, I. F................ Farmington......... 1 Farmer and Cheese Maker........ New York.................... 1841 V Bentley, Nelson......... Elm................ 24Farmer.............................. New York................. 843 K Blanchard, W............ Farmington......... 11 Farmer.............................. New York................ 835 H Briggs, Lewis............... Plymouth............ 17 Farmer................................ New York................... 1830 Briggs, Dexter.............. Plymouth............ 7 Farmer................................. Vermont............. 826 Briggs, Luther..,........... Plymouth........... 7 Farmer................................. New York........... 829 Cable, Daniel C.......Elm................ 27 Farmer and Mechanic........ New York........ 1863 Carey, J. S....,..... Elm................ 35 Farmer.............................. New York............... 848 Chapman, A. L............. Elm.................. 35 Farmer................................. New York................... 1840 Crosby, C. W............... Nankin............... 29 Farmer................................. Michigan..........'.. 85 Cort, John................. Livonia Centre..... 22 Farmer................................. Germany....................1. 866 1 Chillson, George............ Livonia Centre..... 1 5 Farmer................................ Michigan.................... 18836! Chillson, Avery J.,....... Livonia Centre.... 11 Farmer and Butcher............... Michigan..................... 1839 Cudworth, Mrs. H. L..... Livonia Centre.... 9 Farmer............................... Massachusetts'............... 1828 Dean, Mrs. C................. Nankin........................... Farmer............................... Michigan............ 1833 ] Durfee, Allen............... Plymouth............ 20 Farmer................................ New York................... 1829 ] Detsloff, A.................... Livonia Centre.... 21 Farmer................................. Germany.................... 1868 ( Dingman, William......... Farmington......... 3 Farmer.......New ork......................... New York.. 865 ] Ewing, William B......... Elm.................. 23 Town Clerk and Farmer........... Ireland........................ 1855 Everett, E. S................ Plymouth........... 19 Farmer............................... New1 Jersey.830 1] Eliot, C................. Beech............... 24 Farmer................................ New York.................... 1849 1 Eliot, 0. H................. Beech................ 24Farmer................................. New York.................... 1849 ] Everitt, Orson.............. Northville.......... 6 Farmer....................... Michigan..................... 1840 ] Flaherty, Mrs. RI.......... Elm................ 27 Farmer................................ Ireland........................ 18741 Fisk, Hiram............... Nankin.............. 33 Farmer................................. Vermont................ 1836 Fuller, A. C............... Livonia Centre..... 16 Farmer................................. Michigan.................... 1843 1 Fuller, Edwin............... Plymouth......... 18 Farmer................................. New York..................... 1830 Graeffe, Richard............ Nankin............... 33 Farmer............................... Prussia............... 1865 Gates, C............. Livonia Centre...... 28 Farmer................................. Germany.......... 860 Gates, H. & G............... Livonia Centre..... 28 Farmers.............................. Germany..................... 1860 1] Green, G.-W................. Elm................. 13 Farmer................................ Michigan..................1... 834 1 Gow, John................. Elm................. 24 Farmer................................. Germany...................... 1867 1 Glass, E. P................. Beech.............. 25 Farmer................................. New York................... 1832 Hoppe, P. HI................ Livonia..... 4 Farmer............................. Germany...................... 1865 1 Hoar, II. M.I................. Nankin............ 28 Farmer.................................. Pennsylvania............... 1853 I Hawkins, George.......... Livonia Centre..... 13 Farmer................................. Michigan.................... 1839 7 Johns, A. G................. Nankin.............. 1 Postmaster and Merchant......... Michigan..................^. 1819 Joy, James K.............. Nankin............... 30 Farmer................................. Michigan..................... 1845 1 Johnson, D.........N.... a Nnkin........ 28Fr............a........ Germany............... German 1852 1 Joslin, Lyman............... Livonia Centre..... 16 Farming, Vinegar & Cider Works New York.................... 1846 1 Johnston, Simon M........ Plank Road......... 1 Farmer............................... New York.................... 1844 I Kingsley, N. B.............. Livonia Centre..... 16 Farmer................................. New York.................... 1831 i1 Kinney, Charles A.......... Elm..,,.............. 24 Farmer........................... N York" I I-F 6 0 24F r e................... ew York....................,-184 i LIVONI NAME. LOCATION. Kinney. Cortland..Em........... Elm.................. Kator, George............... Northville........... Kator, Mrs. George........ Northville.......... Leach, E. C.................. Livonia Centre.... Lapham, J. B.............. Farmington......... Liverence, G................ Plank Road......... Lambert, William.......... Plank Road........ Lapham, E. A............ Livonia Centre..... Millard, H. B............... Livonia Centre.... Meldrum, L............. Perrinsville......... McKinney, D............... Elm.................. McKinney, James......... Elm.................. Minkly, E. G................ Livonia Centre..... Meining, C.................. Livonia.............. Mielow, 0.................... ILivonia Centre..... Moore, Horace A........... Livonia Centre..... Millard, A. F............... Livonia Centre..... Maiden, David.............. Plymouth............ Nacker, Fritz.............. Plank Road......... Northrop, B. C............. Farmington......... Northrop, Mrs. Jane E... Farmington.......... Parmalee, William R...... Elm................... Paddock, A.................. Nankin................ Pierce, Benjamin........... Farmington......... Pierson, Wayne............ Farmington......... Power, A. D................. Farmington......... Rattenbury, William T... Elm................... Rattenbury, Henry........ Elm................. Rattenbury, Henry, Sr... Elm................... Ryder, George.............. Nankin................ Rohde, C. E..................I Elm.................. Shaw, Matthew............ Elm................ Smith, E......................Nankin............... Smith, John L.............. Nankin............... St. John, E. F............... Nankin............... Smith, William.............. Nankin............... Slender & Miller........... 'Plymouth............ Stockfieth, C.................Plymouth............ Stringer, Abram............ Livonia Centre..... Smith, Jerome B........... Plank Road........ Shaw, Matthew B.......... Elm............... Shaw, William M.......... Plank Road....... Simmons, J. M............. Northville.......... Simmons, I.................. Northville........... Simmons, L. WV............. Northville........... Tinham, Alexander, Sr... Livonia Centre.... Veley, John.................. Elm.................. Wight, 0.................... Livonia Centre.... Wight, George............. Livonia Centre..... Wight, Charles D......... Elm.................. Waack, Frank............... Plank Road......... Wilcox, J. E................ Plymouth........... Welsh, John G.............. Northville.......... Winchester, H. E.......... Wallaceville.........:A TOWNSHIP-CONTINUED. SECTI ON. BUSINESS. NATIVITY. 24iFarmer.......................... New York.................... 9 Farming and Cheese Making..... Michigan..................... 9iFarming and Cheese Making..... Michigan..................... 15|Farmer............................... Michigan..................... 11iFarmer................................ Michigan..................... 11 Farmer................................. Germany..................... 12 Farmer............................... New York.................... 10 Farmer................................ Michigan..................... 14 Farmer................................. New York.................... 35 Farming and Stock Feeding...... Michigan..................... 271 Farm er................................. Ireland........................ 36 Farmer................................. Ireland....................... 22 Railroad Agent....................... New York.................... 27 Farmer................................ Germany...................... 22 Farmer................................. Germany................. 13 Farmer and Mechanic............. Massachusetts............... 23 Farmer................................. New York.................. 17 Farmer; one of the first settlers in the Township.................. England................... 1 Farmer................................. Germany.................... 4 Farmer................................. MJichigan..................... 4......................................... New York.................... 36 Farmer and Mechanic............. Connecticut.................. 31 Farmer and Carpenter............. Vermont..................... 3 Farmer.................................. New York.................... 8 Farmer................................ Michigan.................... 5 Farmerand Cheese Manufacturer New York.................... 34 Supervisor and Farmer........... England...................... 34 Farmer............................... England...................... 34 Butcher and Farmer............... England.................... 29 Farmer................................ New York.................... 26 Farmer................................. New York.................... 25 Farmer................................. Ireland........................ 33 Farmer, Mechanic & Book Binder.................................... Verm ont...................... 31 Farnier................................. Michigan..................... 31 Farmer................................. Michigan..................... 31 Farmer................................ New York................... 19 Farmers............................. Germany................ 20 Farmer................................. Germany..................... 15 Merchant and Postmaster......... Michigan..................... 12 Farmer................................. New York.................... 24 Farmer................................. Penhsylvania............... 1 Physician, Surgeon and Farmer Ireland........................ 6 Farmer and Stock Raiser........ Michigan..................... 6 Farmer................................. Massachusetts........ 6 Farmer..............icigan................... Mihigan..................... 16,Farmer and Brick Maker......... England...................... 264Farmer, Postmaster and Railroad Agent........................ New York.................... 21 Farmer................................. Michigan..................... 21 'Farmer................................. New York.................... 27 Propr. Saw-mill..................... Ohio........................... 1 Farmer................................. Germany...................... 9 Farmer................................. Vermont...................... 71Farmer................................. New York.................... 361Farmer................................ iMichigan...............0..... 'U 1845 1830 1839 1835 1839 1866 1832 1846 1835 1836 1832 1832 1838 1874 1866 1865 1843 1826 1854 1865 1865 1850 1831 1826 1850 1831 1854 1852 1851 1827 1869 1845 1827 1833 1837 1825 1874 1837 1838 1828 1845 1841 1833 1824 1829 1830 1854 1854 1886 1842 1852 1847 1825 1846 EGO1 CE TOWNSHIP. Aben, Louis............... Ecorce...............P. C. 50 Farmer.............................. Germany..................... 1855 Bittorf, John................. Wyandotte................. iButcher, Wyandotte...............!Germany...................... 1854 Briggs, Robert V........... Wyandotte..................... Attorney at Law, Wyandotte............................ Burger, Jacob................Ecorce.......... P. C. 50Farmer................... Prussia............ 15russia...........1 4 Bouchard, C..................Ecorce............... P. C. -4551Farmer............................... Canada....................... 1836 Backhaus, F................ Ecorce............... P. C. 48Farmer and Carpenter.....Germany.........ermany............ 1866 Beiker, L................W yandotte......... P. C. l2iFarmer................................ Germany..................... 1855 Boehle, John.............. Wyandotte......... 35 Farmer................................ Germany..................... 1852 Beaubien, G. L..........;.. Ecorce............... P. C. 525Farmer................................Mehgan.................... 1855 "Coomer, George W......... Wyandott e..................... Attorney at Law, Wyandotte..... Michigan.................... 1870 Campbell, J. S.............. Wyandotte..................d...... Propr. Biddle House, Wyandotte New York.................... 1875 Currier, A. S......... Ecorce..........................o c..eStation Agent Canada Southern Railway........................... Concord, New Hampshire 1870 Clark, George............... Ecorce...............'P. C. 169!Farmer and Fisherman............ New York................ 1819 Cicotte, F..................... Ecorce............... P. C. 114IFarmer....................... Michigan.................. 1852 Campau, Charles.......... Ecorce............... P. C. 496jFarmer.............................. Michigan.................... 1849 Classon, John............... Wyandotte.......... 31 Farmer............................... Germany.................. 1856 Coilord, G. W............... Wyandotte......... 35 Farmer.............................. Ohio........................... 1845 Dasher, Fred............... Ecorce............... 1 Farmer............................... Germany..................... 1856 Dunn, Michael..............Ecorce.............!P. C. 118 Farmer.......................... Michigan.............. 1833 Delisle, Joseph.............. Ecorce................P. C. 114Propr. Six Mile House............ Michigan............... 1828 Eberts, J..................... Ecorce......... P. C. 48 Farmer.............................. Germany..................... 1852 Frank, John.................'Delray...............P. C. 45 Farmer.....................................Germanyo... a.............. 1856 Frank, John C............. lEcorce............... I. C. 85 Farmer................................ Germany.................... 1851 Griffin & Nellis........... Wyandotte..................... Publisher Wayne County Courier Canada....................... 1865 Heintzen, James............. Wyandotte.........I 19 armer and Real Estate Dealer.. Germany..................... 1854 Jenkel, J..................... Dearborn...........|P. C. 66 Farmer...............Ger any............ ermany 1852 Kirtle, Nicholas............ Wyandotte................... Retired Shoemaker................... New Yok.................... 11842 Kittle, Nicholas.......... Wyandotte............ Reie heae Krueger, F..................Ecorce..............P. C. 32 Farmer................................ Germany..................... 1867 Leitch, D. D................. Wyandotte...................... Boot and Shoemaker............... Albany,/New York......... 1874 Lablanee, A..................Ecorce........................ Farmer and Fisherman............ Michigan.................... 1836 Lueter, Frederick.........Dearborn............. P. C. 66 Farmer................................ Prussia..................... 1852 Lablance, Thomas.........lEcorce............... P. C. 75IFariner............................... Michigan................... 1820 Le Blanc, Noah............ Ecorce...............I P. C. 61 Prop'r Grocery Store and Farmer Michigan.................... 1849 Lindeman, H............... Ecorce............... P. C. 35 Farmer............................... Germany..................... 1867 Lapham, Charles........... Ecorce.............. 11 Farmer and Stock Raiser....... Michigan.................. 1836 Longtin, A................. Wyandotte......... P. C. 116 Farmer................................. Michigan................... 1856 Longtin, W........... Wyandotte......... P. C. 116 Farmer............................... IMichigan....................1858 IMcKay, Henry.............. Dearborn........... P. C. 667 Farmer............................... Michigan................... 1852 IcQuade, Owen............ Ecorce................P. C. Fa................................ reland..................... 1852 Nlontie, L.................... Ecorce.............. P. C. 50|Farmer.............................. Canada..................... 1826 1iller, F. William......... Ecorce............... P. C. 671Farmer................................ Prussia...................... 1866 Mlontie, Antoine............ Ecorce............... P. C. 1181Farmer............................... Michigan.................. 1829 Mackie, John.............. Ecorce. i IFarmer............................... Scotland................ 1854 )wen, Evan D.............. Wyandotte......... 35|Farmer................................ Wales.......................... 1852 Pepper, Edward............' Ecorce.............. 32 Farmer................................ New York................... 1832 lelon, Oliver...............;Eeorce............... P. C. 48 Farmer................................. Michigan.................... 11838 Riopelle, H. F................ Ecorce............... P. C. 61 Supervisor........................... Michigan................ 1836 Riopelle, John.............. Ecorce...............P. C. 497 Mason, &c................... Michigan..................... 1839 Rouleau, M. P.... E r......................... P. C. 226jTreasurer................. i igan............ Michiga1847 litter, John................. 'Ecorce.................... Farmer............................... Germany.............. 1860 I........... -....................................:X iý PA IMPO 19 4 ýMWMFO. 74 X44 L %mxaMMdT -In E

Page  78 78 PATRONS' DIRECTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. ECORCE TOWNSHIP-CoNTINUED. NATIVITY. A1 NANKIN TOWNSHIP-CONTiNUED. NAME. LOCATION. SECTION. BUSINESS. NAME. LOCATION. SECTION. BUSINESS. S NATIVITY. I d Reves, Peter W............ Rosenow, Frederick........ Ruhlig, Frederick......... Salliotte, A. M.............. Sweitzer, Martin............ Stange, Frederick........ Speck, Casper............. Salliotte, Oliver........... Schoncheck, August..... Utes, G...................... Vesger, Edmund.......... Webb, E. T.................. Whiting, Abraham......... Winter, William............ Wiegert, Louis.............. Wohleke, William......... Ecorce............... Ecorce.............. Ecorce.............. Ecorce............... Ecorce............... Ecorce............... Ecorce............... Ecorce............... Ecorce............. Dearborn.......... Ecorce.............. Wyandotte........ Wyandotte........ Ecorce............... Ecorce.............. Dearborn.......... P. C. 49 Farmer...............................Michigan....................1840 P. C. 119 Farmer................#................ Germany.....................1 1858 P. C. 83 Farmer...................Germany............. 1852 P. C. 86 Dir in Groceries, Dry Goods and General Merchandsei............ Michigan.................. 1837 P. C. 51 Farmer................................ Germany.................. 1850 P. C. 119 Farmer................................ Germany.................... 1860 P. C. 61 Hotel and Saloon.................. Germany..................... 1866 P. C. 92 Farmer................................ Michigan.................... 1839 P. C. 84 Farmer............................... Prussia...:................ 1864 P. C. 66 Farmer............................... Germany..................... 1871 P. C. 497 Farmer................................ Michigan.................... 1820.......... Druggist and Bookseller.......... New York.................................... Blacksmith.......................Engla.nd..................1849 P. C 119 Farmer......................... Germany....................... 1857 P. C. 83 Farmer............................... Prussia....................... 1858 2Farmer............................... Germany..................... 1854 Parr, G. D........... Wayne...........................Dentist............................ Warren County, N. J...... 1P71 Pettingill, W. A............ Wayne......................... VDr. in Agricultural Implements New York.................... 1854 Palmer, J. J................ Wayne............... 20iFarmer and Lumber Dealer...... New York.................... 1835 Perin, Friend............... Wallaceville........ 1'Farmer............................... Massachusetts.............. 1834 Parsly, Thomas............. Wayne............... 33 Farmer................................ New York.................... 1847 Robinson, Hugh............ Wayne................ 30Farmer.................. Ireland.............. Irelan1854 Sheldon, E. D..............Wayne.......................... Boots and Shoes.....................New York.................... 18-59 Sawslayer, Ezra W......... Wayne.............. 30'Farmer.............................. Detroit, Mich............... 1851 Straight, 0. S................IPerrinville10Farer...........Farm..................... Wayne County, Mich...... 1839 Shook, Peter................ W ayne............... 19iFarm er............................... Maryland..................... 1836 Swift, George W............ |Wayne................ 281Farmer................................ New York.................... 1825 Smith, Julius C............ W ayne............... 341Farmer................................ England...................... 1858 Sims, Samuel..............Inkster.............. 25 Farmer................................ England...................... 1833 Stevenson, Isaiah.......... Wayne.......................... Carpenter and Joiner.............. Michigan..................... 1840 Tait. James................... Perrinville.......... 2 Farmer................................ Yorkshire, England........ 1831 Varney, Frank.............. Wayne............... 25 Proprietor Varney House.........New York.................... 1850 Walker, George 0.......... Perrinville......... 11 Propr. General Store............... New York.................... 1851 Weber, John............... Perrinville.......... 14iFarmer.............................. Holland....................... 1853 Walker, William............ Inkster............. 26'Farmer.............................. Ireland........................'1852 PLYMOUTH TOWNSHIP. VAN BUREN TOWNSHIP. Brown, L. R................ Rawsonville......... 21 Ex -County Supt. of Schools, Farmer and Gardener........... New York.................. 1835 Brown, Perrin.............. Rawsonville......... 31 Farmer................................ New York.................... 1838 Bradshaw, Amos........... Belleville............ 34 Farmer................................ New York.................... 1826 Burt, Franklin.............. Belleville........... 35 Farmer and Stock Raiser..........................................3 46 Brown, D. M............... Denton.............. 17 Farmer and Stock Raiser......... New York.................... 1f65 Barlow, C. J................. Rawsonville......... 19.Justice of the Peace and Farmer New York.................... 1836 Biggam, Thomas............ Denton.............. 5 Carpenter & Justice of the Peace'New York.................... 1835 Burrell, George............ Denton.............. 6 Farmer.............................. England...................... 1838 Campbell, S. W.............. Belleville............ 21 Postmaster and Merchant.......... Wayne County, Michigan...... Campbell, Charles.......... Rawsonville......... 30 Farmer and Stock Raiser......... New Jersey.................. 1846 Crawford, William......... Belleville............i 15 Farmer and Stock Raiser......... New York.................... 1831 Corkins, V................... Belleville............ 34 Farmer................................ New York.................... 1824 Card, C. H................... Belleville............ 36 Farmer................................ New York.................... 1865 Elwell, George.............. Belleville............ 34 Farmer................................ Maine......................... 1835 Forbes,Daniel............... Belleville............ 21 Physician and Surgeon............ Michigan..................... 1826 Featherly, D. A............ Belleville............ 10 Farmer and Stock Raiser......... New York.................... 1831 Fehlig, Henry.............. Belleville;........... 21 Boot and Shoe Manufacturer...... Germany...................... 1856 Haak, William A........... Belleville............ 21 Township Clerk and Detroit Fire Insurance Agent................. Hamburg, Germany...... 1868 Hubbard, Harvey R...... Belleville............ 27 Farmer................................ New York.................... 1819 Heath, Truman H........ Belleville............ 35 Farmer................................ Vermont..................... 1832 Hinds, R..................... Denton.............. 6 Farmer................................ England....................... 1860 Hosner, Newton............ Belleville......................... Threshing Machine................ Washtenaw Co., Michigan 1851 Leonard, Charles........... Belleville............ 16 Farmer...............................Michigan..................... 1856 Moore, G. W................. Romulus............. 2.5 Farmer................................ New York City.............. 1832 Manzer, A................. Belleville............ 29 Farmer................................ Michigan................... 1841 Monks, John............... Belleville............ 21 Farmer................................ England....................... 1852 Monroe, M. F............... Belleville............ 9 Farmer.............................. Wisconsin.................. 1863 Payment. Alfred C......... Rawsonville........ 19 Stave Manufacturer................. Mlichigan..................... 1875 Parker, David J........... Belleville............ 14 Farmer & Pastor Baptist Church New Boston......................... New York.................... 1839 Riggs, Gilbert............... Belleville........... 22 Farmer and Stock Grower........ Wayne Co., New York..... 1836 Robb, Anna.............. Belleville............ 23.........................icia................. Michigan........................... Snuck, George.............. Belleville........... 131School Inspector.................... New York................... 1848 Stanley, C. S................ Rawsonville..... 30 Farmer and Stock Raiser......... New York.................... 18333 Smith, Daniel J............ Belleville............ 21 arpenter and Joiner.............. New York.................... 1833 Savage, William 0......... Belleville........... 26 Farmer and Stock Raiser......... Michigan...................,1837 Savage, Daniel.............. Belleville............ 35 Farmer................................ New York................. 1832 Smith, William.............. Denton.............. 6 Farmer................................ England..................... 1837 Voorheis, Joseph........... Belleville...................... Farmer................................ New York.................... 1832 Warner, William E........ Belleville............ 21 Supervisor, Attorney and Justice of the Peace....................... Onondaga Co., New York 1836 Winslow, G. M.............. Canton............... 3 Farmer and Stock Raiser......... New York...................... 1834 Ward, A...................... Belle lle............ 21 Cooper....................I...... Mc gan..................... 1840 Whitley, William........... Belleville 1............ 21 Merchant Tailor..................... England..................... 1848 Westfall, S. D.............. Belleville............!1........... Cigar Manufacturer............... Orleans Co., New York... 1868 Argent, Geo.................. Allen, Chas. C............... Alien, Ransom.............. Ambler, John M........... Allen, D. D.................. Angell, Chas. P............. Angell, J. E.................. Bronson, A. G. 1........... Briggs, John................. Bradner, Joel G............ Benton, H. C................ Blackmar, Mrs. L.......... Bailey, L D................. Babbitt, Rufus.............. Blackwood, Robert........ Booth, F. L................. Burns, Thos................. Bassett, W. H.............. Bartram, J................. Brockway, A. A............ Baker, Geo. WI............. Bennett & Whipple........ Crawford, Wm.............. Chase, Gifford............... Clarkson, D.................. Clark, E..................... Durfee, G.................... Durfee, R. S................ Durfee, C. D................ Downer, Win. E........... Downer, D. H............... Dodge, John M............. Eldred, Geo................ Elliott, Jasper N............ Elliott, Jabin W.... Fry, Win. E................ Fields, J.................... Griswold, C. A.............. Gage, A. W................. Gifford, Levi................. Garfield, Chas............... Guthrie, Wallace.......... Haywood, John............ Herrick, Chas............... Hastings, Wm............... Hastings, E. S.............. Harmon, John V........... Hudson, W. H.............. Johnson, Homer............ Jackson, Wm. S............ Johnson, Eugene D........ Kinyon, M................... Kingsley, Albert............ Kent, Gardner............ King, H. B.................. Kingsley, Chas. E;....... Kelley, E. A................. Lanning, Wm. J............ Linton, I. F.................. Little, Samuel H........... Leonard, C. T............... Lapham, A. J............... McKray, W................. Moore, A. M............... Moore, J. M................. Macomber, W. F........... Murdock, James............ McClumpha, E.............. Powell, Jas................ Pardee, A. E.............. Parsons, A. C............ Palmer, Horton............ Policy, 0. H......... Root, H. R................ Scott, Winfield.............. Shadduck, H.............. Shearer, J................. Sly, H. P............... Savage, James............ Starkweather, Geeo. A..... Stanley, H................. Scout, W. J................ Starkweather, Samuel.... Smith, Fred. H............ Stevens, A. N............... Slaght, Isaac............... Slade, Henry.............. Selleck, Henry.............. Plymouth........... Plymouth........... Northville........... Northville........... Plymouth.......... Northville........... Plymouth........... Plymouth........... Plymouth........... Plymouth........... Mead's Mills...... Plymouth........... Plymouth........... Summit.............. Northville........... Northville.......... North ville.......... Plymouth............ Northville........... Plymouth............ Plymouth............ Plymouth............ Northville........... Plymouth........... Northville......... Plymouth............ Plymouth............ Plymouth............ Plymouth........ Northville........... Northville........... Plymouth............ Plymouth............ Northville........... Northville........... Northville........... Northville........... Northville........... Northville........... Plymouth............ Northvill e........... I Northville........... Plymouth............ Plymouth........... Northville.......... Northville.......... Northville.......... Plymouth............ Plymouth............ Northville............ Plymouth............ Plymouth............ Plymouth............ Northville........... Northville........... Mead's Mills....... Plymouth............ Northville........... Northville........... Northville........... Northville........... Plymouth............ Plymouth............ Plymouth............ Plymouth............ Northville...'........ Northville........... " Plymouth............ Plymouth............ Plymouth.......... Northville......... Northville.......... Plymouth........... Plymouth........... Northville.......... Plymouth............ Plymouth...........! Plymouth............ I Northville........... Plymouth........... Plymouth............ Northville........... SNorthville........... I. Plymouth............ Plymouth........... Northville........... Plymouth............,Plymouth....... 5 Farmer........................... Wayne County, Mich...... 23 Farmer................................ Wayne County, Mich...... 3 Mechanic.............................. Ontario County, N. Y..... 1865............................................ Wayne County, N. Y...... 1810 28i1Farmer................................ Wayne County, Mich...... 7 Farmer................................H i-erkimer County, N. Y.. 1871 3ao Farmer and Stock Raiser......... Wayne County, N. Y...... 1834 20 Farmer................................ Monroe County, N. Y..... 1868 24 Farmer................................ Cayuga County, N. Y...... 1830 14 Farmer............................... Wayne County, Mich...... 10 Farmer................................ Wayne County, Mich...... 27 Farmer. Oldest living settler inTp...... I Wayne County, N. Y...... 1824 20 Farmer................................. Wayne County, Mich...... 18 Farmer................................ Ontario County, N. Y..... 1838 6 Farmer................................ Bucks County, Penn...... 1831 3.......................................... N ew Y ork.................... 1854 3........................................ Canada........................ 1868 26 Mechanic............................. Cayuga County, N. Y...... 1855, 3 Farmer................................ Wayne County, Mich...... 26 Painter................................ Washtenaw Cdunty, Mich. 1870 26........................................ Wayne County, Mich..... 26 Livery, Sale Stable, and Omnibus Line....... New York................. 1833 2 Farmer............................... Wayne County, Mich...... 20 Farmer................................ Wayne County, Mich...... 9 Farmer................................ New Jersey................. 1831 26 Cooper................... Glasgow, Scotland.........l1873 27 Farmer........................... Wayne County, N. Y....... 1827 28 Farmer................................ Wayne County, N. Y...... 1827 27 Farmer........'.................'..... Wayne County, Miich...... 10 Teacher............................... Monroe County, N. Y.... 1 1838 3 Farmer............................... Wayne County, Mich...... 26 Wagon Maker.............. New Hampshire........... 1838 5 Farmer................................ Wayne County, Mich..... 3 Machinist........................... Wayne Couhty, Mich...... 3 Saloon Keeper......................... Cayuga County, N. Y..... 1831 I Farmer................................ Kent County, England.... 1846 31 Farmer................................ Norfolk, 0................... 1871 21Farmer.............................. Windham County, Vt..... 1826 3 Moulder............................... Monroe County, N. Y..... 1854 26 Engineer and. Sawyer..............!Oneida County, N. Y...... 1865 3 Farmer................................ iOakliand County, Mich... 8 Sawyer............................... Wayne County, Mlich...... IlBlacksmith........................... IWayne County, Mich...... 3...........................................Wayne County, Mich...... 3 Moulder and Miller................. Wayne County, Mich...... 3iMoulder.............................. Vayne County, N. Y....... 1843 9 Farmer and Potter................ St. Lawrence Co., N. Y... 1843 26 1Cooper................................. Wayne County, Mich...... 141Farmer...............................Seneca County, N. Y...... 1834 3Propr. Restaurant............. Wayne County, Mich...... 26|Barber.................................. Elmira County, N. Y....... 1875 26 Hotel Proprietor..................... Wayne County, Mich...... 31 Farmer................................ Rutland County, Vt........ 1829 l!Farmer................................ Wayne County, lMich...... 3 Lumber Merchant................... Michigan..................... 1872 14 Farmer................................ Washtenaw County, Mich 28 Teacher.............................. Washtenaw County, Mich. 1851 3 Farmer................................ Wayne County, Mich...... 3 Carriage Ironer..................... New York.................. 1864 3 Editor and Publisher Record...... Belfast, Ireland............ 1853 17 Farmer................................ Seneca County, N. Y...... 1846 26 groceries, Hardware, Yankee Notions, etc.... Oakland County, Mich... 1866 26 Shoe Business....................... Crawford County, Penn... 1831 26 Saw and Planing Mill, Stave Factory, etc.... Wayne County, Mich...... 261Cooper................................ Monroe County, N. Y..... 1870 3......................................... Wayne County, Mich............ Farmer................................ Genesee County, N. Y..... 1867 29 Farmer................................. VashtenawCounty, Mich. 1857 32 Farmer..............................I -ereford County, Eng.... 1868 23 Farmer and Justice of the Peace Ulster County, N. Y....... 1856 3 Salesman.......................... Oneida County, N. Y....... 1875 3BEngineer./............................ Livingston County, Mich. 1875 26 Blacksmith......................... Sheffield, Eng............. 1865 31 Farmer............................... Wayne County, Mich...... 3 Supervisor Plymouth Tp.......... Seneca County, N. Y...... 1842 19 Farmer............................... Hartford, Conn............. 1854 27 Farmer /............................. Berkshire County, Mass.. 1835 23]Farmer................................ New York.................. 1829 3 Moulde............................. Monroe County, N. Y.....1859 26 General Mdse. and Real Estate.. Wayne County, Mich...... 26 Flouringo Mill........................ Livingston County, N. Y. 1872 3 Peddler................................ Pennsylvania............... 1875 3 Farmer.............................. Sussex County, N. J...... 1825 26 Hotel Keeper...................... Wayne County, Mich...... 26 Cerriage Maker...........i........ iWashtenaw County, Mich. 1850 4 Tile, Mfi.............................. Seneca County, N. Y...... 1855 26 Railroading........................... New York.................... 1855 26 Blacksmith........................... Oakland County, MiJich... 18O50 NANKIN TOWNSHIP. I Biddle & Fisher............ Bradt, A. Schuyler........ Bloomfaldar, A.............. Badgley, Benjamin V.... Bridge, James.............. Bills, M...................... Bevernetts, C.............. Comer, George D.......... Collar, Alexander......... Carver, E. R................. Ditsch & Son, A. F........ Downer, Robert............ Duffield, William WI...... Dean, William D........... Edmonds, Willard........ Grant, David............... Ferguson, W................. Hosie & Stellwagen........ Hammon & Bro............ Harrison, Martin.......... Hering, Tobias.............. Howe, P...................... Harrison, H................. Harrison, M................. Isham, Frederick H....... Kammerer, C................ Lee, Eli....................... Lathers, Johna............... Lathers, Mrs. A............ McGuire, George........... Morrison, Thomas......... MeMillan, Robert.......... Miller, H..................... Morley, Henry.............. Newkirk, D. B..\........... Wayne........................... Dry Goods and Groceries.........Michigan................... 1836 Wayne....................... Hotel Keeper................... Schenectady Co., N. Y.... 1875 Wayne........................... Farm er...................... Germany.....................1854 Perrinville 4.......... Farmer................................. Canada..................... 1872 Perrinville....... 12Farmer................................iIreland...................... 1848 Perrinville.......... 13Farmer................................ iWayne County, Mich............ Inkster............. 24iFarmer................................ 'Germany..................... 1854 Wayne......................... Grocer................................. |Michigan.................... 18845 Wayne......................... Physician and Surgeon............ New York...................... 1849 Inkster.............. 25 Farmer and Stock Dealer......... Ohio...........................1822 Wayne.......................... Undertakers.......................... Germany..................... 1857 Wayne........................... Jones street........................Michigan........................... Inkster............. 23........................................ Pennsylvania............... 1836 Nankin....................... Nankin Mills........................N.ew York................. 1832 Wayne............... 31 Farmer................................ iSaratoga County, N. Y... 1834 Wayne............... 32 Farmer..................................Wayne County, Mich...... 1815 W ayne............... 29'1 Farm er................................ iCanada........................ 1864 Wayne........................... Gen'l Merchandise, Michigan av. IScotland and Germany... 1852 Wayne................ Boots and Shoes, Michigan av... New York.................... 1831 Inkster.............. 24 Farmer...........................iWayne County, Mich...... 1829 Nankin.............. 8 Carpenter and Joiner and Farmer Germany.................... 1864 Wayne.............. 33 Farmer............................... New York.................... 1846 Inkster.............. 26 Farmer................................ Wayne County, Mich...... 1821 Inkster............. 25 Farmer.............................. Michigan.................... 1826 Nankin.............. 8 Farmer.............................. Michigan..................... 1869 Wayne............... 20 Farmer and Butcher............... Germany.................... 1839 Wayne............... d 32Stone Mason......................... New York.................... 1823 Inkster.............. 13 Farmer.............. Ireland...................Ireland....... 1834 Inkster.............. 12 Farmer............................... Ireland....................... 1847 Wayne......................... Flour, Feed and Water Lime, Produce, etc....................... Ireland....................... 1863 Wayne............................iDrugs and Groceries............... Scotland...................... 1855 Wayne............... 32|Carpenter and Joiner............. New York.................... 1858 Wayne.............. 19Farmer and General Trader...... Prussia...................... 1854 Perrinville.......... 10 Farmer and Drover................ England................... 1871 Wayne..................... Proprietor Tremont HIouse and Mfr. of Oil of Peppermint..... New York.................... 1864 Wayne............... 271General Farmer..................... New York.................... 1836 Norris, James D............ I &=Zmwmýw

Page  79 C) PATRONS' DIRECTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 79 Ii PLYMIOUTH LOCATION. SECTI TOWNSHIP-CoNTINUED. HAMTRAMCK TOWNSHIP-CONTINUED. NAME. Shafer, J. S.................. Plymouth............ Springer, Samuel J....... Plymouthl.......... I Thompson,. J............ Northville........... Toles, Dwight W........... Plymouth............ Thomson, E. B.............. Northville........... Thayer, Rufus........ Summit............. Turrell, Lyman............ Summit............. Tobias, E..................... Northville........... Vays, E. D.................. Northville........... Wick, George............... Northville........... Whipple, Calvin............ Plymouth............ Weed, C. L.................. Northville........... Whipple, E. A.............. Northville.......... Waterman, IR. B............ Northville........... Wood, W. A............... Northville........... Whipple, V. 0.............. Northville........... Wood, N. M................. Plymouth............ Yerkes, W. P............... Northville........... ON. BUSINESS. i NATIVITY. i+ 26 Millwright, Draughtsman, etc... Hamilton, C. WI............ 1857 36 Farmer............................. Michigan................... 1841 4 Farmer............................... Livingston County, N. Y.. 1850 26 Wells sunk with Patent Borer... Ilngham County, Mich..... 1875 9 Farmer and Stock Raiser........,jCayuga County, N. Y...... 1861 18 Farmer.............................. Windham County, Vt...1825 7 Farnmer................................Ontario County, N. Y..... 1826 3 Farmer................................Wayne County, Mich...... 3...................................e ont........ 1876 3 Cigrar Er. and Propr. Cady Goose.. iochester, N. Y.-......... 1873 13 Farmer.......................... Ontario County, N. Y.....1832 3 Photographer..... Michigan................ 7 Farmer............................. Wiayne County. idch...... 17 Farmer................................ Hudson,.N. Y......... 183-5 8 Miller. Flouring Mill............ Madison County, N. V 1872 8 Harness Mfr............... Oakland County, Mich... 18-58 26 Blacksmith........................... Monroe County, Mich. 1875 31Attorney at Law..................... Seneca County, N. Y...... 1826 TAYLOR TOWNSHIP. Bull, Charles................ Inkster............... 18Farmer.......................... Boltz, Peter................. Taylor Centre...... 21 Carpenter.......................... Bondie, Antoine............ Taylor Centre...... 15 Farmer................................. Beadleston, George W..... Dearborn............ 4 Farmer................................. Bowen, John............... Dearborn........................ Farmer................................. Coan, Peter D............... Taylor Centre...... 28 Farmer................................. Coan, Martin............ Wyandotte......... 33 Farmer................................. Eggebrecht, Carl............ Taylor Centre...... 21 Farmer................................. Fletcher, William W....... Taylor Centre......I 28 Farmer............................... Fritz, Henry........ nkster.......nkt 6 Farmer.................................. Gordemnier, Mary............I lnkster............... 6 Farmer................................. Graden, RP.................... Taylor Centre..... 15 Farmer........................... Hanchett, L. P.............. Taylor Centre......|22 and 28 Farmer................................. Hencel, Charles............ Dearborn............. 9 Farmer....................... Holmes, James W..........IDearbotn............ 4 Carpenter and Joiner.............. Locke, William S........... Taylor Centre...... 20 Propr. Steam Saw-mill............. Lappeus. S. B.............. Dearborn............ 4 Farmer....................A......... McPherson, John.......... Wyandotte.......... 27 Farmer................................ Moat, Charles............... Taylor Centre...... 27 Farmer................................. Moring, Frederick......... Wyandotte..........* 21 Farmer................................. Murphy, Joseph..........T.. aylor Centre......! 16 Farmer, Dry Goods & Groceries Murphy, Mrs. Mary...... Taylor Centre...... 16.......................................... Ochring, John............... Wyandotte15Far..e....... Farmer................... Prouty W. F............... Taylor Centre...... 18|Farmer................................ Prouty, Henry........... Taylor Centre...... 18 Farmer................................. Rudduck, Sidney........... Inkster.............. 6 Farmer................................. Ross, Henry................. Taylor Centre...... 10 Farmer................................. Sutliff, William............. Taylor Centre...... 27 Farmer................................. Smith, I. B.................. Wyandotte......... 33 Farmer................................. Sickmund, A................ Wyandotte..........i 27 Farmer, &c.......................... Steward, W. N.............. Wyandotte......... 27 Farmer................................. Sutliff, Richard............ Taylor Centre...... 27 Sailor.................................. Schonseheck, William..... T'aylor Centre...... 21 Farmer.................................. Shrader,; William........... Taylor Centre...... 16 Farmer.......................... Silcox, Mrs. E.............. Taylor Centre...... 18 Farmer................................. Sheldon, Lorenzo.......... Inkster.............. 18 Farmer................................. Sheldon, Ezra.............l... nkster............... 18 Farmer................................. Threadgould, Francis..... |Taylor Centre...... 17Farmer................................. Trowbridge, Warren........Inkster............... 6 6 Farmer............................ Townsend, J. G............h Inkster............. 61Farmer......................... Germany..................... 1864 New Jersey..-........... 1850 Michigan..................... 1824 New York.................... 1856 Connecticut.................. 1872 New York...................1. 809 Michigan..................... 1823 Germany...*................. 1862 New York.................... 1824 Germany.................. 1866 Michigan................... 1860 Michigan................... 1848 New York.................... 1865 Germany...................... 1858 Michigan..................... 1834 New York.................... 1844 New York................... 1854 Pennsylvania............... 1845 England.....................1 t834 Germany................... 1854 New York.................... 1863 Ireland........................ 1863 Germany.................... [856 New York............... 1859 Ohio....................... 85.... England................... 1842 Ireland....................... 1852 New York.................. 1817 New York.................... 1834 New York.................... 1855 New York................... 1834 New York.................... 1832 Germany...................... 1864 Germany....................... 1863 Massachusetts............... 1854 Michigan.....................l853 New York.................... 1836 England.................... 1850 New York....................1853 New York....................l1831 NAME. LOCATION. SECTION. BUSINESS. NATIVITY. [ ________ ___ ____________K_ _____- _____ _____________________________________ Behmer, F. A................ Norris................ Lot 16 Farmer and Gardener..............Germany 1855 Birnbaum, George......... Detroit............... Lot 58. Gardener........................... Germany..................... 1866 Barnard, J. B............... Detroit............... P. C. 39 Gardener.............................. Ohio............................1865 Beals, William.............. Derit........Detroit........ P. C. 1- Furlaceuian Peninsular Iron Works......... New York.................... 1869 Busha, Theodore........... Detroit.........P. C. 573 Gardener and Farmer.............. Michigan......................11872 Campbell, Margaret.......N orris............... 3 Farming.................. Ireland........................\1835 Christ, August.............. Detroit............................ Gardener.............................. Prussia........................ 1847 Cooper, James............... Leesville............ 22 Farmer and Lumberman.......... England....................... 1852 Cooper, John........... Leesville............ P. C. 644 Farmer and Gardener.............. England......................1853 Dalton, Laurence........... Norris............... 4 Farmer................................. Michigan......................:1829.Damitio, Chris............... Detroit............... P. C. 573 Township Clerk.................. France........................ 1831 Dubia, Sophia.. Leesville............ 15 farmer.................... Michigan.................... 1845 Dickinson, Thos............ Detroit............... Lot 43 Farmer................................. England...................... 1851 Dedenback, Joseph........ Norris................. 17 Gardener............................... Germany...................... 1854 Dery, Kichard........ hitewood.......... 19 Farmer................... Delaware.....................i1859 Davison, John........ Whitewood.......... 1 Farmer................................. Michigan..................... 185C Dwyer, James............... Detroit............... P. C. 573 Supt. Detroit Stove Works........ Michigan..................... 1842 Engel, Henry C........ Detroit.... P. C. 890.......................................... Germany................... 1852 Emery, Lewis................ Whitewood......... 19 Farmer................................. Virginia...................... 1862 Ennis, IW. A........... Norris..........................7" Farmer................................ New York..................1.. 866 Everding, Wmn............... Detroit............... C. 723 Gardener Germany1...................... 855 Fenner, David............ Norris.............. 14 Mason................................. New York.....................184 "Fournier, Eli.............. Leeville.............. P. C. 154 Hotel Proprietor. Michigan...................Michigan1825 Fowler, Edward............. Detroit................ 28 Toll Gate Keeper.................... Massachusetts...............'1865 Ferguson, George........... Detroit............... Lot 41 Gardener.............................. Scotland...................... 18725 Fitzgerald, Jennie H...... Whitewood......... 4........................................ Ohio.......................... 186 Girard, Ferdinand......... Detroit.............. P. C. 11 Gardener and'Wagon Maker.... Michigan...................... 1850 Gregor, Adolph............. Detroit............... P. C. 644 Milkman and Farmer.............. Austria 1........................853 Greebner, Atbert......... Detroit...............P. C. 573 Gardener..................... Germany 1....................85 Geiser, Henry............... Detroit............... Lot 59 Gardener.............................. Germany..................... 1853 Geiser, Conrad.............. Detroit............... Lot 40 Gardener.............................. Germany....................|1856 Gutschow, F................. Whitewood......... 2 Farmer and Milknman............... Germany................... 1857 Holley, Hanford............ Norris............... 9 Hotel Prop'r, P. M. & Merchant New York.................... 1828 Hardwick, Thos........... Leesville............ 15 Farmer and Gardener.............. England.......................1852 Hilger, John................ D etroit............... P. C. 723...................................... Prussia........................ 1855 Haltinner, Henry..........!Leesville............ P. C. 15 Farmer and Supt. Lutheran Cemetery........ Scotland..................... 1856 Hafeli, John................. Detroit............... Lot 41 Gardener............................. Scotland...................... 1854 Harland, John............... WhiteWood......... 4 Drover and Stock Dealer......... Ohio........................... 1842 Keveney, John.............. Norris............... 3 Farmer and Teacher.............. Michigan....................1846 Klusman, F.................. Detroit............... P. C. 573 Farmer and Gardener.............. Germany.....................|184t: Kremer, Anthony.......... Detroit................ 21 Milkman............................... Prussia....................... |1845 Koch, Christian............ Detroit............... Lot 57 Farmer................................ Germany.....................'1841 Kregel, Ferdinand................................. P. C. 182 Carpenter............................. Michigan......................1848 Lowe, Mary Ann........... Detroit...............I Lot 44 Milk Business........................ Michigan................ [185'7 Ladensack, C. J............ Detrot............... Lot 60 Farmer and Gardener.............. Germany......................18.52 Lee, Thomas................. Leesville............ P. C. 10 Gardener..............................England...................... 184: Methner, Albert........... Norris...............i 9 Farmer........................... ocga...... Mihigan................... 1864 Moenek, Jacob......... Norris.... I...... 16Farmer................................ Germany..................... 1864 Methner, Joseph........... Detroit............... P. C. 19 Mlk.................................. Prussia........................ 185 Marx, Stephen............. Detroit. C..G.mn................P. C. 18 Farmer................................ Germany................... 84 Michels, Anthony.......... Detroit............... P. C. 390S Blacksmithl........................... |Germany................... 185: Miesel, Philip............... Detroit.......................... Gardener............................. Germany..................... 1871 McCormick, Hugh......... Detroit............... Lot 38 Gardener..................Ireland........................ 1854 Marks, James............... Whitewood......... 24 Farmer.................... 185 McCormick, John.......... Detroit...............|P. C. 19 Engineer......................... Canada....................... 1874 Mahony, Wm. C............ Detroit.......................... Engineer Lake Sup'r Iron Co..... Ireland....................... 186( Mersino, Paul............... Detroit............... Lot 58 Gardener..................Iicign............. Michigan...................... 185ý Nagel, Ludwig.............. Detroit....... P. C. 182 Wagon Maker...................... Germany..........6...... 64 Norris, P. W................. Norris...............R............ eal Estate Dealer................. Palmyra, New York........ t867 Puigh, Francis.............. Detroit..................... Gardener.............................. lMichigan...................... 1851 Pallister, Thomas..........iNorris.............. 2 Farmer......................'...........England...................... i85( Rivard, Anthony...........!Leesville............ 15 Farmer.................................I Michigan..................... 184' SRodgers. Geo............... Detroit............... P. C. 18 Molder.................................Wales.......................... 187z Ryan, Chis. L.............. Detroit.............. P. C. 18 Engineer Lake Sup'r Iron Works [relaind........................ 84 Reed, James........... Norris.............. 16 Farmer................... [land..............1..831 Stackpole, Th: s.......Norris.......... 6.......................... ~ c............... 18 Schwartz, Francis.........IDetroit............... P. C. 573 Farmer and Gardener.............. |Michigan..................... 184( Stegriy, Benoit..............iDetroit.............. P. C. 723 Superintendent.............. 'Switzerland...........1 854 Selimann, Cathrina. Detroit... P. C. 678 Gardener.................. Germany...................... 85( Stonehouse, Geo............ Norris............... 9 Farm er................................. England....................... 185: Strasburg, August. Detroit.......... Lot 43 Gardener.........Germany..................... 1861 Shrekel Ernst......... Detroit......... Lot 58 Gardener.. Germany................. 1861 Stoerkel, Conrad........... Norris................ 17 Farmer and Hotel Proprietor.... Germany..................... 185, Schneeman,. J............... IWhitewood........ 22 Farmer................................. Germany............ 864 Schroder, F................. G. T. & D. M. June'........... Proprietor Hotel........... Germany,.................... 841 Teagan, Mrs. J............. Detroit......... I 16 Farmer................................. Michigan.......... 83: Tuxbury, M.................. i hi tewood......... 17Farmer and Carpenter............. Canada......................... 1821 Visger, Jamnes............... Detroit........................... Notary Public and Supervisor... Michigan..................... 182Z White, Jamnes............... JDetroit..............i........... Farmer and Gardener.............. New Jersey................. 84' Wilson, A..... Detroi....................................................... Michigan.................... M c.......i.............. 186........... roi t:................ "........ " ". a.... | Weber, Henry............... Detroit............... P. C. 19 'ard(lener..............................oIMichilan...................... 185, i Westphal, John............. iDetroit............... P. C. 18 Wagon Maker.............. Geiny.......... Germany.................... 85Z SWelch, Nicholas............ Detroit............. P. C. 679 Gardener.........................Germany.................... 851 SZimmer, John............... Detroit............... P. C. 573 Florist.....................Gemny...................... 18.5 i i ) ) i i ~ ~ I I 2 S 4 J 7 5 7 2.) ) 5 2 [ 5 ) 3 5 2 9 9 -2 8 7 5 5 6 HAMTRA&OMCK TOWNSHIP. Ackley, Chas........... Conner's Creek... 1. 0 Farmer................................ England...................... 1832 Ames, Elisha............... Detroit........................... Gardener and Shipbuilder........ New York.................... 1845 Allen, Benijamin B......... Detroit.............. P. C. 16 Farmer.............I................... Massachusetts............... 1865 Allstatt, Emil............... Detroit...............I Lot 39 Gardener and Milkman............. Germany.................... 185b Armstrong, Jas.............1173 Jefferson av..!'........... Boot and Shoe Manufacturer..... [Ireland........................ 1870 Baumgartner, WV............ Conner's ('reek.... J 10 Farmer................................. England....................... 1843 Bondy, Joseph.............. Leeville.............. 15 Farmer................................ Michigan...................... 1821 Breitmeyer, John.......... Detroit...........................Flower and Vegetable Gardener Germany..................... 1859 Bloom, Adolf................ Detroit........................... DeotMilkman and Gardener............ Michligan............... 1858 Bruder, Edward............ Detroit........................... Wagon Maker......................... Germany..................... 1867 Brubeau, Michael......... Detroit............... P. C. 573 Farmer and, Gardener............ Michian.............. 1842 Bender, Henry,........Detroit...............P. C. 16 Shoemaker........................... Germany........................ 1869 Breitmeyer, Geo............ Detrit...............P. 390 Gardener.............................. Germany..................... 1866 Blanck C.....................Detroit............... Lot 59 Gardener.............................. Germany.................... 1852 Bigelow, John M........... Detroit............... Lot 41 Farmer and Physician............. Vermont.................... 1860

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Page  83 Conservator's Report Bentley Historical Library Title: Wayne County 1876 Received: Book bound in case-style binding. Cover was three-quarter leather with cloth sides. Joints were broken. Book was cleat sewn by hand. Sewing was sound. Paper was acidic and brittle. Boards were of solid binder's board. Treatment: Picked book to pieces. Washed pages in water. Deacidified. Added new endsheets. Guarded pages and stubbed for thickness. Laminated. Rebound in new cover in scrapbook-style binding. Fastened with sawtooth lockpins. Materials: Filtered water. Ehlermann's LAL 215 PVA aPIesive. Wei T'o deacidification solution. PROMATCO heavy duty endsheet paper. Ademco cerex tissue. Davey "Red Label" binder's board. Pyroxylin-impregnated library buckram. 23K gold. McBee sawtooth lockpins. Date work completed: September 1991 Signed: J. W. Craven

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