Combination atlas map of Macomb County, Michigan
Stewart, D. J., Friend, N. (Norman), b. ca. 1815., Smith, Clarence L., Hunter, Thos.

Page  [unnumbered] NONCIRCULATING

Page  [unnumbered]

Page  I ~ii I 1 Jmrefa 2 0000 000 04 8 682 I '1 -~~1111~6~ ~ cl~~B ~a~----s8osaR--- - ----~------~ - ~sLL~-~amTim~ 10~. c FLr ~ ~ _ri~4~d ~g~ag t c, ~n~4r ~h~ji~ 'rlr ~~.~!~-. tli~ \~- ~)111 u d~ IIL ~~~~li.~Y~ q~~~ ~~~Lb m~~~i U\\"IV \Q. \~I\ \\~~ \~,? I '\hUur* V~A~n~~a~~ P 1 ~~ 35 ~lpr m ~3 `\r~ Uu B, r\r*\t. 3 ~Z~C 0- a*.ru\ '" ~~Z i " " ~ \ i~~~clllir # c.rl "~-r*~~~~- s, 33 c I c.. ~,,,,, \ \ X\\ \u-ct -i.~-~----~-I--1 -E~C;: "' \ ~--?-~.~:~-~=r~~.;~-=-~- yr ~------.r=r;..r.W id i 1 ~j__ v-h LS ~~ - I r i,I Ir.lai -- i C.-jP,ý,,ALD-AZLIAZ r" a) -. -jPA*i~d ~---- ~ --------- 1. 18 71 5~~ THOS.HUNTER FR.~ PHILA~. __ ---------- -V~~.~a~P~ea~ '~pg..C~f -~V-~---e~~~~B~ ~dl~D~irBCl~b 1.~F~9eWe~46-- ~P~6 --~s~~----"ar~r --~-~-8~ ~ - ---~~IC~~c~-~ -' ~BYBDllldCI~S IP~dL-r~U~.I~L~IIIB-~ i

Page  II

Page  III ;A * <5 feiZ) t ______ ^7% Outline Map of Macomb County. Erin Township.. Lenox..... Sterling " Macomb " Chesterfield Township... Richmond... Armada.. Shelby Warren Bruce. '. Washington Clinton. Ray Harrison " Map of Mount Clemens.... Village of New Baltimore S " Romeo...... ' Utica.. S Armada........ S " Richmond.. S Memphis. S New Haven....... " ' Ridgeway... OF CONTNTS PAGE. 2. 5. 8. 9 S10. 11 13 14. 15 16 S18 19 S21. 24 S25 22, 23... 26 S27 S28 S28 S29. 29 29 29 PAGE Store and Residence of J. A. Gaukler, Erin Township.. 4 Junction Hotel of John Martens, Erin Township... 4 Mtill Property, Residence, etc., of H. R. Hazelton, New Haven, Lenox Tp. 4 Church and Residence of Rev. F. Hendrickx, Erin Township.. 6 Store of P. F. H. Schars, New Baltimore........ 6 Residence of John Crittenden, Chesterfield Township... 6 S S. N. Roberts, Chesterfield Township... 6 " John WVhitney, Macomb Township... 7 " Geo. C. Heydenreich, Macomb Township.. 7 S Win. UTpton, Esq., Sterling Township.. 7 Macomb County Poor-House, Mount Clemens. 12 Residence of F. G. Kendrick, Mount Clemens.. 12 C " Win. C. Groesbeck, Warren Township.. 17 " ce Hieronymus Engelmann, Warren Township... 17 c" " John R. Trufant, Clinton Township...... 17 " Lewis Hartzig, Esq., Warren Township..... 20. John Behrns, Warren Township...... 20 " Mrs. Catharine Hardy, Warren Township.... 20 and Farm of W. E. Hartzig, Warren Township.... 20 SChurch of Father Hendricks, Warren Township... 20 of Henry Fries, Harrison Township...... 20 F. E. Grosebeck, Warren Township...... 30 Carriage Shop and Residence of J. C. Mason, Warren Township.. 30 8IUERLLANEOUSo. Macomb County Court-House, Mount Clemens. Carriage and Wagon Factory of Donaldson Bros., Mount Clemens Residence and Saloon of Jacob Roessel, Mount Clemens 3 3. 3 Tabular List of County Officers and Supervisors of Macomb County. List of Governors of Michigan from 1622 to 1875.. List of Post-Offices in jMacomb County...... History of Macomb County, Townships, and Villages.... Patrons' Business Directory of Macomb County..... IV ~IA ~ IV V-X 31-35 nEsrmn 2 K $ m - Farm House,-Bauern Haus................................ School House,-SchulHaus-............................................. C hurch,- - iirche................................................................................. ---.-............ M ills,- hlA /en...................................................... Blacksmith Shop,- Schmiede.................. -.............. Proposed Railroads,- Vorgeschlagne Bakzn Wege Stone Quarries,-Sein Bruiche...........................................................-... Lime Kilns,- Kalk Oefen...............................................................O rchards,- O bstgd een............................................................................ T im b e r,- H olz........................................................................................ --.... S w a m p,- S u cm pf............................................................................................. Creks,2-Bdc hee to. _he mil Scale, 2 inches to the mile. j Cemeteries,- Begrdbnissfldlze........................................................ ------- t R oad s,- L an dstrasse.................................................................... Railroads,-Bahn Wege................,k / /.. ~ /,.

Page  IV V I NAMES OF COUNTY OFFICERS. t. I I I I I I I I r t I Year. 1818 1822 1826 1827 1830 1832 1834 1836 1838 1840 1842 1844 1846 1848 1850 1852 1854 1856 1858 1860 1862 1864 1866 1867 1868 1870 1872 1874 1875 County Treasurers, Christian Clemens. do. do. John S. Axford. do. Hiram Calkins. Horace H. Cady. Rodney 0. Cooley. do. Henry 31. Dodge. Thomas MI. Perry. do. do. Allen P. Bentley. do. Joshua B. Dickinson. do. Charles B. Matthews. do. Edward C. Gallup. Justus R. Crandall. do. Josiah T. Robinson. Joseph Hubbard. Oliver Chapaton. do. do. do. do. Year, 1818 1825 1826 1828 1830 1832 1834 1836 1838 1840 1842 1844 1846 1848 1850 1852 1854 1856 1858 1860 1862 1864 1866 1868 1870 1872 1874 1875 County Clerks. John Stockton. Thomas Brandon. R. S. Rice. R. P. Eldredge. Richard Butler. do. do. Amos Dalby. do. do. do. do. Robert Thompson. Ira Stout. Theron Cudworth. John S. Fletcher. Perrin Crawford. John B. Ellsworth. Henry 0. Smith. do. do, James Whiting. William M, Connor. do. Charles S. Groesbeck. do. do. do. Year, 1818 1824 1828 1830 1832 1834 1836 1838 1840 1842 1844 1846 1848 1850 1852 1854 1856 1858 1860 1862 1864 1866 1868 1870 1872 1874 1875 Registers cf Deeds, John Stockton. do. William M3eldrum. do. Rodney 0. Cooley. do. do. Amos Dalby. do. do. Henry Teats. i do. Robert H. Wallace. do. John J. Traver. do. Norton L. Miller. do. George W. French. Thomas L. Sackett. do. do. Alonzo 31. Keeler. George W. Robertson. Alonzo MI. Keeler. Traugott Longershausen do. Year. 1818 1828 1836 1838 * 1840 1844 " 1848 1852 1 1856 1860 1864 1868 1872 1875 Judges of Probate. Christian Clemens. do. Prescott B. Thurston. do. Porter libber. do. Prescott B. Thurston. do. do. Isaac B. Gilbert. Henry 0. Smith. Thomas L. Sackett. do. do. Year, 1818 1820 1S22 1824 182(3 1828 1830 1832 1834 1836 1838 184o 1842 1844 1846 1848 1850 1852 1854 1856.1858 1860 1862 1864 1866 1868 1870 1872 1874 1875 Sheriffs, James Fulton. do.. William 31eldram. do. do. SN. Nye. Addison Chamberlin. William Canfield. do. Abraham Freeland. SCalvin Davis. Amos B. Cooley. do. John G. Dixon. I arnum Lufkin. 1Miio Selleck. Walter Porter. Thomas Golby. do. Charles C. Lamb. do. Joseph Hubbard. do. George E. Adair. Haswell Church. do. Frederick G. Kendrick. do. Winfield S. Hathaway. do. Year. 1818 1820 1824 1828 1832 1834 1836 1838 1840 1842 1844 1846 1848 1850 1852 1854 1856 1858 1860 1862 1864 1866 1868 1870 1872 1874 1875 Prosecuting Attorneys. Ezra B. Prescott. George A. O'Keeffe. do. Alexander D. FrAzer. Robert P. Eldredge. Cornelius 0'Flynn. do. De Witt C. Walker. John J. Lenard. Harlehigli Cartter. William T. Blitchell. Andrew S. Robertson. do. Giles Hubbard. do. do. Richard-Butler. Giles Hubbard. Elislia F. Mead. Thomas M. Crocker. Giles Hubbard. Edgar Weeks. do. James B. Eldredge. do. do. do. Year. 1830 1832 1834 1836 1838 1840 1842 1844 1846 1848 1850 1852 1854 1856 1858 1860 1862 1864 1866 1868 1870 1872 1874 1875 County Surveyors, John B. Hollister. William A. Burt. Ephraim Calkins. Joel Manley. do. do. Charles F. MIahury. do. do. do. Ludwick Wesolouski. George E. Adair. do. Addison P. Brewer. do. George H. Fenner. Ludwick Wesolouski. Oscar S. Burgess. do. do. George E. Adair. Oscar S. Burgess. Clarance Stevens. do. SUPERVISORS. Year. Armada Township. Year, 1834 to 1837 Alfred Goodell. 1833 to 1835 1837 " 1838 Isaac Thompson. 1835 " 1837 1838 " 1843 Comni.-sioners. 183711 1838 1843 "1844 Sblomon Lathrop. 1838 " 1843 18441 1852 Norman Perry. 1843)" 1845 1.852 111854 Darius Sessions. 1845 "1850 1854 " 1856 Norman Perry.! 1850,1851 1856 11859 Warren Tibbitts. 1851 "1853 1859 " 1864 Charles Andrews. i 1853 " 1855 18641 1866 Erastus Day. 1855 "1859 1.866 " 1867 George E. Burke. 1859 " 1860 1867 11869 Hiram Barrows. 1860; 1875 1869 "1870 Gideon Draper. 1870 "1873 Charles Andrews. 1873 11874 Gideon Dr, aper. 1874 " 1875 Holley Goyer. Bruce Township. Gideon Gates. Isaac Thompson. Henvan Paimalce. Comrmissi on ei s served. Minot T. Lane. Hiram Sh erman. Hugh Gray, George Chaii dler. Harvey Mellen. Joseph Ayres. Hiram Sherman. Joseph Ayres. Year. 1827 to 1828 1828 " 1829 1829 " 1830 1830 " 1833 1833 (' 1835.1835 " 1836 1836 " 1837 1837 -)1 1838 1838 " 1843 1843 " 1845 1S45 " 1849 1849 11850 1850 1 1851 1851 1852 1852 1853 1854 1856 1-856 1857 1857 1859 1859 1862 1862 1863 1863 1865 1865 1868 1868 1869, 1869 1870 1870 1875 Clinton Townships Job C. Smith. James Conner. tIarvey Cook. Jolhn itockton. Christian ClemerIs. Rodney 0. Cooley. Richard Butler. do. Commissioners served.:* Porter Ribber. David Shook. William S. Robinson. ~ Charles H. Carey. Chancy G. Cady. ~Wesly Hinman. Lemuel Sackett. Andrew S. Robertson. John I. Traver. Thomas L. Sackett. Joshua B. Dickinson. August Czizek. Thomas L. Sackett. John I. Traver. Thomas L. Sacket. George W. Robertson. Year. 1843 to 1844 1844 " 1846 1846 " 1848 1848 " 1849 1849 " 1850 1850 " 1851 ]851 " 1853 1853 " 1854 1854 " 1855 1855 " 1856 1856 " 1857 1857 " 1859 1859 " 1860 1860 " 1861 1861 " 1865 1865 " 1866 1866 " 1867 1867 " 1870 1870 " 1871 1871 " 1872 1872 " 1875 Chesterfield Township, Samuel P. Canfield. Benjamin T. Castle. Cyrus B. Simmons. Charles B. Matthews. Cyrus B. Simmons. Samuel P. Canfield. Eber C. Denison. Samuel P. Canfield. Eber C. Denison. Charles B. Matthews. Joshua C. Parker. Joseph Hubbard. Parker Hart. Cha'rles D. Crittenden. Johni Milton. Ford L. Milton. Park er Hart. Joel Hart. Charles D. Crittenden. Joel Hart. John Milton. Year, Erin Township. 1837 to 1838 John B. Cottrell. 1838 " 1843 Commissioners sej ved. 1843 " 1844 Israel Curtis. 1844 " 1845 Solomon Porter. 1845, 1852 Israel Curtis. 1852 " 1853 William Stevens. 1853 " 1855 Peter McGovern. 1855 1859 jHenry L. Reeves. 1859 1862 Jacob Hetchler. 1862 " 1865 James Whiting. 1865 1866 Jacob Hetchler. 1866 " 1867 Austin Wales. 1867 " 1873 James Whiting. 1873 1 1875 Robert A. Barton. Year. 1827 to 1829 1829 " 1838 1838 " 1843 1843 " 1845 1845 " 1848 1848 1849 1849 1850 1850 ",1855 1855 1861 1861 " 1863 1863 1864 1864 " 1868 1868 "1873 1873 1875 Harrison Township, Henry Taylor. Jacob Tucker. Commissioners. Henry Teats. William J. Tucker. Antoine Chortier. Alonzo A. Goodman. Robert Teats. William J. Tucker. Alonzo A. Goodman. Edward Teats. William J, Tucker. Edward Teats. Frederick C. Forton. Year. 1837 1838 1838 to 1843 1843 1845 1845 1848 1848 1849 1849 1S50 1850 1852 1852 1853 1853 1854 1854 1856 1856 1857 1857 1S58 1858"1859 1859 111863 1863 " 1864 1864 111.870 1870 1.875 Lenox Township, Samuel Gibbs. B. Wright. Commission ers. Aldis L. Rich. Justus R. Crandall. Leander ellen. Carlos W. Brown. Justus R. Crandall. Aldis L. Rich. Thomas F. Dryer. Justus R. Crandall. Carlos W. Brown.~ Justus R. Crandall. George W. French.. Justus R. Crandall. Milo Selleck. Daniel Bates. Lucius 1-1. Canfield. * In 1838 the'Board of Supervisors was abolished in Macomb County (and in the entire State of Michigan) and that of County Commissioners substituted. The Board of Supervisors was re-established in 1843.-[HISTORIAN.] ".q...^ Year. 1834 to 1835 1 "35 ' 1838 1838 s1843 1843 1845 1845 "1847 1847 " 1849 1849 1850 1850 1 1851 1851 1854 1.854 1855 1855 "'1856 1856 " 1857 1857 " 1858 1858 1 1859 1859 1873 1873 1875 Macomb Township, Flaver Greenleaf. Calvin Davis. Commissioners. Joel W. 31anley. Stewart Taylor. William McDonald. Stewart Taylor. Calvin Davis. Hiram 31. Jenny. Perry M. Bentley. Hiram M.-Jenny. Samuel Whiting. Orange Foot. Samuel Whiting. Horace H. Cady. Jacob Stroup. Year. 1827 to 1838 1838 " 1843 1843' 18 4 1844 " 1845 1845 1846 1846 1848 1848 " 1849 1849 " 1850 1850 " 1851 i851 " 1852 1852 1854 1854 " 1855 1855 " 1856 1856 1858 1858 1859 1859 1860 1860 1861 1861 1862 1862 1863 1863 "1870 1870 " 1875 Ray Township. Reuben R. Smith. Commissioners. Alexander Tackles. Jacob A. Crawford. Reuben R. Smith. Jacob A. Crawford. John M. Crawford. Jonathan E. Davis. John M. Crawford. Charles Marble. John Al. Crawford. Joel Thompson. Hiram Barrows. Joel Thompson. Deliverance S. Priest. Elias W. Lyons. Joel Thompson. Deliverance-S. Priest. John 3M. Crawobrd. Deliverance S. Priest. Ezra Nye. Year, Richmond Township. 1843 to 1845 James Flower. 1845 " 1846 Linus R. Gilbert. 1846 1 1847 Pliny Corbin. 1847 " 1852 Isaac B. Gilbert. 1852 " 1853 Hiron Hathaway. 1853 " 1854 Isaac B. Gilbert. 1854 " 1856 George H. Stuart. 1856 " 1859 Isaac B. Gilbert. 1859 " 1862 Daniel Fiagler. 1862 " 1867 Oscar S. Burgess. 1867 " 1868 Isaac B. Gilbert. 1868 " 1.869 Daniel Flagler. 1869 il 1870 Charles J. Heath. 1870 " 1871 Hiraln Burke. 1871 " 1872 George H. Stuart. 1872 " 1874 Daniel Flagler. 1874 " 1875 Thomas Dawson. Year, 1827 to 1828 1828 " 1835 1835 '1838 1838 1843 1843 1845 1845 1846 1846 " 1.848 1848 1849 1849 " 1857 1857 ' 1860 1860 " 1861 1.861 ' 1862 1862 "1863 1863 " 1865 1865 1866 1866 " 1868 1868" 1.869 1869 "11871 1871 "1873 1873 1874 1874"/1875 Shelby Township, Joseph Lester. Samuel Axford. Ephraim Calkins. Commissioners. Oliver Adams. Payne K. Leech. Oliver Adams. Jacob Scrambling. Philander Ewell. Willard A. Wales. Philander Ewell. Payne K. Leech. Willard A. Wales. Chancy W. Whitney. Philander Ewell. Willard A. Wales. Philip Price. Willard A. Wales. Payne K. Leech. James S. Lawson. Albert L. Goff. I I i Year, 1835 to 1836 1836 "11838 1838 "11843 1843 " 18 1844" 1849 1849 1851 1851 1852 1852 1856 1856 1857 1857 1860 1860 1861 1861 "11862 1.862 "11870 1870 1871 1.871 " 1873 1873 " 1875 Sterling Township, William A. Davis. Hilen Ober. Commissioners. William A. Davis. John B. St. John. I-ilen Ober. Elias Scott. John B. St. John. Leonard 31. Caster. John B. St. John. Benjamin C. Gunn. A. W. Aldrech. John B. St. Jolhn. Samuel H. St. John. Seymour Brownell. Humphrey Murphy. t II I I I Year, 18430to146 1846 " 1847 1847 1.849 1849 "1854 1854 "11857 1857 1860 1860 1863 1863 1865 1865 1867 1867 1871 1871 "11875 Warren Township, George Bolam. Alonzo Haight. George Bolam. John L. Beebe. George W. Corey. George Bolam. Louis Grosebeck. Joseph T. De Coninck. Louis Grosebeck. Charles S. Grosebeck. Louis Grosebeck. Year, 1827 to 1828 1828, 1833 1833 " 1838 1838 1843 1843 " 1844 1844 " 1845 1845 " 1847 1847 i 1849 184.9 ",850 1850, 1851 1851 " 1853 1853 " 1855 1855 " 1856 1856 " 1857 1857 "1858 1858 " 1872 1872 1875 Washington Township. John S. Axford. " Gideon Gates. Caleb Wilbor. Commissioners. John Keeler. Aratus Smith. John Keeler. Noah Cooley. Aratns Smith. Elisha Calkins. Noah Cooley. Elisha Calkins. Miarshall S. Hadley. George H. Fenner. Hugh Gray. Aratus Smith. Jerome W. Niims. I I GOVERNORS OF MICHIGAN. POST-OFFICES IN MACOMB COUNTY. Year. 1622 1636 1648 1651 1656 1657 1658 1661 1663 1665 1672 ' 1682 1685 1689 1699 1703 1726 1749 1749 1752 1755 During French Rule, M. Samuel Champlain. " de Montmagny. " " Aillebout.....Lauson (PNre). " " Lauson (Fils). " " Aillebout. " " Argenson. Baron de Avangour. 31. de Mesey. cc " Cour-celle. " " Frontenac. " " Barre. M Marquis de Nouville. " de Frontenac. " Chevalier de Callieres. M Marquis de Vaudreuil. c c " Beauharnais. " Comte de la Gallisoniere. " de la Janquiere. " Marquis du Quesne de Menneville.. " de Vaudreuil de CavagnaL Year, 1765 1766 1766 1770 1774 1774 1774 1775 1776 1791 1798 During British Rule, James Murray, Paulus Emelius Irving. Guy CarletocHector T. Cramahe. Guy Carleton. Frederick Haldeman. Henry Hamilton. Henlry Hope. Lord Dorchester. Alured Clarke. Lord Dorchester. Year, 1805 1814 1829 1834 1835 During Territorial Government, WVilliam Hull. Lewis Cass. George B. Porter. Stevens T. Mason (ex-Officio). John T. Horner. Year, During State Government. 1835 Stevens T. Mason. 1840 William Woodbridge. 1841 J. Wright Gordon (acting). 1842 John. S. Barry. 1846 Alpheus Felch. 1847 William L. Greenly (acting). 1848 Epaphroditus Ransom. 1850 John S. Barry. 1852 Robert McClelland. 1853 Andrew Parsons (acting). 1855 Kingsley S. Bingham. 1859 MNoses Wisner. 1861 Austin Blair. 1865 Henry H. Crapo. 1869 Henry P. Baldwin. 1873 John J. Bagley. ' 1875 ". Post-Office. Township, Armada. - Armada. Disco. Shelby. Frazer.: IErin. MIacomb. 'i3acomb. Clinton. 31T. CLEMENS. Clinton. Clinton. Meade. Macomb and Ray. Memphis. Richmond Riley. Milton. Chesterfield. Mount Yernon. Washington. Village, Armada. Disco. Frazer. Macomb. Marcellus. MqT. CLEIME N S. Quinn. Meade. M emphis. Milton. Mount Vernon. Post-Office, Township. Village, New Baltimore. Chesterfield. New Baltimore. New Haven. Lenox. New Baltimore. Ray Centre. Ray. Ray Centre. Cady. Clinton. Red Run Corners. Richmond. Richmond. Ridgeway. Romeo. Bruce & Washing'n Romeo. Roseville. Erin. Roseville. Utica. Shelby & Sterling. Utica. Waldenburg. Macomb. Waldenburg. Warren. Warren. Glenwood. Washington. Washington. Washington. Si ~lif: ^^, T i ii il...... ' -.]!-,-' '' x

Page  V :L I V HISTORY OF M CoalB C0-U YN, Y'!GAN. ANTERIOR TO.-THE ORGANIZATION OF THE COUNTY. THE Territory of Michigan was established in the year 1805, and the government of it formed on the 3d day of June of the same year. It'was the unfortunate fate of the new government to commence its existence during the prevalence of the most melancholy public and private calamities. The conflagration of Detroit had a depressing effect upon the whole Terlitory, which was keenly felt by the then infant settlements of the region originally embraced within the present boundaries of the County of Macomb. The hostifity and treachery of the Indians, combined with the war of 1812, tended to retara the settlement of the country, and to bring upon it a crisis of financial and general depression. It was a fortunate circumstance, however, connected with the history of this section, that a substantial class of pioneers made the first permanent settlements. To these individuals, and to the narration of some brief historical reminiscences of the many dangers and privations they endured, we propose to devote a portion of our space. Macomb County received its name from General Alexander Macomb, who was born at Detroit; he entered our regular army, and won promotion. He fought bravely in 1813, at Fort George and Niagara,,'and gained the decisive victory over the British at Plattsburg, September 11, 1814. ile was born in 1782, and died in 1841. We trace the history of this region back to its earliest glimmer; but find no record of permanent settlement prior to 1784. - True, there are feeble vestiges of the French trader, antedating, this nearly a, century. In 1788 there were Some thirty-four families' in all the settlements from the mouth of the Huron (Clinton) River, extending up the stream some nine miles. These people were tolerably well situated, but extremely poor, and lacked greatly in agricultural skill. The settlers were all of this description save four, who were said to be Englishmen of industry and enterprise. Twenty of the farms were bought of the Indians in 1788; ten in 1793, 1795, and 1796; and four settled in 1800 without any authority of any kind. We ascertain that between Milk River and the mouth of the Clintorl River, a strip of lake-shore now known as L'Anse Creuse, there were in 1797 thirty settlers. They were very poor and ignorant, and subsisted by hunting and fishing. These people came into their possessions without any authority, even of the Indians. East of the mouth of the Clinton River, commencing at the now site of the " ruins of Belvidere," and between that point and St. Clair River, only two Canadian families had settled. These men had "squatted" at a point near the bank of Salt River, and had possessed themselves of a salt. spring. This salt spring was looked upon by them as the source of unbounded wealth. This spring is now known to the people of this County generally as the one in the little glen where the Plank Road-bridge crosses Salt River, about four miles up the stream from the lake. C. Jonett, Government agent, in a communication to Thomas Jefferson, Secretary of State, in. 1804, placed considerable importance on this salt interest. We quote from his report: "']From experiments which have been made, I am justified-in saying that this spring deserves the public attention. It was wrought some time by a couple of men, who, owing to their want of capital, were incapable of conducting the business on an advantageous plan.. By these men I am assured that a quart of water did with them turn out a gill of salt, and in-all their trials with greater quantities it never failed to produce a like proportion. There is a sufficient quantity of water to supply works to any extent." This salt spring was claimed by a firm whose names are recorded in the State papers at Washington as Melbourne & Parks, and whose title had been obtained from the Indians in such a manner that the Government refused to recognize their claim as of any validity, affecting, as it did, so important an interest. Touching the first white settler who permanently located within the original limits of this County there is considerable doubt, and upon this interesting subject there exist a number of contradictory statements..After much inquiry, wve are inclined to the belief that WVilliam Tucker was the first white settler here. At any rate, the honor lies betwreen that gen teman and Richard Conner, both deceased. According to the best historical data now extant,- we ~find that the former has the best claim to priority of settlement. W~e quote: "W ~illiam Tucker was probably the -first white person speaking English ever brought into this region, who afterwards settled in this immediate vicinity, tIe wvas taken by the Indians when about, eleven years old, together with a younger brother, Joseph, who afterwards wvent to the upper lakes to hunt with the Indians. Three of them, including Joseph, went with a canoe to a desolate island, and never returned to the company. Xt was supposed their canoe floated away and ieft them with no resources for support or escape. Thbree human skeletons were afterwards found on the island, thought to be ~those of the lost. The father of the two boys was shot down by the. Indians while they were gathering their wheat harvest in Virginia. The Indians were Chippewas, and this is supposed to have occurred.during the war between the English and French in 1753, 1754, and 1755. William lived with the Indians, whose centre of operations was at Detroit, and with them roamed through the forests which then covered this vicinity in their hunting excursions, and in this manner learned where the bestlands lay and where to make his future home. When about eighteen years old he visited the scenes of his childhood. He married Catharine Hazel, at Stover's Town, 11irgin;, August 8, 1773. He then came to Detroit, where he lived till the Revolutionary War commenced. He was employed in the army as an interpreter of the, Indian language, and continued there until the close of the war. In the spring of 1784 he removed his family to the banks of the Huron (Clinton) River, and erected his cabin on the site where his son Charles resided until the time of his death, whichl occurred in the winter of 18'4, at the advanced age of eighty-six years. A curious coincidence: within about a decade of' the centenary of his father's first settlement. "Richard Conner and his wife were originally from Maryland. The maiden name of Mrs. C. was Myers. She was taken by the Indians when three or four years old, on the Monongahela River. Her father hid the children as the Indians approached the house, and then ran to the river, swam across, and as he ascended the opposite bank they shot him. Richard Conner came to this vicinity in 1785." There is quite an interesting romance connected with the history of this gentleman. There was, at an early time, a young girl (mentioned above) stolen by the Indians, and by them kept for many years. Under the careless and exuberant life of the forest she early developed into a most beautiful maiden, whose charms became famous among many of the Indian nations. The tribe which owned her were very proud of their captive. Young Conner heard of this " Queen of the Wood's," and went to woo her, not by the usual method adopted by civilized nations, but by a bargain with the chief of the tribe. The negotiations were soon completed so far as the actual purchase was concerned. The most remarkable incident connected with the transaction was the very singular proviso agreed upon: that was that the first male child resulting from this peculiar union was to belongs to the chief. Ere long a son was born, and sure enough the aborigine came along to claim the fulfillment of the original contract. The son was duly handed over to him, and was adopted by the tribe. Ile stayed with the Indians until about twelve years old, when his parents bought him of the old chief. They had considerable trouble to wean his mind from the wild, ungovernable passions instilled into him by his Indian life, but gradually he returned to that civilization to which he properly belonged. The first white child born in Mlacomb County, according to the best historical information obtainable, was Susanna Conner, daughter of Richard Conner.and his woodland bride. She subsequently became the wife of Elisha Harrington, who came to Frederick, in Clinton Township, in 1806. He remained in the settlement until the war of 1812. In addition to the names already mentioned, we find among those of the pioneers of the County, coming in from 1800 to the time of the organization of the County in 1818, John Lovelace, Joseph Hayes, the Meldrums, the Moross family, and many others. We insert the following interesting communication made to Congress February 17, 1804, which relates to original land titles, taken fromh articles upon this subject written by Alonzo M. Keller, abstract-and insurance agent of Mount Clemens: " To the Senate and Ulouse of BRel,)resen tatives of the United States: " Information having been received some time ago that the public lands in the neighborhood of Detroit (i.e. within twenty-five miles more or less) required particular attention, the agent appointed to transact business with the Indians in that quarter was instructed to inquire into and report the situation of the titles and occupation of the lands, private and public, in the neightboring settlenients. His report is now communicated, that the legislature may judge how far its interposition is necessary to quiet legal titles, confirm the equitable, to remove the past, and to prevent future intrusions, which have.neither law nor justice for their basis. SETTLEMENT- OF LAKE~-SINCLAIR FROM GROS POINT TO MILK RIVER. "This settlement is six miles in length, and contains twenty-four farms, with a front on the lake of from three to five acres. The face of the country'is level, though the situation is high and commanding; and possesses from its elevation _a pleasant and extensive view of Lake Sinclair and its banks. The soil is dark, rich, and strong, and extremely favorable to the cultivation of wheat. Art here has done but little, and even less than that little which nature has left her to do, for the Canadian settlers are very indolent; of course very poor, and consequently very wretched. Perhaps on a barren soil necessity would have been an incentive to industry, the natural, or rather the legitimate, parent of affluence. "The tenures by which these people hold their farms are of two kinds. Four of them.may be denominated as French titles. the remaining twenty are derived from the.rndi ns, perhaps by purchase in the year 1783, at +hich timne they were settled. SETTLEMIENT FROM MILKC RIVER TO RIVER H3U RONI~.:'MilkrRiver is so inconsiderable a rivulet, and rendered from its particular situation so vcer-y unimportant, that I shall not waste any time nor tire your patience with its description. From its mouth to river Huron (Clinton) is.twelve miles; less calculated for a settlement than any other I have seen in ~this country. It is low, fiat, and mzarshy. These disadvantages combined with unhealthful effuvia form obstacles which neither the industry nor the perseverance of the agriculturist will be able to surmuount. There are, nevertheless, thirty Settlers on this tract, notwithstanding its apparent destitution of the advantases of soil, situation, and market. These people camne into pos'session in the year 1'797, without au thority even from the Indians. Their divisional lines are marked by themselves, and they are ignorant of the number of acres in their respective farms. This settlement, however, possesses that regularity which is so remarkable in this country. The farmers are as poor as they are unfortunate in the choice of their situation. All of them are Canadians." This extract has a local reference to a portion of Macomb County; but a good class of industrious and experienced agriculturists came in at a later day, and have redeemed much of the land designated "marshy." In fact, the country is comparatively free from swamps, except in some localities in the immediate neighborhood of the lake-shore. The inhabitants of the above-named settlementz, at the time referred to, and for some few years subsequent, have left their names as a part of the history of those settlements. Among those of Huron (Clinton) River we find the names of Francis St. 0bin, James Conner, William Tucker, Henry Tucker, Joseph Compau, Baptiste Compavet, Richard Conner, Augustus Langdon, Joseph Robertjean, Alexis Pettier, Christian Clemens, and Marsac. At L'Anse Crease, Jean Marsac, Joseph Sansfacon, Louis Champagne, Charles Chovia, Baptiste Bie, Charles Dulac, Joseph Dube. M~any of the above have left descendants, who nowwreside in this County, worthy and honored members of society. The average price of the land bought in this County during the earlier settlement was but a trifle higher than that established by law. Very little h-as since been enteredc by speculators, so that the population of Macomb County from its commencement has been of a permanent and industrious character. Possessing but little fictitious capital, its increase in population and wealth has been steady and rapid. THE INDIANS. The chief charactcr of the early western settlements was the Indian. The aborigine has ever become subservient to the wishes of the white man; not, however, in any instance, without difficulty and bloodshed. When the civilizing influence of the intelligent pioneer is brought in contact with the subtlety of the red man, then a lasting feud and antagonism exists between them, which naught but extermination or ceaseless struggles can assuage. Happily, the pacific bearing of the early settlers in these regions, combined with a judicious but stern determination to assert their power, tended to still the sleepless jealousy and treachery of the Indians who inhabited the country now comprehended within the boundaries of Macomb County' The infant settlements were constantly in danger from the hostility of the roving tribes rather than from those that were permanently located among them. During the war of 1812 they had much to fear, not from the friendly Indians, but from those that were in sympathy with the British. Owingr to continued vigilance very few depredations were committed, and less bloodshed. The Indians that formerly inhabited this country were Chippewas, under the famous chief M1aconce. The old chief drowned himself, as recorded in the history of Chesterfield Township. By natural descent his title and privileges went to his children, and Francis Mraeonce, the last chief of the tribe while here, was welt known to many of the older settlers.' The Indians remained in this County until the fall of 1838, when the last of the once powerful tribe sold their reservation to the Government and moved to the banks of the Osage River, in Missouri. Mnany detachments of them had left before, some as early as 1830. Francis Maeonce accompanied the remnant of his tribe to Missouri, but made two or three visits here after their departure. He was corpulent in person, and stood about five feet eight inches in height. He was not one of your ideal dime novel red men, nor did he correspond with the flowery description which Allan P. Bentley gave of him in' a series of articles on the early history of this vicinity, published some years since in an Iowa journal, wherein he describes Iaeonce as being "tall and erect, and as straight as an arrow, with a commanding physique, and great strength and dexterity." But they are gone, with here and there solitary exceptions, who, by thrift and economy, have purchased small farms and become civilized members of the community, There are two or three of this class in the County. The ashes of one of the great chiefs still repose about a mile southwest of New Baltimore. THE LOST CHILD. One of the true characteristics of the Indian in the earlier settlement of the West was the abduction and adoption of white children. We have had to record, as a part of the history of the early settlement of each of the counties the history of which we.have written, at least one case of child-stealing; nor does Macomb County lack an incident of the kind. We give the case as detailed by Mrs. L. Bailey, of Romeo: On the last day of March, 1828, Alanson Finch, a four-year-old son of Albert Finch, one of the pioneers of Washington Township, was stolen -by the Indians. The child, together with an elder brother, was returning home from the sugar bush, when one suggested to the other the idea of trying who could reach home first by two separate routes. The elder one said that he would go across Mr. Bailey's field, and the younger across that of their father. They started, the distance to the house by either way being but about a quarter of a mile. The elder child reached home safely, and was anxiously interrogated by his mother as to the whereabouts of his little brother. He told the circumstances of their separate journeys home, and closed by saying that he had given his brother the shortest way, and anticipated findin g him at home. Search asp immediately instituted, and after many futile efforts to discover the lost one by his friends and the immediate neighbors, the alarm spread through all the settlements in the County, and the entire mazle portion of them turned out to a man, and scoured the woods in every direction; but their charitable intentions. and endeavors proved unavailing, and after many days they desisted. The child wa-Ls never found. Suspicion rested upon an Indian called t'onobn, whio had taken a remarkable interest inl the child for many months previous to its disappearance. He would go to Mr. Finch's house, and, taking the child upon his knee, would teach him the Indian language ere the little one could scarcely prattle the mother tongue.. This suspicion was strengthened by the fact that KIonoba left the settlement simultaneously with the abduction or loss of the child. Some sixteen years after the child wass stolen, a person of about twenty years of age came to Romeo and claimed to be Alanson Finch. He told a very plausible story about having been brought up by an Indian,-by whom he was told that he had been stolen in his childhood, etc. But when he came to be identified by the B alleys and others, who had known the missing child, he utterly failed in the most prominent points of his claim. He finally left the place, not without: leaving some credulous enough to suppose that he was the genuine Alanson Finch, and not the impostor that he really was. Further than this, the affair is involved in the usual mysterious surroundings of similar cases. The same maternal sufferings 'Were endured by the fond mother at the loss of her darling;i the same heroic endeavors were made to recover the lost one; and the same surmises were indulged in that have characterized all such instances since the white -man first became the antagonist of the treacherous Indian. And thus the matter rests until-thle final moment, when all secrets shall be made known, all mysteries solved. LITERARY AND EDUcATIoNAL. The literary privileges of the early settlers were on neither an exalted nor advantageous footing for many years. Many localities, while yet in their infancy, both east and west of this County, were far better situated in this respect. Here the increased and manifold privations debarred the pioneers of our County from erecting either the primitive log school-house or the equally original sanctuary. But when the harassing.i6rcumstances of their situation would'permit, they exerted every energy towards the development of intellectual and moral culture. At * The papers of Rgev. H. N. Bissell, pastor of the Presbyterian Church of MIount Clemens, and Edgar Weeks, Esq., a prominent lawyer of the same place. _ __ __ __I _ _~ I I_ _ __ I I

Page  VI VI first very little concert of action could be obtained, partly because of the strangeness, of the new situation, and partly because many entertained doubts as to whether they would permanently remain in their new homes. Yet those who had families with them manifested a praiseworthy and zealous regard for the future of their offspring. Doubtless the first schools taught in this County were those ta~ught by the Moravian missionaries, those brave and heroic champions of religion and learning, justice and piety, whose works have left an indelible im.press on the history of every settlement in this western country. The first school taught in the English languagre of which we have any definite authority was under the teaching of Joseph Roe, in the house of William Tacker, in Harrison. This was eig-hty-one years ago. Edward Tucker was one of the scholars in the primary department. The teacher's wages were ten dollars per mouth, with board, washing-, and mending- included. Mr. Roe acted in the capacity of a savant whenever an occasion offered. Ile frequently read the E piscopal burialservice at funerals, as there were none present to conduct any other exercises. He remained about ten years in this vicinity. After peace again pervaded the settlement, the families residing on the river east of Mount Clemens built a log school-house, a few rods from the site of the residence of Lafayette Tucker. This was the first school-house in the County. Benjamin P. Dodge, a, British tory, was: one of the first teachers who occupied it. Richard Butler taught school in it as early as 1824, and Dr. Henry Taylor in 1827. The school drew scholars from a distance of five miles. Henry Harrington was one of Dr. T-aylor's pupils. Robert Tate, a Scotchman, taugrht school in this County as early as 1806. It was a family school, gathered at the house of Wm. Clemens. After he had fulfilled his mission here as a pedagogue, he returned to Canada, from whence lie came. After the war, Ezra B. Prescott employed his spare time in advancing the interests of education. He built a house just below the residence of John Stockton. To show his versatility of talent he lived the life of a bachelor, and kept house for himself. "The school was a liter-ary centre for the settlers, and for want of artificial carriages to reach it, the children resorted to those which nature afforded. John Hayes, ~then a lad, would mount his pony, take on two of his sisters behind him, and away to school, giving his pony the limits of ranging through the hours of,ztudy. When their daily task was done they returned by the same conveyance." " After the old-log court-house-was erected it afforded them facilities for instruction until 1843, when a frame school-house was built by subscription, on a lot west of the Presbyterian Church edifice. This was the literary institution of the village of Mount Clemens for six years, when it was burned to the ground. The educational interests of the County have been well attended to since they" secured a firm-and lasting foundation. To give as comprehensive a view as possible of the present status of educational matters in Macomb County, we quote fr'om the County school superintendent's (S. B. Russell, Esq.) report:/ "Number of school districts in the County, 116; number of union schools employing three or wore teachers and organized under the primary-school law, 6, viz., Mount Clemens, Romeo, Utica,, Armada., New Baltimore, and Memphis. Of these, each of the first three named has a high-school department. It was determined at the annual school meetings in September last to sustain ten months' school in each of the above-named schools, except the last two;:New Baltimore is to have -nine months, -and Memphis voted to have only four. (The -vote was subsequently rescinded, and five months' -school was fin~aily ~sustained.) Comibined in the union -and graded schools of this County is a most powerful itnd beneficial influence, and from them comes a larg-e portion of our most efficient school-teachers. There are eight denomina~tional or church schools, havingr an actual attendance of 530 pupils; number of districts failing to sustain school during the summer, a",... "Many of the districts have adopted the system of three instead of two terms a year. This is another step in advance, and one that gives entire satisfaction to teachers: and. with -in occasRional exception, it is p-referred by he fnsc~hool The above extracts cover the entire s-'abject of. the prevailing excellence of the schools of Macomb County. The -present flourishing condition of them also offers a favorable criterion of the vast progress made in educational matters during the past half-century.:No fitter retrospection in this department of social culture can be presented than a comparison of the school system of the pioneer periodapart from the increased facilities now enjoyed--with that offered ri ght in our midst. It is, indeed, a beautiful illustration of the practical excellence of intellectual cultivation. FROM THE ORGANIZATION OF THE COUNTY TO THE PRESENT. The County) of Macomb was erected in the year 1818. It originally included within its boundaries all the territory within the lower peninsula lying -north of the base line to Lake Michig-an. This vast area of country bas been judiciously lessened, until Macomb now embraces about four hundred -and sixty square miles..The firs-t session of the 'County court was held at the house of Christian Clemens, on Monday, July 13, 1818. The judiciary consisted of Christian Clemens, Chief Justice, with Daniel Le Roy and Dr. William Thompson, Associate Judges; General John Stockton -was Clerk of the court. General S. was the first Justice of the Peace in Mount Clemens, the first Reg-ister of Deeds, and the first Postmaster, and he held some other inconsiderable primary offices. Ezra B. Prescott was the first Prosecuting Attorney and Counsellor to plead at this court. The first case was Mitcbel and Leo Trombley vs. Joseph Dupree. It was continued and tried by jury, July 12, 1819. Verdict for plaintiff, thirty-six dollars and fifty cents. The first tavern license was granted to a Mr. Thorn, now of St. Clair County; the first in this County to Chief-Justice Clemens. It was a somewhat peculiar incident, but one in keeping with the primitive simplicity that characterized every feature of the pion~eer. settlemients, to see the Chief Justice leave the bench and petition his judicial colleagues to grant him a license to run a tavern. Horace H. Cady kept the Franklin Ilouse at Mount Clemens at an. early day. There was an insufficient number of houses at Mount Clemens at the first session of the court to accommodate the members of the grand and petit juries when attending~ court. Edward Tucker affirmed that he had to take nine of them home with him, two miles and ahalf down the river. In 1819 one Captain:Benjamin Woodworth contracted to build a square log. court-house on the site of the present one, with a jail in the tower, after the order of the European castle during the feudal ages. This old building served the several purposes of court-house, jail, school-room, meeting-house, and town hall until 1839, when it was set on fire* by a. prisoner incarcerated for some petty offense, and consumed. The present structure was erected by the residents and neighboring settlers in 1841. Charles J. Forton had a contract to furnish a portion of the bricks used in the building, and it is said that his wife assisted in hauling, the brick a distance of two and a half miles. This lady is still living, at the advanced age of seventy years. From this period, and antedating it some few. years, the general growth and progress of the County has been of the most rapid and promaising kind. The establishment of many of the literary, social, and domestic institutions which add so lffuch of practical and non-fictitious worth to a community have been embraced by the people. We proceed to givib a brief history of some of these, commencing with the HISTORY OF THE CHURCHES. Relig-ious liberty, the absolute separation of church and state, has become realized all over our land, far beyond the conception, and still more the execution, of any European Protestant country. This separation, and the political equality of all creeds, constitutes one of the ca~rdinal and salient traits of the American community. Not in indifference to religious convictions originated this religious liberty, but in the finDal ly well understood and well applied principle of the freedom and equality of moral as well as of political rights. This is the great fundamental basis on which our relig-ious liberty was founded, and which gives a hallowed interest to a historical reminiscence of the various local denominations of any particular section. Accordingf to actual count, there are in Macomb County forty-eight religious orgranizations, forty-three sacred edifices, wiL-h a seating, capacity of twelve thousand one hundred and forty-five, and the church property is valued at one hundred and sixty thousand dollars. The three leadingc denominations are: first, the.Methodist Free, with sixteen org-anizations, ten edifices, and church property valued at thirty-six thousand three hundred and twenty-five dollars. Second, the Lutheran, withl nine org-anizations, number of edifices nine; value of church property, sixteen thousand five hundred dollars. Third, the Baptist, with eight organizations, seven edifices; value of church property., twenty-two thousand dollars. The Roman Catholic Church ranks fourth in number of organizations, which is five, number of edifies five. This church ranks -first in point of value of church property, which is forty-eight thousand dollars. Oar sketches of the churches will be impartial and non-sectarian, and arranged in order; not based upon religious preference, but upon priority of organization. The history of this County tends to show that the Catholic Church justly claims precedence in the above respect;l hence we head the church history with THE CATHOLIC CHtURCH. At the earliest settlement of what now constitutes the County of Macomb the Catholic Church had its missionaries here to promulgate the tenets of her faith. At least ninety years have elapsed since the first Catholic church was erected in this neighborhood. It stood upon the south side of the Clinton River, distant from Mount Clemens about four miles. It was surrounded by a burial-ground, and half a century arro it was a rain. Following this, another edifice was erected, also on the Clinton River, about three miles from Mount Clemens. The services in. both of these churches were conducted by the missionaries. After the lastmentioned church fell into deecay, services were held in private dwellings under the ministrations of priests fr'om Detroit. These services w ere continued until the year 1841, when the main portion of the present church edifice was built, and the churclh formally reorganized under the pastorage of the Rev. Father Kenney. the year 1843. The first pastor who ministered in the new edifice was the Rev. Mr. Fulton. The present officers are: Rev. Wmn. A. Kingsbury, Pastor; George Wood and Harry Briggs, Deacons; Thomas Gilbert, Clerk. There is a prosperous Sabbath-school connected with the church, with Samuel Wood, Superintendent. The total enrollment of scholars at the end of the year 1874 was fifty. The congregation of the church now numbers about three hundred souls. THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. This religrious denomination is one of the most prominent religious features of the County. In former days its members held services in the old loog court-house, alternately with other churches. The church was formally organized on the 4th of May, I1S35, under the pastorage of Rev. M. Eastman. These services were dontinued -with as much regularity as possible until 1841, when the present commodious chuich edifice was erected. The charge of the church was then delegated to the Rev. A. S. Wells, who did some faithful service during his ministerial labors. The Rev. II. N. Bissell, the present pastor, commenced his labo rs in 1854, and ha~s continued to officiate since that time. He is an eloquent and earnest advo~cate of Christ's gospel and a faithful worker in the cause of his church,.tHe is generally beloved and respected, both by his own Congregation and the commuhanity caat laroe.beoeeHis lofnghisand eeafaithfulwothdischarge 'of his ministry is the best tribute ] The present oflfcers of the church are: Elders, Lemuel Sackett, J. H. Snook, Calvin Bush, Samuel Shear, E. B. Drake, and George B. Van Epps; Trustees, -ere B. Van Epps, Henry Fries, George Grovier, Calvin Bush, E. B. Drake, Edwvard Teats, 11. S. Donaldson, Samuel Shear, and Theodo'rý,_Traver j Clerk, 'T. W. Snook, who has held the position since 1849. The church is in a prosperous condition, and its congregation has for many years been rapidly increasing, until -it now numbers three hundred and ninety souls, with every prospect of a contin-Led increase. THE METHODIST CHIURCH. The Methodist Episcopal denomination has always held a prominent position in the annals of' religious history. To promulgate the gospel of Christ with:indefatigable exertions has ever been with them the principal endeavcor of their 'existence. In all this broad land, ere the earliest settlements were permanently located, we find, among others, the missionaries of the Methodists doing good service in disseminating the gospel of Chrdistianity. Faithful amid the hardships and toils consequent upon the pioneer establishment of religion, true to the best principles of humanity, we find these undaunted spirits leaving a fair and glorious record of their noble self-abnegation and courageous bearing of the cross of iChrist. Many have received the illustrious crown of martyrdom ere they would desert their calling, and have heroically given their blood to the cause of the Redeemer. The Methodists, like the other religious bodies here, at an early day held their services first in private families, and subsequently in the old court-house. The legral organization of the.1. E. Church was effected on the 27th day of October, 1836, under the ministerial charge of Rev. Hiram Gering. The first officers of the church were J. F. Seaman, J. Tuexbury, J. E. Hall, D. T. Bishop, 11, Pratt. The present church edifice wbas erected in 1841, when the church contained a congreg~ation of only one hundred. By arduous labor and untiring zeal on the part of the several ministers who have successively worked in the church, the congregration has increased to three hundred souls. The present officers are: Rev. C. Simpson', Pastor; Horace 1-. Cady, R. Little, J. C. Cady, William Parrot, and Georgre Robinson, officers at large. There is a, flourishing Sabbath -school connected with the church, which enrolls a membership of one hundred and seventyfive, with an average attendance of one hundred scholars. There is also a Suntday-school library containing one hundred and seventy-three volumes. The!general condition of the church is flourishing, and the pulpit is filled by a sincere and able minister. THIE EPISCOPAL CHURCH. The above religious body was first established at Mount Clemens, in the year 1849. The first services were held in the court-house, under the ministrations of the Rev. Edward McGee, who held the charge until 1851. From this time the interest in the church was allowed to slumber, but not to die; for in 1867 we find it again revived. The Rev. Milton Ward, from Detroit, held irregular services. He was succeeded by Rev. Mr. Hyde, who was the first resident minister since Mr. McGee. The present commodious and beautiful sacred edifice was erected and dedicated to the service of God in the year 1870. Since its erection the following reverend gentlemen have officiated: Woodward, Martin, and Skinner, the latter being the present incumbent. The present officers are: Wardens, Daniel C. Tilden, Dr. W. 0. Tennant j Vestrymen, Thomas M. Crocker, George R. Law, and John Trufant. The congregation now numbers two hundred and ten, and is, ill every respect, flourishing and prosperous. THE GERMAN EVANGELICAL CHURCHt. The members of the German Evangelical United Zion Church, of Mount Clemens, held irregular services in the court-house prior to 1860. In that year the German element of the community, having received some large additions by influx of emig-ration, found it expedient to have a house for public worship. Consequently they purchased the so-called "Academy," and fitted it up in a proper manner to serve as a church edifice. Services were commenced here under the Rev. Mr. Kies, who continued in chargre of the congregation, which only numbered about eight~y members, until 1864,. when Rev. Hermann Gundert was inst.alled. Under the pastorage of the latter gentleman the church has been greatly prospered, and during his eleven years of faithful ministry he has enjoyed the satisfaction of an increasing and permanent organization. The congregatio.n. is now one of the largest of any Protestant denomination in the County, numbering four hundred and fourteen s ouls. The society contemplate erecting ft Dew church and parsonage during the ensuing summer (1875), which they purpose making one of the most convenient sacred edifices in the County. There is a thriving Sabbath-school in connection with the church, having an average enrollment of eighty scholars and nine teachers. The most prominent officers of the church are William Fluemer, Jacob Gob], Adam Schrade, Ernest Olde. The present -pastor is H~ermann Gundert. The general condition of the church is good. It has been said that,1 the independent press is the high pontiff of our epoch." The truth of the above assertion is becoming more and more apparenit. Light and freedom are the elements of its life, of its functions. The press in its true and normal comprehension is rapidly becoming em'phatically the most spontaneous utterance of the human spirit, with its manifold thoughts, impressions, feelings, faculties, and passions. The mission of the press is to be the chivalry of the age. It is to dissolve prejudices, disentangle the truth, elucidate, if not solve, daily social, political, and administrative problems, defend the oppressed, the poor, bring to daylight abuses, discuss with conscientious independence the acts Dot only of those to whom society in any way or manner intrusts the regulation of its affairs, but even of private individuals when their actions bear upon the community. With these important duties to perform, the press occupies one of the most prominent places in history. This fact holds good equally with the local as wit'h the general press. Hence we devote ample space to the history of the press of Macomb County. THE MOUNT CLEMENS MOiNITOR. The history of this paper is involved in such a labyrinth of changes and coun ter- changes) that it is utterly impossible to trace the several proprietors under which it has been conducted. There is nothing assimilatingý to a complete file of the paper now in existence, which fact is somewhat derogatory to the enterprise of those who have had charge of it from time to time. Some maintain that the paper was originally started as a Whig org-an, while others just as confidently assert that it was Democratic in politics, and supported Martin Van Buren for the Presidency in 1836-. We incline to the latter account, seeing that we have before us a copy of the paper published at Mount Clemens, February 27, 1836, and bearing as its number 12. of volume i., which places its establishment on the 5th of November, 1835. This paper bore the title Ma-.c om)b 1Democrat, and was under the editorial and general management of J. K. Averill. It was a good paper for those days, equal to any of its cotemporaries, and superior to many of the weeklies of to-day. Its reading matter includes a good deal of agricultural readingl, the proceedings of the Senate and House, a fair local column, and spicy editorial. Among its advertisements we find the following, which shows that some people were naughtily inclined at Mount Clemens at that early day:

Page  VII . doole - NOTICE. 1' Whereas Hannah Ann Baker represents herself as my wife, and endeavors to obtain goods and credits as such; THESE are therefore to notify all persons not to trust or harbour her on my account, as she is'not my lau,:ful wife--but is the wife of Israel Edwards. " (Sigrned) BjN.JA3[I_ HOWARI)." Nobody can blame 3Jr. Howard for not wishing to support Mr. Edwards's wife, although the -italicized lat,itl would naturally leave a doubt as to the probable relation of Mrs. Edwards to Mr. Howard. There was also a paper published at Mount Clemens called the Macomb Colunty Patriot, under T. iN. Perry; then it was chanced to the State.nan, under Allan P. Bentley, but whether there was the remotest connection between these latter and the old D3eiocrat nobody remembers, and no records exist whereby to accurately ascertain. We are free to state historically, however, that the Ma(tcomb-Coounty Gazette under one A. C. Smith was part of the stem from which sprung the M1onitor. Following Mr. Smith in the management of the Gazette came William Canfield, who conducted the concern until 1864, when Walter T. Lee, the present editor and proprietor, in conjunction with Edgar Weeks, purchased the establishment and changed the name to the Mlonitor. These gentlemen conducted the paper as partners until 1867, when Mr. Weeks retired, and C. I. Lee, brother of the remaining proprietor, bought in, and they continued its publication until 1870, when C. 11. Lee retired and Walter T. continued the paper alone, until the 9th of October, 1874, when W. C. Stockton bought an interest in the office, which extends principally or wholly to the job department. The Monitor, under its present management, is an ably edited and well conducted family paper. It is Republican in politics, and progressive and independent in principle. It has as large a circulation as any paper in the County, which is a safe guarantee of its general worth. THE MOUNT CLEMENS PRESS. The Mount Clemens Press was established under the name of the Mfaconib Concnervative Press, in the year 1864, by Messrs. William Longstaff and James B. Eldredge. These gentlemen continued its publication until 186S, when they transferred the concern to John Frederick, who conducted the editorial and general business of the paper until 1872, when it was temporarily suspended. The office continued closed from December, 1872, until May 1, 1873, at which time Mr. Spencer B. Russell, the present editor and proprietor, resumed its publication under its' present title,,which was adopted by his predecessor. Daring the summer of 1874, Mr. Russell put into the office a complete new outfit, including presses, material for job printingD and for general newspaper business. The office is now one of the most complete, in every detail of the business, to be found in the County. The Press was originally established as a Democratic organ, and it has stuck to its principles from its establishment to the present. It is a progressive, live, ably edited family newspaper, and one which should find a place at the fireside of every family in the County. Office over the post-office, Mount Clemens, Michigan. THE MOUNT CLEMENS REPORTER. In 1873, Mr. Lewis M. Miller established a weekly newspaper at Mount Clemens, bearing the title of. the Mount Clermens Rejorter. He conducted the paper in a very creditable manner for a little more than a year, when he found that he could not make it a financial success. The office was then sold to the other newspapers, and the paper discontinued in 1874. ROMEO OBSERVER. The first paper started at Romeo was. the Livestigator, which may be rightly considered the parent stem from which sprung the present Observer. It commenced its career in Decem er, 1850, under Thomas M.. Perry,-peraps the most migratory journalist that ever existed. The Xrvestigator~ was continued for about seven years, under nearly as many different proprietors. In 1857 the Arguel commenced its publication under Il'. V. Bentley. It afterwards passed into the possession of S. Il. Ewell, by whom it was continued until January, 1865, when the office was destroyed by fire. There occurred here a temporary suspension of the paper, lasting from January until May 3, 1866, when the Observer~ was started by John' Russell, the notorious temperance agitator. Since the commencemuent of the Obser~ver, it has changed hands so often that to run through the entire list of its proprietors would be a task altogether superfluous. Among those who have had charge of the paper for periods varying fr~om six months to two yeass are M~essrs. I. D. H~anscom, E. A. Teatll, I3t. E. Mussey, J. C. Vrial, S. IH. Ew~~elI, and a host of others. In August, 1873, the present editor and proprietor, Mr. George A. W~aterbury, purchased the office, and has continued the publication of the paper since that time. During the latter gentleman's administration the paper has largely increased, both in general worth as a journal and in circulation. It. is an ably edited, interesting, and instructive local newspaper, and enjoys as large a circulation as any paper in the County. Nominal circulation nine hundred. In 1854-, Thomas M. Perry commenced the publication of the lndelJendent, at New Baltimore. After running the paper for about a year he sold out to a Mr. Ferris, who continued the publication of it until 1856, when it was permanently suspended. THE RAILROADS. THE ]MICHIGAN DIVISION OF THE GRAND TRUNK. The line of the railway known as the Port Huron, Detroit and Chicago Branch of the Grand Trunk Railway,, was completed in the autumn of 1859. The entire expense of construction and \ cuipment was borne by the gigantic corporatidn known as the Grand Trunk R.agroad Company of Canada. The Michigan Di\%ision enters Macomb County at the southeast corner of Richmond Township, and traverses the County in a southwesterly direction. The company have stations at the following pilaces- Ridgcway, New Baltimore (now New Haven), Mount Clemens, and Utica Plank. The road has' proved of substantial advantage to every part of the State and County not otherwise accommodated with a railway outlet, while the connection has proved invaluable to our merchants and shippers, and thereby to producers generally, in affording a competing route to the East; as well as connection with points t reached by any other line. The main branch runs from Port Sarnia to Portland, Maine, a distance of eight hundred and two miles. The Michigan Division runs from Port Huron to Detroit, a distance of fifty-nine miles, making a total length, under the Grand Trunk Corporation, of eight hundred and sixty-one miles. TIHE DETROIT AND BAY CITY RAILROAD. This ra.ihway is under the control of the Michigcan Central Railroad Company. It enters Macomb County near the centre of the southern boundary of Warren Township, and traverses through the townships of Warren, Sterling, and Shelby, in a northwesterly direction. It leaves the County about the centre of the wlestern boundary of the latter township, and enters the adjacent county of Oakland. The stations of this company, within the limits of Mlfacomb, are Warren, Glenwood, Spinnings, and Utica. This division is one hundred and fifteen miles in length, and passes through a rich agricultural region, while the lumber and salt trade contributes very matdrially to swell its traffic. THE MICHIGAN AIR-LINE. The Michigan Air-Line project was originally designed as a short line from Chicago to Buffalo, and was intended to run across the State from Chicago, striking the St. Clair River just above the town of St. Clair, and there connect with what is known as the Canada Southern. The Michiigan Central, which aided in building so much of this line as lies between Jackson- and Niles, and furnished almost the entire capital with which it was built, finally made it a feeder for Detroit and the Central. This road enters Macomb County in the southeast corner of Richmond Township, then traverses the townships of Armada and Washington. There are stations on this line within Macomb County, called Ridgeway, Armada, Romeo, and Washington. This branch line is twenty-six miles in length. It cost the people of the townships through which it runs a snug sum of money, but the benefits which will be derived from the road ultimately will doubtless compensate in a large measure for the heavy tax its construction imposed upon many individuals. That railroads in general are a benefit no one will deny, but some are constructed at an immense sacrifice to property-holders, and the remuneration, in actual value, is oftentimes imperceptibly slow in development. But on the whole, railroad enterprises, when conducted by persons who have the welfare of the several communities through which they shall pass at heart, are means of much good, and vice versa when instigated, carried on, and controlled by speculators, who look only to their own personal aggrandizement. As a public emolument, railroads-ought to become as popular as they are generally successful. STATISTICAL AND GENERAL. We insert the following statistical matter, carefully compiled from a census taken by the supervisors of the several townships in the springs of 1874:." The general showing is for the year ending Decemuber 31, 1873. W1e vouch for the reliability of the subsjoined, which wvill doubtless be read with interest by the patrons of this workz. There will be included in this compilation items of agricultural, financial, and manufacturing moment. The entire population of Miacom~b County in the year 1873 was 28,286. The number of acres of improved land, 153,012}; of woodland, 91,8'75; of other unimproved land, 10,8566 acres, at a total cash value of $10,975,8',9. The farming improvements and machinery were valued at $475,968. The amount paid in wages, including cost of board, during the year, was $296,878. V~alue of all farm products, $2,548,975. E'drest products realized $1i10,014=. Of the various agricultural products, the following quantities were returned: wheat, 2~77,610 bushels; corn, 373,339 bushels; oats, 375,849 bushels; barley, 28,0968 bushels; rye, 68'75 bushels: potatoes, 188,696 bushels; buckwheat, 16,817 bushels; -ill other kinds of grain, 325,894 bushels. The returns of live stock are represented as follows: horses, 8788; mules and asses, 35; milch-cows, 9981, working oxen, 403; other neat cattle, 8541; sheep, 58,211;, swine, 9295; total value of all kinds of live " Items not enumerated in said reports are from actual personal tading. VII stock, S1,518,439. Value of animals slaughtered or sold for slaughter, $456,391, Number of pounds of wool sheared, 261,178; butter, 789,640 pounds; cheese, 28,423 pounds; pork marketed, 926,089 pounds; apples raised, 132, '197 bushels.: value of all fruits raised, $93,568. FINANCIAL. Macomb County is entirely free fromn indebtedness of all kinds, and her financial condition is of the most flourishing and prosperous character. The amount of taxes collected for the year 187- was: State,-of all kinds, $24,634.99 County, of all kinds, )24,600. Compared with the first collection of taxes, these figures show a flattering increase. We find that the total amount of taxes paid in Macomb County in the year 1827 (date of regular organization of municipal powers) was $298.37. During the late civil war, the County raised a voluntary relief tax, averaging 930,000 per annum. MANUFACTURING AND INDUSTRIAL. The principal commodities of manufacture and industry in Macomb County are lumber and wooden goods. These great industries are conducted on a vastly different principle from that which formerly characterized them. Only a few years have elapsed since the hum of the cumbersome, but ingeniously contrived pipestave saw was heard, which has now been supplanted by the buzz and rapid whirl of the circular saw. The first material used for pipe-staves was oak, culled from the woods in the immediate vicinity of Salt River, in 'ýwhat is now Chesterfield Township. Mr. Joseph Habbard, of Mount Clemens, was the pioneer in this manufacture, which is now obsolete. We find, by reference to the statistical matter above mentioned, that there are in the County 20 saw mills, which turned out in 1873 11,566,000 feet of lumber. The capital invested in this branch of trade is $103,400. The sash, door, and blind manufactories are 4, of which the largest and most extensive is at Mount Clemens,:Messrs. Lewis & Grosebeck proprietors. Capital invested in all, $271,000. Value of products for year ending December 31, 1873, $41,000. There are 5 establishments for the manufacture of staves and heading, with a capital invested of $91,716. The value of the gross products for 1873 was $150,680. There are two shingle manufactories, with a capital of $1500, and value of products $600. In the manufacture of carriages and wagons, of which there are 10 establishments, there is $44,500 invested; ýalue of products for 1873, $81,800. There are in Macomb County 13 flouring mills, with a gross capacity of 15,950 barrels, and an.invested capital of $105,400. The other chief manufactories are 3 breweries, with a capacity of 1570 barrels; capital invested, $8500; value of products per annum, $13,500. 1 salt works, with a capacity of 3000 barrels, and an invested capital of $30,000. Value of works (excluisive of saw mill), $25,000. The excess of, value of total products over expenses for materials and labor, $5000. This establishment is located at Mount Clemens, and is owned and conducted by Messrs. Snook & Bush, the former a resident of the town, the latter of Troy, New York. CONCLUSION. Having thus glanced briefly at all the more prominent features of the history of the County, having followed it through all the material changes consequent to the progress and growth of a busy and growing population, we skip the less interesting period. A few years ago and this whole country, which now glories in the fertility of its soil and the beauty of its landscapes, was a dense wilderness; the home of the Indians, who plied a profitable avocation by fishing and trapping along the borders of its streams, or hunting in the low lands through which they flow. But their glory has departed; and their wigmwams, which for many years constituted the proudest architectural monuments of this region, are supplanted by the magnifi~cent and tasty ~evidences of a higher and more brilliant civilization. Their hunting-grounds have~ been converted into the cultivated fields of the white agriculturist. The bones of their warriors and chiefs lie scattered in various places, tacitly telling that the red man was once the lord of the soil and the rightful owner of the land 'we occupy. N~ot many years have elapsed since the discordant jargon of the Indian powwow and the Indian war-song were succeeded iby the dulcet m7elodies of music and the hum of a busy and enlightened population. Here and there we find the hardy adventurer braving the difficulties and privations of an unsettled country. Little by little the scene changes, and ere long where once stood the mighty forests broad acres of cultivated land tell the story of his industry, perseverance, and economy. Villages spring up as though touched by the wand of enchantment..~ Thius, stage by stage, the country grows, its best resources are developed, and it makes for itself a history more sublime than that of the Old World, because founded on the broad principles of independent and self-reliant industry. Better far is this than though it were procured by martial bands, and its baptism had been of blood rather than of hardihood and self-sacrifice. Thus has Macomb County earned its history, and she stands to-day, in every respect, a peer among the best counties of the State. Progress has been the motto of her citizens, and in all things pertaining to the prosperity of a people has she progressed. Such is the condition, and such are the prospects, of Macomb County. HISTORY OF THE VILLAGES AND TOWNSHIPS OF MACO1B COUNTY. ARMADA TOWNSHIP. The township of Armada Was surveyed into sections and quarter sections as early as 1828, but was not legally organized into a separate and distinct township until March, 1834. The first township election was held in April of the same year. Armada began to settle rapidly from the first, being a fertile and extremely productive region. Among the enterprising pioneers of the township, many of whom have since deceased, but have left their names as a prominent part of its history, are the Aldrich family, John Proctor, Daniel Draper, Colonel Norman Perry (still living), Neil Gray, Nathan Rowley, Erastus Day, Elisha D. Andrews, Norman Burk, Erie Butterfield, Israel G. B61knap, Elijah Burk, Chauncey Bailey, Darius Sessions, Leonard Lee, and many others. Several of the above have left an intelligent and worthy posterity, that now constitute the proudest element of its populace. After the original five townships Armada holds the_ precedence as being the oldest township in the County. Like the residue of the townships, its principal history, apart from that of a personal character, is embodied in agriculture. As early as 1850 we find it holding a leading place among the most productive townships. We quote from good authority the following statistical matter, which will doubtless be read with interest: "f The number of acres in improved and occupied farms, 7600; acres unimproved, 9711; total cash value of same, $222,880. Agricultural products: wheat, 8615 bushels; corn, 20,070 bushels; oats, 25,186 bushels; all other kinds of grain, 2960 bushels; potatoes, 5696 bushels; wool, 11,632 pounds. Dairy products: butter, 23,916 pounds; cheese, 7410 pounds. Value of orchard produce, $729. Live stock: horses, 230; milch-cows, 486; working oxen, 215; other neat cattle, 657; sheep, 5191; swine, 1112; total value of live stock, $34,820." - The above is quite a'creditable showing, but appears somewhat meagre when compared with the statistical report as returned by the Supervisor in the spring of 1874. We quote: "Number of acres of improved land in occupied farms, 11,922; wood, and other unimproved.land, 9340 acres; cash value of farms, $935,895. Agricultural products: wheat, 20,751 bushels; corn, 32,126 bushels; oats, 43,800 bushels; all other kinds of grain, 13,891 bushels; potatoes, 10,932 bushels; wool, 34,577 pounds; pork marketed, 73,211 pounds. Dairy products: butter, 45,070 pounds 3 cheese, 9420 pounds. Live stock: horses, 605; milch-cows, 625; working oxen, 17; mules, 3; number of neat cattle (other than oxen and cows), 830; sheep, 16,592; swine, 875; value of live stock of all kinds, $130,653." These fi'ures show an average increase of two hundred and fifty per cent. for the past quarter of a century. The township numbers among its enterprising farmaers, Norman Perry, George Phillips, Holly Goyer, Gideon 'Draper, James Stevens, Durfee Pettibone, Uriah Day, Seth Aldrich, the W alkers, and many others. The principal streams in the township are the North Branch of the Clinton River 'and Coon Creek. The former traverses the western part of the township north and south; the latter runs through the centre, in the same direction. 'There are several streams of lesser importance, chiefly tributaries of the above mentioned. The township is thus plentifully supplied with water, both for industrial and. agricultural purposes. The only village of importance within the limits of the township is ARMADA, which is located at the southwest corner of the township, on the Michigan AirLine Railroad. It is midway between Romeo and Ridgeway. The vil!.age was settled as early as 1835, but was -not incorporated until 1869. It now has-an estimated population of 750, and is quite a thriving place. It contains amonog its business interests three general stores, two grocery stores, two drug stoties, two boot and shoe stores, one harness shop, one cabinet shop, one blacksmith's shop, a stave and handle manufactory, sash, door, and blind establishment, a-flouring mill, and two hotels. There are also two resident physicians and one attorney. The village is situated within a short distance of the corners of the four town ~ _~ _~ _ __L__~_~___ __ 1 i i

Page  VIII / I Vill ships of Bruce, Washington, Ray, and Armada, and thus enjoys extra advantages as a centre for the shipment of large quantities of agricultural and industrial products. The Canada Express Company have an office here, and the depot of the Michigan Air-Line Railroad -is within an easy distance of the centre of the village. There is a post-office; the postmaster is Hiram Barrows. The population of the township in 1S50 was 1146; in 18974 it had increased to 1562. With so much intelligence, activity, and zeal among its farmners and citizens, with the fewv years that have passed as a precedent, we may safely predict that the township will continue to increase in population and wealth, ever rankingn amngth first with the townships that surround it in all that appertains to the importance and material and intellectual welfare of its inhabitants. Such is the present condition of Armada. Can the future.fail to be an equally brilliant one? TOWNSHIP OF BRUCE. The township of Bruce was taken fr'om Washington and legally organized in March, 1833. The first township election was held on the first day of April of the same year, at the school-house near John Bushnell's. Gideon Gates, acted as Moderator, and Martin Buzzell, Clerk; and the following officers were electedGideon Gates, Supervisor; Martin Buzzell, Township Clerk; Isaac Thompso n, J. W. Collins, and Jesse Bishop, Assessors; Erastus Day, George Throop, and Hemen Holmes, Commissioners; Gad Chamberlain, Director of the Poor; Asabel Bailey, Township Treasurer; Hiramn Hopkins, Constable and Collector. A bounty for wolf-scalps was offered in this township, as well there might be, for in the summer of 1836 sheep were killed by wolves within twenty-five rods of where Mr. Wilkinson now resides, and the boys killed 'coons in those days in a corn-field, within forty rods of the present residence of Isaac Brable. The principal natural curiosities of Bruce are the miniature lakes, of which there are four or five. The largest of them is called " Cusic Lake," and is located about three miles northwest of Romeo. It contains about tw 'enty-five acres, and is always full of clear wvater. The next in size is " Hall's Pond," which covers about ten acres. The township is watered by the North Branch of the Clinton River and Leslie's Creek. There are some saw mills and other industrial institutions situated on these stream s. Among the names of the early settlers of Bruce we find those of Leander Trombley, Nathan Nye, the Warners, James Leslie, Albert Finch, Stephen Chamberlain, Freedom Monroe, the Chamberlain family, and manDy others. In 1850 the township contained 136 farms, containing 11,859 acres of improved land, with 9128 acres of wood and other unimproved land; the cash value of which was estimated at $318,330. In live stock it exceeded any township in the County, as indeed it did in the above enumerations. Of horses there were 230 (only one ass, and no mules).: mileh-eows, 486; working, oxen, 216; other cattle, 638; sheep, 5682; swine, 769; total value of live stock, $44,520; wheat) 34,.q86 bushels; rye, 430 bushels; Indian corn, 20,695 bushels; oats, 16,024= bushels, barley, 652 bushels; buckwheat, 2141' bushels; potatoes, 2231 bushels; wool, 16,270 pounds. Value of orchard products, $996. Dairy produce: butter, 23,115 pounds; cheese, 9265 pounds. Maple-sugar, 2255 pounds. Contrasted with the statistical showingr of 1874, it makes the following comparison: number of farms, 205; acres improved, 16,3061; wood and other unimproved land, 7675; total cash value of same, $1,228,970. In live stock the following figrures are given: horses, 714-; mules and asse's, 6 milch-cows, 514; working oxen,1; other cattle, 595; sheep, 10,523; swine, 579; total value of live stock, $145,834. Wheat, 50,666 bushels; rye, 40 bushels; Indian corn, 33,803 bushels; oa ts, 48,450 bushels; barley, 8405 bushels; buckwheat, 850 bushels; potatoes, 10,747 bushels; wool, 57,790 pounds. Dairy produce: butter, 4=8,815 pounds; cheese, 1048 pounds. Maple-sug-ar, 345 pounds. Value of orchard produce, $1[1,726. Pork marketed, including her part of Romeo, was 1555; being the third township in point of population in the County. In 1873 the number of inhabitants similarly enumerated was 2045, with every prospect of a continued increass.e. The main part of the history of the township will be found in tha~t of Romeo, which constituted the centre of civilization for the two townships for many years. " CHESTERFIELD TOWNSHIP. The fractional township of Chesterfield was organized in the year 1842. It was taken from Macomb Township, and the first election was ordered to be held at the sehool-house, near the residence of Charles B. Matthews. There is much of historic interest connected with the township of Chesterfield as it is now comprised. About the centre of the eastern boundary of the township, on the shore of Lake St.. Clair, stood the Indian reservation, where resided for many years the chief of the tribes, MIIaconce. This chief was well beloved by his nation; in fact, his voicee was the oracle of his people, his nod the law of his empire. There was, however, in this region a king greater and mightier to destroy than he. This king still reigns, while the warrior of the Indians "sleeps the sleep that knows no waking. Ile was slain by this king, whose name is Alcohol. His death was a tragic one. It seems that Maconce bad beon paying a familiar visit to his bosom friend the. king,~ and had partaken too freely of the hospitality of his host. Towards evening the chief went down to the river, and, with a precipitous rush, glided down its banks into the water, and was drowned. In his suicidal intent he passed the residence Of Messrs. Stockton and Clemens. The wife of the former gentleman heard the hurried tread of the unfortunate chief as he passed on to the river, and heard the splash when he struck the water. Mrs. Stockton's testimony was the only direct evidence that tended to convince the Indians that his melancholy death was voluntary,-that he had not been murdered by the white man, as the ever-suspicious nature of the Indian led them to suppose. The event caused considerable excitement through the entire settlement. This reservation was located in the south 'east part of the township, and. was subsequently purchased by a Frenchman by the name of Paul Giers. Among the earliest and most prominent settlers 'of Chesterfield Township were the Ashleys, Louis La Forge (who died in 1872, nearly one hundred years old), Francis Yax, the Miltons, John Herriman, Robert W. Knight, William Little, and many others. There is but one village in Chesterfield Township, that is - NEW BALTIMORE. This village was formerly called Ashley. It is an incorporated village, siltuated four miles and a half from New Baltimore Station, now New Haven, On the Grand Trunk Railway. It is located on the north shore of Anchor Bay, the northern arm of Lake St. Clair. The bu~siness of the village is represented by several stores, livery stables, etc., and three steam. manufacturing establishments. There are four churches, one each of the Congregational, Catholic, German Lutheran, and I Kethodist Episcopal denom~inations, and an Episcopal Society; also a good union school and a, Masonic ball. The principal exports are staves and headinl'g' shooks, and broom- and shovel-handles, of which large quantities are annually.shipped from this port. The population of the village is about 900. New Baltimore receives a daily mail; the present postmaster is D. M. Heath. There is also a small settlement anDd post-office called Milton in Chesterfield Township. The principal agricultural products and the respective quantities for the year ending- December 31, 1873, were: wheat, 21,983 bushels: corn, 21,744 bushels; all other grain raised, 48,393 bushels; -number of pounds of wool sheared, 15,505; apples, 11,731 bushels; a01 other kinds of fruit, 1500 bushels. There are 14= mills and manufacturing establishments in the township, with 128 employes. Capital invested, $56,750; value of products, $127,200. The population of Chesterfield Township up to December 31, 1873, was 2313, with every prospect of a rapid increase. Amiong the most prominent farmers of Chesterfield are Cortez P. Hooker, James Patton, George TNT. Fuller, John Harriman, Joseph and John Milton, Allan Farr, Putnam Hart, and many others. The principal stream in the township is Salt River, the proverbial rendezvous of defun 'ct politicians. On its classic banks recently sojourned the late (politically) Zachariah Chandler, immediately following his failure in the Senatorial contest. Chesterfield Township is in a prosperous and thriving condition, and its future promises to be attended with the most flattering success. CLINTON TOWNSHIP. The township of Clinton was one of the original five which constituted Alacomb County at the time of its erection. It is one of the most fertile and productive townships in the County. The northwestern part of it is somewhat rolling, while the remainder is generally level. The township originally abounded in all of the best varieties of timber common to the State of Michigan, such as white and black Oak, black walnut, beech, maple, hickory, and, on the banks of the river and on the flat land, traces of sycamore. Though the timber has been a staple commodity of commerce for years, yet large quantities of it still remain. The pri.fiecipal stream in the township is the Clinton (formerly the Huron) River, which rises in Oakland County, and traverses Macomb County in a south easterly course, and Ctintown Township in a zigzag direction. There are three saw mills and one grist mill, and some other manufacturing establishments on the Clinton in this township. The North Branchi, a large and important creek, runs through the township in a northeasterly direction. There is one saw will on this stream within the limits of Clinton Township. There is also a smaller stream called Middle Branch. Among the earlier settlers and pioneers of Clinton Township were the Clemens family, the Allens, Stocktons, Cadys, Eldredges, Trombleys, Poitiers, Whitneys, Chapatons, the Longstaffs, and many ot'hers. These families are plentifully represented to this day, and number among them some of the most prominent citizens of the County. MOUNT CLEMENS. Mount Clemens, the County seat of Macomb County, is an incorporated village of 3000 inhabitants. It was named after Judge Christian Clemens, one of its earliest and most prominent settlers. He was from Germantown, Pennsylvania, and came here about the year 1800. He erected his first house, which was built of logs, on the site of the old brick store opposite the back of the court-house. Previous to this, one John Brooks came in and built a distillery about the year Many of the old families had branched off and begun improvement above and below the village. During the war of 1812 many outrages were committed -by hostile Indians. To- such an extent were these depredations carried that many families sought safety by moving to Detroit. Mr. Clemens joined the army, and did mood service for his country. He returned with his family to this place immediately after the close of the war. In October, 1817, John Stockton came to Mount Clemens, having married one of Tuda-e Clemens's daughters during the sojourn of the fatmily in Detroit. The first frame structure erected was an addition to Judge Clemens's house, built in 1817. The remnants of it now stand opposite the gate of the old buria.1-ground. The growth of the town from the organization of the County to the present has been as rapid and steady as circumstances would admit. The old loog court-house was erected in 1819, and after the seat of justice was permanently established, the gpeneral prosperity of the village increased. Ellis Doty was the first merchant who established himself here. -He came, in 1822, from Chautauqua County, New York, and built a house on the corner now occupied by Mr. John Conner, and exposed his wares for sale in a cabin on the corner south of it. Drs. Thompson and Chamberlain were the first physicians. here, but their stay was only temporary. Dr. R. S. Rice was the first permanently located practitioner here. He came in 1823, and remained four years, removing to Detroit in the year 1827. Dr. George Lee succeeded him, arriving here the 'year of his (Dr. Rice's) departure. Dr. Henry Taylor, Sr., was here on an exploring expedition as early as 1825. Ile came to this vicinity to remsde in 1826, remaining, with the Tucker family. He taught school until his professional services were demanded, when he came to Mount Clemens, in 1828, where he has practiced medicine to the general satisfaction of the community for nearly half a century. Dr. Hf. W. Babcock came in about 1836. The legal profession has always been well represented. Among the early practitioners were Ezra B. Prescott,.first prosecuting attorney, George Alexander O'Keefe, C1. I. Walker, Alexander D. Frazer, and Cornelius O'Fiynn. Following these came Robert P. Eldredge, Richard Butler (who subsequently studied law With Mr. Eldredgre), and Giles Hubbard. The latter three gentlemen are still living in the County. Many gentlemen of eminent legal ability have come in at a later day, and the bar of Mount Clemens is, in every respect, represented by men of acknowledged talent. One of the most prominent features about Mount Clemens is its fine mineral spring. According to an analysis of the water of this springr it ranks among the most popular water-cures of the country. It contains many of the best-known Singredients found in other springs, and some which are not traceable in any other mineral water in the country. There is a commodious bathi-house with all the imost convenient hotel arrangrements attached, and, notwithstanding the fact that Sthese improvements were only completed in 18713, its reputation as a curative establishment is becoming wide-spread. It was originated by and was, until the close of the season of 1874, under the control of Dr. Henry Taylor, Sr., & Sons, Sthan whom no gentlemen of better ability for the position could be found. In the winter of 18'4-75 the concern was purchased by Mr. Philip Thurber, of Detroit, a gentleman who had been practically cured by its waters. The professional management of the institution was delegated to Dr. L. IN. Carr, of Detroit, a grentleman of varied experience in similar establishments. Among the most prominent merchants of Mount Clemens are T. W. Snook, Theodore Traver, V.an Epps & Co., E. J. 01de, and William Heine. In addition to the senior members of the bar above mentioned, there are, of more recent date, Hon. James B. Eldredge, Edgar Weeks, T. M. Crocker, and Arthur L. Canfield, all of whom enjoy a liberal and extensive practice. The educational fatcilities of MIount Clemens consist of a fine union school with high-school department, which gives instruction to about five hundred pupils; also h Roman Catholic school, under the management of nuns, which gives instruction to a large number of pupils; their building is large and commodious. There is also a German school, numbering about one hundred and fifty scholars, who receive instruction exclusively in the German language. There are six churches,"! one each of the following denominations: Episcopalian, Methodist, Presbyterian, Lutheran, Baptist, and Roman Catholic; the pulpits of which are all filled by highly intelligent and worthy men. There are two weekly newspapers, viz., the Moniftor and the Press, both of which are ably edited, and are good family newspapers. There is a fair proportion of stores of all kinds, while the industrial and manufacturing- interests are represented by three extensive carriage factories, two stave mills, an iron foundry, a cloth and woolen mill, two tanneries, two breweries, three saw mills, a large flouring mill, an extensive hoop factory, a spoke and hub factory, a first-class new sash and blind factory, and a large ship-yard. The financial interests of the village are represented by a national bank, established in 1875, with James P. Eldredge, President; William 1). Morton, VicePresident; and Daniel C. Tilden, Cashier. This bank emanated from the former private banking enterprise of Daniel C. Tilden & Co., established February 1, 1872. It is now doing a general banking business, with every promise of success. Mount Clemens is situated on the Clinton River, which is navigable as far as Detroit, a distance of about twenty miles. Quite an extensive commerce, prineipally in wood, is carried on during each season, and exertions are being made for an appropriation, which, if granted, will tend to still further facilitate this branch of business. The railroad communication is easy. The Grand Trunk Railroad has a depot at the west end of the town. Mount Clemens h'as been a post-town since IS818. The first -postmaster was John Stockton; the present incumbent is J. H. Snook. There is a Freemasons' lodge, an Odd-Fellows' lodge, and a German society,-the Arbeiter. The latter has built a fine new ball on Gratiot Street. There are two first-class hotels, the Sherman and the Thomas House. The Sher~man,, under the management of Mr. Henry Conner, is one of the best and most popular hotels in this part o Ahe State. It enjoys a larg e patron age. With the increasing exertions of the citizens, combined with the many natural facilities that Mount Clemens enjoys, it is destined, ere many years, to become one of the finest cities in the State. A healthy and business-like energy and enterprise is the general characteristic of the i nhabitants. FREDERICK. The village of Frederick wvas laid out on land formerly owned by Elijah Harrington, by Frederick M. and Horace Stevens, June 24, 1837. For a time the village it changed to Erin, after their -native isle. At the time of organization the township included Sections 12, 13, 24, 25, and 26, Town 1, N. of R. 12 E. Erin is one of the most thickly settled townships in the County. In point of population it ranks second. In 1874 the census shows the number of inhabitants to be 2466; number of families, 44=8, and of dwellings, 433. Erin is a fine agricultural region; the products in the following staple articles being, in 1874: winter. wheat, 14,565; rye, 1858; corn, 30,611; oats, 42,080; barley, 2583; potatoes, 20,119 bushels. The 'township has a fair proportion of timber, including the best Michigan varieties. "-..The principal stream in the township is Milk River, which rises in Wayne County, and traverses Erin Township in a -northeasterly direction, and empties into Lake St. Clair, at the southeast corner of the township. There are two villages in Erin Township. ROSEVILLE is a village of about 500 inhabitants. It is four miles south of Utica Plank Station, on the Grand Trunk Railway, and is twelve miles out from Detroit, on the Gratiot Road. The business of the place includes three hotels, five stores, and a, saw mill. Staves form the principal art~icle of shipment. Roseville has a tri-weekly mail. G. Schuchard is the presenit po stm aster. The village has not yet been inecorporated. ,: Next in. importance comes."~.. FRAZER..."" This is a post-office at Utica Plank Station, on the G'ranhd Trunk Railway, nineteen miles northeast of Detroit, and seven south of Mount Clemens. The- village contains about 450 inhabitants. The principal business is conducted by the stave and heading factory. There are some other manufactories. The Canadian Express Company and the Western Union Telegraph Company do business here. The place is growing rapidly. There is in addition to the above a small and steadily- growing settlement called the Junction. It is located at a point where the Utica Plank Road intersects the Gratiot Road. It contains one general store, one blacksmith shop, one wagon For history of the churches, see page YI. *:For history of the churches, see page TI.

Page  IX r IX factory, a hotel, fifteen dwellings, two churches, and about one hundred inhabitants. This settlement is outgrowing the other villages to some extent. Among the principal farmers and most prominent settlers of Erin Township are Austin Wells, Henry Savage, Patrick Redman, James Martin, John Commons, Giles Cox, Anthony Gravier, Justus Wormspackar, Joseph Duweka, Hugh McCarron, and many others. There is a good, substantial class of citizens in Erin, hence a prosperous condition of affairs exists in the township. HARRISON TOWNSHIP. The fractional township of Harrison is a part of what formerly constituted one of the original five townships. It is located near the southeast corner of the County, and is bounded on the east side by the mouth of the Clinton River, which stream flows through the centre of it. In Harrison are situated the ruins of the once prosperous village of Belvidere. The site of the old place is now laid out in a respectable farm, owned by Messrs. Campbell and Sackett. One of the main causes of its failure as a village was the liability to inundation during wet seasons. Apart from its agricultural prominence, it is noted as a fine locality for mosquitoes. There are many incidents connected with the history of Harrison Township that lend a historical interest to it. Here was born, lived, and died the late Charles Tucker, a member of one of the oldest and most respected families in the County. He lived an honest, industrious life, exceeding by a decade the allotted span. ie died within a few feet of the spot where he first saw the light, a noble example of the pioneer period of the past. As an agricultural region Harrison ranks with the foremost townships in the County. In all of the staple agricultural productions it shows a fair proportion. According to the statistical returns of 1873, we find that the yields of the different commodities named below were as follows: Winter wheat, 4335 bushels; corn, 8695 bushels; oats, 13,082 bushels; barley, 526 bushels; buckwheat, 410 bushels; potatoes, 2876 bushels; pork marketed, 23,270 pounds. Htarrison contains a sufficient quantity of the best varieties of timber, including white and black oak, black walnut, hickory, beech, and imaple. The land is about equally divided between rolling and level. Near the mouth of the river it is inclined to be flat, and in some places swampy, but on the whole very little irredeemable land exists within its boundaries. Among the old citizens and prominent farmers of IIHarrison Township we might mention, among many others, Henry Fries, Israel T. Parker, John Feller, the Tuckers, Antoine Chortier, William Phillips, and Arnold Jobse. The importance and value of land in IHarrison Township is greatly enhanced by its close proximity to the County seat. It is bounded on the west by Clinton Township, aird the corporation limits of Mount Clemens also touch its western boundary. Its citizens generally are an industrious class of people, hospitable, and good farmers, under whose guidance the prosperity of the township is assured. Population in 1874, 625. LENOX TOWNSHIP. The township of Lenox was organized in the year 1837. The first township election was ordered to be held at the dwelling-house of Sterling Case, in said township. The original settlers of the township were men of sterling worth, of great enterprise, and of untiring industry. Among those who have left their names as the proudest portion of the history of the township are Abner Stevens, Phineas D. Pelton, Richard D. Bailey, Lanson Flowers, Ebenezer Brooks, John Church, Beverly Robinson, Thomas F. Dryer, Apolas A. Fubler, Owen Sheridan, Silas Leonard, and many others of equal prominence. The descendants of the larger part of the above are still inhabitants of the township, though many of them are disseminated over the entire County. Wherever located they are worthy representatives of worthy parentage. The principal stream in Lenox is Salt River, which runs due south through the eastern part of the township, affording motive-power for several mills along its course; next in importance comes Deer Creek and some of its minor tributaries, which affords water for agricultural and other purposes. With these streams the township is fairly watered. Pure spring water is obtainable by digging a few feet in ailmost any spot in the township. The agricultural production at the end of the first decade after its organization exhibits a fair proportion. We quote from a good authority: there were seventynine farms, with 2637 acres of improved and 5147 acres of unimproved land, at a total cash value of $51,700. In live stock the showing was as follows: horses, 74; milch-cows, 291; working oxen, 128; other neat cattle, 253; sheep, 1111; swine, 396; value of live stock, $12,330. Wheat, 1910 bushels; corn, 7590 bushels; all other kinds of grain, 9468 bushels; potatoes, 1849 bushels; wool 2800 pounds. Dairy products: butter, 15,700 pounds; cheese, 7900 pounds. Value of orchard produce, $201. The showing at the end of the second decade from the above was: acres of improved land, 10,018; woodland, 9840 acres; other unimproved land, 19 acres; cash value, $711,640. In live stock the subjoined is a correct statement: horses, 571; milch-cows, 728; working oxen, 24; other neat cattle (other than oxen and cows), 704; sheep, 888; swine, 663; total value of live stock, $120,905. Of agricultural products there were: bushels of wheat, 19,902; corn, 19,265; all other kinds of grain (principally oats, barley, and rye), 59,717; potatoes, 12,483 bushels; wool, 14,917 pounds. Dairy products: butter, 53,940 pounds; cheese, 4340 pounds. Value of orchard products, $4005. Among the best and most prominent practical farmers in Lenox Township are John Dryer, John P. Mabee, Joel W. Clemmons, Jeremiah Carl, Joseph Goldenbook, James H. Norton, Henry Lowell, Richard S. Mellen, Charles Woodruff, S. H. Canfield, and many others. The only village of any importance in Lenox is NEW HAVEN, formerly known, as a railroad town, as New Baltimore Station. It is situated on the Grand Trunk Railway, thirty miniles northeast of Detroit and ten miles northeast of Mount Clemens. The village contains a population estimated at 650 inhabitants. It is distant from' the.thriving village of New Baltimore five miles. The principal exports of the place a9re lumber and general agricultural products. Its chief manufactures are lumber flour, and heading. The village contains five general stores, one dry-,goods store, two boot and shoe stores, one drug store, one stove and tin shop, one harness shop, two wagon shops, one cooper shop, two blacksmithies, one livery stable, one grist and one saw mill, and a good hotel. There are two resident physicians, M. Bates and A. Gunn, in the place. The village contains a post-office, Tolcott Bates being- the present postmaster. The general aspect of New Haven is flourishing. The depot of the Grand Trunk Railway, with a settlement called Ridgeway, is partly in Lenox Township and partly in Richmond. This place has quite a business appearance, and is rapidly progressing. In general, Lenox is quite a promising township, possessing a good class of citizens, who seem determined to advance its best interests. MACOMB TOWNSHIP. The township of IMacomb was organized in the year 1842. The first township election was ordered to be held at the school-house in Stroup's settlement. The land in Macomb Township is very level, and the soil generally very fertile and productive. It is watered by the kiddle and North Branches of the Clinton River, which afford a plentiful supply of ater for milling and agricultural puriposes. The township is as extensively drined as any township in the County, which adds materially to its agricultural facilities. Among the old settlers of Macomb who have done much towards the prosperity of the township are Zephaniah Campbell, Manson Farrar, Lester Giddings, CalSvin Davis, Daniel Kniffin, Daniel Miller, Samuel Whitney, Charles Crittenden, IHorace H. Cady, and many others. In 1830 a post-office was established and a village started under the name of Macomb. This spot was one of the most eligible in the County, being centrally located. It has gone into premature disuse, however, the post-office having been Sremoved to Waldenburg. Frederick Jasmond was the first postmaster; the Spresent one is J. C. Bolty. There is still a general store at the original site of IMacomb. The place was started by Daniel Kniffin, Calvin Davis, Daniel Miller, Sand Lester Giddings. E. S. Axtel was postmaster for a number of years. IThe recently organized townships have comparatively no history save an agricultural one. Macomb has always ranked among the foremost townships in the County in the latter respect. At an early day a general influx of German citizens, of the industrious and economical class, came in. With a laudable zeal in cultivating the soil and bringing forth the best that its fertility afforded, they, in conjunction with the American farmers already in the township, succeeded in developing the resources of the township to the best possible advantage. In 1850, less than a decade after the organization of the township, we find the following statistics authoritatively given: Acres of improved land, 3187; unimproved land, 6098; cash value of same,.$97,925. Live stock: horses, 165; milchcows, 203; working oxen, 98; other neat cattle, 311; sheep, 1248; swine, 447; value of live stock, $15,472. Agricultural products: wheat, 2685 bushels; corn, 9820 bushels; all other kinds of grain, 10,247 bushels; potatoes, 3291 bushels: wool, 3932 pounds. Dairy products: butter, 14,785 pounds; cheese, 1450 pounds. Talue of orchard produce, $285. After the lapse of about a quarter of a century the showing is as follows, in 1874: Number of'acres of improved land, 10,000; woodland, 8004; other unimproved land, 2014 acres; cash value of same, $776,365. Live stock: horses, 624; milch-cows, 894; working oxen, 8; other neat cattle, 524; sheep, 2516; swine, 982; total value of same, S124,460. Agricultural products: wheat, 22,412 bushels; corn,.30,357 bushels; all other kinds of grain, 47,416 bushels; potatoes, 18,296 bushels; wool, 10,141 pounds. Dairy products: -butter, 74,220 pounds; cheese, 500 pounds. Pork marketed, 67,113 pounds. Value of orchard produce, $3922, The latter shows an eminently flattering increase. Among the best practical farmers of the township are P. M. Bentley, Calvin Davis, Horace II. Cady, William Norton, De Witt Pretty, Lefurgey Bless, Aaron Conkling, Hiram Haskins, Frederick Kandt, Charles Schultz, Jacob Stroup, Samuel Whitney. The population of the township in 1850 was 757; in 1874 it had increased to 1791. There is no rational doubt but what the progress that has been made in the past will continue, with a proportionate increase in the future, to the betterment and advancement of every interest of the township and its ultimnate prosperity. RAY TOWNSHIP. The township of Ray was one of the original five, and was legally organized- in the year 1827. The first township meeting was held at the house of Noah Webster, on the 28th of May, 1.827, and the first supervisor of the township was Reuben R. Smith, who occupied the position for eleven years consecutively. At the election held July 9, of same year, for delegates to Congress, twenty-one votes were cast, and John Biddle was elected; Win. A. Burt was chosen member of the Legislative Council at the same time. Among the early settlers were Josiah Lee, Reuben R. Smith, Benjamin Miller, John Diken,'the Gass family, the Morrises, D. S. Priest, Joseph Chubb, Zelotis Stone, James Thompson, and many others. The township is generally level, with very little flat land, and no swamps or' marshes. The varieties of timber common to Michigan formerly grew in large quantities in the township, and a fair proportion of most kinds still exists. The principal streams are the "'North Branch of the Clinton River, which traverses the township near its eastezn boundary, due north, and enters Armada near its southwest corner; Coon Creek, which runs through the township northerly. Besides these there is Healey Brook, which rises on the Lowell farm, in Washington Township. One the whole, Ray is well watered. There are no villages of importance in the township. There is a hamlet called BROOKLYN, which contains about twenty-five dwellings, one general store, two blacksmith shops, a hotel, one saw mill, one cider mill, one cooper shop. There is a Methodist Episcopal Church, and a district school. Brooklyn is loc'ated at the southwest corner of the township, within half a mile of the corners of the four townships of Shelby, MNlacomb, Washington, and Ray. It contains about 125 inhabitants, with good prospects of a rapid increase. The post-office is Washington. RAY CENTRE RICHMOND TOWNSHIP. The township of Richmond was legally organized on the 6th of March, 183S. The first township election was ordered to be held at the dwelling-house of George Perkins. No change of name has taken place in this township. Among the early settlers of Richmond whose names constitute a prominent part of the history of the township are John Hale, Edwin B. Rose, Isaac B. Gilbert, Sumner Pierce, Zeth Hathaway, John Goodar, Philip Cudworth, Erastus M. Beebe, the Burks, and others. The principal stream in the township is Belle River, which enters the township at its northeast corner, affording motive-power for the Memphis mills. Next comes the North Branch of the Clinton River and some of its minor tributaries. The most important village in the township is RICIIHMOND, the post-office town for Ridgeway, on the Grand Trunk Railway, forty-one miles north of Detroit and twenty-one southwest of Port Huron. It is a place of some importance, as being the point where the Michigan Air-Line Railroad intersects the Grand Trunk Railway, and being also the shipping-point for the thriving little village of Memphis, six miles north. The estimated population 9f the village is 900. It has a woolen factory, a stave and heading factory, six general stores, one drug store, one grocery, three blacksmith shops, two wagon shops, one cheese factory, one iron foundry, and two hotels. There are four churches, one each of the Methodist Episcopal, Methodist Free, Congregational, and Baptist denominations. The place was settled about 1832; the first postmaster was Philip Cudworth, the present incumbent is H. P. Beebe. The village is one of the most prosperous in the County; its principal shipments are hoops and staves. It is situated in a slightly rolling country, and has every promise of continued success. Part of the village of MEMPHIS is in Richmond township and part in the Township of Riley, in St. Clair County. We give a condensed history of the town. It is situated on Belle River, twenty miles north of Mount Clemens, sixteen west of St. Clair, and forty miles from Detroit. The village was settled in 1835, but was not incorporated until 1866. It contains seven stores, one saw mill, one flouring mill, one iron foundry, six blacksmith shops, three wagon and carriage shops, one cheese factory, two harness shops. There are four churches here, one each of the Methodist, Congregational, Baptist, and Advent denominations. Its principal exports are staves, cheese, grain, and hops. It is a post-town; the present postmaster is IIHenry C. Mlansfield. The place contains about 800 inhabitants. With these two villages and the large agricultural interests of the township, Richmond forms quite an important portion of the County of which it is a part. The township is plentifully supplied with churches, school-houses, and industrial and manufacturing institutions, which combined conduce to the morality, intelligence, wealth, and prosperity of its inhabitants. Blessed with these various sources of general worth, Richmond cannot fail to increase in population and value in the future, with even greater rapidity than has characterized it in the past. The agricultural products of Richmond, according to the Supervisor's report, completed in the spring of 1874, were as follows: Wheat, 20,099 bushels; corn, 22,044 bushels; all other kinds of grain, 61,489 bushels; potatoes, 10,413 bushels. All other yields in like proportion. Among the most prominent farmers of Richmond are John F. Gilbert, Daniel Hall, William Fenner, George H. Stewart, James Spencer, Hiram and Frank Goodars, Leander Brown, Daniel Flagler, and many others. In 1850 Richmond contained a population of 1000; in 1873 it had increased to 2105. It is now (1875) estimated at 2500. SHELBY TOWNSHIP. On the 6th day of March, 1827, the original surveyed Town 3, north of Range 12 east, was constituted a legal township, and called Shelby. It was one of the first five townships into which Macomb County was originally divided. The land embraced within its limits had been surveyed into sections and quarter sections many years prior to its formal organization. The land is generally very level, and the soil is extremely rich and fertile. Being mostly peopled with an intelligent and industrious class of agriculturists, the productive land is made to bring forth her increase to the best possible advantage. The productions of Shelby have always been up to a fair average, and many seasons exceeding the highest. In 1850 we find that there were one hundred and thirtyseven improved farms within the township, with ten thousand eight hundred and twenty-nine acres of land under cultivation. This is the best showing of any township in the County save Bruce, which exceeds it in the number of acres improved by one thousand and thirty. Farther along we shall make a comparison between the census of 1873 and that of nearly a quarter of a century before. Among the early settlers of Shelby who have left their names as part of the history of the township we find those of Joseph Lester, who was the first Supervisor of Shelby after the organization of the Board, the Axford family,. Ira Preston, Peleg Ewel, George IIauscom, Elias Wilcox, Joseph Miller, Ezra Burgess, Abel Warren, the Arnolds, and many others. The township is well watered, the principal stream being the Clinton River, which enters the township about the centre of its western boundary, and traverses the southwest quarter of the township, until it:eaters Sterling. Next in importance as a stream and water-power is the race, which was made out of the old Clinton and Kalamazoo Canal. This canal was projected in 1837, and constructed in 1838. It was the original intention of the constructors to "complete it from Mount Clemens to Kalamazoo, a distance of about one hundred and seventy-five miles, but it never was finished farther than Rochester, in Oakland County, and never navigated but from Mount Clemens to Utica, some twelve miles. It has, since its discontinuance as a navigable thoroughfare, been used as a race to supply motive-power to the Utica mills, for which purpose it is practically adapted. The only village in' Shelby Township besides part of the villageO of Utica-of which a historical sketch will be found in the history proper of Sterling-is DISCO, a village of about one hundred and seventy-five inhabitants, situated 6n the main stage-route from Utica Station to Romeo, four miles north of Utica, nine south of Romeo, and fourteen northwest. of the County seat. It was laid out about 1849, for the purpose of establishing an academy. Alonzo M. Keeler was selected as the principal of the institution, and ten acres of land and a subscription of a thousand dollars were given as a sort of endowment. The academy was duly erected in 1850, and Mr. Keeler installed. It was used as a joint academic and district school, under the management of the above gentlemen,.for fourteen years, when it was discontinued; but finally the lower portion of the building was used as a district or union school, and the upper part as a church. Among the first settlers of the village were Alonzo M. Keeler, Isaac C. Cross, James B. Fry, Henry Skerritt, John Keeler, and John Russell, the temperance agitator. The business of the village is represented by two general stores, three t 8: i~:r B I: i ii. ~:~: -i is situated near the centre of Ray Township, as its name implies. It is a place of no growth now, even compared with what it was years ago. It is five miles northwest of New Baltimore Station and twelve north of Mount Clemens. The hamlet is situated on the North Branch of the Clinton River, in a level and fertile grainproducing region. There is a post-office at Ray Centre; the present postmaster is Simon Tewksbury. Among the best practical farmers and prominent citizens of Ray are William Gass, Zelotis Stone, John Dicken, Robert Warner, Josiah T. Robinson, John Goodell, D. S. Priest, William Cronk, and many others. Ray is a fine agricultural locality, yielding annually above the average of the principal farm proiuctions. From the returns of 1873 we glean the following figures, as representing the amounts of the various staple articles raised during that year, being a fair general criterion: Wheat, 18,555 bushels; corn, 38,000 bushels; all other grain, principally oats, barley, and rye, 41,170 bushels; potatoes, 14,696 bushels. The population of Ray Township, according to the census (special) of 1873, was 1485. It is rapidly increasing, both by an influx of substantial emigration and by natural results. The township enjoys the blessing of eight district schools and three churches, which render intellectual and religious culture within the reach of all its inhabitants. Judging from the past, we can unhesitatingly predict a prosperous and flourishing future for the township. I _ I _ _ _ _ ~I~~ C_ _ _I I I _ ___ _I _ I __~~__ ___ _ _ ~ _ _ _ _ i ~_

Page  X X wagon shops, two blacksmith shops, one harness shop, one paint shop, and one hotel. There is also a resident physician. Disco has a daily mail. Mrs. H. J. Satler, postmistress. In 1850 the amounts of cereals, grain and general agricultural productions were as follows: wheat, 10,286 bushels; corn, 30,073 bushels; all other kinds of grain, principally oats, barley, and rye, 12,991 bushels; potatoes, 12,174 bushels; wool, 19,509 pounds. Dairy products: butter, 28,940 pounds; cheese, 3548 pounds. Contrasted with the returns made for the year ending December 31, 1873, the showing stands: wheat, 12,011 bushels; corn, 38,000 bushels; all other kinds of grain, 41,170 bushels; potatoes, 14,380 bushels; wool, 20,010 pounds. Dairy products: butter, 37,086 pounds; cheese, 15,575 pounds. The largest increase is shown in wool and dairy produce. Among the most prominent and best practical farmers of Shelby are Payne K. Leech, James N. Ewell, John Stead, David Conner, Chester Andrews, Harmon A. Wells, Orrin Goff, and many others. The population of the township in 1850 was 1482, which had only augmented to 1581 in 1873, according to the respective reports. The former amount is given in the State census of 1850; the latter from the report of the Township Supervisor, completed in the spring of 1874. It would appear that a greater increase than ninety-nine ought to have occurred in twenty-three years. The former report is outrageously too high or the latter altogether too low. We incline to the reliability of the Supervisor's returns, however, as State censuses are notably incorrect. One thing is certain, that is, the general business and enterprise of the township are increasing rapidly but steadily,.and so, we believe, is the population. Every available opportunity that leads to ultimate prosperity to a community is embraced by the people of Shelby to the betterment and advancement of their interests, and this will bring its own reward. STERLIN G TOWNSHIP. The township now called Sterling was organized under the name of Jefferson, March 17, 1835. The first township election was ordered to be held at the house of Jonathan T. Alien. The change in the name of the township was effected in 1838. The principal water-course in Sterling Township is Plum Brook, which rises on the farm of Wm. Summers, in the southwest corner of Shelby Township. It traverses Sterling in a southeasterly direction. There are numerous small branches of this stream, each having a variety of names. The township is generally well supplied with water. Plunim Brook empties into the Clinton River, on the east side of the township. The Clinton also runs through Sterling in a northerly course, leaving the township about the centre of its northern boundary. Among the earliest settlers of Sterling were Eleazcr Scott, Henry R. Shetterly, Peter Moe, John B. St. John, Asa Huntley, Jesse Soper, John Gibson, Oliver Crocker, Henry J. Stead, Chauncey G. Cady, David Stickney, the Skinners, Washington Adams, Charles Hutchins, Richard Hotham, John B. Chapman, John Wright, and many others of equal prominence. The only settlement or village in Sterling Township is UTICA, a thriving village, which was settled as early as 1817, antedating the organization of the County. Utica is situated on the Detroit and Ba;y City Railway, about ten miles west of Mount Clemens, and twenty-four due north of Detroit. It is on the Clinton River, and from its first settlement it has been a place of considerable importance. In the infancy of railroading in this State, a trap rail operated by horse power connected it with Detroit. The Clinton River affords an important water-power. The village contains a population of about 650. Its business is represented by a grist mill, saw mill, blacksmith shops, a wagon and carriage shop, a number of store., and a hotel. It also contains a good union school-house, with a high-school department attached, churches, and other evidences of thrift and enterprise. The village shows, in many respects, the fruits of the energy and business talent of those who were e:Lrly identified with it. At one time it sustained a weekly newspnper, but the concern has been suspended for many years. The village enjoys the privilege of a daily mail, Alexander Grant being the present postmaster. Among the earlier residents of the village were Dr. Cowic, the St. Johns, the Summers, D. Chapaton, and many others of equal prominence. Sterling has always been up to the average standard as a productive and fertile township. The amounts of agricultural products, as given in the respective statisticnl reports of 1850 and 1873, are as follows: In 1850: wheat, 4416 bushels; corn, 12,695 bushels; all other kinds of grain, including, principally, oats, barley, rye, etc., 14,076 bushels; potatoes, 3679 bushels; wool, 4582 pounds. Dairy produce: butter, 17,885 pounds; cheese, 1450 pounds. Value of orchard produce, $319. Live stock: horses, 108: miluh-cows, 289; sheep, 1521; swine, 370; other neat cattle, 280; working oxen, 70. Number of acres of improved occupied farms, 4314. In 1873: wheat, 9241 bushels; corn, 18,315 bushels; all other kinds of grain, 39,645 bushels; potatoes, 12,165 bushels; wool, 9269 pounds. Dairy produce: butter, 23,745 pounds; cheese, 4020 pounds. Value of orchard produce, $2205. Live stock: horses, 553; milch-cows, 733; other neat cattle (other than oxen and cows), 407; sheep, 2228; swine, 564; working oxen, 18. Number of acres of improved land in occupied farms, 9500; whole amount of taxable land, 22,763 acres. Among the most prominent farmers of Sterling Township are William IK. Payne, Calvin Moore, William Upton, Edward H-oxie, Chauncey G. Cady, Thomas Clark, Charles IIutchins, the Dunns, Richard Hoard, the Spinners, and many others. The population of Sterling in 1850, according to the United States census, was 876. According to a State census, completed in the spring of 1874, it had augmented to 1704, and is rapidly and steadily increasing. Taken as a township, Sterling ranks among the foremost in many respects that Macomb County contains. It had the good fortune to be settled by a good class of citizens, who have handed down an industrious and thriving posterity. The future of Sterling cannot fail to be a prosperous and flourishing one. WARREN TOWNSHIP. The township of Warren was originally called Hickory. It was legally organized March 11, 18M7. The first township election was ordered to be held at the residence of Louis B. Cbhapaton. It retained its origi n al name until April 2, 1838., when it was changed to Aba. Finally, on the 25th of March, 1839, it was changed to Warren, by which name it has since been called. What now constitutes the township was settled many years previous to its legal organization. Among the early settlers were the Grosebecks, Joseph Jerome, Harris Corey, Joseph Mobsho, and George Bolam, many of whom have left families, members.of which still reside in the township. As early as 1832 the elder Grosebecks corm menced the old French Road, known now as the Conner's Creek Road, which runs in a northerly direction through the township, and intersects the Gratiot Plank at Conner's Creek. This was one of the first roads within the present boundaries of Warren Township. The widow of Louis Grosebeck, Sr., still resides in the township, as also do several of their children. One of the latter, Charles S., resides at Mount Clemens, and holds the position of County Clerk, besides being extensively engaged in the manufacture of doors, sash, blinds, etc., himself and partner having completed (in 1875) a fine and commodious factory, at which a general manufacturing business is transacted. The principal streams in Warren are Bear Creek, which rises on the farm of Charles Jacobs, and Red Run, which rises in Oakland County, entering Warren at the northwest corner of the township, running due east, and emptying its waters into Bear Creek, in the northern part of the township. W1arren is an excellent agricultural region. The land is generally level, but in some portions inclined to be rolling. There was formerly considerable swampy land in the township, but by judicious draining most of it has been redeemed. The products of the principal agricultural commodities during the year 1873 were as follows: wheat, 11,477 bushels; corn, 29,624 bushels; all other grain 57,294 bushels; apples, 3914 bushels; all other fruits, 829 bushels; potatoes, 24,633 bushels. Among the most prominent farmers of Warren are the Grosebeeks, Thomas Blacket, Charles Davy, A. D. Jenney, Charles Bursley, Louis Heartsig, and many others. The usual number of school-houses and churches are disseminated over the township, which fact offers a fair criterion of the status of the inhabitants in intellectual and religious culture. The population of Warren Township, according to a voluntary census taken in 1874, was 2214. This, of course, includes the entire number of inhabitants up to the date of the returns,-namely, June 25, 1874. On general principles Warren is one of the most flourishing townships in the County. WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP. The original surveyed Township 4, north of Range 12 east, was legally organized in the year 1827. The first township meeting was held ii the log schoolhouse, three miles south of Romeo, and near John D. Holland's residence. At this meeting Gideon Gates acted as Moderator, and Isaac Andrews, Clerk. For the ensuing year the following officers were elected: John S. Axford, Supervisor; John D. Holland, Township Clerk; Asabel Bailey, John Bennett, and Nathan Nye,. Assessors; Alexander Tackles, John Bennett,. and James Starkweather, Commissioners; Albert Finch and Joseph Miller, Overseers of the Poor; Daniel B. Webster, Constable; and Asabel Bailey, Elon Andrews, Edward Arnold, Pound-Masters,--'" their yards to be their respective pounds." At the annual meeting in 1828, a bounty of one dollar was offered for each wolf-scalp taken in the township, and in the following year this was increased to two dollars. In 1831, when these "denizens of the forest" became more scarce and-beautifully less, the bounty was increased to five dollars. Amo1ng the earliest settlers of Washington Township we find the following who have left their names as a prominent part of its history: Asabel Bailey, James Thornton, James A. Starkweather, Philip Price, Hiram Calkins, Daniel Thurston, Aaron Stone, Henry Jersey, John D. Htolland, Ienry.Myers, John S. Axford, and John Keeler. There are mainy others, but all of the above came in prior to 1830. These have nearly all left their descendants, who are scattered over the township and County. The principal stream in Washington is Stanly Creek, which runs about north and south in the western portion of the township; also one of the tributaries of the Middle Branch of the Clinton River. These streams furnish motive-power for two or three mills, and are otherwise beneficial in watering stock and for other agricultural purposes. Washington: has always been a good farming township. In 1850 we find the following interesting statistics given, which we compare with those of 1874: In 1850: number of farms, 116; acres improved, 10,805; cash value, $364,500; wheat raised, 27,436 bushels; corn, 26,983 bushels; all other kinds of grain, 15,945 bushels; potatoes, 5775 bushels; wool, 19,495 pounds. Dairy produce: butter, 28,710 pounds; cheese, 11,424 rounds. In 1874: number of farms, 196; acrcs improved, 16,404; cash value, $1,215,990; wheat raised, 34,004 bushels; corn, 35,560 bushels; all other kinds of grain, 42,640 bushels; potatoes, 9873 bushels. Dairy produce: butter, 55,905 pounds; cheese, 10,300 pounds; wool, 34,922 pounds; pork marketed, 70,675 pounds. Among the most prominent and best practical farmers of Washington are George Bowerman, Timothy Lockwood, John A. Tinsman, Loren Andrus, William A. Stone, Frederick S. Crissman, Franklin ArnoId, Joseph Sikes, Tobias S. Warren, James Thorington, and many others. In 1850 the entire population of Washington Township, including the portion of the village of Romeo contained in that township, was 1541. In 1874 it had augmented to 2099, and is steadily and rapidly increasing. We include the history of the village of Romeo-which is situated on the line between the townships of Washington and Bruce-in the history proper of the former township, because it has precedence in priority of organization. ROMEO. The village of Romeo was one of the first settled in Macomb County. Next to the County seat it is the most important place, historically and otherwise. In January, 1822, Asabel Bailey, accompanied by his brother Chauncey, came to Romeo, then called " Indian Village," and completed the first log cabin, just north of what is now known as the Bailey House. We say completed, because a squatter by the name of Jeremiah Alien, who had taken temporary possession of the land afterwards purchased by Mr. Bailey of the Government, had commenced the erection of the cabin, and Mr. Bailey paid him for what he had done, which consisted of placing in position a few of the logs of which the cabin was afterwards constructed. Mir. A!len then took up his tent (figuratively) and silently departed for the more congenial Canadian climate, from whence he came. There has been some question as to whether Mr. Bailey was the first settler of Rome, some having-as we feel confident, erroneously-given.priority of settlement to Frederick Hoxie, who came in about eleven months after Mr. Bailey. This fact is established historically beyond the shadow of a doubt. MIr. Hoxie erected the first frame building, a small twenty by twenty structure, in 1825 or 1826. During the raising of the frame some altercation arose between the old man and his son Job. The latter went to Detroit, with the wish on his lips that he might never see his father's face again. The next day following the son's departure the old man was taken sick and died; thus the unnatural wish of the son was verified by Providence. In 1824 quite an influx of emigrants came in; among them were Gideon Gates, the Finches, Ebenezer Kitridge, and James Starkweather. The first white child born in the Indian village was Harriet Bailey, daughter of Chauncey Bailey, in 1823. The first death was that of old man Hoxie, as above related. In 1828, on the publication of Farmer's Sectional Map of Michigan, the settlement was designated as 1"Hoxie's Settlement," but the village and post-office was called "Indian Village." Gideon Gates was the first pqstmaster, and Jonas Cutler carried the weekly mail from this point to Mount Clemens, performing the trips on foot. " Captain Gad Chamberlain came in about the year 1827, at bead of a large family, which, with accompanying neighbors and friends, formed a colony of some sixty souls. He bought out Ebenezer Kitridge and settled on the farm next north of Asabel Bailey. His eldest daughter was the wife of Colonel John B. Hollister, who was of the younger and moving spirits of the settlement until his death, which occurred in 1831. Mr. Erastus Day, with his family, came west with Captain Chamberlain. His farm was located just east of the Leslie farm. His sons were Erastus, Russell, Daniel, Levi, and an only daughter, Lucinda."':;The first store building was erected by N. T. Taylor, who came to Indian Village in 1829, from Menden, New York. It stood on the present site of the Citizens' National Bank. Previous to 1826 the early settlers had to go to Detroit for their mail, and to Pontiac to mill. Indeed, the privations endured by the pioneers of Romeo, in its infancy, were equal to those ever consequent upon the life of the western pioneer. The usual difficulties were experienced in the early establishment of schools and churches, although the zealous interest manifested by the early settlers in this respect reflects great credit upon their memories. Prominent in the galaxy of true men and good citizens were Asabel Bailey and Captain Gad Chamberlain. The former gentleman was an example in the matter of religious zeal and liberality. He gave the lot upon which was erected the first church edifice. Elder Warren and Father Ruggles were the first who held the " quarterly meetings" in this settlement. The Methodist and Congregational denominations are entitled to priority of establishment, although services in the Episcopal Church were held at an early day. The first school was taught by Gideon Gates, in the first school-house, which was erected in the year 1828. It served as the district school for many years. The original house was about twenty by thirty, and served for a long time as a meeting-house also. The school was successful, and the school-master eminently qualified for the responsible position, which he filled to the entire satisfaction of the patrons of the school. In 1834, Oram Archer came in, and in the following year, agreeable to the demands of the people, started the Academy, which he continued until 1839. This institution was among the most popular of its kind in this or adjoining counties. The subsequent success of the educational interest of Romeo is due, in a large measure, to the excellent basis on which the early schools were founded. In the fall of 1829 confeience was had between the principal land-owners of Romeo, which resulted in the employment of Colonel Hollister, then County Surveyor, in the spring of 1830, to lay out "a village." That was the origin of the present plat. Main and St. Clair Streets were established as now, and lots, four rods by eight in size, and appropriate streets and alleys, were designated, though not opened, in many instances, till some years later.? The conference was held at the residence of Mr. Taylor, and the gentlemen failing to agree upon a name, Mrs. Taylor suggested Romeo, as being classic, musical, and short, and-not likely to be confounded with any other place in the country. The name was favorably received and unanimously adopted. The success of the village from this time has been rapid. In the spring of 1836 there were but 200 inhabitants in the village, with thirty-four dwellings, seven barns, five stores, and one church. In January of the same year, the only Sabbathschool in the place numbered three scholars,--Willard Gould and wife and Mrs. Archer. The husband of the latter lady acted as teacher. Since this time the work in religion and education has been most successful in their general results. " From 1837 to 1839 Romeo was a general resortSfor counterfeiters, horse thieves, and blacklegs of all kinds (according to the local historian)..During the winter of 1837-38 Daniel Trombley came down here and sold a horse, and the money he received, purported to be bank-notes, was filled out and signed while he was removing the harness." The village was not incorporated until March 9, 1835. From this period the place has enjoyed the reputation of a quiet, easy-going, but steadily-growing town. At one time it was thought to excel Mount Clemens in the amount of its general business. The village now includes among its prominent merchants and business men Giddings, Rowley & Co., Newbury Bros., James E. Price, Morelnnd & Flummerfelt, Rowles Bros., C. F. Mallary, N. Larzelier, I. F. Pratt, and Norton M. Perry. There are the usual number of stores and business houses commonly found in a thriving village of about 2500 inhabitants. There are two first-class hotels: the Perry House and the American. The former is generally considered the most popular, and its proprietor, Norton M. Perry, is quite a genial and efficient host. There are six churclhes, one each of the following denominations: Congregational, Methodist, Baptist, Christian, Episcopal, and Catholic. There are two banks, the First National and the Citizens' National, the former established 1863, the latter in 1874. The present postmaster is Milton Thompson. There is railroad communication from Ridgeway to Rome, on the Michigan Air-Line Railway, which intersects the Grand Trunk Railway at Ridgeway, making connection with trains east and west, and terminating at Romeo. There is a daily stage from Romeo to Utica. Altogether, the village of Romeo is in a most thriving and flourishing condition, possessing every appearance of continued and increased success. There is in Washington Township a small post-office settlement called WASHINGTON, which is located sixteen miles northwest of Mount Clemens, six south of Romeo, and thirty due north of Detroit. It is in a good farming region, special attention being given to wheat and wool raising. It is one of the oldest settlements in the County, and contains about 250 inhabitants. It has a daily mail. A. D. Maher is postmaster. With the uncommon advantages that Washington enjoys as a township, combined with the admirable class of inhabitants that have peopled it from its infancy, there can be no exaggeration in classing it among the foremost townships in the County in every respect. It has a brilliant future, if its past may be taken as a criterion of its ultimate success. * The above is an extract from papers written by John H. H-ollister on the HIistory of Romeo. I I (j r: i I~ _ _ ~ -m-w

Page  1

Page  2 SCALE, 2 MILES TO AN INCH. COPLD&DAW,Y LVRF-A ONCE wagon shops, two blacLFmith shops, one harness shop, one paint shop, and one hotel. There is also a resident physician. Disco has a daily mail. ~rs. E~. J. Satler, p~ostmistrees. In 1550 the amounts of cereals, grain and general agricultural productions mere as follows: wheat, 10,286 bushe2s; corn, 30,0'73 bushels,; all other kinds of grain, principally oats, barley, and rye, 12:992 bushels; potatoes, 12,174 bushels; wool, 19,509 pounds. Dairy products: butter, 25,910 pounds; cheese,3~4s pounds, Contrasted with the returns made for the year ending December 31, 1573, the showing stands: wheat, 12,011 bushels; corn, 35,000 bushels; all other kinds of grain, 41,1'70 bd~heZs: potatoes, 14,350 bushels; wool, 20,010 pounds, Dairy products: butter, 37,036 pounds; cheese, 15,575 pounds. The largest inorease is shown in wool and dairy produce. Among the most prominent and best practical farmers of Ehelby are P~yne K. Leech, James N. Ewell, John Stead, David Conner, Chester Andrems, Hnrmon A. We!l~, Orrin ~off, and mnny others. The population of the townsbip in 1850 was 1482, wllieh had only augmented to 1551 in 1873, according to the respective reports. The former amount is given in the State census of 1550; the latter from the report of the Township SupePvisor, completed in the spring of 1574. It would appear that a greater increase than ninety-nine ought to have occurred in tweot~r-three years. The former report is outrageously too high or the latter altogether too low. T-~e incline to the reliability of the Supervisor's returns, however, as State censuses are notably incorrect. One thing is certain, that is, the general business and enterprise of the township are increasing rapidly hut steadily,~and so, we believe, is the popu1RtiOn. Every available opportunity that leeds to ultimate prosperitg to a community is embraced by the people of Shelby to the betterment and advancement of their interests, and this will bring its own reward. S~C ~E~ R LI N G- TO VV NS H: IF. The township now called Sterling was organized under the name of Jefferson, March 11, 1535. The iirst township election was ordered to be held at the house of jonathan T, Alien. The change in the name of the township was effected in 1533. The principal water-course in Sterling Toivnship is Plrxm Brook, which rises on the farm of 7;Trm. Summers, in the southwest corner of Shelby Townsbip. It tr;cveraes Sterling in a southeasterly direction. There are numerous small branches of this stream, each baring a variety of names. The tomnship is generally well supplied with water. Pluni Urook eu;pties into the Clinton River, on the east side of the township. The Clinton also runs through Sterling in a northerly course, leaving the tomnship about the centre of its northern boundary. Among the earliest settlers of Sterling were Eleszcr Scott, Henry R. Shetterly, Peter Moe, John 13. St. John, Asn ~untleS, Jesse Soper, John C~ibson, Olircr Crocker, Henrg J. Stead, ChaunceS G;. Cady, David Sticknev, the Skinners, ~Vilshington Adams, Charles I-Iutchins, Richard I-lotham, John B. Chapman, 50hn ~Pright, and many others of equal prominence. The only settlement or village in Sterling Tomns~ip is U'JCICA, a thriving village, which was settled as early as 15l'i, antedating the orgnnization of the County. Uticn is situated on the Detroit and a;tS city Railway, about ten miles wePt of ~ount Clemene, and twenty-four due north of Detroit. Zt is on the Clinton River, and from its Grst settlement it has heen a pl:ice of considerable importance. In the infnnoy of railroading in this State, a trap rail operated by horse power connected it with DetPoit. The Clinton niver nffords no important water-power, The vill;lge cont~iins a population of nbout 6o0. Its business is represented by a grist mill, saw mill, blacksrnith shops, a, wagon and carriage shop, a number of sture~, and a hotel. It also contains a good union school-house, ~vith a high-school dep;Lrttuent attached, churches, and other e~idences of thrift and enterprise. The villagre sbo~re, in many respects, the fruits of the energy and business tale~rt of those who were e:Lrly identified with it. At one time it sustnined a weekly nervepnper, but t~~e concern li:ts been suPpended for mnny years. The village enjoys the privilege of a daily tnnil, Alexnader ~rant being the present postt~apt~r. Among the earlier residents of the villn.ge were Dr. Cowic, the St. Johns, the Summers, D. Chnpaton, and many others of equ~l pruminence. Sterling has always been up to the nverage stn.adxrd as a productive and fertile township. The fl.mounts of~ ngiicultur:tl pruducts, as given in the rePpective sratieticnl reports of ]SjIl and IS'i3,,zre as follows: In 1S50: mhent, 6116 bushels; corn, 22,695 hushcls; all other Irinds nF grain, including, princip;lIly, oats, barley, rye, etc., ~4:076 ~uehels; potatoes, 38'i(3 bu~hels; wool, 4582 pounds. Dairy produce: butter, 17,555 pounds; cheese, I~j0 pounda. Value of orchard producej I~S19. Live stock: horses, 108 uiiluh-cows, 2SD; sheep, 1521; stvi3e, 370; othttr nest csrtle, SSO; ~vtrliinv osen, ~0. Wurnbcr of acres of improved occupied farins, 43I~. In 1S73:,v.hent, 9211 bushels; corn, ~S,315 bushels; all other kinds of grain, 39,64j bn~hels; potatoes, ~2,16~ bushels;'~ool, 9269 pounds. Dairy produce: butter, 23,7~~ pounds; cheese, 4020 pounds. Value of orchard produce, S3905. Live stobk: horses, 55,7; milch-co~vs, '733; other nent cattle (other than osen and c~ws), 40'7; sheep, 2228; smine, ~0~; working oxen, IS. ~umber of acres of improved land in occupied farms, 95003 mhole ~Lmount of tasnble Isnd, 22,'763 acres. Among the most prominent farmers of Sterling Tomnship are ~Viniam I~. Payne, Calrin ~oore,'lT'illiam 'Upton, Ednsrd ~-Iosie, ChaunceS O. Cady, Thoruns Clark, Charles Hutchins, the Dunns, nichsrd Honrd, the Spinners, and many others. The popul~ttion of Sterling in IS50, according to the United States census, mas S76. According to a State census, cornpleted in the spring of 1S?4, it had augmented to 1SO~I~, and is rapidly and steadily increasing Taken as a tamnship, Sterling ranks among the foremost in many respects that Mncomb County coutains. It had the good fortune to be settled by a good class of citizens? mho hn~e handed domn an indu~trious and thriving posterity. The future of Sterling cannot fail to he a prosperous and flourishing one. VV~~I~~E~I~F1~N TOVVNSIJ~IP. The tomnship of ~TVan~en nas originally called HicBory. It mas legally organized March 11, 1SY'7. The ~r~t tomnshiy election rvas ordered to be held at the residence of Louis B. C bnpnton. It retained i ts origi n al name un til April 2, ISSS, mhen it rvas changed to Abn. Finnlly, on the 2~th of ~Inrch, 7 8:-:9, it was changed to ~a~ren, bg ~vhic~ nnme it hcs since been calle?. 7Vbst nom constitutes the township n;lS settled many years previous to its legal organization. Among the early nettlers ~verc the Grosebecks, Joseph derome, ITsrri's CoreS, Joseph ~o~bo, and George ~olam, many of mhui~ have left families, mem~ers.of Tvhich still reside in the tomnship. Bs early as 1S3~ the elder Grosebecks coru menced the old French Road, kuo~cvn now as the Conner's Creek Road, mhich runs in a northerly direction through the tomnship, and intersects the G;ratiot Plank at Conner's Creek. This mas one of the ~rst roads within the present boundaries of `r;T~nrren To~nshir. The widow of Zouis Grosebec'k, Sr., still resides in the township, as also do several of their children. One of the latter, ClharTes S., resides at Mount Clemens, and holc~ls the position of County clerk, besides being cstensive~y engaged in the manuf~Lcture of doors, sash, blinds, etc., hiimself and partner having completed tin 1S75) a ~ne and commodious fnctory,;lt which a general manufacturing b~rsine~s is transacted, The princi~al streams in T;F~arrea are 13enr Creek, which rises on the farm of Charles Jacobs, and Red Run, which rises in OsBl~nd County, entering T;Vsrren at the northwest corner of the tomnship, running due east, and emptying its waters into Bear Creek, in the northern part of the to~nship. `\Trarren is an excellent agriaultural re~ion. The land is generally level, but in some portions inclined to be rolling. There was formerly considersble swampy land in the to~rnship, but by judicious draining most of it has been redeemed. The products of the princip~l agriculturnl commodities during the year IS'73 were as follows: tvhent, 11,677 bushels; cprn, 29,624 bushels, all other grain 51,294 bushels; apple~, 3916 bushels; aII other fruits, S29 bushels; potatoes, 24,633 bushels. Among the most prominent farmers of T7Varren are the Qrosebecks, Thomas Blacket, Charles ~av$, A. D. Jenney, Charles Bursley, Louis Hesrtsig, and many others. The usual number of school-honses and churches are disseminated over the to~rvnsbip, which fact offers a fair criterion of the status of the inhabitants in intellectual and religious culture, The population of'l~arren ~ownship, according to a voluntary census taken in IST4, was 2214. ~his, of course, includes the entire number of inhabitants up to the date of the returnslnamely, June 25, 1S74. On general principles ~Va~ren is one of the most -8ourisbing tomnships in the Gouuty. VVASW:I~NG~C`O N ~OVVI~S~IP. The original eurveycd Townshipp 4, north of Bsnge 12 east, was legally organi~ed in the year 1527. The first tomnship meeting rvns held id the I~g schoolhouse, three miles south of Romeo, and near Sohn D. fIolland's residence. AC this meeting Gideon Gates acted as ~Pv~oderator, and ~snne Andrews, Clerk. For the ensuing year the follomina otlicers were elected: Jahn S. Axford, Supervisor; Jahn D. Holland, Townphip Clerk; Agnbel I~ttiley, John Bennett, and Nathan ~Tye,~APsessors; Alesnnder THcklesJohn Bennett,~:and ~n~mes Starkmeather, CommipS~ioners; Albert Pinch and Soseph R/Iiller, Overseers of the Poor; Daniel 13. ~Vebeter, Constable; and Asabel Bailey, Elou Andrems, Edmard Arnold, Pound-`Masters:,--'' their 95'ds to he their respective pounds." At the annual meeting in IS2S, a bounty of one dollar was offered for each Tvolf-scalp taken in the towhship, nnd in the following year this was increased to two dollars, 3~n 1532, TPhen these'l denizens of the forest" became more scarce and~benutifully less, the bounty was increased to five dollars. A t~n Ong the earliest settlers of T;VAshington Townsh ip me ~nd~ the following who have left their names as a prominent part of its history: Aaabel 13ililey, James Thoruton, SRmes 8. Starkwenther, Yhilip ~Price, IIirum CalBinP, Daniel Thurston, Aaron Stone, ~-Ienry SerseS, John D. ~Iolland, Benry ~1Ijere, John S. Asford, and John ~eelep. TI~iere are miiny others, but all of the above came in prior to 1S~O. These have nearly all left their descendants, who are scattered over t~e townsbipp and County. The principal stream in T~Rshington is Stnnly Creek, which runs about north and south in the western portion of the tu~rvnPbip; also one of the tributaries of the ~4ic~dle 13ranch of the CJ~inton niver. These streams furnish motive-power for t\~o or three mills, and are otherwise beneficial in wstering stock and for other agrrir~ultur~l purposes. 7~Tnphingto.n` h,, a~mnys been a good farming township. In 1550 we find the following interesting sta.ti~tics given, which we compare with those of ~ST4: In 1850: aumber of f~rmP, 116; acres improved, ZOS05; cash value, $3fi4,500; ~Phent raised, 27,436 buehele; corn, 2fi,9;j3 bushels; all. other kinds of grain, 15,9~5 bushels; potntoes, 5775 bu~h~la; mool, 19,495 I~ounds. Dniry produce: butter, 2S,710 pounds; cheese, 11,424 r~unds. In ]ST4: nutnber of fiirms, 196; nc~cs itnproved, 16,40~; cneh value, S1,215,990; wheat raised, 34,00~1 bushels; corn, 13~,580 kiushclu; all other kinda of grain, 42,G~O bushels; potatoes, C3ST3 bushe~s. Dairy produce: butter, 55,905 poundsj cheese, 10,300 pounds; wool, 34,1~22 pounds; porIr mnrketed, 70,6i~j pounds. Aniong the Inust Frominent and best practicsl farmers of nTnshington are Geo~~gs Botvertnan, Tirnothy I;ockwood, John A.'rinsmfln, I;oren Andrup, ~Villi~m A. Stone, Frederick S. CrisPman, PPsnk~in RrnoId, Joseph Sikes, Tobias S. ~Varren, James Tho~ington, and many others. Pn I.SjO the entire pops!ntion~of TVt~.ahingrtonn Township~ including the portion of the village of Romeo contained in thr~t to~rvnship, ~vAs 156~. ~n 1S7~4r it had augmented to 20'J9, and is steadily and r~ipidly increasing, Tl'e include the history of the village of Romeo--~hich is situated on the line between the townships of T-T~ashington snd f3ruce--in the history proper of the former tomnship, becstuse it has precedence in priority of orgsnization. RO~EO. The rillnge of Romeo was one of the first settled in I1'Incomb County. ~fext to the County seat it is the most important place, historically and otherrvise, ~n January, TS23, Asnbe~ Bailey, ~Lcc~nipanied by his brother ChnanceS, came to nomeo, then called " Indian VilIage,'" and completed the first log cabin, just north of r~hzt is no~v known as the 13uiley ~E~iouse. ~TTe say completed, because a squatter by the name of JeremiRh Alien, ~vho had tuken temporary possession of the land nfter~~rds purchneed by ~ITr. BaileS of the Government, had commenced the erection of the cabin, and ~~lr. ~uiley paid him f~r what be had done, mhicb consisted of placing in position a few of the logs of which the cabin was afterwards constructed. nIr. ~!len then took up his tent (figuratively) and silently departed for the more congenial ~snadisn climate, from ct-hence he came. There has been some question as to whether Nr. ~ailey was the ~ret settler of Rome, solne having-as me feel eon~dent, erroneous~S-,air~en~,priority of settlement to I~redt~rick ~oxie, who came in about eleven months after ~r. 13rtiley. Tfiis fact is established historically beyond the shadow of a doubt, ilIr, fIosie erected the ~rst frame buildiag, a small Iwenty icy t~Pent~y structure, in 152~ or 1526, During the raising of the frame some altercation arose betmeen the old man and his son Job, The latter went to Detroit, mith the wish on his lips that he Illight never see his father's face again, ~he nest day following the son's departure the old man was taken sick and died; thus the unnatural wish of the son'was verified by Providence. In 1824 quite an in~ux of emigrants came in; among them mere G;ideon Gates, the Binches, Ebenezer ICitridge, and James St~trlrweathc~. The ~1~st white child born in the Indian village was ~arriet Bailey, daughter of Chsuncey Bailey, in IS23. The ~rst death was that of old ma;n I~oxie, as above related. In 1S2S, on the publication of Farmer's Sectional Map of Michigan, the eettlement was designated as L' Roxie's Settlement," but the ~r~iIlsge and post-o~ice was called "Indinn TTillnge." Gideon Gates was the first postmaster, and Sonas Cutler carried the neekly mail from this point to Mount Clemens, perf~rming the trips on foot, C' Captain Gad Chamberlain came in about the gear IS2~, at bead of a large family, which, with accompanying neighbors and friends, formed a colony of some sixty SOU'IS. He bought out Ebenezer Kitridge and settled on the frirm nest north of Assbel Bailey. Nis eldest dnuahter was the wife of Colonel John 13, ~ollieter, who was of the younger and moving spirits of the settlement until his death, which occurred in 1S31, 1~3~r. ~E~r~tstus Day, with his family, came west with Captain Chambcrlnin. His farm was located just east of the Lealie farm, ~Eis sorts were Erastus, Xlussell, Daniel, Lcvi, and an only daughter, I;UCinda."~:~;The drst store building was erected by N.~ T, Taylor, who came to Indian ViiIn.ge in. 2529, from ~Menden, New Pork. It stood on the present site of the Citizens' Nation al Bank. Previous to 1526 the early settlers had to go to Detroit for their mail, and to Pontino to mill. Indeed, the privations endured by the pioneers of Rorneo, in its infancy, were equnl to those ever consequent upon the life of the western pioneer. The usual di~f~cnlties were experienced in the early establishment of schools an d churches, slthough the zealous interest manifested by the early settlers in this respect re~edts great credit upon their memories. Prominent in the g"lnxy of true men and good citizens were Asabel Bailey and Captain ~ad Chsruberlain. The former gentleman was an example in the matter o~ religious zeal and liberality. He gave the lot upon which was erected the first church edi~oe. Elder ~Vsrren and Psther Ruggles were the hrst who held the ~L quarterly meetings" in this settlement. The Methodist and Congregational denominations are entitled to priority of establishment, although services in the ~Episoopsl Church mere held at an early day. The first school was taught by Gideon Gates, in the first school-house, which ~cvris e-ected in the year 1S2S. It served as the district school for many years. The originsT house was about twenty by thirty, and served for a long time as a meeting-house also. The school was succe~sful, and the school-msster eminently qusri8ed for the responsible position, which he filled to the entire satisf~Lctioa of the patrons of the school. In 1S34, Gram Archer came in, and in the ~following year, agreeable to the demands of the people, started the Aosdemy, which he continued until 1539. This institution m~ts among the most popular of its kins! in this or adjoining counties. The subsequent success of the educationxl interest of nomeo is due, in a large measure, to the excellent basis on which the early schools were founded. In the fall of 1829 coafei~eoce was had between the principal land-owners of Romeo, which resulted in the employment of Colonel HolTister, then County SurveSor, in the spring of 1530, to lay out "a vlllxge." That was the origin of the present plat. Main and St. Cleir Streets were established ~~s now, and lots, four rods by eight in size; and appropriate streets and alleys, mere designated, though not opened, in many instances, till some years later. 6 The conference was held at the residence of ~lr. Taylor, and the gentlemen failing to agree upon a nnme, Mrs. Taylor suggested no~neo, as being classic, musical, and short, sad'not likely to be confounded with any other place in the country. The n:lme was favorably recei~ed and unanimously adopted. The success of the village from this time has been rapid. In the spring of 1536 there were but 200 inhabitants in the village, with thirty-four dwellingrs, seven barns, ~ve stores, and one church. In January of the same year, the only Sabbathschool in the place nurnbered three scholars,--T~Tillard Gould and mife and hIrs, Archer. The husband of the latter lady acted as teauber. Since this time the 7770r1~ in religion and education has been most successful in their general results. " From 1837 to 1SY9 Romeo was a general rePort'for counter~eiters, horse thieves, and blncklt~gs of all kinds (according to the local historian). ~During the winter of lS37-38 Daniel Troiubley came down here and sold a horse, and the money he received, purpurted to be bank-notes, was ~filled out and signed while he was remoBing the harness." Tbe village was not incorporated until March 9, 1835. From this period the place has enjoyed the reputation of a qniet, easy-going, but stcndilg-groaing town. Bt one tiine it was thought to excel Mount CIemens in the amount of its general business. The village now includes among its prominent merchants and business men Giddings, Rowley & Co., Newbury BrOp., Sames E. Price, Morelnnd ~ FIumTnerfelt, Ro~Ples BrOP.t C. J~. ~lsllary, N. Lnrze-elier, I. F. Prstt, and ~Torton nI. Ferry. There are the usual number of stores and business houses commonly found in a thriving village of about 2j00 inhabitants. There are two ~irst-c~nss hotels: the Ferry Bouse and tbeAmerican. The former is generally conPidered the most popular, and its proprietor, Norton M. Ferry, is quite a genial and ef~cient host. There are sir; chnrcl;es, one each of the following denominstions: Congregational, Methodist, Baptist, Christian, Episcopal, and Catholic. There are two hanks, the First Nationnl and the Citizens' National, the forme~ established ~S63, the latter in IS'74. The present postmaster is ILTilton Thompaon. There is railroad communication froru Ridgemsg to Rome, on the Michigan Air-Line RnilwaS, ~vhich intersects the Grand Trunk RailmRy at RidgeFvny, making connection ~vith trains east and mest, and terminating at nomeo. 'I'hprn i. a. ~n.Flo stR.I-re from Komeo to Utica. Altogether, the village of Romeo is in a most thriving and ~ourisbing condition, possessing every appeafsnce of continued and incressed success. There is in ~Vashington Tomnship a small post-oflice settlement called ~7rA sIx ~~i'G;TOj~T, n~hich is located sisteen miles no~th~rvest of ~Iount CTemens, sis south of Romeo, and thirty due north of~ Detroit. It is in a good farming region, special nttention being given to mheat and ~rvool raising. It is one of the oldest settlements in the County, and contains about 2j0 inhabitants. It has a daily mail. A. D. L~iIaber is postmaster, \Vith the uncommon advantages that TVaahington enjoys as a tomnship, combined mith the admirable class of inhabitants th;it hare peopled it from its infancy, ~herp ~nr, h~ nn Punaaeration in classingr it nmong the foremost townships in the LUUIV VUY YV yv uu~-~bb County in every respect. It has a, brilliant future, if its past may be taken as a criterion of its nltilnate success. ~f The ~tove is au e~tmct fi-om pnpers ~-ritten lJy John H. ~Z~ollister on the I-ristol~g of nomeo. I I (j r: i I~ CIL: I:* 't - I JCIL cr-) IL ýD ET R mi '4z IL -.4 ýZ-N "i T A MID 11-4 4\1 ýi I KI, O.k txýAak t.. I "-A -, 745 4;=O-j ----------------------------- 7, 1 =" 19,. K JL 1:7 71 P r BAY CJJITY pp n 6 ý 11 I'L W ý 11 1 11 -A I CIO I:Zý ) kq' i 19 1, 'i IV -W 2f -- IN( cli Ilz ON tlz 1ý4 7 -WA L 777 L -6 71 lip ia -------------- lei rZil ý7FITT Iýz tcý ý i - 1ý1ý FJ;-- -77-7 - F H Iýz --.L I Iýi I 41 I:IL Ill. I -I-- - - - A - -. 1 1.1 11.ý ----A!,I ýFý F MO.. V ýULZý--L I - U jo, Ilz P-- I ii Ll IL I r44 F iLm 'fý lk I. I. -1 1. -it - Rý I I I E, F, % -1ý-t T It -1 11 f j I - I OL-4::ý -.4 \Zý Y R i --I -1 L I CAý [ýý 1144 - -L vo ý = ý\P-j ý I r 10 i IT] CIL.: 00 L4 I I I I I I ell Awlm. MAE it - I. Ii _JL L_ WOO;ZýZ;71 I! H zwý_ i_41 11 - -----................. 7f T__ -41t QlA r-Q 101-7................................. co Lýl I, - - 7 liý4 -ýo ie -VU CN tj Cal................. OR

Page  3 11-P RE:S.& SALOON OF JACOB ROESSEL. r cz 1-/w IE/V 0 / /C/-/. 0 0 N A L D S 0 N'~ E3 R 0 S - C14 9171A OZ- (:5ý A C f, ON It-A 07-0 R Y. - M7, CZ ZMZ-1V S, 1 / 0 A/ - MAC AMC COUNTY COURT * H 0 U 5 E~ MT/~-/ IIII IV/ I- jr L ~~ l rr~ _ I-- ~1 - ____ -1

Page  4 i ~~~~ ~ __ _ ~:zt ý.;z.0.. ck) t\) 1 1ý4 1 Qi..;.~:.~-.1 ~~;. ~:al~~r~~?`' I~:hi. ~~~: ~; ~~I~~ '~' ~I 1'1 ~ Y Noý N) rq r 0 M 1 C/) 4E) <( CI M 'bo C's CI CZ > gz::~:~.~i;: ~:1.r~l I' i.i; ":' 1~:1~1 ~ C%-:i SC cs $' ~ P1 Gr P -j:- ~:: I 1~ ~dl Lt~ I-4 'o C.I -4 r n rS I L~II I _ ~ _ _I ~ - r --~, I I,,.~il ~-l~~Y-l~riYli~P*~~~~P~~~~ _-----

Page  5 5 oi~~' r it rr p --tA I IV. -H. 13-E.632~ i /,Z/ P~C iil /i i i i i ~~:

Page  6 6 4j rr ---1 ----- II ~-I CC ~ R7ES.OF J OH N C RI'TTEN DE N 01-1CS7-'-19-1ZZD TP, IVACO/g 0011VICH. 01-UROH 8k 17ES. 0-F HE V F~- H E N\ D R I ý K Z-/// T19, IWA cou o..l W/C/-/.. ~:~.......... ~ ~_~i~:~.~;c~~:~iS'D:::~:~~:~-~~~`~',,,1. ~~S~~p ~:~ j; 'L~i.:;.. ~c`l;;~+;: ~:".1 "-~:- ~~~~;- ~, -~~:.;.r s~-~~s:~.~~~~;- ~ ~::~~~-~;i. I I~"~ij ~;~'~~~.-~-:~~:~::~::; ~~~;I~;:;-~::::;::; ~.;_,::-;-~i-c~. ~-c~~:~~~--~ _~~l(:~:~~~r,~..~:~:-r ".-;~.~-- ~I;--I-C1~. ~ r.i ~iC Oi~;~ ~ry_:~I _I=-: ~il -:~~ ~ ~ -i- ~r=~: ~\:~: '~~;`'~ ~-~~--: i;l -:;-;~::::---;- ~~~~~ d ~-. C:' i ~:~:: ~I~ -:..~.-r~~-~~ J:~~~-~.' ~-~`?~-:-' '~:'' i-~~~;~~ '~''~l~i::'ll ~:~-::C~:-":1: *u v:.I ~ ~r" 9~` 11. Ii RES. OF S. N. ROBERT S. OlI'SZ-S~fRREý TF, Srr-C /8,. &A 0011149 Co,//N \ 5~~TORE~ OF P. F. H. SCHA a. DZýýIZEI? IN DRY CO oDs, OR 0CfR/rfS,9 07S&8 & 0HES, HArS, C PR/S ~DCNS RC~RY O/N NVEW BAA r mo~f-,1w aoCwB CO.. rMICHIGA V. II _ -, - I- -..- - -e - I'- I ~~ r I~- ~ONE=

Page  7 ;7 7 tý4 N, ~R 'vi LN' h, Vx-" yx IrA M12 irm %N V* N ý7 IR.7, 777 J'A. CL -77777ý 4 APPf YA" Co FF Co N Ad' I Pf ýQ 1ý.;ýt 's X own, x!4 V 0 Ell Q3 q k 6 v - 4 -j 4.1 4. J VJ AD M.......... 7., ý t1, 'Tý 6 4. ý,A I ý"4 I 'l, - y _2.4!'UiPzt,: 71 "N "Jon j yýL -:4 WVV:jiE ";,L lT177777, A I t w ~ 1'_ ~::::::: ~::: WIN,: X. r ~ r i l S# 21, -NOW Pi ýNq II Iri iiri! i; iI-'x. WON; Ni: i i i pr Lrk, ii, f, gq: ~~~77`7t' IT '0. A -TýM I; I i ' j i i i i:f~ Ts I: E Aii.r gr! h IN 11p1p..p 7ý7i %k,200, 77, i kywmm,ý $1W117 i: iiWw I j "T'* ff iV. sggv oi j"JVi rr bt~ ksl I&...... zrq': -SITI Yz. '74 W. V:~~:~i, i ~~;:::?. i --g j~ ý,x........ F.!4' MIA,! 64; 5' v.,: ~ 5 0b:?......... ý,Q gý j MEMOi~ rr:i ~~;-:~ i; ~~.:rrl~. ~::..,i ja:ira~:~iJ~~~:".i~~?!.4Wi~C.: i mi~rt~i~;i- rt~;~:~3 u:,_.~~::~;~;i,:eB~;i~:~~~ ~ ~- i"~~;:::~:i:,rl-k~s~:-~~~:~;;!i:.-.~.::, 1; I,:~;;igye:it:'i~mQ:~ i!! ~IW:i~.:-i. ~:a ~:. i ~ " ~: i~i' it __ -_-~~~~i:3in:~~~~::rl: r:: ~~jii:;~ri::.~.~~;-i ~~1l~s:~!:~::::::~-:;I.-~.;I.~rr (!Ti:;" i.r~ r "Ibi~.~..'.';..~~~~~:;;i-ir.;~:~.-~i '":"" (.~~i"lP1"~4a.-:II ~~'"~!: ~?'; ~~~~I~ io,,rii~i;-~ii~i~i ~:~::. ~~~~ ~~~3; ": I,:~~~~;~~ ~r.~i~~- --..I:*~I 1 7~~::~i~jl~i~i:~? ~ B~!:;li7'" '~::%'Y;!':*~t~~:i;~F~*~.... E~~~t I~iR4 -~-~~:li ~:::::-::..:,.i )(1: r.li~I~ r;::: C:.F~ ~~ip c?;ir~:-a,-r,~ss 31~s 5~!5 ''.'~ -'.~~ i~~ ~$:jJyFA:~~:i::I~ 12~i~::~.~, ~.~.:; r;; ~: ~I~~I~::;i,p, ~i~~S~~ ~, ~-" i_~~::~ I'7..~.::........... E, fz'vl -Oz-~ i;~j~: Dl; P. ~;; C 'Cvý ":V..r:v ýzi NOR F ~:~:1.!~~ gg4 g. %'y;r.;1f~~; qg-lx r i M -Alf.'' NJ~i;~I: i~~~~~;;: Ii LI _ ____ ~._ -------L. I

Page  8 Q. Q~t~ g I I --,~ I 'II ' - ~ TP. *X-Ro.ýE TO yjft R Aý - ~Tr~ ~E~`Jr'T~-AIIZ~T~ _ _~__~ _I_ Kai S e7- 77L i; ~~4, f~ rC~ Pil, A. Y/to s a TO7L Cct7 - 1.. 2) t J iT ~o 7i/7t E~ ~Y be I ~ -Pt, -. &eeo. -.4.. d it-cu~ SAWe, 7" a, aul 1.11!Peel I~rp, PT Pe ii 1 r 1 I ia7n P, -V -R, a~-v i' s 1-5~~uZI;.Ct~777C~7t: ter I~eh i ff o 441 _FEK Waytlw-f cockwoo~ 2C~n~stscs Fu ~t ~r r leer iere ~. i~~er 1~1-c4 L3~ S, jy~ ~.7ts --. I i; i i i --A I J I es I... - - F. - II i 1; 31-17~m,E]V s Pff. Shook Yhoa 4 IShook ~_____~ II~~I t r I h 'r-h i - I -,- %,I11 I 1 R rV - - - I I Vý9-[PNP~iS~r;-- Fre7 1, Ch)C JamC;P~Lesff. VO -r t a 7u~ 11~1II e~e h~ pecle~l N ee-SL eee~ eeeF9,g L~i 4Y? hj I..................... irQT- P- t?-T IZ I- Ict-n so 71, Y C' 7' 2 fa7t -w a-;~r reters jttý lel~~ d JJ A IN 9 Mol ellen d ri S elhh m C ff-T -0 Pee ma,-ar c~,C;I ~a ~!?~u Pd~~' 1071 1213' J71C7 WI~2/ lwzng Anvang I -Liz - Zti" h L.;.Col tos nv r E~~ _.L~~ ~~~CII~--~---J~---~I~-.-B. Tf To -w er O7a ewray CF3 1 R- tC- e7 ~GL~N( D rep e I~ob Cc oze J-H ýo A. aa rbi-7jams -Pa- w i. v MI ý,L ee,, Af, -P Sk e ldo.7u CHBonvr Lf ( A-Vieeep 7 f.7jF~ 6e(77~y e e'ie; eeel P~LE tr Jno: EZishn ~richo21~ i~lr -i~~~Tl Ze nC e e -fl -44WU I~C~CC~ L O ~ I, I I I alcc hir Ir ý:li - -. I, t _ II -Y I ~1 )I__1I -T: LO i Ilu ~I O rCbre-r ~Si~ '9 ~~P~ei~ts Es~ r ý fve a B Shrede",~ v Y -Poro ti 0 [life, Lb o 1"7I rt- SoSay e r UZI~ F-Le ~ps: r d A IT C) I:.' Y \ I. I ý. fl I I ~C '. i 1 ~ r 9 w i~t r KT-ý -ff.~tz 10," c Ik I ES1 YrPi~I~ ijie~ CO ~~27~ I L1Z7Y~7;C; IP7j~7_tL~jr 72u s;ie jo 7un, K-a S i e -AL-8 H c7irr ~r? i~P~J b~c~i Ig~nr ~Cr;m ~ 1T~F~it JH i I 2q iip I )i 1'-am..I - -Iýl si Cc VY O-le 0,,,411 enl --.,t4, JL jo AcSage, i I I 1 77 1 1-~ T: -Do# Z ey ý'Mh t~:i.30 TP~e "Cru ir - ild w, TeBwks~c ~i~IR~EL ~r i IA R ~c Srdarm es l eet s la f: vhwa ei e7 z 7ill Fri I S a 7t e 1P T. F C I lgt9 a Qf t. ~ 7nL~sJ )7yere JO_ ItC,-Iu Fuller;T hY Yoht, F6.V P ýr_ Zý L li 7 ai 16 ' I. k 7a w sht t.Jo 7ut e- Jo A, 7 -1 Jacob Se"~ e rr/ C;Ct, 1 Itula 1 4,) Ti~uo ffazleto-7t a eee t z, C. CI C-tLP ý? C ry e r alis Th e o' 8~.Ife drick 6:7L reenlL epht el Fo x S-Fa7-i ~ ~ bn kt Md ~ dBoholz fiI 1SL.B e b eF Ja-rae ~ t 3a3 -P _L Dra~~aves 20l t il~tov teP b V 5 ~I 7e/ m o rt 7, d 4 I ltz le, 0 rftr;3 ' t~2 ~r~ Zd Mw t 0 7t~ _7%7j~i~T0 7 7, C&-rs~ I S n Lil ~F~IN W: a vk. i I L T ~P2ý _30- -5 R r i VI7js. t IiV I IAK j r Jo /tic j~ u ~a~crom 0 -1 V- L 19 o i U- YU IMP,3 ~ ~c~Ja rp, t e Art f A vost &Wva pi ~ D~. ~: ýdlivwtz/~a.1 til ~e~Ctj~ HIS 8~ -ireuc F Oti.M -76 CA.~~i e-m e, as lulls en ýAA i_~_ alC Cer -n-ry L;pl ~ra; rd JLI I, I mo-no -D wi -ae lz? -ý Ct; ~1 s h Is d t e 1~ -E b e ze, Car-rr ~3 rr IL CI u 'E3.B;3 F? 1, O~tx 14, ellc~ ~ S4 CO ~ 1 Lp s Z ja rf~ O 23Lana 71, C I 1w i I I I I --I I- I ' ~r~r P u rc~.r;;r: R ~c; O Ct, r rl - d -' 6aLrrte JB - F Carl~@ fffel. lisfls L 'f3 d Jos e p boy er \i 5 ~; ii O o a ii '~il ~ i. I 11 ' I b h Lj ~~4; n~~e~ ~r3~t VI rr 2 ~Ot~e' I I " P Cr. J cpPIS0o Q A I I,, I OEM4 -ýkl.1% klil ~rj ~bc~j S fZ L/ iPP' kl~~C~f~t;ro -tv ~ 54= --~i eepf, -:~a.e -rl tot I - I -- - II o ýrl -I - I - - - - c -L " I w 1 11 _ ~ ~ ~~_~~____ ~ I I.. L-. I I,. I i ~t;0. i, % - ý V J If \ Li I _ - r I 'a ~ I r ~I I L1 L~-..15 --c~:~ I-;u I

Page  9 e)~ins~IriI-lrb')>: i,: -~~LII~I-LL-. - T' 2, B. 12 /Ilz Ivr ly" 11 h., a..~ r reepr leeei h:~ li~l~ctrt~in c

Page  10 10~g it - - - - - - - - - - - - T. p o.- Vt. 13. - E.~ a G e o 16 h~ a~CF r.-I tl- -n2~ 13.nJ ' tp~~~' I 81 21: i jjt 5 re ii\ -i a77,d br 0. B-.- Cra-lto

Page  11 II T 3 -Ný- -HR, -14-d -rr_ ~ ~ I //// z // i j I ii //;j~/ L ~'/~ /////' /~ //i ~ ~c 5-----, 1 ~ -~-~-~I ~, '6 ri/ / / r o JV.A 1 iI i ~/// i i i //;;i // I/I j I I, // I ~r; lii/ i: i I, / / I r _ _ _ I _ __~_ I IL ~

Page  12 12 MA Uu m HOUR HI CO.1 MICHIGAN. FES.OF F. U. KLNUHI.UK. PZ EMENS, iwo'A C011118 CO-AlICHICAN,

Page  13 13 I L II - ~, I I- ILL - ~ -C-PI~DC~ I L I _I I - --~ T 5, -R. 1 I ~ ~ _,1,, ie9_ c;; i~~~-,~G~3 O 1 I ~-~----~L--------- A&~E C. SWU 7; 32 rim~ er. Praft afioer;r Fros t J. r I i - 1 ~-M! - 1 t us P1 E s s vy~-r Fe WEzt Cj I -Z I 1 ll~ill Inn ~ I O 1 lo ~ I Z0 1 091 1 - Iy PEI slutL 7tee 2/ I I _1~1 1 ý o M lil I - N I -19 -- l I I LH I IV #41 -6 0 FEE p ffer~lkcorVan f? b str,,Taý7 ý- CR " ~ss Mli h a I, ý I w j I I i;7 W-C.Prestoyv. 'ti~Z'il j~~ee~~ PI W I r I I Fros t.7 C 74uro rhin 1T rk ct. Tr I I-A B -i s~Ska- rp Win iv. JZLo - 0- o Ct; J I Ci yZr~w s Belb.71, Z/te-r~v c: 5' a. list -B7tr w. ler e *V W -Be! ld. 8te ifa D ~b~E~ MIER)%' S`Ql rret~~ ee~ I I I ee-nun Il notier~ ILEa t7 a~ ~cl. ~S;-_ - I. i m i I 1',4 1 1 4,--4 1--, - N-: - '-. L ~~n;--------~ I.U b ru I/ N~o 7z/ St Se iv i~. Creo S. Ste IwU~TI; 'II tj a F? J Li3 P, e A l~avs Swtkew helanff?-- L2~ ~AA ý Ac I IVý I 3E5 ' - 0ý= I~ \ I -`r I b rbPnl I _ -\ 1 E~ C`~`~ST~.a~s. S~~ Gi I ~ el-~ O \Y;-------;J~~ s. ePccCo;rz/ A h7i -F~E )WIA ý I. I' -L l C C P,,10 Zt77t N ttY hai q. -Tr -v T, -r Ll -1 I - [ _jit -WI - I %. - -I - I dA I W I ~P ' UP M. - I P-~I I-I T i I IV 1. r 0ow~-Lke t~r A d r Geo-ra e W. lyickb Ict -V d 4L~ o 0~;~. semo, ý JIU0ccr.~z cas-tor kýýyr c~s~ &tzhie-rlawi I Sý I B-M T07 6-e O.H. le w &7-ce~ 8 1~2a ey m3 r fe e o x\ Y" 53 - "JL id I Smithi~i JaC; S. Sp SGn E es SP enn c e- rl S p e n c e r Eot;C)~i~ e. 7a s IWO It el RX Al 4'2, 1PIP! W, 0, 'CO 7 bit S. C-1c ts -F J je b~;z, E, 71! 7%-9 fLe t fackwia NJ~ SIP e- nceP c r rat. 0-~. -E T ar r r ~ Ypl`:. yaat e 1 VT ý e,. C'o a k /I L 2 I a ME I a Ed,iz/ Jý 8- e ii I~lpuo-rez:L cwS-S, Est ~~3 c ff s ti go,~ alu -l I~L;-t I ~ *,bo7 8, i lit2.. -. 7 itto C. J. ý-Jf~r.r-[ tP' JT ass dc~T f- FT, r 6-0 d l, W. c Fotk 12% Fon W-1 B l C a, e b ytt............... Jo e I -C ly rt ffi r a~ir?T v JIL Stre CtC 7 - A i:- q a I IN - h Q P: L\ ~t Z _I~jlE! ~ ~eeiP~~ ~~eel loPleell -9 k~ f5l 0Vre i B.r 5r K i t~ i;t J ~-~i= h JzariP-~izk Pre Tu S Ns Sanlfor E~ Stoae2 ~aO't~e I F~ u;s h, ~-3~; J-Oev 0. C.I CTO s 2.vu, ss pt~ h sFLPI I-ae~ ~2~ lert~ a Mc~h~n; f4 -ff 7 t cai I 9 P -1 MKrrC I TI,,,,,, r S IAfst Sowcn ~OS~So v e r (I a -I k I i' u u i~N Ie'ie ei -Ji re1PrrrcgZ I fue~L;U r Y -n~ lr: -I-------- r -I FJ S u' na f' ~ i ~ ~ / 1 Jct as. e ee h c OOfi oo ~ C-9 1 e -rn, C/Msff. su " M& Affste I-V~ FL D. C - fib I VI1 7 C' hi '-t~~Uc~lA Ijw/ e I C& t i e(? to er Ii TI,. w e Z T B e e, b e luL~Se~~ ýA t? u gc l 4f.ýf Upt 7ý~-,C i ffetrr -1' 'pe I I -E, IT Wle Z d-i-a sx~I I mj I ME In I eu -~ ----- "-C, I I I -I ~(L II 44 Sh~ookt -s Ge 0 60 -tv ver 4L~ klefit i~s ~ ~L~ O i, i~ ~ t~3 ~92 ~ ~3~ i~e'e~'rs~ s IPeel~ a re s ~5 Y h' ee fee L~S ee~, r c;s c C rel ~mom ~le i~ d 4r U IL ~i L~;R S~ ~.. Y.. L-C e;%f2~ ~Yit O~V ii: ~~ls -M'OT C1 a alive-P e 'l l [. N d ii tl Affs S-t pm -W j------ i i I i ilp i t; I `I ý 1PV i I I P-O I m ý ý1 -a TI;e 17-1 x -m~D Or 0 7V2 I P"OL91 liz; Q I -ý-,Ja Se cvnt~ Nchss ffi p'. e -a c-u IMIN~s~t c~Bunk I lIw/ e.1 ch, ~ liI rn- rn o Zt 6eo Set h. 'i~i zu c7~ ~/S7LTlu alp ýA~C~ Il ry Y I I I A ni it of I - I I I ~ ---- --Y C- ~s

Page  14 -1. AA A: 7JE - ~I--I: `~ ~ -: 1..,~,'--~;-------~------------~----------- 11 - - - - - -----~ - -. -...~ ~---~----------------~----: --I~ ~ T -- - I I II I ~ - 'P ~' ---~~:i(r I-R. 13:~ RDL FIA ck,9rd o ~ fecr, cL Jj) P, ~~on es -big, Wni Tt~----' ----- Vre Sili" 9 tj R OI ret~r Ipqp!, e -wL ~7 titeo I ~Xi~~~tt~ JI ~io~nycr 1), -4 IM~pi 13 o Crs &i r~P9 MZT-1 'TO &Tstara hmFt~ b TIMOI) f I la e jar LP, oomis Sis son Xi r L'9 p I i - ~~ I I nr -\r r ~-~lr ~ i I - L LL k I \ 1 I~C cl I:.I~I ~~~ ~L1\ ~r I ~d~S- 1 I _ iL? I r OL 1 II.Mna I ill 1~ - _I 1 ~` LJ -I\- 1 8, I~ 'ce9 F: lr r;~~ ii i I k i~ Llrr ~'~F ~_D~t~a/Z' ~- "h h3 "E F?~ jaw-nl2 Ti.-b. b tt ' s-17?'i I& ty-zp CID " -r IC~P teq ~7no ~I r SiC~;rirLTt et~ Sh eSl'e r t i" ýMDZ G-Pe,-rki-tus-s I i_ Sa-m/l ~ b r7 R7 msell Cot: by 'r ~:~~~;;:-~~ ~-:Ylj~ ~1i:: 41~ ~';~ a 1~ ~F~ /I~ 17 ~.5 age 5 ~ ru~ he p alrd Sar Warr ener A P[a3/o w JOS RO I C, fz; or C, topo 72 r~~l ~C~ -7V- J ay jIgp~ a_ rPI B a I Saw c a-f che den a r, v r G' ~ r; -1 1 1 _,Eib & 0 r t 3r2-~~h dffe, bb I~ e'w-hit e VIC ZýIM; ~p -Esl~sate- of _Tim a hlyamdanus lev i Fe9 It lullP JU1i ee W~s aylF ts~~~~Io-n Ifa.Ta s - ~TEo~t. Ntep-hent4 C-r..-,,If,,d S O.F d i~pnSCp le9eee leeeee IIPPOo arzn er &.-W. 47~E~ p -icy V-X47-~9 S, ccyn S. ITY d e 16L~ - - IFi IfT%. ~ha g d IEZPI!p r9: JTas 4~a "Afurrd u3 ~5 Ipaeeeqe'P~sri InFn e..o ~LOI Ad tcr 77Mlit7st, releelmýei 7x: OIo -ýn S T 07Z, -ElyE -D,. n~n ~j~27 -I!- n c e M- sA. Tr OCA ~G~LC ~4I%" M ST SuM77, er ~Oni ""IE. ~qo~Z7;rtes _R T~a Z YT;L es ~_e~ I \\ - I I i I 11r~II -onI -~ 1 1~I r(l I ~ 5 a~ ~1" p d 3 qr~ C3 r I LL I p1 T-- - --ý - I - 1 q Lpp I-M ny "t Arring ffulelel, Wit 7 et tI i o cj ~: D p PPI d Cc~ -Waa2ke iffcU: L" iCf 9M av l Kp clb lli z vi 1:21~~I -LL of? Cr-rct tv~ S O d 01 O ~Ct ~ir I L_~I ' ~ I r I -'J r rl 1 1 - -I r r r ~ rr I EJ ~n7n s; 1 jk Al Cliz) ~k,4,lnzb IIU N Qj IndFersoln 0. Wa- o d & c-k emo7ý Gý-rv c f Cr IT~GC~ A. Fro 0 ek~C 7 -1- a J J; ~ CaeLP h~rtm P~o _q 0;r r~l 00 - --z4 e P C~'ab dy A -D Fro s t FGibsou - L4~ Bsi C Ph 0 ýsm-T- -N ~7" SI ' -E F & -if, Was bZ \1, MA We- P-rz -PZt-rfee. WPe 1-t~i bann linsn~ I 'MT:~n~kiiac. 1 "; ~: I ~; i! ';A I 'r' i B d.cS; 1 -. 1 f I _ L PUMPS 41 dA I i;- -I, 1, I I i IM L% I- --COP i-d I S -h a~E.-M JIOS e 7 ~r 5 '3 9;1 PI XSe TV nt l,7Z F~r e c 7n cy- 7z U u~ ~ j O I1",P~'-e~t~ ~G I Jno d l -r coi -P fi ~ ~iY~tl 2 s k! O ~,2TiI: 1~~;~e;tw le r; e r SswtwmzZ~ c I ý Fre c m a n S e- c eL ~ - -j ZZ, Arr TO -w e, I IU e~sra, -nz, JP776 Cf 0 r P. A?,. t C -tit: bftA Otif l Ilk s E a k-n. n Wlw r A awt 0:,41,~ i v-llas k in, v Iff. tn i I ~ f 1 _ _ ___ I _1 r - L

Page  15 It 1 -J I I/ (I l ý I -W 1IIP5~e ~R~- BC.-~- 7 - --~- ---- IJ I.. ~ ~. I- c,:e~~Ltt 7 U Itj 0; I s~ E o ~j ~, ~S u 'irry j17~ tzar vB r 13hC ~1 s~3 u r~t w~ 99I CA Wtler ~u Ca n.;~ fR~ eyr t fuls.Sit 0 R, -1 - Iri Z c o -e ~1, I I;s C~f ~~cj 3 ~cz~ d t~i ~~ 5 ZY h IA M I' W, 1- ) I I / 11 I P w? -it% %%all r\ V I LT~i 7N-:~n~%~ 4 B c~c; ~ ~ UM 'ý.? giO U ~ - C71 19 - F3 A iS' tU' I;, -1 r h, 7Lt -E.I car s a.,l~ l r/ ~EP~O ~e~ t 9 i lee e ~1 ~~ee en C3 F1~ if S~i M t117 I 71-f -Ili t7 i -1 14 'V c ~u M ha pe~e I` I r ' _~ ~I I 1 -r t eil\ lim11 11' fin ~-/I~F~f~PP. I Gri mv a TI -P -YUITDII 1 ~: r - 3 1 / 1.ýT 2 ýP W 4f T-_ ~I.,4x fo r C Frit c 'el TT A /Je C c7,t ru1 'P;n~c~ a~i, ~is 1I~sc i _ppql~ Fi;Ci Pea -rs -PC- OF, r j WE ~'~T'C 4\ O N o Y~a Xj I~ f '~ ~I V ~cj -~ 2"h, m I~arr is ~ ieeu Leeel~ d b ~c~j ~ S1, n/ll~ a I -41 F%- i I iz_ i.~ ' _~U 1 I 141,ý, ~a ~ o r, r i+ CI: L: $t lort~ i - 1 119- - - 72:;i I -~ji~l eeni F? O "J c~ t; zF- ý. It l l; I i's IF i 7 k-11 rt~] ee~ I _A. tY7;~ S 07Z/ ý-I IT. C. A K-K _Mary ~3. ~Rl~art ~r~e g~orrn &0~f I 4mi m Il S~w_ -Phil llip a-J~~Krr zs pe, liv, It 1 11- 1 L l - i Ipluf& I It y Ol ePei ~ ru C F C i K. I r:~~-FlEatee,U 9 Lvt I S. iLtX ~-b 19-T I ewS 'Ta 8 KemR, cb en -E tv C'. I I _r i tZ IJno "'P-F-2Wo-~vftn re, Cw. rlis~ tbco. r tj d Fl o O.Wa I1 e, s ro zt to r / ~ee er lp~7 -11. 1 1 Jhvj -n, lz1 kqo I t -,,,1 1..A M~ e s CErz Merm ý,~e 5h Fl Ci 11' L4 -2~. Ig hrp: FoyelZson~yer Jc~u~ru: 7nerS, I 1 6 Mý LV I -.. 1 1, r - I ii if e- r 4erq I:~z Si 1:i r c r I ~jr~t;~Pr e s~ a77, -~--~--~ ~7~Cn/ rZtnlr~ ~B.E.~1CQ;iL~tZIY ~IGdngs~cLf~. Crd r3S 1 I I FE -Vt~h 'Fl"~rE~ F? t) ~f u --4 I. ýi i L4 I-- i M, -1 M NO 1 ir~ U~ C YY~- ) a ~FI VIPhn..$-A.. ~to tc`-hki~a is 3 521~ C&Sr~ Lewi M_ ýv ý ---41 -.70. I - 11-.1_ i 5 E3~5 Fe 1hi~c3 C" I F~~ H S '~~ i lkjl Tz~wer TV jnri;t 311Cro's S ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- R~jli ---L -- f o a-~rn DV -bowr e7 -ZWiereSwwum ers 5yCrowCr lot -vWezl e P ~r -C, a OM a 1 1:112 Y.Yp11- IY! Ixr, -n 1 5COI - -Fm o- - -- 11 -F-- FIN -- 8~ c~i;nzes ~7GC~-r~ It pt ft u Jýý l5~ q ~ss ~ rO i;s~ 'rS /1 P1 U o, pe~teer 1 J. d -s:Pi erce Ever e tl ~ ~1 411 - II"n~n -M~ay AaT rr:Zi 2?5 i I i. -,-- 1. Ph~il o &0 f JOW7211i C. -P r/1 YPT e.Z Z a F? P1 FiC~r 3rl r 111 n h Ku rP3 Gj ~ i~ IU __7V, Tin of~i~ m 2TI. FoZey 9 r9 t? NIL, a v~/Can 2Of --7' ~ezt 3~L 1L ~C/ ~7~ r~Ce co _j \ S. - ea-4 ----~ I1~-r ll- L--I ~ ~n n iUP I I - --- 'ee, ~iee, -~ I I IPIs7c e cfff,,To A72 C-1-0 -1-V~ TV -- --- 4 417 SAM T it A u.l '~ Su Y g o z 'i %Q PZ W-E Z 'kr-u,- e I II- I ~ ' 1 ~I 13':15 h3 er h, tP'i INe~\ r.-W J. Gl ýl. s -u -In-'. n- e r' s C~IIL~c~-S Z;7a~~~GLZ;~~~Z 7r. -L. Vn,, ho t'y~ ~ I I- r -- - I `,I. 1 I 0717t~7L CrO I V Ja, s -0 ~Pa--i s hl Anld-~-e -~ v;~i~irLitk iizo I, e cv -Allo -r 7 - I II _ _- 11 ~r r I r r I' ]P r Ib~ii s IV PatIr t "' c~frdr S! ý S Jo "c Jith-s.~s:. Co ~ t s UVIN1 ~I t~i I ~7)~ I-M I ClCý 1 711. - I et~s K. W! ~fEarru e s FPBE~Se ZI - 7;c~ k Sm, ' KMA i ji, - ý 9-a-ti -ft., -1 S1 eT Jo~Ln rrc?' E, pi 'rj.d -Bol ty rý ler -~-- I. rc~4 66 r 2 F) 61 ~~ Pi!P -dr i$ ~hj i; JNY I r;" l`i Ivy, PIN Ott'? _i r Cj i r r~-er l~t~c t ~ar r - r -~- - ~ ~ -- 1 ___~_~~

Page  16 A A&\. &$b Toh T, I --R., 12. 1 C, Jo s. -B-ra h -7'R7;0 lb2 ~~jt3 L; lc~ 17$T ~

Page  17 7 P ~---- I ~a ~a~--~ra I ~p~ I -~ -9~ 1 -- ~PIP a I rr Ir ~ larc~ ___ ~ ~ ~ ~ 4 ~c::_:: ~~-~-~~~~~ S.OF HIERONYMWUS ENG~ELMANNO A RRENV TP, IVA COM3M Co./ /V CHI A /V Es. OF~ VY * U6. G~ROESBECK.e W/jP Ir? EI - j IW 0 0VIL Co., A.Ci~~ X ti 1 Zý 77Z~I........ -~77 -777 R E: s. OF JOHfN R -TRU FANT. CsYA C 0 1VI13 00C., jtf/Cýý/0 A A" 4 - ~ I r - r I ~, III ~~~e9. I I _I-~ I ~=~I g _~__~ RPlsr --~~~~a~llP--CI~-~~~-~~-~~~~ ---___ --~~ q I _ __

Page  18 I~ TP5, -R.12. A ) r th~tr Gb ert 9. Q~e Iil Es tale ol 0 Sal-m horn as ff wico-j r EJ B C~ G;;;d C ~0C~7GC, 177i,, rin s I Mh-I Ez r 0ý 0 0 T, DOfi ) P,,,,, Vs iaj, -l It a-in e s o I/V e I co I. c ~sO ~s t ~8:1M-~ ~5Cldl7 ~Utn -A le-x-. Re 8 i Wraii d wa a d ICI UYIE Ell - -m- f ILac 19 Sa/7~~ IC 3. `W1Z~ O~n-R -E. Go jg ýpe I W WI, F.i, th~~L ~ N CI tti I V '%C~ t 5 Q 1orýt cooz,.100oozey CkI LI I E a Gs. Slto s Cooley 01.1a-~co-býK-onp re dl 1MIM7 1 -MM.eiee~' leel ede"Zel e I Ch as. ~ uw r: ~ Hie, e- -Ip 8 i rOki ei% c)I XT Corn e a ley Q Hig s -a e P _n s. T f v 0.5 s 4 iE~ e~i( 'v`0s 71 e- ctn ~e~Oý)- Est. T SO:99 z~ LI L-L Eld edk-s a a &"6- F 7-.~~2deopin nto -a 1 Jre ~iBan croftl leeeJHo s n e %ýtes HTD ew ey ffTa s h iw7s 1~ 7 t)e J.6- r,.-~~\ta WC~i ~-ff~:rC- a_:fo nt7c~t&ELf~ 2M ýv/E~F~F Q~~ k Xga. i h tw S. Jo -a, C.s eT A.5. o n/~f. ov ey HIPT n7~~;tz SQO Ir" W, r a- 4 am es q, a, Th~olnp s 077, 0 1 L I~~I I I C--I__.l II I; - ------------- - _ I I ~ I II f ~~----~~~~---- -----~ ~ ~- ~ ~~~

Page  19 '191 i 0 lr l( ~ (t r Itt fi ct r. -v e I ~dr e,.d,Cho-C7 ing I9~ oo~7 C? X3~:499~ r:~9~$~ I ENS~i t E712 -7n a -L C'r is mangidi RachL'ILel STurner"

Page  20 =t--E---S OF- JOHN BEHRNS. WA RRPEN 7-P, MIA C OMB O., MICH. *1 vY R -f v*1 --. I lL-r F RES, OF HENRY FRIES. FATHH HP RICKS CHURCH & RES) A/V TP. /v/A/ O B O/ /O/-//, 1110. LNG -. 0 IV Tl'::,'fl M A c U IW ZJI 1 I

Page  21 4Fs:-rý, e-r F CCe r~tv - - - - -- no~jP / i5 ~/j i1 - - - (. JJ70 s) C o -1,114i r4, F PIZ., ittle W, j~I--L~~ ~ i~IPe Its,now O re.ten, o r ~% 0 2 P~ pari Co a z~an, IIu 9 s He i!_ -";5 e j J~5 ~ ar-bo-e-' e ves7-;1 TI Ri Weid er C 7r ILIi a= "t-a~ B It L~'U Pih`j 1-i; \j-S 'N A Ira < J,'~J ~ -~1 IT tzot~l~j~Lla ~ ~ 8" _pq q.ý M -1.. lzýý e ~ I I ch - T NýF -I;Va-JY7Z aZld 60'71-11-7iled 7ý// O.-B. Crrl-lz P

Page  22 ,. 4 % I i s 1 i LV I-A\ ^' ^ ^ *"~ -P J \9] C. %.* w to (rr ~ ^ %? ^',P ~^ i. I w z 0 o0 ~, > 113 0 '0000' - ri-, (k 7t-a.i z Q < QC W 0 C ir-aVd aAmO9 ^ 00 T^s.mz/^ W-1 Z 9 w ocr FLJ > -j ssojoj^ Y ^jnu6f.0o0t-. ~ 0 /g+ StJ o a o [/U Soldv. Oot ~ 9t F; I' up '001 -"OD^SOL lid PIo Jd 7 7 q 7f l >. q ^p^sy s/t^Mo.f^ y 0O ow --jy " -or ".,e So L ur z

Page  23

Page  24 9A, r-_ if [ ~ T ,-.RI3.E. li,

Page  25 _ _~ I_~___ ___ _~I_ ~~__1~__ '-cl----2_ __ ____ ~---.-, --------~l-'t: i' i i' \\ 1!I lk ri~ Od ~j "S) c, ~csl 44 /a 7 1w v I uj,,L~Zyo2p?Lo~aKp o ~~Cr V3 49 T~ -72 ~~~ ~ ~~. ~ ~S~~: s rrl~~ 2~2?-Y d ~MA~ 3 'FQ~ -:~L a?I.? -~:oyd~ a~:~

Page  26 96 I......... 7 - I / / I I - - - - - - - - - N 7 6' / Os 4X; 27 K / N / NJ N / / 77 - 74' 71/, / / / 4 - eN / / - 73 2~ / - 72 / / / N N 277 / 4 77,' <C N / 2~7 N / N 2" / 0; -.70 67 / N N / N N / N * a 07' N N N I - '54' 70 19 Ko~ N> N K N VI /,/1' <oraL I N' K. N m V I' ~ r N N / K.4/ / / / N. * b \NN N CID K' K / / / / / I -/ / I N K N 7 *~* 2J 1\ I-o 1 v. 7 2 N 1 N,. N N N C - 27 TI IN/ 5 / N C,) N N N 92 Ll N 0; NN N> N N N 773 N ~ Nt ~ N N N 7-iN-~ CC N N N K N N ~? C? N '7> 5<244' *. - 35'2 44C N K N N *- N N N - TJ 74 -73 Z74 72 77 -12 -77Aý 09 70'.070 7,~ 8 7 -16* 76 1 6' 4 73 714 -13- 741 g72 77.* 12 77 8_- *_7A 70.19 IM 70 9 7 8 7 N N50 REAR ~ 1 C71C a -7*0 W~~ T K V172t322 7 q jtzq<Ns GREEN Cuch 4P -S 749 -720 _720 10 20) ' 4 - 7 2 '7A'I VQ-j- ztS..z NO01 104O970 3 ' 7 L A L-FR E D Sor-*? T'1 T fl?, -14C7 -111[z1AC]7 IeV 6K -a6 t.8 C$ 1 ' 8 ' 7 -., &.9 5010 070 z 0of 3rei'Z 9 P-1 0~. 150 13041 ci 10o03$ 720- o 7- "' 1 (j)_ccA --C 0 ~ c< I I7 t~420 NOi I

Page  27 I ~ r I I _, ~ _ I I.~_._ 1_ _ ii, ii~P 7L.~C_~-~ s,~U~-ro7726 ~b, c.~i~t'c~t~z~g(~.n~. I_ j;F. 73i~ Ct;dc~i~i~s Grey _E: ~r: ~7JdcE~s Gi~dzi i7~I: a. Cic~d~L~ys 707 ~~7 77. G.~-E~ 7 a. d 4 -3 ~i~Lroei,~~ Wb~c~s st 8 9 lo 7J rrL13 14 00~1Y~ g 1 707 1 701 I 761;li~ Gi~"Z. TU R N ER ~Q '- 6_L,!3~ ~T~7f~ ~/26~~2? 15,,qt 18 i 78 ~ ~7 C71aSI ~t~Ft f6 '_-~' -iC~! ~t3r I j t I I I 3~p.76 ~t~Jr~tZ;lrt"7.' AnnsC~~ St~I~ tj.PS A. ~B. By~r ~t~Z~ 2;. x~e PC' J.R; ~TZi. Owens T, ~ $, te ~2~ Hbr?7ct7~-~.G-eo- ~t" I ~i~~*" I ~=~s~.~LP~E~B~z ~-~J-fi/a~ TCi7hP B S ~5~S~e~v.BeeQe/~D~ /i. cw c1;3z~~ ~ Z;t~l;oud ~ ~L~t~ ZZu-lz~~t Y ~M7t" izUza 1 Ei 10tj a hj ~3 ~i~" ft~T~~c~n ' I I -f~ ~eal7Lapgh~L RidinS Pna~I~I i t. ~.e J 1 I 1 A. ~1 i' II~ I IV1 ~rirs. ~t~Z~e ~;rdo rz/ h r3 h I;; B t-: ~ $ tf: Ro3~t/~e3' cJ~-EI ~3-~e~ H: ~: Grci~~/ ~" C7'~"~v Z Ia z~iLF? c 1 3~0 a~o st9 78 33~ IV - 3. Jn YOT Cc~a IV~ ": Ch~J: BeesZ~ G,~v~tsz~r ~Uz~~t JoS.:I~~L-7Zd' C7taJ;1R.La~ JrnaS C;ri~sz~za~a~a;n I ~ ~..~ ~J7i~j077/ Sc~oo~ 2q 2V O-tva~ rs~.B~-ebe h; ~ ~-o rz. to ~r~L1Low~L ~/Si~~F~rd I-iY~;t'77~0s~ i 3 5 ~ i; ~hj 1 ~ 1~ ~l-~t~h;. _~'i~,~j~j~gc~:~t~'si~7uy~~ - ~I. ~each/ r;. ~E~. iYo7~~on, cl'..i~ ~-1~veL~l~ n~U Lt, I S ~ E: K ST. t, 1 I I I I I ~I Cr i I ic;l )L U Lrl CD I,~c~~~" Etj is:I I ~iu~ll ciCT, ~st ~\7~2- 8:: 710 6 1~ ~ost 5 ~Z~i~L. g G~c~fCh, ~sJ ~" 19~ "1 85 /86 I _ 1 h I 1. 1 1 I I rs. Z~. Gr~t-~ r r I ~Lt %i:E 1 __ 1 1 t C 66 8;t~ ~5~]~ s fv 7 rid 798 ~ Wb 70 26 P7 ~ ~8'7 ~5~ J~ 73.'~zs ~ 30 75 ~37 16 &6 C' c~J r~,a I: 1 ~c~ ~l~'arso7i~~ S 0' 75P ~F '5~ ap. IMT, i5~1z IL L ~s, h hnSo *Q' C;ic. e ~ a~ 6 ~i.u R`-~3 S Pi 75cr~ 75~0 h:C~~~ 6 7~4 7~0 50 ~5Q Ws B7 t~iS r. itf~ F~i N iN' R~Y P~ 81 ~1 ~5' 8 7jg ISO. ~io 1SO. 750 8~ 7 8 )L: 15~ 7 3 ~I-- L f~ 5 69~ f~i d5 3 ~T17Ba i----. I 40 '75 SI~F S -r:~ 7 I~5 s'p 7 75 '76 Pi; 3 B 5--- r3 hj 93'~ "j cn k B 8 ~F~-~7~d Pj Ey' h Z 50 F3 ~'L. AF~A -ETT,'lo 750' 75a. 750 ~s rz 5 d C~L~ 4 I7 P,7 6 GS we4 s ~I1 3 ~2~ i -.IC O Pd Q~ I~ 6~ ur B 7 [II: 150 7GO 750 4~ ij e WASHINGTO~N ~i~i~tch~ ~E~ C. ~B~J1~ ~7: S~ X;~ A~d~~7YS _D7~ ~87Z~i 798 ~I ~uar~edbi~ 17~5~-t~almJ 7~3~ 1 II i.ir0/6 8 9 3 9 ~ ZIG.P.Ne7VZ, 66 I " ]" I ', i ~~~ 1.~~ I ~~ I ~~~trS'iF-'h~t~ 66 68 S "r. I I 1.7i~ CUr~Z~7ZS F9~ B~LS ~g Davi~ Q _iWrsJt ~01137~1~2~1;53.l;s~ 125[86[87 ~Lg ~ni~ij5s 23/ICi2-S~/ IS 90 Cj~ J~ a~L~1..1.6~a i ~~ I~~ I r~ /, I II I,, 1~~ 166 82t 798.17~Vrc~si4~r 331 3f 1 41',3125(23 75~ 1 7~ II 9 5 I 264~1 I~--iBal 69 69 68 ~.ac2 r r!1 c J C ~1 I~ t 6s P1 ~L "d r n 0 26 g 2~S S 13 j~c 1, AS3 -. o, ~-tg~ /I-PLr;94 9 r, to ro h Jz~LE~s~ fij 7 B 7 ~~t- 4 G. PD B f3 a, ~ Is r-Q 75 Is 17 lb 6 d /i145 5, O ^s~ C~; 1 ~,r3-[4~ 5 3 4~ 750 BO ~~ I 80 K I N~ G S `a N s T, iT~a 150 40 750 t50 40 750 7~5 Y 742 65 161 r~.16$,7 "4 d ~n b ill \n " "s 4Y ~ 7 " " 79 ~ ~ca ss iD i 7j 6 ~i c~ 77 1~.- ~ i'6 o o o o o z ~ r~t a ~~O (a $ -40 39 B ~ 4~4 CD~ h~ 7 -- ~: eI 3 h 'yc~ ~I _if_.._lk~S~-a_. 1.tijs II 1~ ~5.-~-.3 --) 1~ 7~ 1 ~7~,r.481 55 ir5or- z~t~?Y 79 36 - 46,; 4 727 750 ggo e- FI~i; ~LY `11/3]~.53 1 3~9 --~]~ 47 ~-/ 5:f~lb~ ~-~r~r t, ~rir ~5 B h ~e I~ s~ ~c~Lt: a 7~i8 3 (1 R D 3fE~ ~ 48 3 ~6~ 750 760 7so 750 ~7~~L~ I ~1 ~~LC~,F;UJ /% a ~lf~rl~ o f~ lh h' 7 la 3 4'1 ]L. ~T31 r~5 261 1271~R I~Q]801 1e91~0? 8~1 ~~gE~y ~ /3D r 75 1 [/7~ '7~r )'751 " I lr 1 75 f 1'7$ 751 r;r7 '71 1 1~7t3~ / ~ ~ P~ S r: 73?~ 75 '76 75 ~1 I?s 68 0'6 -sO~f~Z ~7 a 3 4; 7 6 5 4 3 ~ 7 Q E3 ~L I~ ro 5 6 b o ~ 8 9 O 70 71~~ ~7~8 ~4 to a; rib 7~ 68 s~ dG-P;T~dvlBbrkr S T~ i\ 750 750 75 1~ 95 50 5U`15D.1*~ 7 ~S B cn O II - d ~2 ~7: ~17 3 7 r C3 I, 87 a s~t70 3 750 C 75 176 O ~WASHINZTO S crohn ~Pht~gS 7s 75 O 5 4 3 I "I 7 I 1~11~ 37 8 9 ~t170 71 $ 5 4- 3 7 Irl~ I a I,, T c ITT~5~ 66. ii rg a; 1 Sis ~er-s 7,~ O~i~er~ ~2;1' M'i~i~Jc)irLC~El B E ~tl cJ A,-P Ch7'7JSS Ma7Z/ I 1 -- I r I 1 ~I.i 1,I 1 r- I rru - - o pt E A S a N T $ T. C'~"~/U 661 ' I '' I " I " I 'I I '' 16~slP~ g0 6611 1 1 i _1 t 1 29" ~ 2?44 21,'019 t.e 7 t; 5 4 3 (21 ~2~ 7 i T6~11~i72~17~18 6~ ~J Oj~ ~9 ~ 1 P7~1281 37 33 j 35 )37 13914~7 1 4'3 ~f cnl, a7 66 rr 6g 80 69 703 F6 $6 1~3~i16616~ st64 -rl~tL~ON 66 66 661" 1,1 I~r 1.'' /66 7~57 66 1 ~1 1C6 66 66 2$4 1 I I I t i t~c3 g)_ZT~ ~2~1~1761 78 l~zola~ 1~4 1 ~6 1 ne 30 1 3~5 Isa 13sl~el~4ala~21~4 qb ~ E;61~~ 11; fv 1~~ I* I '' (~`6 7~~7 67'u 7a3 166 Ill 16d s7~~Cis166~ t 264 _E. G. l~lE~wa;i~ NT `tlJ~Z~j~L~td i~a~u~~ Jo~n ~M~nc~J~ ~2~lt~v~ I\j a ~:~cJv Sis ters CI~F~J1S~~W SC~7~ 400 ftr;Eo aa~-r~zc~c;~ ~ -I IC I I ~ -~51 I I.. i~.... ~: I ~. ~ I I s, ~~~---I

Page  28 tip W E~ S T. L L Th.. U I 7 tzr -j;R AM~ coi. 66 66 H -74: u m P-Z 1ý 3:? T.H)~H ) T I I A -Ark k V N 4 s ~s ac hiT rr 74o-4 1L "IC1 =r f a 49 &&1 " i9Fi F if.in 71w - 4 i iv- -A -r- L-Ji 44 -740 _ ___ _ _~ __ L t; G] -t O CH R C I -FLI~ 105. CNH ST Irr -j ~~7~1. -~ i 31 ~1, G1 I i 1 u frl Crs Y 4/ 6 U R K. r --7 ~ PEAR'RL ST u_ S E C 0 N D S T. Wll W YCIO TH IRD ST. 759-17I.~se, M-A [Nc 4-7i? 4 7.3 14i 74 4~ 57,3 7 floz 5 zo 20 6 WI 130 i A E 9 S T. 0q, 7 z P 114 Gs- 7 7S6/G 4-. '.3 49 1 i 6 1 _ -10 IfN j 1.7 co x 6 ~fl t;ts17?s17la, 9X 765 718- q6 3 )1 ~.76r 77 5: f 31 7 fi t s ts Ell

Page  29 29 73Z IY Z. yqj , SOUT~ge g ~0 Z3 x41--" ":.:T SOUTH S, r..o9. ~ 6 7. 9 70 7 3-3...7 2,0.79 8 IT P ii::':: ~~~~~6 "57.. -. .',f'J T" x i i(:, " - 14 - " i' ' 7"3, ':: i i, 6 6. ' 6g I. 6 . 721 ":liI " _. " '. "-I":. 77Z -77 QJ-1 A-7 - - - cn 74 77?'P-,:73 1J*74 60 70o 8. ýý 4-4 (7 78;rq 910 27 92 1ý Lq 71 5 4 3 A T..1-:10SO ~ F U ' R T.. _,S. T.__ T HI IE0R D S..,.. 732 l "I 66 6 Awl\ EN 10 c -. 5S, 7W 7 6G.77 19 z9 6. I.,I'D I _SECOND.. ' 433ýz-L - ' I T I'a %.r.a m *-iV 1( 5 14I ill I'

Page  30 30 t-7 - RES.OF F E.COROSEBECK. w A R2RFF/V T7, 1/v/dcO0/W3 cO', MW/-fAI UANN I AUL ESMUF&.KLS OFJ.G. 1MASbVIN...WA4R/RPEA1 T7I9,WMA.CO/VJB 0C0,1W/vI//-/ /OAA/ N

Page  31 31 BUSINESS DIRECTORY OF MACOMB COUNTY, MICHI GIVING NAMES OF THE PRINCIPAL PROFESSIONAL AND BUSINESS MEN IN THE CITIES AND VILLAGES, A DESCRIPTION OF THEIR BUSINESS, AND OF THE PRING WHO PATRONIZE THIS ATLAS. Date of NAME. DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS. LOCATION. Settle- NATIVITY. NAME. DESCRIPTION OF BU8INESS, ment. Ayers, J.................... Boot, shoe, and harness maker................... Hollister Street...... 1841 New Jersey. Lowell, D. N............. Attorney-at-law....................................... Str et.........852..%ain.........eo.H a..s Ayers, A. B............... Lumberman........................................... aian Street........... 1852 Maine. Newbery, G ee. P........ Harness maker. [clothing, etc. Elliott, J. D.............. Proprietor of American House............................................. 1869 Connecticut. Smith, T. A.... General dealer in dry goods, boots, shoes, Leach A. M.............. Wagon maker................................................................... 1834 New Hampshire Starkweather, J. S...... Attorney-at-law........................................ [GAN, UIPAL PRODUCERS OF EACH TOWNSHIP Date of LOCATION. Settle- NATIVITY. ment............................ 1843 Mfichigan............................ 1845 New York............................ 1850 Connecticut............................ 1844 Michigan. E0BW 5rs I~WX X 3B^ r NAME. I Allen, Asa.:".......... Agers, John.....,.... Allor, Lewis A...... Bush, Henry......... Baily, M. F........... Beach, MIf.............. B urt, E. MI............ Barrett, Wm. A..... Burleigh, Jane...... Beach, Stephen...... Black, Thos. E...... Boardman, J. F..... Beebe, Romine...... Bullard, L............ Church, Mrs. S. M. Carl, W. G............ Coombs, Hiram...... Chubb, Joseph....... Caloman, John....... Cassidy, 3Mary....... Canfield, L. H....... Collens, Charles..... Claggett, S............ Church, Chancy..... Cavey, Lewis N..... Davis, Jas. B......... Dyer, John............ Dyer, Martha........ Duval, Elair.......... Edwards, J. D....... Fenton, S. A......... Fullerton, E......... Fitzgerald, Patrick. Flower, Alanson.... Fitzgerald, David... Fredmann, E......... Gleeson, George..... Green, H............... Green, E............... Gilmore,.Alex........ Hicks, C. S............ Date of LOCATION. Settle- NATIVITY. mont. Section 3............... 1856 New York....... Village.................. 1864 Michigan.......... 4t................. 1853 New York........ Section 11............. 1865 Canada............. ( 3............. 1840 New York-........ Village................. 1851 Michigan.......... Section 36............. 1853 cc......... Village.................. 1847 cc......... Section 27.......... 1852 Scotland........... cc 22............. 1852 Mlichigan.......... Village................. 1861 New York........ (i.......... 1865'..... Section 21............. 1855 Michigan.......... " 1............. 1874 England......... " 9............. 1838 Pennsylvania.... i 33............. 1837 New York....... c' 29................... Canada............. Village................. 1825 New York........ Section 12............. 1856 Germany.......... " 6............. 1849 Scotland........... " 33............ * 1835 Connecticut-....... " 12............. 1856 Germany.......... (( 13............. 1831 England........... Village.................. 1833 Vermont.......... Section 11............. 1853 Michigan.......... 14 1............. 1870 New York........ li 17............. 1836 li........ t( 17............. 1836........ Village................. 1865 Canada............. "................. 1865 New York........ "................. 1862 ".........0............... 1853 Michigan...... Section 13............. 1854 Ireland............. z 7............ * 1833 New York,........ "4 14............. 1865 Ireland....................................... 1870 Prussia............. Village.................. 1870 Canada............. Section 28............. 1841 Michigan.......... 44 25.............. 1844 Ohio................ " 27............. 1851 Ireland............. < 4............ 1886 New York........ Post-Office Address. Richmond-..... Farmer. New Haven.I......... "... Merchant and milling. Richmond.... Farmer.. Lenox..;....,... Carpenter. New Haven.. Blacksmith. 4(.. Farmer. t(.. i N. Baltimore Mariner. New Haven.. Blacksmith. C9.. Farmer. Lenox........1.. Hotel proprietor. New Haven.. Farmer. ~. ( DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS. I i Lenox......... Richmond.... New Haven.. Richmond.... New Haven.. Lenox......... New Haven.. Armada....,.. Richmond.... New Haven.. Lenox......... New Haven.. N. Baltimore New Haven.. Richmond.... Lawyer. Farmer. Carpenter. Farmer. Postmaster and real estate dealer. Farmer. Station agent. Farmer. Miller. Hardware merchant. Farmer. Shoe store. Richmond Hotel. Carpenter. Farmer. NAME. Howell, Joseph....... Howe, Wm. W...... Henderson, W. Mi.. Haire, Robert........ Halsey, Silas......... Hazleton, H. R...... Jacobs, A., Miss..... Johnson, L. C........ Jackson, Samuel..... Jones, Gustavus..... Johnson, C............ Kirkham, Jane...... Knapp, E. H......... Keabblock, Chas.... Lowell, Henry....... Ladnd, A............ Lake, Chas. C........ 3Morell, Felix......... McClanathen, S..... Owens, H. P.......... Pasko, Whiting..... Parker, John S...... Parker, Elias......... Pulver, )W............ Phelps, J. F.......... Pease, J. C............ Parrich, J. H......... Richards, Homer E. Raymond, Edw. F.. Renki, Frederick.... Suppel, Otto.......... Schultz, Adolph..... Weymouth, Dan.A. Walker, Frank....... Wellington, J. L-.. White, James........ Waite, A. C.......... Warner, George..... Webster, Eli......... Wright, Geo. F...... Yax, Peter............ LOCATION. Village................. Section 86............ (( 33............. "t 383............. t 4............. Village................. Section 34............. 4z 25............. C4 22............. Village................. Section 1............. <~ 12............. 1 22....... S 11............. V g 8.............. Village................. Section 6oo............ 6l....oo......... Secti 2 6.............. 6......o....... 4t 29............. Village................. Se tio 6............ Secion19........... Village............... Section 1............. Village............... Seciong................ CL 25o............. Village................. Section 13............. Date of Settlement. 1857 1848 1871 1857 1855 1836 1858 1844 1842 1874 1874 1837 1845 1870 1850 1847 1842 1864 1847. 0.... 1848 1835 1865 1872 1835 1863 1872 1861 1845 1854 1854 1866 1851 1870 1887 1865 1867 1857 1858 1858 1861 NATIVITY. Michigan.......... Connecticut....... New York........ Ireland............ Michigan.......... Canada............. Minnesota......... New York........ Michigan.......... Germany........ Michigan.......... New York........ Prussia............. Vermont*......... France............. Ohio................ New York........ Massachusetts... Pennsylvania.... New York........ Connecticut...... Michigan.......... New York........ Massach usetts.... New York........ Michigan.......... New York....... Germany.......... Massachusetts.... England........... New York........ Ireland............ Michigan.......... Ireland............. France............. Post-Office Address. New Haven.. N. Baltimore New Haven.... N. Baltimore New Haven.... Lenox......... New Haven.. Lenox......... Richmond.... New Haven.. Richmond.... New Haven.. Providence... New Haven.. Richmond.... New Haven.. Armada...... New Haven.. N. Baltimore Lenox......... New Haven.. Richmond.... Lenox......... New Haven.. N. Baltimore New Haven.. Lenox......... DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS. Blacksmith. Farmer. ISchool teacher. Carpenter. Farmer. Saw and stave mill. Teacher. Farmer. Merchant. Farmer. Lý Shoe store. Farmer. Boots and shoes. Roads and lands. Wagon maker. Hotel keeper. General store. Farmer. Hotel keeper. Farmer. Carpenter. Farmer. Boot and shoe maker. Farmer. Restaurant. Farmer. I Saw mills. Carpenter.:Farmer. IMerchant. Farmer. xMIAL ~fi om-msAtL0t=/ O-l0wBmy sa1.1 NAME. Atkins, Lewis........ Alward, Henry...... Bottomley, A. W... Bacon, George....... Chapman, George... Coates, Richard...... Crittenden, WM. M Davis, Emma........ Deneweth, Felix.... Detrick, William... Dewanter, Fred..... Engelbrecht, John. Furton, Mfaxim...... Foss, Frederick...... Falkinhoger, John. Flory, Z............... Goivi, Frederick.... Gamber, Sarah...... Gottgen, N............ Glode, William...... Hanggi, John........ Howard, Parley..... Hinte, Frederick.... Heydenrich, Geo.... Hirsack, William... Ingbray, Henry..... Immer, John H..... Kookinmeister, G... Kiichinmeister, F... Kandt, Frederick... Klokow, John C. H. Kregar, Frederick.. I I -. - I LOCATION. Date of settleMont. 1 1- 1 - Section 35............. " 22............. ( 23............. ( 3............ Sections 13 and 14.. Section 26........... 4( 7............. S 4............. " 364.............. 8 24............. ( 291............. (( 162............ ( 127............. " 174............. S 14............. < 345............. ( 35......... 8 36............. t 330............. " 305............. " 352............. 1 12............. ( 322............. i 221............. ( 16............. S16............., 9o............. " 35............. ( 16............. " 32............. li 20............. '~ 31............. 1831 18,66 1847 1848 1848 1870 1857 1864 1856 1849 1853 1863 1831 1833 1872 1866 1863 1859 1854 1854 1872 1836 1856 1852 1862 1857 1850 1864 1863 1854 1854 1856 NATIVITY. New York........ 3 Germany.......... Mlichigaan......... New York........ England........... Vermont.......... J New York........ Belgium........... Germany.......... G m......... New York........ Germany.......... Germany..... New Yorkn........ Germany.......... Prussia........... Germany.......Vermont.......... Germany......... England........... Germany...........,......... Post-offico Address. Mt. Clemens. Waldenburg Alt. Clemens. Macomb...... Mt. Clemens. cc Waldenburg M ilton......... Mt. Clemens. Waldenburg 4 c M~t. Clemens. AIt. Clemens Waldenburg Mt. Clemens. Waldenburg Macomb...... Mt. Clemens. Waldenburg (4 49 cc DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS. Farmer and Justice of the Peace. Carpenter and joiner. Farmer. Farming and blacksmith, Teacher. Grist mill, saw mill, and farmer. Farmer. and brick maker. and carpenter. NAME. Lallman, Charles... Longstaff, Alfred....Moon, Henry..........Miller, John..........Manning, Edward.. Miller, J. W......... Miller, Peter......... Norton, Anna........ Ohrns, C. D.......... Pencen, Henry....... Peters, John........ Pencen, John........ Pangel, John...,...". Pretty, De Witt..... Roos, John............ Rowley, James...... Stroup, Jacob........ Stroup, George...... Stoolmaker, John... Stork, John........... Schutt, C. C.......... Schott, John......... Schoff,John.......... Schultz, Frederick.. Scranlin, M. E...... Timlin, Thomas..... Tessin, John.......... Whitney, John...... Weston, D. B........ Youngs, Steven...... Zahn, F. H........... LOCATION, Section 28............... t " 61............. 0 26............ ( 31............. 3 30............. 5" 83............. is 33............. ( 5..,........... t 2 1. 9...... i 16....... (t 16............. (t. 2 8............. it 2............. 4. 1 6 7............ c 7...........o o o.o 10............. S 134............. l 34............. 0 16.............. 3 34..............4 3 2....... I t 80.............~ ' 31........... (( 28.............. ' 815........... 16............. ~t 25............. " 7............. {t 35.............. Date of Settlement. 1871 1854 1867 1854 1836 1841 1872 1836 1854.1871 1856 1866 -1855 1850 1865 -1840 1834 ' 1833 1870 1863 1857 1852 1865 1856 1842 1846 1855 1836 1840 1872 1841 NATIVITY, Post-Office Address. Germany........... Mt. Clemens. Michigan........., Macomb...... Germany.......... Mt. Clemens. ~." ~.......... Waldenburg Ireland............. U tica........... Michigan.......... Aft. Clemens. Germany............. New York........ IMacomb...... Germany..........A Mt. Clemens. '......... Waldenburg France............. M ead........... Germany.......... Waldenburg TMichigan.......... Macomb...... New York......... MXt. Clemens. Germany.......... "........... Waldenburg.......... Aft. Clemens........... Waldenburg )New York........ Macomb...... Ireland............ Waldenburg Germany......... 'C New York........ Macomb............................. MIt. Clem ens. Canada.............. Macomb...... Germany.......... Mt. Clemens. I -DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS. Farmer. and carpenter. and supervisor. Proprietor of saw mill and farmer. Farmer. and mason. II (i (C and carpenter.

Page  32 ___~__~~~~~~~ I 32 31-111 X S.~a I Alman, W............ Battty, James......... Bracy, S. F........... Bentley, F. H........j Bonday, A4nthoine.. Bogule, Cornelius...l Brehler, Thom~as.,... Beyne, Anthony..... BrewNerý Augus~t A.. Beatty, Geo. H...... Chapoton, 0.......... Crittenden, C. D.... Califeld, A. L.... Connor, H............. Crocker, T. TNI........ Czizek, Alathias..... Cookr, TJhomas........ Chatelot, Felix...... Clarkson, Robert... Donaldson, WM11. S. Drake, E. B...........~ Debaz, Leivis.......... Deeba, ~Prescol....... Davis, MI. S........... Dankers, John....... Deebey, Charles C.. Eldridge, Jas. B..... Essig, John........... Freilinger, Pleter.... Forton, Richarfd..... Groesbeck, C. S..Greiner, P. P......... Garand, Joseph...... Geiss, Conrad......... HEut'chins, J. E....... H~eath, J. B........... Hamman, John...... Hart, Fred............ Heydenrich, E. C... H3arbeck, H~ans....... H~athawayS, W. S.... Hanrrington, Mary. Heine, W.............. Hubbard &~ Crockrer. Jenney, Jr., WM u... Jorrey, Joseph F... K~eeler, A. M......... Ktendrickr, F. G...... Kersting, C........... 'KIomes, N ~............. Kimnmeritz, August Keijls, Hutbert........ KEoehler, Julius...... Kuhne, Louis........ Klein, Hermann...... Data of LOCATIO~N. Settlemeat. Section 23............. 181-3..................... 1851............ 6........~~ 1864.......................... 1838................. o......... 1834 0. 0 0..................~~ 1860........................... 18 72...............,..... k.... 1854................. 1870 3-9..............~~ 18.57................ *...... 1832...........................1 1844.................. 9.0..... 1818..........,............... 1844 I......................~ 1874~..................... 1865......... 0................. 1872 C....... 1854........................... 1840...................... 1853........................... 1823............... I.......... 1840.......................... 1~869 0..................~~~~~ 1866 too I....................I 1834.................... d..... 1836........................... 18-57................ a......... 1871 S26.....,........ 1823...................~~~~~ 1833..................,..... 1866...................1~~~ 1873 Sections 16 and I'l.. 1852........ 0..........0..... 0 1854.................... 0~~~ 1865............. 1870........................... 1854 400--o........ W. 4...... 1852...... a.................... 1855........................... 1836 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~' 1836 to 1~~~~~~~~~~~~ 856........ a................. 1861.................. lot..... 1843........ 0........ 9....... 1874............. 4........ 1826............... 0........ 1844...................~~~~ 1874~........ t...... 0...~~ 1862........... *.... 0......... 1869........................... 1865........ 0......... o... ý... 1843..................... $.... 186 ýection 30....,......... 1852 NATIVITY. Afichigan.......... Encrfand.......... Vermont........... New~ York........ A~lic~hicran.......... Ireland ~ lC....~~....... G~ermiany........... Vermlont...., Aichigan. ---... New York n......... Vermont...... Geri-nanv..........~ England........... Fran~lce.......,...... i1-ngland..,......... Ir~eland............. New~ Yorkr....!. Mdichigan......... Ontairio Germany........... 3frIichigan........... Germ-any......... Alrichigacn.......... Canada...,.......... Giermatny.......-... M~ichigan.......... Ohio.......,....... Germalzny........... New York.,....'.. Germany. -**-.. Mounlt Clemzens. New York........ Ohio.......,........ Alf~ichigan.......... G~ermany......... it Prussial........ Ali ch igan...... G~ermany.... Post-Offce Address. DESCRIPTION OF BUTSINESS. _11t. Clemens. Farmier. Prihotographer. jBlacksmith. Jewde~eler, west side Pearl Street. LrIaborer. rlSaloon. ~ICarriage m~aker. IrFarm3er. rrBrewver. F~razier,........ Farmer. _Mt. Clemens. j County Treasurer. cc Superintendent of County poor. LawZRyer. rtProprietor Sherman H~ouse. Ar ttorn ey-at-law. rrPainter. Lr~ aborer. Ir Car1penter. Waldejiburg Farmer. M~t. Clemens. _31nfi~. wagons, carriages, plows, &4 castings, jobbingr in wrought k~ it Wagon maker. [cast iron 4( Salt maker. it Stave makrer. it Cooper. Wac~Taron muaker. rrLaborer. it Prosecutino, Attorney. Fr armier and huckster. IICooper. it Farmrxer. trCounty Clerk. Wr~ Cholesale & retail dealer in win es, liquors, cigars, & groceries, No. it Billiard hall. [2 Union ~Block. cc Farmer. it Dentist. IICicrar maker. Hotel. IrLaborer. ItJeweler and machinist. it Frmr it Sheriff. Farer trDry goods and groceries. rrLawyers. it L~awyer.. cc Stave jointer. rrEx-Register of Deeds, Abstract of rrEx-Sberiff. [Titles. rrDealer in furPniture. Boo30t and shoe miaker. rrCigar mzanufaLcturer. It aborer. (9 Blacksmzith. 44 Farm~er. Cady's Cor's. M~otel and grocery. M1~E. LOCATION. Date of Settle- NITIVITY. ment, i I --I-------:- -- L~ee, W. T.....,....... Lacrovx, Gillbert.... Langee, Fred......... Lehnei, Leonard.... Lu-noershausen T71... Moser, L., A.......... Mliller, Jacob B,..... T Uiller, Cbarles...... AfaIllast, Julius....... Mloross) V. A......... Mimnauuogh) ill....... Nicke, Charles....... Otte, Charles IEI...... Peltier, Jesse..,....... Peltier, Daniel...... ý'Peltier, Isdore....... Parrott, ~William... Peltier, Charles B... Pepin, George........ Prengnitz, W........ Pretzer, H~enry...... Parrott, George...... Pulch~er, -M2artin J.. Quinn, John R...... Roskoff, Jacob.. 'I. Russell, S. B....,,, Rose, Lewis..,,., Ramsey, Mi. J..,... Russell, Jacob...... Rick, John..,.... '.~ Reeve, H1Eenry......... Sackett, T. L......... Stephens, C. M...... Snook-,'F T...... Snook, J. H........... Shook, P. H.......... Schmon, Lewis... Schott, W............ Spear, Joseph..,....... Stockton, John...... Tilden, JDaniel C.... Traver, Theodore... Trombly~, Edward... Tucker, Capt. Albert Thom-as, Moses...... Trufaut, John R...., Vaneps &~ Co......... Widrig, Philo....... WD\eeks, Edo-ar...., W7iood, Samuel....... WVood, John.......... W7elkenbach, Chas.. W~urzel, WM 1......... Wminslow) Milon..... W~enland, John...... Zolling, Jacob........ Zander, Wni....................................................................... Section 4......................................................................... 4.................... *........~~.......-.00.......... i ( 8.......~........ Sections 33 and 34............................................~~~.......a............................................................................................................... Section 8............................................................. *... 0.................................................................~~ 0...**................~~....................................... *.................l~~ ~t~~ S19..................~~~~~........................~. I..................... "........................................ I... 0...................... 4............................ S25....................... * *............................................~~ ~~~ ~~ I~................,........ 1841 18455 18'74 1865 1852 1872 1883 1832 1854 1855 1852 1823 1825 1866 184.5 1867 1869 1855~ 1859 1871 1854: 1853 1854 18'70 1869 18;54 1854: 1880 1853 1836 1836 1856 18'73 186 1852 1817 18'72 18466 1865 1849 1824 1849 1844: 1848 1839 1852 1849 1869 1870 1836 1855 1852 M\ichi o-an.......... Grermany ~......... Prusssia....................................~ SGermanv.......... Pr~ussia............. Irelandg a............ Texas............... Germany n.......... 2 cig~n.......... Enaland.....,...... 2 Alchigan........... Pr~ussia............. Germa~ny.......... Eno-land.......... Irela~nd....,..................... 6........ New York y......... OIihio............... Newv York........ New York.......... M~ichigan........... New York......... England............ AenS~~tichiga....... Germ any.......... Englhiand.......... New York......., ccihi a......... England........... Germa~ny........... New YorI r......... Germany........... ~t. Clell7ens. tr tr rr rr rr rr (I (I IL LL ~I (( LI ci rr Ir (L (( (L ([ L( (L (( (( ~I I~ It ~I (( (( IL II II LL (L L[ L( (L LI (( ~I LI ýEditor. Sailor. Farmzer. Register of Deeds. 2 Aason and collector. Farmer. Carpenter. Farm er. St~ave maker. Laborer. Farmzer. L~aborer. Cooper. tButcher. Farmler. Insurance.. Carpenter. B3utcber. Editor&cS Superintendent of County I....... schools. Cooper. Saloon. Farmer. Probate Judge. Civil Engineer and County SurMerchant. [veyor. Postmanster. Mi~nfr. & dir. in hard wmood, lumnber, Saloon. [& wagon bubs. Lab'orer. F'arm er. Ex;-Couuty officer. Banker. M~ierchant. Grocery store. Ala~riner. Grocery. Farmzer. Miierebants and tanners. Farmelr and Po'orm~aster. Attorney-at-law. Farmzer. Carpenter and joiner. Wagon maker. Fa~armer. W~agon makrer. Post-Office Adam. s, DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS. C L. I r C............... 26................................~~~....................~~~..................... ~~~.......... 4... a................................~~................................................. 2....... 8......... S30.................... **..........~~~ _ I I NAME. Angell, Charles...... Ardy, Cathar'ine..... Amies, Julius....,...... Ackerman, Wml.... Beebe, J. L........... Bradley, A9. H 3....... Bolan, Susan......... Buckley, John....... Buhlmann, L......... Bothe, Christopher. Blackrett, Thomuas... Brown, John A '* - Buchel) Joseph.....,. Behrns, Joachim.... Bota-rins, Peter...... Condo, John......... Cramer, Joseph...... Davy, Charles...... Davy, Jr., Charles. D~eckrer, Barnhzart... Delor, Garod......... Eng~lemuan, Hiiramz.. Eames, Charles E... Foster, J. C.......~.... Fink, Wlilliam...... Franthoff, John..... Frinkr, WFalter....... Groesbeckr, Lewis... Gray, R................. Gill, George........ Gill, John.......... George, John... *"**" G-riffn, John... 000.0. Groesbeck) Alex..... Groesbeck, Wm.11 C. G~roesbeckr, Charles. Groesbeckr, F. E..... Grobbel, Anthony.. Hendrick~, Rev. W. Hartzig, Wmz. E.... HEartzig, L~ewis...... Huth, IMike........... Hisnor, John......... HBunt, Peter.......... Hoffmire, John...... Herzog, Albert...... Henky, Franz....... HIoffm3eyer, John A Haker, Anthony.... H~olt~z, Peter.......... Half~mann, -3f. J.... H~ines, Michael...... Date of LOCATI~ON. SettleMont. Section 17........... 1868 44 28.......,...... 1830 cc 6............. 1836 15........,..... 1864 5........ 1847 4............. 1864 25...,........ 1831 26.6......,...... 18377 26 2..,........... 1853 LL 24............ 1846 'L 25....... 1833 'L 35............. 1852 21.............1 1856 S20......,....... 1854 'L21.............! 1844 L'35.............1 1829 22.............. 1842 5.......... 1840 'L4....,......... 1846 31........ 1853 10......,...,... 1852 [~27.............~ 1847 94 26........ 1852 41 26.......... 1848 Ic 2......s. 848 1.............! 1831 8.............1 1860 4.......,...... 1833 26.....,....,.... 1852 23........ 1 5 25.....,........ 1845 L~34.........,..... 1837 LL28.......,...... 1850 LL 33..... ý..... 1830 L ~33............ 1839 S28..... ý....... 1 830 'L 17............. 1849.................. *....... 1869 16 1............. 1X843 LL ~......... 11843 4...,.......... 1863 25.............. 1843 26........,..... 1844 1............. 1844 S10............ 1852 15.....,....... 1859 1............ 1844: 8.....~........ 1861 2o 1............. 1848 ~L 15............. 1857 86 tj............. 1831 NAT~IVITY. Germany........... M~ichigan......... New York........ Aichigan.......... New Y~ork....... Canada,........,.... Fran ce.............~ Ireland.,............ France............ German~y.......... En gland............ Germazny........... Prussia. - ' - " " - Germa~ny.......... Prussia............ Germanny......... England........... Germany.......... Prussia............. G~er-many......... Germaany........... New York....... T Uichigan.......... New Ytork...... G~ermalivv.......... IrelXand.....,........ Michig an n....... Vigna...... GGermlany.......... Prussia a............. (4 ini............ Irelmand............ Post-Office Address. R~oseville...... Norrisville... Warr~en....... RIoseville....... WVarr en....... Conners Clk Warrenr e....... Warren......... Roseville....... Clady's Cor s.ý Frazier_-- i.. Warren........ Roseville....... Conner~s Ukk WaT~rren........ Norrisville.... Warren.... Nor risville... WTarreen...,.... Roseville... FFrazier-- Wa7~rren........ iMt. Clemens. WCTarren....... DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS. Farmer. TIinsmith. F~armer. 4C 14r rrand g~rocer. rland carpenter. ~Land minister Carpen ter. Farm er. Teacher. Farmer. a(Lnd lumberman. Catholic priest. Farmner. It,Carriage maker. I Farnier. 41 NAME. Hogan, Michael..... Keeler, Hienry....... Kaltz, M~iss M ary A Klunke,- B............. IKoltz, Peter. 0'****"* Kothe, Christopher KLeiser, Christine.... Kline, Augusta..... K3uhlmannL..... Lefevre, Paul........ Moore, Samuel...... Miiller, Peter......... Miller, Anthony.... M~ason1, J.C...... Measel, Daniel...... MBIeasel, ews., MIiller, Mathia~s...... M~alburz, Jacob...... M artin, Williaml..... Miller, Joseph....... Numiner, Barnhart Nolan, Mich~ael...... ~Nedai-niller, Mrs. B Opifrenas, F......... Porhl, Joseph........ Patton, Robert...... Plumlmer, 1vi. Kt..... Platz, Joseph........ Rotarius, Peter,..... Roosen, Casper...... Seagle, Jacob F..... Spralmaeb ar, Chris. Sheer, W~illiam...... Simnonds, W~illiaml... Spranger, Leonard. Smuith.7 L. D.......... Strake, Henry....... Sifferlin, J. M....... Spinning, C. E...... Si~fferlin, Caspar..... Schemmrr, Leonard.. Serach, John......... Spyer, Wlilliam H.. Stricker, Jacob...... Tromlba, Vincent... Trumip, Joseph...... Tro-hable, Napoleon Verhoven, HenryS... WVolff, Banrnard...... ~Wes tphel, Theodore Whaleen7 Miicha~el... LOCATION. Section 27........ (L20............ 16.............~~~~~~ (L LL L( LI LL It (( L1 Lr tL (( Il II cl~ I1 II II II II LL (L rl (I LI LI II 11 20............. 24. ~........... 86............. 2............. 26............ 22......~....... 2........... 21.......... 8............. 4............. 26.....~....... 26............. 22...r....~.... 15............. 23............ 22.....1....... 36............ 34............. 17............. 36............. 35......,....... 34.............. 6............. 15............ 21............. 5........... 21............. 20............. 20............ 32............. 15.......... 22.......~ 22......~....... 35............ 35............. 4Q~~=~~~ 35............. 27.......~..... 24......~....... 35............. 31............ 21........... 19~~ ~........ 21........... 26........... 37............. 31 ~.......... 34............. Date of SettleMont. 1841 1866 1853 1844 1848 1846 1828 1851 1853 18655 1804 1842 1856 1856 1844 1839 1842 1852 1849 1842' 1834 S1835 1852 1888 18-51 1844 1864 1859 1844 1850 1.852 1866i 18~54 1856 1859 1844 1844 S1852 1852 1832 1852 1852 1853 1850 1846 1859 1861 1882 1850 1846 1854 1830 NATIVITY. Post-Office Address. Irela~nd.............. Norrisville..., Germaiiy.......... Daltonn Cor'sl Tih~ n..... Norrisville... Germany.......... Warrzrlen....... Prussia......,..,.... 99 Germany........... 9.... 14.4.0....... Rosseville,..... it......... I Cady.......... F~rance............. Roseville...... Belgium............. Warren....... 'Ifflichigan....... F~razier......... Germany.......... Warren....... Prussia.................. Manssachcluseetts........ Michig~an.......... R oseville...... Germany..... arren....... it - "- " *Roseville....... Ireland....... orsvle. Germany.......... Warren....... Europe............. R os eville...... Germany..........l C - oner's Clk Mainn ne.......,....... W~arren....... Germlany.......... it.... Prussia.....,......... it.... G~ermzany........... 9.... Canada........ --* Norrisville... Germany......... " Dalton Cor's Canada............. Norrisville... Germlany.......... Wai~rren....... Belgiumll......... 0 i.... Prussia......,........ c Germ~any......... Ros~eville...... Mijchigan...... W. ~arren....... G~ermawny...........I R~oseville...... Mich~igan.......... ' 4.....,..... Conner's Clkis G~ermany.......... Roseville...... Alichigan.........,. W arren....,..~ Germany.......... Daltlion Cor's M~ichigan............ Norrisville... Prussia.......,....... RRoseville...... Germany.......... Erin............ ~Prussia.............. t MIichigana.......... 1 Norrisville... DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS. Farmer. it Teac~her. Farmer. it cc 14 it Carriage maker. Farmer. rrand grocer. it (I f4 it it Catrpenter. Farmer. Physician. Farmer. it and niechanic. ~I rt W~ag~on malker. Farm er. _ __ ~j___~_ ~_~ I ~_ -w.--

Page  33 T ------- ~ T XI Xv _~__ ~ _~~_ ___ Burgess, IRev. R. A. B~eebe, E....... B3aily, Edwin......... B~lack, WTilliam...... Brett, John........... Bates, H............... Bassett, Georoe Al.. &oworn, C. W........ Cornell,, James...... Cooper, James WV.. Churcb, DMI. E Carter', M~ary...... Carlo, Harrison...... Curtte, W............. Clury, Robert.. -- - -.. Clegg, Jolin.......... Dawson, Thomuas... Durfer, James S..... Dixon, William..... Dayton, James...... Dysinger, Daniel... Denton, Jamlles- S.... Ellis &s Co., Wm11.... Fenner, Frank W.. F~luogler, Daniel...... Fairbanks, Joseph.. Fillmzore,Chas. I... Gilbert, A. L......... Goodar, H. G........ Gillett, Daniel....... Gille~tt, Charles S...' Gracnger, Orrin... I... Granger, ~Wm. H... Groat, Ira............. Gerrowv, William... Groat, Amzbrose..... Haskin, Hiram A... Hicks, Wm~. R...... Hitbeck, Frarnklin.. LOCATION. Section 25............. it 36............. 91 28........... It 31............. 22..... i,. LL35......~....... 14..........i... 36.............~ 19............. 2 3...t.....;.... 3 3......~...~... LC32............. ~L 23.....L ~12........~~~ 2........ 14.......... CI 31......... as' CI 12........... It 2.....1..... It 30......... it 23.....t~.... 1........ *'-~ it 2~~~~~~~ 49 36......~....... 2.......~...... (L 36.....;~.... Date of Settlement. 1840 1836 18 54 1864 1866 1836 1861 1863 1853 1861 1848 ~1865 1872 1834 1854 1863 1868 1837 1850 1854 1854 1839 1857 1853 1838 1862.1874 1843 1830 1844 1867 1848 1850 1874, 1867 1865 1873 1831 1846 NkT~rVITY. Post-Office iddress. DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS, ~New York........ Richlmond.... Farmer. lCanada............. Armlada....... Englad......... Ijephis......! Tinsmith. New York......... Richmond.. Fiarmer. re it....'Dealer in ge-n. mdse &agrglicultural, Michig~an.. i Farmer.hs....iE~rmr [implements.. German.............. New YPork........ 11ichmond..... _M~nfr~. of and dealer inl staves &~ headings, al~so generatl myerchant. Ar rmada....... Farmer. Pý. (.h ( d..- I t NAMKBE. Hicksrs James~i... LOUBTION. D~ate of SettleMont. 1836 I I - - -ISction 3.5............. I Unlo....6-0........~ Canada............ New Y'Iork........ Canada............ England........... New~ York~... Hichigan..... Canada......... New York...0..... it Ontario.....,. N;ew York........ ic..... 19 *... *49..... Mic iga....... Oh o......... 41~~ ~ Michigan.......... Massachusetts....... New York.......... Mermphis...... R~ichmond... Nein phs..... Richmond..... General merchant. Farmner. MaI~chinist. Farmere~ and supervisor. Lumber, cut staves, and forkr-htn-j Farmuer. [dles.i Wagon and carrfiage makaers. Farmrer. Barber. Proprietor of liotel. Farmer. 44 & Highway Commission'r. 0. Gra~nger &~ Son, dlrs. ~in general Hop-o-rower. [m~dse. Tanner. Meclianic. Pump manufacturer. Hardware and Town Clerk. Farmer.. Mason. Hanncock; A. J....... H~enderson, Wm11.... Ide7 H. G.......~....... Joyce,. Alexaulnder... Joy-ce, 31.........,...... Leavino-s Eva E.... Lennox, L. Jolinson Miller, Theodore....'I 21Liller, Caleb......... Xanclieste r, A....... Nli Ph ~ilo A-.../ M1anninw,, Hiraml3 T.'.-ills, Asa D......... i~lills, Chafrles G.... Mlellen, Jonas...,..... SPettib one,. Edward. Phillips, H3arford... Prentice, Caroline.. Rugg, NPathaniel.... Reed, A. W........... Rigg, Isaac E........ Russell, Wtm. P.. Sutton, HEoralce D... Sperry, S. G.......... Spencer, F. E........ Stewart, Wni~1. B3.... Stuart, George H... Streeter, Joel......... Stone, Elias........... Steivart, 'Wm. H.... Smith, WM. H * ' 'Shaw~, X~rs. J. ~W... Spencer &~ Son, Ira, Smith, Clalvin A.... Tansley, Ptichard... Thompson, Wn-i. B. Taylor, Charles...... ~Wilson, Alfred...... (I35............. 2.....,...... 2 3............ 32.........~.. 20.......... ~C20............. 30............ 18........... 18............. ~L35......~..... I~19............. [[ 13........... I123...~.......... LL 35....... L~36............. 2.............~ 2 2............. L I.......... 20............. 32........... LI35............. 18.............. 35........... 3 5............ 1840 1854 1874: 1855 1874~ 1838 18'74 1848 1846 1868 18871 1866 1867 1835 1865 1841 1845 1836 1874 1872 1832 1848 1866i 1860 1844: 1837 1842 1856 1859 1862 1864 1844, 1839 1863 1858 1865 1966 1~863 NkTIVITY. Post-Office Iddress. i DESCRIPTION OF BTJSMNSS. New York........ Richmond.... lEassett &C Hicks, dealers in general md'se. and ao-ricul. irnpl'ts. G,,i~eneral mierchandise. Canada............ M~Iemphis...... T armer.. MXichigau....... Homceopathic physiciar~t.~i ~ nlrrfirfin & s uro-'o'n. New Y~Tork.............. Ho-gI ower......... IStock dcealer......,,...,R1ichmon... Famer Ontario............ A.. llopalthic phy~sician and surgeon. New York............;_N~nfr.. of agricultural implements.......... Gr~ist rriill andi saw mll.l~ rr....... Ai rmada....... Tai-rmer. Ontar~io................ New YTork.............. l MIichigan........... Richmond... ITlil illawe Encin ineer. New YTork........ A r m d..... Farmer. New Y'ork........ Raichmond....'31~illinery aind fa~ncy goods. A',.,, rmada...... Farmrer...... 3f emph is....... etired farmesr. Ca~nada~................... Farmer.nel' New YPork....,.... Riichmllond.... 14 I\/lichigan........... Alemlphis..... New York........ cc. *. ý-stor of Congregational Church. MRichigan............ Richmzond!..~Proprietor of hotel. New York....... ll~e emphis......vyer MI~ass ach us etts-,,...... 'School. Director. Now YIork.............. Tarmer, Ontario............ ~Armada...... ~New YT~ork...... Richino n-d.... r... I Wlenipb~plis...... ' rr........ Richmz~ond............ Armada cl~........ t Ontario............ f C.,...... Stave and heading maker. Con necti cutG......, I Vr em p i s...... Farmesr. MSichigan........... i (,, Sho emaker. cc........ Richmlond.... B 1lacksi-ith'g &r carriage miakring. Cananda............. Mlemphis...... Farmer.leP 1 I I WOW3___W SIX X 3PM I 1 Il I I I. NAME. Briggs, Egbert L... Burgess, Josiah...... Burgess, Eli.......... Benedict, S. J........ Baty, Daniel......... Betee, Joseph......... Briggs, George...... Black, Thbomas E... Barman, C. F........ Chapman, J. H3...... Crittenden, John... Davis, Abel.....,...... Doneghue, E. J.......Erdman, Elias....... Elsey, George........ Farr, D. G............ Eitzgerald, L;. G~...., FIishpool, Thomas... Filahertyr, E. C....... Gordon, Day...r...... Green, J. W.......... German, Thomas... Goner, F~rederick... Huzdson, Samuel...'.. Hart, Putman......,.. H~ulin, Aaron........ Heath, D. IU......... Hickey, James...... H~ultgren, F.......... Heath) H. P.......... Hathaway, J. S. P.. Hidbret, flenri.......Hooker, C., P......... Hamblin, 7r...i HEart, Chester..,....... Johr, Jobn............ K~elly, Josep~h........ L~ogan, John......... Leonard, Charles... LOUITION. Section 16............. 16............. 15 1E............. New Baltimtore.'.......4004 - 6..... *as **0**"** Section 23......... Section 18.......~~~~~ New Baltimore...... gection 11............. New Baltimore...... Section 9.....~.......... New Baltimore....,. Section 8............... New Baltimore...... Section 3.......... Date of SettleMont. 1856 1847 1864 1864 1852 1856 1861. 1868 1856 1831 1845 1855 1874 1850 1841,1866 1844: 1862 1867 1856 '1858 1850 1834: 1832 18483 1850 1850 1855 1850 1853 1852 1836 1860 1832 1862 1855 18400.1833 NATIVITY. I to. 0.... ***6~~~ New York........ Ilichiigan.......... New Y ork.,...... Germany..........r Englhigand........... Scoland....et....... England l............ ~New Yo-1.k........ 99 ~ n......0.. 4 America dl.....,...... New York......... Germany.......... New Yorkr........ Gntermc an......... New York......... Germ~any......... N~ew York......... Michigan.......... New York.... - -- Gemany....... * - Michigany......... France............ New York....... Iemn..., Post-Office kddress. N. Baltimore Milton....i..... N-. Baltimore cc avn mt. ClemensN~. Baltimore New Haven..... Mt. Clemensor N. Baltimore lvlilt ont.*... Milton.......... N. Baltim~ore DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS, Teacher. Hardware.are Farmner. MiIariner. Cabinet makaer. Druggist. ~Farmner. H~otel. Mariner. Carriage mak~Ler. M~aster masriner. Farmler. Station agent. Farmer. Livery stable. Clerk * Farmrner. Druggist. Retired gentleman.n Insurance agent and Justice of th& Farmier. [Peace. Cooper. Hf3arness, boot and s~hoe m~anufac-- Merchant. [turer.,i Saloon. Farmzer. Blacksi-nit'i. Farmler. HEotel.. Blacksmrith. Shipowner. Farmner. NAME. LOUBTION. Date of settlement. I -1 ]-1-~ I Losh, John............ Leonard, H3. H...... Lampher, Albert A Luttenbacher, L.... Little, F~rances...... Maliskrey, Charles... MSilton, WV. J......... MS~ellen, Oscar Tf-..... M~iilton, Obed A...... Mellen, WT. B........ M~iaddock, J. C...... Milton, Ftord L...... Miller, Frederick... Petre, J r., Francis.. Riice, A. D.......,..... Riman, Paul......... Rose, King............ Rose, Frank.......... Roberts, S. N......... Rlandall, Jam~es...... Randall, WI~illiam... Stitt, Thomas W... Schaes, P. F. H...... Schnoor, Christian. Sutherland, HIugh... Schars, Peter......... Sumner, - Sarah...... Shoemakrer, H....... Turner, Mvartha....... Taytlor, J. W........ Williams, F. F...... W~alter, George...... W~anks, Charles..... 'WVCilson ' T. M........ Warwick, Isaac..... Warwick, Chas. A. ~Winch, Caleb........ Yask, Oliirer.....,.... Section 12............ it 2,., 1~23........~..... LI 18.......... it 17............. New Baltimzore... Section 16.....'...... New Baltiniore...... Section 16.......... N3ew Baltim~sore......!Section 14............. 11 8....... 11 it 14.......~~~ New Bal~tim~ore..... Section IS........ 0" It 22.......... *** New Baltim~ore..*... Section 16............. Newi Baltimo~re...... Section 9s..,, New Baltim~ore...... Section 3...,............. Now Baltimore...... Section 6..,.......... New Baltimnore................................. 18544 1850 1854 1852 1852 1855 1837 1874 1873 1836 1851 1850 18ýi 1850 1850 1~837 1837 1851 1835 1852 1852 1844 1852 1858 1856 1836 1832 1853 1861 1858 185.5 1836 1856 1874: 1846 NATIVITYS. Post-Office iddress. Germany.......... N. Bazltimore Miichigan......... Nhew H~aven.. 44 to.... o. e N. Baltiniore Cana~da............ Alft. Clemens........................ N.~ Baltimorell G~ermany........... 4 England........... ~Milton................. N stm r New YPork........ England...........~ Germany........... Miichigann......... England........... Milton........ NewY York........ N., Baltimore Mdichigan...........r NewY York........ Alt. Clemens. England........... N. Baltimore New York........ c I~reland............. c G~ermany........... Scotland........ Germaliny.....~~ A-ichigan..... Mt. Clem~ens. N~ew York..,...... N. Baltimore.e. i..... 0 New Haven........... *.....,...... N. Baltimuore ~Michigan..........0 England........... Milton........ GermanyS......... N. B3altimo~re Tilassa~ch u setts... England........... Michigan.......... New York....... Richmzond... Fl~rance......,....... N. Baltim~ore DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS. Farms~er. Boot and sh~oe makler. Farmler. Bricklayer. FF-armler. Barber. Farm~er. Watch makrer antld jeweler..MiIariner. Farmuer. Mieat marzket.:Photographer. -Physician and surgeon. MIerch ant. Farmler. Landede proprietor. Boot and shoe manuufacturer. T~each er.. Farmzer. Grocer. Merchclant. Liveryy and sale man.Farm~er. Sash, door, and. -blind.fatct~ory.. Pensioner I __ W- WK w 0 W-11,XVM ___ NAME. Allen, Warren M... S Aldrich, Peter....... Buckner, Elisha L... Bisbee, Julius... * " " Caldwell, John...... Colles, Denohe...,.... Crawcford, Mfary..... Crandall, Justice B. Davis, Frank......... Davis, B. R;.... Freeman, Oran....... Gass, William...... Hartway, John J... Ha~rtwiay, John... Hicks, Charles A... Jackson, -Barnabas.. Millerl-Louis.....;.... LOUTI~ON. 3ection 8............. 44. 5............. 8..........~ M...........~1~ 15...~......;... 16............. C~21............. 8............. 32......... 15........~~ L ~21.....~.... ~ II12............. ~L13............. 2.............~ ~C12...1......... Ct.13............. Date of SettleMont. 1.848 1840 1873 1869 1848 1883 1833 1835 1844 1843 1824, 1832 1856 1874 1843 1870 1856 NiTIVITY,. 1Michigan......... New York........ Vermzont........ Miichigatn......... New York........ Rthode Tsland.... New Y~Sork........ Germany.......... Post-Offioe Address. DESCRIPT' Rom eo........~ ~. Farmr~er. Fa.....lcrmer and tlE Ray Centre... Fa~rmer. Romeo......... I i(--.. 0 S... Brick mason. 4t "...... Farm~ll er. ~Washingto~n. 44 Rome eo......... T each er., W~ashington. Farmller. N'ew H~aven.. 'c. Arm-adat....... ' Bur'k's Corls. L RomZeo......... I I rION OF BUSINESS. - - I I hrasher. MlcLallin' William. I M~clallin, Levi E... Nye, Ezra...;......... Nut~ting,, D. H~...,. Prestow, George..... Robinson, ~m...... Robinson, Levi...... Tickrnell, John........Villerot, John........ Vovillia,- Jobn B.... W~hitcou-1b, Charles Wright, T. W....... Wmoodman, Thomas W~aterman, Edgar. War~aner, Robert... W~eatherbee, Geo... W~Jeller, Charl~es.,.....i I ", p I I LOCATION, II - I Section 23............. L~23......r....... 17............. 26.............~ 5L 5......... 6. 26;....~........ L~26.......~...... [C 20......... 26 3.......~...... ~L 12~~~;1~~ 1866 1866 1835 1849 1882 1844 1868 1855 1865 1854 1835 1828 1856 1830 1874 1874 Date of settlement. -I NATIVITY, W~isconsin..,...... New York.....,... Michigan......... Mi~assa achus etts.... Vermsont.......... New York....... England....... Frasnce............. Michigan.... 4 C New York........ Germany,....... Post-Office Address. Ray Centre... Rom~zeo.... I Mlead...... Burk'sS Corls. MSIt. Clem33ens. Romieo......... MSead~........... Wasbington.on Romeo...;.. IMead......... Burk's Corls. New HXaven.. DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS. Carpenter.. Farmner. Supervisor and farmer. Farmzer. Ca-rpenter. Fa2rmer. ~__~_ _ _______~_~ ~ _ ___ _ ~______ __ ~_ _~ _~_ I _ ~_ _~_~ I _ _~ _ II IL _ __

Page  34 I 31 Im Xt IT w0wW&Fs I- x --P I t NAME. Aller, Lewis B...... Aller, Joseph........ Aeines, Nicholas.... Albrecht, Benny.... Belcher, Giles........ Beckbessenger, F... Barton, Robert A... Buell, Joseph......... Beste, Lawrence.... Betz, Frederick...... Blum, Henry......... Chapoton, Richard. Cox, Giles............. Carlow, Frederick.. Dusky, William.... Demrick, Charles... Defer, Francis....... Fralich, Adam....... Fleischhut, William Fisher, T. William. Forton, Robert...... Gaukler, Jacob A... Gntaw, John......... Green, John.......... Hendrickx, Rev. L. Hersey, Thomas..... Haselhuhn, George. Haslon, Frederick.. Heins, Henry........ Keough, John....... Krehwisch, Jacob.. LOOATION. Section 31'............. 44 30............. (i 4............. it 8............. Claim 625.............. Section 30.............,( 21.............. 19............ Claim 599............. Section 16............. " 16............. ii 16............. Claim 599............. Section 21............. 14 6.............. it 20............. l -2......o.o.o. oo. it 312............. (< 6..............,t 167............. "{ 17.............. CC 9.............. cc 19............. it 15............. it 7............. it 17............. 4C 9............. Date of Settlement. 1856 1788 1850 1853 1854 1874 1868 1848 1858 1870 1836 1838 1850 1833 1870 1856 1842 1866 1853 1847 1852 1854 1862 1871 1872 1861 1851 1843 1854 1854 1860 I. NATIVITY. Post-Office Address. DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS. Michigan........ iMt~ Clemens. Farmer. it..... ~ cc4 Germany.......... Roseville...... Butcher and store. S t.......... cc...... F arw er. England........... Roseville......, Germany.......... Frazier........ I New York........ Roseville...... cc Canada,............. C...... Germany.......... CC...... i ".......... Frazier........ i,.......... R oseville...... 'M ichigan.......... It...... E ngland........... a 4......,, Germ any.......... Erin............ " "I.......... Roseville...... Laborer. CC CC Farmer. "....~...... "......Fa e. Switzerland....... i......,, Germ any..........,...... M ichigan.......... Frazier........* " Germany........... Roseville...... cc M ichigan.......... c...... " Germany........ "...... Hotel, grocery, and County store.,,.......... Frazier........ Store and factory.,.......... Roseville...... Laborer........... It...... Catholic priest. England.. "...... Farmer. Germany.......... cc...... ( ~( ^^ _ ( (t ot.......... it Ireland............. i...... it G erm any *........,(I......, NAME. LOCATION. Date of Settlement. NATIVITY. Post-office Address. DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS. Lubke, Mary......... Section 7............. Moorhouse, George! " 4............. Martens, John....... it 17............. 3NcGovern, Janmes.. 4............. Moss, James.......... 31............. -Most, Adam.......... 21............. -Mahney, Dennis.... 16............. Maison, Michael A. 10............. May, Samuel W.... 4............. Meynell, Henry..... 18............. Nicolai, Raymond.. 30............. Nolen, Daniel....... 18........:..... Nummer, Henry.... 19............. Niemann,Fred'rick 21............. Rackham, George A.31............. Rothenberg, H...... 31............. Rein, Charles........ 30............. Euell, Joseph......... 30............. Redmond, Patrick.. 18............. Raisa, Joseph......... " 7............. Ready, Timothy..... " 6............. Schuchard, Gus...... 19............ Schulte, John C..... 30............. Savage, Henry..... 17............. Stricker, Jacob...... 31............. Schroeder, John..... 29.............. Schroeder, Chris.... 20............. Sufferlein, George.. " 6............. Vernier, Gazette.... 14............. Wilkens, Joseph.... 20........... Wiggant, Nicholas. 17........... -1- 1 1. I 1852 1842 1854 1853 1854 1858 1856 1852 1842 1862 1848 1841 1850 1822 1855 1866 1844 1848 1834 1852 1849 1852 1874 1830 1849 1865 1853 1852 1864 1845 1858 Germany.......... England........... Germany.......... Michigan........ England........... ýGermany.......... Michigan.......... (C Gray.......... Germany.......... Michigano............ Germany.......... ( c * - *! Ohion................ Germanyd.......... Canada.......... Ireland............. Germany.......... Ireland....... Germany........... New York........ Germany............... o..... Michigan.......... Germany.......... 19 *.*. Frazier........ Roseville...... Mt. Clemens. Conner's C'k Roseville...... it it Rosvile..... Frazier........ Roseville...... ~t t( ti Farmer. Lawyer. Proprietor of hotel and carpenter. lFarmer. I " it Teacher. Harness maker. Farmer. Ic Postmaster. Farmer. -i-' 3---, JL ^, XL &--, ^ AV^~1 3 &A--- I NAME. Adams, W. JD......... Adams, S. D......... Beliers, L.............. Brado, W............. Bliemeister, H....... Brownell, George... Bittner, Charles..... Chapman, J. B...... Crawford, J. M...... Child, P. H........... Clark, Thomas....... Cowles, Norman.... Drake, Orton & Bro. Emerson, Joseph.... Ford, Charles H..... Geisler, A............. Geisler, F.............. Harvey, W. H...... Hutchins, C. S....... Heldt, Carl............ Date of LOCATION. Settle- NATIVITY. ment. Section 9............. 1822 New York........ 8............. 1822 it........ 19............. 1862 Michigan.......... 27............. 1862 Germany.......... 27............. 1873 cc. 3............. 1824 New York........ 21............. 1852 Germany.......... 17............. 1837 New York......... 21............. 1857 "........ 8............. 1870 "........ 17............. 1850 England........... 24............. 1835 4...................... 14............. 1832 New York........ 8.............. 1859 Maine.............. 3............. 1871 Michigan.......... 16............. 1852 Germany.......... 22............. 1852 4z........ 13............. 1836 New York........ 7............. 1837 "........ " 36.............. 1856 Germany.......... Post-Office Address. DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS. NAME. LOCATION. -1 1 11 - 1 1 - Utica..............o..o... C(..........o ((..bo*...~.00 tt Cady's Cor's. Utica...........,. o oo (r.c....o ll (( Cady's'Cor's. Farmer. i t cc Photographer. Farmer. (i t,t Herling, C. F......... Jinwein, Andrew... Koth, August........ Lockwood, Geo. W. Ledwidge, Wm...... Moore, Calvin....... MAurthum, George... Murphy, H............ Nicholson, Robert.. Priehs, Frederick C Shuer, Joseph........ Skinner, Edwin R.. Smith, R. M.......... Schneider, Stephen. Soper, W. N......... Thompson, John.... Upton, Wmi.......... Wright, John........ Warrenner, John... Section 10............. 635............. 16.............. 8~............ 720............. 617............. 26............. 826............. 518............. 257............. 327............. 321............. 531............. 125............. 213............. t 22............. Sections 14 and 15.. Section 19............. 8 31............. Date of Settle- NATIVITY. mnent. 1871 Germany.......... 1854 i oooo 1858 it..... 1838 Michigan....... 1860 Ireland............. 1835 New York........ 1847 Germany.......... 1851 Ireland............ 1853 England........... 1860 Germany.......... 1866........ 1834 New York........ 1867 Michigan.......... 1874 Germany.......... 1835 New York........ 1864 it -..... 1862 England........... 1838 t...... 1849 (...... Post-Office Address, DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS. Utica.......... Cady's Cor's. Utica.......... it Utica.....o... Cady's Cor's. U tica.......... Warren....... Cady's Cor's. U tica.......... W are....... Warren.... Farmer. it cc it CC 44 t al,n L m 9-- Lo-,IDA LA W 0 wN XMs IME-x F-e NAME. Andrews, Charles... Aldrich, Philip V... Armstrong, Gilbert Barringer, John E. Butterfield, J. H.... Burns, Calvin....... Barrows, Hiram..... Crawford, Robert... Coddington, Frank. Carpenter, Henry... Chase, Joseph......... Cline, Joseph......... Conger, 0............. Davis, Seth............ Edwards, Josiah J.. Finch, Amos......... Goyer, Holly......... Hamlin, Asa B...... LOUATION, Section 23............. " 15............. cc 9o............. Armada................ Section 26............. cc 21............. C 23............. 4t 17............. ( 22............. 8. 415^ o 15....... o.......... 23o 1............. ( 152............. ' 15.............,1 25............. i 30............. Date of Settlement. 1841 1837 1863 1832 1838 1864 1833 1822 1872 1855 1852 1874 1864 1823 1835 1867 NATIVITY. Post-0ffice Address. New York........ Armada...... Massachusetts... It...... -'Michigan................ New York........ "4...... Scotland........... omeo....... a New York........ Armada...... Michigan................. New York.............. Michigan................ New York............. (C.. S........ Eomeo....... DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS. 11 Farmer. Physician. Farmer. Postmaster and general merchant. Farmer. Charge of cemetery. Hotel proprietor. Farmer. nt NAME. Hulett, Newton...... Hulett, Irving....... Harris, David........ Lemon, Abner....... Proctor, Benj. F..... Peabody, Albert H. Perkins, Jas. G. R.. Pell, Wm. H........ Rice, Stephen B..... Stevens, R. B......... Stump, Levi.......... Scott, Amasa T...... Smith, L. B........... Spencer, Charles..... Taylor, Hiram....... Travis, David........ Wilcox, John........ Youngs, D. S......... LOATION. I I I Date of Settlement. Section 20............. 20............. 23............. 831 30............. 13............. S 2............. 21............. 32............. 248............. 15o............... 2............. 236............. 32........^... 26............. 27............. 15............ 1834 1836 1832 1867 1832 1864 1863 1866 1842 1832 1856 1843 1847 1872 1846 1871 1857 1850 NATIVITY. Vermont.......... New York........ Canada............. Michigan.......... New York........ Michigan.......... C anada...'......... New York........ Michigan.......... New York........ Vermont.......... Canada..... New Hampshire New York........ Post-Oflce Address. DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESSk Armada...... Farmer. ie...... Cabinet maker. Romeo......... Farmer. Armada....... " "...... "~ and hop raiser..... Hotel proprietor. ".. Farmer. (i. ' and merchant....... M iller. Romeo......... Farmer. Armada...... c,,.. Miller. it... Farmer. Date of Bate o NAME. LOATION. Settle- NATIVITY. Post-Offine Address, DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS. NAME. L0CATION. cittle- NATIVITY. Pc, m ent. ment, Allbard, George................................. 1849 Michigan.......... Mt. Clemens. Farmer. Luke, William................................. 1865 New York........ M Alband, William............................... 1852 Germany......... Matt, Lewis.......... Claim 542............. 1856 Michigan.......... Baart, T.......................................... 1871 Belgium...........,, Moore, Francis...... " 643............. 1834 "......... Benfoit, Maglore............................... 1810 Michigan.......... * Moore, John B..... U 133............. 1840,(......... Ballard, Thomas................................ 1873........ Pquignot, Constant " 134............. 1865 France............. Campan, Henry..... Claim 101.............. 1839......... Pumaville, Richard.......................... 1829 Michigan.......... Campan, Francis................................ 1873........., Pumaville, Joseph............................ 1822 " Campan, John................................... 1873......... Parker, Israel T... Section 6............... 1847 New York........ Cottrell, F. RE........ " 220............. 1830......... "eimole, J. J......... Claim 129............. 1853 Germany.......... Feller, John.................................... 1864 New York........ Singer, Charles...... Section 20............. 1853 Russia.............. Fries, H................................. 1850 " " and Superintend't County Tucker, David....... Claim 37............... 1820 Michigan.......... Fenton, F. C....... " 129............. 1835 Michigan.......... - [poor. Thede, Henry........ " 542............... 1854 Germany.......... Grundman, Charles........................... 1874 Germany.......... W "t,, Tucker, Lafayette................ Hatzenbuhler, J.... " 616............. 1874 "......... Tucker, Charles........................... 1789 " Irwin, John......... " 2425............. 1872 Canada.... ",, Teats, Edward....... "1 167............... 1841 New York........ Jobse, Henry..................................... 1858 Holland.......... ' Wilson, Mary C.... Section 3............... 1839 Ireland............ Jobse, Arnold........ 4( 145............. 1866 "............,, st-Office Address. DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS. t. Clemens. Farmer. It (I Ht ( It It "( ' and potash maker. it_ itt ^

Page  35 W 0 W-j X---*iT 5 3--E-,X X 3 35 Arnold, Alvah,...... Akin, DaRvid......... Bak~er, P. i........... B3aker, John J....... Beanrdsley, A. D..... Beam, Maryl' J....... Beam~, Martin C..... Bixby, MLyron....... Chapin, `L. S......... Connon, Levi E..... Fawcrboner, Daniel. Freer, A. W......... Gresbeck, Charlies...1 Gillett, Jesse......... Haines, HI. W........ Hixson, 31arshal.... Hlains, Alson......... Hanins, F. At....... Insley, John.........! Kenagra, Jr., Benj..! Lintz, R............. ~ongst~aff, Al;ark..... I LOOLTION. Date of Settlement, I-[ 3ection 18....,......... it 16........... 44 5........~.... cc 5............ 'L 3..,....... 21........... L' 12......... (I19............. ~13........... L(30............. ((32............ 17.........r.... 14~7.......... 1826 1864: 1862 1863 1844 1866 1866 1836 1824 1856 1837 1849 1847 1834 1836 1843 1832 1853 1843 1866 1858 1853 NATMTY. Post-Offie Adaress. DESCRIPTION 0' New Y`ork........l Disco........... IFarmer. it 4 1... *... 0... H~ Iotel keeper. M~ichigannrrr New Y~ ork--- r Mficbigan........... and mere.1 New~ York........ Alacomb....... i ( Washington. r T-T~~~~~itica.......... Canada.............] Ho~~~~~tel proprietor. New York........ Disco.....,..... F~armer, it....... Washington. Fruit7i farmer. i......,... Utica.......... Farm~er. 31icbign...... i i New Yo~Trk........ Disco ~..I.......... t ~England........... Utica.......... I Pennsylvania.... 'U~tica.......... i L England.......... Disco........ I I DF BUJSINESS. hant. MlcLellan, A. C~. P. Mrorris, janies...... Mills, M~artin M.. Norton, Abby L.... Philps, B............. Parkhurst, Chas. H. Pierce, Alpheus..... Roberson &~ Chapel. Smith, Hiran-i....... Simmons, Thos. J~... Smith, A. J........... Sm~ith, Orville........ Simmons, David..... Steaviens, J. H....... Singer, H.............. Smith, W. I..... Tharp, ~ Earl W... Tucker, Daniel...... Whitney, P. H...... Wiers, Peter......... WT;ell) H. A...........j Date of LOOLTION. Settle- FANTIVITY. Post-Office Adress. DESCRIPTION OF Mont. Section 24............ 1835 M~ric~higan......... Ultica.....,..... F'arm~er. 2 5.........., 1839 1 England..... L.......... I rr 2..~........... 1838 A~Iichigan....... I Washington. II LL 13......... 1844 /New York..... Disco.*...... rr 29........... 1829 Michigan......... Utica....... * 26............. 1863......i t 28........... 1837 lNew Y~ork............ 'L 33.....,. 1828 Newv Jersey......., ~~~~ ills 33........ 183 Connecticut...........Mles 'I 32............ 1842!NwYr.............. Fai~rmer. LL 31....... 1831 i r r1 'L 26......... 1832........ r LL 25.............1 1863 M~richiga n.............. L' 23............. 1831 INewP York........I Disco........... 13...........,..1 1843 'Vermon t...................~ r' 24........ 1856 ]Penn sylvani a.... L...........i 2............. 1835 Newi York........ ~........... I 2........ 1842 M~ichi oan........ " I(.. L...r,......... 1856 New Y~lork........ Alacomb..,.... 29............ 1849...... Utica......... 1............ 1853 C an d......... 44 0..... 7 7..............1 1829 l~i~ewv York....... Disco............ ' SBUSINESS. I I L~ B TO F 03 1- ý E-ki -1 W., M W 5- 1 -, w x I -P NBMELOOLTION, Anderson, -W. G.... Section 24............. Balfour, Louis.............................~~ ~~~~ Beach7 R. B..................................~~~~ Brown, G~. M........... om eo.................. Bancroft, H. T...... Section 33.........~.... Beagle, WT. H......~.. CC 22............. C~ooley, Chester...... 17.............~ Colles, Elon C....... 17........ Casey, P. H................... Cooley, Noah......... L 20. *9..e. 0. V. Cornell, H. R........ 27....... Cawker, John....... Romeo VTillage... Day, Daniel C....Scin1...... Donalson, J. E...... 11 2.~..... Davis & Son, S. H~.. Romneo Village... Edgett, Albert......,. Section 36...~......... Gould, A.............. It 6....... Gould, Edward...... ci 22......~....... Ilatnscom) I. D...... Riomeo..........~~~..... I Date of SettleMont. 1866 1875 1865 1856 1839 1851 1832 1846 1868 1839 1871 1861. 1850 1853 1843c.1827 1845 1823 1840 NATIVITY. Post-Office Address. DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS. NAME. New York,........ Romeo........ larm er. Hedges, M. F........ Scotland......... 0 4...Be*... 'jHomeopathic physician. Hamilton, John M.I Ca~nada........................ ee, Ni H............. Germany.............,tMeat market. McI~ay, R. N.....,... Newt York........ 44.....Farmer. McLcay, Robert...... Michigan'...,....... 44. 0 0 1. * * 0. 0 * Mcc~affy, A.......... New York........ it......... House carpenter. Mc~chesny, John.... Michigan.......... 91......... iFarmer. Phelps, Mfaggie A.. Irelanda.,.................Station agent. Perry, N. Af......... Michigan........-. so. a 0 0 Farmer. Robinson, W. A.... New York........ i......... 91 Skillman, Louisa H Canada,......,.. L......~.. it Meat market. Smith, Sr., John.... Mlichigan.......... it........ 0 Farmer! Thompson, John C. 4t "" 0" 4...... tTh m so, en y New York.........4.6.... a. Dealers in agricultural imp'lements. Throop, D. I.,,, 4 (..44.4......,.Farmer. W. Voodbeck, B....... 94 it.. a... 9 9 aterbury, G. A *9' rr (I ( Woodin, Daniel.....,Mlichigaln...,,.... A] "...,,lttorney-at-law. I I LOCATION. Section 9............... St. Clair............... Section 24............. it 12............. it 24......~....... Romeo Villatge... Section 25............. Romeo Village... Section 2,9............. cc 25............. 64 17............. CC 27............. C4 17.....g........ Date of Settlement. 1857 1853 1831 1847 1841 1852 1874 1865 1842 1841 1832 18~44 1856 1856 1839 1837 1873 1845 ~ I NiTIVITY. Post-Offie iddress. DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS. Michigan........... Romeo......... IDry goods, etc. (I.... Almuont........ Fa~rmer. it it....*.. a Livery and s-ale stables. it..a....... RI omeo...., Farmer. Scotland........... (I..* 00 1 I Ireland...............aset It New YTork,.... 4.. 0 ( I...Carriage m~aker. Canatda.............. it..-. Teachner. Michigan...........Perry's Hotel. cc....0...&..... Fa~rmer and painter. it a*.. 1 0. 44-60*Dress maklier. England.......... it,.... Farmier. New York...... itL r Michigan.......... 0*60** ~New York........ it M ich igan.......... it ease. tEditor -Romeo Observeq%. New YEork........ L......... Us S.. claim aglt, suspended claims ci 6-4666 a peciality, & Jus. of the Peace. I ~-~---~~ D3ate of NAME. LOCATION. Settle- NATIVITY. Post-Office Addiress. DESORIPTION OF BURNESS. NAMEB. LOUBTIO Stl-e. BITY ment, Andrews, Loren..... fSection 34............. 18121 New York...... IWashington. F'armer. Sikes) Eli-ily......... Section 14.......,13 e ok....~ Arnold, Mriarth~a....., 94 15............. 1855 M~lichigran.... Romeo......... 1 Shaw, Charles WT... Ci 6..~ 8 Mcin Bennett, Henry...... L' 33............. 1835 94..... Washington. C. and fruit grower. Shaw, Lysande r A.. It 7. r Holcomb, 1. p....... 10..'.*..... *... 1863 New York........ Romeo........ it adsoc asr Snoolk, J-ohn J....... Sections 20 n 9 14 ~~~~lil Hadley, Jr., Jacob.. L 31ý............. 1874 MZichigan........~ I.,Rochester..... it Tinsman, John A... Section 9........13 NwJrs...l~ MeliI12 A.............. 2........ 1839 '....~~~no... doRmo.........Sur~geon. W~ildey, Chatries E.. 94 31.... 85Nevror.....~ Nims J. W......... 1........~~..... 1856 1Vermont............... Farmer. Yates, Joseph......, 5..~~.~. At-Officekadress, DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS. )meo....... Frmer. t. Vernon.. I )M1eo......... )chester. *-. Iashington. ~r I;::: ~;: I~ ~:i:,:: ~ 1; ~~ Ir i::::';j~:~ I~I.-.:Ei~,~ i; ~A ___ I _ ~aa~~

Page  [unnumbered]

Page  [unnumbered]

Page  4 ' . m, __ --- --.... __- .... --- I........ osm" POPULATION BY COUNTIES, 1870-1860. I Counties, 1870, 1860. ALABAMA, Autauga. 11,623 16,739 Baker.... 6,194........ Baldwin..6,004 7,530 Barbour.. 29,309 30,812 Bibb..... 7,469 11.894 Blount... 9,945 10,865 Bullock.. 24,474........ Butler... 14,981 18.12. Calhoun.. 13,980 21,539 Chamb'rs 17,562 23,214 Cherokee 11,132 18,360 Choctaw. 12,1676 13,877 Clarke... 14,663 15,049 Clay..... 9,560........ Cleburne. 8.017......... Coffee... 6,171 9,623 Colbert. 12,537........ Conecnh.. 9,574 11,311 Coosa.... 11,945 19,273 CovingfYn 4.868 6,469 Crenshaw 11,156........ Dale..... 11,325 12,197 Dallas... 40,705 38,625 De Kalb.. 7,126 10,705 E tmore... 14,477........ Escambia 4,041........ Etowah.. 10,109....... Fayette... 7,136 12,850 Franklin. 8,006 18,627 Geneva... 2,959........ Greene. 18,39g 30,859 Hale..... 21,792........ Henry... 14,191 14.918 Jackson. 19,410 18,283 J efferson 12,345 11,746 Lauderd'e 15,091 17,420 Lawrence 16,658 13,975 Lee...... 21,750........ Limestone 15,017 15,306 Lowndes. 25,719 27,710 Macon... 17,727 26,802 Madison. 31,267 26,451 Marengo. 26,151 31,171 Marion.. 6,059 11,182 Marshall. 9,871 11,472 Mobile... 49,311 41,131 Monroe.. 14,214 15,667 Montg'ery 43,704 35,904 Morgan.. 12,187 11,335 Perry.... 24,975 27,724 Pickens.. 17,690 22,316 Pike..... 17,423 24,435 Randolph 12,006 20,059 Russell... 21,636 26,592 Sanford.. 8,893........ Shelby... 12,218 12,618 St Clair.. 9,260 11,013 Sumter.. 24,109 24,0f5 Talladega 18,064 23,520 Tallap'sa. 16,963 23,827 Tuscal'sa. 20,081 23,200 Walker... 6,543 7,980 Wash'gton 3,912 4,669 Wilcox... 28,377 24,618 Winston. 4,155 3,576 TOTAL. 996,992 964.201 Counties. 1870, 1860. Sharpe... 5,400........ St. Fran's 6,714 8,672 Union... 10,571 12,288 Van Bu'n 5,107 5,357 Wash'ton 17,266 14,673 White.... 10,347 8,316 Woodruff 6,891......... Yell..... 8,048 6,333 TOTAL. 484,471 435,450 Counties. 1870. 1860, I I New River....... 3,820 Orange.. 2,195 987 Polk..... 3,169........ Putnam.. 3,821 2,712 Santa Rosa 3,312 5,480 St. John's 2,618 3,038 Sumter.. 2,952 1,549 Suwannee 3,556 2,303 Taylor... 1,453 1,384 Volusia.. 1,72,3 1,158 Walkula. 2,506 2,839 Walton.. 3,041 3,037 Washington 2,302 2,154 TOTAL. 187,748 140,424 CALIFORNIA, Alameda. 24,237 8,927 Alpine... 685........ Amador. 9,582 10,930 Butte.... 11,403 12,106 Calaveras 8,895 16,299 Colusa... 6,16b 2,274 Co'a Co'ta 8,461 5,328 DelNortc 2,02.2,f1,993 El Dorado 10,309 20,562 Fresno... 6,336 4,605 Humb'ldt 6,140 2,694 Inyo..... 1,956........ Kern.... 2,925........ Klamath. 1,686 1,80~ Lake..... 2,969........ Lassen... 1,327........ Los An'les 15,309 11,333 Marin.... 6,903 3,33 4 Mariposa. 4,572 6,243 3iendo'no 7.545 3,961 Merced.. 2,807 1,141 Mono.... 430........ 21onterey 9,8876 4,73P Napa.... 7,163 5,521 Nevada.. 19,134 16,446 Placer.... 11,357 13,270 Phumas... 4,489 4,836 Sacramento 26,830 24,J42 S. Berna'd'o 3,988 5,551 San Diego 4,951 4,324 S. Fran'co. 149,473 56,802 San Joaq'n 21,050 9,4`35 S. L. Obispo 4,772 1,782 San Mateo 6,635 3,214 S. Barbara 7,784 3,543 Santa Clara 26,246 11,912 Santa Cruz 8,743 4,944 Shasta... 4,173 4,360 Sierra... 5,619 11,387 Sisldyou. 6,848 7,629 Solano... 16,871 7,169l Sonoma.. 19,819 11,867 Stanislaus 6,499 2,245 Saltter... 5,030 8,390 Tehama.. 3,587 4,044 Trinity.. 3,213 5,125 Tulare... 4,533 4,638 Toulumne 8,150 16,229 Yolo..... 9,899 4,716 Yuba.... 10,851 13,668 TOTAL. 560,247 379,994 CONNECTICUT. Fairfield.. 95,276 77,476 Hartford. 109,007 89,962 Litchfield 48,727 47,318 Middlesex 36,099 30.859 New Hav'n 121,257 97,345 N. Lond'n 66,570 61,731 Tolland.. 22,000 21,177 Windham 38,518 34,279 TOTAL. 537,454 460,147 DELAWARE. Kent.... 29,804 27,804 New Castle 63,515 54,797 Sussex... 31,696 29,615 TOTAL. 125,015 112,216 I ARKANSAS. Arkansas. 8,268 8,844 Ashley... 8,042 8,590 Benton... 13,831 9,306 Boone.... 7,032........ Bradley.. 8,646 8,388 Calhoun. 3,853 4,103 Carroll... 5,780 9,38 -Chicot... 7,214 9,234 Clarke... 11,953 9,735 Columbia. 11,397 12,449 Conway.. 8,112 6,697 Craighead 4,577 3,066 Crawford. 8,957 7,850 Critten'n. 3,831 4,92( Cross.... 3,915...... Dallas... 5,707 8,281 Desha.... 6,125 6,45i0 Drew.... 9.,960 9,07~ Franklin. 9,627 7,298 Fulton... 4,843 4,024 Grant.... 3,943........ Greene... 7,573 5,843 Hempst'd 13,768 13,989 Hot Sp'gs 5,877 5,635 Indep'd'ce 14,566 14,307 Izard.... 6,806 7,215 Jackson.. 7,268 10,493 Jefferson. 15,733 14,971 Johnson. 9,152 7,612 Lafayette 9,139 8,464 Lawrence 5,981 9,372 Lit.diver 3,236........ Madison. 8,231 7,740 Marion... 3,979 6,192 Miss'sippi 3,633 3,895 Monroe.. 8,336 5,657 Montg'ery 2,984 3,638 Newton.. 4,374 3,39. Ouachita. 12,975 12,936 Perry.... 2,685 2,465 Phillips... 15,372 14,87W Pike..... 3,788 4,025 Poinsett.. 1,720 3,621 Polk..... 3,376 4,262 Pope..... 8,886 7,883 Prairie... 5,604 8,854 Pulaski.. 32,026 1i,699 Randolph 7,466 6,261 Saline..:. 3,911 6,640 Scott.... 7,483 5,145 Searcy... 5,614 5,271 Sebastian 1.2,940 9,238 Sevier... 4,492 10,516 GEORGIA. Appling.. 5,086 Baker... 6,843 Baldwin.. 10,618 Banks... 4,973 Bartow.. 16,566 Berrien... 4,518 Bibb..... 21,255 Brooks... 8,342 Bryan... 5,252 Bullock.. 5,610 Burke.... 17,679 Butts.... 6,941 Calhoun. 5,503 Camden.. 4,615 Campbell 9,176 Carroll... 11,782 Cass.............. Catoosa.. 4,409 Charlton. 1,897 Chatham. 41,279 Chattah'che 6,059 Chattooga 6,902 Cherokee. 10,399 Clarke... 12,941 Clay..... 5,493 Clayton.. 5,477 Clinch... 3,945 Cobb.... 13,814 Coffee... 3,192 colquitt.. 1,654 Columbia 13,529 Coweta.. 15,875 Crawford 7,557 Dade.... 3,033 Dawson.. 4,369 Decatur.. 15,183 De Kalb. 10,014 Dooley... 9,790 Dougherty 11,517 Early.... 6,998 Echols... 1,978 Effingham 4,214 Elbert... 9,249 Emanuel. 6,134 Fannin.. 5,429 Fayette.. 8,221 Floyd.... 17,230 Forsyth.. 7,983 Franklin. 7,893 Fulton... 33,446 Gilmer... 6,644 Glascock. 2,736 Glynn... 5,376 Gordon.. 9,268 Greene... 12,454 Gwinnett 12,431 Habersham 6,322 Hall..... 9,607 Hancock. 11,317 Haralson. 4,004 Harris... 13,284 Hart..... 6,783 Heard... 7,866 Henry... 10,102 Houston. 20,406 Irwin.... 1,837 Jackson.. 11,181 Jasper... 10,439 Jefferson. 12,190 Johnson 2,964 Jones.... 9,436 Laurens.. 7,834 Lee...... 9,567 Liberty.. 7,688 Lincoln.. 5,413 Lowndes. 8,391 Lumpkin. 5,161 Macon... 11,458 Madison. 5,227 Marion.. 8,000 Mclntosh 4,491 Meriwether 13,756 Miller.... 3,091 Milton... 1,284 Mitchell. 6,633 Monroe.. 17,213 Montgomery 3,586 Morgan.. 10,696 M~urray.." 6,500 Mnscogee 1 6, 663 Newton.. 14,615 Oglethorpe 11,782 Paulding. 7,639 Piekens.. 5,317 Pierce... 2,778 Pike..... 10,905 Polk..... 7,833 Pulaski.. 11,940 Putnam 10,461 Quitman. 4,150 Pabun... 3,256 Randolph 10.561 Richmond 2.5,724A Schley... 5,129 Scriven... 9,175 Spalding. 10,205 4,190 4,985 9,07ti 4,707 3,475 16,291 6,356 4,015 5,668 17,165 6,455 4,913 5,420 8,301 11,991 15,724 5,082 1,780 31,043 5,797 7,165 11,291 11,218 4,893 4,466 3,063 14,242 2,879 1,316 i1,860 34,703 7,693 3,069 38656 11,922 7,806 8,917 8,295 6,149 1,491 4,755 10,433 5,081 5,139 7,047 15,195 7,749 7,393 14,427 6,724 2,437 3,889 10,146 12,652 12,940 5,966 9,366 12,044 3,039 13,736 6,137 7,805 10,702 15,611 1,699 10,605 10,743 10,219 2,919 9,107 6,998' 7,196 8,367 5,466 5,249 4,626 8,449 5,933 7,890 5,546 15,830 1,791 4,602 4,308 15,953 2,997 9,997 7,083 16,5849 14,3'201 11,5491 7,0381 4,9511 1,9731 10,0781 6,295I 8,7441 10,125 8,499 3,271 9,571 21,2.84 4,633 8,274 8,699 Counties. 1870, 1860. Coanties. 1870, 1860, Stewart.. 14,204 13,422 Wabash.. 8,841 7,313 Sumter.. 16,559 9,428 Warren.. 2,3,174 18,336 Talbot... 11,913 13,616 Washington 17,599 13,731 Taliaferro 4,796 4,583 Wayne... 19,758 12.223 Tatnall.. 4,860 4,352 White... 16,846 122,403 Taylor... 7,143 5,998 Whitesides 27,503 18,737 Telfair.. 3,245 2,713 Will..... 43.013 29,321 Terrell... 9,053 6,232 Williamson 17,329 12,205 Thomas.. 14,523 10,766 Winnebago 29,301 24,491 Towns... 2,780 2,459 Woodford 18,956 13,282 Troup... 17,632 16,262 - - Twiggs... 8,545 8,320 TOTAL. 2,539,8911,711,951 Union... 5,267 4,413 Upson... 9,430 9,910 Walker.. 9,925 10,082 Walton.. 11,038 11,074 I M 1I lAMA Ware.... 21286 2,200 INDIANA. Warren.. 10,545 9,820 A. 1 9 WashIngton 15,842 12,698 Adams... 11,382 9,5 Wayne.. 2,177 2,268Aillen. 43,494 29,328 Webster-: 4,677 5,030 BarthTmiw 21,133 17,865 White.... 41606 3315Benton.. 5,615 2,809 Whitfield 10,117 10,047 Blackford 6,W2 4,122 Wilcox... 2,439 2,115-Boone *... 22,593 16,753 Wilkes... 11,796 11,420 Brown... 8,681 6,507 Wilkinson 9,383 911376M ar'oll... 16,152 18,489 Worth... 3,778 2,763 Cass..... 24,103 16,83 or..Clarke... i 2^ 4 77 20502 TOTAL 17184,109 1, 0~57,-286 CIay..... 19,084 12,161 1 1,, Clinton. ~ 7,830 14,505 -- Crawford 9,851 8,226 Daviess.. 16,747 13,323 Dearborn 24,116 24,406 IINOISF Decatur.. 19,053 17,294 IL 'NOIS. De Kalb. 17,167 13,880 m... 5 6 4 Delaware 19,030 15,753 Adams... 56,862 41,323 Dubois... 12,597 10,394 Alexander 10,564 4,707 Elkhart.. 26,026 20,986 Bond.... 13,152 9,815 Favette.. 10,476 10,225 Boone.. 12,942 11,678 Foy.,... 330 20,183 Brown... 12,205 9,938 Fountain 16,389 15,566 Bureau.. 32,415 26,426 Franklin. 20,223 19,549 Calhoun. 6,562 5,144 Fulton... 12'726 9,422' CarroU... 16,705 11,793 Gibson... 17$371 14,5.32 Cass.... 11,580 11,325 G^rant.... 18,487 15,797: Champaign 32,737 14,629Greene.. 1 " 9,514 16,041: Christian 20,863 10,492 Hamilton 20,882 17,310-0 Clark.... 18,719 14,987 Hancock. 15,123 12,802 Clay..... 15,875 9,336] Harron. 19.913 18,521 Clinton 16,285 10,941 Hendrick2,;. 20,'277 16,953 Coles.... 2525 14,203 Henry....... 986 20,119, Cook.... 349,966 144,954Howa..rd 15,847 V12, 524 Crawford 13,889 11,551 H4untington 190C36 14,867 Cumberl'nd 12,223 8,311 Jackson.. 18974 16,286 De Kalb. 23,265 19,086 asper.r "6,54 4,291 De Witt.. 141768 101820.ay..... 15,000 11,8399 Douglas.. 13,484 7,140 Jfrson. 29,741 25,036 Du Page.. 16,685 14,701 Jennings. 16,218 14,749 Edgar... 21,450 16,925 Johnson.. 18,366 14,854 Edwards. 7,5()5 54,44 ^Knox.... 21,562 16,056 Effin-ham 15,653 7,8161-o:ciusk- 23,531 17,418 Fayette 1),638 11,189 La Grange 141148 11,366 Ford..... 9,103 l.979 1 39 945: Franklin. 12,652 9,393 LaPorte 27062 22919 Fulton... 38,291 33,9388L awrnce 14:628. 13.692 Gallatin. 11,134 8,055 Madison.,- 22,770 16,518 Greene... ~ 20,277 16,093 Marion.. 71,939 39,855 Grundy.. 14,938 10,379 Marshall. 20,211 12,722 Hamilton 13,014 9,915 Martin,... 111103 S,975 Hancock. 35,935 29,061 Miami... 21,052 16,851 Hardin.. 5,113 3,59.Monroe.. 14,168 12,847 Henderson 12,582 9,501 Montgmry 23,765 20,888 Henry.... 85,506 20,660 Morgan.. 17,528 16,110 Iroquois. 25,782 12,25 Newton.. 5"829 2,860 Jackson.. 191634 9,589 Noble.... 20,389 14,915 Jasper... 11,234 8,364 Oio-..... 51837 5,462 Jefferson 17,864 12,965 Orange. 13,497 1,0-6 Jersey.... 15,054 12,051 Owen.... 16,137 14,376 Jo Daviess 27,820 27,325 rke".... 18,166 15,5' 8 Johnson.. 11,248 9,342 Perry..... 14,801 11, 847 Kane..... 8091 80,062Pike..... 1779 10,078 Kankakee 24,352 15,412 Porter/. 13942 10313 Kendall. 12,899 13,074:P " ".. Knox.... 39,522 28,663 Pulaski... 7801 5,711 Lake.... 21,014 18,257 Putnam. 21,514 20,681 La Salle. 60,792 48,8 2 'Randop 9 $2 r 8997 Lawrence 12,533 9,214 ^i,1, o,977 19,054 Lee...... 27, 171 17,651 [~J "" ' ag ^ ^ 19}3 Livingston 31',471 11',6371o.....;/, ^3^3 g3 Logan.. 23,053 14,2721.7... 21,892 19.569 Macon... 20,481 13,73 '/s pencer. 17,998 14,556 Maooupin 32',72 24,602 gtarke. " -3.888 2,19.5 Ma~o 4,13 3,, [Steuben.. 12,854 10,374 Marion.. 20,622....,.73[9 ^Josp 25,322 18,455 Marshall. 36,956 13,437,......45 15,064 Mason... 16,184 10,91 [Switzerland "12, 134 32,698 Massac.. 9,5.81 6,21.3Tippecanoe 33,515 25,726 McDonough 26,509 20,069 Tipt on 11 953 S 170 McHenrv 2.376'2 22,089/- ~~o " 34" 719,--, McLean. 53,988 28,77",^ '314 20:552 Mfenard.. 11,73o 9,584[Vermillion 10'840 9,422 M~ercer.. 18,769 15,042/ 33,549 22,517' Mfonroe... 12,982 12,832[Waash. 21 305 17 547 Motg'mr 25......14. I ^^Warren.. 10,204 10,057 Morgan.. 28,463 2,-Warrk k 17",653 13,261 Moultrie. 10,385 6,3851W ashin,,'n 18.495 17,909 Ogle.... 27,492 22,888 aye... 34048 29,558 Peoria 47M540 361601 Wel l. 183585 10,844 Perry.. 13,7"23 9,52 Wite... 10,554 8,258'.... - ^.... 7D593 62 Whitley.. 14,399 10,730, Pike..... 30,768 2,249i -.... I P o...:' 1., 43 6,42TOTAL. 1,680,637 1,350,428 P'ulaski..,.,752 87,943 Putnam.. 6,280 5,587------ Randolph 20,859 17,205 Richland. 12,803 9,711 ' Rock Isl'nd 29,7.83 21,05 - IOWA. Saline 12,714 9,331 Sangamon 46,352 32,274 Adair.... 3,982 984 Schuyler. 17,419 14,684 Adams... 4,614 1,533 Scott.... 10,530 9,069 Allamakee 17,868 12,237 Shelby... 25,476 14,613 Appanoose 16,456 11,931 Stark... 10,751 9,004 Audubon. 1,212 454 St. Clair. 51,068 37,694 Benton.. 22,454 8,496 Stephenson 30,608 25,112 Black Hawk 21,706 8,244 Tazewell. 27,903 21,470 Boone... 14,584 4,232 Union... 16,518 11,181 Bremer.. 12,528 4,915 Vermilion 80,388 19,800IBuchanan 1.7,034 7,906 Counties. 1870. 1860, Counties. 1870. 1860, Counties, 1870. 1860. Buena Vista 1,585 57 Johnson.. 13,684 4,364 Aienifee.. 1.986........ Butler... 9,951 3,724 Labettee.. 9,973........ Mercer... 13,144 13,701 Calhoun. 1,602 147 Leavenworth 32,444 12,606 Mletcalfe.. 7,934 6,745 Carroll... 2,451 281 Lincoln... 516........ Monroe.. 9,231 8,551 Cass..... 5,464 1,612 Linn...... 12,174 6,3'6 Montgomery 7.557 7,859 Cedar.... 19,731 12,949 Lykins............. 4,980 Morgan... 5,975 9,237 Cerro Gordo 4,722 940 Lyons.... 8,014.........uhlenb'rg 12,638 10,725 Cherokee. 1,967 58 Madison........... 63.6 Nelson... 14,804 15,799 Chickasaw 10,180 4,336 Marion.... 768 74 Nicholas.. 9.129 11,030 Clarke... 8,735 5,427 Marshall.. 6,901 2,280 Ohio..... 15,561 12,209 Clay..... 1,523 52 McGhee........... 1,501 Oldham. 9,027 7.283 Clayton. 27,771 20,728 McPherson 738........ Owen.... 14.309 12,719 Clinton.. 85,357 18,938 Miami.... 11,725........ Owslev... 3,889 5,3.25 Crawford. 2,530 383 Mitchell... 485........ Pendleton 14,030 10,443 Dallas 12,019 5,244 Montgomery 7,564........ Penry.... 4,274 3,950 Davis... 15,565 13,764 Morris.... 2,225 770 Pike..... 9.562 7,384 Decatur.. 12,018 8,677 Nemaha.. 7.339 2,436 Powell... 1599 2,257 Delaware 17,432 11,024 Neosho... 10,206........ Pulaski.. 17,670 17,201 Des Moines 27,256 19,611 Ness..... 2........ Robertson 5,399........ Dickinson 1,389 180 Osage.... 7,648 1,113 Rock Castle 7,145 5,343 Dubuque. 38,969 31,164 Osborne.. 83........ Rowan... 2,991 2,282 Emmett.. 1,392 105 Otoe............. 238 Russell... 5,809 6,024 Fayette.. 16,97,' 12,073 Ottawa... 2,127........ Scott.... 11,607 14,417 Floyd.... 10,768 3,744 Pawnee... 179........ Shelby... 15,733 16,433 Franklin. 4,738 1,309 Pottaw'amie 7,848 1,529 Simpson.. 9,573 8,146 Fremont. 11,174 ~ 5,074 Republic. 1,281......... Spencer.. 5,956 6,188 QGreene... 4,627 1,874 Rice...... 5........ Taylor... 8,226 7.481 Grundy.. 6,399 793 Riley.... 5,105 1,224 Todd... 12,612 11,575 Guthrie.. 7,061 3,058 Russell... 156....... Trigga.... 13,686 11,051 Hamilton 6,055 1,699 Saline.... 4,246........ Trimble.. 5.577 5,880 Hancock. 999 179 Sedgwick. 1,095....... Union-:... 33,640 12,791 Hardin.. 13,684 5,440 Shawnee.. 13,121 3,513 Warren.. 21,742 17,320 Harrison. 8,931 3,621 Smith.... 66........ Washington 12,464 13,575 Henry.... 21,463 18,701 Sumner... 22........ Wayne... 10,602 10,259 Howard.. 6,282 3,168 Trego.... 166........ Webster.. 10,937 7,533 Humboldt 2,596 332 Wabaunsee 8,862 1,023 Whitley.. 8,278 7,762 Ida...... 226 43 Wallace.. 538........ Wolfe.... 3,603........ Iowa..... 16,644 8,029 Washington 4,081 38&3 Woodford 8,240 11,219 Jackson.. 22,619 18,493 Wilson... 6,694 27 - - - Jasper... 22,116 9,883 Woodson. 3,827 1,488 TOTA&L. 1,%21,011 1,155,684 Jefferson. 17,839 15,038 Wyandotte 10,015 2,609/ Johnson.. 24.898 17,5731 - --- Jones.... 19,731 13,806 TOTAL. 364,399 107,206 Keokuk.. 19,434 13,271 Kossuth.. 3,351 416 ---m-, Lee...... 87,210 29.232 LOUISIANA, Linn..... 28,852 18,947 Louisa... 12,877 10,870 Ascension 11,577 11,484 Lucas.... 10,388 5,766 KENTUCKY. Assumption 13,234 15,379 Lyon.... 221........ lAvoyelles. 12,926 33,167 Madison. 13,884 7,339 Adair 11,065 9,509 Bienville. 10.6:.6 11,000 Mahaska. 22,508 14,816 Allen ".... 10,2w 9,187 Bossier... 12,675 11,348 Marion... 24,436 16,813 Anderson" 5449 7 404 Caddo.... 21,714 12,140 Marshall. 17,576 6,015 Ballard - 157(i o Calcasieu. 6,733 5,928 Mls..... 8,718 4,41 Barren"". 1780 16.665 Caldwell.. 4820 4,833 Mitchell. 9,582 3,409 Bath."'" 101145 12'113 Cameron.. 1,591....... Monona.. 3,654 832 Boone'... 10,696 11,196 Carroll... 10,110 18,052 Monroe.. 12,724 8,612i Bourbon" 14863 4,60 lCatahoula 8,475 11,651 Montgomery. 5,934 1,26 Bovd "". 8'573 - 6044 Claiborne 20,240- 1648 Muscatine 21,688 16,444 Boyle.... 9'515 9,804 Concordia 9,977 13,805 O'Brien.. 715 8 Bracken. 11,409 111021 De Soto.. 14,962 13,298 Page..... 9,975 4,419 Breathitt 5,672 4,980 E. B. Rouge 17,816 16,046 Palo Alto 1,336 m 132 Breck'ridge 13,440 13,236,E. Feliciana 13,499 14,697 Plymouth 2,199 148Bullit..t 7781 7:$89 Franklin 5,078 6,162 Pocahontas 1,446 103 Butler ". 9404 7,)927 Grant.... 4,517........ Polk..... 27,S57 11,625 Caldwell. 10'826 9 9318 Iberia.... 9.042........ Potta'amie 16,893 4,968 al'awa: 9410 9915 Ibcrville.. 12,347 14,661 Poweshick 15,581 5,668 CampbeUl" 271406 20'.909 Jackson. 7,646 9,465 Ringgold. 5,691 2,923 Carroll 67189 6'5578 Jefferson. 17,767 15,372 Sac...... 1,41P1 -"16 Carter.'" 7509 8'516 Lafayette. 10,388 9,003 Scott..... 88,599 25,959 Cas(y 884 6'466 Lafourche 14,719 14,044 Shelby... 2,540 818 Christian 23227 21'627 Livingston 4,026 4,431 Sioux.... 570 10 Clark 10.88 11484 Madison.. 8,600 14,138 Story.... 11,651 4,051 Clay..... 829(n7 6652 'Aore house 9,887 10,,357 Tama.... 16,131 5,285oClinton.." 6,497 5:781 Natch'ches 18,265 16,699 Taylor.. 6,989 3,590 Crittend 9381 8 7 Orlans.. 191,418 174,491 Union... 5,986 2,012 Cumberland 7'690 7"'40 Ouachita. 11,582 4,727 Van Buren 17,672 17,081 Daviess. 9 20,714 151549 Plaq-mines 10,552 8,494 Wapello.. 22,346 14,518 Edmondson 4,:459 4,645 Pt. Coupee 12,981 17,718 Warren... 17,980 10,281 rliott 4433 Rapides.. 18,035 25,360 Wash'gton 18,952 14,2351Estill..... 9,19 "S 6,886 Richland. 5,110....... Wayne... 11,%87 6,40.9Fayette.. 26,6556 2-'2599 Sabine.... 6.456 5,828 Webster.. 10,484 2,504.F5rnI" 13398 32489 St. Bernard 3,553 4076 Winnebago 1,562 16S Floyd.'" 7877 6'3b8 St. Charles 4,867 5,297 Winneshiek 23,570 13,942r 15'300 12694 S'. Helena 5,423 7,130 Woodbury 6,17`2 1.119 F~uton " 6' 16 5'317 St. James 3 0,152 11,4}99 Worth... 2,892 7561Gallatm'" 5'074 5'056 St. J'n Bap. 6,.762 7,930 Wright" m 2,892 653 Garard'" 10;37G 10'53l St. Lndry 25.55)3 23,104 ---- --- Grant "" 9 529 8'356 St- Marthn 9 870 12,674 TOTAL. 1,191,792 674,913 Graves"" 193898 16'238 St. Mary.. 13,860 16,816 1 Franksln.'" l,.'5O0 71982 S. Tammany 5,586 5,406 Green!.... 9,879 8,806 Tang1pahoa. 7,928.... Greenup.. 11,463 8,760 Ten sas.... 12,419 3 0,078 Hancock 6'591 6 213 Terrebonne 12,45l 12,091 KANSAS, Hardm " ] 5,705 15'189 Union.... 11,685 10,389 m Harlan... 4,415 5,494 Vermilion 4,528 4,394 Allen... 7,022 8,082 Harrison. 12,993 13.779) Washington 8,330 4,708 Anderson 5,220 2,400 Hat... 13,687 10,348 W" B. Rouge 5,11 7,332 Atchison. 15,507 7,729 Hendcrson 18,457 1,26 ~. Fec a 1,499' 11,_7 Barton.. 2....... Hen.y... 11,066 11,949: Wren.... 4,9o4 6,876 Bourbon. 15,07f' 6,101 Hickman. 8,453 7,008 - non Brcck'rge...... 8,197 Hopkins.. 13,827 11,875] TOTAL. 726,915 708,002 Brown... 6,823 2,607 Jackson.. 4,547 3,0871 ________ Butler... 3,035 437 Jefferson. "118,958 89,404 "Chase.... 1,975 808 Jessamine 8,638 9,465 + Cherokee. 11,038........ John Bell 3,731....... Olay..... 2,942 163 Johnson. 7,494 5,306 Cloud.... 2,323........ Kenton.. 36,096 25,4467 MAINE, Coffey..'* 6,201 2,842 Knox.... 8,294 7,707 Cowley... 1,175....... La Rue... 8,235 6,891 Androscog'n 85,866 t.9,726 Crawford. 8,160.. Laurel.. 6,016 5,488 Aroostook 29,609 22,479 Davis 55 5526 1,163 Lawrence 8,497 7,601 Cumberland 82.021 75,591 Dickison 31043.878 Lee...... 83055....... Franklin., 18,807 20,408 Doniphan 13,969 8 083 Letcher.. 4,608 3,904 Hancock.. 36,495 87,757 Dorn............. 88 Levwis... 9,115 8,361 Kennebec 53,203 55,655 Douglass. 20,592 8,637 Lincoln.. 10,947 10,647 Knox.... 80,823 32,716 Ellis..... 1,336....:.. Livingston 8,200 7,213 Lincoln.. 2-5,597 27,860 Elsworth 19185........ Logan.... 20,429 19,021 Oxford.. S3.488 86,698 Ford 427........ Lyon.... 6,233 5,307 Penobscot 75,150 72,731 Franklin 10,385 3,030 Madison. 19,543 17,207 Piscataquis 14,403 15,032 Godfrey... 19 Magoffin. 4,684 8,485 Sagadahoc 18,803 21,790 Greenwood""3,484 759 Marion.. 12,838 2,593 Somerset. 34,611 86,753 Howard.. S1794........ Maishall. 9,455 6,982 Waldo... 84,522 38,447 Hunter........ * 158 Mason... 38,126 18,222 Washington 43,843 42,534 Jackson.. 6,053 1,936 Mcracken 13,988 10,360 York.... 60,174 62,107 Jefferson. 121526 4,459 McLean.. 7,614 6,144 - - -- Jewell.. 207....... Meade... 9,485 8,898 TOTAL. 626,915 628,279 I FLORIDA. Alachua.. 17,828 8,232 Baker.... 1,325........ Bradford. 8,671........ Brevard. 1,216 246 Calhoun. 998 1,446 Clay..... 2,098 1,914 Columbia 7,835 4,646 Dade.... 85 83 Duval... 11,921 5,074 Escambia 7,817 5,768 Franklin. 1,256 1,904 Gadsden. 9,802 9,896 Hamilton 5,749 4,154 Hernando 2,938 1,200 Hillsboro. 8,216 2,981 Holmes.. 1,572 1,886 Jackson.. 9,528 10,209 Jefferson. 13,398 9,876 La Fayette 1,783 2.068 Leon.... 15,236 12,343 Levy.... 2,018 1,781 Liberty.. 1,050 1,457 Madison. 11,121 7,779 Manatee.. 1,931 854 Marion.. 10,804 8,609 Monroe... 5,657 2,913 Nassau.. r 4,247 8,644 ( 1 i......e_ ..,----....... ' "h--- --.,

Page  5 lu ___~ _=__ ~ ~ I -- ----~---- ~ ~b~g~e~EPrCIPrP3 I1P~aaarra~rrrr ~ ~ ~ 85~ ~ L c~ ~LI I mwýlr OFFICIAL CENSUS OF THE UNITED STATES. 5 Counties. 1870. 1860. Counties. 1870. 1860, Counties. 1870. 1860, Counties. 1870. 1860. Counties. 1870. 1860. I ~ Counties, 1870, 1860, Counties, 1870, 1860. Counties, 1870, 1860, I I -1 I I MARYLAND. AUllegany. 38,56 28, 348 A. Arundel 24,457 23,900 Baltimore 830,741 266,553 Calvert.. 9,865 10,447 Caroline.. 12,101 11,12~ Carroll.. 28,619 24,533 Cecil..... 25,874 23,862 Charles:. 15,738 16,517 Dorche.ter 19,458 20,461 Frederick 47,572 46,591 Harford.. 22,605 23,415 Howard.. 14,150 13,338 Kent..... 17,102 13,267 Montgom'ry 20,563 18,322 P. George's 21,138 23,327 Queen Anne 16,171 15,961 St. Mary's 14,944 15,213 Somerset. 18,190 24,992 Talbot.. 16,137 14,795 Washington 34,712 31,417 Wicomico 15,802........ Worcester 16,419 20,661 TOTAL. 780,894 687,049 MASSACHUSETTS, Barnstable 32,774 35,990 Berkshire 64,827 55,120 Bristol... 102,886 93,794 Dukes.;.. 3.,787 4,403 Essex.... 200,843 165,611 Franklin.. 32, 635 31,434 Hampden 78,4)9 57,366i Hampshire 44,388 37,823 Middlesex 274,353 216,354 Nantucket 4,123 6,094 Norfolk.. 89,443 109,950 Plymouth 65,365 64,768 Suffolk... 270,802 192,700 Worcester 192,716 159,659 TOTAL. 1,457,3511,231,066 MICHIGAN, Alcona... 696 185 Allegan.. 32,105 16,087 Alpena... 2,756 290 Antrim... 1,985 179 Barry.... 22,199 13,858 Bay...... 15,900 3,164 Benzie.. 2,184........ Berrien.. 85,104 22,37S Branch... 26, 226 20,981 Calhoun.. 36,569 29,564 Cass..... 21,094 17,721 Charlevoix 1,724........ Cheboygan 2,196 517 Chippewa 1,689 1,603 Clare.... 366........ Clinton.. 22,845 13,916 Delta.... 2,542 1,172 Eaton.... 25,171 16,476 Emmet.. 1,211 l,14.9 Genesee.. 33,900 22,498 Gladwin.......... 14 G. Traverse 4,443 1,286 Gratiot... 11,810 4,042 Hillsdale. 31,684 25,675 Houghton 13,879 9,234 Huron... 9,049 3,165 Ingham.. 25,268 17,435 Ionia.... 27,681 16,682 Iosco..... 3,163 175 Isabella.. 4,113 1,443 Jackson.. 36,047 26,671 Kalamazoo 32,054 24,646 Kalkaska. 424........ Kent..... 50,403 30,71( Keweenaw 4,W05........ Lake..... 548........ Lapeer... 21,345 14,754 Leelanaw 4,576 2,15~ Lenawee. 45,595 38, 11 Livingston 19,336 16,851 Mackinac 1,716....... ]Macomb. 27,616 22,84S Manistee. 6,074 97E Manitou.. 891 1,04S Marquette 15,033 2, 821 Mason... 3,263 831 Mecosta.. 5,642 971 Menominee 1,791........ Michilima'c...... 1,3 Midland.. 3,285 78 Missaulkee 130........ Monroe.. 27,483 21,59 Montcalm 13, 629 3, 96E Muskegon 14,894 3, 941 Newaygo. 7,294 2,76( Oakland.. 40,867 38,261 Oceana... 7,222 1,81~ Ogemaw. 12........ Ontonagon 2,845 4,56 Osceola.. 2,093 21 Oscoda... 70........ Ottawa.. 26,651 13, 21E Presque Isle 355 26 Saginaw 39,097 12,693 Sanilac. 14,562 7, 59 Schoolcraft......... 78 Shiawassee 20,858 12,34t St. Clair.. 36,661 26,604 St. Joseph 26,275 21,262 Tuscola.. 13,714 4,886 Van ýBuren 28.829 15,224 Washtenaw 41,434,35,686 Wayne.... 119,038 75,547 Wexford. 650........ TOTAL. 1,184,059 749,118 MINNESOTA, Aitkin... 178 2 Anoka... 3,940 2,106 Becker... 308 38( Beltrami. 80........ Benton... 1,558 -"627 Big Stone 24........ Blue Earth 17,302 4,803 Breck'nridge...... 7E Brown.... 6,396 2,339 Buchanan......... 26 Carlton.. 286 51 Carver... 11,586 5,106 Cass..... 880 15( Cbippewa 1,467........ Chisago.. 4 "358 1,143 Clay..... 92........ Cottonwood 534 12 Crow Wing 200 269 Dakota... 16,312 9,093 Dodge... 8,598 3,797 Douglas.. 4,239 195 Faribault. 9,940 1,335 Fillmore. 24,887 13,542 Freeborn. 10,578 3,361 Goodhue. 22,618 8, 971 Grant.... 340........ Hennepin 31,566 12,849 Houston. 14,936 6,645 Isanti.... 2,035 284 Itasca.... 96 51 Jackson.. 1,825 181 Kanabec. 93 8( Kandiyohi 1,760 76 Lac qui P'le 145........ Lake..... 135 248 Le Sueur. 11,607 5,318 Manormin.......... 13f Martin... 3,867 15] McLeod. 5,643 1,286 Meeker... 6,090 92 Mille Lac 1,109 73 Monongalia 3.161 35C Morrison. 1,681 618 Mower.... 10,447 3,217 Hurray.. 209 29 Nicollet... 8,362 3,773 Nobles... 117 35 Olmsted.. 19,793 9,524 Otter Tail 1,968 24C Pembina.. 64 1,612 Pierce......... 11 Pine...... 648 9) Pipestone......... 23 Polk.............. 24C Pope...........,691 Ramsey.. 23,085 12,15C Redwood. 1,829........ RenviUe.. 3,219 245 Rice...... 16,083 7,543 Rock..... 138........ Scott.... 11,042 4,595 Sherburne 2,050 723 Sibley.... 6,725 3,609 Steams.. 14,206 4,505 Steele..,. 8,271 2,863 Stevens.. 174........ St. Louis. 4,561 406 Todd.... 2,036 430 Traverse.. 13........ Wabashaw 15.859 7,228 Wadena.. 6........ Waseco.. 7854 2,601 Washington 11,809 6,12S Watonwan 2,426........ Wilkin... 295 4C Winona... 22,319 9,203 Wright... 9,457 3,7'29 TOTAL. 439,706 172,023 Wayne... 4,206 3,091 Wilkinson 12,705 15,933 Winston.. 8,984 9.811 Yalabusha 13,254 16,952 Yazoo.... 17,279 22,373 TOTAL. 827,922 791,305 MISSOURI. Adair.... 11,448 8,531 Andrew. 15,137 11.850 Atchison. 8,440 4,649 Audrain.. 12,307 8.075 Barry.... 10,373 7,995 Barton... 5,087 1,817 Bates.... 15.960 7,215 Benton... 11,322 9,072 Bollinger. 8,162 7,371 Boone.... 20,705 19,486 Buchanan 35,109 2-3,861 Butler... 4,298 2,891 Caldwell. 11,390 5,034 Callaway. 19,202 17,449 Camden.. 6,108 4,975 C. Gir'deau 17,558 15,547 Carroll... 17,446 9,763 Calter... 1,455 1,235 Cass..... 19,296 9,794 Cedar.... 9,474 6,637 Charitan.. 19,136 12,562 Christian. 6,707 5,491 Clarke... 13,0667 11,684 Clay..... 15,564 13,023 Clinton.. 14,063 7,848 Cole.... 10,292 9, 697 Cooper... 20,692 17,356 Crawford. 7, 982 5,823 Dade..... 8,683 7,072 Dallas.... 8,383 5,892 Daviess... 14,410 9,600 De Kalb.. 9.858 5,224 Dent..... 6,357 5,654 Douglass. 3, 15 2,414 Dunklin.. 5,982 5,026 Franklin. 30,098 18,085 Gasconade 10,093 8,727 Gentry... 11,607 11,980 Greene... 21,549 13,186 Grundy... 10,567, 887 Harrison. 14,635 10, 626 HIenry... 17,401 9,866 Hickory.. 6,452 4, 705 Holt..... 11,652 6,550 Howard.. 17,233 15,946 Howell... 4,218 3,169 Iron..... 6,278 5,842 Jackson.. 55,041 22,913 Jasper.... 14,928 6,883 Jefferson. 15,380 10,344 Johnson.. 24,648 14,644 Knox.... 10,974 8,727 'Laclede.. 9,380 5,182 Lafayette 22,623 20,098 Lawrence 13,067 8,846 Lewis.... 15,114 12,286 Lincoln., 15,960 14,210 Linn..... 15,900 9,112 Livingston 16,730 7,417 Macon.... 23,230 14,346 Madison.. 5,849 5,664 Maries... 5,916 4,901 Marion... 23,780 18,838 McDonald 5,226 4,038 Mercer... 11,557 9,300 Miler.... 6,616 6,812 Mississippi 4,982 4,859 Moniteau. 11,375 10,124 Monroe.. 17,149 14,785 Montgomery 10,405 9,718 Morgan.. 8,434 8,202 New Madrid 6,357 5,654 Newton.. 12,'821 9,319 INodaway. 14,751 5,252 Oregon... 3,287 3,009 Osage.... 10,793 7,879 Ozark.... 3,363 2,447 Pemiscot. 2,059 2,962 Perry.... 9,877 9,128 Pettis.... 18,706 9,392 Phelps... 10,506 5,714 Pike..... 23,076 18,417 Platte.... 17,352 18,850 Polk..... 12,445 9,995 Pulaski.. 4,714 3,835 Putnam.. 11,217 9,207 Rails..... 10,510 8,592 Randolph 15,908 11,407,!Ray...... 18,700 14,092 SReynolds. 3,756 3,17i3 Ripley.... 3,175 3,747 Saline.... 21,672 14,699 Schuyler. 8,820 6, 697 Scotland. 10,670 8,873 Scott.... 7,317 5, 247 Shannon. 2,339 2,284 Shelby... 10,119 7.301 St. Charles 21,304 16,523 St. Clair. 6,742 6.812 S. Genevieve 8.384 8,029 St. Franqois 9,742 7,249 St. Louis. 351,189 190,524 Stoddard. 8,535 7,877:Stone.... 3,253 2,400; Sullivan.. 11,907 9,198 Taney... 4,407 3,576 Texas.... 9,618 6,067 Vernon.. 11,247 4,850 Warren.. 9,673 8,839 Washiniton 11,719 9,723 Wayne... 6,068 5,629 Webster.. 10,434 7,099 Worth... 5,004..... Wright... 5,684 4,508 TOTAL. 1,721,295 1,182,012 Calhoun........... 41 Cass...... 8,151 3,369 Cedar.... 1,032 246 Cheyenne. 190........ Clay...... 54 165 Colfax... 1,424........ Cuming.. 2,964 67 Dakota... 2,040 819 Dawson.. 103 16 Dixon... 1,345 247 Dodge... 4,212 309 Douglas.. 19,982 4,328 Fillmore.. 238........ Fort Randall...... 353 Franklin. 26........ Gage..... 3,359 421 Grant.... 484........ Green............. 16 Hall...... 1,057 116 Hamilton. 130........ Harrison. 631........ Jackson.. 9........ Jefferson. 2,440........ Johnson.. 3,4.29 52S Jones............. 122 Kearney. 58 474 Lancaster 7,074 153 L'Eau qui G. 261 152 Lincoln.. 17........ Lyon..... 78........ Madison.. 1,133........ Merrick.. 557 109 Monroe.. 2:35........ Nemaha. 7,593 3,139 Nuckolls.. 8 U Otoe..... 12,345 4,211 Pawnee... 4,171 882 Pierce.... 152........ Platte.... 1,899 782 Polk..... 136 19 Richardson 9,780 2,835 Saline.... 3,106 39 Sarpy.... 2,913 1,201 Saunders. 4,547........ Seward.. 2,953 Shorter........... 117 Stanton.. 636........ Taylor.... 97........ Washington 4,452 1,249 NWayne... 182........ Webster.. 16........ York..... 604........ Unorganized N. W. Territory..... 52 1,765 Unorganized Ter. W. of Madison.. 183....... Winnebago Ind. reservation. 31........ Pawnee Ind. reservation 44........ TOTAL. 122,993 28,841 NEVADA, Carson............ 6,712 Churchill. 196........ Douglas.. 1,215........ Elko..... 3,447....... Esmeralda 1,553..... Humboldt.. 1,916 40 Lander... 2,815... Lincoln... 2,985........ Lyon.... 1,837........ Nye...... 1,087....... Ormsby... 3,668........ Roop..... 133........ St. Mary's......... 105 Storey... 11.359........ Washoe.. 3,091........ White Pine 7,189. TOTAL. 42,491 6,857 NEW YORK, Albany... 133,052 113,911 Alleghany 40,814 41.,881 Broome.. 44,103 35, 906 Cattaraugus..43,909 43, 88f Cayuga... 59,550 55,767 Chautauqua 59,327 58,422 Chemung 35,281 26,917 Chenango 40,564 40,934 Clinton... 47,947 45,735 Columbia. 47,044 47,172 Cortland. 25,173 26,294 Delaware. 42,972 42,465 Dutchess.. 74,041 64,941 Erie...... 178,699 141,971 Essex.... 29,042 28,214 Franklin. 30,271 30,837 Fulton... 27,064 24,162 Genesee.. 31,606 32,189 Greene... 31,832 31,930 Hamilton. 2,960 3,024 Herkimer. 39,929 40,561 Jefferson.. 65,415 69,825 Kings.... 419,921 279,122 Lewis.... 28,699 28,58C Livingston 38,309 89,546 Madison.. 43,522 43,545 Monroe... 117,868 100,648 Montgomery 34,457 30,866 New York 942,292 813,669 Niagara.. 60,437 50,399 Oneida.... 110,008 105,202 Onondaga 104,183 90,686 Ontario... 45,108 44,563 Orange... 80,902 63.812 Orleans... 27,689 28:717 Oswego... 77,941 75,958 Otsego... 48,967 50,157 Putnam... 15,420 14,002 Queens... 73.803 57,391 Rensselaer 99,549 86,328 Richmond 33,029 25,492 Rockland. 25,213 22,492 Saratoga.. 51,529 51,729 Schenectady 21,347 20,002 Schoharie 83,340 34,469 Schuyler.. 18,989 18,840 Seneca.... 27,823 28,138 Steuben... 67,717 66, 690 St. Lawrence 84,826 83,689 Suffolk... 46,924 43,275 Sullivan.. 34,550 32,385 Tioga.... 30,572 28,748 Tompkins 33,178 31,409 Ulster.... 84,075 76,381 Warren... 22,592 21,434 Washington 49,668 45,904 Wayne.... 47,710 47,762 Westchester 131,348 99,497 Wyoming. 29,164 31,968 Yates.... 19,595 20,290 TOTAL. 4,882,759 3,880,735 NORTH CAROLINA, Alamance 11,874 11,852 Alexander 6, 868 6,022 Alleghany 3,691 3,590 Anson.... 12,428 13,664 Ashe..... 9,573 7,956 Beaufort.. 13,011 14,766 Bertie.... 12,950 14,310 Bladen... 12,831 11,995 Brunswick 7, 754 8,406 Buncombe 15,412 12,654 Burke.... 9,777 9, 27 Cabarrus. 11,954 10,546 Caldwell. 8,476 7,497 Camden.. 5,361 5,343 Carteret.. 9,010 8,186 Caswell.;. 16,081 16,215 Catawba. 10,984 10,729 Chatham. 19,723 19,101 Cherokee. 8,080 9,166 Chowan.. 6,450 6,842 Clay..... 2,461........ Cleaveland 12,696 12,348 Columbus 8,474 8,597 Craven... 20,516 16,268 C0mberland 17,035 16,369 0urrituck 6,131 7, 415 Dare..... 2,778........ Davidson. 17,414 16,601 Davie.... 9,620 8,494 Duplin... 15,542 15,784 Edgecombe 22,970 17,376 Forsyth.. 13,050 12,692 Franklin.. 14,134 14,107 Gaston... 12,602 9,307 Gates.... 7,724 8,443 Granville. 24,831 23,396 Greene... 8, 687 7, 925 Guilford. 21,736 20,056 Halifax... 20,408 19,442 Harnetf.. 8,895 8,039 Haywood. 7.921 5,801 Henderson 7,706 10,448 Hertford. 9,273 9,504 Hyde.... 6,445 7,732 Iredell.... 16,931 15,347 Jackson.. 6,683 5,515 Johnson. 16,897 15,656 Jones.... 5,002 5,730 Lenoir... 10,434 10,220 Lincoln.. 9,573 8,195 Macon.... 6,615 6,004 Madison.. 8,192 5,908 Martin... 9,647 10,195 McDowell 7,592 7,120 Mecklrnburg 24,299 17,374 Mitchell.. 4,705........ Montgomery 7,487 7,649 Moore.... 12;040 11,427 Nash..... 11,077 11,687 N. Hanover 27,978 21,715 Northamt'n 14,749 13,372 Onslow... 7,569 8,856 Orange... 17,507 16,947 Pasquotank 8,131 8,940 Perquimans 7,945 7,2:38 Person... 11,170 11,221 Pitt...... 17,276 16,080 Polk..... 4,319 4,043 Randolph 17,551 16,793 Richmond 12,882 11,009 Robeson.. 16, 262 15,489 Rockingham 15,708 16,746 Rowan... 16,810 14,589 Rutherford 13,121 11,573 Sampson. 16,436 16,624 Stanley.. 8,315 7,801 Stokes... 11,208 10,402 Surry.... 11,252 10,380 Transylv'nia 3,536........ Tyrrell... 4,173 4,944 Union.... 12,217 11,202 Wake..... 35,617 28,627 Warren.. 17,768 15,726 Washington 6,516 6,357 Watauga. 5,287 4,957 Wayne... 18,144 14,905 Wilkes... 15,53) 14,749 Wilson... 12,258 9,720 Yadkin.. 10,697 10,714 Yancy... 5,909 8,655 TOTAL. 1,071,361 992,622 OHIO. Adams... 20,750 20,309 Allen..... 23,23 19,185 Ashland. 21,933 22,951 Ashtab'la 32,517 31,814 Athens... 23,768 21,364 Auglaize. 20.041 17,187 Belmont. 39,714 36,398 Brown... 30,802 29,958 Butler... 39,912 35,840 Carroll... 14,491 15,738 0hampa'n 24,188 22, 698 Clark.... 32,070 25,300 Clermont 34,268 33,034 Clinton.. 21,914 21,461 Columb'na 38,299 32,836 Coshocton 29,600 25,032 Crawford 25,556 23,881 Cuyahoga 132,010 78,033 Darke... 32,278 26,009 Defiance. 15,719 11,886 Delaware 25,175 23, 902 Erie..... 28,188 24,474 Fairfield. 31,138 30,538 Fayette.. 17,170 15,935 Franklin. 63,019 60,361 Fulton... 17,789 14,043 Gallia.... 25,545 22,043 Geauga.. 14,190 15,817 Greene... 28,038 26,197 Guernsey 23,838 24, 474 Hamilton. 260,370 216,410 Hancock-. 23,847 22,886 Hardin... 18,714 13,570j Harrison. 18,682 19,110 Henry... 14,028 8,901 Highland 29,133 27,773 Hocking. 17,925 17,0571 Holmnes.. 18,177 20, 589 Huron... 28,5632 29,616 Jackson.. 21,759 17,941 Jefferson. 29,188 26,115 Knox.... 26,333 27,735C Lake..... 15,935 15,576 Lawrence 31,3S0 23, 249 Licking.. 35,756 37,011 Logan... 23,028 20, 996 Lorain... 80,308 29,744 Lucas.... 46,722 25,831 Madison. 15,633 13,015 Mahoning 31,001 25,894 Marion.. 16,184 15,490 Medina.. 2U,092 22,517 Meigs.... 31,465 26,534 Mercer... 17,254 14,104 Miami... 32,740 29,959 Monroe.. 25,779 25,741 Montg'ery 64,006 52,220 Morgan.. 20,363 22,119 Morrow.. 18,583 20,445 Muski'gum 44,886 44,416 Noble.... 19,949 20,751 Ottawa.. 13,364 7,016 Paulding. 8,544 4,945 I Perry.... 18,453 19,678 Pickaway 24,875 23,469 Pike..... 15,447 13,643 Portage.. 24,584 24,208 Preble... 21,809 21,820 Putnam.. 17, 081 12, 808 Richland. 32,516 31,158 Ross..... 37,097 35,071 Sandusky 25,503 21,429 Scioto.... 29,302 24,297 Seneca... 30,S27 30.868 Shelby... 20,748 17,493; Stark.... 52,508 42,978: Summit.. 34,674 27,344 Trumbull 38,659 30,656 Tuscarawas 33,840 32,463 Union... 18,730 16,507 Van Wert 1r5,83 10,238 Vinton... 15,027 13,631 Warren.. 26.689 26,9002 Washington 40,609 36,268 Wayne... 85,116 32,483 Williams. 20,991 16,633 Wood.... 24,596 17,886 -Wyandot. 18,553 15,596 1 TOTAL. 2,665,260 2,339,5113 Umatilla. 2,916........ Umpqua.......... 1,250 Union.... 2,552........ Wasco... 2,509 1,689 Washington 4,261 2,801 Yam Hill. 5, 012 3,245 TOTAL. 90,9 23 62,465 PENNSYLVANIA, Adams... 30,315 28,006 Allegheny 262.204 178,831 Armstrong 43,382 35,797 Beaver... 36,148 29,140 Bedford.. 29,635 26,736 Berks.... 100,701 93,818 Blair..... 38,051 27,829 Bradford. 53, 204 48,734 Bucks.... 64,336 63,578 Butler.... 36,510 35,594 Cambria.. 36,569 29,155 Cameron. 4,273........ Carbon.. 28,144 21,0 Centre... 34,438 27,000 Chester... 77,805 74,578 Clarion... 26,537 24,988 Clearfield 25,741 18,759 Clinton.. 23,211 17,723 Columbia. 28,766 25,065 Crawford. 63,832 48,755 Cumberland 43,(,)12 40,098 Dauphin.. 60,740 46,756 Delaware. 39,403 30,597 Elk...... 8,488 5,915 Erie...... 65,973 49,432 Fayette... 43,284 39,909 Forest... 4,010 898 Franklin. 45,365 42,126 Fulton... 9,360 9,131 Greene... 25,887 24,343 Huntingdon 31,251 28,100 Indiana.. 36,138 33,687 Jefferson. 21,656 18,270 Juniata... 17.390 16,986 Lancaster 121,340 116,314 Lawrence 27,298 22,999 Lebanon.. 34,096 31, 831 Lehigh.., 56,796 43,753 Luzerne.. 160,755 90,244 Lycoming 47,626 37,399 McKean.. 8,825 8,859 Mercer.. 49, 977 36,856 Mifflin... 17,508 16,340 Monroe... 18,362 16,758 Montgomery 81,612 70,500 Montour.. 15,344 13,053 North'mpton 61,432 47,904 Northumb'd 41,444 28,922 Perry.... 25,447 22,793 Philad'a.. 674,022 565,529 Pike...... 8,436 7,155 Potter... 11,265 11,470 Schuylkill 116,428 89,510 Snyder... 15,606 15,035 Somerset. 28,226 26,778 Sullivan.. 6,191 6,637 Susqueh'nna 37,523 36,267 Tioga.... 35,097 31,044 Union... 15.565 14,145 Venango.. 47,925 25,043 Warren.. 23,897 19,190 Washington 48,483 46,S05 Wayne... 33,188 32,239 Westmorel'd 58,719 53,736 Wyoming. 14,585 12,540 York..... 76,134 68,200 TOTAL. 3,521,791 2,906,215 Benton... 8,234 8,46i3 Bledsoe.. 4,,r40 4,469 Blount... 14,2:37 13,270 Bradley.. 11,ti52 11.701 Campbell. 7,445 6,712 Cannon.. 10,502 9,5U9 Carroll... 19, 447 17,437 Carter... 7,909 7,124 Cheatham 6.678 7,258 Claiborne 9,321 9,643 Cocke.... 12,458 10,408 Coffee.... 10,:237 9, 689 Cumberland 3,461 3,460 Davidson. 62,897 47,055 Decatur.. 7,772 6,276 De Kalb.. 11,425 10,573 Dickson.. 9,340 9,982 Dyer..... 13,706 10,536 Fayette.. 26,145 24,327 Fentress.. 4,717 5,054 Franldin 14,970 13, 848 Gibson... 25,666 21,777 Giles..... 32,413 26,166 Grainger. 12,421 10,962 Greene... 21,668 19,004 Grundy.. 3, 250 3,093 Hamilton. 17,241 -13,258 Hancock. 7,148 7,020 Hardeman 18,074 17,769 Hardin... 11,768 11,214 I-Iawkins. 15,837 16,162 Haywood. 25,094 19,282 Henderson '14,217 14,491 Henry.... 20,380 19,133 Hickman. 9,856 9,312 Humphreyu 9,326 9,096 Jackson.. 12,583 11,725 Jefferson. 19,476 16,043 Johnson.. 5,852 5,018 Knox.... 28,990 22,813 Lake..... 2,428........ Lauderdale 10,838 7,559 Lawrence. 7,601 9,320 Lewis.... 1,986 2,2,11 Lincoln... 28,050 22,828 Macon.... 6,633 7,290 Madison.. 23,480 21,568 Marion... 6,841 6,10. Marshall. 16,207 14,592 Maury... 36,289 82,498 McMinn.. 13,969 13,555 McNairy. 12,726 14,732 Meig.... 4,511 4, (667 3fonroe.. 12,589 12,607 Montgomery 24,747 20,895 Morgan.. 2,969 8,353 Obion... 15,584 12,817 Overton.. 11,297 12,637 Perry..... 6,925 6,042 Polk..... 7,369 8,726i Putnam.. 8,0698 8,558 Rhea..... 5,538 4,9911 Roane.... 15,6622 13,583 Robertfon 16,166 15,265 Rutherford 83,289 27,918 Scott..... 4,054 3,519 Sequatchie 2, 3:35 2,120 Sevier... 11,028 9,122 Shelby... 76,378 48,092 Smith.... 15,994 16,357 Stewart.. 12,019 9,896 Sullivan.. 13.136 13.552 Sumner.. 23,711 22,030 Tipton... 14,884 10,7(15 Union.... 7, 605 6,117 Van Buren 2,725 2,581 Warren.. 12,714 11,147 Washington 16,317 14.829 Wayvne... 10,209 9, 115 Weakley.. 20.755 18,216 White.... 9,375 9,381 Williamson 25,328 23,827 Wilson.... 25,881 2i,072 TOTAL. 1,258,520 1,109,801 MISSISSIPPI. Adams... 19,084 20,165 Alcom... 10,431........ Amite.... 10,973 12,336 Attala... 14,776 14,169 Bolivar... 9, 732 10,471 Calhoun.. 10,561 9,518 Carroll... 21,047 22,035 Chickasaw 19,899 16,426 Choctaw. 16,988 15,72 Claiborne 13,386 15,679 Clark.... 7,505 10,771 Coahoma. 7,144 6,60C 0oplah... 20,608 15,39S Covington 4,753 4,408 De Soto.. 32,021 23,'33F Franklin. 7,498 8,26E Greene... 2,038 2,232 Grenada.. 10,571....... Hancock. 4, 339 3,13 Harrison. 5,795 4,819 Hinds.... 30,488 31,339 Holmes.. 19,370 17,791 Issaquena 6,887 7,831 ltawamba 7,812 17,695 Jackson.. 4,362 4,12S Jasper.... 10,884 11,007 Jefferson. 13,848 15, 49 Jones.... 3,313 3.323 Kemper.. 12,920 11,68S Lafayette 18,802 16,125 Lauderdale 13,462 13,313 Lawrence 6,720 9,21: Leake.... 8,496 9,324 Lee...... 15,955........ Lincoln.. 10,184........ Lowndes. 30,502 23,625 Madison. 20,948 23,382 Marion... 4.211 4,686 Marshall. 29,416 28,823 Monroe.. 22,631 21,283 Neshoba.. 7,439 8,343 Newton.. 10,067 9,661 Noxubee.. 20,905 20,667 Oktibbeha 14,891 12,977 Panola... 20,754 13,794 Perry.... 2,694 2,606 Pike...... 11,303 11,135 Pontotoc. 12,525 22,113 Prentiss.. 9,348........ Rankin.. 12,977 13,635 Scott.... 7,847 8,139 Simpson.. 5,718 6,080 Smith.... 7,126 7,638 Sunflower 5,015 5,019 Tallahatchie 7,852 7,890 Tippah.. 20,727 22,55C Tishemingo 7,350 24,149 Tunica... 5,358 4,366 Warren... 26,769 20,696 Washington 14,569 15,679 RHODE ISLAND, Bristol... 9,421 8,907 Kent.... 18,595 17,303 Newport.. 20,050 21,896 Providence 149,190 107,799 Washington 20,097 18,715 TOTAL. 217,353 174,620 NEW HAMPSHIRE, Bellknap.. 17,681 18,549 Carroll... 17,332 20,465 Cheshire. 27,265 27,434 Coos..... 14,932 13,161 Grafton.. 39,103 42,260 Hillsboro. 64,238 62,140 Merrimack 42,151 41,408 Rockingham 47,297 50,122 Strafford. 30,243 31,493 Sullivan.. 18,058 19,041 TOTAL. 318,300 326,073 NEW JERSEY. Atlantic.. 14,093 11,786 Bergen... 30,122 21,618 Burlington 53,639 49,730 Camden.. 46,193 34,457 Cape May 8,349 7,130 Cumberland 34,665 22,605 Essex.... 143,839 98,877 Gloucester 21,562 18.444 Hudson.. 129,067 62,717 Hunterdon 36,963 33,654 Mercer.... 46,386 37,419 Middlesex 45,029 34,812 Monmouth 46,195 39,346 Morris.... 43,137 34,677 Ocean.... 13,628 11.176 Passaic.. 46,416 29,013 Salem.... 23,940 22,458 Somerset.. 23,510 22,057 Sussex.... 23,168 23,846 Union.... 41,859 27,780 Warren... 34,336 28,433 TOTAL... 906,096 672,035 SOUTH CAROLINA, Abbeville. 31,129 32,385 Anderson 24,049 22,873 Barnwell. 35,724 30,743 Beaufort. 34,359 40,053 Charleston 88,863 70,100 Chester.. 18,805 18,122 3hesterfield 10,584 11,,34 Clarendon 14,038 13,095 Colleton.. 25.410 41,916 Darlington 26,243 20,361 Edgefield. 42, 486 39,887 Fairfield.. 19,888 22,111 Georgetown 16,161 21,305 Greenville 22,262 21,892 1Ho10y.... 10.,721 7,962 Kershaw.. 11,754 13,086 Lancaster 12,087 11,797 Laurens.. 22,536 23,858 Lexington 12,988 15,579 Marion... 22,160 21,190 Marlboro'gh 11,814 12,434 Newberry 20,775 20,879 Oconec... 10.536........ Orangeburg 16,865 24,896 Pickens.. 10.269 19,639 Richland. 23,025 18,307 Spartanburg 25,';'84 26,919 Sumter... 25,2688. ý3,859 Union.... 19,248 19,635 Will'msburg 15,489 15,489 York..... 24,286 21,502 TOTAL.. 705,606 703,708 TEXAS, Anderson. 9,229 10,398 Angelina. 3,985 4, 271 Atascosa. 2,,)15 1,578 Austin.... 15,087 10,139) Bandera.. 649 399 Bastrop... 12,2!)0 7,006 Bee...... 1,082 910 Bell...... 9,771 4,7Wi9! Bexar.... 16,043 14,454 Bexar Dist. 1,077....... Blanco... 1,187 1,281 Bosque... 4,981 2,005 Bowie.... 4,684 6,052 Brazoria.. 7,527 7,143 Brazos.... 9,205 2,7T6 BrowXn.... 644 244 Buchanan......... 210 Burleson. 8.072 5, 6-'3 Burnet... 8,688 2,487 Caldwell.. 6,572 4,481 Calhoun.. 3,443 2.642 Cameron.. 10,999 6,0 28 Cass............... 8,411 Chambers 1,503 1,508 Cherokee. 11,079 12,0(!8 Clay............... 1UM Coleman. 847........ Collin.... 14,013 9,264 Colorada. 8,326 7,8W5 0omal... 5,283 4,030 Comanche 1,001 709 Cook..... 5,315 3,760 0oryell... 4,124 2,666 Dallas.... 13,314 8, 665 Davis.... 8,875........ Dawson........... 281 Demmit.. 109........ Denton... 7,251 5,031 De Witt.. 6,443 5,108 Duval.... 1,083........ Eastland.. 88 99 Ellis...... 7,514 5,246 El Paso.. 3,671 4,051 Ensinal... 427 43 Erath.... 1,801 2,425 Falls..... 9,851 3,614 Fannin... 13,207 9,217 Fayette... 16,863 11,604 Fort Bend 7,114 6,143 Freestone. 8,139 6,881 OREGON, Baker.... 2,8S04........ Benton... 4,584 3,074 Clackamas 5,993 3,466 Clatsop.. 1,255 498 Columbia. 863 532 Coos..... 1,644 445 Curry.... 504 393 Douglas.. 6,066 8,203 Grant.... 2,251....... Jackson.. 4,778 3,736 Josephine 1,204 1,623 Lane..... 6,426 4,780 Linn..... 8,717 6,772 Marion... 9,965 7,088 Multnomah 11,519 4,150 Polk..... 4,701 3,625 Tillamook 408 95 I ~ t NEBRASKA, Adams... 19........ Blackbird. 31........ Buffalo... 193 114 Burt..... 2,847 88 Butler.... 1,290 27 TENNESSEE, Anderson 8,704 7,068 Bedford.. 24,333 21,584 I I I I IYI ~sl~urs III I ~a II I u I III I L~ ~ -- 'L L1I ~ I I CI ~ Il ~ L

Page  6 m 1. 6 OFFICIAL CENSUS OF THE UNITED STATES. Counties, 1870. 1860, Counties, 1870. 1860, Counties, t870. 1860, Comities, 1870. 1860. Co oties, 1870, 1860. Comoties. 1870, 1860, 0oCuties, 1870, 1860, 0ounties, 1870. 1860. Frio.... 309 42McLennan 13,500 6,206 Wise..... 3,450 3,160 Bedford.. 25,327 25,068 Madison'. 8,670 8,854 WEST VIRGINIA, Tucker... 1,907 Crone 20,297 12,186 Galveston 15,290 8,229 McMullen 230........ Wood..... 6,894 4,968 Bland.... 4,000........ Matthews 6,200 7,091 Tyler.... 7,832 6,5171La Fayette 22,659 18,134 Gillespie.. 3,566 2,736 Medina.. 2,078 1,&V8 Young.... 135 592 Botetourt', 11,329 11,516 MeckPnburg 21,318 20,096 Barbour.. 10,312 8,958 Upshur.. 8,02:3 7,292 La Pointe......... 353 Goliad.... 3,628 3,384 Menard.. 667........ Zapata... 1,488 1,248 Brunsxick 13,427 14,S09 Middlesex 4,981 4,364 Berkeley. 14,900 12,525 Wayne... 7,852 6,747 Manitowoe 33,364 22,416 Gonzales.. 8,951 8,059 Milam.... 8,984 5,175 Zavala.... 133 26 Buchanan 3,777 2,793 Montgomery 12,556 10,617 Boone-. 4,553 4,840 Webster.. 1,730 1,555 Marathon. 5,885 2,892 Grayson.. 14,387 8,184 Montague 890 849 -----Buckingham 13,371 15,212 Nansemond 11,576 13,693 Braxton.. 6,480 4,992 Wetzel.. 8,595 6,703 Marquette 8.056 8,233 Grimes.. 13,218 10,307 Montgomery 6,483 5,479 TOTAL. 818,579 604,215 Campbell. 28,384 26,197 Nelson... 13,898 13,015 Brooke... 5,464 5,494 Wirt-..... 4,804 3,751 Milwaukee 89,930 62,51 Guadalupe 7,282 5,444 Nacogdoches 9,614 8,292 Caroline.. 15,128 18,464 New Kent 4,381 5,884 Cabell.... 6,429 8,2U0 Wood.... 19,000 11,046 Monroe.. 16,550 8,410 Hamilton. 733 489 Navarro.. 8,879 5,996 Carroll... 9,147 8,012 Norfolk.. 46,702 36,227 Calhoun."2,939 2,502 Wyoming 3,171 2,861 Oeonto... 8,321 3,592 Hardin... 1,460 1,353 Newton... 2,187 3,119 Charles City 4,975 5,609 North'mptn 8,046 7,832 Clay..... 2,196 1,787 - -- Outagamie 18,480 9,587 Harris.... 17,375 9.070 Nueces... 3,975 2,906 Charlotte. 14,513 14,471 Northumb'd 6,863 7,531 Doddnidge 7,076 5,203 TOTAL. 442.014 376,688Ozaukee.. 15,5G4 15,682 Harrison.. 13,241 15,001 Oransge... 1,255 1,916 Chesterfield 18,470 19,016 Nottoway. 9,291 8,836 Fayette... 6,647 5, 997 Pepin.... 4,659 2,392 Hays..... 4,088 2,126 Palo Pinto........ 1,524 VERMONT, Clarke.... 6,670 7,146 Orange... 10.396 10,951 Gilmer... 4,338 3,759-Pierce... 9,958 4,672 Henderson 6,786 4,595 Panola... 10,119 8,475 Craig..... 2,942 3,553 Page.... 8,462 8,109 Grant.. 4,467. Polk.... 3,42 1,400 Hidalgo.. 2,387 1,192 Parker... 4,186 4,213 Addison.. 23,484 24,010 Culpepper 12,227 12,063 Patrick... 10,161 9,359 Greenbrier 11,417 12,211 WISC0NSIN Porage.. 10,634 7,507 Hill...... 7,453 3,653 Polk..... 8,70? 8,300 Bennington 21,325 19,436 Cumberland 8,142 9,961 Pittsylvania 31,343 32,104 Hampshire 7,643 13,913 Racine... 26,740 21.360 Hood..... 2,585........ Presidio.. 1,636 580 Caledonia 22,247 21,708 Dinwiddie 30,702 30,198 Powhatan 7,667 8,394 Hancock. 4.363 4,445 Adams... 6,601 6,492 Richland. 15,731 9732 Hopldns.. 12,651 7,745 Red River 10,653 8,535 Chittenden 36,480 28,171 Elizabeth C 8,303 5,798 Prince Edw' 12,004 11,842 Hardy.... 5"518 9.864 Ashland. 221 515 Rock..... 39,030 36,690 Houston.. 8,147 8,058 Refugio.. 2,324 1,600 Essex... 6,811 5,786 Essex.... 9,927 10,469 Prince Geo. 7,820 8,411 Hanrson. 16,714 13,790 Bad A-.......... 11,007 Sauk.... 2,860 18,963 Hunt.... 10,291 6,630 Robertson 9,990 4,997 Frankdin. 30,291 27,231 Fairfax... 12,952 11,834 Prin. Anne 8,273 7,714 Jackson.. 10,300 8,306 Barron... 538 Shawanaw 3,166 89 Jack..... 694 1,000 Rusk..... 16,916 15,803 Grand Isle 4,082 4,276 Fauquier. 16,690 21,706 Prince Wm. 7,504 8,565 Jefferson. 13,219 14,535 Bayfield.. 344........ Sheboygan 31,749 26,875 Jackson.. - 2,278 2,612 Sabine... 3,256 2,750 Lamoille.. 12,448 12.311 Floyd..d.. 9,824 8,236 Pulaski... 6,538 5,416 Kanawha. 22,349 16,150 Brown... 25,168.11,795 St. Croix. 11,085 5,392 Jasper... 4,218 4,037 S. Augustine 4,196 4,094 Orange... 23,090 25,455 Fluvanna. 9,&75 10,353 Rappahan'k 8,261 8,850 Lewis... 10,175 7,999 Buffalo... 11,123 3,864 Trempeleau 10,732 9,560 Jefferson. 1,906 1,995 San Patricio 602 620 Orleans... 21,035 18,981 Franklin.. 18,264 20,098 Richmond 6,503 6,856 Lincoln.. 5,053........ Bumet. 706 2Vernon.. 18,45........ Johnson.. 4,923 4,305 San Saba. 1,425 913 Rutland.. 40.651 35,946 Frederick 16,596 16,546 Roanoke.. 950 8,048 Logan... 38 12,335 7,895 Walworth 5,972 26,496 Karnes... 1,705 2,171 Shackleford 455 44 Washington 26,508 27,612 Giles..... 5,875 6.$83 Rockbridge 16,058 17,248 Marion... 12,107 12,722 Chippewa 8,311 1,895 Washington 23,919 23,622 Kaufman. 6,895 3,936 Shelby.... 5,732 5,362 Windham 26,036 26,982 Gloucester 10,211 10,956 Rockingham 23,668 23,408 Marshall. 14,941 12,997 Clark.... 3,450 789 Waukesha 28,274 26,831 Kendall... 1,536........ Smith.... 16,532 13,392 Windsor.. 36,063 37,193 Goochland 10,313 10,656 Russell... 11,103 10,280 Mason... 15,978 9,173 Columbia. 28,802 24,441 Waupacca 15,539 8,851 Kerr...... 1,042 634 Starr..... 4,154 - 2,406 - - - - Graysun.. 9,587 8,252 Scott...... 13,036 12,072 McDowell 1,952 1,535 Crawford. 13,075 S,068 Waushara 11,279 8,770 Kimble... 72........ Stephens. 330........ TOTAL. 330,551 315,098 Greene... 4,634 5,022 Shenandoah 14,936 13,896 Mercer... 7,064 6,819 Dallas............ 13 Whmebago 37,279 23,770 Kinney... 1,204 61Tarrant.. 6,788 6,020 Greenville 6,362 6,374 Smyth... 8,898 8,952 Mineral.. 6,332........ Dane..... 53,096 43,922 Wood.... 3,912 2,425 Lamar.... 15,790 10,136 Throemortn...... 124 Halifax... 27,823 26,520 Southampton 12,285 12,915 Monongalia 13,547 13,048 Dodge... 47,035 42,818 Lampasas 1,344 1,028 Titus..... 11,339 9.648 Hanover.. 16,455 17,222 Spottsylv'nia 11,728 16,076 Monroe... 11,124 10,757 Door.... 4,919 2,948 TOTAL. 1,054,70 775,881 La Salle.. 69........ Travis.... 13,153 8,80 ]Henrico.. 66,179 61,616 Stafford.. 6,420 8,555 Morgan.. 4,315 3,732 Douglas.. 1,122 Sl_ Lavaca... 9,168 5,945 Trinity.... 4,141 4,392 Henry.... 12,303 12,105 Surry.... 5,585 6,133 Nicholas. 4,458 4,627 Dunn.... 9,488 2,704 Leon..... 6,523 6,781 Tyler..... 5,010 4,525 VIRGINIA. Highland. 4,151 4,319 Sussex... 7,885 10,175 Ohio...., 28,831 22,422 Eau Claire 10,769 3,162 Liberty... 4,414 3,189 Upshur... 12,039 10,645 Isle of Wight 8,320 9,977 Tazewell. 10,791 9,920 Pendleton 6,455 6,164 Fond du Lac 46,273 34,15. Limestone 8,591 4,537 Uvalde... 851 506 Accomack 20,409 18,586 James City 4,425 5,798 Warren.. 5,716 6,442 Pleasants. 3,012 2,945 Grant.... 37,979 31,189 DIST. OF COLUMBIA. Live Oak. 852 593 Van Zandt 6,494 3,777 Albemarle 27,544 26.625 King Queen 9,709 10,328 Warwick. 1,672 1,740 Pocahontas 4,069 3,958 Green.... 23.61] 19,808 Llano.... 1,379 1,101 Victoria.. 4,860 4,171 Alexandria 16,755 12,652 King George 5,742 6,571 Washington 16,816 16,892 Preston.. 14,555 13,312 Green Lake 13,195 12,663 leo'town 0 11,384 8,733 Madison.. 4,061 2,238 Walker... 9,776 8,191 Alleghany 3,674 6,765 King William 7,515 8,530 Westmorel'd 7,682 9,28Q2 Putnam.. 7,794 6,301 Iowa..... 24,544 18,967 Washingt-n 109,199 61,122 Marion... 8,562 3,977 Washington 23,104 15,215 Amelia... 9,878 '10,741 Lancaster 5,355 5,151 Wise.... 4,785 4,508 Raleigh.. 3,673 3,367 Jackson.. 7,687 4,]70 lemainde Mason.... 678 630 Webb..... 2,615 1,397 Amherst.. 14,900 13,742 Lee..... 13,268 11,032 Wythe.... 11,611 12,305 Randolph 5,563 4,990 Jefferson. 34,040 30,438 of the Matagorda 3,377 3,454 Wharton.. 3,426 3,380 Appomattox 8,950 8,889 Loudon.. 20,929 21,774 York... 7,198 4,949 Ritchie... 9,055 6,847 Juneau.. 12,372 8,770 District 11,117 5,225 Maverick. 1,951 726 Williamson 6,368 4,529 Augusta... 28,763 27,749 Louisa.... 16,832 16,701 - - Roane.... 7,232 5,381 Kenosha. 13,147 13,900 McCullech 173........ Wilson... 2,556......... Bath..... 3,795 3,676 Lunenburg 10,403 11,983 TOTAL. 1,225,1631,219,630 Taylor... 9,367 7,463 Kewaunee 10,128 5,530 TOTAL. 131,700 75,080 TERRITORIES OF THE TNITED STATES, Counties, 1870. 1860, Counties, 1870. 1860. Counties. 1870. 1860. Counties, 1870. 1860, Cotiesuies 1870, 1860, CoCuties. 1870, 1860, Coonties. 1870, 1860, ARIZONA, Greenwood 510....... Hutchinson 37"........ Oneida.., 1,922........ NEW MEXICO, Box: Elder 4,865 1,608 WASHINGTON Yakima'" 432........ Huerfano 2,250........ Jayne.... 5........ Owyhee.. 1,713........ Cache.... 8,229 %605 WThe Disputed Mohave.. 179........ Jefferson. 2,890........ Lincoln.. 712........ Shoshone. 722........ Arizona. 6,48'. Cedar............ 741 Pima.... 5,716....... Lake..... 522........ Minnehaha 355........ Bernailo"" 7,591 8,769 Davis.... 4,459 2,904 hehalis. 401 285 Yavapai.. 2,142 "... Larimer.. 838........ Pembina. 1,213....... TOTAL. 14,999........ Colfax 1,992... Green River....... 141 Clallam.. 408 149 TOTAL. 23,955 11,594 Yuma.... 1,621. Las Animas,276........ Todd..... 337........ Dona-a *,86 4 "" '3 Iron..... 2,277 1,010 Clarke... 8,081 2,384..Park. 447........ Union.... 3,507........ Grant.... 19143Juab..... 2,034 672 Cowlitz.. 730 406 TOTAL. 9,658 Pueblo.. 2,265........ Yankton.. 2,097........ Lincoln 1,803..... Kane.... 1,513........ Island... 626 294 ".. Saguaohe 304........ Unorganized My-ora.. 8,056 ".. 56. Millard -. 2,753 715 Jefferson. 1,268 581 Summit.. 258........Sportion of ]2Morgan... 1,972........ Kig..... 2,120 302 WYOMING. - Rid,3 et~y 01M NA A o Ariba 9,294 9,849 Pue.. 2.... isp. Weld.... 1636..... Territory 2,091........ MONTANA San Miguel 16,058 13,714i.... 82........ Kitsap... $66 544 - - Santa Ana 2,599 3,57W 2 Rich..... 1,955........ Klikitat.. 329 230 Albany... n,0 "... C RD ATOTAL. 39,864 277 TOTAL. 14,181 4,87 Beaver Head 722........ Santa 6. 9,699 8,114 Ro Virgi 450........ Lewis.888 384 caro.. COLORADO, Big Horn. 38........ Socorro 6,603 5,787Salft Lake IS 337 11,295 Mason... 289 Laramie 2,957........ Choteau.. 517........ Taos.. 12,'079 14 103 San Pete. 6,786 3,815 Pacific... 738 4. 0 Sweetwater 1,916........ Arapahoe 6,829........ Dawson.. 177........ Vencia. 1321 Sevier. 19........ Pierce.... 156........ Bent..-. 6592.......... Deer Lodge 4,367........... VaIenci. 9v,09 1 _ 1Shambip.......... " 162 Sawamish........ 162 Boulder.. 1,9.39........ DAKOTA. IDAHO. Gallatin.. 1,578........ TOTAL. 91,874 93,516 Summite.. 2,512 198 Skamania 599 Clear Creek 1,596........ Jefferson 1,531........ Tooele.... 2,177 1,008 Snohomish Conejos... 2,504........ Bonhomme 608........ Ada9..... 2,675........ Lewi OIlarke 5,040........-Utah..... 12,203 8,248 Spokane.......... 9961 0ostilla.. 1,779........ Brookings 163........ Alturas.. 689........ Madison.. 2,684........ Wasateh.. 1.244....... Stevens.. 734" ""....... Douglas.. 1,388........ Buffalo.. 246........ Boise.... 3,834........ Meagher. 1,387........ Washington 3,064 691 Thurston. 2,4 1,507 E1 Paso.. 987.....Charles Mix 152........ Idaho.. ^ 849........ Missoula.. 2,554........ UTAH, Weber.... 7,858 3,675 Wahkiakum '270 4 Fremont,. 1,064........ Clay..... 2,6271........ Lemhi.. 988........ -------- -- Walla-Walla 5,300 1,318, Gilpin... 5,490........ Deuel... 3......Nez Perces 1,607........ TOTALU. 20,595........ Beaver... 2,007 'i'85 TOTAL. 86,786 40,273 Whatcom 83 52[ RECAPITULATION FOE 1870. 16. Alabama...... 996,992 4. Illinois....... 2,539,891 20. Maryland.... 780,894 37. Nevada....... 42,491 2. Pennsylvania. 8,521,951 27. West Virginia. 4429014 TFR O1S6.Mnna... 9,5 S6. Arkansas..... 484,471 6. Indiana...... 1,680,637 7. Massachusetts 1,457,351 31. N. Hampshire 318,300 32. Rhode Island. 217,353 15. Wisconsin.... 1,054,670 ' f 2. New Mexico.. 91,874 24. California.... 560,247 11. Iowa......... 1,194,020 13. Michigan..... 1,184,059 17. New Jersey... 906,096 22. S. Carolina... 705,606 9. Arizona....... 9,65813. Utah......... 86,786 25. Connecticut.. 537,454 29. Kansas....... 364,399 28. Minnesota.... 439,706 1. New York.... 4,382,759 9. Tennessee.... 1,258,520 Total of States... 38,115,641 4. Colorado...... 39,86415. Washinton.. 23,955 34. Delaware..... 125,015 8. Kentucky.... 1,321,011 18. Mississippi... 827,922 14. N. Carolina... 1,071,361 19. Texas......... 818,579Tot. of Territories 442,730 8. Dakota....... ]4,181/10. Wyoming.... 9,118 33. Florida....... 187,748121. Louisiana.... 726,915 5. Missouri...... 1,721,295- 3. Ohio......... 2,665,260 30. Vermont...... 330,551 ' 1. District Col... 131,700 -12. Georgia....... 1,184,109 23. Maine........ 626,915 35. Nebraska..... 122,993136. Oregon..;... 90,923 10. Virginia...... 1,225,163 Total of U. S.... 88,558,371 7. Idaho........ 14,999 Total of Ters. 442,730 NOTz.-The number at the left denotes the standing in regard to population. m POPULATION OF THE PRINOIPAL CITIES OF THE UNITED STATES, Cities, 1870. 1860. Cities. 1870. 1860. Cities. 1870, 1860,0 Cities, 1870, 1860. Cities. 1870, 1860. Cities. 1870, 1860, Cities, 1870, 1860, Adrian, Mich... 8,438 6,213 Camden, N. J.. 20,045 14,858 Evansville, Ind. 21,830 11,484 Lafayette, Ind.. 13,506 9,387 New Albany, Ind. 15,396 12,647 Portsmouth, N. H. 9,211 9,335 Springfield, 111.. 17,364 9,320 Alcron, Ohio.... 10,006 3,477 Canton, Ohio... 8,660 4,041 Fall River, Mass. 26,766 14,026 Lancaster, Pa.. 20,233 17,603 Newark, N. J... 105,059 71,941 Portsmouth, Ohio 10,592 6,268 Springfield, Mass. 26,703 15,199 Albany, N. Y... 69,422 62,367 Charleston, S. 0. 48,956 40,467 Fond du Lac, Wis. 12,764 5,450 Lawrence, Kan. 8.3820 1,645 N. Bedford, Mass. 21,32-0 22,800 Portsmouth, Va. 1,9,8 pigilOi.1,5,0 Alexandria, Va.. 13,570 12,652 Charlest'n, Mass. 28,323 25,065 Fort Wayne,Ind. 17,718+t10,368 Lawrence, Mass. 28,921 17,639 N. Brunsw'k, N.J. 15.058 11.Z56 Polkeepsie, N. Y. 20,080 14,726 Steubenvflle, Ohio 8,107 6,154 Allegheny, Pa. 53,180 28,702 Chester, Pa..... 9,485 4,631 Frederick, Md.. 8,526 8,143 Leavenworth, Kan 17,873 7,429 Newburgh, N. Y. 17'014 t15'196 Providence, R. I.68,90450,666 Stockton, Cal. 10,966 3,679 Allentown, Pa. 13,884 8,025 Chicago. Ill.... 298,977 112,172 Galesburg, ll.. 10,158 4,953 Lewiston, Ale... 13,600 7,424 Newburyp1t, Mass. 21,595 13,401 Quincy, 111.... 24,052 13,718 Syracuse, N. Y. 43,051 28,119 Alton, Ill1...... 8,665 3).585 Chillicothe, Ohio 8,920 4,581 G-alveston, Tex. 13,818 7,307 Lexington, Ky.. 14,801 9,321 New Haven, Ct. 50,840 39,267 Racine,Ws.. 980 722TutnMa. 1,69 536 Altoona, Pa.... 10,610 3,591 Cincinnati, Ohio 216,239 161,044 Gaeorgetown, D. 0.11,384 8,733 Little ock, Ark. 12,380 3,727 NewOrleans, La. 191,418 118,670 Raleigh, N. 0... 7,790 4,80 TauntonuteaIn. 16,1038 6 Atlanta, Ga.... 21,789 9,554 Cleveland, Ohio 92,829 43,417 Ged Rapids, Mich. 16,507 8,084 Lockport, N. Y. 12.426+13,523 Newport, Ky... 15,087 10,046 Reading, Pa.... 3,90 2,162 Titu te, Pa., 8,594 Auburn, N.aY... 17,225- 10,986 Cohoes, N. Y..d. 15,357 8,799 Hamilton, Ohio..11,081 7,223 Logansport, n d.4,9Newport,R.1.. 12,521 10,508 Richmond, Ind 9, 6,1623 Toled, O... 83 438 Augusta, Ga... 15,389 14,857 Columbia, S. 0. 9,298 8.052 Hannibalo, Oo..10,125 6505 Louisville Ky.. 100,753 68,033 New York, N. Y. 942,252 10,51 Richmond, Va. 51,038 3 Treno, N.oJ.. 22,84 17,8 Aurora, 111..... 11,162 6,011 Columbus, Ohio. 31,974 18,554 Harrisburg, Pa..l 23,104 13,405 Loweull, Mass.. 0,M5 36,827 Norfolk, Va.... 19,229 14,620 Rochester, N. Y 5.,3864,904 Tron, N.Y... 46,4 39,28 Baltimore, Md.. 267,354 212,418 Concord, N.H.. 12,241 6,896 Hartford, at... 837,180 17,966 Lynn, Mass.....;8,233 19,083 Norwich, Cta.... 16,653 14,048 Reome, N. Y.... 61,386 3,584 Troy, N. Y... 28.804 22,52 Bangor, M0e.. 18,2S99 16,407 Council Bluffs, Ia. 10,020 2,011 Haverhill, Mass. 13,092 9,995 Macon, Gao..... 10,810 8,247 Ogdensb'h. N.Y. 10,076 7,409 Sacramento, Cal. 16,283 12,797 Vicksburg, Miss. 12,443 4,591 Belleville, Ill... 8,146 7,520 Covingt=on, Ky.. 24,505 16,471 Hoboken, N. J.. 20,297 9,659 Madison, Ind... 10,709 8,130 Omaha, Neb.... 16,083 1,881 St. Joseph, Mo.. 19,565 8,932 Wash'ton, D. 0. 109,19961,32 Biddeford, Me. 10,282 9.349 Davenport, Iowa 20,038 11,267 Houston, Tex... 9,382 4,845 Madison, Wis... 9,176 6,611 Orange, N. J.... 9,348 8,877 St. Louis, Mo... 10,864 160,773 Waterbury, Miss. 10,$26 10.004 Bingh'ton, N.Y. 12,692 8,325 Dayton, Ohio.. 30,473 20,081 Hudson, N. Y... 8,615 7,187 Manchester, N. H. 23,536 20,107 Oshkosh, Wis... 12,643 6,086 St. Paul, Min... 20,030 10,400 Watertown.N. Y. 9,336..." Bloomington, IU. 14,590 7,075 Des Moines, Iowa 12,035 3,965 Indianapolis, Ind. 48,244 18.611 Mansfield, Ohio. 8,029 4,581 Oswego, N. Y... 20,910 16,816 Salem, Mass.... 24,11722,252 Wheeling, W.V. 19,280 14,083 Boston, Mass... 50,526 202,977 Detroit, Mich... 79,577 45,619 Jackson, Mich.. 11,447 44799 Memphis Tenn. 40,226 22,621 Paterson, N. J.. 33.579 -9,586 Salt Lake City, Ut. 12,854 8,207 Williamsport, Pa. 16,030 6,564 Bridgeport, Ct.. 18,969 13,299 Dover. N. H.... 9,294 8,502 Jacksonville, Ill. 9,203 5,528 Mfilwaukie, Wis. 71,440 45,246 Peoria, Ill...... 22,849 14,045 San Antonia, Tex. 12,256 8,235 Wihmington, Del. 30,841 21,258 Brooklyn, N. Y. 396,099 266661 Dubuque, Iowa. 18,434 13,000 Janesville, Wis. 8,789 7.702 Min'apolis, Minn. 13,066 2.563 Petersburg, Va. 18,950 18,266 Sandusky, Ohio. 13,000 8,408 Wilmngton, N. 0. 13,446 9,552 Buffalo, N. Y... 117,714 81'129 E. Saginaw, Mich 11,350 3,001 Jersey City, N. J. 82,546 29,226 Mobile, Ala..... 32,034 29,258 Philadelplhia, Pa 674,022 565,529 San Fran'co, Cal. 149,47356,802 Worcester, Mass. 41,105924,960 Burlington, Ia.. 14,930 6,706 Elizabeth, N. J. 20,832 11,567 Kansas City, Mo. 32,260 4,418 Nashua, N. H.. 10,543 1,065 PittsburgI Pa... 86,076 49217 Savannah, Ga.. 28,235 22,292 York, Pa....... 11,003 8,606 Burlington, Vt.. 14,387 *7,667 Elmira, N. Y... 15,863 t8,682 Keokuk....... 12,766 8,136 Nashville, Tenn. 25,865 16,988 Portland, Me... 31,413 26'341 Schenectady, N. Y' 0,026 9,576 ZanesviUe Ohio 10,011 9,229 Camb'dge, Mass. 39,634 2,606 Erie, Pa........ 19,646 9,419 Knoxvine, Tenn. 8,682 6,000 Natchez, Miss... 9,057 6,612 Portland, Oregon 8,293 2,868 Scranton, Pa... 35,092 9,223 * Inclusive of South Burlington. t Township and city. -....... -=----= L..... ...,_.--=_........... =...... = --------.... _._ _,____.., _ ..... .......... ___ _____: =--=--=..-=__=__ -..... =...... =......- -._....._ - 14

Page  7 _ _ I ~_~~f~ _--~--~--~II IDIIL- II ~_ I. ---I I ill _ jl~r~,,,:~Iwo, Ne w OAA---i ýms P~lezc Gi lrvo s"I~~.I: Oh~c~01 " o'"'WITH VIEWS OF THE COMPARATIVEVE HEIGHTS 01TH gatebeAND THE LENGTHS OF THEE drI I-OVER THE GLOBE. --Fetelly Fri 4 1 O)T, E,.cp v vz4H RIGIDZol ~-~~Rn FIG90 Vieq 7r hcujht ojýJT01171afýIS t-,& 40icated y a. scaleqf-E-mc~LS7L ~~-;b~, J/~~~. GorsipL-t-~ ~~ZCt)~JI~~U~ ~ CL, Ca. e. y. U051-070?rr, 'I" Ar I~ ~ =~ I~I~~T r-k Lai~ ~I 30 irif Nr V ~':t 10 iiR,ii!ý2o MIA /X"// -7- MITI/" '(1 ffialt 10-0 - jsdil a r i~~~]~ii ~ hi;~:::Ulm I _'; -E d- Cirtbet....... ~V~-AO r~runtnl10 irswC ~L~~~s %k~r/~ c 0 0 ilGID SO, 2's o23 -Rd-L7 ~I ~!I B ~ y;' ~~,i:I "' 'I a I~~rci~~;i--~ vs C ~!i I~i: 1 ~~; n,...~.i_,,ll~il~.;c~'-' ";""'C""'" PI...B r: r _~""._Ilk - _ --I I I

Page  8-9 ti 0l <..',,_l _,? -- " ", " I -....,,i. _ t _. ._ "it o#",". "." "i--""l""t __,":r------_ --" "."i":'!--'.--'t, X ", \ ", " l:i Ir i--if-- 1. 6,0.... j,. i Gi yuhLell La-, 0 Bh6-. md --Nce s t Z -, _ 41, -,, i! IT....... I i, t ~ " i - - - - --------------!-.:..-: J"i 71 x.,,.,,,.. \ ",, ''; t,. '.,., i iil i,: I i......... ........I 2"....... "l_.--_\--"- - / Laxt. ON-" E ]ff %-Y Ax E A Tr D-. i .............& ' /ii,i.!:! f, " '.; /,.. /,.:i:;,'.,i}..!, t/l!: I ',///7 /,"//t,':-/,,;//, k.-'7/,./:,';,';, <4,!y;<i>;: _"',. '1"/:':: I//I /?d};i '........ " i......., + 4"-.:-:'-..--..b.]. /, --...,,.,%'..,......! i--q":::-:-',! i,',:':, ',,, i ýrAWcx jLaxict I A - C -kIFEW T - Qe Vie: lu t 5 - -i.T C_4 -crtic C x-cle nited Statesýl IeT f eat, IN eý TOW", L-V- Le (F-N N, t'-b A r o TL, 0 to JI 01 Cýjs eke City 7U -C 9 T vus Ila.... -...... r.... - -A-XL c main, L d-,.,//.f,..... ----_ ///,., >-., _ /.., / o! Yf-----------Z) '.-,be?, Au~ '>' t,,,, Aire. ire, L8i. a-:-I < M_ U pe.,..c,::. >?.>.YS f,/'i ', i i! i!L-:.::,:/i?/;,,y l,' r".,':?\\X%;;,;,. /,,,. "-..,,,,..\. /. -,..., D,4>.:,d.A <.:.................~ -.-.'---i - --:.. ! -. i ':. " ----------- -4.... =-.... i.... 4--!i;.: 5 <) "_Z_; - j T " I R.. -!..... / t \ \ - \ Aq ?.......... 7-i, 41:'---:{7:.':"/'. --c-.::Li,./ // TRALrA (( fýe-e t MiA týr-a I- -i -a N/Y,, \,,, HN'\.i t _ . -- _ it'i!\ 7' / " "t /",. / /, /, / //, ///..,.'/? ml I A I i i i i i i t @il! So-,,id.,1-1_q' a7q from, -1,7/,/',.I' / t I '. I; J',/..,,.-..........,;,..,.,;/, /:,/7//,//> _7 ----arctic -..----"..,.i -\,;.... ~..x'\X. '! \. ~ / / / //,// ////,."///,,,.V,,",,.:Y/;y,.,.!;'/,,"/t, L //'//,/////, ~L,. i j Al" I....., i, 1 I J r. "G -,--, I. I '-.".,'/, ", 1 - " F.....I- - I-- 1 -4 = -' -" -. // i l ' i i!! i',,.,,....: - l,m.uv2, -Up p io t-'eOZb4]z'P.7.. Sol,72 t n e a I I S-ta-tc--ýp &,rfh,,C ask txntZ Tf-ewb, //'//"/ / t;2_;;71T_ -_. iI ~ t it!7 - -East i i d7'+ 17 1 4t7 -,=.~, 9111' 41l

Page  [unnumbered]

Page  10

Page  11

Page  12-13 .. --, A -, "........ i;/.,. '...... i.... '. - $-.--(.-;f- -::- LL_;].,/?:;'. I,'..X ' $ ,, \ ~ '., ' _;... \ tAl I W.A..0 ',, ", "\.,< \ i/ Z"\ 3-< " " "--.._ -:---L'__---_J-j./.,,... -........ -. '\ -- L.. -.. \ /i--j_.. \....: _. -., ~,-:Z---_7_2-.......:. NO, ' j(, ,,.,..',.,,..,(/' I,,/,~,; / '.: ~/// \\ \ i(.,'.' ~ ',. "-\ \. ~ '\ \.. %;:,.--:.,..-...,. -. -..,. _.__._i---..;//,/ \...-.. \ '.----....,. Y:!i' "' '>"""' i"."h )*-t'i',,',',' " X',?,.,,.',\'., .''s,-.:><.,,,., \ .,, t A., L > '! ~ > \?46 ip-111-1ý4 "" '\\< X -( -k., ' ,//, -.i.: // / /..,,,"...... ,,.< ~" //// ///,. i/, i, \" ' 0) Ld 0 N Fz w -j to to </ /-'// "..""/'/ W;.-.:-- '.. ~ I.'-:-. -,\ "" " "......: '"..L" ~ -. -" '" I. i ~! -. "...,.,. - ,,.,, i , y.,i ',\ ',. <... ',.,., ' i,,"//7:>:, y, % j.___ .L,"_' i' '.'...,-"..::,:.. co to CO. f- - 7., Tý vo." - il 5<:. % i _ '. i:-- <-:.,. ;!,.--.:.._...... 4, :,,,?'.-:..4 . i;i:C..:;i'. i};::,:.(.'i:i ",?;.. /.. ).,"/. "! /,;...;,, ~. /,!! t iI I I./ i': "%<>.% ,. 7-- Nli 4Y" i -.CL t6 - \, Z 0 S:".'::.,, "., ..,'t...... -. \.,.:h.._._i,,i_,<....... ~,x.-- ',i..,,..<,,, ",':,,ziil.' t .,, =;7-.., "... PR,..... ".. z... 0 "./,./..,,. . "i:II:/!11 [,..?"" ", /i. I I! i t i,, cn /,/.,..,,........,,,... - --....-.,.!... :,// '-._. i'/!' i Vi 0 0 LO o -i ~, "...: S:3 "I":; C) l; 60..L/.;, -,,.. / /.;\.I- ',",!":/ _ 90- C., - VMt- -

Page  .

Page  14

Page  15 15

Page  16-17 -Ad / / ,_.. /,! ip ",. ] " A."., i,,... "' ,:. /.::.',. ~ - -.-:.....: /... IS / c; yz ý. 9A.o ,;_.., Iil Q t F&P6 10 14, Ti 0 ~ r,. ' " /)ý -t -4 r Y...... ". '- --; \ =-- .. \ _. --,,. ~ o

Page  [unnumbered]

Page  18 18 fi or% 4<0 * ^ ^ - CD^I C.)g 1, o I oC/) A^ ca a o *^ J Q-?1 V\ - * I

Page  19 U20 a. 80- tionmucle Nrr~est iCam k-areeTOVI - r r 7 -- 0 10 20 XF t Imir / P s~~ SCALE: OF MILES, ~~ 470 Go b or m3'4~'= verne ti 'ri;L ~~~-r ~~3~ i~2~t~ I f~ C iS O ~~;~~p~~~-wi~;;C~.~"~-;;~, ~~,~y. VIV-LIU........ 16 h-i T Aw~A~4F ~~..........~ ' 5.~~~: -L A Itj ýZ, ej w\......... 746-3i~ 7~ )don.~ E~lei~~r'F~l _L va 72 lu m 9 SA Spc~ 76'' OB E- SP~ k 0 x 1704, ~.,...~T:~f-: lo I N. IAW'AýRT Bql A ys _ _~~ ~_~_~~_ ___~___~__ l~ oný:Ltud,-Nlres-t

Page  20 h)~ ~sl i f `3 ii 4 L'~ ~ L!~p~i II! r~)=4~ $--,2 iB cl ~6~7~ --~ ~--\ ar'i,i I or oaji ~.o E ~~ -14 ~m"r i Irln ~8s14 \ s

Page  21 MEMO" "":4w Fs OD r4 P 7'....... co "Ch;Z0 ýlSr ýr I TA TV 0 V Z-ti a:. tný 0 u ou OF 0,5' 7;.................... 0.............. 7ýq -Z r) 01 rn rrTýo Pin uj rn ii d vi;-w f"'A L Z-;7-1 0ý io rqcf 00 Z -------.................:.Vv ICY. -rn.iS.................. V1 -1 ow..................... rr) itý3;ý..................... zý CD xww I szz t-L4 rn rn olt. rip,;o 4TO r fn AQ

Page  22 IL OEM I_ _ 1_ __ _ I ~I ___ ~_ ~ _ _ _ _ __ _I _ _ ~ _~ _ ~LIIIE~ ~ ~ C. c _ 1 -~ ~ II ~i IP3sP~ _ Isl - YV ~ OVL vm)).-n AT ff I 7 -~-----~--~-- - i i' I ~ ~ _ ~_ 001: oe 09 O C a, S:3-1 q A 0.3-1v 0,, ~~ ar~ ~s a~5~2~1~ ZLO.LCI~ ~Z~ T""'~~ s, DI~*U~s13;~ 3 ~ar~ir~s~ i' ^4m ~r-l ~"~"~:~"p~ d~Y~i$ l;g~5 ij~ii 4i ~~i~*~8~i~ I! - sb~ ~~h~ Cl/ ~\ \ \\i~~l~.e j 1 i r.~~i., z I ''''''',I, ~-~-~s~- ~. I r, I a j _I-~-- I 1 `I \\ IS ~\\\ i 71; ' i!I\ i i ~I I, ssi ill! iti i i i'' I. \ \11' i i\\.ca\~ \\\ \\\ BI 1~ '~ \:ii/i // i; iii ~I iI ~C----- //://ii iii I i iI i ~..i: ~~'/ ~' I / / i, i..~~ ]~~ -!~~.1 ~ f~;.:i~;~''~_~'T''/~///;/~t;'///~//~/~~ n /// //~/~~~/~XrCI~LI~T~Jj~~ I / / / ////~j(~////~,~//////////,~'///,,~I~I~'~ /// ~L\d,~'-I oL 3iO 1 Z ~d~Lo~;;;;; a J NoIs3 ~i v H 3:- o"~Jj~= i~~r~~~ei8L'..L ~mr \\\\\\Ulvr do--~t - sZ o j........ hI! AI ~fi~:"i~~~'~:;t~;*.~;~~~~.-? C%~ IP~nj):10 B~ Ilp~~~Z~X1 U~Q12- o a~ 6~ a.....rq~ d~~.~~F a 13-1 1 W &I l 0 d-13 teti or3 o i~ T~ 00 -:P. it ~TL1 10; r0 '~P~ 4aaa s 3 /...............?/ 4 X 5/ a Oil v f......... n;/%?'fC) J_ zi 4 _T ai ~~:~ i~4~c~ji 11-................... 0 j Ilk) I'l" ' t2.............. ateiiN W T s 0'L ~~~..... i~............ Hmrr~w~~..........i/~ t.1c 7 'Fa u........ ýXrsb 'd........ R 3.4:: 'I i......... ~. -3 3 N 3 2PN - A ) ý-Oý ~4~ C~.........:~La ~ ~ ~jFS~:'~-iicr `dbti'lO H ~'~p~S~O,15 MAII t, tp~ - 1 0 'OLE ~0 ~ ' dl '9 o~~d LS i-~3LV ' 30~9- ~-~ ~~-~;9~~ W33 3~~L U6-1S?0I o i: czt CY ~~~r't~'~iC~.1'''~"~'~~ rr~Ch~N V r ~P~8 -. ý" Yd V I _ ___,ol3,3;8 I I ~ _ _ _ I R~r e~-~s~---~ --r I -~I-_ IL~r -3~CI~e- SL~saa- - _ e-~ ~L. I ~L ~ c Ip ~ ~ac ~L~-_ I q= a~a~a

Page  23 nz,-m:c., P 0- C 0."W: C:'. - -i, ' I-';\, ii~~~~~~~~~~~~ A \ I................;-'0 %/ ' ' ~ m_ ..., , > > ,.:.,,....0M; Q,,-'. - >.- k "" F_- tF m. 1,"

Page  24 tiff,,, 7`1 ----------- ------ ----------------- rn ZI Awxh lomO ý%WOJý NZ 21 lz In IW vo~R 0 Inpor CID) a CIL................................................... ý.i............... go.................. i\A Pi rn... CD X rn 03 U3 ti I....................................... -n C q L -......... rA..... IV 09.............................................................. t;jrl Ile 7ý4

Page  25 r"!, ".................,................................... Id! J TO!,~, oi-/.. 0.,1 t:1 Y3 W. It u d- -------------------... i -"--' i .--, ------.. -............--...-,- - ' 'e ".. U (,l Or" vi.... -0 y).": N....Y'"; - y2A; i. 310 0 1. W' "nt., g"o. ~j...._...................................- =. _+ ff N,Iv0v V4I -a 7 i. S S...i-" " 44 1 1 '""0'':)",."S' S 0 s.- - 100 CT.. _ ". _.. S....o!;;- " 4 0.... ~ _t............",.............. I- "C _....................... Ri s.Z_ N -------------...........,...... --------..---.--.-- M al fli i.............-... -.................. t o...._- -- --.............. I INVNnsm.,-,. ', 3-1, ~ - ''33--_ 'pip o O o t 6 0 0i ":D:) z_3 stt-id ",u(Su~u,- oilO ol'lin -N 0.,'. -- Ole.;D- '......,,,, f- -lop /., i,,, v Iil'.1 41-..."... '" ..,#55,_ -: ..... -,7y a!1 o~O.so oW "l'---'-'14' (=..M-I 100

Page  26 2.6

Page  27 IC il rr 0- 'Jill 'MIX ly WWI\ 11', lf\jl1111 ~-~ZLIW ýj~I" Diil~ 7179 Ir"flill"110'eil fow.. ey I----------------- m~~f" K~5 '1411t fill k~ r 1~~ ~4, Y Il~E,ýjj/ I =. mL 14 Tr, 57TUIIIrrMMITiii X.-- ~171 "til,,, il ~ 611;Jý)~ a, J, V i \ rl ilh, 1_ L,,1-v e I--- ~~Ail Lo ~ w il s~Will rz.~ ~ ~, Ld~

Page  28 All (n L C9,,6 ICb~i ut~EO~ \\\\'` -i "~ ~I ~c-~~ii OslP ~:s~x,,~-,~ r~i~L.1,ri~"~~i, ~T~t~Y~J~.$ y--~-~-,~ wki Z,rd: r 0 -5rr mf: I;Jci ~ I, G ~C:---cc~; ~ L -I 1~I,I--

Page  29 29 Sannr TIP ~CQ ~~flIb Or SCALE OF MILES, 0 10 ~0 40 60 SO 100 HS)-i ~-4 A' don gre Cri4,.7~r F I I G Ci C ~ Ax eyo~ t-- AcomaY E A- ^js L N St-v I1C "4//ft

Page  30 ,44 /4 '4e Li - 0 __ P~,lic~i 0~' 0k) L~W Cc w co 0 -Ui u, 0l K' 'AZ I

Page  31

Page  32-33 Ig 7~.. / oil... ^. " * I y-/ -. Io.m_,,. I.I ^,,;.,,,. 1 i.^--- ^-.,;,. s tl,[ /;"/ t.!.., (i 0 ' I ^?-^ -..,. p 'H ^ /fly ~l''$ *n S S-l 1 1! 1^ ___ _ I i:.\:-;... -rlz "T? ctý 0 ON i' t j i^' '..,! ^ ^ "IS '!\ I I ^ mi - WM,.*// 4/^e^ */** -7< 3j..43( z^ > ^ > 1A ' 1 ' 1 0 %%%*.,**^%4 t%': ~ /',. I. '....' i ",,,\! **,' /::' */2'* MAi ^ ~.-* WI *i] --------,,, ., _-2-.---- Ill;/j'/. iii^ 'i n.i, 71 r ^ ^ ^S '~" a ^ / n i < 4 1! '. * %.~.-.,--g-^.'.., L.':... IF to ^-i moISi I It.yy'',,.>:",., rr b Z.............. ~ ~---

Page  [unnumbered]

Page  34

Page  35

Page  36-37 Tfr r /w/.^y iK ........ J J.... i- ~ -- *. ^,:--:^-- I o] t~ i i' 'UP I,l l ', t / * / / i. *. //,//', '-..., _~ I." =. _!o '" '....... = ^ 1 r0C /#;; ---- tii'/^/y^ -^ m!f/i!I 0 y/i l..?";. ini o ^i /" /...-.: - 3-- o......... -......-"../....... o.,/ 1...-. -" --- t-../.ii. i _. . -.... -. __. - _......... ~ __..C7--......-_Z.............. ---<. -- ___CT...____._ _ _+;._._ __.__._ .......;.. ' //:", t.... " ~ w_.,i/.I A. _ ^Ife^B--^ ^^r|y;>-:--'--.J..' "".....,.5,:.. e.' ""^ la, "^ 4.1 Rz I it,! V//7 \ \ '*' / /I + -.,1{ It; \ ' ý, " Sý.2t!41 i 4- - I,,, / It t j~ *\\\\.v^^ H.? 0~ ~~" \ *..\.<-S sri ^s^;B^-. 1~. /4 fe.-1^' G tt.^......3: Sf i, \ '..!is i~L}t{t~! ' -:------.----. ^//'/i',,: '^..//,^ >>*';",-/ ",.,, -.1 "1 L~*. ' Z '-- "'-"-- --.-.' ' t ".. ' ",", \"\"\\ *. ". \ \ \.",',..,.,, \ \\\v ^T^^^' r ^1 rPA Will o i m ^::.."" HA I 4 45ýtý 0-.-il - -^- its* 4 ^ wit NO; A, O.,WK. ~ c Ir ';.,.4...., I I j Oil %^-. -^R04 l^^^l/-"^ />/;:^r^:^1 ^w^^-^--- jiC^' T'Sc-sEffir^? 54 1 11 - -I I I -W, j!k i) N 2Tk 4.ý WE - - I I ý ý ý I a 111 1 1,,, I i -7. 1 74: Z- I tf -<^ y d * "- 7 "...-."-.-U:'t " m-- LIE I I - W - -I. - I Z9 7" --.7', III I. ' -- * / i' ~,.,',i ' /, '/!!l| n.;if..."--... AV *P I; \ ^ "--..ZN too l^ ' lit~ js?<^C^^:-:-4z ~1' m k'l.-..--,, " 5 - R 2.f I 'f. H~e',,,"..-, ,, <+ MM" 'I.. --.--b -. -..'..'--.; ~ -..,-...,,<, J^[.,..'a'^ ^ E ' a'; il^ __r: - -J - - - - y.... " -- itts \,". _ \ t..-. ' -I, "I i^//-^ ^ --'r---Jr,..-.... -..._----- I i......:> i. {;;; '(. i ' n ">* t, \ \ \i \\\ -. '^u ^^.. ",.. \ - m k/.If 0 ý4.1.-...,.' ^ ~ - "".... - 1 0 " id ^ __... ^ g -:,. **-,.\ 10 ^1 co "\ CA -- - . -; it_ - -. ': I 77 j-e

Page  [unnumbered]

Page  38

Page  39

Page  40-41 0 11 C4 It's 74). IlE -. fo a P.X'. 44" tj 45 IQ to N ot il cl tn 0 ý,Llvlutia?R'O F'l LE 0 F TELC(

Page  [unnumbered]

Page  42

Page  43

Page  44-45 11i 7 127 ý&2a J637y

Page  [unnumbered]

Page  46

Page  47

Page  48-49 44 C.) ~C I ~ J I r b7 _ cr; j r L, ir: I ~ I r _~~ ~iil ~. ~.. ~ ~ ~1 i ~j JJc~J~-/ J I Z, - ~'~'E~ ~~~ ~~ B ~3 - o pp iL--= ~T I~ ql -r;a "s ~"~~~ -le Z a On' 'r \ ~. ~:? ill, i i' i j; i\ \ i 1.] ~\ \\I I\ j/: ~'II L r r j i\! o I I~ i1: i:; i r:cL;i; ii i i,']/,~ / j d "i ~\ t~ I ~s~i~~;~r~~~:. i i I; 2al )ft~: ~ ( i s/;; ~S~ ~-~f~ III M ~ ~ i:~.r: ~ r; a~iu~,`i~~~~ Iiriiiii;/~:'.~,,,!,,~ ~ 1 I a ~t~vi\r;~: I I I I i-I` Ft` ~ I PP 8 'h.r b o.s I,:!I ( iijI~ r: j I i i iii i, f~l O `~ ~1 =;_~~ u j j i~~LLE!~r~,5 3 Ci; II; f; I r;r r i,_~e ~. - P ' 'C; i, h' c $; c t.a 51 i~ =--i~;~ r ~ ~4~ r I 1, ii // iii C J 11 Ali MERON ioNITIS LUMA i ii wk F~~id if l~a,i -C II i = r'5 6' -rir~~ Le, -~ li 'f s LJ I rI ", o i _i_ NI nAH EM N-t- 'ý E R 10 ALAH -ETH r --------~ ~t I~-~-'~; i,i"~gG; Q,, i JANOAý ~I.~~*nz ___i$ 711. ~--;--- 4w ~i r r r ( ~.~11~~-~-- - _J -- AIM LYO.R 1106 'A~4 TAM IXP H f SEEM 4A -Aiý ýc -la t o P4 )ý -N I i " Oi, Il~il/ i ~~"~;r~ --- A K j 0 Is-,Fs i i i iij i jii;Ti u 9 ~~~s-a~ 2 iii 3 G r. ~ h 9 w F F~j g 81~ 78 S% g SE o o N O oo o.fi c oP, ii i o o Es i So 113o.h o o o i I~1" o k g o B d. r7 LA ANI Aft )m dN A R m hf ES 0 A6N:)A I AL ADAH, Z4A ';i;~ ~~~ ~ 1 ~ r ~' =~-==J~= ~t,~ ~--~--0~ I i/ /II 0 0 I~, /// i// C~ i~ r/ / / i J, ------; 0

Page  [unnumbered]

Page  50

Page  51

Page  52-53 I ii ---------- -1 ~, \ \ ~6~e~ --~_-C------ r I i iii llý:i: r; i I// i i/,,!i~ Of Caal,ii~~ \\:: ~\\ \~\ C.,~i~\Ii \\\',\ \\ ~r ~,? i,, r i' i I rI r I rI; rr~iP: I I ~ i ' ~~\\ j ~:~~\ I \ ~\~\\.\ \\\\\.\~\ TB~ g7~c~L a~tir 1'i /i/I!1///'i2 ii i ~-=x1 II. iiliiiI I ii II'ji i ~~t~i~~--- ~~-=-~ /i S1 II/// /ý vo 1*ýy -ITT -~ i I~ koi t i r.~ I j.: Ij;i i j/ /I/// i ''I o IC \\" I i i iI rC: I,, i- i i i ii i I i ~S~fg'III~I~,,jj /~/' ~ I LI i ii 1\ j/'; i I ~i - ~~I I-:ii, i I ~/ '--e ~IB~ _r_ -Xý \\:i!it jii I 'I I:! -iI r i i,,ii i i i~i. i i. i; /6~r i/i /~//~ ///: l/i/. iir II i;i; ii!i I i:'fj o i \1 I:::,\: I ii' ~"lic iii~j I i i I' i,.. i, I iillI(it:\ \ ii I i r;1S, i /i i iI /i ~: ii i j; r I Ij' I~Iir i i ~~~/i;; II r 1 ~IB~ aP-I I 'i/i /i -,~ 7; r if i ii /ili:1 ~, ~.i:ii i~i i ii~ t~ //I ij i i: I i I I 'i ---~-I ~ ~ j i i ii i 1( I, j~.,~ /I j;~ I j ~ '_11 1 ~,t;. i I.t i i

Page  [unnumbered]

Page  54

Page  55

Page  56

Page  [unnumbered]

Page  [unnumbered] ~3--L--r~L------~-C~ -C~_C--C -~ I M i I__~~ __ _~ ~____i~i __ ___~ ____ 33 1 Y 'Oc ~~: I;i ~cS ~/,,~, ///./ ~I Ii I;Ii iiI i ~i I,I/ O 3C~;it~:!~.~i~ r // ~/, c~~~I /'Ii I/.I//// ~.:s rr~ia//;r' r~i ~i i i I/ ~s ii' ii ~?o,,, ~.__. __I__ __ I ---- _ ----------r ~F(;3" "Z ~i C j/,j iii I ~~////; 1ii/iI,,, ii, r ~I, /1 / r.~ i/ /~ I NZ Wli N fill T -------------- RIX INN, I i i I I //~ I ~/i i I/i, i ----/// I -~ ~,,V: $4~ i i r r f 157 1 ) f t 1 i I:_1--- ~~'~/ II I; j," I i ~ i i -~,, i /`31 -J =-' i ~/ I " k-. IJ (i 7~ I ii / t i,1 r -C ~r. -c; r i i i:! ~YI i i i i ~ `r; i,r, iig~ iiii Ii,-i ~r 'r' r r II 1; 1I t I I,, I I I -;r r 0. \'\\ \\i::ji I:Ti; ~~. ';ii/Z h i ////', / I 1 I.~ I /?/"; I\ i, i ii ~ ii /j,' ~Z ------- r-- Ii i ~\ ';crx I ~ \ hi ~) i i r 1 I j I ii r "i ~ i `~;,~;~i~i~i~J~~\~~\\ \\\\\\\\\~rl~ i~\~'~,lri~i~,~`lll~I! I Il i 1 I I I I ~~ \ a ~. ~~ ~~\~._ ~ --------- s ~s~~.~ ~ ii 2 ii /~ -r ~,u~ac~ j 'I ' 1/ ii, i i ~\?~ i! 8 ~ ~, ~I ~ i r=\` ~, i '\ r,-l Pji I iiU 'i r ~)~1~ I~ -b3~iI -i;1 ii.ii s:~I:? I I I ~,~ / cj~ I T 5 I I,I.I 1 i ~ r i" ~:F:~ Y,, I i j --j I I j.4 /r t I 1i' ii o ~~ /i i ~t~~ I i;I: ~I i' r I 'i O~i rI /~:t I i i i L r,, r II ~ ~, /r j: Q Y II _ii L- ii i ~ ~:tf i, FI,, 1'1 ii i is'i// // j ri i\ S ~I i:l \\ i\ i' d --e I~.i \'I i /C:-$ i i /i I, ~~ ~i i i bf'/ ii: i i, i I I ii I i Ii i ~Y-~~, 1 Ii f I I Ii II i r ~~; I IiiI 1/ ~-, i!4'.4 Fr h 3 i ~i o ii ii pi,\ r rte r o~,r ~, ly i~4t~ I;bi ~c~ ~T/ o ~5~,AF j: I. ~/ b~~ i r ~~ e I ~j~lr4d~Yli ~6. i I Y i ~ ~u;: ~;t;rs~ ~, ~ iirrq~$' / ~t _~ ~///i i s' ~_~ ~7.-I;i 1~~r /i.I/ j v;3 ~1 C~i~LV' c~h~ ~ /,T 1~ m e I ~ I 1,- le Id:.:: L- ~Z i.- a i $ r I~AI~i ~:r~.L I B -i * ~.. I\\ I IrJ~ - ~ i, 'vi~ O ~i 1:~--I I ' / I If t r!I;j% /I iJ1 I!;i i I -J a 7i ~7i'ii I i?! "z~y -~-- '~ \ ji;i ( i:lii ~-s~ i i: I\ B o X t ~3~-cp i I 1 i Ic B 3 C9 9 '1:i ~e~Y-,!kui:! rY. r;3' ~ZJ: i ~ ~ i ii \~:)i cl~" r rlIi I fI t I III; i I i ~(I it i: iI~ 'iilrrtirci i. rlil.~ j ff~ "r v id"~~ J:I ':ljI tli'i I?. Icr~~. %: I \j j; /li I`i.I.I j i 0' J ~j!; t~\ L II i j;~~; -i o l:i i ~ 17\\ I~i ~nj~ pi;;ii:i: II i i ~i O ~\ui' i r ii i~r----- J, ~//~:~ 1~L ii j u ~2s~or i\\ 1,11 '~P;t hi o j r ji;~ ii, ctit-~ i 1S:i r Bii i Ii\S ~1.. j/:':: I "i I i 1-~~ i 'i:~ I'// i: C1 I h\ ir'/ 'i~i~2 j:s*II_~~="~:~ ii 1~I;-&3~ I~J Ulc~- ~J~~~:~ 1 a /~ o- i R.'RL~.!% i;S i \I i iI i I ( ~ ~ I ~BA L,c. i! \:j ij I ~- 7e a b I ~ iii tar i / / rce i 'cl ~iA:~~~: i\~ I,v!,tY, ~Is?\ ~ i~ -t~ S i\ rr, cq ~yc~r,~~ Id -let C-.7 wahý 110 mzý 0 -Aý Ile; OW Re C2 G 0 Zvi PCR yu ply 46 04sy to * "VV, via ~0 Fiq Ar/ q A 1z: 0 -102. 47 0 /71 Ak A%% F7 4E 4 ISO: Z. 0 fý lpýjt ý( A %J) 2d Ay AZ 126.4 =y: ~-iC--w.11 ovrUP A7 wo- ~ -I.Il--~~~- l~-~C-~-~-~ rl -- -- e I ' I ' - -sl - - - - - I v - 7 1 - NINON= I

Page  [unnumbered]

Page  [unnumbered]

Page  [unnumbered]

Page  [unnumbered] . 7 i.ýý -,-- 1.7ý..,,!- r " ý m;. I -, r L.,....-"-,.....:;. 1,,, 1,,..,, - 1-11ý ýý 11 -1-1 m '! --. -..u-ý. ý. ý%.; 7. N." 0.-j.1.... j".... '...., -..,... %,. ý,, ý,.ýý,,... ý:. 1:4 ',.,,ý!i n;,..::ý L:: ". '..... 's T:77-..., r ".,, 1 I.- %.:;'1..;... ý- '...1.. %.,ý,`, - -.", - - ".j.. -.M,?, I I, k11 I 'i, ý.I'.. ý...,..,.1, t. -...'. 2"p.!.I,!- 1,1_4,14ý',:11 P...,, -... I.. v.,;,,ý..'., 1., ý... 15,,';ý ý, g..... '.. 1...... 9-4,1-...:.! ý;,::.-,ý:, ý..,: ý. -%. 1... l.4.,, %.4,-'. ':..:.-.1.,, -, 1;-,. i! TOM,! 1-1 I. ý...U...: ý?,... r,!-,:.:. I, -. I "'..."Mg...W." ý ý.:. 1Y."i., ga ".4:ý,.. ý:x:":: % I;ý 1....?,.:.:.....; s I,.'.... r.....,.21..::11:ýt2i;":W liw,..'..... 11 1....?.:.:..1 -..., im;..,. ýa )!;e1g*.. ý.!",..:%!,. 1,11.'. M11,., -1: 4, 2-1., ", 1'.-,:,,!m.-.j:1...." - -. 1.,,. 1 L., j,..! i,.'..!...-................,.... v '2,',,.-%ý-. ý:!:',,ýA'F.!.ý%.'.ýý iýl..ý,,fý5.% ý,.,. ý;:,'ý..ý..1. Z,.";Zý -;;,-,%1.jt!,VfK... u;. 1,;:;. '..,.ý ýý, qiý;ý!ýý.,-.-,-,,& ý',: 1; ý..iL... ':...... -.. W 'D --.-.1.1' %Dl- - U ' 10P.wj, '.!%.-,7..ý.ý,ý.,.:%, j,:; r r% '?,:..ý "',...::-..,.",W4..;.ý ý!,Q!ýJ-,,ýll,.".;"ý,'ý.,...:Is:ý"-f.ý.ý..,..ý:."Iýg.z.,ýi:.,ý;ý,..lýý,.ý i. ý,,...,.. 1i:... I -..ý.:.!. 1.:.,.,. -p.MN5ý;U, -.0?!;4..r,..., ý.:!.. -.-ýý. ý.1ý,.ti,,, ý...,., K......" "n, ý,w u 0:, X l?:Z % rj.. A S.io.4F"., ',. % ý ý,-- -,,:ý., I.ý. 4ý r I j, -,. V A ek,f.;,-,, I.&... ý.1 %...,,L. 7,.!.....i-.`,4:,;. '....:.:;;:& hl -,: ý".Y:- g.,: ý0 4 ý I lgo;,... I... jj......:;;......ý.m:1. I:: i:5.: ý '..".. - ý,--,, -. IM.:...... V......-.. týý..:....:.:. i. ý 1 ". ý,':ý,:,.ltl ý.! 1:11- 11-1 I -..,,ý -,: ý 7 1r,4, ý j..:. ý;...:; lzlýý::... II w-,ý-,, kt: e - -.. 1 ý4ý:.::,,.ýý,;,.ý %,;Tý......; ýý -,..m-1W.- j.... ',iýiiii:ý,,ýýý.ý',".,'."..,:ý '..,e(-'1;,'.ý`., A, ý.. 74.....(..,. r.,.11....1....10%. -. ý,....;". wý:,- 1 -Ii....."... '...,,.'.;,.;. 4..,ý%,. -,.. -;:jg'.ýjý'.ýý`,.:!.. u"I., - I - i. '.,ýi, M,wil"K 1,1~..., ý$:^,....:,.,!,-v-..... - 'M ij..-,; ý-j... L%-,.-frx, '-!....:: 6%*ez. 1ýif, -`m. "; - 4;ý,! ý. W.:,:. V: I U, 1. 1 -1-11.1-N!'m Pý,ý;1-7tý 0.,-a. VK!. 'Y jimiýiý..:;&- V.: ý,. '.. 1,;., - " I.... I.. - '. 9:! ý,,,, Aý,7ý. -..,.,;:R'T.4ý.ýii -,. iýK`.;.ý... ii,11...... I U-ý4ýýv;8"r".',` "',,.; '.,'.,ý;,ý. i; 4 ý`. "I -L, ýa. dý. -ý.,,i,"-'.,ý,'..-?.,,ý,,ý,.,::,.;ý'.,.';.,ý;,,ý..0,f, ý,-!: ý....: ý. ý., A ý ýi!,ý ýAi!:ý -,;ý,ý-11 - M,.: ý IT-, F, 1; 1ý..: f'...,,,.,.f. i R..ý; -o"....1 -;:% I ý-?V.--1m-1--m '... ". Wvo --m -"ve, ý;;'11ý1ý-.,*ý l!"...", ýr.viNf`ý;ý,ý.,ý,,?ýli I..........1.1-1-Pl. I........... - ý.?ý&,7.'ý V,ý,...,., ".. 1-...ý:,..ý 4"',.ý ic w I..;iil,Z_....,.",,.,. 1. Li..ý -j %, ý k 6:,. " '. ". 1:.ý;;., -,. -,?... - -....::. -, -..6,ý.: f:iý.ýý:.ý.!'- c,..;!:,.. ý, ý I. j-1;,":1n, V` 1:1 CM..;,..,ýý.-x,' ýz OT:4-,.i.,;ýýý.i%.,ý.r.ý.:A"ý-.-.ýl.ý,:ýý-. v'.d, j-- - ý ýA-Yvkz 7.:::'Z N.... I. 1:.... 0-. ý....;. - -iiitlý ý7;- %!:Y!", -.ý!.,.,'..iýý.,ý::.....:1 i i%:,!.jiý..ý,ýý'-.. " ý 4eý 11.?111-1fýý:ý', Ptý,-;;... m.;,.14-i'l, L.4ý'.`.,,ý! j... ml- -ý;e6,:;ý:.,'! n:1: 1 ý ` W:......,Tý,.:.;;:;k".,-.,%!-A,-..i,;k..,., ý!. ý.";,ý,':ý ý:ipq..--. -.,..... - 1....ýýi'.!,. - - - - - - -.......1-4.......... 7ýPVnl -.I. %,-&..,.... I I MA:.. - - Q. jýz.A,-,. -.1.. -,tý.% j - _A..,.!.... -1 71 m ý1: 1.1.,ý"V.-Lj,? -............., ý.. 2,-.,ý--., -- ý '. '........ -....:.... '.... - - z...,.., t '....... 1ý0.; vj.r...,.ý!;,,:! - 'It. 7'M,j -. -i":: ý `A.:-:. V. -. I...,.,........1...P;ol N E. %-:nlý,-I, -. '......1,;, ý:".ý,:. ý,;::,Jý %: '..ý11.... I A, A 6- 1,. 1. -..,: ". -,.,,,..A..!-K,,, ",!ý-, ` 4, ýý'ý,';,""'. %-j"'.. N..p.... ý.. - -ý! ", 1ý,. 1'..,: ý,ý -,ý.ý.;ý'!, -...::jý`:%_ýý;:, i'!:: i: i. %:ýum!,:ý K., "..,,.,ý.g". ý.., ýij..:,Z ",. f y -...,.! 1 -,ý..:.....". 1 Im. ":..iý%.ýý,ýý.ýt"-".ý7ý:.,""?i,... ý,..ý % ý,.ý.,.. 1. ý, v-14,ý ý rrý ý'-141i? w'n ý,ý.,11:40:ýTt",....-. - 5, -Inz:,;:ý:... Wý-.;,.,m!ý:: " 1ý'..;;.. ý:.:.ý:.,;ý..,-:ýl 4ý-,i, ", - " '. ",:,* -, N -- -...;.. -I.;..,... 'v "!:ý-,. ',, -ý, "..ý:;,... ", 1 -ý 1 '. % - -,-, W. - -;.i, ý... -,. il...,--,",.:::,! 11 -.,;L:T;:;.;.:.A.-.,, 1. %.. 1.,........ t'i'lli'ac'; ýýk, '...,.'.., ý 2".. ""'ýý No g,. n -.ýalýpr-. M.!."ý!..,,,, ý. T..;I.;:!.. -ýý!... " 'j.:;.iýý::Z.ý, I a, ýý- y-,. ýk, 1, -..., -.. -.W.,ý 0-....7, I,..., 4..;ý'- I -,-1;o.- W, &1 F, 4! 1,111-41 I,;1.,.,.N ý - ý.,,.,.,,i:,,_ I., "riz.-, %,:ý....: ý.:,,',',,ý;,., I,.. xs m.,ý,...j,w..,. ". I I -1w....,,...,.. 2. r.1. c " Zý.1. M,%-1.11A Ii.1.1.1-Krill.. ".,. -.... _... '.4.. a -A H"i % E. "., '. -11,;.Z A,ýý-.',- k::1,...,-.1.... - 1k. d, -.. ý......,.... "K:...: 1 1,;:;...,.!,ýe%!,&..ý,'f, l.l. `-...t... i... - 4, ':,:,1, -, ý!m ý:: ýý,. ý!ý.,.,j..Y..e. 1...:...:ý;:...t..,..lý:,?ý,A;"..,o,7.,;"ý.,jý,".II: i""V,,.,. 'Or, -...:.. i., ý, AR. M;1`1 -.1.- 'i,;.-% -,Af, L,;t:"" -il:-!.N 1,0-ý.,.;,?;1'.,-ýei-,:' uM ".-;ý.;,ý;--. zi: j,, N W I I ". k,.1. e., ý ýi`.;jj-.j.,:. -i?ý... ý"2..;.Zop! 1ý InK.",..........".. j?"I.LO...,?.:!-- -.%.:ý - ý::...'.7 ý, W N171 M.,.. I.1.-..-.ýLg 5" -7,,lýý,ýk li ý! T-- Gý;:,..- ýýN-;, -!.,z4..::.%:',4ýýi,ýt',,;...ý,'ý!;-,ý.m -.-.,ý?, '.. M.,.7.;1 - - i..,ýý ý5,;.!3:ý- w". ý,.,. ý. I f...., - I I K, -."'ý.'% W. 11.11,. - "'., -ý,;ý;,-r:-,.:.. ý ý:.. _. ii,.ýý -. ý.... ý ýýjý...,, "M u 'ý-# ý,-,,';"4:-.`.;;:yLy,ýý,Mý,;j 1:,"':., ",.,;:%LM A'17ýý,:.:;..., 'I ý,,."ýMOýAR M.i " ý1,;T.... -;,, w;, %..,ý:, -),ýý.... -.:ý,,..-_,,,kfq,-'ýý: ýf4ý-,..,.. "..., ý 1: ---ý:%$ý?:eý?.ýýlý..Pý i ý:,m T,,ýgt,--g.j,,p,-v.-5%!x,..,7!,1,.- 1. 1ý'ý-ý. j. 'g." ý M, ý`,:%-ý; S...,.,.... `ý41-.: ýý; kýlýj.;.,,ý--,,. ý..,ý,,ý,.,,.%ýi:,ý'gýý!,I.,.:..::!,:.ý:W,,!,:ý.,.ý-4fý4;ý,.ý'T -?,;,,g:1iiv-ft1......;4'."), -ýý. -...,.1. -..... zn- 7zý-. 1... 1. - '. ý,,-.,...:......,. "." ",.,...... - -...... 1:;. '... ý:ý:;':. ýý, 'k:-f!ý:ý%ý.' ". ul. - ": 1: ý,..11 - N. ý.ý.;g-.'j, -.. '.1, %., "K, ý L ý:i,.I- ýý,... 0..,,.ýý.,fi, - ýi4pg-, 3 I,!A;ý.ý--,,;i.ýi., ', ý, I. Im.. -ý,,'ý,,,W%----,ýý,N...... 1,1ý "A'......".......... %,ý. '!;, ý,.;.:., %;,ý', ý::j,,. 0 ý,,ý,:,ý;,;,.'-py.ý6!,ý 'p.,ý!.M.!ý,ý: -..:,'. = hjjý..... Vpýp "!..::m,.-=.:ý:,.!., 4... 1 'y ý 4,, %:;,NP,,11ý 1 AP, % 0--pQ. ingg, ",,j;R ý.,ýý -, ý; il.p ---" v.1. j.4 ýnlýaý!.......,,., ýl;!mm- - L ýw4!,ý ý11 -:. %.;-.., I.,,f 1% i,..ý -Ar4l,: V --.!KqA.11ý I - 1, W "'i'l.,.!w- 1 'T:!ý_.-,,,,.,ý yY.;ý. 4,4,...; - W ý-'-'L. "-." - 'r...;,.ý 1:....;.,.-'..ý.-,..... 3.....-.., 1,. z. nt.;A. ý:;, -,.... ý I '. ý T 2,'ýtORX-Rk..,. ", ý'j -.:op. -M. ý 1;'?..,.:::j %., Im, W,". ý...1 1.; ': "I ý a"fa 4 " ý.. ýý,.If ý1:t., ý mo- -5, I, - - v ""'M ýý -',...1!... 'l. k 4 ý N.; Wll:, ý:;.. -ol.,....ý,... M I - -,ý -!2! &, - M. Q,., ".,.ý'. ý:i..;j, '. i ýJ!j,;. -pp.;d4ý:; g,.. ýN..... '. I,, "',ýK,..' r.:,j- r, " I, ý 7,'I't "'M I -ý.. I ý:.; %..ýi.0..:..-;,.. j:..M., " ',7.'.";.-:: -,ý -.N'ýý ýýk-:ý, 1,.?. '.. ý:..i n, -,;, r..,.,Lý M......"PL11.1"';, u!ý,,,ý.,,:ýý,, '... ýZý: I.::: 1.11 11, o. I..so.,;- ý,Jý W.?.,- v - sg \,1PR.-,:r. 1.V 1.:ý. ý,!,, I ý t...... '.., * - 11,...... ý 1...I, --v - -,ýk.. I.R., $ 1 h;.,.. iF ý;ý,,ý,?, ýfO O".,. Im, R; I,.-... '42,t. ýj!;!;....j:!, xVY.1%,-., I, - IT;. ý. '......."..; ý:.ý. 1:; ý7; i,ýý,ý *%, N, I R W....1...... 1 $,Vtv..1 - - - 1ý 14 -, ý -,ý;,:E -ýPW:1'3..v J, I!-P 1, ýýiQ ý.Z;ýý!,;iýl..,....., klý'ý,. -Z4,,.ý:--,ýý. i";z:;'..;ý,ý. -`: ý,ý:j dN1 ". SQý,.'Zzj' ý, -; 1. r ý.. 1..,.ý......,..,..., ý,,, P18......... ý:P.:1'..i.:,v-'. 44 N..:..:.. ý 4.:...'. -.A '...;-M.Aýr. -.., ý f I - R, 9 -,,ý 'In' ý,.t,.,ý.,,ý.,.';,,, - 11:,ýý,, ý;: ). `ýS 1.7 -,. m-I.- PO ROM.,;.,. I.. -1: 1ý ý'kjk&i1.;:%.;.ý& - '! ý, ": 1 0 ý ýý;ý ýiýl M IR ý ".'.. ý.,M,,-.;e '.,,'-ý,ý'J -Affi- i'. 3--,31,,, -Xw:wm--- 0m;X'; ýIw. j'..;:-,i: j,;,j:% I.....111.1........1,.ý.n o.., ",...ýCj,.. -NN - ý ý-',. PIA "IV' %I:.., NM,, - ý -.,. - ý, ý - - " - -, ý - -,1: ý,-:,::,...,,!ýý,,.ýii:,ý";".ý6iýNlb,ýý,ý...Iýý%ý,..T-...:Zz:z.-.. "tý:V,.-ý ". AMM,.- ý,,, "....5 'p,,, 1. '.. ':1 -,.,; ", ý., "t, k 4ý ý 1ý! 'r 14, i.;N y4lq. iP:1ýL:ý:,.:--!ý.k? v........... I.". --.:..!Aý ý,;:,,Wiý-FWýo.w.!;ý!ý, ý -.,. O"I"" 'C-ýj!g,.!&--,, -;-1-7 gm jowir.,,%:..Y-T-,ý;jrr,.,]ý;*. q,"IMIDP 1;,ýi:ý... -,?.! 7 fA. A112"; ~ýýIpl:A--,ýIne'ý,iýAZOIA% ".", - -..... "',..ý.;;,:ý,ý:M ",ý,.,%,:-, '!, "..,..:.!... I.... --ý,K - I - -1..... --- -., 5,, ý-ý!! I f;n-1,.p.. h -.,;;ý. ý:n ý ".,,-,,,, ý-`.1I I`II -I.. `-I-,.11,-,,I--,,,,,-,,,,ý,'., -1ý -...... -- 'A.,ý,:1!1ý1,k ýV;': 1. 1ý.-r.,,iý;,.k.,, -ý,,,' ýi;t.4 ",:!4ý;ý,j.ý..,--ý........ iAll.?. I i -1. I i: I..:.1. I 1>."TIMMIT -.K1... 'rm" ýK VýP,ý"ýPtmM;11 ými -4i 'w I r. ---ý-ý;:,u, -........,... I.e..,,.!:,,,ýLýý.,ýký ý,ýWm ýS.I-i..q.,24, rli;ZNý. ý:iil -ý,. ý., - %:1-L I -ý " ý,; Til%':1.17.. `ý-..-.'.-T- - m-mm:ýý,ýýFý;w o7ý-.'! ý11ý,5.ýZ'ti'YAlýe"..,g.'ý;-j:!.. " ''T.-.-T". 1.....,,,, 4-- 'ý, &ý!::, ý;%:?Jý;:, 1W. - a ý;:.,ý::tý,i",Iý,;,Xn.!.ý,, I 14 f jýý; ýý-l i?ýýR ýt!!: ý: qfý -?,. ý 1,,-.., A; ý,.! ý:.:ý:i.-'):ý";,---hý ý 0 - s F.,;-ý:ý;, i, -i '), l- %,w ýffg!,,ý:ý,ý,'.,ý-. Am..,ULý!,,4ý,! ýý.;ý -,:,.;,tM.;ý7i,',' '. -ý_P:ýr..gm. t;; -,M..,-N.*,ýý... - Aý r:', - i., 't'ý., % g", ]ýT,...,,"..,ý, ýr'-Tj... A, - - - M vik -;4QFir2..ý,; -.0.4-011 1 -.50!: ',.-,:,..v, 4sm?, JI., m, ri.4..t --1 'g W,,., 1,:., Kýý ý,%:q tNie,',,t',,ýý ý'-f ý:!-,.'%ý.Z... 4q,7 v4iý. m r m. I,;,:., -S.." mm;A- o I '.A." lftý, 1%. "I....'4-;& 014.1.1 ý31.1.04.ý--Q % r 11MR, &ý NIL. X. ký;.ý:ý!:,),ý. ý!:ý il'ý,--M. M..!...!,..,., - " %ý,!! t. S. rý,,,...-..."'....9. 1-1 ý -. A-z-," -..." 11 ý -!ý,,..it ý,.::;:,. 'f,.. 1, -,"A". ýý;,Týý -..'ýK..,...k, I W I, ". - -... W, 1r,.ii '.,,01 11! h:,...ýr4. %. %.:;..dj.,.cc;,:&.;...:d-. 4CA-, 0ý ': r;N --),'1.ý;,ý,ý.!& ý 1,.ý;.;!ý,ý. k A#,;-;mz,.-wQ:o:k.1...., - - op,.1 w I i;.ýLl: T!"Ni 'Vj!. ".; -x -W!Z-Y,.N14,;.,ZV -.,.-..... I'll,......... IM. I! 'ý 7.;.;ýT- m: -,.1 ý11Z.A-wýaý ij ý- -- -- '-- I V M.Fl.f "16ý i,4' ý.:.,.1'..3... " "I - P., I, -...,,.ý'-.'ý"r,.,..ý'ý-'.-4ýý-;Eeqivl, c... I -, I. ý.ý-';,ý.::.j:, I 1-0.;.;...41 N..'si.. 14!ýIZ %ýý,ý,,ý Me,., j MgM, i`, "I..)-',-'. ýý 4 ý,ýj -o'.... -m...:.--.. ý " 2 11, ik:; -1- ý -;....,g.... OMXWZý ý,:-,.;ý "!,::ý;,4..j,.,, g,1,,.,,',,ý, 1.1 --MWý- jleý,, Wý, -ý -..ý, -, al l..4".,:,.r4 "".4 ý' 'ý 1. W &A-:.4!..- -m - 10.,ý.X..W "',. '.. P,,,. 1... I 17-..,wko -. a,,ý,% --ý%--.... 1.1 101- T. I..... 1. i " - -ýý,v4:p,%%,,.2ýh$...,.,,.g,ý%... ý. I.., I..,; S Ulf N-,%11. 1A..ý...;. ý 19'., 41. 0ý&,! --! -P!M "W'k. '.., ý', ý.N.-I '.-,.,%,.., I ý,,ý rýqf'.?,.,.?.P.,.-, tktyl i, R i 111:.M,1.11 I%-.1 ý, 4,_ý%.;ý m - - '........... 1--- ý 11 - m. ý, miit;k4 &P.- rp",, "....j.-r.. ', J. 6-1&n.ý.441. n, 11",.il * -.., /n B '., A,-pvý!n; - ý,ý -ý:.,N ý,.%ý,ý,A!,!.::! %ý..., 17 ýK,iii.!!. j,!-.;A-gý " 'yr.ý,Qký " " ý:'i'V. ý11ý ý11, ý ý 4,ý5#!:;ý ý.p '. ý ýý:::,%t:,ýiP!,.jý'Im.-i.,?::;,ýý.";.-.iýNI "PY U t.,,,i,ý,, -,.? ý.. m. -ý, -, '....ý,- -,,;... -:g -0 M,-Z? Zý-;` -o.-.n*&q%, - ý..6- r,,,lip. IýN %-.;.s,,% f.:ý;. I 'r,,V 'k- - - %-W'gf#6ro.Ap*z.........'MA.., UMý -- pq * i V s.4,-Y:.. TPY, jr-.., ý, 1,ý,. '. ý`iý,,m I ý$!L:- ý 1:,A gs gj.ýý..!'.VA. ý, j,,-,;.-, AV,,; fIr. V.. wyg,'ý;?.. g g., ý.,,, M-L............. ý-AA:!, M ý,,!ý,Nlm* 011ý1. ý... m ý.1:..-. ý x, -1.,.!; -.',ý.!, t, '. ý:.,...ý. I 0.ý,;,: 11.1 ýý-. ý ýV,. 0.,1. I 7 "I'll' I ý --;-rg.;Vý ý ý-;;ý. j k.;-. r.ýH-T)ýý.,%,ý, 1112116i.P iV24fý.J,ý, -1 111-ýra--Uvj,ý,'!;.ý IE F.I..A. X -.6; -.1 - N1,1Lz1%P,.1 ý 4N,,-- N O `7.11.401- mlm.................. 7.:.., %, Id,.,.-ROm -.fA-!,.,;,, --j?.;1:".!,',%;ý -,'-' X.., ý.., -,,.,,;,. V 'Ej= R m " ý! ý ý& -,,,,ý6 `.!.".`;,-:,ý;, 7,.ý ý;.Allp.1.1.,__ ý,,,..,..,.,.r 7. ý,., - 'Y' I -`-i"!ý ý'.1"'..".I....1.,ýW"-,,ý.1... liý.1,,g- %1,?; %.:J., ~;'.V;,ý 'k..ý:ý, ýý;. z. - --;--ý ýk, N.A. Tk Jiý,.. "'01 i-.ý ý I..;7.-. ý I N -11. %:,T ýý. f.:ý- ý..; g.!....,. %,,, o-ý:M,;. ý.1i1:-1K::,-?.1-,:ýý'ý,ý Pa'. 'o.'.ý I. 'A I -'. Em 1. I * A i.i.. --... -, -.... - -.-,.W..,,.-L ý ".: -, v,. '! ý.....,;:,!ý: ý I!ý 14:?,ý,ý, -,1.,7.'Xs 1:, 5-:1::,, I,', i ".'j; ýýW;, -,,,:,ý,,, Z... ýZý 1ý I I.... %.:ý. ý(.ý.:.,.. ý,,-! ý - -,. -W..41.. Al'.1-1 1.5 11ý i.',ýý:ýA!!-,: l.'ý,ýýl,.ý'4'4.ýi,ý,,,'-,4.?ý.ý;: 'Cl;;,ý%c 1'.1 A ýý,Z N.1 ký -. I!Tcl -A,:.,I, I.. -0, -ý, - MAI -,ý, ýý:ý. -2:. 4 P.11 ýiý: lmý "11, ý- ý 7 T,-M!4:ý -, I.4 x. g I APA; v;Aliz... r. gy;!..,, ý11.,,ýý.,.N %.,T I.,,;;."." ý I'K.... f."oss........... -,.111 m;..: ý i. --Iý4!,:_,..-I., I.M. '. ", ý " I......1-1;5;..-M 18-.-Pil-1154-.ý.. 1....ý,, I...R........ 41-- r -.,, - '", 11-1.;.Q. ý ý A rn,ý,qr - 1ý1!. -,! 1, M 'W,,;!., 10 '-wil,,, gg;,... F." -, M.;:-.Iýi i-ý:-:ý4:*.'.'p%ýý' 'p, j'ý'N.. -.A...... ".P.e, "n "'. - -.- 1.ý,.:. -.1 I I M,.6ý, FpC, '.,, -ýrj,! -1 M I.,.....?: ý.ý,:ý..-. ý%ý.,,'.-.!ýi..;,:.,i",t-i;ý.;ý j;.ri;9,%iý-)...,.. --..-,..,..,.... I MM.! -..ýNv--V..: ýW I.,.,... ýjfl,.O i 'I ý%10:.Mý r. -?"N"` -,; ýY; 1 141, f4.71!.....,,,.il, " -, -.,.-z, ý- -'Z'. - -.,,..,, -1,1A t%..,, ýý,.- 1ý1,..... ý..ý, ý'... " I - ý,!.iw.? )4 ký6..,j pvn....,.....A:, " - ý,.:ý%!F, ':. - q-,%1!4.f,P ýmn*, -F.. B; ý ý-,, M.,..ý!,.; M -\ -- -.4.%.ý. -W. I -,-......,., P.;. ':..;;.!:,.- i A-iz EX; ýQa,. -., -ý I ý '..T;,.."., IV- t....... ý....... a ffiffi,.;.. 11 f.1 I tý ý W E'* " ff" -vv; ýý. iýi,-,1!7;:ý:.-Ak i-tý.,............. 1..,.. W. I -.- ME.:ma.,-;ý.-.."ý'r.,?.41,7777i-C-l OT,,rýfti,... 5-1ý.7,.-.6 %V;,ý. ra. VNA.mlo Lq-i;.... ft-ssiaiuuýý!ýNý-' Ný, g&:,ý,p ý?M -Itr,ýAýý ýý, ý.mAý in:.,.?. -ý;,! zr. ', - ýIi,ý,-ý.-.,, -,-.ý:ý!;?.. ý;ý,!ý.-',%A,`ý'., 1.71 M!ý'-.A'3 ý. rig pfe".,.,.;,, 1 -!, M i -,R'ýý ij...E.DA,,.. ýe.,ý!.. -',ý; `:ýlm L ý.ý-Ql r,: - -..'m.,.,: 3;ý, 1?ý;.:.;.,; %..,.-.-.--Q, ký1q " '. X.g -, '..ý. -w. -::",!:fjýyý!:,.;,ý% ý,"-`&4!ý w:ý, &$yAl-, C-.-J.,ci e......, O:x 1ý " ", -, - 11 10-.. 1,'A.4 it. kýýK-R.........ý; yU" tM'At4Cý,Xff.v:-..g',,,,ý,ý,,ý,ýý, IIPIXIK.,,ý`T, MMW.111.101 -11-11";, I,. M..; ý,. kl.,.K Zý,.., -,, L. o:;;)% ý.". l!j!..",.;ý,',ý;ýM l ý!illk;ý.' M.p ý,,.:,,,?...14,,,ýý,WN,-,-. ve. *gý %ýý p ", W -1, "... ý4..... " t.. -.. - 0., - "Ný?ý% ý;?,so ý-.?.;ýkjiz:;;.,.. ý. -, N,, 11-11,.-.ý': i.-.%:,.j..... 1-4 I,4 4 12" 1... ý -ý....;.. iý,.-;4( R"i.'a..gra....... P:--.",.O.Rrm.......... -I,,,,---,,ý.:ý I ý - '. I.M.-ir"'T.-I'm. V.....ý-.q-'R -,:m -,Cnw:-ý ---,2...-?..,.,.... - -j,;:%?ýffl - " /.. 1-7w..!?ý m.!,.x:n ai. ". ý - s Wý,....... '. I 11.."IM.. 10.. -,. ý I I I -11, 710:ro.1 m ý, --,.r ý'.... M - - fý&q.ý,..i.f,..'ý-'IZM.ý "n.:,$ w ý.;A" g-- w'. gf, ý;-L.bw,%: L, -,:,,, $ "Ll, ýIm!%ý:L. KIN*L- ýA.ý, -.q4 "...,,..... ý- - f ý!ýý:..,. - -.ý.........., %.Výý.a7ý ý-ýLý,,j-'ý;%.:o,.;ýMjý,L,ý I ý,:1..::,;;... ý! L. v,, j -, BU-MIM %M! >ý!,, -';ý,ýý.--ý.,,!ýL-7,ýý5! - -.g. ýýjý,.!ý::.,. 'N'. ý;-;- -i, -,. R.A. n., jr-11......'.. ýL..:. &M,4, ire pwA ý ý rip r'.Illmi.".I....'.., ý,- @,-,..,"ýý.ý!ýý, f ', i., --ti,. I,ý,;ý.! -.ý;ý pý.,;?e. - Vl;,,-. ---. 1,,q- - -.ý L,., r,ý.!,;ý!, - I 4..'s- sk.,,,ý,ýýB. 1- I.. ýiý.ý'!;;.:ý -.ý.I'.'P.M. ".,40 121w-l 1M..,...." g? ý ý, '. 6 '..; -:.,4;i... ok 2-156ri 'n - ý O"k,. I.......,ý - 1 -..,,F,....., ý -- -,- - ýA. 4. -4.. ff "M a"110"'AM 'W"..., 1ý,:, ý,-;-."f, A"11:7.,ý,..44P."WIX,!Aý.-,..,,ý 'A.16 n;ý,".'F'. Q... ý m.: ý! -.,. ý;iZ.Sr....W, R ý;,,ý. I 1."tw,. ". kl'llý"ý,,,.,f,,,ýll,ýAýrAý.i,ýý,!.ý;:.4 14e0!WM;1vS-Wýz,-',, ý..... I I W ýý -T 17 11., ý F..,.. -.- -'. ý 1".. ý 1. % 01.;.. --w l'... -, ",......,-, -,.,, g.., ". '1ý - -`.. 'k ".. w I *vj -ff--% -. ý.,ý.rý,5,,,.,,,,gv'T.-ý V. ý -N ýýM ýýl,'.,ý,ýý'Aqlý'.,ý,7,ýýý;,aý,ý,ý.ý ý, m:,:ý: 7;"$,ý,'ýifmq.,"".E Rýýll.ýk,ý.ýr & 't It 4ý iý. 3 1ý ý.. ý..;.%. "I ýr -- -, ".X 11 "I'll ).. W ",..ei.:...-.-.-,.-.,....-..-..,,.-.Q il--544*2`,4ý-- me,ýCA.47r.w..1.111.1!.,..1.. El I I Na -,"', ',ý-- "ýJ-'jj.ý ',-,.If.;-,:ý '..', 11. ý. ý. -.. jrz, -......."'.w. ý,;........ I, -, ý:,,a ý,.ý;, -..7,,?.q.% 1ýý: A.A. --1-,.. ý-., ýý 1,":, -, -r,.,...,.,!Irl:..',..7,!ý.;ý:ý.,Y?ý;ýýL'ý ý& VýMv),'.ýIj; -0-..ý, ý, ý k `ý?;)in- v,.,.q..ýZý1, vA-.1 " '.i", 1 1 6;;ý,. 'Teil" MR., 5,:,M ý...--,;n V,, ý.- '4-',ý, ) ýý. ý: 1.. nmm-m -".,ý!%i:L..ý, ".., 7--..P.-".,iýký, iýý;ijýý,.-"-;:..lfl;ý.,q V.,.0%...,-.... ý '. -Wý "Z ýtý'ý-'ý,ffi -.,,! iý.nM,-,-A,,,- -1., Vpý I - "Z:% " ý ý,...,,.-.,- "i MR: -, -.., 1-,L-ý,-. -, ý.. ý -71ýjj..1,.ý.. - -,, 193w..--- -. ". "AM111 IN z: j,,1:N',:ý;'ýý. ý!I.-',gjiýS,ý'ý,):... ý.ý..h.A. 'ý:,.T -..1. I 1%.;- I 811ýý.4SIM.1W.-It, -ý,IVý..."....'r. ý.-..40 xq..ý.-. ýý,:'S,. - 'm,. 5'- w -5, -:ý;EKT - - '%; -",:!%ý jo. k&:;ý;....., ', ý.. 1 -".,4 e. -o'j",,%F'.-ý -,Wý, 11:`