The county of Eaton, Michigan : topography, history, art folio and directory of freeholders
Bullock, Taggart & Morrell., Eaton County Republican Printery.

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Page  [unnumbered] COURT I-HOUSE AND JAIL.

Page  5 THE COUNTY MICHIGAN Topography, Histor Art Folio AND Directory of Freeholders. BULLOCK, TAGGART & MORRELL, TOPOGRAPHERS AND PUBLISHERS; 189%.

Page  6 ABLE OF CONT -,NTSO' Topographical. PAGE. M ap of M ichigan.................................................. 60-61 COUNTY OF EATON....................................... 7 Bellevue Township................................ 33 B en to n.............................................. 21 Brookfield " CarmelI Chester Delta Eaton Eaton Rapids Hamilin Kalamo " Oneida Roxand " Smufield Yermontilville" Walton Windsor............................................ 3 7............................................. 2 7........................................ 1 9............................................... 1 5.............................................. 2 9............................................. 3 1....................................... .............................................. 2 #5. 13....................................... 1 1.................................... 9............................................. 1 7........35............................................... 2 3 CITIES AND VILLAGI Chester Delta Mills Dimondale Eaton Rapids Grand Ledge Kalamo Milletts Mulliken Olivet Potterville Sunfield Vermontville West Windsor.......................... 54-55............................................. 4 6- 4 7.............................................. 5 0 - 5 1............................................ 5 0 - 5 1............................................... 5 4 - 5 5......................................... 4 6- 4 7............................................. 4 2 - 4 3.............................................. 5 7....................................:.......4 6- 4 7.............................................4 2 - 4 3................................................5 0 - 5 1.......................................... 5 7.......................................... 4 6 - 4 7 Is. PAGE. CITIES AND VILLAGES. A rw id...................................... 54-55 B ellevue............................................. 54-55 Carlisle................................... 42-43 Charlotte, 1st and 2d Wards..........................42-43 Charlotte, 3d and 4th Wards..........................46-47 Historical and Statistical. American System of Rectangular Survey................ 78 Census of Eaton County...........................................75 Churches of Eaton County by Rev. W. B. Williams....74 H istory of Eaton County........................................... 65 M iscellaneous Sketches............................................ 76 Newspapers of'Eaton County................................. 68 Physicians of Eaton- County...................................... 72 Schools of Eaton County........................................... 70 List of Freeholders in County..........................S.....O80 Printed at the Eaton County Republican Printery, Charlotte. (i 40 /

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Page  15 15 Township +Xdrth flaage 3 Wa&t tytrt~t JAr/i ci ~ ~ $~ ~11.,, Ceo t>~ ~CVisticntMa6er dcc- KCScttrycr I t t2ui~t&t 7~ k~ ~sc~#su/v ~ c'mlande> itier; c~ ~ ~ J/a(;tf Jt&rZ~oit -- j7~t~wrrt? ~ ~ Wan/co/v 4 -~ ----- ~ 59$j ~ K ~ ~. K? L9 ~ K~ -At y~I ~ iTHwMcrt ~z ~ ~ t~t,Ja;;;tn/we~/ t I ~~irn A%/ryJOlYClttt2 WcurtrrNe/ ~? cc 95 ~:~ * &.E. >~ 09AN0 ~ ~. ~ 2tfrc/ur~awders I ~ k > ~ j~z~ ~ 0 I 1 (1) C ~ ~Yt - -e~ j I$2lbcrt ~ K 2> 9% K ~K t SN ~ ~ I rp ~indltnyer z~~K? ~ yt5rtz< 2> I Nt Z~ ~ ~;~t.' ~S ~Ctz~: N~ -~ K ~ Q~ ~ *;t ~ A ~ C ~ Lester ~ -- - %hn~ ~ <~: ~ '~ ~t ~ ~ ~ ~ ~; wit? b~s~>~ Pal 4ck ~, ~~1 us ~~'42 ~ ~-9~aoc- ~ i?4 ~;:~ U ____________ ___________ I _______ ______ tt ---4 ~ 6rea cm AM~c4 ~$ Stzcewvat ~ ~ Aeerc& ~ Grcrhza'trv. -4) *1 JoAwIY rrtcr ~ArKV~pac& ~ ~& ~ (or ____ ~- ~ ~zi ~ kt~ h50 c~t /6) ~ N~ /tctcrrnatv ZAosWxxdcvbte, ~ ~ _____ Geaor&cti/rt> _____________________________________________________________________________ ~zz:~~ Jtt/; ~ to tard & ft/2& nicccrl (/C C AltrcdFErcvtt 9) ~ 4) ~ 4$ ____ ____ __ __ ____ ____ __ ____ _____ ___ __ __ __ Ceo /kt~rttu/%rtyt& try c, ~ CA s.F Stw/Y~orc1 t3$ > ~ Jibs/ug 44) ______ _________ /tT@Fogtcr; 3m, ~ ~t - K~~:~ ~> ~ ~ ~ Jasorv4~ffst/~er __ Q~ ~-4 K ~ ~, ~ I ~ -t ~ Ks ~ Frost A, rtSara/t Aa6kfl-z/ Y&rrict ~ ~ z~'- N ~K >s I IOY ~b'tam- 6) L~c#urttO? ~$ 4 - I [cz& 3, ~ U ~ & I SH4~uJf~ __________ m U q ~ ~ ~I) K~ S U - - -.Eu a (S D I. U U p 0 K ~tSaaorrt Re I; ~ %% I~ ~- VN c:>- N -* S &UN Kbt;5 $N Cc WmJ?.Itllinys Cc Ed wa rct 1:7 S/i art/i _________ I ~ QCtl 41 N /20 ~ i K3 N ~Q-) ~-Ij ~ ilk I:4 > ~K;T h. ~ ~ Th. ~ ~ sj ~ *Cc I ________________________________ "7- 1~ fart/ta' 0> ~ ~ ~ IbtUJkVtty i'~A Vt/C? k~ Thst&r ~ ~ ~> I ~ ~ 2 1 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ I z ~ ~~bed&ntck ~Cc ~ ~ &I ~t F >~ t~ CcK ~ ~ _ t~ NK ~< ~ Alexan ~ <> I J\~S\tZ~ N *1 -t~U 5> [cowL. /6) z~5 ~ -~ 4 I ~'>~ Lv ~ Q~N - ~ ' { ~/ZICe W MPflcberts -N~ *-: ~ -.~ ~' ~ I ~ ~A ~ ~ ~ N~ J/btzet Sheets 462 ~ 69 ~. ~i.i w N %:k Nt j ~ ~ ~ jPa:~ ~ C~ ~ >~ U '~U. __________ p -F U U * 5flJ2$ U U *?~> JCUIJC? *% Cc ' s ~ ~ -K Ut a I U U S Earkar Cc I. N ~ ~I% ~ - F ~ N, TWffWeich 1#2'ltct [iirYowwA'ait karp '> J'~ I - -40 I/d//ice 4) tYoweIt ____ __ 567 4 d- ~ ~A lose/i/-v Rarrh ______________________ CZ) % ~ (odeb Crouch I-- ----- t~/4~vwelur Cr5ct/C' N (1 F ~ N. (eo.IF I -~ /6) > V&~ ~ < N /567 6:eo, /4/' U N K ~-' Q~ Z~ sQ > ~ xUte,'tfiPavsons I/alter ~ 967 30~ ttThi-~i--1~--Zt~-. I - IN7~ _____ ___ _____ __ ____ _ _____ _____ _ _____ __ __ __ __ I ~ -2 ________ ____________ ________ IK~ ~/ 5> & % > I S/iCc 0 I ' > 4) +0 ~ ~ Ccj~~ ~ _____ K ~ ~ Cc: ~ N _ ~N _______ K N~ ) 67 ~ ~ ~ ~eo:~aztarsw /)akYd/tItl/tbct~{til/ _ N ~I ~ ~ I > ~ (/-ucrs;X ~~t 2> ~ ~ ~ ~ S 109 uSt. J7AP/;J('0 IN ~ c~ ~> ~ ~ 7 ~ '-A F U K ~ V N X~; ~ 4~O9 -j{yDr. I %~ ' >2 s ~ LYlecr \~ > ~ K I ~"-- ~ 4Ccurestct Be-e'~ ~> N j-jo N ~K ~ - N~ Th~>P~ ~ I ~ ~>< ~ 4. w Fuller ~. ~?~ $~ ) 4$ ~:4- ~ Iy)~ ~ ~ N ___ 4( __ N- /5) ______ FFI~ N Nw1 97 -~w---\ ~ ~ I ~ ~ Lk{r+t/4~rdc/i 4 ___ __ ___ _ _ __ _ _ ___ ~ S ~ )-caP-///-tf/t(s-tc( U U lluiarcR trc< ~ N I ScAalcz -$6) /2 I ~ ___________________________________________________________________________ _______________ ______ 5 ~1- reC lf~er so V'~ fig' ~ ~ K ~ > ~ \i~~ __ ___ ___________ __ ___ ___________ 9~) ~ -4$'-~ C il-toorc ___________________________________________________________________________ 4 1 ~ ~ ~ 4~4/ '~ ~ ~ ~ _________a UTiZ77dred ~'7 ~S ~1 4 I ~ -~ (2 ~ ~1 ttsworiAFurkc'~-' ~ ~ > 7/7) ------- ff2/lbnn'6U2rarvt /2/7 f <~> Coot YIrtt/6lH. I Rartrtahhhmi1ltow ~ 62ev Fccc/vnC-riwt El/lot C ~ ~ ~ ~ ut ~ 1/(Ra/te-rSo-'-e~ ~ I ~'~7/';so -- ~~ I I I & < ~ - ~ 4) f. Q ~ AKarttgr~ ~ _ [ mU~ i(tsW&3 ~ j ~ ~ II'Vasow 1~ -- -- Il/If ' -~ I I Wttt9arvw jI~S Qg & ni > >~ Par/cM- ____ {~ KtJo/tn'A Th N~rde/iKf$r~'~ -so ~ A ( ' MiLL TTS - ~ 7 ' SYc-t&/c'r 11 11/ _ ~< ~ Raf 7 / ~ ~ ~' ' 4' N JotaWEceurt >~ F~ ~ 1 ' ~0 9+\J& ' 2 ~IK~ IN~ I < ~> 50 I~~>s~ ill _ _________ ______ N -7' ________ __ z~ I ~ ~:t I JJWa~c/c IIJ/j 'JIhfesittyJitd/~Cc/o6 ~ 4'~ N ~ K ~ ~ ~ 'N ~ * ~ ~' ~~ <Vi 17: (aldwtat - ~ ~N' II~ /~Wjj- KS 'N ~ 'S ~ ~ I ~4~f 7-i --I > ~ > N ~64tv/fg~~~I Awc/rcn-~ > Il it i't 45 2) I - ~I ~ ~j I-? /79~7 kFft1te/~ C> -I ~ - I '-A _ __ _ F AD. U ~ ~ J)CtttttSOCOfl/tOt' 1/1/ -so ~ 1 ~ I ' ~ ~ ~i F,-tclZ-rSh/-r/cc - ~ I Ctadde;-u Q) 1~ ~ 97% I ~ ~ - < C> (C>N~ I/I Evander 7;. _______________________ 47 ~Jo~c- 8'i-t a i-v ~N N __ l~iiI~tii;ii ( Q2547 A I & %NS I ~~ tZ ~C> (I~-97'Ill 4 1 Brcc Ira /7 j -C K' /4~15 ~1 7~~j~j.- Ic u/tao..~~'-1i- - U II II I ' Ifiari-~'t'n S. /~6nv A%;z7n+(/'ti(1> 1 1 t') et/-UOCIe'it N 6 N 5) F ~ 4 ~ ~ 1~ )ij * I ~ * J U 5~ /~//i, J c n i c o n, IJI-IIIi awMvtt - _______________________________ I NU ~

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Page  37 ON.37 5 2' r~tta~ I U Crwtt~j l *I'TM17I -Frovutnt Bros & 60 -SAVi M ILL e- 0 -c-1---- ttv7'tMi w/ Mlt/esc-lt Aop r- c.e-r Spwcr 4-30 PFranlGtivA.Sp icr 4ý0 Vt) ~ m fer,t'rzl& 4ft/self Thcr( A. Pc/tom '50 Jo/tn T! I 4, -'u- _V1j 44 -508 S Sc-lr-c A totis it otber i Jiio r to 7-1, /710 StiflOlt DBryruc- a 9~' 6.iBtVVtOtU 5~ ~bsb tHy/b';. I. 60 Par 760 8 -4.4, I j *17 A c~ Z~~b 4 7~. &ea. S, C r otvc' - Jarrt -esB fecc, 4-0 40 I f At' C-p LI C TUJLIP VFw MJE uL I *1 '] --w ~8I =4ý JU V 4u Ste-W.,-c a -85,JuFwuB S /AC, 7hl'l 70~ I ýczv - -W Perry 2f If, 6eo-A. Pei rq /,5CL, -4- S; Y 0 % 0 a S S (-.4 - i( - N ~ N V:(~ ~# 0 (-N 2 V$ V 2~' 4 j,-k"t~ 1.24$ ~ 0 0 I JimS 4A4 F. Corrxtt 'I~I7~ Lu 0 U t -I H 24 ID dir S Pro utn~ar~ B - 2> ~ 0 ~ ~ -S -4--- 44-4 -42W- 4-4 -2W N Smalley Piworty \'4 51. 40 i7 Aw~cry Arinn 40 - lul aýl Iu 30 [ I --Af F Til b c Xis~ 40 40 co -'~4-A0 4-6 0 L.Cull7ttler 29 ým 3 -> 4-4 - a S NA (.4 ~ 0 V. 24- 4-~ 3-0 2 ~ -~Cb NA (0 CI 7(13 S V 1 ) -- 1 - 4 ~ Y - --~ - V a] UQ< ~4 0 ~ -4-4-- AL Nil~ AILI, iL_ 7r - m - I- ~7i$. ~ i~L7~1 -----~i~4 s/s-AL AfcJt/L-Itxtt 0 ~ 4-.4 -.4 OK-2~2~ 2w ~ 'C 11 w0 SZ 4-N 20 bas.1 'Jifagoow -3d I JctsjJ -A.nt- )erai,' AIL 6t b Ol ~ý6,70 '41 corwER. S tewaurt - 40 4-0 -41i I 5u.1 IL - 2-4 - Wi -I i~ eent4 j -4.0 - S ra a 3 A- J,4 Nil, x - -ML 7~ j ~ -A'- ~ -ALL, -44 - - L Alb40 Kwte-1 ffolbrdj,,, iotbrookl 4o. --A 40 --7 7JflirC e, B. Per, fo8. -K I. C, JYIttter 40 ThosE. S irttth~ - 40 U 4-4-. -0 (04-')N;- -:4-- - '~.42 Ka '.4 -40 A Lbert ZKdIvaId? 5~44 - h. jt Ilta5A -w]lt 'I --ýr 5-, SH. ~11-art,2c2r U wiiIKc'v I ~2 A w _df, - - - Cc.oA, Per r.y 40 L Po kes~ 7 - - II -4~..2--L-. -A~4-.4f ~ I -?.. -.. - 4 4- ~ 4-'~ - ~ -4. 4- P -~-- ~)~-Wjg ~ ~24 L, I IV + -h&ý-Y -- ý 7 - 74 4 l0. 111 -i -.-. N "I -,-iý, 4S 140 --Mt -MA ~ -MA St 4-A--- Th4s. ~1? 7 Sidt/i,/ ~30,~ -.4 4.4.44..Ac-~telbcrd 4- 40 el2 0_ S 4-0 WE. ]Qwn.Anelt 40 ~ IlK Sheen - 80 7.4o --tr."U.V W j -r-___ Z4 0iw 4-'s t 0,110 Jos e-A Co *4-04 A4-Vl -44 4 -Ball,~>&~=* --A - ~M 40 1-3 7t 7,4 - /i-sKeet ~--~ 4 4t 11 s gMil 1 ~1 -U C [ Gree. M4~Ie~cqelr 41- -144 '1 -U -:-MJtttg~. tj, 1 -N-A I, 1 44 44---,6 Go AIX,44~ 2t. IT, 2 -AIL-..j - 4 - --a I 1 '9 I (0 (A. A, 4-4-I "0 -0 ~ (NC' 4-' WAWS. '1 -1 I'v.4 Ufx~.~ 0. a~temw It ----U. - -A 4- 0 C, its o J 40 A-t J.J 04-~, 0" -V. VA (A. (A a I - NPoos W. -k WetT/, - aSrrw os St4 40 ~ CZ, 6e,.-TA --11i~, I0I-R, ON 0 7, C, /A to 13---t - ~ ~ -2 - 4 - 9--- ffea0 -F-___y I A ta1--C 13Bor? ~! - I P17 co a Im RuowtaumdA- 03JJ4 Cl 0' 0' (A. 444-b 65 4-b 4-' K -S -. (~4 4- -4 -~24 ':~-'- -4 -(0 -A' U El 717 m 2-a,'.<2 o 'I -lf t ALI 0.S ' 40 0 1 -0~- 40 - -0 YrebbS -4 ---JiA, -Lebbas sOrv Iaat knee 4-0 40 ]9eCatA~EIIa]LYLI /444 'U ~ -' I *6.. 1/F,~ U- - ~7 J~e-'-~77tc5 Awuxiss 4-C/tz.44'Oc s~, 0.C FV~ KIM~i1t' 17 CZN:ý -6~ W-Co -~; se -.1U. a ~, A 4 - ODN Joseph-Z I ~ ' a *b ~'- + h -2Th~ -.4- -4-A-- -A-A ~ U J _ iC.-% ~% C' -B-&~T ncthtti J/C4-5&Spc ar- 7 r 'I- C -~~~ ~~ &v~w; ~-~t~sTIc -ffA Bmtl, 0,.0 t. - y '~ ~~ __ ___ ___ ~ 4 -.1-UH'I MI ILL. F -ilesao' et on A'-.0 -AL C- 3- 1,10 T i. 9 oii - -f 6t2 JoY -- I447FaK3 Ou IL < 'r, 4 CO V. - 0-' (-4 V. CO~ (0 ~ (0 - "N 4--C' ~ ~ ~ 64-: l~ 0 fret C, ~Ji"} irl~; 4 -4 tic-i iyf 7i1~, abs nf7 --40 or-, a. tociwstee;. Tonuv 7 I -1 y-4L W7 PeC 40 - - -- M - ~ I. TriIscLQ-,,Ytcýh/zs taer r /'tntliUt1- o 4 -&-' 4"2- -.%I-Al ~ ~ 4 ~ - -- qo SK ---KNIsL -*1 -4- ik 1 -T, COC- 1? (11-.-4L I \ o4- ' -42~ 40', c 77-". 0 ~ - - _ I Zr b 6~~' +"6 A4k ~-ALG- - -Carte~r t tv~ a..,2v e- 0 2~- - -4 -1. 0 r r/ 40 )MIN ________ ~ -r=~;-;~.~i--- - F 9" ~ - - "t-A-. ~ 7 Ar a1

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Page  39 /~:39 ----go. -, 39. z!n~~~1rreNx 6)0 III. 11. N,. wilim b 910 II 'qb n-r ~ W~J~b4LtVrcenan. ' ~ -~YK< ATCarr t~n~ora wirian I 1 m, ~/100 ~~~~~Y eI 1Pait Banq/, I K ~ ni i"'t~,NW A~ / I 4 V 7' / / 7 r7777'/7//:r7$m ý r-rt,177r nr77rr 1iM7" AL IN Ix AMOZYI-ý Ir apimet -t ~ '4. K C~C lamqilI3~ jWE' ' V /. 4. OEM. 0> Itt JYg iter t7&~2 t60 - ~ - S It]? Bre.ntr +0.4. 19'4 HwZ-& /60 Wtjy/t liton At Itltahit IVI j~2~~. C--' -i C-'. a Aan B.irzmti W.V Pratt 12~ 5~i 60 174 a~/.ti/bort AtV~aletP #0 E( aler K "C if -~ a 3' 'p 02 e JZi'I{otra.es 60 Fayelte Osbora. /60 * in.. 7... I.... ý 12 4, a. 'I 05 a~ 099 50 ý Sb a I SI as.b.W6't[~~nvs 4! st K oil I.1. 15 Fre dertIck ffe4iqtt9 ~. 0~ a C0> N m05 73EM 1,5 I... I:.. I I. A - I ý % i I-~ -J-~- -I ~ *. "'~. ' - *. t ~ C-'. 'a a 0: lK ~t -e, A c s inu tz/. 1=j linUt/v rawcom b 1-0 on othart. I4 Un" IbsilbUer t9idwe It 1-0 N5~5 15-4 C--' K;eo. 4A A AA.~ ~~ ~~~ ~ ~ li I? ((f4U-,'.E-v '1-- IN- 1o< 1 Vi S -I--.' leti/ion 1-0 Jacob Jacob 4 1, A-~ ~ j~ 1 ~Kt-' ~:4 -.6 Th?~ I ~N A' 4 I Win IIoa'{imcttu - -to I i. 4...A W~ i,... I v (has Ploci~$ff A Chaster, J~tite.r Richard Rbdprett W(Snul/v #1 75 -5 - Awctt 1k/Inca /60 N a (Ný. a I 9-F -: K 1 X C-i. (N N C-- (N -5.:A acf atbere Aitctu on/it7r IUt of S -p ~..K~' '-0>~-.:.. I ~, ~ ~ I 4 - 4 ~ - S 32 tvi py. --- --- -- UP =. w.. p!/hert!iker -to Jwticob, vwanAt.i. her 'V a _ -to V V6 1.77 - 'I/ ~ 'rICO 4 -1 CeelJoitWts rn/tsr -A 4 K~ Sd9,r Grrd./on, cater1to itt Aowi.6. wtttT to~l f C/ices At be Wi It to 1 SI Vi 5% I 'IL il/sis Covk7T 'Nicholas Ann A/I/o/inca flare/er L tO 60 'U In -U- ~ V I ', ~- ~, ' n s-. j ~C I I r~ m ~. it t 'K, an' ~aj~ 9,50 WctI~h /ie i Mi tee,ý,Lco t El/AN, 60 Saye Arias.if 1/tis Jo/nt. 711/ 2 1/ice So Hary 53 S ~-16;) -2-* I/WI? awsey 200 Slc//aWlanda I/to. U S I c/IA. -F Lena/wit.6(9 A v/vt cv.AC cz\~\5 ~ ~ 4 A~ ~t I ~tt ~t Ikqers Jo Vi C/,dinber/aii~ #0 Est AtozoRnccl' /61. b1ea..21st fl//an tas 610 IN" Mai.:. - t ~(N 12/ sS.5 C--' iN C 9/' is ~59.5 9-45.55 ~/ /5 -'.54.. bO C-q5' 1-g e -MY '1 n jP:e d7T-'vt ZC41 JOwjr q~~'sWt':. >, iLi~ 5 i AL 1Y'~~~,~ Pc/sterN tH DEPOT 5 ~ Ia/her ~3 Goody ~ 'So / Vi. 4 A, Ii~o A, _ SN (N 0 -(N N N 74 I C C "" 0t40fl4 Cso SOS - ~ r{Nosie k-1 -E S. i/o r 0 C--' ~ 0> y~ C-C -C-s a V ~ 61] s/V/A. Nichols '+0 Ian GocIcroftI' -to.44 -AL / -IL~Y At Y-1 'L v - - F(n / to 6' 0' 9~ S -0~ ~ C /" ~~5 55 >3 05 NN /0 0 p ~ frI 112 ~ffA.tu1A ~&icldflty 0~0 ilanmak & Reynolds 9% -~ ~ 1 -~ ~ 5k ~ 0~ - CC pp 5, w Vaniliesn.' '/0 ' '95 vo f vAw' VBa ~ ' A'AV-~ R-,, 2 -Z1K CV'S '' IiCtbrlv,0. v#O55 I Trw'nam Fm/icr __ 1#. ~4i stepA~enlh/Ier #0 r _.4 -Vi 5(N IivccacAfosley N C-'~ s-ti ki _______________ 0>-'--' OSC0> --'5 ~ Ain't/iS ti/a/cod 0 ~ -t V. ~ a,io a 1 -3 S A4.> Corrittytoti.~Srr6f t, to - C-i (N C'S -I 0> (N S - Vi -'I ~ C-- C~ '5/, CC- iN Vi -u-s-s ekwý

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" -52 ~ AT ^.K.W-it^OTtJSsi. \ \ \ ^wy. \ \ // ----- \\ S.T.Ca^^e-r S 56 ________________ <: ^/ \ \ \ \ \ / / Y: I. \X ^ ---------------ai - ^ * \ \ \. \ \ // ~ne~ I \/ ^1 ui,. jr \ \ * \ A \ v y/ -i^- r e CaiTiaviTt^ Jordan Sc ________________ '1. W ' \ \ \ y / -^ 5 \ c 12. '. <5^^ \ h;^ ^Q, [So ^. \ \ \ / / ^ * -4 -s [o. \JI.S.IawTa^c^ co- ^^ ^ ^^ ^ \ \J^Jrt/^OJTJr)ic7t \ // ct _____*ls ^-----------------------------r--------------I----------------------i---------------------------------------------SgC./g^CENTEF;-------------------- ------^--------------- g MAPLE_____________ ___________^X___________ ] ----------------l^ \ ___________: ________ C \ ^^ -, -)v g \ \ \ // ^ 3..; h ' ^c co 49 iquLft. ^^jyL?.^^1^^. ^^^ ^^^^^^"i^------,iL-_ I.__________,*___SSS Sl-^i^irttr^11'!!^- 1 \ ^^^ / ^> ^^^^v> ^ 7 S I j^.^im^^ - 41 'p^s--------T"" ~ " ~.^ " /"I- ^te--V---"-"-""--^ ---^-^^^^^-^^^---^.IL^J __________________.___________\^\ __________^ C ^ '_________________ { AZ-b^rt C^yp^t I_______^ ^. ^Y ^ / ' ^ ^X/ ^^^l^T^^. ^ -^/ ^.B-i6^Z^wi^ \^' '""?A'' ' ' A.Tra.c-y 7" ';. 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A n 0 ' Cd Fctu'^s:7ler./ ' '(c\~ / / ' ^/ / ''' ' I^IC-t^^e^ ^ oA^ 45 ^---,--------------^----------- -. 4~ / * / //.:; - ^^^ I ---^JCir^^ -- ^.^.^7^ S \^3^ - ______________ S ^TZI / ^ / I/ // ^___. f --------------------- 'S?^ Uj C.c^r^e/pi/ie/r^tui^e'^ ^ / /(, / / ' ^^^^^^^^^^.* ----------------------- X"? o. 4!; ' I '-----, /yf ^.aa^^ __________.\^. 4^ ^ -.^^. ^. 1;.^ 4' / ** "-----------~ ------A?""--- ------------- ^ swf-"-'7 3 / /<?^ ^-Y // J--&WK&Z De'pe.w, ^ ^^^ T.V.HoZde,^ \ ~ ^.^^.y ^ j-o^^Sfcaw ^ \ ^ < ^ pY ^J1 -^. 3?.]).Sotd^ 2 3fi \ ----------------- *^*^ I/ ^ \ ^X, %/A I - ^ *... i------ - \ ~ ^ ^^^/.;/. J /> ^V //\!. J^.... ^*^^ 0,]3.Jac7.aTd 7.~.C^^^______________ | TT^^.^ 1 AM^TY0" ~\-----^F-----''!__^ | ^ w // ^^y// V'i * '.'"*: *'.-."^^ \a.sti"\'"fs i-""*"'' \ i-7"--;~"<::?-?r--i '**""^' / / '\, / /'^N. \\i *; '. 70 *~.a.4 (I 23- a^^ W 1~^ 9 r^----. I--------1---------; ^ /\^X^\ 7/^<^\ \: ":,5 ^:^- S B-randebe-rru ' 2? s6 m ^^ Sc B.u-f**'--------l 7 ^(.^^~^^; ^. / X ^^.--CY / / *^.Y^/ '^-----------,---------,------------------- i ^"^,tm....v^ _^._2i. ^<A tt 8,A^-^ _"_-__ ^^^^. * i ^ Y.S^/^^y/^s/ \ * * _____ \^C^ _^. ^\ ----T-/^^- ^S r g ^^^V/^^^ * X *-..:,;-:':---------:. ___!______ j_82__3i_ e^" m m \ --'--.f1 j-i | 7? ^^|-a7. ^7? i A 7.? s "i ^^^S"<V/\^X/ X;- -,: -____ 69 g 33 34.,,,~~,~,~~,, ^k~ V ~ / ' * 2,i~8~ aigt^~ - g t| g-, 0 ^> \^V^'''/ /o\%,y *B,.-s--ichois^w'u 2 r""""" \ " v / | -a- =9^:t'3-^F'~ j^fy'3-9-; ^ '^X//\V^v \ '& -. 38373635...sHg^ ^ \ --- /* [^'""grc^ * 4 "_lg0: > 4 f 10 T. ^^ '\/ /^>\^/ \ ^ ^ * _.:_;_.,_*__:,__ __________ scA^ --- gg--,^... g_ B y j/ i-^=:^,i-^-A^ j-^-^j %. 7/x-^y \ i ^ ^~~~~^~~ o^^^.... cu^s.j^^ 0 A^<^^^-. r"^1"^- i: ^^^^M 1 V &'// v7 ^S ^ ^^~^S^ S..5.W--ri^----- -----T^---- ~^-41- - ^ - 12 ^ -? ^^ti^^H ^=^ t- \ //, U I ^ *.., ^^ ^^ 7^- -^^, ^^fe^t^ Kfa i,. /.--//.'. V t ] I.. 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I^Ti S; v^./^ ^ 1 -- v^J^" ----^-.--^tiUFAcruRwoiiiP I ^^y^^j^ ^ ^^i.VMGf-w: I: y /'^^^'^ I______________________________________________________________________^^^ ~2^~.^~~~~-^~^~ ^---^1 ^W-- ^ COMPANy ^1 ^^-"^^^A^^03 / / /> ^^Y ------------------------F~OQ^F^-----"-------^-^x^^g-&^^-_---------^-^-^^--"^-.^-'*^^^^""rT^ * ^^^^^^fet \^^^^ K/ /^i'^"^> \ ^ i--------------i---;~7i --r-^T001" i!^ ^"-^i-7^^ E^~^: ^==p.s^^^K? _.1._^__ /y %y - ^ l:&7taJPoot& a 1;:..f 6 ^^IB 6^ J ^ ~~_ _^.-6__^4.: tr^ani -^^ ^^ ' "T^ E^-._._L_ _._._ ** * --^ '' psr ___________--__________________ ^________^-^....^______L-_________________^ ^ ^/^ ^W^ajO -------.I ------- 6 5,43 2 1 ^,7 ^ ^: ___;. | | ^- >: --|- --^~ ^ H- -^ *k^^^^l'1 ^ i 70^1---r^ Kl~^--7--^--_---^^----- - ^ oirrTTZT/ve-^^T ^ iv-^-- - ~--- - ---------- jdp--: --__rr.-_n_^"~^^:.^^c ^p^,, A * ^' ^^.^l. 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Page  63 COUNTY OFFICERS. I Clement Smith, Circuit Judge 2 Jacob L. McPeek, Judge of Probate 3 Frank A. Dean, Counsel to Naples, Italy 4 J. M. C. Smith, Charlotte 5 Horace Maynard, Charlotte 6 G C. Fox, Charlotte 7 Le Roy Jones, Charlotte 8 Edw. K. Shaw, Eaton Rapids 9 10 11 IL 12 13 14 15 16 I7 18 BENCH AND BAR. Milton A. Bretz, Charlotte J. B. Henldee, Eaton Rapids Geo. L. Hauser, Charlotte L. H. McCall, Prosecuting Attorney J. C. Nichols, Charlotte Geo. Huggett, Charlotte J. M. Powers, Charlotte I. H. Corbin, Eaton Rapids B. T. Jones, Grand Ledge W. R. Clarke, Grand Ledge 19 C. 0. Markham, Eaton Rapids 20 Henry D. Jones, Grand Ledge 21 W. Stine, Charlotte 22 Cassius Alexander, Grand Ledge 23 W. S. Morey, Bellevue 24 R. E. Wood, Grand Ledge 25 Hon. H. A. Shaw, Eaton Rapids I J. B. Smith, Treasurer 2 M. E. Newvcomb, Drain Comn. 3 J. L. Wagoner, School Corn. 4 Frank M. Green, Sheriff 5 R. A. Garber, Register of Deeds 6 Geo. Decke, Clerk BOARD OF SUPERVISORS. 7 Warren Davis, Carmel 8 Stephen Benedict, Kalamo 9 Joseph Bacon, Charlotte io Albert Ford, Mayor, Charlotte I I C. T. Hartson, Mayor, Eaton Rapids 13 Albert Shotwell, Windsor 14 15 16 17 I8 19 20 H. L. Curtis, Vermontville S. B. Evans, Bellevue S. W. Mapes, Walton C. L. Carr, Eaton Rapids Twp J. T. Fuller, Hamlin Win. M. Beekmnan Charlotte L. D. Dickinson, Eaton 21 J. B. Rudesill, Brookfield 22 J. W. Dann, Delta 23 Dwight Backus, Benton 24 J. S. Hamlin, Eaton Rapids City 25 Chas. W. Dean, Chester 26 J. H. Bera, Sunfield 27 John Ewing, Oneida

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Page  65 E--ATON A.-U Tr?I7SLUAItY 11, 1805, Congress passed an act providing showing a. free white populatioll of 87,27. The Legisfor the organization of Michigan Territory, and the act latiVehCouncil passed an act authorizing a convention to -be held in Detroit for the p-urposeofraigattecwas made effective on June 3d of the same year. The- stitution territory was formed from a portion of Indiana, and Stitution. consisted of the Lower Peninsula only, the remainder of This conyention, of 39 delegates, convened at the specie tim and frmd.aCD our present State being still attached to Indiana and Ill- ified time and framed a constitution, which was inois. submitted to the people and adopted by a vote of 6,299 The Territorial Capital was fixed at Detroit, a small to 1,359. At the same time a full set of state officers French trading village of log huts. President Jefferson and a Legislature were elected toact under the new conappointed as officers Gen. Win. Hull for Governor, and stitution. lton. Steven T Mason was chosen first (byHon. A. B. Woodward, for Presiding Judge. Governor ernor of "The State of Michigan." ulf spositionvth honor and credit until But before admission could he grilted, a certain I -io nl rdt ni Hull filled his oi on wt iIbo n ayt o b e ald h -T le August 16, 1512, when he surrendered fourteen hundred boundary trouble, calledthe Toledo war, had to be adtroops and the whole of Michigan Territory to a few justed. rhe people of Michigan claimed that the ordi^ r'.. hundred British troops. For this act he was stripped of nanee of 17S7 described their boundary as extending all official title and Gen. W. H. Harrison waS appointed South of the Mlaumee river, and giving thom the port as-hssccesr.of Toledo. Ohio cla.imed that this was not the intention.a hi su c ss r -.0-en. Harrison exercised gubernatorial authority over of Congress, and that this description had been based. the Territory of Michigan until October 13, 1813, when upon iiiaccurate maps. Congress compromised the i he resigned in favor of Col. Lewis Cass. By various ap- matter by giving to Ohio the disputed territory and to pointments Col. Case retained this position until he was {ichiga), as its equixalent, that wlich i cm n called to a seat in President Jack~son's cabinet in 1831. known as the Upper Peninsula. The bill of admission His career as Governor of Michigan, noted as the long- was granted the State January 26, 137. est, the most peaceful, the most effective in developing The state constitution did not fix upon any permanent out of a wilderness a beautiful and prosperous state, was location for the State Capital, and in 147 the Legislaended, but his memory is still fresh in the minds and ture, after a long discussion, decided upon Lansing, a ( hearts of many very old citizensa The names owf streets, small village in lghami County, as the proper place for d I-GAN.I selves up in their blankets, bore in silence their grief; It was hard, even for an Indian, with his stoical nature, A 1o endure. The government had wisely refused them,he poor consolation of whisky. EARLY SETTLEMENTS. The first land entry in Eaton County, according to the rract Book, was made in 1829, by A. Sumner, on Section 30, of Vermontville. No other entries were made that year nor the next. In 1831 H. Mason made an entry on Section 2 of Oneida; in 1832 three entries were recorded _ind a like number in 1833. Reuben Fitzgerald, a most familiar name in the early Pistory of the County, was the first actual settler. He irrived in July, 1833, and located in the Township of Bellevue, as it was afterward called, when divisions were made and names given them. This useful pioneer was Aorn in Montgoinery County, Maryland, February 23, 4 L800. He began life for himself as a farm hand; then 'or a year or two operated.a farm on shares; later, he Q mntered a foundry, and with the money he was able to j3;ave during his seven years experience as a moulder, he ^s )ought a small farm. He sold this, emmigrated to Vfichigau, built himself a bark shanty and soon became )ne of the best known citizens of the new country. It s impossible to write a history, however brief, of Eaton >ounty without a reference to his honorable career. He lied July 20, 1873. townships, cities and counties testify that his place in its location. our history will not be forgotten. A really useful, heroic But while these state affairs were transpiring pioneer man lives forever, farmers, merchants, landlords, mill men and manufa c 'I In 1815 Congress established a base line and principal turers were rapidly putting in their appearance at Bellemeridian from which Congressional Townships and vue, the gateway into the deep forests of Eaton County. Ranges might be surveyed and numbered. The next In making the journey to his new home the immigrant year public lands were surveyed in the vicinity of De- found travel comparatively easy through the oak opentroit and were offered for sale soon afterwards at the ings from Kalamazoo, Battle Creek and Marshall. But Detroit Land Office. From that time on the State has at Bellevue was the jumping-off place, intothe wilder- t been gradually surveyed and opened for the people until ness, and the coming-out place of the burrowing settler, at present only a small area of the Upper Peninsula is ' where he was once more in the light of day. In speak- f S known as public land. ing of the early inhabitants we refer, of course, to the t About this time the formation of counties began. At whites, for, previous to 1810, Pottawattomie and Ojibewa 1 first the County of Wayne included about the whole of Indians were here in large numbers. They were the i the Territory of Michigan, but from time to time por- original owners of the oak, walnut, sugar and maple ( ' tions were cut off and called by new names, forests that grew in this favored portion of the State. On the 29th day of October, 1829, the Legislative If they had remained here to the exclusion of the ( Council of Michigan passed an act forming the County whites the great development of the County would of Eaton, and at the same time twelve other counties, not have occurred, for the civilized Indian is an Indian ] comprising a large scope of country, the richest and still, with little capacity for the development of a a most populous of Southern Michigan today, This was country. C S the first year of the administration of Andrew Jackson. The land occupied by these Indians-was fine territory t John H. Eaton was Secretary of War in his cabinet and. for hunting and fishing, and the other pursuits peculiar f from him the County received its name. The Counties to their tastes, but they were early compelled to surrenof Berrien, Barry, Ingham and Branch were also named der to the more capable whites. The Pottawattomies for members of his cabinet; Jackson, in honor of the were removed by the government in 1840, to territory t President himself and Cass and Calhoun for distin- beyond the Mississippi. Gen. Brady, who was in charge guished Democratic statesmen of the day. of the work, sent his agents and soldiers through the But while these formations took place in the year woods in search of them. Pursued by the troops, and t 1829, their several populations were very small, and for as unwilling to leave their forest homes as we would be. this and other reasons the organization of these Counties. to leaye ours, they met in council just west of Bellevue; 1. did not occur until years afterwa-rds and at various mounted on their ponies, which stood arranged in the times. Eaton County was not organized until December form of a circle, a solemn consultation was held. 29th, 1837. When they separated, one company of them fled north The Ordinance of 1787, establishing the Northwest into the forest, but was overtaken by the...g.ernment Territory, provided that when a Territory contained a troops, brought back to Marshall, and eventually banpopulation of 60,000 it should, upon application, be ad- ished to land reserved for Indians in the far west. mitted as a member of the Union. In Michigan the pre- The last night of their stay was indeed a night of sorlinminary steps were takeniin 1834. A census was taken row. The squaws moaned; and the men wrapping them^. Very soon after the settlement of Mr. Fitzgerald others tame and Bellevue, as before mentioned, receiving the greater part of the early influx of immigration, became n a very short time the metropolis of Eaton County. The birth of the first white child occurred here when Sarah, daughter of Capt. Fitzgerald, was born, Novem- - )er 12, 1834. ' Here a Mr. Baker met his death, and was,he first white man buried in the county. The first;own meeting was held here in the spring of 1835. The roters of the county, four in number, assembled for the irst time in a log shanty, called in New England fashion, -hemeeting house. This building was church, school mouse and town hall combined, and the small but historcally interesting company of original voters consisted of japt. Fitzgerald, S. Hunsicker, Calvin Phelps and John r. Hoyt, the latter of whom was chosen clerk of the dlection. The officers of the election took their seats: Calvin Phelps stepped to the front of the cabin, took off his hat Lnd in a loud voice proclaimed, "The polls of this election ire now open," and warned all men under penalty of;he law to keep the peace; the humor of which was fully appreciated by those present. There were more )ftces than voters to receive them; so the minor ones vere given to the ineligibles who had gathered to attend;he town meeting from five hundred and seventy-six. square miles of territory. The election board waited intil the legal hour for closing the polls before ascer3aining the result of the election. Lawrence Campbell, in 1836, built and kept the first hotel, called the Bellevue Village Inn. The oldest post office in the county is situated here, and John T. Hoyt was made its first postmaster. His commission was dated May 2, 1835, but it was near the close of the following summer before it reached him. It cost twentyfive cents to send a letter when Mr. Hoyt was postmaster. People did not always pay in advance for the carrying of letters and Mr. Hoyt says, "while I had the office I lost twenty-five dollars by trusting postage.

Page  66 The first great public enterprise was the construction country, with all the money invested in land with nothof a bridge across Battle-creek in the Village of Belle- ing but an ox team and an ax to do with, no crops to S vue, and the laying out of the Ionia and Bellevue road in turn into money and most of the people sick with the U 1835. A general subscription was taken by J. T. Hoyt. ague, made close, cramping times, indeed. A prominent He called upon the more prominent citizens first, receiv- writer says that five or ten dollars in one man's pocket ing fifteen dollars from Reuben Fitzgerald, six dollars produced a sensation in those days. Everybody knewof from Daniel Mason and twenty dollars from Sylvanus it and the man was highly respected. All kinds of Hunsicker. In all one hundred and fifty-five dollars schemes were laid to borrow it, to sell him a watch or a were raised, and the road was opened to Thornapple rifle, or to work up some kind of trade which would river. It was afterwards opened to Jonia by the citizens bring in a little boot money, just enough to sweeten it. of Vermontville. Bellevue gave a Fourth of July cele- Although houses were far apart, neighbors lived very bration in 1835. Rev. Asa Phelps, standing on Reuben near in those days. In trouble, in sickness, at weddings Fitzgerald's wagon house, read the Declaration of Inde- or funerals, everybody was there to do all that could be pendence to the citizens, who then marched in a proces- done; to feel all the sorrow or joy or sympathy that session to the home of J. T. Hoyt, where they partook of could be felt by those who knew and undersood each such viands as each family of the village had brought other so well. for the occasion. The first settlers were from New York, At a meeting of the Board of County Commissioners, Massachusetts and Vermont. They were wide-awake, held March 19, 1840, it was resolved that all future busstirring and shrewd in a deal, and soon began to look iness pertaining to the county or its affairs should be after commercial growth, as well as the more primary held at the house of William Stoddard in the Village of business of farming. Among the earliest were J. Pond, Charlotte. This building, which was intended for S Caleb Woodberry, grocers; B. F. and J. F. Hinnman, a tavern, served for five years as court house, jail, general dealers; Abner and William R. Carpenter, gro- hotel and dwelling. In 1842 the office of County Con?. cers; Major Elija Bond, grocer and dealer in general missioner was abolished and the affairs of thecounty. Mmerchandise. M. Worderry started a tannery, David transferred to the Board of Supervisors. The unique Lucas a painting and chair manufacturing business, I. ideas of public economy as expressed by this honorable E. and J. B. Crary built a flouring mill with two runs were probably due to the excessive stringency of the of stone. Hiram Ovenshier built the pioneer saw mill times. At their session in 1845 it was agreed to build a of Eaton County. Farms were rapidly cleared and im- court house on the public square of Charlotte. Much proved and roads built. Before the change to a perma- dissatisfaction was expressed by the Eaton Bugle, then nent seat of justice had been made the county business published in Charlotte, because said building cost nearly was transacted at Bellevue. It was the headquarters of a thousand dollars. good society, the center of learning, of religious instruc- In 1847 a jail of hewn timbers was erected at a cost of tion, of manufacturing, agriculture and commerce. several hundred dollars. It stood on the site of the presWhen the courts and juries gave a dignity and impor- ent jail. tance years ago Bellevue stood highest in the thought of As a summary of Charlotte in 1845, we quote from the the.people. But other communities- were destined to Eaton-Bugle: - "Improvements are now the order of the grow, and Charlotte was one of them. day. From our window we can number at this moment CHARLOTTE. nine new buildings going up, and we hear of several Stories conflict concerning the discovery of the plains others that are delayed on occount of the want of manow occupied by Charlotte, but the fact that George W terials. A new court house is going up on the public -v Barnes located land here in 1832 precedes the more ro- square under the steady guidance of Major Scout, and inantic reports of discovery by George Terry and Hanni- will be ready for the next term of the Circuit Court in bal G. Rice. There is no doubt that these gentlemen September. Dr. Jos. P. Hall is erecting a commodious ' were here in the early thirties, but they did not locate two-story dwelling on Cochrane avenue. The Messrs. land until 1833. In 1835 Mr. Barnes sold his right and Hayden are putting up a large tin, copper and sheet iron title to the Northeast Quarter of Section 18 in Town 2 manufactory, and are preparing to go into business as Its citizens enjoy the privileges of electric and gas lights, of water works, of beautifully paved streets, which are shaded on either side by overhanging maples, so that it might now with propriety be called the "Forest City," instead of the "Prarie City." Its taxable property, as shown by the returns of 1894, amounted to $2,228,000. On August 17th, 1837, James Gallery came to Eaton Rapids. There were then only three dwelling houses in the place. The streams were not bridged, the timber was uncut, the ground uncultivated, the Indians rowed up and down the river in their canoes, and trails instead of highways led off into the forest. Amos Spicer, Benjamin Knight and C. C. Darling, with their families, were the only persons here at this time. But a dam had already been built across Spring Brook and the frame of the grist mill which is still standing had been partly enclosed. An event of consiherable importance was the establishment of a post office, in 1837 or 1838, with Benjamin Knight as the postmaster. When Mr. Gallery arrived the nearest grist mills were at Jackson, but about January 1st, 18838, the mill at Eaton Rapids was started. On the corner where the Anderson House now stands Benjamin Knight erected the first store building. His little store developed into a large and successful business enterprise, In 1834 Mr. C. C. Darling had a small grocery in a shanty. He sold whisky, but was very cautious about disposing of it to the Indians who were encamped close by. In the summer of 1842 the dam across Grand River was built and the race that connects the river and Spring Brook was dug. The mill received the addition of two runs of Burr stones and a set of merchant bolts. Some seven years later Mr. Sterling located in Eaton Rapids, and in company with Mr. Seelye, entered the mercantile business. The Frost House was originally occupied by the dry goods firm of Frost & Daniels. The south part of the building was erected in 1852 and the north part at a still earlier date. In 1870 Mr. Frost opened the entire building as a hotel and bathing establishment. Dr. Morris Hale became its proprietor in 1875. The Vaughan House was opened for business in 1872 by Pantlind & Picker- ing. It was a fine three-story brick with a basement under the whole, and contained 125 rooms. In 1874 it was totally destroyed by fire and has not been rebuilt. The Anderson House, an elegant, four story and basement brick hotel, was built in 1874 by W. H. Dodge. Col. G. M. Anderson, after whom the house was named, S North, Range 4 West, and also the East Half of the extensively as any other establishment in the state. We Northeast Quarter of Section 13, Town 2 North. Range were highly gratified to see these enterprising young 5 West to Edmund B. Bostwick, of New York City. On men start out a traveling wagon yesterday; it is the best this land the original Village of Charlotte was platted, evidence of our prosperity. We are informed that it is SJonathan Searls and his brother Samuel were the first the present intention of one of the proprietors to sink a settlers. They found their way here from Bellevue in tannery here this summer. A large ashery has already October, 1835, located a little Southeast of the Barnes been erected by our friend S. E. Willett. The Messrs land and built a log house, the only one within eight Welsheimer are making arrangements to commence a miles, and with their families, endured all the hardships saddle and harness business. Their stock and tools are of those pioneer days. On February 1st, 1837, Jappet already here, and in a few weeks they will be in the full Fisher arrived, and about the same time Steven Kinne tide of successful experiment. But why need we particand wife. The death of Mrs. Samuel Searls, in June of ularize? Our motto is onward! and who shall set bounds S this year, left Mrs. Kinne the only white woman for miles to our efforts? Commendation in behalf of Charlotte is around. The home of the.Searls brothers soon became superfluous, for to see is to love it. We confidently bethe headquarters of the county, and all sorts of public lieve, from present appearences, that no other town-in meetings were held there. Settlers came in rapidly dur- the state has fairer prospects ahead; and we know that ing the next three years, among whom may be mentioned no other can furnish so many natural beauties to feast Simon Harding, Allen Searls, Hiram Shepherd, and Ele- the eye and regale the senses. Such is Charlotte, the azer Stearns the first settler to locate within the limits County Seat of Eaton. S of the original plat of Charlotte. *Enterprises were not After eighteen additional years of substantial imslow to start. Mr. Bostwick, the owner of the site of provement Charlotte was incorporated as a village, JanCharlotte, caused it to be platted into a village, and uary 7, 1863. A flaw in the description of the boundarnamed the place in honor of his young wife, Charlotte; ies necessitated further action, and the Board of Superthe streets and avenues were named for Francis S. Coch- visors at their sesseon in October, 1863, issued an order rane, Thomas Lawrence, Townsend, Harris, and Bost- incorporating the followingterritory, to-wit: The Southwick avenues are for the owner himself. These men were west - of the Southwest - of Section 7, and the Northinterested with Bostwick in building upthe village. west, the North ~ of the Southwest and Southwest' The Eagle Hotel, a large block building of early re- of Northwest A of Section 18, Town 2 North, Range 4 nown, was constructed in 1838, on the site of the West; also Southeast 1 of Southeast of Section 12, and Phenix House. Its name was afterwards changed to the Northeast, the North 2 of the Southeast, the outhCharlotte House. It was burned May 20, 1862. In the. east ' of.the Southeast 1-4, and the East -4-of the Ssummer of, 18385. Jonathan. Searls. was appointed post-- Northwest 1-4 of Section l, Town 2 North, lange 5 master of Charlotte; a boy named Isaac Hill carried the West. mail bag through from Marshall once a week. The first It became a city March 29, 1871, with the Hon. E. S. school of the village was held in a small house built by Lacey as its first Mayor. At present the population of a young man named LeCont, and in it was also instituted Charlotte is 4,300. It boasts of two National banks, six a pioneer debating society. But the growth of Charlotte school building, ten churches, two railroads, a half dozen was very slow in these days, owing to the want of good prosperous manufacturing establishments, three money. The first year or two in a heavily timbered newspapers and a hundred other business institutions. ^\,Y. raised by subscription three thousand dollars towards its construction. This house is well furnished and fitted with an elevator. Connected with it is the Arcana well, 192 feet deep. It has a greater flow of water than most of the other wells in the place. There are a number of these mineral wells in Eaton Rapids, and their value in the treatment of certain diseases,.has been clearly estab- N lished. The first mineral well was sunk in 1869, and the discovery of its character created considerable excitement. The original plat of the village of Eaton Rapids was laid out July 19, 1838 by Amos Spicer, Pierpont Spicer, Christopher Darling and Samuel Hamlin. It became a village by act of the legislature April 15,1871. In 1881 it received a city charter, and H. H. Hamilton was its Mayor. The total wealth of Eaton Rapids is about $1,000,000. The first permanent settler in Grand Ledge was Peter Lawson, the date of his arrival teing cetober L8, 1848 A mile and a half west of him lived John W. Russell, about the same distance north, David Taylor, and about two miles south, Peter Bozier. These were his nearest neighbors at that time. In 1840 Abram Smith came to Michigan and eight or nine years later he and John W. Russell were granted the privilege by the legislature of building a dam across Grand River. When this was completed a sawmill was erected and'put in operation. Reuben Wood visited the place in the fall of 1849 and and purchased six and a half acres of land on the north side of the river. The next spring a building was erected for Wood & Allen by Smith, Russell and Taylor, and in June a general stock of goods was opened in it; this was the first store established in Grand Ledge, Win. Russell opened the second, and the Daniels the third. The former also built a hotel opposite the store of Wood & Allen, which ranked before its destruction by fire in 1876, as the oldest in the place. There was no postoffice at Grand Ledge until 1850, when Henry French was appointed postmaster, but it was some time later before / a mail route was established. The postmaster at Lan

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Page  [unnumbered] Rhs. OF MRS. T. W. DANIELS, EATON RAPIDS. RES. OF JACOB UPRIGHT, BENTON TwP. LATE RES. OF ENOCH WALTER, HAMLIN TWvp. RE.OHP. RES. OF HOMER G. BARBER, VERMONT\ TILLE. RFEYNoLDS BROS. DRY GOODS STORE, CHARLOTTE. INTERIOR VIEW OF RES. OF MRS. EMMA J. CHURCH, FLORIST, CHARLOTTE.

Page  [unnumbered] FIRST NATIONAL BANK, EATON RAPIDS.. MERCHANT'S NATIONAL BANK, CHARLOTTE. E. T. CHURCH, PmRS. H. K. JENNINGS, CASHIER. OLD CAMP GROUND, EATON RAPIDS. MAIN STREET, EATON RAPIDS I. FIRST NATIONAL BANK, CHARLOTTE. 2. W. P. LACEV, CASHIER.. 3. F. S. BELCHER, PRES. 4. A. J. IVES, VICE PRES. SUNFI.ELD MFG. CO. SUNFIELD, MiCH. SCENE ON GRAND RIVER. W. G. RAMSAY, WALTER BLOCK, EATON RAPIDS. GRAND LED)GE SEWER PIPE Co., GRAND LEDGE.

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Page  67 v 07 sing delivered the letters to any person who happened Sheldon, Levi Merrill, Charles T. Moffatt, with others to bring the mail bag from Grand Ledge. In 1853 a remained and commenced chopping andhilearing, D. wooden bridge was built across the river. It was re- S. Church returned to Vermont toTae placed in 1870 by one of wood and iron at a cost of $9,- first frame house was built by W. Jquer, con-W 800. A foundry, a steam saw mill, several planing mills, tinued to live in it until his death, whieh o~curred in and a furniture factory were added at various periods, 1869. This old house has since been rep1aced by aine the foundry ranking first in point of time. The Detroit,, brick structure. It was R. W. Grswold, however, who Lansing & Northern railway has included Grand Ledge erected the first brick house in Vermontville, bing since 1869 in its list of stopping places; and several mineral the masons who did the work from Battle Cree. EdH wells and a summer resort have attracted to the town a ward W. Baker, Willard Davis, George Browning, George large number of visitors each year. The original town of Squier, Martin L. Squier, Daniel Barber, Rev. William Grand Ledge was laid out October 28th, 1850, and incor- U. Benedict, Simeon McCotter andFrank P. Davis are porated as a village by an act of the Legislature, ap- familiar names in the history of that interesting ]ocaity, proved April 8th, 1871. Various additions have since and many incidents of historical value might be given been made, and a city charter was granted in 1893. in connection with each one of them. In May, 1850; Isaac M. Dimond commenced to improve Wells R. Martin was the first hotelkeeper, the water power of Grand River, on the present site of company with Decatur Scoville, was also the first to M Dimondale, but in 1832 a part of the dam he had built open a stock of goods for sale. S.S. church brought the was carried away by a freshet and the sawmill damaged first mail, and a postoffice was established at the same t fo such an extent that considerable repairing was made time, With Dr. Dewey Robinson as postmaster. gj necessary. In 1856 Mr. Dimond erected a grist mill. Olivet, "The Athens of Eaton County,"is situated in The village,- which was laid out the same year, was the township of Walton, on one of the most picturesque named Dimondale in honor of Mr. Dimond. A.X. Bruen locations in Michigan. Its fitness for a village site was became his successor; the dam was repaired, the mill, never questioned by man, as there(are evidences of its which had partly fallen down, was righted and the prop- habitation at one time by Mound Builders. The firsm erty transferred soon after to E. W. Hunt, who contin- white man in Walton township found, upon his arrival, 1ued to do an extensive custom and a fair merchant busi- an Indian village of about one hundred population, on h ness. A postoffice, called East Windsor, was early estab- the site of the present college grounds. lished in the eastern part of the township. Dimondale's The village was built for the al first postmaster was Edward W. Hunt, who was corn- College; hence a history of the VillageofOlivetis hismissioned January 6th, 1876. tory of the college. Rev. John J.Shipherdoneofthe Nearly all the early settlers of Vermontville came managers of Oberlin (Ohio) College, conceived the idea from Vermont, hence the name. In 1835 the Rev Sylves- of going again into the wilderness and building up an ter Cochrane visited Michigan and conceived a plan of institution of learning. He came to Eaton County in colonization, which, on the 27th of March, 1836, was put 1843, to look after certain property situated in the Grand into active operation. At a meeting held at that time River~ Valley belonging to Oberlin COllege. He was de-1 rules and regulations for the government-of the Union lighted with the scene presented by the elevated land, S- Colony, as it was called, were adopted.:Education, re- t~he beautiful stream, the wild oak forest of Section 29, Sligion and temperance were prominently mentioned, and Walton township, and decided upon it as a suitable place Mit may be that the recent triumnph of prohibition in Eaton for the location of the new school. He returned- to Ohio SCounty was due remotely to these pious New England- and organized a colony of thirty-eight persons, includSers and the resolutions by which they were influenced, ing fourteen children and youths, and on Saturday, FebSAt a regular meeting of the society, held in Vermont, ruary 24th, 1844, the entire party arrived on the desigSMarch 28th, 18.36, it was voted that each member of the nated spot. [I society should advance $210.50, which would entitle him The first twelve months of their stay was a period of 2 to a farm lot of 160 acres.....and a village lot of 10 acres, or great suffering....Many.were. sick, with_:the swamp.. fiend,., - from that time on no one has predicted anything but ~ success. The village grew apace with the school and to-day exerts a great influence for good over all of Eaton County. Olivet's usual enrollment is about 300 students. Her buildings surpass those of any other institution of a like character in the state. Her instructors are liberal, " broad-minded men and her alumni are, as a class, successful business and professional men and women. Bellevue occupied originally all the territory in Eaton County. By an act approved March llth, 1837, the town- ^ ship of Bellevue was divided, and the new townships of Termontville and Eaton were set off and organized, the former including the Northwest quarter and the latter' " the Southeast quarter. March 6th, 1838, the Northeast half of the remaining portions of Bellevue, or the North- M east quarter of Eaton County, was 'set off and organized into a separate township, known by the name of Oneida. On the 15th of the same month Bellevue was further, reduced by the'formation of Kalamo, to include the territory in Town 2 North, of Range 5 and 6 West. No more divisions were made until March 21st, 1889, when the East half of Kalamo Was set off and organized as Carmel. The East half of Bellevue was set off and organized as Walton, and the East ha~lf of Vermontville was organized into a separate township called Chester. Brookfield was formed March 20th, 1841, from a portion of the old Township of Eaton, and included Town 1 North, Range 4 West. On March 21st, 1841, Eaton was further reduced in size by the formation of Tyler, ineluding Town 1 North, Range 3 West. February 16th, 1842, witnessed several changes. Sunfield was set off from Vermontville and made to include Town 4 North, Range 6 West. Windsor and Delta were formed from the East half of Oneida, and Eaton Rapids township was created from that portion of Eaton included in Town 2 North, Range 3 West. On the 9th of March, 1843, the township of Chester was divided and its North half was Set off and organized into a seperate township, known ' | by the name of Roxand. On the same date Oneida was M cut in twain, and its South half formed into a seperate M township called Tom Benton. This name was not satis- M factory to t~he inhabitants of the town and the "Tom"7 was dropped by an aet approved March 19th, 1845; March P 14th, 1845, the Township of Tyler was united to its next Northern sister and the name of the latter--Eaton Rapids--was applied to both:as a whole. For nineteen years this arrana'ement continued, but finally, on gd ^ land in proportion to the amount of money contributed, ague, and returned to Otio, but me ecurit u - Lue ^ This money, or its equivalent in notes, was to be fur- band possessed the spirit to cope with- the--ditfiulties nished the agents before their departure for Michigan. that nature presented. L. A. Green, one of the students, ^ William G. Henry and S. S. Church, the agents, left Ver- erected a small cottage for a study and private dormaM mont April 21st, 1836, to select and purchase land for the tory. This served for a chapel, recitation room and viicolony. It was a long and tedious journey much of; the lage post office. The corps of instrnctors ineluded Rev. route lay through the wilderness, and had to be Reuben Hatch-and Oramel Hosford. In 1848 a charter traveled by stage, was granted the school under the name of the "Olivet W. J. Squier surveyed the site that was finally chosen Institute." School and village prospered under this for the village, and those present selected their village charter and students came from many parts of the state. lots. W. J. Squier, W. S. Fairfield, Samuel and Charles In 1859 the institute was changed to a college, and the 26th of March, 1863, the old township of Tyler was again set off from Eaton Rapids, and Organized under the name of Hamlin, in honor of one of its pioneers. No ^ change has since been made. M There are twenty-six post offices in the county. The list, omitting those already named, is as follows: Ainger, Bismark., Brookfield, Carlisle, Charlesworth, Chester, Dellwood, Delta, Gresham, Hoytvifle, Kalamo, Kings- M land, Millitts, Mulliken, Potterville, Roxana, Sunfield V and Woodbury. 1

Page  68 ~ lcw6papcM6 0f Jatonc 6( SWe believe in the newspaper-daily, weekly and It is difficult to understand how any citizen of the S monthly--because it brings together the people who county can get along without taking at least one home have something to reveal, and the people who should paper. The adoption of proper methods in the conduct konw what it is. Supplied with instruments that of the county's affairs, are due largely to the work of S make the eye far seeing, the hand mighty, the 'feet these papers in sending out information and presenting Sswift, the ear exceedingly sensitive, the truth seeker facts to their readers. When any question that con2 1is able to make many important discoveries; and the cerns the future interests of the people is brought up, j pure'love of truth that seems so deep down, so far each voter's paper discusses it. The building of anew Saway, so impossible to get at, is the unfailing inspira- court house, the the construction of a bridge, the openStion. Pain smitten bodies, darkened intellects, souls ing of a road, drainage, the care of the poor, the buildhidden in midnight bid him make haste, and the silent ing of a school house, have all at different +imes been investigation goes on night and day, while the alert subjects for newspaper discussion and the information newspaper tells to a host of sympathising listeners obtained by the people in this way has made a wise of success or failure. What a crime it 'would be to decision possible. hide the knowledge upon which life, health, hap-. THE CHARLOTTE LEADER. piness, and all depend! But it is not hidden. The The Charlotte Leader was established in 1855 by C. C. Smeans of revelation are now so numerous, varied and Chatfield, at Eaton Rapids. It was then known as the cheap, that ignorance is without excuse. Every orator Eaton County Argus. It was removed to Charlotte, with Shas become a. thousand. Talmage. preaches to a few F. W. Highby as editor, in 1860. William Saunders be-. hundred on Sunday, and to millions on Monday morning. came proprietor in 1861 and continued as such until his Surely the opportunity to know implies responsibil- removal to California in 1865. From that date until ity; the man who goes up from the nineteenth century; 1868 it was published by D. F. Webber, who changed its to be judged, should be ashamed to plead ignorance, if name to the Charlotte Argus. J. V. Johnson then bought his life on earth has not been a useful and helpful one. the office, but sold it again in 1875 to F. A. Ells, the i ^ It pays to be informed. Knowledge is power; and present post master of Charlotte, by whom the name of i success does not exceed power, and power does not the paper was changed to the Charlotte Leader. D. F. ^ exceed knowledge. They maintain an exact proportion. Webber is still a resident of Charlotte, a Justice of the We do not farm for the sake of farming, nor are we in Peace and has united to himself, by years of acquaintbusiness for the sake of business. The hltimate end of. anceship and service, a host of esteemed friends. " - / ).an issued as the Exton County Republican. E. A. Foote, the well known attorney, was editor, and. Mark H. Marsh, a practical printer, afterward connected with the Evening News of Detroit, superintended the mechanical department. In 1859 Mr. Joseph Saunders became the proprietor and changed the name to the Charlotte Republican. Mr. Saunders was a man of large newspaper experience, keenly alive to new and improved methods, the first to use steam power in the printingbusiness of the county, and the builder of a number of our substantial brick buildings. After a prosperous business of seventeen years he sold his paper to K. Kitteridge in 1866, who had been connected with several papers in the state, and is the present publisher of the Ann Arbor Register. In 1877 the Charlotte Republican became the property of Mr. D. B. Ainger. Mr. Ainger is now living in Lansing. From the first of May 1893, to April 1st of the same year, the Republican was edited and published by E. J. Tomlinson. Bissell & Jones are the present proprietors. CHARLOTTE DAILY PRESS. The newsboys' announcement of the Charlotte Daily Press is the latest evidence of Eaton County enterprise.n the newspaper field. The Press is the first daily iewspaper published in Eaton County. The initial num)er was issued from the Republican office, May 27th, " 1895, and contained four pages of five columns each. L. P. Bissell and A. J. Munson were the promotors of the enterprise. L. P. Bissell was born in Medina County, all effort is character; the perfection of the man, Mr. Ells sold the paper in 1884 to W. G. Blymyer, who, mental, moral and physical. To wash, clothe, and feed on account of ill health, was compelled to retire, and was the body, and for seventy-five years and daily repeat the succeeded by G. C. Btandon in 1886. The Bryan Brothprocess, while the mind is left to rags, filth and starva- ers have owned the paper since February 14th, 1888,. tion, is to blunder fatally. The body for the brain, the and are well satisfied with the developments of the past brain for the mind, the mind for thought, and and the evident prospects for the future. Theywere thought for action. The mind is the man. born on a farm near Fostoria, Hancock County, Ohio; In this age of newspapers and books a great mind can Horton on January 9th, 1859, and Homer on August ] set the world moving in the direction of higher levels. 17th, 1863. Soon after the war they were brought by As a consequence reforms are numerous, and the man their parents to Eaton County, where, with the excepwho institutes and the man who completes may be the tion of a few brief intervals, they have remained ever same, and no gray hairs or abated vigor will appear as since. They learned the printer's trade in the office witnesses against him to prove the long and wearisome they now own, the elder entering it in 1875, and the length of the task he assumed; that which was once the younger in 1878. Horton did his first editorial work work of centuries, is now accomplished throught he news- when the Prohibitionist was published in Charlotte, but papers in a few years. But the majority of newspaper later became city editor of the Ann Arbor Register. His readers have come to know their value, and it is the in_ single year's residence in the University City brought S telligent u3 of them more than anything else, him valuable experience and aided in further preparing that needs to be emphasized. Murders, crimes of all him for the management, in company with his brother, kinds, removals, deaths, marriages, births, divorces, are of the Charlotte Leader. May 12th, 1892, he was marnews features of every successful daily or weekly; but to ried to Miss Adele McClure, daughter of the late D. G. ' be satisfied if the paper contains nothing more, is to be McClure. Homer K. Byran and Miss Edith, daughter of harmed rather than helped by it. Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Haslett, of Charlotte, were united in SFrom the newspapers we can learn how to take better marriage November 18th, 1890. Their home is brightcare of the body, how to improve the mind, in what way ened by the presence of two boys, Carl H. and Philip H. the home may be made more attractive, the children The Charlotte Leader, to which they are giving more efficiently trained. It is this ability of the news- their best thoughts, is the only staunchly Democratic paper to answer and discuss every question that inter- paper published in the county. Homer K. Bryan ests the thinking portion of the world that constitutes brought to the paper the knowlege gained by seven its chief value. Even a working man who will take years' expepience on the metropolitan dailies of Chicago the time and the pains to make a discriminate use of and is a practical job printer of much local fame. The the newspaper, with the additional aid of a few books, Bryan Brothers are both Past Chancellor Commanders may become fairly well educated. Carlysle says, of Charlotte Lodge No 53 K. of P.and members of the the question is not, now-a-days, if a man has been Grand Lodge K. of P. of Michigan. through a university, but if a university has been THE EATON COUNTY REPUBLICAN. through him; not where did you go to school, but what Has the following history: A paper that was started do you.know. in Eaton Rapids in 1847, by L. W. McKinney, andtafter\ The newspapers of Eaton County, eleven in number, ward published by Dr. E. D. Burr, from whom it was / have many intelligent readers. They should have more. purchased by Foote & Mah, moved to Charlotte, and Ohio, in 1854. His father was a Presbyterian clergyman, a graduate of several universities, and spent a num-> ber of years in educating his children in the languages mnd sciences. At an early age the subject of this sketch went into a printing office in an Illinois town and cormmenced his preparation for life as an adept in the art preservative. He made a study of the mechanical and professional branches of printing and publishing, and is well versed in almost every feature of the same, hav- -. ing worked in nearly all the large cities of the country in the various departments, printing, reporting, editing, stc. He is an earnest Republican, believing thoroughly in the principles of that party. He has only been in Eaton County for two years, but is rapidly coming to the front as an enterprising man. While engaged in the printing business in Ohio President Harrison appointed him post master of the little city where he resided. He is an alderman of the second ward of Charlotte, a Royal Arch and Council Mason, a member of the Republican Editorial Association of the state, and was unanimously Chosen as secretary of the recent Congressional convention at Kalamazoo, which came so close to sending an Eaton County man to Congress. In 1887 he married Miss Frederika Salisbury, at Medina, Ohio. They have two children, Dorothy, and Paul Frederick, the latter born in Charlotte in December, 1893. Mr. Munson is a Michigan man and has at different periods been engaged in newspaper publishing in this state. For the last few years he has been engaged in the different branches of newspaper work in Chicago, and brings to the Press a wide experience in metropolitan journalism. THE CHARLOTTE TRIBUNE. The Charlotte Tribune first appeared in August, 1887, with F. M. Potter as publisher. A half interest was purchased in December, 1887, by Geo. A. Perry, who was born July 8th, 1851, and is the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Horace B. Perry (see sketch) with whom he came to Brookfield, Feburary 8th, 1860, and has ever since resided in Eaton county. On September 19th, 1876, he married

Page  69 Miss Belle MeArthur, eldest daughter of George and crat at Goshen, and finished his trade under the instrucEliza MeArthur, then of Brookfield. Their home is tion of Dr. W. H. Ellis. In 1856 he became proprietor blessed with two daughters, Georgia Belle and Grace of the Goshen Times, which he conducted for many Avery, and another died in infancy. Mr. Perry's early years. During this period he was United States Marshal life was devoted to farming summers and teaching and United States District Enumerator of Elkhart, Inwinters, with an occasional term at Albion or Olivet diana. In 1868 he sold the Times and purchased the S colleges. At an early age he began to take an Hudson (Michigan) Post.... Three years -later he located - active part in politics, and he was elected super- - at Eaton Rapids and engaged in the manufacture of visor of Brookfield for five consecutive terms. He re- staves and heading. His business at that time was the S signed this office in 1882 to accept the county clerkship, largest manufacturing establishment in Eaton County. Swhich he held four years. While still connty clerk he He purchased the Eaton Rapids Journal and successfully secured the release of two veterans from the poor house managed it for a time, when age and a competency bade and through his instrumentality each was given a good him go out of business. Mr. Stevens is now wel along pension. This was the beginning of a successful pension in years and is retired from journalistic work, but his practice. On September 1st, 1889, Harry T. McGrath career has been a noble one. For forty years he has inpurchased a half interest and the firm name was fluenced public opinion and wrought out reforms. changed from Perry & Potter to Perry & McGrath. In THE EATON RAPIDS nERALD. 1892 the the new firm moved into their fine new brick The Eaton Rapids Herald is edited and published by J. block from which the Tribune is now issued. Mr. Perry Dow Trimmer, a native of Ainger, this county, where he is identified with the best interests of the town and was born April, 21st. 1870. His parents moved to Charcounty and the Trbune, while Republican, is progressive, lotte while he was a babe. At the age of twelve Mr. along all lines of reform. He is secretary and treasurer Trimmer entered the office of the Luther Herald, at of the Eaton County Law and Order League to whose Luther, Lake County, this state, to learn the printers influence the recent increased majority for county pro- trade. His winters, however, for several years were hibition is no doubt due. He is also serving his ninth spent in school. A high school education and several consecutive term as secretary of the Eaton County years of practical experience have fitted him for the Agricultural and Pioneer societies. iany positions he has held in connection with the printSMrs. Belle M. Perry, wife of Geo. A. Perry, conducts a ing business. He has worked on the Reed City Clarion, valuable Woman's Department in the Tribune. She was the Stae Democrat, of Cadillac, the Hudson Gazette and for three years President of the Michigan Woman's Press the Hudson Post, and was foreman of the printing deAssociation and is now editor of the Interchange, the of- pariment of the Central City Soap Company of Jackson ficial organ of that association. The Interchange is for nearly two years prior to locating in Eaon Rapids, printed at the Tribuine office. Mrs. Perry is also Presi- which was in March, 1894. Mr. Trimmer is a Democrat dent of the Charlotte High School Alumni Association, and the Herald is independently Democratic. The HerPresident of the Century Club, and was the first woman ald has had four or five different editors during its life ever elected a trustee of the Charlotte schools. She has of thirteen years. The present editor is a young man organized a fine club of Tribune writers, all of whom are who is generally known as a hustler. members of her own sex. The Tribune is in good hands. THE GRAND LEDGE INDEP.NDENt taking their places. The Grange Visitor, the official or- Was established in January, 1869, by B. '. Saunders, gan of the State Grange, is published by Messrs. Perry & son of Joseph Saundersone of the earlier publishers of the McGrath, who are its business managers. This paper is Charlotte Republicanm He induced W. C. Westland in devoted to the interests of farmers, and has a large pat- February, 1894, to take a half interest in the business, ronage throughout the state. Mr. Perry is a member of and for a period of three years the paper was published the Grange, the I. 0. 0. F. and of the Loyal Arch by the firm of Saunders & Westland. The firm was disMasonry. solved the following May, the junior member becoming - TnE EATON RAPIDS JOURNAL. sole proprietor. For a time it was difficult to make the S The Eaton Rapids Journal was founded by J. B. paper pay expenses. The business men and citizens, its present namnie, to which it has clung ever since. After a few years Mr. Knox disposed of his interest in the business to John Sherman, who purchased Mr Holt's interest as half owner, and took possession of the office as proprietor and publisher. The firm is now J. C. Sherman & Son. John Sherman was born in Farfield,. Franklin county, Vermont, October 6th, 1883. His parents, John and Persis Sherman, were natives Connecticut. From the district school. in his native place, Mr. Sherman went to Bakersfield Academy, and the Academy at Rome, Vermont, vvhere he' received excellent training, to which his success as farmer and editor is due. He arrived in Michigan at the age of twenty and bought a farm which he still owns. In 1887 he began his career as publisher. Mr. Sherman was married to Miss Jane Boyce in March, 1855, She died in 1861. Mrs. Nellie M. Holt of Lansing, to whom Mr. Sherman was married in 1868, is the mother of W. E. Holt, editor of the Bellevue Gazette, and the partner to whom reference is-made in this sketch. THE SUNFIELD SUN Was established by J. Q. Rounds,who continued its publication until November, 1894. His successor was I. N. Stevens, but his connection with the paper was severed January 23, 1895. Legge & Jenkins are now the proprietors, the purchase having been made February 27, 1895. Sunfield, the place of publication has a population of about five hundred. The paper is independent in.politics devotes itself to the surrounding country. It has a circulation of about four hundred. THE BELLEVUE GAZETTE. " W1as established January 9th, 1871, by Mr. Alfred Linridge, who conducted it until May 29th, 1873, when it became the property of Edwin S. Hoskins. March 27, 1882, it-was sold. to G W. Perry, in whose possession it remained for the next ten years. The present publisher of the Gazette is W. E. Holt, who was born in Canton, Wayne county, this state, June 4th, 1860. lIe was graduated from the Charlotte high schools in 1884, and on the 15th of October, 1895, he married Miss Lina V. N Kennedy, a native of Vermontville. Mr. Holt is a Republican and when election day comes is sure to 1)e at the: polls and equally sure to cast a straight ballot. When he edited the Vermontville Echo he served for three years in the capacity of village treasurer, recorder, one term and school inspector, two terms. He has been a member of the Ancient Order of Teneyck in 1866, and sold to Frank C. Cully in 1869, however, promised to give it their support, a promise who, in 1874, changed its name to the Saturday Journal. which they have faithfully kept. Mr. Westland, who is From 1876 to the 1st of January, 1879, Mr. E. O'Bien was still editor and publisher, enjoys the distinction of being the publisher. K. Kitteridge, his successor enlarged the the oldest in consecutive years of service in Eaton paper and gave it the name under which it has since county, having edited and published the Independent been issued. The present owner is C. T. Fairfield, who for twenty-one years. was born at Hillsdale, Mich., September 6th, 1866. He THE GRAND LEDGE REPUBLICAN. is the son of Hion. E. B. Fairfield, who was president of We.have been unable. to obtain the details of this 1.Hillsdale college for twenty-one years, Consul at Lyons, paper's history, but we have observed from its columns France, and for six years Chancellor of the State Uni- that it is a newsy sheet, with a good circulation. It's versity at Lincoln, Nebraska. Here the son, C. T. Fair- editor, M. LH. Gunsenhouser is an able and experienced field was fitted for college. He entered Oberlin, Ohio, newspaper man. lie was born in DeKalb County, InS in 1883, and was graduated from there in 1837. He was diana, November 26th, 1854. He has worked'in various financial manager of the Oberlin College paper for two cities of the country as job printer and editor. July 11th, financcolpany withoH.tJ. Davis, years, and with this limited experience, and before at- 1839, Mr. Gunsenhouser, in company with. J. Davis, taining his majority he assumed control of the Eaton purchased the Grand Ledge Graphic, a union labor paper. SapidsJournal. He is succeeding. They changed its name to the Grand Ledge Republican, RapidsJoral e ssucedn SChauncy W: Stevens, retired editor of the Eaton and likewise its politics were made Republican, for which Rapids Journal, was born in Buffalo, N. Y., February 9th, party it is an effective worker. Fraternally Mr. Gunsen1825. Hlie started in life for himself at the early age of houser is identified with the Knights of Pythias and ten years, and with a school career of but one year. His Sons' of Veterans. first venture was as a newsboy in the streets of. New THE VERMONTVILLE ECHO. York City, hustling for "The Sun." He advanced with Was started in 1874. It was called The Enterprise, this paper from newsboy to roller boy, and finally corn- but failed to become a financial success. Mr. Hawkins.positor. In 1839 he came West with his parents and was the next owner, and F. M. Potter the next one. This settled in Indiana. He entered the office of the Demo- purchaser gave the paper a new name-The Hawk-but Swhen it became the property of Holt & Knox it received kh, Mum. * Pe United Workmen for a number of years, and duringo his residence at Vermontville, acted as recorder for that organization. He is also a prominent member of the Masonic Lodge at Bellevue. THE OLIVET OPTIC Was started in 1887 by Mrs. Stella Warner. During the first year of its issue it was sold to Fred Williams, whose proprietorship lasted but a brief time, and the present owner, Frank N. Green, purchased it. The Optic is alive paper, filled each week with news and sound editorials. It l has a good circulation, is independent in politics, but is fearless in defending the moral side of all local questions of interest.... The Optic. has one of the, best equipped offices in the- county, from which are printed all the fine work, such as catalogues, programis, invitations, etc., of Olivet College; also the Echo, an illustrated magazine edited by the students of the College. Mr. Green was born in Olivet in 1859. He attended the public schools and Olivet College until 1875 when he removed to a farm-a few miles east of Olivet. He was on this farm for about eight years when he, returned to the village and purchased the Optic. This paper he con-.. tinned to manage until November, 1894, when he was elected sheriff of Eaton county. He then placed his paper under the editorship of J. K. Swindt.... 2

Page  70 F^ nnns.nflnnnnn W " " AIW " AOW.AV " " " AMF AW " " ASF " AW AV IdWr AOW AW " AW -"--AAV AV AV IMF AW MW "F -Affdir. IýV Aý-ýW dý- - --IM 112:--dafty MW Omr AMEW Anisr -ý 70 S'iHOOLS OF EATON COUNTY. By Rev. CHARLES McKENNEY, A. M., B. S. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: The author of this sketch wishes to puiblicly express his obligation to Hon. Frank A. Hooker, Hon. Daniel Strange, and Mr. George W. Sherwood for valuable information fron which he has freely quoted. On January 26, 1837, the last necessary step was taken by Congress, and Michigan became a state. The population of the new state was 87,278, centered mostly 'in the southeastern portion. There were but few organized counties and Eaton was joined to Calhoun till 1839, and had in 1837 not to exceed 300"inhabitants. It was the good fortune of Michigan that the foundation of her school system should be laid by such wise master-builders as Gen. Isaac E. Crary and Rev. John D. Pierce, both of MLarshall. Mr. Pierce was the first to hold the office of Superintendent of Public'Instruction, filling the position for five years, and to him more than any other, is due the credit for whatever worth and excellence our school system possesses. His general plan was to have a free public school in reach of every family,schools for academic training at favorable places in the state and a university for higher education. With some modifications the public school system of Michigan.today is the same as planned by Father Pierce. The early settlers of Eaton county were mostly from New York and states lying farther east, and brought into the Western wilds the love of education which has ever characterized the people of New England and their descendants. They determined that the privations of pioneer life should not rob their children of at least a common school education, and soon after the scattered clearings, each with with its rude fashioned log house, appeared the settlers joined in rolling up the log building which should be the home of the district scchool. In some instances, as in Oneida and Sunfield, a school was kept in a settler's home before the school house was built. In 1835 the territorial council passed a bill organizing certain townships, one of which was Belleville (Bellevue) including all of Eaton county. The township now known as Bellevue' contained about twenty-five families and here the first school in the county was taught by Hepsebeth Hutchinson in 1816. It is fitting that the name of this pioneer teacher should go on record and should be remembered by the never ending line of educators in Eaton county who, under more favorable conditions, shall carryon the work she so faithfully begun. The Inspector's report for 1836 gives the valuation of school property at $70, the number of children, between five and sixteen, as fifty-six,-and the total attendance seventy-two. For ten months school $61 were paid, the rate of wages being $1.50 per week. It is not staled that the teacher " Loarded 'round " Lut we may safely conclude that the blessed experience was hers. Gradually settlers began to locate in the other parts of the county, and in 1837 schools were taught in Eaton Ralpids and Hamlin, though the townships were not then organized. A glance at table 1 will show how rapidly pioneers pushed into all parts of the county, and how the school teacher, the pioneer of education and.'culture, was abroad in the land to train the children who grew - as ple-fitifAi1-Pnd- robist as "the peachblow potatoesivhich [,the settlei s planted between the roots of beech and oak stumps. Benton and Windsor were the last townships to support schools, but in 1843 schools were taught in every township in the county. The limitations of pioneer life were well reflected in the school facilities of that early day. School house architecture had not reached the -classical period. One common type prevailed. The school house was usually made of unhewn logs with the bark still adhering. The crevises were stopped by fitting in split sticksand mud. Long shakes, split from ash or oak, covered the roof; the windows were few and small and the door turned on wooden hinges. A huge slick chimney often relieved the monotony of outline at one end. Knotholes in the logs often became the homes of yellow jackets and bees and not unfrequently snakes would be seen coiled on a projecting end enjoying a sun-bath till the recess or noon hour literally verified the prophecy that the seed of the woman shall bruise the serpent's head. The exterior of the building" was prophetic of what was to be found within. Rude logs formed the walls; planks hewn from logs with an ax made the floor. Soon, however, sawmills were started in the county and the ax-hewn planks gave way to the product of the mills. A huge fire place filled one end of the room and baked to a crisp those who sat near it while those farther away were shaking with the chill. On the sides, and at one end of the room, desks were made against the wall by boring holes into the logs, and driving in pegs on which boards were fastened. In front of these rude desks were benches made by splitting a log in hialves and inserting legs under the convex side. The pupils while using these desks sat with their backs to the teacher and when classes were called they rightabout-faced by lifting their feet over the benches on which they sat. In this position only did they have backs to their seats and they were formed by the -sharp edges of the desk. Books, whose names long since ceased to be heard in school circles, were studied by the barefoot lads and lassies of fifty years ago. Mitchels geography, Adams' arithmetic, McGuffy's readers Webster's an d Townsend's spellers were the most commonand the attics of modern houses contain mutilated copies of these books that puzzled while they developed the brains of the children of the 40's. But while these books were common they by no means exhausted the list, for " uninformity of textbooks' was much farther away then than to day. As a rule each child studied the _. books which chanced to be in use in the place whence he came, be the place New York, Massachusetts, Perinsylvania, Ohio, or Canada. Few branches were taught, and the three R's,"readin', writin' and 'rithmetic " with spelling, claimed almost the sole attention. Grammar was rarely studied and not till very recently did history, civil government, and physiology find a place in the district school curriculum. In very many instances the teachers were poorly qualified and methods were of the shake-roof and ash-bench order and yet, in the rude log school houses, pouring over these ill-constructed books, guided, and often misguided, by the teachers, sat the boys and girls who, 'as men and..oniienr, hlave shaped the destiny, made the honorable present and made possible the more honorable future of Eaton county. Educational enthusiasm which now finds vent in so many ways had its chief outlet in early days in the spelling school. Of the spelling school, Hon. Daniel Strange writes the following: " The spelling school was an important and frequent institution in Onedia for a quarter of a century. I have known a crew of young men to capture a pair of wild steers, never before yoked, and hitching them to a sled; push and pull them to the middle of the-road, and with a whoop and hurrah, go merrily off to spelling school. If the sled tipped over or became entangled p,mong the stumps there were enough on hand to right all again, and he was a luckless wight who failed to catch tne sled when the steers again started on the run. Of course the more orthodox and satisfactory way was with a staid yoke of oxen and a long sleigh, with the box half filled with straw, but without other seats, the boys and girls sitting closely huddled, while practicing the spelling of such intricate words as 'necessary,' 'separate,' etc. "You ask after the value of the spelling school. It was inestimable. It was the most important social institution of the day. It was there Ifound my wife. In an educational sense its pirice was above rubies. I knew a young man fitting for a spelling contest, who began spelling on Sunday morning, and with different members of the family to pronounce words to him, he spelled till ten o'clock at night without missing a word. But he failed to win the contest, for though he had mastered four spelling books he had not learned all the words in the Geography. One who learned to spell at these contests has recently written a treatise of 200,COO words, and assures me that in writing the whole he consulted the dictionary for the spelling of but one word." The following graphic account of the old-timie spelling school is from the pen of Mr. Geo. W. Sherwood, who is well known throughout the county as a believer in the spelllngschool, and as a dangerous antagonist in the lists: 'What a multitude of reminiscenses crowd thick and fast upon the memory as we contemplate the 'old-time spelling school.' Looming up in our mental vision stands the old log school house with its stick chimney, its long writing desk next to the wail, with oblong windows running parallel therewith, the big benches and the little benches, the long birchen whip on a couple of nails, just back of the teacher's desk in handy reach on short notice,. and off in one corner that most dreaded and mortifying seat, 'the dunce block,' and last but not least the old-fashioned schoolmaster, with goosequill pen over his left ear, rule in hand, pacing back and forth the room with all the assumed dignity of a country judge. All these old-time relics in panoramic view come up before me as I ruminate on this subject-relies of the long ago that this rising generation know but very little about. Being myself a student in those days, w'ell do I remember with what joy and gladness every scholar hailed the announcement from the teacher that 'on Friday evening we will have a spelling school,' acgompanied with the remark that the -adjoining districts would probAtly 'catch on' and be out in force, and that we had better be prepared for them. With what renewed energy would the industrious scholar betake himself -to the old 'elementary' in looking up all the hard words, if in so doing hle might perchance be able to 'take down' the whole school. "Night after night lhe may be seen by the dim light of his hickory torch pouring over his spelling book until he becomes fully satisfied there is no word in that book he cannot spell. Again what a, thrill of joy vibrates his every nerve as he contemplates the possibility of his being chosen by one of the captains in the coming contest, to sit beside the modest and fascinating blue-eyed Mary Jane, the prettiest girl in school, and thereby be afforded a most golden opportunity to engage her company home after shool is out, much to the chagrin of that 'other fellow,' his most hated rival. But to my subject-the old-fashioned spelling school in Eaton County. It may not be amiss to mention right here, for the benefit of those who may never have attended one, the 'modus operandi' of an old-fashioned spelling school, which consists simply in extending a general invitation to meet at a certain time and place for a friendly contest in spelling. Having convened, the first thing in order is to elect a moderator, whose duty it is to keep tally of all the words lost and gained on either side, and, in conjunction with the teacher, to settle all difficulties that may arise in the contest. Next [in order is tihe election of two captains, whose duty it is to choose sides; they generally draw cuts for first choice. Having chosen all that care to spell, the contest is now ready to co:nmence. If any teachers are present from adjoining districts, out of courtesy they are generally invited to take part in pronouncing words. After spending about an hour in this exercise the teacher calls a halt and requests the moderator to report, which of course plainly shows which side has gained the victory. A recess of fifteen minutes is now taken, when the 'dewks are cleared' for the final contest in 'spellinm down.' Now is the time the average scholar feels a slight shock to his nervous system. Confidence, or lack of it, now plainly asserts itself. Having taken their places the teacher commences by pronouncing the first word of that old familiar lesson, 'ail-to be in trouble,-and the trouble commences. One after another they go down like shocks of corn before the wind until there are but two left standing. The cross-firing now becomes fast and furious, and the feeling runs high as it is observed that one of these belongs to a neighboring district and is considered a champion of that school, while the other is of our own home school, and from the merry twinkle of his eye is plain to be seen that he feels himself master of the situation, andlhas 'come to stay.' A word finally strikes the former like a thunderbolt, when all eyes are centered on him as he hesitates, not knowing whether to say 'ion' or 'eon.' It is a critical moment, on which hangs possible victory or sure defeat.'. He finally guesses, and guesses correctly; his friends breathe a sigh of relief and the battle goes on. Back and forth the words fly in quick succession, when another one strikes the champion 'amidship' and d/own he goes all in a heap, and thus e'ds the contest in favor of the home suihool. "4It is with much regret that I learn on careful inquiry that for the last fifteen or twenty years the old-fashioned spelling school in the majority of districts in this county has been most sadly neglected.. This is very lamentable, for nothing is of more importance in writing than good spelling. Poor penmanehip may be excused, but poor spelling, in this age of free schools, never. 0 It is of interest in the light of Mr. Sherwood's closing lines to know that the Superintendent of Public Instruction is endeavoring to revive the interest in spelling by stimulating contests somewhat of the nature of the spelling school of early days. Another educational institution, fruitful of unmeasured good, was the singing school. It gave play to social impulses, besides cultivating an art which added cheer to the home and interest and power to religious gatherings. During the winter months a singing teacher would organize schools in adjoining districts, to be held on different nights, thus occupying each night of the week Merry loads of young people from one district would visit another and in not a few instances. Fires of love were kindled then that barn on warmly yet. The following sketch of the old time singing school is from the pen of Mr. Strange: "If the spelling school was golden the singing school was solid silver, not yet demonetized. James Bailey, father of E. H. Bailey of Charlotte, taught our first singing schools. A great bulky lad of seven, I was sent along as escort to my elder sister. I remember well his quaint English accent as he counted wan, tu; wan, tu, sing. I learned 'do' was on the addedline, 'mi' on the first line, 'sol' upon the second line and so on for the eight notes. Imagine my surprise to learn later that 'do'was on the second line. I mastered this key with some courage, but when the following week 'do' took another skip, I refused to follow, and would sing only when the music was in my two keys. "Do you askthe value of the pioneer singing school? 'By their fruits ye shall know them.' Previous to the singing school we had in our neighborhood two singers, my aunt Sally and a negro. When a hymn was read,they would consult together and he would whistle a tune half through, in a whisper, to see if it would fit. If it did not fit, he would try another until one in the right meter was found, when she would lead the tune and he would follow at a respectable distance. Young people were present but not one of them could sing. After the course of lessons by Mr. Bailey, a choir was organized that would do credit to any country church today. Our first chorister has since led the choirs in many villages and cities; our second has led a church choir in Lansing, and our third led the chappel singing at a Michigan college for three full years. "One who had noinstruction in music, beyond the Eaton county singing schools of thirty and forty yeaas ago, has written sacred music which has met the approval of criticts, and though the harmony is somewhat erratic, the wonder is, as Josh Billings said of woman's preaching and a dog s walking on two legs, that he could do it at all.'" with the singing schools of -twenty-five years ago, can endorse Mr. Strange's /NSA~

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Page  [unnumbered] . HkRNlR'S WOOLEN MILL, EATON RAPIDS. Ris. OF JAMES BAUGHMAN, CHARLOTTE..-" NfCl-C' IMW S. T. GREEN, IMPLEMENTS, CHARLOTTE. RES. OF D. D. VAN ALLEN, HAMLIN TwP. PORTRAITS AND OLD RESIDENCE OP MR. AND MRS. WM. B. VAN ALLEN. SCHOOL BLDG., GRAND LEDGE, IST WARD. OLD MAID'S BLOCK, CHARLOTTE. SUNFIELD ELEVATOR, SUNPIELD. MICHIGAN STATE BANK, EATON RAPIDS. RES. OP REV. W. B. WILLIAMS, CHARLOTTE. DISTRICT No. 8, WALTON TWP. SCHOOL BLDG., GRAND LEDGE, 2ND WARD. EATON RAPIDS CITY SCHOOLS. RES. OF SETHI KETCHAM, CHARLOTTE.

Page  [unnumbered] .7 OTTO MEER. PROPERTY OF W. B. OTTO, BENTON TOWNSHIP. OTTO MER is located in Benton Township, four miles north-east of Charlotte, and is the property of W. B. Otto. He began the breeding a of thoroughbred Perchron horses in 188o and his first horse, the Noble Victor together with four brood mares, weresecured from M. W. Dunham, of V From this time on hepurchased quite frequently horses of this breed. The purcliase price of Altino was $,9o00.oo. This horse was popularly Eaton County's favorite. Altino was sold in 1887 but his place was soon filled by Favoria, a $2000.00 stallion. The purchase at this time of the Constante and of the two famous black mares, Edith and Lauretta, was the laying of the foundation of his herd of beautiful black Perchrons. T( Perchrons are widely known as breeders of prize winners and among their productions may be mentioned the first pure bred black Perehron ever foale( county-the greatest prize winner in the state of Michigan-the black beauty, Prince DeConde and the wonderful niare, Pride of Benton, noted as the bred filly ever foaled in this county and she has also distinguished herself as a prize winner. The accompanying illustration of this herd of Black Perchrons shows Constante, a horse of Ioo9 pounds weight, who is known as a winn premiums at state and county fairs; Prince DeConde whose reputalion as a magnificent animal has gone far beyond the limits of his county; Royal Sta follower in fame of his half brother, Prince DeConde; John L. Sullivan, a four year old who is justly classed with the rest of this noble herd; Editl year old filly of excellent quality; and the black filly called Beauty, a three year old; and last but not least, the greatest prize winning mare of the famious Edith with her filly colt Bessie at her side. nd raising Vayne, Ill. known as imported iese three d in Eaton first pure er of first r; a close i, a three state, the

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Page  71 .. 71 view of their importance. Modern about 1846, and for years was patiently at its base he named Kedron, but the school to be ta S methods in music select the few who prosecuted by Mr. Johnson alone. I new name has never supplanted the ly secured aft | I may have special talent, and pass by remember of his starting to slide off former one of Indian Creek. The Olivet and often, th ] the many of average musical ability, the roof while shingling, and as hlie got Colony, after a ten days' journey, board went f V with the result, that we have a few to the eaves and was about shooting arrived at their future home Saturday, ments of the t< ' cultured singers, while the art that over, there happened to be a solitary February 24 184. Dwelling houses "Methods of S most of all adds to the home and to the staging pole about four feet away, were built, and land cleared, and soon of necessity, e S social and religious gatherings is closed against which he fortunately placed buildings for the college were corn-. own. As a ru S to the many. A revival of popular in- one foot and stopped his progcress, pleted. Father Shipard fell a victim to itive. One or struction in music would be a blessing. When Printer Johnson suspended his deadly malaria at the beginning of the none had glo SA history of education in Eaton Bugle and went back to Ohio to reside, enterprise, but the colony did not My first attam, county should not fail to mention the the academy enterprise languished, the despair. The first distinctively college arn of exam Lyceum and Debating societies which, subscription got cold, and Nathan building was burned before fully coin- uniform stand in many parts of the county, played no found academy building up hill work, pleted, but faith was not exhausted, single examin insignificant part in the training of much more so than sliding down that In 1845 the legislature chartered Olivet consternation young men in extemporaneous speak- roof. Just then paople commenced Institute which continued until 1859,. rons and teach ing. In some districts these clubs were finding fault because he was so slow in when a college charter was obtained, tion did not p maintained winter after winter with finishing the academy. I have a recol- In 1894 Olivet College celebrated her. to teach half Sno less of interest and zeal. The lection ofgoing down to that building fiftiethanniversary. Darin the half holding priv school house was the place of meeting one cold forenoon during the winter of century, the value of her equipmnnt granting deser and was often packed to its utmost, 1848 and 1849, after it was roofed and had grown fron nothing to $175,00). certificates all sleigh loads of visitors from adjacent sided up. I remember of climbing in, 10,030 young m(an and wo:an hav re- first summer, districts often helping to swell the with no plank to walk upon, and of see- ceived instruction, and 380 had been tied down to p u thron, ing windows boarded up with.long graduated. OlivetCollege ranksamng been badly dis The questions debated did not vary boards to save spoiling the lumber, the best educational institutions of the very unpopula much from year to year, and every Joists, sleepers and studling were all west, and is a source of pride to the "By fall the winter the pros and cons of capital pun- bare. Therewere just boards enough citizens of Eton county. result of work ishment, and the relative greatness of for the work bench to stand upon in For a quarter of a century theschoos ers, and each sword and pen were rested. The argu- the middle of the lower room. All was of Eaton County increased more in gave better res ments of the veterans in debate came silent save a long shaven hitched to a number than in efficiency. The wages was too short to be well known, yet seldom were sliver by the side of a crevice, stream- paid offered no inducement for young very great i tiresome, while each winter brought ing and fluttering in the wind. There, men and women to educate themselves persistently to out some young knight ambitious to all alone, sat the academy builder, for the profession of teaching. School and a few othc win his spurs in this verbal tourna- Johnson, upon the work bench beside aparatus was limited to an ill-assorted able to accomi ment. These societies served a good his empty nail box, his coat on and lot of books in the hands of pupils, a tion. During purpose. They developed social and buttoned up to the chin, his purple square yard of blackboard, made of I developed n' intellectual life, and some of the most hand clinging to the handle of his ham- matched lumber, cubes of chalk an inch standard of tc popular orators of E.tlon county began mer. I couldn't see much sunshine in square, purchased in many instances marked impro their carreer as speakers in the debat- his countenance, and am sorry to say by the children who used them, and That seemed t ing societies. he found some fault because they were erasers made by covering one side of a was a necess It has been a matter of congratulation so slow in paying up their subscrip- block of wood with sheepskin with the improvements and pride to the citizens of Eaton tions. He had been dunning away at wool on. Occasionally charts illustrat- which would i county that almost from the earliest them for weeks without raising a dol- ing penmanship adorned the walls, but The work so settlement there have been within her lar. 'Not a board,' said he, 'not a nail, were never used. The branches taught Hooker, was c borders institutions that afforded opper- not a sash nor a pane of glass, and were, reading, writing, spelling, arith- ors, Saperinter tunities for at least academic education, those d-d fools all the while grumb- metic and geography, and commonly and Shoop; bu The colony which settled Vermont- ling because I don't finish off this acad- grammar;occasionally a class in alge- ular througho ville,: before leaving Vermont, had emy!" This was Wooden Johnson. bra would be found. History,-physiol- eight years of drawn up articles of agreement stating Printer Johnson, the instigator of what ogy and civil government were practi- - In place of a the purposes for which they were seek- led to this, had deserted us and gone cally unknown. Grammar was largely there was elec ing homes in the West. The sixth arti- back to Ohio. a giCls study, for they could attend each township ole reads: " And we do also agree that Somewhere about 1850 the academy school during the summer, while the disappeared no for the benefit of our children and the was finished; by what means I never boys, who, after the age of twelve, by county so' S rising generation, we will endeavor as learned. Several professors were at were kept at home to work, devoted undone. The far as possible, to carry with us and different times inveigled in there to the three or four months of the winter supervision m perpetuate among us the same. literary teach, but found it up hilt work in col- term to the three R's. fact that in 18 privileges that we enjoy here." Amid lecting their tuition. Professor Wal- Until 1867 the licensing of teachers the county h all the hardships of pioneer life, they lace stood it as long as he could and wxas done by a township board, consist- study, but nin ceased not to remember the vow made. then went to railroading it out West ing of the township board and two there were on] lught. jThey were usual- in Michigan have better educational t mr the school was secured opportunities than the youth of Eaton e wishes of the school County. Her district schools are as " arther than the attain- good as any. From them it is but a eacher.. step to excellent high schools,and when \ teaching were individual, the high school is completed a college \ *ach teacher having his stands prepared to give the higher edle they were very prim- ucation. two schools had maps, It is safe to say that no c)-:nty in bes or other apparatus. Michigan of the population an age of pt was to raise the stand- Eaton has had such large influence in inations. Manifestly a the educational affairs of the state. lard was the result of a Her teachers have achieved distinction. Ler, but the result was Miss King, Superintendent of Charlotte upon the part of the pat- schools from 1877 to 1881, is Professor lers. The first examina- of history in the Michigan Normal )roduce teachers enough schools; Miss Jones, Superintendent of the schools, but by 1881. to 1838, is Professor of English ate examinations, and Literature in the State Normal schools '~tionary and short term of Kansas; Mr. Hammond, Superinwere provided for the tendent from 1888 to 1893, is a member ird the community set- of the State Board of Education.,ace and quiet. It had Eaton Rapids has been hardly less turbedand the office was hbnored than Charlotte. Mr. Briggs, r..Mr. Schunrtz, and Mr. Evans have all examination showed the been called higher, and today hold reon the part of the teach- sponsible positions, as Superintendent succeeding examination of Coldwater schools, Principal of the suits, though two years West Side IHigh school, Grand Rapids, a time to accomplish a and Superintendent of Jackson schools, mprovement. I worked respectively. Sintroduce maps, globes For twelve of the last thirty years ~r things but I was not Olivet College has furnished the state )lish much in this direc- the Superintendent of Public Instructhe two years I held it, tion, Prof. Hosford holding the posiy energies to raising the tion for eight years, from '61 to '72 and ~auhers, and felt that a Prof. Estabrook four years, from '86 to vement was discernable. 90. Mr. Schurtz, while Secretary of o me' the first step, and School in Eaton, was nominated by the ary foundation for other republicans for the office of Superinin methods of instraction tendent of Public Instruction, but a nevitably follow. " political reverse lost the state to that ) well inaugurated by Mr. party. arried on by his success- With honest pride the citizens of this adents, Townseni, Evans county can look back over a third of a t the office was unpop- century and contemplate the material )'t the state, and. after progress that has been made, and with trial it was abolished, even greater pride may they view tihe County Superintendent,- social, religious and educational ad-..... ted a superintendent for vancement that have come with the.. Unity of plan at once years. id the work accomplished TABLE I. DATE OF TIEC aRmSTr TEImM OF pervision was gradually sCoooL IN TIlL YAliOUS TOWNSiiIPS. ntter failure of township Bellevue.................................... 1836 ay be judged from the Hamlin........................1837 80 only fifteen schools in Eaton Rapids..............................1837 ad prescribed courses of Vermontville...................1838 eteen were classified, and Eaton..........................................1839 ly ten that did not change W alton.........................................1839 S in far off Vermont, and in 1813 began and got killed. Professor Loring and school inspectors. The board elected teachers durin to carry it into effect by organizing his wife taught a few pupils, and one of its members "'visitor," whose A demand fc the Vermontville Academical Assoeia- boarded themselves frugally in a. small duty it was to visit each school in the 1881, to the cr tion, which was incorporated in 1843 room upstairs in the academy, until township at least once a term, to exam- Board of Scho Swith nine trustees and a capital stock they starved out and went to farming ine into the work of the teacher, and posed of three 10,oo000. A building was erected before over in Eaton, where the Professor to test results by examining the pupils, was toexamin the incorporation of the Association, soon died. Professor Ingham, who If capable men should chance to be the secretary and in the winter of '44 and '45 the seemed expressly constituted for such chosen, such a system would have schools when academy was opened with 11ev. W. U. usage, browsed in this field of thorns yielded fair results, Lut too frequently J. Estabrook, Benedict, the pastor of the Congrega- and thistles until the oroganization of such was not the case. Loose examin- Kittridge wer Benedict, sthel pastorhofa thearyC C tional church, as teacher. The higher the Union school gave hima salary. He ations were supervisioned, and un- board. From English branches and Latin were subsequently became a newspaper edi- progressive schools were the net schools have taught. The academy building still tor in Nebraska. product. Nor does this statement im- the law of 188! stands, serving as chapel to the Con- What dividends the stockholders re- peach the general intelligence and board was to g gregational church. ceived upon their subscriptions I have faithfulness of the officersof thatday. supervision \i j The academy was a beacon light of never learned. The stock was cheaply It impimplymplies that a man who. oc- Secretary of S learning in the newland and attracked bought up by the few. The old acad- casionally interests himself in educa- fortune of Eat to itself students from not only the emy has been sold and moved upon a tional affairs, and whose wholethought secretary Mr. immediate vicinity, but from even re- front lot, and is now turned into is given to other lines, cannot in the ficiency and z moter p'a-es. For twenty years or the Peninsular Hotel. The entire very nature of the case do efficient ond to none in more, the academy was sustained, but ground has been cut up into city lots,. work in school supervision, which re- Schurtzresign Sas colleges sprung up in southern Mich- and the academy is prjbably finished, quires technical knowledge.. tant position i ig-an, and union schools were organ- The Vermontville Academy was just In 1867 the law creating the office of Rapids, and w ized in every considerable village, the opening when a company of thirty- County Superintendent of Schools went Wagner, the demand for it ceased and in the later eight persons, with goods in wagons into force and F. A. Hooker, a young who had been Msixties it was merged into the Vermont drawn by ox teams, driving their flocks lawyer, now a member of the Supreme ining Board si ville Union Schools. and herds before them, left Oberlin, bench of Michigan, was elected Super- the supervisi But it had not lived in vain. It left Ohio, for Olivet, Michigan, The town intendent. In reply to a question con- schools have 1 cernin1,ttheaonditioniofdhenschools atgreefiv1..I an enduring impress upon Vermont- existed only in name. cerning the condition of the schools at gressive. In 1 ville. society and its influence was wide A few months previous, Rev. John the passage of the law and the work ficer was chan spread and gave vitality to the lives of Shipard, the founder of Oberlin College, accomplished by him, IMr. Hooker tary to Commi vmsmtedantheavGrandlRivero valleys Mm hm-I wittes: many who are filling responsible post- visited the Grand River valley, Michi- writes When Mr. tlions with ability that only thorough gan, to look after some land belonging "The law of 1867 providingforcounty Superintenden Straining can give. to the Oberlin College. He had already superintendents of schools was a radi- village and cit Wiilliam Johnson established a high determined to found a Christian college cal departure from existing conditions, tion, and st school in Charlotte in 1845 or 1846, and in Michigan, but had not decided upon Three school inspectors had previously marked their was himself the teacher. Mr. Foot a location. He chanced to visit the granted certificates and established and day. Gradual] writes of the institution and its asso- present site of Olivet, and becoming altered the boundaries of districts. So ing, graded cc ciations as follows: lost in the dense oak under brush which far as I discovered they seldom did to-day every v "From this germ of a school finally then covered the spot, stopped at a set- more, though occasionally a man would following a de sprouted and took root the ambitious tier's home and was entertained over be found among them who visited.From an accom S project of organizing a joint stock corn- night. Receiving directions, he re- schools. This, if I am not mistaken, learned in w pany and incorporating the Charlotte sumed his journey in the morning, but, was without compensation. The qual- schools began academy. Notonly here, but in all of to his surprise, sood foand himself at ifications necessary to obtaina certifi- the number g the adjoining townships, stock was lib- the same spot where he became lost the cate differed in the various localities. fifteen years t erally subscribed. Mr. McComb, a night before. Again he started, and In the villages an1d I re advanced have ranked a land owner, donated the academy again after endeavoring to pick his way t)wnships they were mjre than in state, and the ground and a bell. Mr. Nathan A. throughl the heavy underwood, he came others. In the townships, especially school are acec Johnson was the fortunate bidder who upon the same emminence. He decided the newer ones, when log school houses versity for a got the job of putting up this academy, that this spot should be the site of his abounded, the granting of certificates Rapids schoc and of collecting the subscription for proposed college. The hill he called was largely a matter of expediency, university dim his pay. The work% was commenced Olivet and timelittle brook which flowed and depended on the eharacter of the for all courses g the year. Chester................................... 1839:r better schools led, in Oneida......................................... 1839 cation of a County Board Kalamo........................ "1840 ol Examiners, to be com - Delta...........................................1841 members, whose duty it Charlotte...................................... 1841 ie and license candidates; Roxand........................................ 1841 of the board should visit Brookfeld..................................... 1841 occasion demanded. Prof. Carmel.........................................1841 J. L. W agner, and K. Sufineld.......................................1842 i members of the first Benton..........................................1843 that day to this the Windsor.................................. 1823 Yradually improved. By NOTE: The dates for Oneida, Windsor and Walton are not certain. 9, the secretary of the TABLE Ii. SCHOOL POPULATION BY DEyive his whole time to ith the title of County 1844.......... CADES.. *459 chools. It was the good 1844........................................ *459 on County o have fo1855............................................. 4,670,on County to have for 184,1 Orr S hurtz W hose 1864............................................ -61314 Or Schurtz, xvhose of-al made her schools see- 1874.......................... 780 i the state. In 1891 Mr. 18S4..................................... 9,351 S189 J4.............................................9,207 ied to accept an impor-,. ^ ed o accept an impor-.*School age in 1844 between five and seven-.[n the schools of Grand teen. Other dates between five and twenty. as succeeded by J. L. TABLE II. MISCEm.ANEOUS SCHOOL present commissioner, STATISTICS FOR 1893. a member of the Exam- Children between 5 and 23............ 9,142 nee its creation. Under Value of Scnool Property.........,$201,043 on of Mr. Wagner the Male Teachers..............................78 been efficient and pro- Female Teachers.........................280.891 the name of the of- Total Number of Teachers............. 358 ged from County Secre- Wages Paid Male Teachers.... $16,460.66.ssioner of Schools.. Wages Paid Female Teachers $40,878.81 Hooker became County Total Wages Paid................ 57,339.47 it in 1867 he found the Primary School Fund............ $13,973.22 y schools in good condi- Total Expenditures..................81,783.34 ýeady improvement has No. School Districts................148. history to the present No. ChildrenAttending.................7,452 ly, the larger places lead- Teachers required for Graded Schools 66 )urses were adopted and Ungraded....................................... 138 Tillage and city school is Average Price per Month (male)..$43.09 ýfinite course of study. Female...................................$... 29.93 mpanying table it will be School House Material (brick).........45 that year the various Frame.........................................113 to graduate classes and NOTE: The last log school house ceased to,,,, - -be used in "1886. maduated from each. For beused in 1886. he schools of Charlotte GradSchools' No. Graduates Schools. fi rst mong the finest in thel ________lass Male Females. diplomas from the high Be 19 epted by the State Uni- Charlotte 1871 76 136 Dil courses. The Eaton Dmondale. 1893 4 10 Eaton Rapids....... 1876 50 87 ols are also upon the Grand Ledge No 11 1886 14 16 Grand Ledge No. 9 1893 6 ploma list, though not Olivet... 1893 5 5 The yo-uth of no county PotlervilIc...... 1891 6. The yoth of Vermontville....... 1889 17 32

Page  72 I 4 >7^^SSS^^^^>S^^J>^>>>gS ý IEFXXIý2ý A72 tLHYSICIANS OF EATON COUNTY.... ~;I~ By WM. PARMENTER, A. M., M. D. The practice of medicine in this state was regulated by no laws requiring study or preparation. The result has been that in the earlier history of this county the number of qualified physicians was few. In the early 60's it would have bee.n possible to count all the doctors of this county on -the;,fingers of two hands. Now there are more than fifty such physicians. Moreover, the requirements for graduation in these later days are three or four times as extensive as then. Medical schools were few, and the professional equi pment of the young doctor was obtained in a course of reading in a doctor's office, attending at the same time to cleaning of spittoons and grooming of his preceptor's horsc. In some cases he concluded his studies by a single or double course of lectures of four months' duration in a one-horse medical school; yet the majority went directly from their preceptor's office to assume the responsible duties of physician. The result was that a very few persons, endowed by nature with peculiar aptitude for the profession of medicine, rose superior to their surroundings and became noted physicians; noted more because of the contrast with the average-physician of the time than because of actual attainments in knowledge and skill, compared with that of large numbers of our physicians of to-day; the great mass of doctors were contented, or compelled by their environments to be, and remained mediocres. It must be said, however, that with the great advance of science in the last half century, medicine has not lagged behind. This is particularly true of preventive medicine and surgery. The causes of many diseases, especially contagious diseases, having been discovered, the means of their prevention wvas worked out and applied. The existence of disease producing germs in the atmosphere, and attached to all material objects, has called for and obtained the means for their destruction; and as a result, surgical operations are performed with impunity, which, before, were almost uniformly fatal. In the early 60's there were not a dozen surgeons in the United States who dared to open the abdominal cavity; now, in our own county, there are at least four who have successfully removed abdominal tumors, and did not think it "in form" to "sound a trumpet before them"'on account of it. Thirty years ago the diseases in the autumn and early winter were almost exclusively malarial. Large quantities of quinine, at $2.50 to $4.50 an ounce, were prescribed, often amounting to an ounce of the drug in one round of the "physician. The diseases during the remainder of the year were largely the results of the malarial poisoning of the internal organs and nerve centers. This has changed. Ague is a nerve disease and yet it lingers in the vicinity of sluggcroish streams and ponds. The practice of medicine then was attended with many inconveniences and hardships, among which were the sparcity and scatteredicondition of the population, requiring long rides on horseback over corduroy'roads, and along bridle paths through thexwoods, to find in a log cabin whole families shivering with the ague, or pale and cadaverous, awaiting with dread the hour of the return of the swaamp. fiend; and he was sure to come. The scarcity of surgical supplies at that time is well illustrated in a very common incident occurring in the year 1863. It became necessary to amputate a torn or broken limb in -the town of Vermontville, but no instruments could be found nearer than Eaton Rapids, 24 miles away. The physician in charg'e set the hour of operating at ten o'clock the next day, as it was then near evening; then mounted his horse and rode all night-fortyeight miles-and was -home in time to remove the limb without delay. It was his first amputation. While the present physicians of this county compare favorably in ability and success with any others in the state, there are none who have attained special prominence, or who have been called to professional chairs in medical schools. One, who thirty years ago laid down the scalpel and medicine case, after ten years of service, has found in other fields a prominent place. Dr. R. C. Kedzie, a graduate of the first medical class in our State University, was called in 1863 to the chair of Chemistry in the State Agricultural College; and has since become prominent in sanitary and scientific circles. A very brief history of medical practice in the various localities in this county will be given in the alphabetical order of the localities. Under each local headingu will be found the names and qualifications of each physician now in practice, as reported by himself. It will be noted that four ladies are now in the field. Twenty-two years ago there were none. It has been attempted to give in these pages the name and address, at least, of every physician in the county. If anyone has been overlooked it has not been for want of careful and persistent inquiry. BELLEV UE. This is the earliest settled town in the county. A Dr. Carpenter was probably the first doctor who settled here, but of his history nothing can be obtained. Later came Drs. S. H. Gage, Pero, Taylor, Marshall and sixteen others, who remained but a short time. The present practitioners are A. W. Adams, Erastus Berry, A. S. Wilson and Horace D. Hull. Dr. Albert W. Adams received his diploma from the Medical Department of Michigan University in 1872. He also took an ad eundem from the Bellevue Hospital Medical College of New York, the following year. He began his professional career in Kalamo, in 1872, but removed to Bellevue in 1882, and is in active practice there at the present time. He has never had time for office. He acquired the title of Ph. D. from the Michigan University and has since been satisfied with his titular honors. He is now in the prime of manhood. Dr. Erastus Berry, now seventy-two years of age, commenced business as a physician at about forty-two. He graduated at the Detroit Medical College in the year 1871, six years after commencing his practice. Of late years, and at present, he has combined the business of druggist, with. the practice of medicine. The first year as druggist he took out a United States revenue permit to sell liquors, paying the usual fee of $25. Determined to sell according to law, and strictly for useful purposes only, he found at the end of the year his sales, all told, amounted to but $20, and said good bye to the liquor business. Hie is married, but without children. Dr. H. D. -Hull graduated at Hahnemann Medical College of Chicago, in 1870, at the age of forty-one. He is married, has a fine farm just outside of the corporation and has not aspired to political honors. He has been continuously the health officer for fifteen years, the entire time of his practice in Bellevue. Dr. A. S. Wilson is a young physician of twenty-seven, a graduate of the State University in 1891, and has practised only since graduation. So:ne future historian may be able to write a brilliant history of h's future career. He is married and glad of it. BROOKFIELD. This town has been supplied with a physician most of the time since 1860. The order of their practice is: Dr. Thomas, 1860-1865; Dr. D. T. Williams, 1870-1887; Dr. W. E. Van Ande, 1883 -1888; Dr. W. E. Newark, 1889-1894, and Dr. C. S. Sackett, the present incumbent, who came in 1894, a young married man from the Eclectic Medical Institute of Cincinnati, which gave him a diploma in June, 1894. He has a promising future. CHARLOTTE. The first doctor to attempt the task of visiting the sick in this city, then a little hamlet, and surrounding woods and marshes, came in 1842 but soon removed to Eaton Rapids, where he died. His name was Rolph. He wasfollowed by Dr. J. P. Hall '49, who also died twenty years later. Contemporary with him was Dr. H, M. Munson who finished his work on earth ten years before the death of Hall. Dr. A. B. Sampson came in '53 and died in '68. Dr. Chas. A. Merritt came in 1853 and in 1857 Dr. G. T. Rand, a homoeopathist, located here but died in 1890. The present physicians in active practice are G. B. Allen, P. D. Pattersoni A. R. Stealy, E. C. Palmer, F. A. Weaver, C. A. Merritt, W. E. Newark, Warren Rand, Sara J. Alien, H. J. Emery, and Mary E. Green. Philo D. Patterson claims the State University as his Alma Mater, in 1869, and has used his knowledge.and skill as a physician ever sinze that date; one year at Marshal, two at Carlisle in Kalamo township, and thirteen years in Charlotte. He is now fifty-one years of age, married. He filled the office of County Clerk for six years, from "72 to 78, has been First Vice President of the State Medical society, and has also held several other honorable positions in that body. Besides his degree, M. D., he holds that of B. S. conferred by Hillsdale College. Dr. G. B. Allen has spent 35 years in Charlotte in the healing art, and now (1895) finds himself a member of the lower house of the State Legislature, his "first political offense." He received his degree of M. D. from the State University in 1867, and has practiced medicine twenty-eight years. He is genial, able, reliable. Dr. Mary E. Green graduatedin Philadelphia in 1868, and began practice in New York City. She became a member of the New York Medical Society, and, later, of the Medico Legal Society; the medical journals, both British and American, referred to her as being the first woman ever admitted to any medical society. She was elected Judge of Food Products at the Columbian Exposition. Makes a specialty of the study of foods, as to their scientific and nutritive value. Haspracticed in Charlotte 21 years. Dr. Horatio J. Emery took his medical degree from Queen's University, Ontario, in 1884, at the age of 25, and has spent ten of the eleven subsequent years in attempts to heal the sick. He combines the cognato of drurgg-ist with that of physician. Dr. Allison R. Stealy found himself dubbed doctor of medicine by the Rush Medical College of Chicago, February 16th, 1886, at the age of 29. "Sensible to the last," he married and settled at Carlisle, in this county, remaining but one year, when he took up his abode in Charlotte. His early life was a struggle for existence; but by dint of farming, teaching school and studying at intervals he finally succeeded in obtaining his title of M. D. at Chicago, in 1886. In 1894 he took a post graduate course in Chicago. Dr. Charles A. Merritt, at the ripe age of 70, remembers that his diploma, Ssigned-by. Henry P. Tappan, D. D., L. L. D., University of Mlichigan, bears date of 1855. He combines agriculture with medicine, the former for pelf, the latter pro bono pubico. He has been Mayor of Charlotte one term, and for 20 years Superintendent of the Poor. He is now the oldest physician in Charlotte, having lived and practiced there since 1855-forty years. Dr. Emory C. Palmer has practiced medicine in this county for twenty-five years, and two years elsewhere. He first located in Potterville, where he remained twenty-two years and more since that time he has resided in Charlotte. He claims for his Alma Mater the State University in 1876, and took a post graduate course in 1882 at Rush Medical College, Chicago, with private course in gynecology. He has also combined, a part of the time, and at present, the drug business with the duties of physician. Dr. Sarah J. Allen took her medical degree from the Hahnemann Medical College, Chicage, in 1881. She has practiced in Chicagd, Burlington, Ia., Battle Creek, Mich., and Charlotte. in 1885 she gave three months' special study to medical electricity, under Prof. Mills, of Binghamton, N. Y. Dr. Lewis A. Snell has given twenty years to the 'practice of homoeopathy in this state; at Lyons, Mason and Charlotte, where he is now located. He claims graduation from Detroit Homoeopathic College, session of 1874 and 1875; from the Homoeopathic Medical College of St. Louis, session of 1875 and 1876, and Chicago Homoeopathic Medical College, session of 1884 and and 1885. Dr. Frank A. Weaver, aged 37, wid ower, commenced business fifteen years years ago at Chester,. where he remained eleven years, going thence to Charlotte. He acquired his medical equipment at the Detroit College of Medicine, in 1881, after studying in the office of Dr. George E. Ranney, Lansing, 1878. He is at present the Secretary of the Eaton County Board of United States Examining Surgeons. Dr. Wallace E. Newark presents his credentials from the Toledo Medical College, Ohio, dated 1888. Seven years he has followed his chosen profession, and now, at ths age of 38, finds himself installed in practice in the beautiful City of Charlotte. His first year was given to Nashville, Barry County; then five years to Brookfield, in this county, CH fESIER Has had but three physicians since its foundations were laid. Dr. James L. Johnson first served that town from 1870 to 1882, then came Dr. F. A. Weaver, who was finally succeeded in 1892 by Dr. L. Frank Rice, a gentleman now twenty-nine years old, married, a graduate of Michigan University in 1890. He claims five years active practice, four of them in this county; first at Sunfield one year, and now three years in Chester. DIMONDALE. As early as the year 1848, Sylvester Derby located in the town of Windsor near the present site of Dimondale and treated the sick, made chairs and hunted wild game for a living. His knowledge of medicine was "picked up," yet he was considered a person well informed for the times. He was the first physician of the town, if tradition is not at fault. Then came Martin E. Munger, a graduate of the State University in 1852. The present physicians are Drs. Tyler Hull and E. S. Walford, both of Dimondale. Dr. Tyler Hull has tried for twentyeight years to cure the people in and about Dimondale. He began in the in the year '67 after having attended one full course of lectures at the Ssate University. His graduation from the Detroit Medical College dates from 1871. He took a practitioner's course at Rush Medical College, Chicago, in '83. He studied law and was admitted to the bar nearly two years since. In 1882 he was elected to the lower house of the State Legislature. Dr. Edgar S. Walford is thirty years of age, married, and has seen six years of practice. He located in Dimondale in 1890, one year after graduating from the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Chicago. He tried and abandoned the drug business, in connection with his practice. EATON RAPIDS. In the year 1836, so saith tradition, there came to this locality a Dr. Hart, but whenever he came or where and whither he went, this scribe has not been able to learn. Among those of later dates are found the names of Drs. C. N. Hayden, C. Metcalf, W. B. Hunt and A. C. Dutton, the last-still-resident but retired. The present Medical faculty consists of Drs. Wilkins, Walter, Knight, Gallery, Bradley, Stimpson, Hyde, D. A. Long, Fred Long, Mary A. W. Williams and Henrietta A. Carr. Of all these, Drs. Wilkins and Knight are the earliest. A brief notice of each and all, whose history could be obtained, is given below Dr. Amos Knight, aged1 -fifty-five, is contemporary with Dr. Wilkins; both locating here in the year 1866. He is a graduate of Cleveland Medical College, Cleveland. 0., 1869; took an adeundem degree in '71 at Rush Medical College, Chicago, and again at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, in '75. He ismarried and has one child, a daugher. Dr. Samuel M. Wilkins came to Eaton Rapids in 1866 and, with the exception of two years spent in Dakota, has continned in the healing art in that city now twenty-nine years. His degree was conferred by the Charity Hospital Medical College, Cleveland, 0., in '66, and an ad eundem degree, in 1871, was bestowed by the Wooster University of the same city. He is nearing the sixties and hassuffered for several years from poor health. He has been twice elected to the State Legislature, one term in each house; has served as '1' NOW L--C--AMW Aý AMW AMW AMW AFW ASW AWW ARW AvAr 4dr4ff F N-CA

Page  [unnumbered] .,-t.*7 I Sara J. Allen, M. D., Charlotte 2 G. B. Allen, M. D., Representative, Charlotte 3 Mary E. Green, M. D., Charlotte 4 L. E. Higbee, M. D., Potterville 5 B. F. Willey, M. D., Sunfield 6 E. M. Snyder, M. D., Sunfield 7 0. S. Bailey, M. D., Hoytville 8 - Hiram Walter, M. D., Eaton Rapids. 9 D. T'. Williams, M. D., Brookfield o10 F. A.Weaver, M. D., Charlotte I I W. E.Vanande, M. D., Sunfield MEDICAL GROUPo 12 A. R. Stealy, M. D., Charlotte 13 M. S. Phillips, D.D. S., Charlotte 14 F. J. Stocking, D. D. S., Charlotte 15 Frank H. Honey, D. D. S., Charlotte i6 A. S. Wilson, M. D., Bellevue 17 P. D. Patterson, M. D., Charlotte 18 L. C. Jones, M. D., Kalanimo 19 A. K. Warren, M. D., Olivet 20 C. Hooker Mead, M. D., Olivet 21 J. S. Newland, M. D., Olivet 22 Abram N. Hixsoin, M. D., Grand Ledge 23 A. C. Dutton, M. D., Eaton Rapids 24 Sam'l M. Wilkins, M. D., Eaton Rapids 25 Frank Merritt, M.D., Charlotte 26 E. S. Walford, M. D., Dimondale 27 Wn. Parmenter, A. M.,M.D., Vermontville 28 Tyler Hull, M. D., Dimondale 29 W. A. Davis, M. D., Grand Ledge.

Page  [unnumbered]

Page  73 3173 Mayor of his cityv; and has held the Ledge in 1870, after twelve years of one year in this ambitious village. He age, a graduat position of 1ecal surgeon of the 2M. C. hard service in Ingham.county, Mich. comes equiped with papers from the in 1875, a be and L. S. & M. S. railroads. He served At the age of twenty he commenced his from the Detroit Medical College, dated Chicago & Gra as, a Union soldier in the late war till studies at Ypsilanti preparatory to 1894. He was a student and practi- the p:st ten ye its close, in Reg. 103, Ohio Volunteer teaching, but abandoned that idea four tioner in the office of Dr. Tyler Hull, has one compe S Infantry. He is married and has one years later; and, taking a three years' Dimondale, previous to his graduation. Dr. E. R. Espi child, a daughter, course of lectures, he graduated at the His only competitor is Dr. G. V. Ran- Dr. E. R. Dr. Allen C. Dutton, a retired physi- State University in 1858 with the title dall, who was the first doctor to locate Michigan, in 1; cian now seventy-one years of age, of M D. He is now s'xty-four years here-about 1888. assistant to his cainme to Eaton Rapids, June 10th, 1856, of age, married, and is "on call" nigoht Doctor Granger V. Randall has pre- g.neral merc after eight years of medical practice or day, especially day. scribed medicine according to the 182, at the St elsewhere. He took his degree from Dr. Ambrose Brown took his degree Hahnemann system for twelve years, as he should d the Western Reserve Medical College, from Charity Hospital College, Cleve- The Chicago HomoeopathicCollege gave ville, and, in a Cleveland, 0., in 1848. He withdrew land, 0. After thirty years of service him his papers or sheepskin in1883. He partner in a b S from medical practice in 1864, since at Grand Ledge, hlie is reminded that is the first who located at Mulliken. ministers to th which time he has been druggist, he is sixty-four years old. He served OLIVET. patrons. merchant and banker. He has been as Assistant Surgeon of the 193rd Ohio The first physician was Dr. Chas. called to, and filled, many local post- Volunteer Infantry in the late war. Jennison, Who came in 1845 and died in This little vi tions f usefulness and r esponsibility; He has attended strictly to his profes- 1846. Then followed Dr. Chase, who tors at present among" others, he has been member of sion since locating here. also died a year later, and was sue- row. One physi Sthe city school board for twenty years. Dr. Abram N. Ilixon in mature life, ceeded by Dr. S. Kendall Orr, who con- Abram DeConHe is a genial, high minded gentleman, has attended sick calls for seventeen tinued to practice until 1855, and died, of Dr Armst it go prospec f mny y s of years; twelve at Hoytville, and five at leaving a widow, who, in 1862, mar- -Dr.John J. withg(ood prospect of "many yearsofz1 5 useful life. Grand Ledge, his present home. The ried Dr. Asa K. Warren, one of the Dr. Thomas Dr. David e. Long is an alumnus of State University gave him the title M. three physicians now doing business in forty-four ye nevan e a CoI eg o C,n D., 18S3. He is one of nine sons, but Olivet. Dr. Gordon, who succeeded Dr. practice in R 1870, and has devoted his attention to not the "seventh." He runs a farm of Orr, died of small-pox in 1858. Drs. A. ago, continui medicine at Eaton Rapids for fifteen 160 acres in Roxand; and is, in conse- A. Thompson, Martin E. Munger, Asa place. He the years, giving to Ellendale, North quence, well rated. His fine resi- K. Warren, Wm. Parmenter, Albert medical studie a other two rsof his pro- dence in the city is located in a garden Thompson, Philip L. Green, Crang, College, and g: Dakfessionallife. He is,at the age of vwhere he worked for his board, while Book. IHazen, Stockwell, C. H. Mead, at Grand Ledg fifty-six, married and in active practice pursuing his medical studies. M. L. Meads, George Weaver, Holnes went West, r H e has had no hankerd ing for offactice. OyrILLE and J. S. Newland have located here ago to the old MHe has had no hanlkernofor office. HO0. rVILIE.sic15,inteodr aeadfoatieat Charles Augustus Stinson MA D., a This place, so named from Dr. Henry since 1856, in the order tamed, and for a time a st young and promising physician, has a A. Hoyt, who first settled there and have all removed or d except War- Prof. E.. Je.diploma from Ann Arbor '91, and a gathered around him a little cluster of ren, Mead and Newland. otr fi marriage certificate, date not given. houses and people, to whom le minis- Asa K. Warren is one of the oldest Dr. Calvin He made a special study of eye and tered as physician and merchant, has present practitioners of medicine in Pathie docto Eaton County. He graduated from equipment fin ear diseases while at the University, had but two doctors in its history- Oberlin College in the year al College, P yet he also engages in general practice. Hoyt and Bailey. Or 3eei h e ier of 0. D fo i b in alovePh Dr. Henrietta A. Carr, located in Dr. 0. S. Bailey, in 1882, came here Universit of M. He is slihtly Eaton Rapids in 1892 coming direct direct from the State University, and the Un iversity of Michigan. He settled i from the University 0f Michigan, where has remained ever since. He never had in Olivet in the year 1859 and has been ied. in almost continuous practice in that she had just completed her medical the political fever. His parentage was place ever since. His energy and force This town a studies. At twenty-five she is unmar- Scotch and English; born in Ontario, cac er sne r h t res L^ &u~i^ ^-p/,?,, _,..,,r '.,of character secured for bimnh epc etTu ns vied, and has been elected health officer educated at Lansing and Ann Arbor, a cofdce ofh fo i t zes en f1M Snyder [v] and confidence of his fellow citizens, E.. Sngder, of the city the past two years, where he took special literary courses who elected him twice to the State Leg- Vanande Ea -Dr. Mary A. Williams, aged forty-one, in connection with his medical studies. i Wiley was foi W\ *> L \ ' -F^ -~m. TI-i- s-*i n.islature (one term in each house) and n e a u has done duty as a physician for four. He has failed to marry. hi f f y as line of Sunflel year in thi cut. Her presen ad-KLAO continued him for fourteen years as noxune yearsin this county. Her presen d- LAO. their township supervisor, and, later, of whom thet dress is Eaton Rapids. Her diploma, This town has at present. two physi- as county treasurer. He has owned years later (18 9from the State University bear. date eians-Dr. L. C. Jones, of the regular and operated a farm in connection with der, located at v1i91. She is the wife of Hon. W... school, and Dr. Frank L. Snell, homee- his practice since 1865. Drs. Mead and on the foundii D JWilliams. G y t i opathist. Newland are at present his only corn- field, about 181 SDr. John M. Gallery, in the prime of "From the most ancient times" to petitors, the present ph life, has had eleven years' experience the present this town can boast of pt. Chas. H. Mead is forty-seven dozen others p in medicalpractice, allin Eaton Rapids. twenty-two different physicians, most years of age, is married and has one vnden A brief 8 H His commission come t hfeom Board of whom have tried 'their 'prentice daughter. He studied medicine with dent doctors is b8 ehs s o Board of ban'" and then removed to fairer Dr.Perkeyof Charlotte, dissected a Dr. Chas. N. United States Pension Examiners, bnt.PeeyofCaltdsecda has not attained political pefm ent, fields. Of these Dr. J. P. Cessna was subject in. CarmelHall; spent one sum- the Eclectic 2 the pioneer. He is still living, and n mer in,reparation with a Dr. Hooker, nati, Ohio, in....ro a....a..o...g.. '. ' o t n i g h s p ac i e i h o r -, of C a n g Cr o unatyn N wi Y o rk; the fo l-otkha ton, e of the State University, Onio. His college medical education,nedict; has served the was pursued at Ann Arbor and at the nd Trunk Railway for Pensylvania Medical University of mars as local surgeon. He Philadelphia, where he received his titer, in the person of diploma. Hie was the first to locate in e. the town of Sunfield. He has also Epsie, born in Moscow, practiced in Portland, Grand Rapids 865; was brought up as and in Kansas, and is now returned to s father in Alasherville in the field of his former labors. He has handise; graduated in a wife and one son. ite University; married, VEMMONTVILLE. o; has located in Potter- This village has, during its entire ddition to medicine, is a, history, been visited by fifteen doctors. Dotand shoe store. He The first who undertook the unequal e bodies and soles of his task of battling with the malaria and. wild beasts came in 1837, but gave up ROXANNA. the struggle with his life in one year. llage supports two doc- His headstone bears the name of Dr -Armstrong and Lock- Oliver Stiles. Dr. Dewey H. Robinson cian preceded them-Dr. came in 1838 and was succeeded in a -and one took the place few years by Dr. Palmer. Then came rong after seven years a lime when no physician lived here, Weaver, since removed. and Bellevue, seventeen miles away,,,McKee Artustrong, is McKee Armstrong is was the habitate of the nearest physiar land begran his ars old, and began his an. This '"interregnum" was foloxana twenty-one years lowed by the advent of Dr. R. C. Kedng seven years at that zie, from 1852 to 1863. Dr Stevens n returned to pursue his and Dr. A. A. Thompson were co-temns in the Detroit'.Medical porary a part of the time with Kedzie, radnated in 1882, locating who was followed by Dr. Win. Pare for seven years,he then menter. There are now three resident eturing about one year physicians-Parmenter, Green and campground. ie was Snell. Their medical histories are udent in the office of briefl-summarized below. nks, the President of the Dr. William Parmenter is third in SCollege length of practice in this county, being Lockroiw is a homic- anticipated only by Chas. Merritt, of ri, claiming his medical Charlotte, and Dr. Asa K. Warren, of m the Hahnemann niedi- Olivet. He is sixty-six years old, the iiladelphia in 1877, and "husband of one wife." He received.ctice now eighteen years. his degree of M. D. from the State Un- ' past a half century; mar- iversity, in 1857, which was preceded by the literary degree of A. B., in SUNFIELD. 1854, from Oberlin College, Ohio, and nd village claims at pres- followed, in 1853, by the honorary decians-Drs. C. N. Snyder gree of A. A1., from the same college. B. F. Willey and W. E. M^^ ^^ ^g^e B. F. Willey and W. E. I-Hespent the first four years after rly in the 60's Dr. B. F. graduating in Iowa, returning to and located on the East Olivet, Michigan, in 1861 and to Verd as the first physician mnontville in 1863. own could boast. Many Dr. PhIip L. Green is past middle 77) came Dr. C. N. Sny- life, has treated the sick for twenty' Shaytown, and finally, si years. He has been located at Verin of the village of Sun- montville for a quarter of a century. 38, we find, in addition to He is a graduate of Adelbert College, ysicians, about a half Cleveland, Ohio, in 1869. He took a post sho remained but a short graduate course in Chicago in 1881, sketch of the four rest- and again in New York in 1887. He i given below, has declined all office and has kept an Snyder is an alumnus of eye single to medical practice. fedical College of Cincin- Dr C. S Snell, a homoeopathic phy1873. He began business sician, locatedhere sixteen years ago; ^ S prooaiy nas no sugu,, . continuing his practice in Ohio. Dr. of Cayuga County, New York; then fol- at Shaytown i Dr. Hiram Waliter has attended sick John Hall was a contemporary of lowed a year's course of lectures in the Sunfield Villat c alls for nearly fifteen years. In the Cessna during the 60's, but has "passed University of Michigan, after which he ded the drug 1 year 1880 the Medical Faculty of the oe" i a oae tCril.O State University thought muali over" He was located at Carlisle. Of practiced in Olivet for eighteen months; but has now a SState University thought hlm qualifie the later practitioners, mention may be then completed his studies in Chicago He is married ' to prescribe for the sick, and so certi- te opee i tde fled to prescribe for the sick and so certie made of Samuel Perkey, now of Chica- in 1873, and then came back to Olivet i pr has held the office of Mayor of the cit go,0 Joseph B. Griswold, a prominent for a permanent location. For the past hard work. Shas held the office tor the cwas one physician of Grand Rapids, and J. H. fifteen years he has combined the busi- Dr. Edwin 1 oaf ftUnted Stas Pension 9 amn- e Johnson, of Lisbon, North Dakota. ness of druggist with physician. He is for the sick o Sof the United States Pension Examin- Dr. Lejeune C. Jones graduated from now President of the Board of Exam- years, comm ers. He is in the prime of man hood. the Detroit Medical College, in 1885, iniug Surgeons for pensions of the twenty-two, a GORAND LEDGE. from which college he later received ad county from the Mid 5 This city supports eight physicians, eundem degree. He is thirty-two years Dr. J. S. Newland located in Olivet and Surgery o and is not considered very unhealthy old, has practiced ten years, the last in 1893, after a practice of twenty years also runs a d Seither. No traditions of its early trials seven in this county, and lives in single elsewhere; is a graduate of the College ried. Swith its medical men can be obtained, blessedness, after a few years of nn- of Physicians and Surgeons of San Dr. W.EV Dr. Ambrose Brown and Dr. C. J. Covey congenial married life. Francisco, Cal.', in 1877; he also grad- teen years a are the earliest of those now resident Dr. F. L. Snell, a homceopatlhic'physi- ated from the Eclectric Medical Insti- Department in the city. Dr. Lamb was an old clan, has practiced the healing art for tute of Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1892. He is and has done physician here in the fifties. Dr. S. S. the last quarter of a century. He Jis a a gentleman of about fifty, married and this county si t grduae o theHomeopthicMedcalfield and now Messenger came in 1866 and died in '90 graduate of the Homoeopathic Medical has not aspired to political honors. S He was an alumnus of the Michigan College of Chicago, in 1886; is about POTTERvILLE. his present b S University Medical Department. Be- fifty years of age and married. He has Dr. E. C. Palmer fii'st located here in and the sale c sides Dr. A. Brown, Dr. Davis and Dr. resided in Kalamo about sixteen years, 1870 and was followed by Dr. E. R. He has lived Hixson, who are sketched below, there but not continuously. Several of his Espie, in 1892. The present physicians is somewhat 1 are Drs. C. J. Covey, Geo. Green, W. E. brothers are also homeopathic physi- are Drs. Espie and Higbee. registered ph Wilson, D. D. F. Brown, and Solon clans in this county. Dr. Lewis E. Higbee has followed the of this state S Whelpley, whose biographies this MULLIKEX. profession of medicine about twenty Dr. B. F. this scribe has not been able to obtain. Orlando A. Tooker, a young man, years, nearly all ofthat time in Potter- 1830, and in Dr. William A. Davis came to Grand and single, has tried the healing art for ville. He is a gentlemen in middle: 1n, and later Si n 1877 and removed to a graduate of St. Louis Homoeopathic, ge in 1893, where he ad- College of Missouri, in 1876. He had business to his practice, nine years experience in medicine in Lbandoned that business. Whitefield, New Hampshire before, energetic and at forty- coming to this locality. He is now in mrise of many years of - middle life, married, with a family of 'three children. He has been village \.L Snyder has prescribed President several terms and a member V Sunfield for the past six of the Board of Education a number of encing, at the age of Lfter getting his permit years. igaan College of Medicine ADDENNDUM-CHARLOTTE. )f Detroit, in 1?89. He Dr. James L. Johnston, at the age of trug store. He is mar- 58, has retired from -practice, after active service for thirty years. His ofcanande g'arduated thir- fice studies..caa.-enced in 1858. In o from the Homoeopathic 1863 he enlisted in the army and was )f the State University, detailed as assistant in the medical debusiness as physician in partment, Eighth Ohio regiment, in nce 1883, first in Brook- which he remained till the close of the, in Sunfield; he confines war. He assisted in the only successasiness to office practice ful case of re-section of the hip joint )f drpygs and medicines, during the war, in March, 1864. He iearly half a century and was the first doctor located at Chester, broken in health. He is a 1870-1882, when he moved to Charlotte, armacist under the laws and retired from business-in 1892, living now upon his farm. in that vicinity. tilley was born in Ohio, in Dr. Warren Rand, homieopathist, tarly life studied in Ober- gives no auto-biography, yet he is in in a physicians office in business in the city...A

Page  74 Gfri 'HURCHES OF EATON 6 The larger log houses of the early the first time October 30, 1846. It stood inog to the exegencies of the times, did Turner. It is settlers, with extemporaneous seats of about three blocks South of its present service as a school house, printing sons lodged at boards and chairs, were the first places location. In 1860 the building was re- office, chapel and dwelling. In that time. It is n of worship in the county. When log moved to the present site and greatly year a class was organized with David household shou school houses were built services were enlarged and improved, but on the Darwin Hughes as leader, who later religious servic held in them. When the farms were night of January 6, 1877, it was burned became a [distinguished lawyer. The nor that, with cleared and the settlers had secured down and the present ne-it brick edi- next place of meeting was in a block hand, Mr. Reyr homes for themselves model houses of fice was erected on th3 ground where school house on the corner west of able to secure t worship were built that cost no small it stood. Munger & JenninP's store. In 1846. igan Confeienc amount of labor and self-denial. The The Congregational church in Olivet the court house was built and for some Ohio, and sent ministers, who, between the years of was organized with seventeen members thirteen years the people met there for parts by the na 1835 and 1850, threaded their way by a council that convened at the house worship. In 1859 the society erected a Conference met through the forests of this county on of George Andrus, Olivet, March 20, brick house for worship 49x60 feet missionary, Rei foot or on horseback, fording the 1815. At first its services were held in which is the main body of the present who moved mt streams in order to reach their appoint- private houses. When the first college edifice. During the pastorate of Rev. ily and lived ments many miles apart, have nearly building was erected the upper story C.S. Fox in 1875, this building was ea- Blodgetts whe: all gone to their reward, was fitted up for a chapel and the larged by putting a transept across the living before t In 1833, at the house of Reuben Fitz- church worshipped there. The next south end and carrying out a vestibule son preached at gerald, in Bellevue, Rev. John D. place of worship was in a chapel across and steeple in front. Griffith neigh Pierce, a Congregational minister from the East end of Colonial hall, the build- EAo IAPIDS. weeks alternat Marshall, delivered the first sermon ing now used for a gymnasium. In In 1840 the Ingham Mission of the some eighty mi ever heard in Eaton County. MIr. Pierce 1852 it united with the college in build- Methodist Episcopal church embraced appointments was the first Superintendent of Public ing a house of worship, which, in 1865, the west half of Ingham county and all meetings at in Instruction in theState, and we are in- was enlarged by adding several feet to of Eaton county except Bellevue. Rev. way. His first debted to him more than to anyone the length and putting under the whole Isaac Bennett Was pastor in charge seems to hay elsefor shaping our excellent system of a basement story. In 1894 college and and organized a class in EAton Rapids Jonathan Sear -A public schools, and also for outlining the church united in the erection of a with nine members. During the pas- of Charlotte. works of the university. A full lengtho il beautiful house of worship, of field torate of Rev. W. E. Bigelow in 1845, David Thomas painting of him adorns the walls of the stone, containing some 500 sittings, the church erected a small framehbuild- the 7th of Octo reading room of Olivet College. In 1834 The Congregational church of Ver- ing for a house of worship. In 1856 ized a class of the Methodists organized in Bellevue montville was organized February 28, Eaton Rapids was made a station with about the ssame the first church of the county. The 1838, by Rev. Sylvester Cochrane, one Rev. Richard Pengelly as pastor. In seven members second was organized by the Congrega- of the original colonists from Vermont, 1882 the society erectel its present man Barts; "h( tionalists in Vermontville, February who preached for a time in the large beautifuland commodious brick edifice, after merged i1 28, 1838, and was followed October 7, log house of S. S. Church. When a &nA.ND LEDGE. ings were held in the same year, by the Griffith M. E. log school house was built the church The firstMethodist meeting in Grand February, 1855 church on the South line of Hamlin met there for worship. In 1844 a two- Ledge was held in 1851 by the Rev. pleasure of w Township. In 1840 the Methodists of story frame buildinz wus erected for John Clayton. an earnestlocal preacher new sanctuary...% zzIL n i 0UNTY. said that thirty-two per- The Free Will Baptist church of, Mr. Reynolds' at one Grand Ledge was organized in the ot strange that such a * Johnson settlement four miles west of ld have felt the need of Grand Ledge by Rev. S. A. Cusner in es at least once a week 1851 (one authority sa-ys 1863). There so many preachers on was also a small society of the same lolds should have been faith in Eagle, lonia County, and in hemi. In 1S3 the Mich- 1871 these united and changed their e was held in Mansfield, place of meeting to Grand Ledge. a missionary into these In the year 1893 a number of repreme of Kinnean. In 1839 sentative men from the Free Will Bapin Detroit and sent as fist and also the regular Baptist 7. Washington Jackson, churches met in Jackson to see if it was o his field with his fam- feasible to adopt some plan to secure a in the house with the closer union between the two denomire three families were nations. After a protracted and ieir arrival. Mr. Jack- friendly discussion an agreement was t different houses in the reached on the following principles, borhood once in two which are known as the Jackson Plately with Grand Rapids form, and which is gradually being acIles distant, going to his cepted by the churches of each body. on foot, and holding TIE JACKSON PLATFORM. termediate points on the I. No abandonment of doctrines now station west of Griffith's held is required, but the regular Bape been the house of tists are asked to simplify their aeceples two miles south-east tance of the doctrines of freedom and In 1838 Conference sent responsibility of man, and the Free Will as preacher, who, on Baptists are asked tosimplify their acher in that year. organ- ceptance of the doctrines of grace-the fourteen members, and exact interpretation of all doctrines,, t'me another class of being left to the individual, subject, was organized at Tru- only to the mind of the Lord as re-.se two classes were soon vealed in the New Testament. nto one. In 1840 meet- II. According to the teaching and in a school house. In practime of the apostles, baptism should i, the society had the be received immediately after regenerorshiping in their own ation, and therefore properly precedes. This church has had the Lord's Supper and public Christian Eaton Rapids organized the fourth an academy, and the utipper story was who is still living. The meeting was the benefit of church in the county. A brief review fitted up for a chapel and is still used at the house of 'one Adam Smith. In eight different of the several denominations of Eaton as such. The present house of worship 1852 the present Grand Ledge charge of local preach County is given below, but owing to a was built in 1864, during the pastorate belonged to the lonia Circuit, and Revs. BAPL lack of data of some of them we are of Rev. 0. H. Spoor. During the pas- 0. Whitmore and A. R. Bartlett were In 1851 Mrs. unable to give an extended notice. torate of Rev. David Beaton, in 1886, a preachers: No record shows the num- Pierce and MaI CONGREGATIONAL CHUtRCH. lot was purchased and a commodious ber in class at that date. Its house of known, the on In 1851 a man named Joseph Dunton parsonage erected upon it at a total worship, built of brick, is furnished vicinity of Cha made his appearance in the countydlec- cost of $2,000. It is the oldest Con- with a town clock and is the only secured a visit turing upon mesmerism and preaching. gregational church in the county, and church in the county that is thus kins, whoprea <,home religious interests was awakened was the second such organized in the equipped, in. in Carmel 1 in the West part of the town of Carmel county. It has in fifty-six years had VE RMONTVILLE. house, and the which resulted in the organization of a thirteen different ministers. What is now known as the Vermont- women were r church with seven members, andit was The Congregational church of.Grand ville M. E. church was originallyin the Conference of calle I '-Thea Coagr gational Church of Ledge was not organized until 1864. same circuit as Eaton Rapids, and later changed their Christ in Carmel." It met for worship Rev. Win. P. Esler was the organizer, with that of Charlotte. In 1859 Ver- Court House ii in the Ells s-hool house, situated a few and the church had four original mem- montville first appears in the minutes new members rods North of the present Congrega- bers. Its house of worship was erected as a separate charge and Rev. Josiah ber, and these tional chur-h in Carmel. It had occa- in 1866 with two hundred sittings and Fowler was preacher. At the close of the First Bapt sional preaching by Rev. E. & Bartlett ata cost of $2,COO. It now has fifty- the year he reported one hundred and and the servic of Olivet Cillege, aa.l Rmv. W. / Bea- one members and one hundred and six- fifty-nine members and fifteen proba- were secured f edict of Vernmtv.'lle. In 1852 it teen in Sabbath school.,. Its current tions. buat the: circuit then embraced several years s changed its place of worship ti the expenses are $550 per year. There are classes in Kalamo, Yermontville, Bis- CourtHouse, ti Cjurb House in Charlotte, and its name at present fourteen churches with 1,363 mark and the Dow neighborhood. In and in Carmel to the the "First Congregational Church members; their current expenses are 1845 Rev. Noble was preacher and frame buildint of Coarlotte. On New Year's. Day, $18,352. They give annually for organized the Vermontville class, of worship. I 1854, Rev. Wolcott B. Williams became benevolences $1,652. The value of which held its meetings four miles veneered with the first resident pastor.of the church Congregational church buildings in north-east of Vermontville, where they and more rec' and continued for thirteen years. In Eaton county is $94,000 and their corn- erected a house of worship during the further impro 1856 the society erected, at the South bined seating capacity is 3.422. pastorate of Rev. Thomas Clark in 1862. On the 22 o end of Bostwick avenue, a frame house CHARLOTTE MiTcrHODISTr EPISCOPAL. In 1877 Rev. J. W. Smith was pastor Race, Ann Ra of worship at an expense of $1,275, for In 1838, Rev. E. H. Pileher was Pre- and moved the house of worship to the Mary L. Jeff house and lot. It had two hundred siding Elder. "and with the exception village of Vermontville. Rev. J.H. Asenath Whe Sand fifty sittings and was innocent of f Bellevue the Methodist work in Thomas was pastor 'in 1287 in which Samuel Ferris vestibule, bell and steeple. By out- Eaton county was known as the Ing- year the church was enlarged by the selves into the Ssiders it was dubbed "The Bass Wood ham Mission belonging to the Marshal addition of a wing, and was refitted. Eaton Rapids, SChurch." It was, however, the first District. This Mission embraced also These improvements were made at a faith and ente house of worship in Charlotte, and at the west half of Ingham county. Rev. 'cost of $1,800. each other. 0 the tine there were no others within Washington Jackson was preacher and IHAMIN. i April it w ten miles. In 1873 the society erected conducted services at the house of The Griffith M. E. church in the by council Fe Sits present house of worship which was Jonathan Searles, two miles southeast southern part of Hamnlin, although a was supplied uot fully c:mpleted until 1881. of Charlotte. In 1839 Rev. Isaac Ben- country church in a remote part of the among them R The Eaton Rapids Congregational nett was preacher and held services in county, and but little known, is really Hill. The firs Schurch was organized July 13, 1843, by the new court room in the hewn log one of the oldest religious organizations the church is t 'Rev. Joseph W. Smnith, who was pastor tavern kr.o vn as the Eagle Hotel that in the county. The first religious of the old Dr. Sfor only about two years, but lived in stood where the Phenix now stands, meetings held in the neigborhood were to the present SEaton Rapids until his death in 1867. It is supposed that he performed the conducted by local preachers at the the pastorate c After the close of his pastorate, for first marriage ceremony in Charlotte, House of Stephen Reynolds. Those frame meeting about ten years, the church had only the parties being Rollo Cushing and were days of boundless hospitality and thepresent sit< occasional services. In 1855 Rev. John Susan Searles. In 1l41 Rev. Levi Mr. Reynolds seems to have kept a repaired in 187 S. Kidder became pastor, ana the Warnerwas preacher and the meetings vertiable ministers' tavern. At one of Rev. J. M. church has ever since steadily main- were transferred to a hewn log -build- time he had three loc'al preachers and again enlarged tained its church life. It occupied a ing 16x20 feet that s.too.d just east of their families living in his house, viz: nder the past ( \ small house of wbrship of its own for the Sherwood House and which, accord- Revs. Wm. Crane, Truman Barra-nd and mer. rr:^ ^^ ^^ ' 4^^ ^^ the labors of twenty- duties.../ ministers besides those III. It is advisable that initiations to ersand Presiding Elders. the Lord's Supper be omittbkd, the anIST CHURCaES, nouncement of the observance of the Esther Searles, Julia supper being considered sufficient, ry Rager were, so far as IV. All our churches are advised to ly Baptists living in the omit the use of the term "Sacrament," riotte, and in 1852 they as defining the nature and meaning of from Elder John Tqcmp- the ordinances, and that "watchcare ched at the old log build- membership" be discontinued where it known as the Ells school has existed. n and there these three V. It is surggested that our churches ecognized as the Baptist discontinue the use of the distinctive Carmel. In 1855 they terms "Regular," "Particular," "Free" place of meeting to the and "Free Will," and use only the name n Charlotte and seven "Baptist" were added to their num- V1. Itis suggrested that the churches ten were recognized as of both bodies mutually accept church "st church in Charlotte letters of commendation and ministeres of Elder Tqmpkins ial credentials. or one-half the time. For Inasmuch as there is a coming toervices were' held in the gether of the Regular and the Free Will he Congregational church Baptists on the basis of the Jackson Hall. In 1869 a model Platform we have included the Grand v was erected for a house Ledge church among other Baptist n 1882 it was enlarged, churches in the county. brick and a spire added, UNITED BRETHREN CHTURCIIHKS. ently it has been still The first United Brethren church of Ted and decorated. Eaton County was organized in Walton f February, 1815 Calvin by Rev. Ross. It had five members. In ce, Henry R. Jeffries, 1877 they erected a new house of worries, Timothy Wheeler, ship at a cost of 800. It has a seatinge eler, Ann Arnold and capacity of two hundred persons. They met and organized them- also have a $400 parsonage. In 1864 First Baptist Church of they organized a United Brethren soby.adopting,-.articles of ciety in Charlotte. Their present ring into covenant with house of worship is a neat brick struc'n the 17th of the follow- ture, erected in 1874, at a cost of $3,000. 'as formally recognized In 1872 the United Brethren atir three years the church tempted to build a small brick church by different ministers, in Potterville, and laid the foundation,ev. J, C. Post and Elder and gathered some materials, but the t building occupied by leader became discouraged and called j he present upright part on Rev. W. B. Williams, then SuperinS. M. Wilkins house next tendent of Missions, and requested him edifice. In 1859, under to organize a Congregational church )f Rev. H. G. Mosher, a and take the foundation and materials house was erected on on the ground and go forward and come. This was extensively plete the edifice, Mr. Williams sent 8 under the supervision word to Potterville that he would ritterington. This was preach there on the following Sabbath. g and rimodeled in 1890 At the close of the sermon he statedI orate of Rev. J. P. Far- to the congregation the request he had received, and inquired if'anyone present annya~n ^ - - ^- ^-n---.-----~ & /Aj NaL

Page  75 . * ^75 b had anl- objections to the transfer. No three in Charlotte, and for several years Francis Broegger of Hastings, bogh Taylor, ser S objection was made, and soon he or- thereafter no services were held in the property of the Episcopal society in several year ganized a church of seven members Charlotte, but during the time Patrick Eaton Rapids, put it in repair and newed by R raised funds to finish the house. McDonald and wife went once a year furnished it, and in September of that two years cc In 1885 the United Brethren erected to attend worship in Marshal, and year it was consecrated by Bishop Foley ShurP a la a brick house of worship in Mulliken, finally induced Rey. P. C. Koopmans to of Detroit. ent house o: but before it was paid for dissensions visit Charlotte occasionally and cele- Rev. Van A arose and the building was advertised brate mass in their private residence. EPISCOPALIAN oHUmjCiiES. for one ye for sale to pay debts incurred in its The building of the Chicago & Grand In 1846 the Rev. L. Foote began hold. served as Re erection, and Rev. Leroy Warren, then Trunk railroad brought many more ing the services of the Protestant EpisSuperintendent of Missions, was invited Catholics to the town, and in 1868 Rev. copal Church in the old Court House in to organize a Congregational Church in C. M. Frain, with the assistance of Mr. Charlotte, and continued them for six isoe Mulliken, and take the meeting- house McDonald, raised money to erect upon years, Then for twenty years there field, someti on condition of settling all claims a lot donated by the priest, and situ- were only occasional services. In 1872 ard church, weroonyiccaioalonr Sagainst the property. This he did, or- ated onthe high ground in the north- a mission was organized under the ganizing a church with eleven mem ern outskirts of the city, a modest edi- name of St. John's Mission of Charlotte, peculiarties Sbers, and securing a liberal grant from fice costing $5000 with a seating capac- subject to the visitation of Bishop Sam- pay their ml the Congregational Church Building ity of two hundred. In this effort they uel A. McCo6kry, and occasional ser- Duringthe Society and becoming personally re- were generously aided by the Protes- vices were held by Rev. G. P. Schetky made severa sponsible for the balance of the claims, tants. In 1892 Rev. F. Broegg-er, of and Rev. G. E. Peters. In 1873 a wing lent objects There are at present eleven United Hastings was in charge of the parish of the old Court House was bouaet and been kept. Brethren churches in Eaton County, and raised money to purchase a site fitted up for a chapel. The Rv. J. L- missions in with a total membership of three hun- upon which the present house of wor- Taylor took charge of the mission as Swedenand tdred and thirty-four. The total value ship was erected in 1893 through the permanent Rector in the Spring of UNLVI of church buildings is $13,650. agency of Rev. P. Langhorn. In this 1874 and continued services in Charlotte Ever since cATHOLIC, effort also they gratefully acknowledge ani Eton Ripids four years. In 1877 sional libera SIn 1851 there were,so far as known,not the liberal aid of Protestants. Bishop Gillespie changed the name of Unitarian at more than a half dozen Catholic fami- In the spring of 1891, the Catholics of the mission to that of "Grace Mission, For some mc lies in Eaton county, and only two or Eaton Rapids, under the lead of Rev. Charlotte." On the retirement of Mr. Unitarian m The following tables will show the several historical points of interest concerning the remainder of the churches of the county. SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST.Denominations. %.4 0 C t:0ud - u U2 ' I^~lI^^^. ________________ Churches. By Whom Organized. t ' ^ o ý. Epise ali an................. ~,-.;" o ] i-i niversallst............... ^0 ' -*?-^~ 5 >^ O^^^ Episcopalian.............. Ms: * ~ s | < S ^.5 ^ ~..2 German Baptist Brethren. so^ C) O l g ^ i S 'Catholic.................. _____ ____ Free Methodist............. Charlotte. Rev. J. N. Loughborough....... 1662 17 67 $ 7 412 1 150 1.500 Methodist Protestant...... Eaton Rapids Rev. J.O. Corliss................ 1875 12 35....... 100 600 Seventh Day Advenists. Potterville.... Rev. Joseph Frisby............ 1862 8 61 30 432 1 200 1,700.....Presbyterian........... Dimondale... Rev. John Sisleg.................. 1876 11 27 20 95 1 200 1,200 Baptist................. SVermontville. Rev. J. D. Van Horn............. 1885 10 16 1..... United Brethren. Brookfiell... Rev. Franklin Star................ 13 40 25 229 Lutheran............... Total.....6........................................ 29 5 26 4 50 0 Congregational........ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _- -- 00-- _ __55, 0 0.... M e t h od.e s t E p i s c o p a l.. t *PRESBYTERIAN. --Tol............... _____ __41 -------------ol.---------------- - _ _There is a Union churcl.J ^ n. C, U ) whole number of houses of Churches. By Whom Organized. 1't 0.. + I +. is e l~- ' o ^ I |. The following table ' 'C + 4 iS >' Cities, since 1840. ^ ___~_____ _____________ ____ zb! 0 __"__g^*Ctis ic 80 uOnelda........ Rev. William U. Benedict...... 188 7 41<' 350$ 142 1 140311000 Name of-To Windsor....... Rev. William Ua. Benedict...... 1866 5 31 97 51 1 2)0 2,000. Nameof To SWindsor... Rev. Calvin Clark..............1875 13 120 700 71 1 300 3.000...... b-lene------.._____ Total.........................................25191 147 261 3 ~640 56600...777 Benton............. M 'Brookfield.'.'...'.."......... METHODIST PROTESTANT. Carmel..................... Ch elta r..................... C,) 'i CharlotteW..................... o *.5 ~ '-t + + +O.l,... o i.d Det W sor...................... Churches. By Whom Organized..4. |2 00 | I0 r- J ^ ~| Eaton'..ap'is.:.:.::.::::.... <i; 0 | Gi n ^ -e UrandLeoge................. vice.s were suspended for regularly. In 1870 a Universalist Sos. In 1887 they were re- ciety was organized. Rev. James Gorev. J. W. Bancroft and for ton was the first resident Universalist )ntinued by him and Ore minister. He began his ministry in y reader. In 1889 the pres- Charlotte in 1881. In 1889 the societyf worship was built and was reorganized with seventy memntwerp served as Rector bers..ar. Rev. M. H. Martin FIRST HOUSESQ OF WORSHIP ERECTED..ctor from 1891 to 1894. The Congregational society in Olivet GERNIA- BRETHIEN. in 185 2, completed the first house of worship in the county. The second.11, which is located at Sun- osiinteCU T ecd h,mes known ahich is located at Sun- one was build in 1853 by the Methodists ies the known as of thise Dunk- at Bellevue. In February, 1855, the is the onlyoe of this de- Griffith M. E. Church was dedicated in the county. One of its and in the same year the Congregationis, they think it wrong. to Z_' h am erte " ain is, they think it wrong to alists and also the Methodists in Eaton inisters a definite salary. Rapids completed houses of worship )astyear the church has * cpd ^P6 oss hpT 1ast year the church has bthat they had begun in 1843. The old 1 contfibutions for. benevo- church, built in 1856 by the Congrreo-aof which no record- has 1hrb 0ul 1D15 b h Dea of which no rec rd-h us tionalists, in Charlotte, was the sixth The denomination supports meeting house built in the county. Canada, India, Denmark, Tie Township of Sunfield is better Germany.supplied with churches than any other IsAL:sT CHIURCHIIES. township in the county. It has twelve 1853 there has been occa- church organizations and ten houses 1 preaching in Cearlotte by of worship. The Methodists are better id Universalist clergymen, supplied with parsonages than any )nths Rev. J. Pardee, a denomination in the county. They inister, held services here have one for every charg e. CHURCH SUMMARY. -~~~~ (1)gl ^ ^T.0.0 "-I CC h n00. 5. C, ~0 C OQ ^i,50 C. 'Sb M.... 1/ 67 5, 1,200S 1100 1 250 3.5550 1.].... 1 67 51) 120; 110 $1 i250 3,.555 0c 2 -.. 1 70 72............. 3 0 1,0 / C0.. 2 213 - 30 250 50 2 510 640 C.'............ 3 55 9.) 416 63 2 40() 2,80o "":... * * 4- 271. 351 3,079 71 4 775 8,300 "2 "-1o ~ o 6~~ 0 12300 i~ 6 219 226 145 1,268 4 650: 0.ooo '... * I 3 194 250 1,1o7 o264 3 640 6$000........... /* 6 893t 740 4.081 574 5 1,750 2,60 2 2 ",-566 11 33 404 1,059 60 10 2050 13,650 6 3250 1.... 355.... 9 41........ 2. 4011 2,00(1........ 1 0 1,63 1,393 1352 '1,652 14 3.422 9,00 4 600.. 22.8 2.199 194 21,9800 2.0806 19 49 n 6000 11 12.450 wn 1 183 0. 1850. 1860..1870 1880. 1890... 1894...................... -- 9~ --- ~ 1,551 1,985 12,047 2,084 T y5 ~.*......................... 3Ui 755 1,3.55 1,763 11.537 /1,534 01 1,86'S 1,393..1.. 52255 821 1,057 1.431 1,34 4113060...................... " 8.5 566 1,363 2,504 1:175 1,089 129.4.............. 195 8 42, 80 796 1,6117 2 1,487.5 1,420 25 24,3300 d in Walton which is not included in the above table, making, the worship in the county 68.......................... ** * -* * *- * *......... 2,910 3,867 /4,350- M w.... 180........... 1 94 5 6018 18150 1,60 1,82 1,48:3 "868 755 1,20 0355 1.739- 31 1,3 *** *** ** * * ** ***. 255 i 821 1,057 1,7391 7183 1 730W...................... 539 1,270 2,035 1, 92 1,084 1058 1,525 2,899 3,636 |,3 1,256 1,249...............................8...... 1,970 2,157 * * * * * ** * -- * * * * * * -* * ** - * * * * * ** * *........... 2.1s Ainger........ Revs. A. Byers and S. Philips.. 1878 25 66$. 25 I-25( 53,000. - Kalamo........................... Oneida.................... Carmel........ Rev. George A. Eadus........... 858 25 7411 40. 1 200 1,900 300 Roxand................. Dimondale.... Rev. L. F. Hutt.............. 1869 8 89 479 42 1 125 900 900 Suneld................ Eaton Rapids Revs. L. Dodds and F. A. Perry 1893 14 421 1.850 ___4 _ 1 200 2,50..... ermontville Total......4........................... 1 041................. 72 2W alton................. T311A Ao S...................... 1, 363 1.32 1,329 1460 5 139 *1'is 0' 1d*8 1.363 1.632 iji91 1,460...................... 265 492 1,382 2,047 2,638 2.930 1,229................... 353 790 1,144 1,598 1,731t 1,593................ * * 122 507 1,106 1.595 1,891 2,002............ 182 324 875 1.801 i2.C92i 1,881t 1,746...................... 116 464 1,005 1,645 1,857 1,995 1.874 IT' --

Page  76 76 S[/IISC ELLANEOU" sKET J. VAN OSDALL. of the plant, owing to the decease of its founder, was U J. Van Osdall was born April llth, 1839, in Wayne changed to James Gallery's Son's foundry and machine county, Ohio. He was united in marriage to Mrs. shop. A stock company was formed in 1893, for the S Susanah B. Dixon, February 1st, 1865; In the spring of manufacture of plows, and the new institution received 1860 they moved to Michigan, settling on a farm in corporated privileges from the Secretary of State in Windsor township, where they still live. Mr.Van Osdall April of the same year. The capital stock is $25,000. discovered, soon after his settlement on the new farm, The plant gives employment, at good wages, to twentythat an excellent quality of stone lay hidden beneath five men, and the output, consisting of thirty-eight difthe soil and decided to quarry some of it as an expert- ferent styles of plows, is about six thousand a year. Sment. In color, the stone is a very light gray with a The Bissell Plow Co's. principal market is the Eastern faint bluish tint. It is free from lime and iron and does and Central states. not tarnish as quickly as many other kinds of sandstone. LYMAN BENTLY. About twenty-five or thirty men will be employed this Lyman Bentley was born in Gustavus, Trumbul Co., season in quarrying it. Ohio, December 14th, 1838. His father was a cheese s.. HORNER & SONS. manufacturer of Gustavus, and the family, of whom The Eaton Rapids Woolen Mills, of which S. Homrer Lyman was the oldest, consisted of four children. & Sons are the proprietors, are located on the north end Lyman attended the district schools of Ohio, but at the Main St., andrepresents one of Eaton county's varied early age of fifteen began life for himself as a maker of industries. This plant succeeds the pioneer carding cheese boxes. Later he entered a general store in mill of William Gallery, the change from carding exclu- Wayne township, Ohio, where he spent several winters sively to woolen manufacturing having been effected as a clerk, At the age of twenty-one he secured employsome years ago. Yarns, flannels, cassimeres and blankets ment in a dry goods store in Warren, Ohio, where he all of excellent quality are manufactured. The mills remained as clerk most of the time for about three consist of a long three story frame building 35x90 feet, years. In 1863 Mr. Bently and his father formed a a dye house, a boiler house, and a one story frame struct- partnership and purchased a good hotel equipment in ure 20x40 feet. The mills usually run the year round Warren and for several years did a successful business. and employ, when doing full duty, from twenty to thirty From Warren Mr. Bently went to Louisiana where he hands at good wages. The mills represent an invest- spent four years as a farmer. He has resided in Eaton CHES. four daughters, Fannie, Malinda, Sally Amanda, Anna A., and Mary. Horace B. settled in Concord, Michigan, in 1846 and two years later married Miss Lodema Hicks, eldest daughter of Samuel and Betsy (Reynolds) Hicks of Marshall. Of the five children born to them three survive, Cornelia Ann, George Avery and Nathaniel James. The latter has been a school teacher and Inspector of forBrookfield. The former married Dr.W. E. Vanande now of Sunfield. His mother died when Horace was about eight years old, then he was thrown upon his own resources. He refused to be bound out, and by dint of persevering industry he gained a good education for those days. Mrs. Perry, who was born at Newsted, Erie Co., N. Y., January 12th, 1829, was educated at Rockford, Ill1., her earlier home. Mr. Perry has been honored many times with positions of trust, among them being that of supervisor of Brookfield, which office he resigned in his fifth term en account of poor health. His official as well as his private life will bear closest scrutiny. The home of Mr. and Mrs. Perry has always been a refuge for the unfortunate ones. The hungry never pass from their door unfed or unassisted. Charles, a little foster son, finds a substantial home with them. He attends the district w school, studies music and is an affectionate and obedient boy. These esteemed pioneers of Brookfield have lived quiet, unassuming lives, and their strict honesty and intelligent industry make them worthy of the good name which is theirs. The world is made better by the r N ment of about twenty thousand dollars and bring to Rapids since 1872, and has given most of his time to the SEaton Rapids a gross amount of some seventy-five boot and shoe trade. There are many other enterprises thousand dollars each year. Messrs. Horner are also however, in which he takes a lively interest. Numerous proprietors of the Eaton Rapids electric light plant, municipal positions such as city treasurer, president of SMRS. T. w. DANIELS. council, and chief of fire department have been bestowed Mrs. T. W. Daniels, nee Anna N. Sherd, was born i upon him. He was honored with the presidency of the Alleghany county, New York, in 1841. She was the State Firemen's Association and holds also a seat of daughter of John and Catherine Sherd who came to membership in the National Association. Mr. Bently Michigan in '44 and settled in the town of Onondaga, was uted na age to Miss Carrie Decker in March, g Ingham county, where she grew to womanhood, coming 1866, at Geneva Falls, Ohio. Mrs. Bently is a cousin of lughamn county, where she grew to womanhood, coming th1ol eone ila oy to Eaton Rapids to live when but seventeen years of age. the world renowned William Cody. She had the good fortune to meet and marry T. W. Dan- MS. T. D. WILLIAMS. iels who was known in Eaton county as one of the Mrs. T. D. Williams, of Duttonville, is the widow of brightest of merchants and business men. Mr. Daniels T. D. Williams, one of the pioneer physicians of Brookdied Sept. 7, 1891, and by his will showed his great love field. She has, for a number of years, kept the store and the confidence he reposed in his wife by giving her located opposite the postoffice. Her store is always his entire fortune, well stocked with groceries, hardware, boots and shoes, SWM. B. VAN ALLEN. dry goods and necessaries of all kinds. Mrs. Williams William B. Van Allen, who was one of Hamlin town- has the confidence of her many customers who speak of ship's historic landmarks, was born in Cayuga county, her as strictly honest and fair in all her dealings with New York, January 10th, 1816. He was the third son them. She is an earnest worker in the church at Dutof Daniel Van Allen of New York. and was given a very tonville and gives material financial aid. She is popuS good education in that state. At the age of eighteen lar and successful as a business woman, esteemed by the he came to Michigan and located in Hamlin township, community in which she lives for her many excellent then called Tyler. Here in a vast wilderness he began qualities. the subjugation of the soil and soon made for himself a HORACE B. PERRY. valuable and comfortable home.- He lived the life of an Horace B. Perry, of Brookfield, was born August 28th, Horace B. Perry, of Brookfield,Wobr ugs active, enterprising farmer, and was instrumental in the 1525, at Murray, Orleans Co., N.Y. He is a descendant introduction of numerous local improvements. With of Ebenezer Perry, who, with three brothers, came from democratic interests of the state and county, he was England about 1735. One of the brothers settled in a actively identified from the beginning. On the 7th of southern state, one in Massachusetts, and one in Rhode July, 1887, he passed peacefully away at the residence Island. Two grandsons of the latter. Oliver Hazard of his son, D. D. Van Allen, mourned by hosts of friends Perry and Matthew Calbraith Perry, have placed their living in Eaton and other counties and states. He names high in the history of our country. Ebenezer, was the father of six children, four of whom are de- the great grandfather of our subject, settled in Connectceased. Mrs. Albert Clegg and D. D. Van Allen are of icut and there married Miss Mary Williams about 1765. the county's substantial citizens and are still residents To them were born Nathaniel, William,Ebenezer,Aiaph, of the township in which they were born. James, Fannie and Mary. The youngest son, James, T. N. BISSELL. marriedMiss Fannie Avery, of Vermont, about 1810. The T. M. Bissell PlowCo., No. 115 Canal street, was They had six sons, James Atkinson, Oliver Williams, established in 1848 by James Gallery. In 1882 the name Walter Avery, Harrison G., Horace B., and George, and,ae aley n 82te ae. v influence of such people as Mr. and Mrs. Horace B. Perry. GEORGE D. PRAY. George D. Pray was born in the township of Superior, Washtenaw Co., Mich., February 2, 1843. His parents, Nathan H. Pray and wife, settled in Windsor township in 1837. There were only two families living in the township at this time, Mr. Pray being one of them; the other family had come in some time earlier. In 1842 Mr. Pray moved to Washtenaw county, but after a brief stay of three years returned again to Windsor. Mr. Pray's well equipped farm of two hundred acres is a part of the homestead on which he has lived since between two and three years of age. On Friday afternoon, January 18, 1895, he was attacked by his bull which he was leading, and was so badly injured that he died the following evening. Because of his unselfishness, straight forward honesty, his high purpose in life, and pure character, he was one of the best known and most highly. respected men in Eaton county. He leaves a wife, two daughters, a son and an adopted daughter. JACOB UPRIGHT. Jacob Upright-' is a resident of section twenty-one, township of Benton. His birth occurred in Oil Spring, Maulbron Co., Wertenberg, Germany, November 2, 1839. He was educated in the district schools of his native country.. In the spring of 1854, John Upright, the father of Jacob, accompanied by his family, emigrated to Oneida, then to Benton township, where he bought a forty acre farm which is now a part of Jacob Upright's possessions and the-site of his present home. Our subject remained at home until the first call for volunteers was issued, when, although foreign born, he determined t') enter the service of his new country. He joined the 66th Illinois Regiment, Sharp Shooters, and stayed until the close of the war. He is one of the very few men e who escaped all the showers of shot and shell, and came oAit as good a man as when he entered. In May, 1866, he was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Brunn, also of German extraction, and a native of Lewis Co., N. Y. Five children are the fruit of this happpy marriage. Eva, Clarence, Ray, Estella and Maud; the first men

Page  [unnumbered]

Page  [unnumbered] . HkRNlR'S WOOLEN MILL, EATON RAPIDS. Ris. OF JAMES BAUGHMAN, CHARLOTTE..-" NfCl-C' IMW S. T. GREEN, IMPLEMENTS, CHARLOTTE. RES. OF D. D. VAN ALLEN, HAMLIN TwP. PORTRAITS AND OLD RESIDENCE OP MR. AND MRS. WM. B. VAN ALLEN. SCHOOL BLDG., GRAND LEDGE, IST WARD. OLD MAID'S BLOCK, CHARLOTTE. SUNFIELD ELEVATOR, SUNPIELD. MICHIGAN STATE BANK, EATON RAPIDS. RES. OP REV. W. B. WILLIAMS, CHARLOTTE. DISTRICT No. 8, WALTON TWP. SCHOOL BLDG., GRAND LEDGE, 2ND WARD. EATON RAPIDS CITY SCHOOLS. RES. OF SETHI KETCHAM, CHARLOTTE.

Page  [unnumbered] STONE QUARRY OF J. VANASDALL, DIMONDALE.

Page  [unnumbered]

Page  77 77 tioned is now Mrs. Albert Towe and resides in Charlotte, raphers' Association which he helped to organized in S the other children still residing at home. Mr. Upright's January this year. home, as will be seen in the above illustration, is one of Mrs. Fowler is a practical and experienced operator Eaton county's finest, and his farm, a well stocked, well of the camera and has been identified with the business equipped tract of two hundred and forty acres, is rich for eleven years. She is also one df Charlotte's enerand productive, getic women, and is interested in all enterprises that J tend to the best interests of the people. She is a memJ. MIKESELL & COMPANY ber of the School Board of Charlotte and also county IIs the title under which the preserving factory of secretary of the State Sabbath School Association. We Charlotte is conducted. This institution is situated at will add that a large number of the illustrations conthe north end of Oliver street, opposite the Michigan tained in this work, are engraved from photographs Central depot. The plant consists of three large build- made by Mr. and Mrs. Fowler. ings, the first of which is a two story structure, 35x70 SPENCER. PHARES feet. The west end of the first floor is equipped as an P propri office, and the packing, shipping and storage rooms, in Spener C. Phares is the proprietor of the feed barn their respective appartments, occupies the rest of the between Lovett and Lawrence on Bostwick avenue. bnilding. The second is a one story building and mneas- Every one in the city, and many horse owners in the S, building. The second is a one story building and meas- adonn neighborhood know where the skating rink unres 35x85 feet, and contains the cooking department, adjoinig neighborhood know w the heavy machinery and the engine house. The third was located. Mr. Phare s has had this building for two building is a store room for uncanned stock, measuring y earsand hs the finedustri accommodations for man and in size 20x50 feet. beahis customers an with criourtesy. gHe isa anativeatsof in-ll The plant is modern in every detail; the large boilers hi nstOm wit ce H i are of 70 horse-power and are used for cooking, in their cinati, Ohio, and served in the Union army for cokn,*nter nearly -five years. He belongs t h.A. n season, berries, tomatoes, apples, peaches and green er f ars ae An t he. iia iS deserving of patronage. Anevninhsmltr peas. To give the reader at intelligent idea of the ex- ireerwn parthe. in tn Jefferso. tent and usefulness of their new institution, we will say caree I rwinville, Georgia, May 10th, 165, and two that its daily capacity to put out its products are as fol- Davis at I rwinville, Georgia, A th nd lows: Apples, 5,000 gallons; tomatoes, 15,000 cans; and hundred and ninety-three dollars of the one hnndred Sberries, S to, cans, and its arket is the unli- thousand paid by the Presieent for the capture of Davis, 5 berries, 8 00 0 to 10,0.00 cans, and tmaktsteuni- ^ ^ ited territory of the United States. was received by Mr. Phares as his share. The records The force employed is eighty hands, and this number of Congress, shown the writer, substantiate his claim. is found inadequate for the business, and the pay-roll THOMAS JENSEN. per week is $400, and the weekly purchase of stock is at Thomas Jensen, feather renovator, has lived in Charpresent something like 6,000 bushels of apples at a cost lotte for nearly two years and is regarded as absolutely of $1,500. Hereafter the company expect to double its honest in his dealings with his customers. He is an force of hands, likewise its pay-roll and its out put of expert as a feather renovator, and no one in Charlotte goods. would hesitate to entrust him with pillows or feather The management of the cannery is in the hands of beds. All his customers say he gives perfect satisfaction. Lundy F. Mikesell, the junior member of the firm, a He is also the proprietor with Mr. Wilson of a secondyouna and enterprising man, son of J. Mikesell and a hand store. All kinds of new and second-hand goods native of Charlotte. The book-keeping of the institu- are bought and sold, of which the firm keeps a great tion, which will be readily seen is no small task, is in variety constantly in stock. The people of the county the hands of Miss Lula Mikesell, daughter of the senior are invited to call and see his three hundred dollar renomember of the firm. vating machine. Mr. Jensen employs reliable agents Jerrie Mikesell is a native of Ashland, Ohio, where he only. of troughs and a puncheon floor, neither nails nor boards having been used. The father died in 1846 and George N., then eighteen years old, supported and protected his widowed mother and orphan brothers and sisters. His school career consisted of one three months' term in Vermontville, he chopping wood to pay for his board. He earned fifteen dollars, and received thirty-five dollars more from his mother, and with this amount purchased his first farm, a forty acre tract of government land. Upon this he built a log house, and on March 1, 1849, was married to Miss Martha L. Gladding, a native of New York. He has been sheriff of Eaton county four years, was deputy provost-marshal during the war and has served his county in the state legislature. He was the first to introduce the circular sawmill in the county, was one of the prime movers in securing.the Grand Trunk and Michigan Central railroads, the first of which he was for years a director. He is at present the owner of nearly a thousand acres of Eaton county land, is interested in a large factory in Lansing, and also the B6n- ' ton Manufacturing Co. of Charlotte. He owns a large brick and tile factory at Potterville, a creamery, a flouring mill, a hotel, a brick block and a sawmill in Delta township. His son, John C. of Charlotte, is interested with him in many of his enterprises. Mrs. Martha L. Potter having died in 1869 he, in 1870, was united in marriage to Miss Mary A. Page of St. Lawrence county, New York. JACOB MICHEL, Cigar manufacturer, is of German nativity, his birth occurring in Herdingsfelds, Bavaria, Nov. 19, 1857 March 15, 18S2, Mr. Michel came to America and found employment with the large cigar firm of Shutwell & Co. in New York. He soon left this place and in a few months came west, arriving in Charlotte January 1st, 1894. Here he established a factory of his own and it ranks the largest of the four similar institutions located in this city. Mr. Michel's factory employs four men constantly and turns out an average of three thousand cigars per week, of which about one-third are ten cent goods. His brands are among the most popular and are known as Star ^j Unions, Good'Nough, Honesty, Emblem, Large Hiawatha, Small Hiawatha, and Charlotte Pride. The first was born January 28th, 1838. His father, Jos. Mikesell, CHARLOTTE GREEN HOUSE. a native of Pennsylvania, was of German decent, a brick Mrs. Emmna J. Church, proprietress, corner Cochrane and stone mason in his younger years but a farmer in avenue and Henry street. Four large buildings are re later life. When our subject was fifteen years old his quired to accomodate this institution. Hot beds almost father emigrated to the present site of Charlotte, Mich.. without number, using over 4,000 square feet of glass to y\There le lived to the age of ninety years, his demise cover them, nearly three-quarters of a mile of piping is where he lived to the aeof ninety ve-,-,his demisen occurring August 23, 1892. Jerry has lived an active used for heating purposes, and in cold weather over business life, as a grocer, as a farmer, as a real estate twenty-five bushels of coke are burned each day. Mrs. dealer and as a manufacturer. His friends call him Church is a practical business woman, with a natural S broad minded, stirring and enterprising and we do him aptitude for the growing of flowers and vegetable plants. an injustice to omit the statement that his public spirit She has just filled a single order for 400,000 tomato has has been a leading factor in putting Eaton county plants. Attention is immediately given to orders of cut at the head of the list in Michigan. flowers or art work for parties, weddings, funerals, etc., G. H. FOWLER & CO. her resources enabling her to supply any demand. Nor This fir consists of G. H. Fowler ad wife, p oto- does she depend solely upon a home market, as she S This firm consists of G. t.Fowler and wire, pnotoD- almost daily ships orders to the eastern and western raphers and portrait painters, No. 123 Cochrane avenue. almost -y ss o s to te r ad w e rpheand pra pin s. 1 cities. The accompaing illustration of the interior of Mr. Fowler was born in New York torty-five years h n e, shows a beat& f aao. He is the son of Henry Fowler, a farmner of Ontario er pleasant ho, ~ own hlandiwork. county. In 1861 he came to Michigan in company with his parents. After several removals they settled in HON. GEORGE N. POTTER. S Charlotte in 1874. Mr. Fowler is a selfmade photog- In Eaton county it would be difficult to find a man so rapher, but he studied portrait painting with leading art- stalwart, so capable of great ideas, so successful in bringists of Michigan and it is by this latest mentioned branch ing forth results as Geo. N. Potter of Potterville, Charof his business that his reputation first became known, lotte and Lansing. He is a manufacturer, merchant, and. He has been proprietor of his present well known gallery farmier and is more successful in each branch of his busisince 1889. The superior quality of his work has earned ness than the average man who has his attention conS him a splendid reputation as an artist, which was fined to but one of the occupations. acknowledged by the National Photographers' Associa- Mr. Potter was born in Cayuga Co., N. Y, but has retion at the World's Fair convention by the awarding sided in Michigan since three years of age. His early to him of two silver medals. He received another mnedal life was beset with all the severe trials that come to in '91 at the National Photographers' Convention held poverty-stricken pioneers. In 1844 or '45 his father at St. Louis, and is now President of Michigan Photog- came to Eaton county and built a log shanty with a roof -........ * - " tour are five cent goods, long tiller, hand made mixed with Havana with Sumatra wrappers. The last three are his popular ten cent brands. Large Hiawatha is a clear Havana filler with Sumatra wrapper; it is a five inch cigar and weighs about eighteen and a half pounds per thousand. Small Hiawatha and Charlotte Pride are four and three-eighths inch cigars with other qualities about the same as the Large Hiawatha. They are exceedingly popular and no flavoring is used in any of them. w. B. OTTO. This well known farmer was born Jan. 16, 1844, in Wood county, Ohio. The parents of Mr. Otto were Henry and ---- Bryan Otto, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Ohio. William was given a common school education. His father died when - he was quite young but he continued to work the farm as the loyal support of his widowed mother until the second call for volunteers was issued from. Washington. To this Mr. Otto responded. He was then barely sixteen when he entered the armry in which he remained until the close in 1865. At Knoxville he was taken prisoner and confined in Libby prison for several weeks. An exchange of prisoners caused his release and he returned to his regiment, the 111 Ohio Infantry. When he returned from the war in 1865 he located in Eaton county, Mich., and engaged in lumbering and farming. In 1878 on the 16th day of January, Mr. Otto was united in marriage to Miss Celia M. Potter, daughter of the Hon. G. N. Potter, a prominent pioneer citizen of the county. The next year after his marriage he purchased a beautiful farm of 240 acres, known as the G. N. Potter homestead. wo~ .^

Page  78 2ý1ý3 IaEm 72 oM/.inzctcan> 7 oectallwaaz @(ttvey The strucrggle for independence of the thirteen American colonies with Great Britain, although a successful one, left the colonies with a heavy burden of debt to pay. The fact, however, that several of the colonies (now states) had an interest in what was then known of the Northwest Territory, proved one of the most powerful influences which kept the new born nation from dropping to pieces, and a fruitful means to assist in clearing off the burden of debt. The four states, Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York and Virginia which claimed all the land north of the Ohio river, west to the Mississippi, agreed (from 1780-1786) to give it to the United States, to be disposed of for the common good, and in 1787 Congress passed an ordinance for the government of this territory, and also for establishing a definite method for the survey and sale of these lands, which were then designated as " 'Public; Lands," to be placed on the market for sale, the proceeds of which were to be principally applied to the payment of the war debt of the Revolution. To draw up a definite plan for the survey of these " Public Lands " in the Northwvest Territory was a difficult problem, as the methods of survey in the different states differed somewhat. Virginia had her regular plats known as " Tamahawk Surveys." Connecticut had a more uniform plan which she had adopted in her survey of the " Western Reserve " in Ohio, part of the territory to which she laid claim. And now as all these different states had ceeded all this territory to the general government for the good of all, it became highly necessary that some general and definite method of survey be adopted. The plan arranged by James Mansfield, surveyor general of the Norchwest Territory, was adopted by Congress in 1802. It is so simpl'e and practical that it has received very few modifications by any of the land commissioners since. After the adoption of a definite method of survey the government proceeded to have tracts of this territory surveyed off as the demands of the public required; the first tract surveyed being nearly all in the state of Ohio, the second in Indiana. The United States Rectangular Survey may be briefly stated as follows: First, a north and south line is run through the tract determined upon to be surveyed. This line begins at some prominent or easily distinguished point, and is designated as a "Principal Meridian." Then a line running east and west, at right angles with the first line, is run through the tract, called the " Base Line." The Principal Meridian of our state begins at a point forty-eight miles west of Lake Erie, on a line between Michigan and Ohio, and from there extends north to the City of Sault de Ste. Marie. The Base Line extends from Lake St. Clair to Lake Michigan, forming the south boundary of Eaton County. These lines are run with a "Solar Compass," avoiding the errors of a magnetic needle. Lines are then run north and south parallel to the Principal Meridian and six miles apart, which divide the territory into long north and south strips called Ranges, which are numbered in their order 1,,2, etc., East of the Meridian, also the same west of it. In Michigan there are 17 Ranges East and 47 West. Across these are run lines six miles apart, parallel to the Base Line, cutting the territory into long east and west strips called Towns, and these are numbered North and South from the Base Line. iu Michigan there are 47 Towns north and S south. By this " cross-lining" the territory is divided into squares, six miles on a side. Each of these squares is a Congressional Township. Such "Townships" sometimes, but often do not, correspond to the Civil Townships which are known by popular names. The only designation of Congressional Townships is their Range and Town numbers. The system is illustrated by the following diagram: In practice the surveyors did not run the Range and Town Lines their whole length, continuously. The magnetic needle points east of north in Michigan and its variation from north continually changes. Running a line through primeval forests is beset with difficulties. No measurements of such great length can be made exactly. Hence the surveyors began on the Base Line six miles east of the Initial Point, ran a Range Line six miles north as nearly as they could, and then ran a " random line" west to the Principal Meridian, to check their work. Then they ran back to their Range line, markiny section and quarter-section corners as they went, and so proceeded to lay out the next township north; and so on east and west of the Principal Meridian. But as they ran north, on account of the fact that all lines running north continually, approach each other and come together at the pole, every township was narrower at the north than at the south. To prevent this error growing, every fourth Town Line north.and every fifth Town Line south of the Base line is called a " Correction Line," and on these a fresh start is taken with distances full six miles east and west. " Auxiliary Meridians" were also established at 'every eighth -Range Line. After the tract is thus surveyed into townships six miles square, the townships are divided into thirty-six tracts, called " Sections," each containing one square mile, more or less. The sections were run off very much as were the townships, using each township's east Range Line and south Town Line as bases. Commencing one mile west of the southeast corner of the township, the surveyor runs north a mile, then east a mile to the east range line and corrects back to the northwest corner of the section. He sets a quarter post (or a half mile post) on the west line of the section at forty chains north of the starting point, and sets the quarter post on the north line of each section, half way between the northwest and northeast section corners. The surveyor proceeds to run off the remaining sections on the east tier, up to the north line of the township, placing the last section corner where his north and south line intersects that north town line, whether this point is east or west of the section corner previously established in the township survey. The distance between the two corners, if any, is called the " jog," and is recorded. In the more recent government surveys in the west, there is no "jog " left, the surveyor being required to close his lines at the section corners on the north and west lines of each township. The section surveyor establishes no quarter or half mile posts on the north line of any of the sections on the north and west sides of the township. Each tier of sections in the township is run off in this manner, except the last two, which are run off together. On account of the errors previously mentioned no township will divide into thirty-six exact sections, and in the sectional survey new errors arise. These errors are all run into the north and west tiers of sections, which are called "Exterior " or " Fractional Sections," because they contain the excess or deficiency of land in the township, and this apparent excess or deficiency is always thrown into the last quarter mile, lying next to the township lines on the north and west. The other sections are called " Interior " sections, and are intended to be full six hundred and forty acres each, but they nnarly always exceed or fall short of this amount. The government sub-divisions of the section (although rthey are not actually surveyed by the government surveyor) by which the lands are * sold, are " quarter" sections, or one hundred and sixty acres; " halfquarter" sections, or eighty acres, and " quarter-quarter" sections, or forty acres. The section is divided into quarters by running a straight line north and south and one east and west between,,the quarter posts on the sides of the section. The quarter sections are "halved" by running a straight line north and south or east'and west (whichever way is wished to divide ii) from points midway by measurement of opposite sides. The quarter sections are quartered by running lines north and south and east and west between points at the center of each side of the quarter section. Other smaller sub-divisions can be made on the same principles, It will be seen froni this that if a section is perfectly square and con tains the exact number of acres, that this method would sub-divide it into tracts of equal areas, but it hardly ever occurs that a section is exactly square or contains the exact number of acres. Consequently, it almost alway occurs that the sub-divisions will differ more or less in quantity. But the government has istablished this as the only method by which the sub-divisions shall be made, making the eight corners established on he exterior lines of each section " the corners," however incorrect they may be. In order that no one purchasing lands from the government may suffer injustice in expecting to get the actual number of acres intended to be in each sub-division, the government sells all of its lands on the condition that each one of these sub-divisions contains so many acres, " be the same more or less," according to the government survey. And this rule follows the future transfer of the lands, where they are sold and described in " Government Descriptions," whether the words "more or less" are mentioned in the deed of conveyance or not. The method of description under this system is exact, and simple when once understood. The township is described, as previously stated, by the numbers of its town and range. The sections are numbered from one in the northeast corner to six in the northwest corner, then the next row below that from left to right, and so on back and forth to thirty-six, in the southeast corner. The sub-divisions of the section in the following diagram as it is divided into " Government Descriptions," are each described in brief on the diagram. sample of all, The one marked X we will describe Section 36, Township 36 N., Range 11 East. Sin full as a E1oa S~a I N ~2 N E 80a X. N 1 0 160a S A^ N E 'M S aNE 80a 40a 40a NW Y4 N E 4 SWi4 swl~ ~~ - -.-- SEl s 80a I 40 a 40a SWP4 SEh s w s w 4 "The north half of the northeast quarter of section 36 township 36 north, range 1I east of the Principal Meridian." The ne - and nw - of each section lying on the north side of the township are described as the fractional ne - or the fractional nw I, and the sw 1 and the nw - of each section lying on the west side of the township are described as fractional nw - or fractional sw - of such sections. If any of the fiactional quarters on the north side of a township are divided into halves by an east and west line, the south half is made eighty rods wide and the north half takes the excess or deficiency and is described as the fractional n ~. If they are divided by a line running north and south each half is described as either the e - or the w ~ of the fractional ne - or nw. Of the fractional quarters on the west side of the township the descriptions would be the reverse, as they are divided by a north and south or an east and west line. When a section contains a lake which was meandered out in the original survey, the fractional pieces in each quarter section were numbered as lots, and sold by the government as lot No. - in - quarter, see. -, tp. - N., R. -E. Land may also be described by " Metes and Bounds," that is, the actual beginning of the lines and actual measurements being given. Thus: "A parcel or tract of land lying in the southeast quarter of Sec. 35, Twp. 36 North, Range 8 East, commencing at a point ten chains east of tlie southwest corner of the southeast quarter of said Sec. 3.5, running thence east ten chains, thence north twenty chains, thence west ten chains, thence south twenty chains to the place of beginning, containing twenty acres." A tract running the whole length of any side of a square or rectangular piece of land, as a quarter-section, half-quarter or quarter-quarter, can be definitely described as so many acres off of the E side, or W side, or N side, or S side, whichever side it may be. But if the tract does not run the whole length of a side, that style of description would be wronog. There is one very common error in the description of land, and that-is many notaries public, attorneys and justices of the peace, where there may be an eighty acre tract or any other government subdivisions to be divided among different parties, who are unwilling to have each of their different interests surveyed before their deeds are made, naturally fix this in their minds, that if it is a forty acre tract it must be eighty rods square, or if it is eighty acres it is one hundred and sixty rods long and eighty rods wide, or if one hundred and sixty acres that is one hundred and sixty rods square, which in our government sub-divisions hardly ever occur exactly, so in dividing the government sub-divisions, as if they were exact in measurement on each side, the diffreunt pieces willt. overlap each other as they are described, or leave a surplus not conveyed to any one of the parties. Real estate should be so conveyed that there could be no question as to its metes and bounds when it is surveyed. -7 Town Town Town Town Town Town Town TABLE OF MEASUREMENTS. LINEAR. 16- Feet = 80 Rods = 160 Rods = 320 Rods = 1 Rod. k Mile. 2 Mile. 1 Mile. 7.92 Inches = I 100 Links 66 Feet, = 1 4 Rods ) SLinl Chain 80 Chains = 1 Mile. X is Township 2 Y.s Township 2 Z is Township 4 SQUARE. 272k Square Feet = 1 Square Rod, 160 Square Rods = 43,560 Square Feet ==1 Acre. 640 Acres = 1 Square Mile = 1 Section. SSquare Acre is 12.65 Rods Square. 1 Square Acre is 208 Feet, 84 Inches Square, ( 3 Chains, 164 Links Square. C. North, Range 3 East. South, Range 2 West. North, Range 1 East. -100 r >0. 0 rKF^

Page  [unnumbered] CHARLOTTE 2/I 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 Io J1 12 13 14' 15 16 17 G. H Spencer S. M. Cove G. H. Fowler Jacob Michel Mrs. Anna Bush W. Geddes D. B. Ainger H. A. Blackminar C. E. Chappel E. H. Bailey Jerrie Mikesell J. W. Munger C. M. Jennmings A. L. Nichols James Bryan 18 J9 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 F. M. Stevens M. B. Warren D. A. Casterlin Mrs. J. F. Terrill John L. Miller Seth Ketcham G. A. Williams Geo. L. Sing Geo. Bnsh Frank G. Smith D. L. Freeman L. P. Bissell Jas. Gillingham B. J. Culbertson David Barr CHARLOTTE. 33 Geo. W. Rowley 34 A. D. Bretz 35 G. S. Beardsley 36 Mrs. G. S. Beardsley 37 Homer Bryan 38 Horton Bryan 39 J. G. Miller 40 L. 0. Smith 4V A. D. Baughman 42 Joseph Lang 43 Myer Vomberg 44 Gideon Cogsdill (Deceased) 45 J. H. Rasey 46 A. B. Allen 47 J. M. Daron 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 A. H. Munson (Deceased) H. F. Reynolds Henry Mull S. C. Phares Chas. Foster Jas. Gouldsborough J. F. Terrill Frank A. Ells Geo. A. Perry Wm. H. Reynolds B. W. Warren Rev. W. B. Williams J. J. Curtis Albert Murray C. M. J. Young

Page  [unnumbered] I 2 3 12 13 14 15 t6 17 i8 40 4' 42 43 A. B. Swift Mrs. C. H. Wells C. H. Wells Mrs. Peter Horn Peter Horn Mrs. David A. Grier David A. Grier Chas. D. Peters Jacob Dawson Mrs. Harris Cooper 4 5 6 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 44 45 46 47 Mrs. Thos. Lyon Thomas Lyons Williard Mead Harris Cooper Mrs. Erastus King Erastus C. King (Deceased) Frank L. King Mrs. S. G. White S. G. White Fred. Schneckenberger 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 Jacob Schneckenberger C. H. Griest P. M. Mason J. Q. Griffith Mrs. W. A. Case W. A. Case Mrs. C. H. Case KALAMO TOWNSHIP. 7 W. F. Granger 8 Mrs. A. B. Swift CARMEL TOWNSHIP. 9 10 II. 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 52 53 54 S. A. Perry Mrs. Stephen Benedict J. D. Butler C. H. Case M. W. Cooper Mrs. M. W. Cooper Mrs. G. H. Wade G. H. Wade Isaac Krusen Mary Krusen Mrs. G. H. Fowler C. S. Jackson Thos. Jansen Floral Piece from Charlotte Greenhouse. Miss M. Kinne Miss C. Kinne Belle M. Perry Mrs. C. M. Young CHARLOTTE (Continued.) 48 D. C. Hoedenlaker 49 Win. Long (Deceased) 50 C. B. Lamb. 51 H. H. Curtis B. F. Belding Mrs. Dr. F. A. Weaver (Dec.) Mrs. Enmma J. Church

Page  [unnumbered] EATON RAPIDS. I 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 H. H. Widger Mrs. H. H. Widger H. J. Milbourn A. Osborn Samuel Andrsky John M. Corbin Lyman T. White W. F. Stirling 9 H. P. Webster 10 H. C. Minnie II J.C. Shaw 12 W. E. Merritt 13 Chas. Raymer 14 I. N. Reynolds 15 P. C. Birney 16 G. B. Blair 34 W. J. Babcock 35 G. W. Irish 36 J. M. Burtch I7 18 '9 20 21 22 23 L. A. Bentley Arthur Gallery Geo. Minnie Chas. Wack C. F. Fairchild Geo. D. Wilcox Win. Smith 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 J. D. Pilmore Hon. Win. Miller J. Dowe Trimmer A. V. Roehmn Scott H. Rorabeck Wesley Vaughan F. H. De Golia 31 32 33 W. Ellsworth Davis F. C. Arms, F. C. Beach GRAND LEDGE. 37 Geo. N. Berry 38 Mrs. Volorous Kent 39 Volorous Kent 40 W. C. Westland 41 A. B. Schumaker 42 E. T. Astley 43 Robt. Astley

Page  [unnumbered] 3/A/I WINDSOR TOWNSHIP. I Win. J. Batemail 2 Mrs. Win. J. Bateman 3 Mrs. Jas. Ranm 4 James Rann 5 Ctlas. E. Lewis 6 Mrs. Rebecca Troup 7 Mr. John Troup 8 0. H. Barber 9 Mrs. 0. H. larber io Charles Hull Ii Mrs Chas. Hull 12 Mrs. F. B. Skinner 13 Frank B. Skinner 14 J. P. Miller 15 Mrs. J. P. Miller 16 T. M. Sloan 17 Mrs. T. M. Sloan i8 C. 1E. Norton 19 Mrs. C. E. Norton 20 Mrs. James Urie -21 Jaimes Urie 22 Mrs. Dr. E. S. Walford 23 J G. Schmidt 24 Mrs. J. G. Schmidt 25 Geo. W. Rose 26 Mrs. G. H. Shippard 27 G. H. Sliippard 28 A. D. Holmes 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 Albert F. Porter Mrs. A. F. Porter Freeman G. Pray Frank J Spafford Mrs. John Vanasdall John Vanasdall Mrs. A. D. Carlton Hon. A. D. Carlton J. L. McCready Mrs. N. P. Bateman F. E. Phinney Esek Pray John Hetrick N. P. Bateman 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 Mrs. Albert Shotwell Wm. Jeckles Mrs. Win. Jeckles Geo. Pray Mrs. Geo. Pray Mrs. F. G. Pray Mrs. 0. D. Janes 0. D. Janes Mrs. A. W. Strobel A W. Strobel Silas French Mrs. Silas French Whitman Hull

Page  [unnumbered] 1 2 3 4 Mrs. W. HI. Suttherland W. H. Sutherland Mrs. Geo. W. Nichols Geo. W. Nichols J. V. O'Neil Mrs. Thomas Vickery Thomas Vickery James Newark Adeline E. Newark 5 6 7 Chas. V. Fuller Isaac S. Taylor Mrs. John Ewing ONEIDA TOWNSHIP. 8 Daniel Strange 9 Mrs. C. A. Patterson io C. A. Patterson Ii Michael Feess 12 Mrs. Michael Feess 13 Wm. Brunger 14 Mrs. Win. Brunger ROXAND TOWNSHIP. 15 16 17 is8 19 34 35 36 20 21 22 23 24 37 38 39 Mrs. D. P. Fuller D. P. Fuller Bishop Haddix Mrs. Bishop Haddix Mrs. M. D. Merriam 25 M. D. Merriam 26 Perry Trim 27 Mrs. Perry Trim 28 George Rimmel 29 Mrs. Geo. Rimmel 30 31 32 33 Mrs. L. W. HIoag Rev. L. W. HIoag Mrs. D. V. Helms D. V. Helms BENTON TOWNSHIP. Ezra Palmiter Geo. P. Hoff Geo. S. Cady S. M. Homer Perry F. Hines Mrs. John Woodworth 40 John Woodworth i41 Mrs. C., T. Ford 42 C. T. Ford 43 V. D. Murray 44 Mrs. Augusta Murray 45 Alva P. Claflin 46 Mrs. Alva P. Claflin 47 John Berner 48 Wesley Eldred 49 George Lee 50 Evander L. Drake DELTA TOWNSHIP. 51 T. Huxtable 52 Mrs. Evander L. Drake 53 54 55 Mrs. J. W. Dann Mary A. Dann Lewis J. Dann

Page  [unnumbered] g -- V. MONTV1.LLEFRI VERMONTVILLE AND VERMONTVILLE TOWNSHIP. I 2 3 4 5 20 21 22 30 31 32 33r 34 35 36 Eli P. Fashbaugh Mrs. E. P. Eashbaugh W. P. Viele Mrs. Ellen Viele J. N. Hawkins Edwin R. Martin Mrs. S. W. Harmon S. W. Harmon Daniel Hulett Miss Edith Hulett Mrs. D. Hulett Schuyler Weeks H. B. Sackett Win. Edwins Albert Hunter 6 Victor C. D. Hawkins 7 Mrs. E. F. Tubbs 8 E. F. Tubbs 9 Chas. Hull io. Wni. M. Griswold II Mrs. Jonathan E. Lake 12 Jonathan E. Lake 13 Eugene Carey 14 W. C. Alsover 15 Geo. L. Lamb 23 Kelley Bosworth 24 Johnl A. Rich CHESTER TOWNSHIP. 25 Geo. R. Gardiner 26 Mrs. Geo. R. Gardiner 16 A. R. Williams 17 Homer G. Barber i8 H. S. Dickinson 19 Mrs. H. S. Dickinson 27 Chas. Allen Martin 28 M. F. Young 29 Mrs. M. F. Young SUNFIELD AND SUNFIELD TOWNSHIP. 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 J. K. Hunter W. R. Hager David Smith Mrs. Rachel Welch Geo. H. Cheetham Mrs. E. M. Snyder J. Bona Peabody 44 Mrs. J. B. Peabody 45 Geo. V. Hildinger 46 John H. Palmer 47 Henry Chatfield 48 Alden Childs 49 A. B. Bishop 50 L. A. Wilson 51 52 53 54 55 56 W. B. Bera L. G. Lemmon Mrs. W. E. Vanande Deloss Bishop Mrs. Deloss Bishop Peter Chatfield

Page  [unnumbered] HAMLIN TOWNSHIP. I 2 3 Saimuel Hamlin Mrs. D. D. Van Allen D. D. Van Allen Geo. Tulip J. A. Vanande (Deceased) Mrs. J. A. Vanande Horace B. Perry Mrs. H. B. Perry 4 5 6 David Walter David B. Hamlin Mrs. Eli Walter 7 Eli Walter 8 V. M. Smith 9 N. T. Taylor BROOKFIELD TOWNSHIP. o10 Mrs. 0. B. Lake I1 O.B. Lake 12 13 '4 15 i6 31 32 33 34 35 49 50 51 Elton E. Spears Mrs. Cary Ranney Cary Ranney C. W. Stevens Mrs. B. L. Bentley Josiah Miller Michael Merkel Anna McFarland I7 18 '9 20 21 36 37 38 39 52 53 54 Mrs. N. J. Perry N. J. Perry Mrs. Jos. Myers Jos. Myers Mrs. Dr. D. T. Williams 22 G. Fuller 23 Mrs. Ezra D. Spotts 24 Ezra D. Spotts 25 John D. Kay 26 Fridolin Webber 27 28 29 30 EATON RAPIDS TOWNSHIP. Joseph Webber Mrs. Henry Livingston Henry Livingston C. D. Peters B. L. Bentley Win. Spicer Mrs. Win. Spicer Mrs. A. D. Saxton (Deceased) 40 A. D. Saxton 41 Mrs. Levi Rogers 42 Levi Rogers 43 S. C. Mix Mrs. Josiah Miller Mrs. L. D. Dickenson Benj. Spotts EATON TOWNSHIP. 55 Mrs. Benj. Spotts 56 Mrs. A. Hoffiier 57 A. Hoffner 44 45 46 47 48 58 59 60 6t Guy Parker Mrs. Guy Parker Mrs. C. E. Bennet C. E. Bennet E. B. Spears Mrs. Abraham Lee Abraham Lee Mrs. Jas. French James French

Page  [unnumbered] BELLEVUE TOWNSHIP. I P. G. Hemenway 2 Anna Hemingway 3 Guy W. Monroe 4 N. P. Shumway 5 Nicholas Simons 6 Mrs. Nicholas Simons 7 J. A. Spaulding 8 Mrs. J. A. Spaulding 30 Wni. Farlin 31 Mrs. Win. Farlin 9 10 II 12 13 14 15 Joel Kelley Mrs. Joel Kelley W. West F. E. Andrews L. E. Spafford, Jr. Abram B. Hoyt James Mulvaney I6 '7 i8 '9 20 21 22 Mrs. Horatio Hall Horatio Hall Jacob W. Depuy Geo. P. Stevens Curtis A. Day W. E. Holt Albert J. Sawyer 32 A. W. Walker 33 Edward Waterson OLIVET. 34 Henry Shalliar 35 B. W. Pinch 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 36 37 38 51 52 53 Edwin N. Ely Fred N. Ely Prof. J. Estabrook (Deceased) A. E. Fitzgerald J. R. Hall Hiram M. Allen John H. York T. E. Robinson N. H. Johnson Allen Havens 39 40 41 42 Clinton Hockenberry Geo. W. Sweet Burger Mott Chester Smith (Deceased) 43 44 45 46 F. A. Fisher W. C. Roberts F. Waggoner S. K. May WALTON TOWNSHIP. 47 W. Perry Ogden 48 J. M. Dillon 49 Frank Martin 50 Jacob Reasoner J. W. Reynolds 0. Osborn Mrs. Susanna Ogden

Page  1 I DIRECTOR RESIDENT FREEHOL S Of Eaton County, Michigan. CITY OF CHARLOTTE. Brezette, Louisa, widow, Forest Corell, E. A., laborer, Lincoln Ford, Albert, Abell, Geo. W., fartiej, So. Coehrane Bretz4& Co., mer. tailors, S. Coehiane Corsett, E S. S Aeker, S. J., V. -S. So. Sheldon Bretz, A. D., grocer, So. Coehrane Corsett-, Geo. P., Seminary Ford, Edwin. Abell, E. J., laborer, So. Cochrane Britten William, painter Cortwright, J. W., sawyer, N. Sheldon Forbes, Magi 3 Aiger, D. B., D. A. Gen., W Harris Brown, Mrs. S. S.. widow. Pleasant ----- Crosier, Cha:s., slioem'ker, S& Ciitaon Foreman, Ge Ainten, G. B., 11 D., S. CG hrne.aeRbet aoe, Lincoln Cront, John, N.n'~ Allen, A. B. Bradley, A. A., horse br'dr, N.-C.inton Crosier, S. P., heirs of, So. Clinton S Allen, G. B.. M. D., So. Cohrane Brader, Robert, laborer, Lincoln Crout, John, N. Cochrane Foreman, Ge Allen, Sarah J., M. D, W. Lawrence Brown Bros., clothiers, So. Coehrane Culbertson, B. J, ins. at., Pleasant Allen, John, blacksmith, N. Cochrane Baldwin Geo. W. Culp, Win. A., laborer, N. Sheldon Fortney, D. Allen, Addie, schoolteacher, N. Oliver Brugrh, Chlas. E., clerk, So. Sheldon Culpl), A. J., sawyer, Maple Foster, Mrs. S Allen, Henry, farmer, So. Sheldon Brugh, Joseph, clerk, E Seminary Curtis, J. T., laborer, V. Snminary Follett, Jacol Allen, ERiza, widow, So Cochrane Bryan, Jason, laborer, E. Henry Curtis, J. J., matiuf'r, Pearl Foster, Jhas. Alton, Henry, retfd far., So. Sheldon Bryan, James, farmer Curtis. H. H., unanf'r, Warren av. Foster, Augu S Ames, I. H., farmer, So Cochrane Bryan, Serah J., E. Henry Cross, H. W., laborer Foster, N. E Ames, HarriettS, widow., W. Henry Bryan, T. D,ret. farmer, E. Henry Curtis, L. 0., dressmaker, Pleasant ots, Mrs. J M1 Ames, Jason, feedstore, So. Cochrane Bryan Bros., (Homer) (Horton) Chiar- Curtis, Clara, dressmaker, Pleasant Fox, Mathias Amedon, Mariah, N. Sheldon lotte Leader Curry, Samuel, farmer, Prairie Fox, Cynth1, Andlerson, Win., teamst'r, So. Shieldbn Buck, R. M., horse br'dr, N. Sheldlon Curtis, E. F., laborer, E. Henry Fowler, G H. S Adams, Sarah S., widow, N. Sheldon Butler, Orinand, laborer, Pleasant Cunningham, William Fowler, Lynn Arnold, I. B., farmer Burwiok, J. W., carpenter, E. Henry Dunning, F. W. Freeman, L. I Annabel Heirs, So. Sheldon Bundy, G. F. Dale, Elizibeth, widow, N Oliver Barrett, C S., ex-p. m., So Sheldon Burkhead, Samuel, teacher, E Henry Davidson, Mrs. Levi, Robinson av. w. Frase, P. B., Bailey, E. H., bookstore, Bostwick Burneitt, CAtherine, Heirs of, So. D icons, J. H., carpenter, W. Prospect Frank, John, Baker, Frank G., dep. clerk, N. Oliver Cochrane DAvis, Fred, laborer, Maple Friesner, Hen Barkhuff, Cynthia, wid., N. Bostwick Byers, W. J. horse farrier, Washington Davis, Van C., moulder, N. Cochrane Baughman, JennielM.,wid,N. Clinton Bunting, William Davis, C. W., carpenter, Prairie Frost, A. G, SBaughmanJ. A., bl'ks'th, So. Sheldon Butler, Chas. Dart, William, laborer, N. Clinton Fuller, Mrs. V Baughman, C. E., bl'ks'th, W. Lovett Carpenter, Cyrus, farmer, Pleasant Daron, J. M., boots & shoes, W Lovett Fuller, W. R., Baughhman, A D., dry g'ds, N. Clinton Callister, Johtn, blksin'th, N. Bostwick Depew, Lemuel, farmer, Lovett Fulle.ron, J, ( Baker, J H., ret. far, N. Clinton Casterlin, D. A., Pnenix, N. Cochrane Dennie, Emmet, butcher, N. Sheldon Fullerton, Str Barber, E. H., carpenter, N. Clinton Campbell, J. M., laborer, N. Coehrane DTan, F. A., atty; con. a: Naples, N. Fuller, W. D., SBarber, Miles, laborer, N Washington Campbell, 0. F., S. D. A. preacher, Sheldon Gavit, S. W. p DERS R. R. Agent, Mayor, N. Hall. Marcus, carpenter, Johnson Bostwiok Haynes. WViliam, masou, N.Cockrane Slaborer, W Seminary HarteHJ,.J.e.C,buatcher, N Clinton gie, widow,,.Lawrence-. a miltaon,. Z, under sheriff. No., ret. hardward mer- Cochrane chant, So. Cochrane Hageman & Burman, grocers, So. ne, housewife, So. Coch- Cochrane rane Haun, John. grocer, Forest 7, laborer, N. Sheldon Hawley, Daniel, retired, N. Cochrane Win. T., wid., W. Warren Halpin, John, farmer, Foote b Harmon, Clyde E., clerk, N. Wash., dry g'ds, So. Cochrane Haage, Susanah, wid, N. Sheldon sta,. drs-mnkr, N. She'don Hart, Jennette, h'sw't'e, N. Cochrane, milliner, E.Lawrence Hart, H J, carpenter, N. Cochrane. T., wid., N. Cochrane Htaydetn, John, tinner, W. Lawrence. carpenter, W. Henry Hayden, Celii, widow, W. Seminary widow, E. Seminary Haefner, C., wagon irmnf'r, Pleasant. photographer, Prairie Haslett, J. C., clerk, So. Bostwick Rn, barber, N. Sheldon Hatch, Vina i R, fruivs anid fowls So. Hart, Catharine, widow, E. Henry Cochrane Hartvel[ Luletta, widow, So. Sheldon M carpenter, So. Oliver Haminorid, Emma, hsewfe. S., Sheldon carpenter, So. Sheldon 'Haas, Lewis, billiards, So. Oliver.ry, restauranter & ex- Hall, Elick S., ret. mec., W. Seminary saloonist, So. Sheldon Haves, Teneyck, clerk, So. Bostwick carpenter Henderson, Etta, E Lovett V. T.. wid., N. Cochrane Hartwell, Synymore labjrer, Lincoln Herbst & Son, tailors, S. Cochrane ^ U., carpenter. E. Lovett Heyman, M., butcher, N Sheldon ah J.,h'sewifeE. Lovett Heilway, H W., billds, So. Cochrane night police, Lincoln Hill, Alson, carpenter, So. Sneldon -L )edler, Lansing Hill, Benj, painter, So. Cochrane Barber, A. M., hardware, E Lovett Prairie Dean, Jonathan, ret. far., N. Sheldon Gamble, Fra Barber & Spencer, h'd wtr-, Cochrane... Cary, Nanny, nurse; N.Cochrane Dean, W B, hotel, So.'Cochrane Birhyte, Edwin, labo.:er, N. Clinton Carpenter, S. A. Dell, Geo. S., laborer, John-... Gamble, Jame Barnpy Geo J., dry goods, W. Lovett Carpenter, Mary L. Dexter, E. L, foreman at Bennett's Gamble, Jame Barringer, Christ, farmer, Forest Carpenter, F. T., N. Forest furniture factory, Lincoln Gale, Fidelia Baker, N H., teamster, N. Oliver Carey, Thomas, pianist, So. Sheldon DeFoe, Emma, h'sewife, W. Seminary Gardner, Lew Babcock, R. H., pumps, Pearl Carey, G. H. - Dennisou, Priscilla, wid., So. Sheldon B-con, J. H., carpenter, W. Prospect. Casher, Frank, laborer, W. Seminary Dickinson, H. L., carp'rr, N. Wash Gardner, Geo Barnes, Sylvia A., widow Casher, Susanna, W. Seminary Dick, I. C., farmer, Lansing Garber, I. P., Barnum, Mrs. G. H. d's'r, S. Cochrane Casher, Mrs. Dan, W. Seminary Donavon, D. J, cab'makr, N. O.iver Garber, Samu Ballard, Josephine, So. Cochrane Church, E. T., President Merchants Dolph, Mary, housewife, Forest Garber, R. A. Ball, Ira, b'acksmith National Bank, So. Cochrane Dolson, J. L., carr'ge fact., E. Henry Gage, H. H. SBates, A. W., drummer, W. Henry Chappell, Osman, money loaner, So. Dolson, D. E, carr'ge fact., Pleasant Garrison, Mrs. S Beekman, W. M., supervisor, ins. and Sheldon Dolson, W. E. carr'ge fact., Pleasant Gillingha, J S real estate, E. Cochrane Chappell, C. E. brick and tile, So. Dolson, J. L., Jr., car'gs, W.Lawrence Bement, J. B., farmer, W. Henry Sheldon Donovan & Packard, furniture, So Geddes, W., n -Belcher, F. S., capitalist, W. Lawrence Cherry, JospL Cochrane Gibbons, Chas Benton, Geo. E, carpenter, Linsing Childs, J. M., barber Dudley, W. H., ret. hiwe. mer., N. ~ Beard, Harrison, farmner, W. Henry Childs, W. W., farmner, N. Cochrane Cohrane Gibbons, J. H Belcher, Mary C., wi,1, N. Cochrane Chase, D. S., miliright, Lansing Durand, Marietta, wid., N. Cochrane Belger, Elizabeth, wid., N. Cochrane Chevalier, Harry W., laborer, Lansing Duffy, James, laborer, So. Clinton Gilchrist, B. I SBennett, Philip, oil dealer, S. Sheldon Clever, Jacob S., teamster, E. Foote Dunlap, E, well pumnps, Pleasant Gibbard, N. E Bennett, Chas., manftr, W. Seminary Clever, Elizabeth, N. Sheldon Dunlap, W., ret. har'nnrkr, N. Oliver Gordon, Saral Beals, L. J., laborer, N. Clinton Clark, M. E, coal dealer, N. Sheldon Eaton' A. D, drayman, Prairie Goadby, F. H Beardsley, G. S., phot'gr, S. Cochrane Clark, Phebe H., So. Clinton Eastman, J W., ret. real est., Prairie Goodrich, D. I Beardsley, Mary E.,p'tg'r,S. Cochrane Clark, Frank E., music tchr, S. Clinton Eddy, J. F., wag'minkr, W. Lawrence Goodrich, A. J Beals, Horace, ret far., So. Sheldon Clase, A. P., laborer, N Clinton Ecbert, James, mason, W. Seminary Bentley, Susan, weaver, W. Henry Clark, Alice Ells, F. A., postmaster, E. Lovett Goodspeed Br Bellinger, Gao., organs, Pleasant Clay, LizzieJ., bdg house, N. Cochrane Ells, Mary I., housewife, W. Henry Belger, James E, drayman, Prairie Cleveland, L. C., laborer Ells, Geo. W., laborer, W. Henry Gouldeboroug Bisseli, L P., Editor Republican Cove, Samuel M., lumber, N. Bostwick Emery, H. J., M. D., N. Sheldon S Billingsly, 0 Heirs, N. Oliver. Cover, Anna, farmer, N. Washington Emery, Fred, drugist, N. Cochrane Granger, Jose Billingsly, Rebecca, So. Clinton Conrad, J. H., laoorer, Lansing. Fargo, Samnantha, widow, N. Oliver Granger, L. C Biggs, Lewis, Jan. ct.. h., N. Bostwick Corbin, Laura A., widow, E. Henry Falkuer, WV. P., ret. far., N. Cochrane Gregory, Hort Bice, Hiram, shoemaker, So. Clinton Coy, E. L., clerk, W, Henry Fast, Lucinda, housekeeper, E. Henry Greenman, K: Bishop, Jacob, farmer, So. Sheldon Collins, John F., drugs, N. Clinton Ferry, Hattie Greenman, Ja Bickers, Geo. Collins, Mrs. Jennie, hswfe, Foote Felshaw, L. W., laborer, W. Lawrence Green, Mary I Bisel, Bert, painter, High Collins, A. B., drugs, Pleasant Ferguson, S., minister and farmer, Green, Alonzc Bingham, A. L., ret. farmer, Lincoln Collins, G. V., drugs, W. Lovett W. Lawrence Green, Ann, w Blackmar, H. A, dr'g'st, W. Lawrence Collins, James Fhaner, Julia, dressmaker, Cochrane Green, Lydia, S Black. Alexander, carp'tr, N. Sheldon Collins, C. V, laborer, Pleasant Finch, Mary, widow, N. Bostwick Green Homer, Bliss, Ida, dressmaker, Lansing Collisi, J. L., hardware, So. Cochrane Fifield, L-ife, teamster, McClure Green, Frank Bower, J. W., baker, N. Clinton Cogsdill, C. R, farmer, N. Cochrane File,Williamn, laborer, Amity Greensmith, V Bohn, R H., lumberman, N. Cochrane Cogsdill, Mrs. G., N. Clinton File, Fred J., shoenmaker, So. Oliver Griest, Gao. M Bonnett, W. J., lumb'rman, E. H-nry Cook, Mairy E, dr'smn'kr, So. Sheldon File, Mrs John, widow. Prairie Grier, Mrs. L. Bodine, Emma, widow, So. Sheldon Cook, C. M., captitalist, W. Lawrence Finch, William, retired, Lansing Guide, Philip, Bowie, Win., engineer, W. Seminary Cook, Jas. C. Fisher, Solomon, laborer, W.Seminary Bottomiley, F. E., Warren Conant, W. H., hotel, N. Olver Fish' r, C. M, widow, Cherry Gundlock, Fre Bowers, Halsey, painter, E. Lovett Conklin, Chas., laborer, N. Clinton Follett, C. J., farner, So. Sheldon Gunn, C. A, h Boyles, Win., agricultural implements Cobb, Frank, lumber, Pleasant Foote, Geo. W., druggist, So. Sheldon Grinbie, Marim \ Bunger, John S., ~h0emk, Pleasat Cot@, J D, farmer, So. Oliver Foote, E. A., attorney, N. Washington Hart, Mrs. Je SlBrumley, Jennie, So. Cochrane Corley, Levi M., mason, E. Prospect Foote, FrancisA., ho'sewife, N. Wash. Hall, C, J., ca ' Bretz, Mary A., widow, N. Cochrane Corell, A. 0, pat. fence, So. Sheldon Fix, GarryC., attorney, E Lovett Hall, Laura S. rices, nousew fe, W. Hill, Fred, painter, Pleasant Seminary Hill, Elmer, drayman Es, laborer, W Seminary Hines, Ermina L., hswfe, Washington )s, ret far., W. Foote Hobbs & Co., T. D., gro, S. Cochrane D., Mrs. widow, Pleasant H,lden, John G, farmer, Forest 'is, 21 hand store, W. Howe, M. H., carpenter, N. Coehrane Lawrence Horn, Luceata, hswfe, N. Washington. F., W. Lovett.Houck, J W., finisher, Stoddard peddler, Pearl Hood, Eliza, widow. iel, ret. farmter, Pearl Holbrook, L C., w'rclerk, S. Sheldon, register deeds Henry, James druggist, So. Cochraue Hough, Charlotte, ho'sekpr E Henry. L., wid., W. Seminary Houser, Geo., Sr., laborer, Forest anes, blacksmith, So. Hauser, W. E., Forest Sheldon Hauser Geo. L., attorney, Forest ler. tailor, N. Cochrane Honey, F. H., D. D. S, E. Lovett s. F., foreman furniture Hotchkiss, S A, barber, So. Cochrane., traveling salesman, S. Huffman, Clein Bostwick Hults, Peter, butcher, So. Cochrane '., sec. foreman, Pearl Huber, Daniel, farmer, W. Lawrence, shoemaker, So. Oliver Ives, Andrew J, Vice President bank, S., wid., W. Lawrence E Lovett, dry g'ds, N. Cochrane Jackle, Jacob, gunsmnith, S. Cochrane )., sawyer, Pearl Jackson, Andrew, farmer, S. Cochrane r., small fiuits, W. Sem- Jackson John, organs and pianos, inary S. Cochrane os.. boots and shoes, So. Jessup, Marietta, widow, N. Bostwick Cochrane Jennings, C M., hardware S. Cochrane h, Jamies, ret. farmer, Jennings, H. K., Cashier Merchants So. Sheldon National Bank, So. Cochrane ph, mason, N. Sheldon Jenkins, Dor, barber, So. Cochrane., peddler, E. Henry Jessup, Geo., pensioner, Lansing;ense, housewife, Prairie Jones, D. M., painter, E. Lovett atie, dr'"smkr, Pleasant Javett, Cyrun, carpenter, ames, dclo, deal. Pleasant Jipson, William, laborer, Foote E., M. D., W. Lawrence Johnson, James. constable, E Harris ), farmer, W. Lawrence Jones, R. C., supplies, So. Cochrane Tidow, W. Lawrence Johnson, Mrs. T. L, ho'sewife, Clinton widow, Prairie -Johnson, Mrs. Horace, So Bostwick telegrapher, E. Lovett Johnson, C. S., teamster, Forest N., sheriff, N. Bostwick Johnson, Jo, laborer, N. Sheldon Vam, mason, N. Wash. Johnson, Jordan, farmer, S. Cochrane /V., ret far., S. Cochrane Jones, William. mason, Shaw M., wid, W. Lawrence Jones, Sylvia, widow, John wagons and carriages, Jones, John, janitor, Oliver W. Lawrence Jordan, William, grocer,-d, laborer, E. Foote Johnson, P. R., ret. farmer, E. Henry ousewife, N. Cochrane Johnson, C. D. in Katz, Mathew, finisher, W. Prospect 9SP, widi, W. Senminary Kauffman, Benj., laborer, Foote shier, W. Harris Kauffman, Peter, taylor, Pleasant,., widow, W. Harris Kelloga, Bradford, mason, W. Harris ] nni I ". Harri

Page  2 CITY OF CHARLOTTE. Mikesell, Jacob, farmner, W. Prospect Porter. Geo. A., carpenter, E. Foote Stealy, Eva Kessler, A. H., lumber, W. Harris Mock, William, retired, N. Coe.hrane Powers, J. D., retired, Lincoln Stely, A i Ketchamin, Seth, supt, W Lawrence Moll, Henry, cooper, Railroad Powers. Lovina, wid., S. Washington Stoner, Her Ketchaiu, M. P., h'swife, W. Lawrence Moll, Geo., laborer, Robinson Powers, J. Al., attorney, Warren Stoner, J. C Ketchami, Myrtia C., atiAtt, W. Mosier, Jackson, clerk, W. Lovett Powell, J. W., farmer, N. Forest Stamp, Lal Lawrence Moore, A. R., patent rights, N. Wash. Pratt, Mrs. J. M., wid, W. Lawrence Stone, houn SKennedy, Maria J., housewife, W.- Morey. Addie C, teacher, N. Oliver Preston. Adaline M., hsfwe, Prairie Stone, Calv Seininary. Morse, H. F., widw, W. IHenry PriddIe, Mlalinda, widow, E. Henry |JKing, Lurana Mouser, James A., farmer E. Henry Prince, C. E., elk Wilson & Spaulding Stone, L. A. Kinne, Marintha, iiilliin'r,.S. Cochrane Mount, Sylvia, widow, E Henry Raidle, Alice, hswfe, So. Coehrane Stockwel', 1Kiplinger, Jonas, laborer, Johnson Morgan, C. J, laborer, Forrest R'ind, Agnes, widow, N. Cochrane Kilbourn, F H., retired, N. Bostwick Morrison, Henry, retired, W. Henry Rand, W. H., M. D, N. Cochrane Strother, J ~t Kimberly, Mary, housewife, Pearl Mover, H A., ret. farner, S. Cochrane Rasey, N. C., clerk, So. Washington Kimberly, Erastus, retired, Pearl Morey, B. E., clerk, N. Cochrane Rasey, Alex, carpenter,,Lansing Stewart Ne Kirkland, E. P., ret. farmer, Prairie Munch, Otto, cabinetmuk'r., Stoddard Rasey, J. H., farmer, Lansing Stevens, Ar Kimmel, Isiah, laborer, Lansing Mulholland;<W., ret. farmer, Beech Rathburn, Lora, housewife, High Stewart, B SKies, A.H., laborer, Lansing Monger, J. W, hardware, E. Henry Rathburn, S. B., laborer, High Stewart; E. ~ Kip!inger, Grant, laborer, Higlh Munson, Mrs. A. H, wid., S. Cochrane Randall, Benj., foreman Charlotte Stamm, D. - Kleirnhamrr, C., laborer, Foote Munson, Altuira, widow, N. Bostwick Man'fg Co. shops Sweet, A. J Kirkland, Geo., sheds, So. Cochrane Murray, Albert, boots and shoes, E. Randall, C. B., laborer, N. Sheldon Swevens, J4 Klaiss, William, laborer, N. Clinton Lawrence Rauser, Dora, hswfe, N. Bostwick Stocking, C Klaiss, Enaimael, retired. N. Sheldon..Mygrants,-Jacob,~retired, N. Cochrane Resch, Win., barp-rter, Stoddald + Stall, Jenni Klock, J. D., cigar mn'k'r, So. Sheldon Myers, Abigail, widow, E. Henry Reynolds Bros., dry g'ds, S Coohrane Summers, C SKlock, Peter, painter, N. Washington McArthur, Mrs., widow, Shaw Reed, Geo. WV., carpenter, Lansing Tanner, Wi Knowles, Fred, engineer, Clinton McCartney, J. M, farmtner, W. Harris Rohfus, Gottfred, blksmith, Lansing Taggart, C. rjKrebs, J. S., sewing machines and McCausey, Geo., laborer, Forrest Richardson, G, W., engineer water Taylor, Ch1: organs, So. Cochrane McCargar, William, far., N. Coehrane works, N. Cochrane Thomas, J. Lacey, W. P., Cashier First National McCall, Jennie, h'sewife,N. Cochrane Rice, Althea, widow, N. Washington Thomas, P < Bank, W. Harris McCa 1, L. H. attorney, N. Cochrane Riley, B. J, lab3orer, N. Coehrane Lamnont,L. A., laborer, N.Washington McCAnnon,Melvina,wid.,W.Lawrence Richardson, D. J., laborer, S. Sheldon Thomas, II Lamont, Win. laborer. N. Washington McClellan, Maggcie, h'sewifeE. Lovett Richardson, J. J ret. do, S. Cochrane Thomas, H Lamb, C. B., grocer. W. Stoddard McConeaughy, William, mason, So. Rickard, Mrs. Daniel, wid.,S. Sheldon Thompson, Lamb, G. R., cabmkr, Lincoln Cochrane Rickard, John E., teamster, John IJLamb, E. J, housewife, Lincoln McCarroll Bros., steaim laundry Robinson, Chas., baggagemaster G. Thompson, Lamb &Spencer, grocers, S. Cochrane McClure, C. H, grintmill, N. Cochrane T. R. R, McClure Thompson Lang & Vonmberg, dclo., S. Cochrane MoClintock, Lovina, widow,E. Henry Robinson, Samu, ret., E.Lawrence Laughery, Isaac, laborer, W. Henry McCoy, Orange, ret. mnillin-r, S. Oliver Rowley, (eo. W., insurance and real ThorpeWil Lane, L. N., S. D. A. officer, Pearl MeDougall,W. M.,t'mist'r,N. Cochrane estate, E. Lawrence Tirrill, J. F Lanimbert, C.G, carlpenter, E. Henry McDonald, Grace, music teacher, E. Rowley, Lafayette, bookkeeper, E. Titus, W. SLamport, S. harne-s, So. Cochrane Lovett Ltwrence Leinnon, Martin, drayminan, Raliroad McDonald, Frank, slt'kbuy'r,E. Henry Roberts, J. C., blacksmith, E. Shaw -Titus, W. S Lewis. R. A. Mri., widow, So. Clinton McGrath, Fred, grocer, So. Sheldon Robb, Mrs M. W, widow, W.Harris Tracey,Abi Le Rose & Co, frults, So. Cochrane McGrath, I. T., printer, So. Sheldon Roblin, C. V., car. trim., So. Cochrane Tracey, Wi Lee, Geo. D., M. E. minister, Battle MIolntyreJamines, ret. far.,S. Cochrane Rowe, Julia N., hiswt'e, W. Henry Tremaine, ] Creek Road McGrath, LIarzareth, wid, S. Cochrane Rogers, Henrietta, wid, S. Cochrane Levy, John, clothier, W. Seminary MoLaughlin, Rebecca, artist, Prairie Rogers, Clara, hswfe, So. Cochrane Tubbs, LUc Lightner, John, farmer, Linsing McPeek, J. L, Judge of Probate, N. Russ, Nathan H., car'pnr, N. Sheldon Turner, L. Light, Geo. F., sho'nfk'r, N. Cochrane Cochrane Rulison, T. C, blacksmith, Laning Tucker, Jen F Lightner, Priscilla,-hswfe, ansing McUmnber, C. H., farmer, IW. Shaw Ricked, Win. W., laborer, S. Sheldon Twogood, S Lisby, Ruth, widow, S. Sheldon Newton, Susan, h'sewife, S. Ccchrane Sanderson, J. B., retired, Foote Twitchell, l Lockard, Adaline, housewife, S. Newlon, blacksmith, N. Sheldon. Santee, J. L., ret. farmer, So. Sheldon Underwood Cochrane Newlan, Mrs. I. I., wid., W. Seminary Sawyer, Mdsts, ret. far., So. Sheldon Long, Martha J., widow, E. Lawrence Newland, M. D., So. Cochrane. Scott, Ansonret. farmer, N. Oliver Van Horn, Loring, A. T., real estate, N. Clinton Newcomb. M. E. drain com.CW. Shaw Selkirk, A. N., jeweler, E. Lawrence Vanderhoo Loop, Albert, carpenter, John Ni.'hols, J. J., laborer, Forest Searles, Phebe E., wid., E. Seminary Vanderhoo Loree, Levi, laborer, Pearl Nichols, J. C., attorney, N. Cochrane Semon, Sarah D., hsekpr, N. Oliver Vanta sel, Love, Lucy, widow, E. Henry Nichols, Stephen, lab'r, W. Seminary Seavolt, W. S., traveling salesman, Vantassel, Loveland, Fred. H., dry goods, S..Nichols, A. L., coli'ct ag'cy, E Lovett Pleasant Vickery, F Cochrane Nichols, Edgar F., laborer, High Sattler, Geo, ret. farmer, Pleasant L, housewife, Pleasant Wilcox Jerusha P..widow, N. Cochrane Z M..D, Pleasant Williams, W. 1B., Congf. minister, W. iry, mason, John Stoidard 1, mechanic, So. Sheldon Winters, Josephine, widow, Summnit ayette, clerk, Warren Whitcomb, Lucy, housewife, Summit ewife, W. Lovett Worden, Mrs. M. K., widow, N. Oliver in; janitor Congregational Wood, Mrs. N. G., widow, S. Oliver church, W. Lovett Woodberry, Almira, housewife, Prairie, bazaarstore, S. Cochrane Woodberry, Gno., plumber, Prairie. Cyrus, preacher, W. Wolston, Joshua, laborer, E. Shaw Seminary Young, E. D. steamfitter, Forest". T., boots and shoes, Zimmerman, S. laborer, Forest W. Lawrence Ison, carpenter, S Clinton GRAND LEDGE-FIRST WARD. in C., widow, S. Coctirane Aldrich, Henrietta enjainin, retired, Lansing Archer, Carlton news dealer, W. Henry Aldrich, Chas. F., mason, Amity Alexander, Cassius. cooper, W. Henry Aldrich, Frank obn, laborer, W. Henry Allen, Clarence. H., carpntr,W. Lawrence Arms, F. C. ie S., housewife, S. Washli. Astley, Ed. leo., engineer, S. Cochrane. Astley, Jo Illiamn, ret. far., N. Clinton Allen, E. F. H.,engineer,W. Lawrence Bowes, James, is. E., marshal, S. Sheldon Burdick, Mrs. C. D. Q., retired, W. Lawrence Barker, W. A.. M., tray. salesman, E. Bosworth, Ranson Seminary Brunger, Joseph orace S., farmnpr, Shaw Bailey, Sol 7 Mi.-, farmler, S. Cochrane Beng'amen, Elmer Chas. EGl, street sprinkler, Barber, John l N. Sheldon Billings, W. R. Frank, laborer, N. Clinton Beach, Fletcher Sarah E. bkous-wife, N. BabcoAk, Dora Clinton Bolls. Mrs. Levi Ison, carpl)ente'r, S. Sheldon Blanchard, M.,. rer. fartiuer, E HArris Bullard, D. C. S. Jr., trav. salesman, N. Berry, Geo. N. S Cochrane Bailey, Myron., U. B. minister,,S. Oliver Biglow, Emma gial, hsewife, N. Cochrane Blake, Peter Iliam, teamster, Pearl Beach, M. P. D. L., livery and hack linp, Bailey, Geo. H. E. Lawrence Babcock, IV., J. ina, widow, W. StoddarJ Bengamen, Orson G H., grocer, E. Seminary Blanchard, Hannah nie, dressmaker, W. Henry Blanehard Frank;. B., carpenter, N. Sheldon Brown, Geo. A. 3. N., ret. far., E. Henry Burtch J. M. L & Lynd, barbers, So. Brown, Nettie E. Cochrane Brinkerhoof, Luke C., laborer, Forest Beck, C f, Peter, ret. far, W. Lovett Brown, D. D. F. f, lumber ag't, S. Sheldon Beach, Emily V. T., farmer, W: Prospect Brown, Ambrose 0. L, farmer, W. Prospect Bobier, Teos. teuben, night watch, N. Briggs, E. M. Clinton Chilson, Jas. '' Lovell, Olive, ho'sekeeper, S. Sheldon Ober, -Chas., laborer, Brackett Shepherd, Elisha, Sr., far. S. Cochrane " Vickery, L Lowmaster, Win, carp'ter, S. Sheldon Odell, Aaron, W. Henry Shlepherd, James, dr gds, N.Cochrane Walrath W Ludwig, L: J., laborer, Pleasant O'Bryon, Mrs. Win., widow, Prairie Shepherd, L. H., grain, N. Cochrane Waltersdor Lynd, E. H., barber, W. Henry O'Neil, Edward, saloonist, N. Oliver Shepherd, Emeline, hskprS Cochrane Wells, Mar Marple; F. D. restaurant, W. Harris Owings, F. H., farmer, W. Prospect Shepherd,Mrs.A.L wid.,W. Seminary Weston, Ye Mason, C, sea captain, N. Bostwick Owiogs, Georgia A., wid., Johnson Sherwood, Geo. W., J. P., S. Cochrane Whittum, 1 Martin, B. T., ret. farmier, N. Clinton Olmstead, Otis, laborer, N. Sheldon Shau'l, Warren, rest., So. Cochrane Whittum, SMarkham, 0. J.,ret. frm'nr, S. Sh Idon Olinstead, G., laborer, N. Clinton Shaw, Joseph, far., N. Washington Wood, C. I Marks, John, painter, Lincoln O'Leary, C. R, milk, W. Lawrence Shear, John, farmer, Lansing Waltersdor: ~ Maxson, Wilbur, ret. farmer. McCIure Packard, 0. E, grain, E. Lawrence Shriner, Mrs R. W., artist, S, Coehrne Waller, W. Maxson, Roswell, ret. far., Pleasant Packard, Eliza, hswfe, E Lawrence Shrontz, James, laborer, N. Clinton WarehamV May John B, trav. sales.,S. Cochrane Patterson, P. D, M. D., E. Lawvrence Shuler, 0 P., druggist, So. Bostwick Masten, J. D., laborer, Prairie Patterson, E. J., jeweler, So. Clinton Sleater, A. H, wall paper, E Lovett Warner.Ma:. Masten, C M., farmer, -N. Sheldon Parrish, Alex, laborer, E. Foote Smith, J. M. C. attorney, Warren av. Warner Oti ~ Martin, A-manda, M., housewife, W. * Parrish, Homer, laborer, E Foote Smnith,'Chas., retired. Clinton, Walker E. SLawrence Paine, Henry, laborer, Forest Smith, Harriett, hswfe, So; Sheldon WarrenB.V Maynard, H. S, pros -att'y, W. Harris Palmir, Stephen Smith, N. L., manager Charlotte.. Warren, M.. Mathews, Bert, foreman Bennett's Palmer, E. C., M. D., So. Cochrane Manufacturing Co., So. Sheldon Wholihan,,...... ' factory, W. Henry Palmnenter, Mary, Smith, Richard, mason, W. Lovett Meeker, H. W, ret. far., So. Cochrane -Parkhurst, J. D., retired, N. Sheldon Smich, Lucas J., clerk, W. Lovett Warren, He Merrill, John W., laborer, N. Oliver Parker, Sarah A., wid., N. Cochrane Smith, Adelbert, laborer, N. Cochrane Walker, E.... Merrill, Sarah, ho'sekeeper, N. Oliver Perkins, Mariah, housewife, John Smith, Mrs. Chas., wid., W. Seminary Walker, W.,. Merritt,: Mrs. P. E, housekeeper, Perkins, John Smith, L.O., abstractr, N. Bostwick altersA.C ".,,-* Wx. Harris Perry,Geo. A. Publihher, W. Henry Smith, Mary J., hoswfe, N. Bbstwick Ward, Fran Merritt, C. A., Supt. poor, W. Harris Peskett, Geo. sec for'n,N. Washington Smith, F. G., city treas., W. Harris Ward, Nanc SMerritt, C. J., liveryman W.,Harris Perry, Chas. A., well digger, Shaw Smith, J, B. & Co., teas, Horatio Warren F...: Mitchell, Herod, lab'r,. 3, minary Perry, Mrs. Joseph, wid., S. Cochrane Snow, T. D., laborer, So. Sheldon SMiller, Lett, laborer, So. Cochrane Philips, M. S., D. D. S., N. Sheldon Snow, Newton, farmer, So. Coehrane Welch, Hira SMcConnell, James, retired, Lansing Pierce, T. C., farmer, Stoddard Snyder, Geo. A., farmer, Lincoln Welch, Fra.....Merritt & McClintic, dgs, S. Cochrane Pixley, Lucy M., prop. Phenix house, Snyder, Chas., laborer, W. Lawrence Weeks, M. ] S Merritt, Frank. M. D., Pleasant N. Cochrane Snyder, J. F., carpenter, Shaw Webber, D. S'Merritt, William A., foreman in Curtis Pierson, Helen L, hswfe, S. Cochrane Snell, L. A., M; ID, So. Cochrane. Weaver, F. Pike F..W..how.n. E..enr + *factory, -S.Sh'ieldon Pike, F. W. showman, E. Henry Snyder, Diana Webster, Co Metsinger, William, billiards,N Oliver Piper, Win, retired, W. Lawrence Snyder, R. S., laborer, So. Sheldon Wetmore, E SMetsinger, R. B. Pitcher, Chas., teamster, E. Shaw Snyder, Geo. A., farmer, Lincoln "Wilcox, Hor Merchant, D.J, laborer, So. Sheldon Pitcher, Elizabeth, wid, So. Sheldon Snyder, Robert SMeyers, J. G. carpenter, So. Oliver Parish, James, laborer, Lansing Solomon, Mary A., hswfe,. Oliver Wilton, L. Miller, Jane M., housewife, W. Henry Parish, Perry Solomon, A. A. mason, N. Washington wMiller, John G., agriculture, W. Henry Pangburn, Chas., carpenter, Lansing Solomon, Isaac, laborer, Amity Winslow, H Miller, John L., harnessm'k'r, Prairie Paine, Fred, laborer, Forest Solomon, Samuel, laborer, Amity Williams, Cl Miller, M.K.,fo'ndryman, N. Cochrane Pangler, C. H., farmer, Beech Spencer, E. laborer, Lansing Winchell, N SMiller, John A., foundryman N. Proctor, Herbert, laborer, High Spencer, Geo. H., grocer, S. Clinton WildernJol Cochrane Preston, E A. gardner, Pearl Spencer, Mary J., wid., W. Lawrence SMiller,AndrewJ.,1laborer,N. Cochrane Pitcher, Edwin, mason, E. Shaw Spreng, Ada, Prop. Peninsular House, Williams, G Miller, John H., laborer, S. Cochrane Platt, Elbert, laborer, N. Sheldon Sprague, Mrs. Z. R. wid., S. Cochrvne Wildt, Chas Mikesell, Jerrie, cannery,W. Seminary Pollock, Samuel, retired, Park place Sprague, Gideon Whaley, Ez: SMikesell, L. F.. cannexy, S. Sheldon Pollard, James G., bookkeeper, N. Spaulding, Mary M.,widow, W. Henry Wheaton,R. Mikeseli,M. J.,dressmk'r, S. Bostwiek Cochrane Spaulding, A. P. boots and shoes, E. Wheaton, Cl ~ Mikesell, Ablinda, widow, W. Henry Polhainus, Emma, hswfe, Lincoln Henry WhitfordH; Mikesell, Mrs. William F., widow S. Potter, John C., grocer and manufac- Spaulding, Frank, agricultural impli- Whitaker, Sheldon turer, Stoddard ments, S. Cochrane White, Addi SMiers, Mrs. Frances, hswfe,N. Sheldon Potter, F H., oper'r G. T.,N. Sheldon Spencer, S. B. Whitright, Michel, Jacob, cigarm'f'g'r,Cochrane Potter, Sarah L., widow, Pearl Squier, J. H, retired, W. Lawrence Wilson, J. rI SMitchell, D. M., butcher, So. Main Powers, Hannah J., hswfe, Lancing Squier, Geo. W., retired, N. Sheldon Wilson & SZ ~j<^^gr^^^^^r<c^~e~ Kaniel, plumber, -E Henry Clark W. R. r. S., carpenter, W. Foote Cole, Mrs. Ezra f, C, E.,plumber, E. Lovett Capwell, Wm. y J., widow, Merritt Cole, Henriett t, laborer, S. Cochrane Chadwick, Nancy H. C., retired, E. Lovett Campwell, Geo. W. Fred. - Campwell, J. M. I., farmer, Beech. Carver, Watson f, FrancesE.;wid.,N. Sheldon Campwell, Milo H., blacksmith, N. Clinton Capwell, John hilip, bag.- agt. M. C. R. R., Coryell, Geo. L. - N. Sheldon Cole, D. E. rgaret,h'sewife,Battle Creek Cramer, E ugene is, laborer, Battle Creek Chamberlin Jas. ' L. Campbell, A.E..E ~.,ex-Reg. deeds,S.Bostwiek Cole, Emitt. B., liveryman, S. Sheldon Cronk, John John T., day operator M. C. Doxsie, Saml. R. R., Stoddard DeGraff, Mrs. E. NA. nry R., ret. far., W. Henry Dravenstatt, Harrison lie, housewife, S. Sheldon Derbyshire, Mrs. J. E H.; ret, far., W. Seminary DeCoo, Mrs. Bettie., agricultr'TlImp.,W. Henry DeCoo Mrs. Anna k W., grocer, W. Henry +DeGraff, Emanuel Est. iy N., milliner, E. Lawrence Deryes, Samuel G., mnilliner ex P. N., S. DeWitt Al S Cochrane Dutcher, David im, drayman, N. Clinton Dudley, M. P. ices, widow, W. Henry DeWitt, J. W. B3., laborer, N. Sheldon DeWitt, Jas: N. F., J. P., W. Henry. Earl Emily A., M. D., E. Seminery Enos, B. H. bb& Co., lumber, W. Lovett Edwards, Rodman uunice, widow, S. Oliver EarlJohanna 'ace, far., ex Regr. deeds, N. Earl. Hett Clinton Earl, B. F. VW., farmer and produce, S. Earl, Abbey Cochrane Edwards, Letty. H;, widow, S. Sheldon Earl, C. C. haarlotte, wid, W. Seminary Esler, Minerva. D., laborer, W. Henry Fritz, D. C. ). crockery and glassware, Foreman, Tobias S. Cochrane Fuller, Fred eo. A., livery, E. Henry. Frickert, Geo.., ret. farmer, E. Henry Fitzgerald, J. W. ra, retired, W. Harris ' Feess, Frank D.,bridge builder E.Lovett Foster, Sanford has., bridge builder, Prairie Foreman, D. C. attie, h'sewife, E. Lawrence Granger, Mrs. S. B. Flora J., Grinter, Orla e, widow, S. Cochrane Grand Ledge Sewer Pipe Co. E. J., clerk, S. Sheldon Grand Ledge Canning Co. U., Agr. Imp., E. Lawrence Green, G. D., aulding, Agr. Imp., Lawr. Gillam, Mahlon1 ^sssssss....s.~ fs

Page  3 S. A. GRAND LrEDGE.-1ST. WARD. Grand Ledge Building Association Glenn, Chris Grand Ledge Chair Company Guns3nhonser, M. H. Grinold, Emerson Goodale, H. K. Gates, Samuel Hall, WNm. H. Hixson, A. D. Hixson, E. J. Holmes, J. S. -H. Holmes. J. S. Halliday, Oliver Henderson, John Hubbard, Estella Hart, BWion Hilliker, T. W. Herringcton, Ed Howe, Judd Hudson, V. E. Hemlock, Point Association Hazel, James Hubbar 1, Howard Hulee, Hannah Horby, Lucy V. HUddleston, Isabell Hines. Harriett C Haves, Mrs. Wmn. Haggarb, A. J. Holce, Ben Hewett, S. P. Holmes, J. C. Holmes, N. W. Holmes, Mary L. Hixson, Herbert HoacR, V. W. Holmes, L. W. Holmes, Hattie Hixon, Abram Hixson, Armon Hixson. Mrs. Rose Holmes, Anson Hixson, Fred Hilliker, Charles Holmes, Harley Homer, A. L. Jenne, Silas Jenne, Christina Johnson, Hiram Johnston, Milford Jones, Mrs. Chloe Kiser & Clark Kiser. Al Klumpp, Herman Kenedy, G. D. Kenedy, Bert Kent, D. L. Kent, V. M. Kent, C. A. Kent, E. G. Kiser, L. J. Kebler, Chris Kr pp, Mrs. E. M. Krupp, Frank Kimnrl, S. W. Kincr, P. A. Lambie, Clark & Hale Lambie, Al. Lanckton. J. C. Landenberger Love, Ralph Long, James Loveless, Geo. B. Loveless, Phebe A. Lee, Amy Lord, F. 0. Mascho, Geo. A. Messengrer, Mrs. S. S. McGiboon, Wm. Man warring, Win. Maier, Martin McDowell, C. C. Murphy, Albert Miller, S. J. McGowan, Samuel Mascho, Almond Mascho Bros. McGibbon, Hattie Micddleton, Maria Middleton, Ed MePeek, Lydia Morgan, John Mudge, S. S. Marshall, Joseph Murphy, S. D. MeRobertbs, Wm. McCormick, N. J. McBride, Mary A. Newton, R. L. Nostrant, Geo. W. Nostrant, Mrs. Susie Nixon, Mrs. Francis Newson, Fred Newson, Chas. Niles, John Otto, Joseph Olcott, Mrs. E. J. Pearce, 0. S. Pratt & Son Pearsall, Volney Parsons, Frank Philips, C. H. 0 Potter, Sol, Jr. Putter'il, C. S. Peterson. Mrs. Etta Parxer, David Parker, Ruifos Patterson, Earl Porter, Henry Russell, A. E. Reynolds, Os3ar Ro3smainan, Hugh Rahl, John Reed, Jon-s Reed, Frank L. Reed, Mar bLin Russell, J. P. R-isell, CLvin Rasscll, Frank Russell, Edmund Russell, Selah Rawson, F. Reynolds, Clarissa Reynolds, Alta Reed, Chas. P. Robinson, T. B. Robinson, Sam'l Russell, Wm. P. Rogers, Mary M. Rall, Lucy Romers, Thos. Roswnberger, J. C. Reed, MAlert Russell, J. N. Ro vley, Wolcott Shafer, Jas. Skinner, Wm. N. Sekell, Laura Spears, Simson Spen-er, Jas. Spencer, Milford Shane, D. D. Shaine, Enunice Sackett, Chis. Snyder, L. J. Smith, David Smith, J. WV. Stark, Lewis Streeter, Anna J. Streeter, J. W. Streeter & Son Streeter, M. T. Streeter, N. J. Stanton & Son Sisco, J. W. Sommers, J. D. Sickles, J. W. Sprague, A. D. Sebring & Co. Shadduck, D. Sminh, Maria Sweagles, Henry Simpson, Lester Simpson, John Sanders, David Saxton, John Schuamiker, A. B. Sheets, M.'B. Sedore, John Slater, F. A. Sntherlrnd, Mrs. S. Sutherland, Hattie Schieler, G. Sheets, Geo. Sanders, Elij'th Smith. Robert Smith, Mrs. G. B. Spencer, Forest Smith, Byron Smith, An eline Teeter, Mrs. Adell Traver, M. S. Tuber, A. J. Tinkham, Wm. Taber, Frank A. Taylor, Mrs. Ed. Toaz, WZ m. Timcrl-tin, Mrs. Emma Tib belts, Flizabeth Thom-is, Geo. W. Thomas, A. J. Taylor, J. P. Townsend, F. G. Townsend, Mrs. S. A. Tucker, J. C. Vanu-tor, Mrs. N. M. Vandervolwen Peter Valentine, Ben Wareham, H. Wareham, J. C. Waldo, L. P. Westl:ind W. C. Watson, N. G. White, Sam Wagner, J. L. Wilkinson, R. F. Wilkinson, M. L. Wright, Win. Wright, Fred Wright, Elbridge Whelpley, S. R Williams, Mart Wiekwire, Ellen Wickwire, Nelson Wythe, W. T Wythe, Mary Wythe, Chas. Wickizer, W. Wallace, MAary Wells, Ralph West, Bros Wilson, W. E. Zufelt, Juliette 2ND WARD. Albright, A. Ames, Willis Astley, E. C. & Son Abbey, H. L. Appleton, W. T. Austin; James Acme Hall Association Briggs, George Boyle, Fargo Baker, Geo. Blumbergr, Mrs. M. Brown, Geo. W. Brown, W'. H. Benjamin, Chas. Beach, Ml. P. Burtch J. M. Burtch, Martha Bigelow, Henry Brown, G. J. Bissell, John Byxbe, John F. Brown, S. A. Bedford, H11. D. Bement, F. P. Bigelow. J. H. Barnum, A. P. Borotc'hf, John Bair, Henry Bush, C. B. Covey, Sarah, A Covey, C. J. Clayton, P. P. Canute, Chas. Campbell, S. P. Cummnincrs, A. S. Case, J. B. Clark, Gilbert Chapman, L. W. Cheesmond, Wm. Chapman, Clark Chapnman, L. D. DeWitt, Jacob N. DeWitt, Mrs. Jonathan Davis, W. E. Davis, A. C. Davis, M. 0. DeWitt, Geo. H. DePuy, Fayette Detwiler, Isaac Dilmater, Geo. Dnnn, Thos. Daniels, Winm. Dean, Cyrus Doty, Nelson Esler, Mrs. Edward Esler. J. P. Eley, Robert Esler, Robert Foster, Albert Foster, Frank Flenmming, C. W. Fuller. S. L. Field, Win. H. Foilett, Eugene Fisher, Martin Foster, Eugene Fritz. J. F. Goodale, John Gillamn, Aalhlon Gleek, Amy Gibson, Lewis J. Grinold Emerson Glover, MArs. Louisa Green, Walter Gates, Leonard L. Gilmiore, Alfred Gilmore, Win. Hollis, MAlary Howard, Robert Hyde, W. G. Henderson, Robert Halstead, J. E. Hixson, E. J. Hall, Mrs. ChLarles Honor, Joshua Halbert, Mrs. Harrison Hines, Charles Ilolt, C. W. Howard, Steven Haninmmil, MAl. V. Hodge Geor-ge Irish, Geo. W. Irish, Geo. E. Johnson, MAIrs. C. R. Jerome, Susan Jenkins, Thomas Kimball, Jason Ketchem, Sarah Kebler, Chris Keep, Clyde Keeny, M. J. Keeny, R. W. Keeny, Edgar Kelley, John Knauss, Charles Lonier, Lewis Loomis, Hiram Lovett Amanda Little, Geo. W. Mattoon, Henry lecKinney, Mrs, Wm. Meliillen, Win. Morley, S. L. Meyers Fred Merril, Mrs. Ed. McKinn, Daniel Mletcalf, Wilbur McBride, Mrs. Mary Moon, Bert Mudge, J. S. Moulder, A. Miller, Wm. H. MePeek, Rose Mitchell, Emma A. Miller, C. I. Moss, J. K. Noyes Bros. Noyes, Frank Noyes, Ed. Persons, Louis Phillips, Percilla Phelps, Mary J. Parker, Mrs. Fannie G Parker, Adam Phillips, Grant Pruden, J. B. Phares, M. L. Parker. Betsy A. Pearl. L. Pike, James Parsons, Win. Quale, E. lM. Reed, A. H. Rossman, Wm. Rogrers, I. P. Ring, W. R. Rambo, P. F. Ring, I. G. Ressegule, E. E. Rogrers, Marv D. Rich, EzrA Rihg, Hiram Rowland, HIenry Rowland. Daniel Rogers, Mary Roberts, Butter & Co. Sanborn, Faank Sharp, Geo. Strickland, S. A. Swvger, Geo. Smith, S. B. Swift, HI-. W. Swift, Frank Shadduck, A. E. Snydey, Emery Summers & Wareham Sloan, Nellie Sheets, S. J. Smith, George. Smith, David Sutherland, MA. Story, Chas. Smith, B. R. Shadduck, Levi Sutherland, Edson Sly, Lester Toaz, Harriet Toaz, Thomas Thomas, Tubbs & Co. Talleman, A. Tinkham, W. H. Taber & Spencer Vanderbogert, Mrs. John Van-Wie, A. Vandorvolgen, J. C. Vanderbilt, W. T. Wright, Oliver Williams, W. J. Williams, Mrs. Geo. W. Woodruff, MAirs. C. Williams, Wm. Wellman, J. T. Wood, C. A. Wood, Reuben Walker, Albertus Winnie, James West, Milford West, M. L. Ward, Fay Walfrain, MIrs. Rosalia Watson, A. Wheeler, Geo. Wheelock, 0. Wheeloek, Carl Walker, G. W. Walker, J. B. Williams, Hannah Whitneck, Rachel Walters, John Whitney, S. G. Whitney, Ed Wells, Emri Young,. Geo. A. Young Geo. W. EATON RAPIDS CIT Y. Alien, Mrs. H. M. Adams, W. A. Adams, Mrs. S. L. AMhley, David Aii-durn, Fayette Andrews, Nelson Anderson, G. N. April. John Annis, A. W. Amidursky, Sam Abels, Frank Allen, George I. Andre ws, John I. Arnold, Ursula Ayers, WV. C. Anderson. Mary L. Baker, E. H. Butterfield, I. L. Bacon, Nettle Braynard, F. iM. Bacon, Anna Bemis, Catherine Barnard, Mirs. M. J. Brady, Sophia, Estate of Brewer, Mrs. A. N. Boody, L. Burch, Thomas J. Brings, W. C. Blake, Dexter Bissell, T. M. Plow Co. Blair, G. B. Butts, John Bentley, S. A. Bradr, Richard Blacker, John Barton, L M. Brooks, 0. Boatman, Jacob Birney, Francis Bateman, Williani Seward Blodgett, Richard Bradley, J. B. Brai nard, W. D. Biministool, -James J. Bentley, L. A. Bangs, Mrs. F. B. Battley, George Bellman, Catherine Brown, Ida W. Bruer, E. J. Ball, A. P. Bromeling, Mrs. T. J. Blackman, Mrs. F. Britton, Henrietta Bentley, C D. Bartlet, A. J. Birney, Peter C. Bostedor, J. H. Boody, Mary Buchanan, Levi Blaire, G B. Bentli y, Wi~liam Booth, G. L. Bidwell, A. J. Bangs, Heleni Belknap, C. G. Bostpdor, James Barnes, Henry Belknap, Morris Crawford & Sterlingm Claflin, John D. Crawford, M. D. Cowen, G. 0. Cobb, William Caldwell, E. D. Crumley, Robert Casp, M. L. Clark, MA. L. Caster, Chas. Cowan, A H. Clark, John E., Est. Clark & Griffin Cronen, M. Casper, Wm. Corbin, E. D. Cowles, Martha, Est. Chapman, L. E Corbin & Harris Cowden, James Capron, H. Carr, Joseph Chiamplin, Mrs. Lyman T. Cook, D. H. Casler, Wesley Cruson, Benj. Clark, P., Est. Clark, William Clay, Frank H. Cook, Mrs. J. A. Covey, Mrs. Benj. Cox, Walter Cole, Mattie J. Crannell, Marcus Corbin, J. M. Darling, Andrew Demmining, F P. P. Drewery, D. Decker, Elizabeth Devering, H. E. Derby, Mrs. H. R. Dearin, H. E. F

Page  4 IL A Fown rVI Ikk a L A Vila EATON RAPIDS CITY. Decker, Oscar DeCoursey, Jess Decker, Mrs R. Decker, L. DeGolia, F. H. DeCoursey, Jerome Daly, C. W. Daniels, Mrs. T. W. Datton, Allen C. Disbro, Phineas Davis, N. H. Durand, Chas. Disbro, Lacey Disbro, Bert L. Dunbar, Jennie Dayis, Simnon Decker, Mrs. Jacob Darling, Albert Drake, Olive Decker, Irvin Drake, Mrs. R. E. Davidson, R. E. Dunlap, Annie E. Elliott, Marcelius Edict, Geo. W. Elder, Elias Fay, J. H. Field, L. H. Ford, W. A. Ford, Geo. W. Faueer, Seth Fuller, Geo. A. Fassett, W. D. Frost, Mrs. E B, Est. Fix, Mary Fist, Caroline Flynn, J. J. Freer, Amanda Fairchild, James Fuller, S. R. Frost, Frank Fowler, L. Fish, Jane French, Mrs. Sarah Filley, Caroline Foote, A. G. Field, Rev L. H. Ferris, James Ferris, Sarah Fairfield, C. T. Gary Bros. Gillett, FanLie A. Goodrich, A. D. Griffith, Geo. P. Green, Albert Green, Clark Grubb, Juliette Geer, Rachell Gould, Mrs. A. E. Giddings, Sarah Goodrich, S. F. Gaylord, Mary E. Griffin, H. M. Geer, Nellie Green, Nettie Gale, John C. Godfrey, Mrs. Dolly Gould, Margaret Greer, Ella Greer, Ficrell Gaylord, Mary C. Ga: field, MAary Gould, Dan W. Goodyear, Andrew Gaylord, Mary E. Garry, E. S. Gallery Jack, Est. Gallery, J. H. Gifford, Chas E. Gallery, Eliza M. Gallery, J. M. Gallery, Emma Gallery, Arthur Hicks, Leonard Harmon, Eugene Horner, Samuel Hess, Mrs. Hannah Hulbert, AzAriah Hicks, Liberty Hudson, Mrs. S. E. Holmes, W. F. Huntington,L. B. Haminlin, Mrs. Ada L. Hyde, Rufus J. Hall, Belle Hadley, Orvat Hartson, Ursula Hill, Mary A. Harris, E. S. Hall, Edward S. Hall, Win. A. Hyde, J. R. Hall, Jesse Hunt, Fcnny Harrington, S. R. Havens, Sarah A. Holmes, J. J. Hurd, Alton Harris, Geo. E. Hall, Betsy Harmon, Beckey Henderson, John -r Harwood, A. Est. Henderson, W. S. Hobart, Mrs. Anna Hurd, Marve Harris, Chas. Hadley, Richard Hall, J. T. Hicks, George W. iHoage, Mary A. Hicks, Mrs. Lovina Horner Bros. Harper, Edwin Hamlin, Mrs. John Hamilton, H. H. Hamlin, Frank Huntington, Wm. J. Humeston, James Haner, Nelson Hu-Imeston, Amnanda Haight, Seward Hostler, D. B. Humeston, Julilus Holmes, Eunice Hill, Mary A. Hostle, Miss N. Harwood, Susan Horton, Susan Hanes, J. R. Est. Hamlin, Ada L. Higcgins, Win. R. Higgins, Eliza Hicks, J. M. Hammond, Daniel Haight, Jacob Haywood, R. Huffman, Marian Holmes, E. Jopp, Nancy Jacokes, T. H. Jenne, Mrs. M. A. Jordon, Mrs. William Jackson, C. H. Johnson & Wheeler Johnson, Hiram Jones, Joha Kiper, M. King, William Kelch, L. L. Knight, Mrs. Geo. W. Knight, Amos Kositchek, Max Kositchek, H. Bros. Kimler, Adam Knapp, E. F. Knapp, George W. Knapp, Sarah -LaFever, F. E. Lindsley, David Lindsey, Frank Lewis, D. Lewis, M4. H. LaFever, George Leonard, Celestia Latham, William Laurence, Ira N. Lewis, C. N. Long, S. A. Letts, C. M. Lewis, 0. B. Lown, Iloxana Lincoln, Sarah N. Leonard. Frank Leisenring, Mrs. S. E. Leisenring, John Leisenring, P. C. Laurie, Mary Lane, 0. W. Lecggett, Wm. Leonard, Philip Manning, Jerry Markham, 0. Menter, Mrs. R. P. Menter, Mrs. M. C. -Miller, Amos Marshall, William McKinsey, D. McKinnie, Amos McFee, Mike MeArthlur, Ira W. McNutt, C. E. McCauliff, J. D. McAllister, Eliza J. McFall, Mrs. Rhodes McAllister, William MeNntt, J. W. McNutt, J. E. MeNutt, Eliza McAllister, Edson Milbourn, J. H. Milbourn, Josiah March,, Watson Miller, Frank Miller, William. Meechem, Orlando Munn, Mary Mahan, Earl Mast, Harry Minnie, H. C. Merritt, Geo. Montgomery, Clifford Miller, Peter Miller, Ml. lrena Markham, Maggie Molton, Louisa Murdock, Ira Merritt, Chas. Miller, Henry Meserole, George V. Miller, Dennis Miller, James C. Marvin, H. B., estate of Morse, Chas. Miller, Uriah Mendell, H. C. Mitchell, Frank Mendall, Edward H. Morgan, Jo. K, Magden, Harry Naricon, C. J. Nichols, E. M. Nash, Benj. Newman, Mrs. E. S. Newman, A. Nelson, Geo. Nash, Stephen Nash, Mary Osburn, E. C. Osburn, F. A. Owen, William R. Osborn, A. Otto, Will Parks, James Parker, Mrs. A. Putnam, W.H. Powers, Harry S. Porter, Albert Picket, Warren Picket, C. E. Payne, Geo. Peacock, J. Perry, James Phillips, Win. G. Perine, Geo. C. Pilmore, John Powers, Calvin Prantges, Jane Prescott, Lucinda Priest, Atlantic. Piersons, Lucy J. Porter, Lyman S. Rose, Orrin Rogers, Geo. S. Rich, J. W. Rogers, Mrs. Garrett Rorabeck, Marietta Rogers, Will Rogers, Sarah A. Reeves, W. H. Roberts, Isaac P. Reynolds, Caroline E. Rice, Miss Anna A. Root, C. H. Rice, Mrs. Rebecca Sargent, Samuel Rhead Bros. Rogers, William N. Reynolds, T. L. Rhead, Benj. Rice, E. A. Rose, Nathan Reynolds, Mrs. B. F. Rogers, John Reynolds, W. B. Rice, James Rogers,Prudence Reynolds, Mrs. Alminira Rank Retta Rank Reuben Rice, F. W. Rolph, J. W. Reynolds, R. H. Reynolds, I. N. Rhead, R. 0. Raymer, George Rogers, Mrs. 0. K. Russell, Lather Ryan, Chas. H. Rumsey, Mary Reynolds, W. H. Raymer, Chas. E. Rossman, Gillet Rank, Fred Rogers, Mrs. Garret Shaw, B. E. Shaw, Sarah Mi. Seofield, Jerry Sloeum, Leno Slayton, James R. Speer, E. D. Seibner, George Swift, H. A. Swift, Philet-us Stump, F. M. Shaw Josephine Salpine,- L. Smoke, Hiram. Smith, William Smith, C. J. Smith, J. W. Shaw, J, C. Sprinkle, M. H. Slayton, Susan Slocum, P. G. Mrs. Speer, E. D. Snyder, Mrs. Alva Stirling,' W. F. Spicer, Fred Stirling, J M., heirs Stevenson, Chas. Sabin, -Eugcrene Sheldon, Alien & Co. Soule, Hiram Shird, E. M. Smith, Nancy Selby, J. C. Smith, John 0. Strong, iHellen A. Skinner, William. Stedwell, J. D. Speer, Matilda Stirling, Mrs. James Shem, Edward Shrump, Nelson Sloat, A. 0. Sabin, Anson Spinning, Eva Spear, John. B. Strank, Mrs. Sophiah Stone, A. K. Strawn, James Salisby, Mrs. Win. Stedwell, J. G. Stowell, Mary A Scott, J. P. Steri!ng, Mrs. J. H. Spencer, H. H. Springer, 0. H. P. Strong, Mrs. D. Seger, M. S, ger, Geo. Seger, Cornelius Sherwood, Mrs. M. G. Springer, E. B. Sprague, G. T. Stevenson, John A. Taylor, Martha. Trefry, Mrs. Russell Union Lumber Co. Vorce, Mrs. John Vaughan, D. 0. Vaughn, J. W. Vaughat & Son Vaurhan, Wesley VanGordon, John VWre, Mae Veil, C. W. Walters, Mrs. Orrin Webber, Samuel D. Wrigh t, V. N. Waldron, John Walter, Hiram Wilkes, Chas. E. Walters, Norman Williams, S. Williams, Thomas Whitam, Geo. J. Washburn, S. A. White, L. T. Wetherell, Wilber Whitaker, Geo. W. Wood, Nelson, Estate of Wells, Henry Wilson, Mrs. Emma Willis, L. B. Whitaker, L. R. Walters, Daniel Willoughby, Samuel Wright, Geo. L. Wilkins, Francis G. Waek, L. W. Wack, Chas. Waldo, Mrs. A. E. Wells, Geo. Winn, Lee Wells, I. C. Wadsworth, M. M. White, Mary E. Wilson, Anna C. Whitum, H. C. Walrous, Mary Widger, Hannah. Webster, H. P. Walworth, 0. J. Weeks, Etta Wood, Jonora Woodruff, Eugene Wood, Jane Walworth, Minnie A. Washborn, John Woodruff, Chas. Webster, Geo. W. Wilder, Geo. Wood, F. M. Wright, DeForcest Wells, Geo. Jr. Wells, Geo. Sr. Zimmerman, Mrs. S. A. BENTON TOWNSHIP. Austin, Fred 8 Bartholomew, Noyce 32 Bartholomew, Levi 31 Blanchard, D. A. 31 Brooks, Alonzo 20. Brandeterry, D. A. 12 1 Bare, Catherine 27 Baird, Orin 26 Barr, W. H-. 24 Burkhead, J. F. 25 Brown, T. H. 23 Backus, Dwight 13 Beard, Harrison 34 & 35 Brubaker, Jacob 34 Barker, R. R. 23 Burkhead, Herman 35 Bear, Anson 5 Cook, 0. P. 2 Carman, J. F. 24 Conley, Thomas 35 Carman, Richard 24 Carpenter, Frank 31 Casey, Peter 17 Cady, Fred A. 18 Cady, Geo. S. 19 Carpenter, Cyrus 18 Carpenter, B. F. 18 Challender, Mitchell 4 Cobb, William & Son 17 Cover, Anna 33 Cole, A. N. 30 Cole, N. J. 30 Casey, Thomas 31 Claflin, A. P. 31 Claflin, Mary E. 31 Claflin, A. F. 32 Cove, Anna 33 DeCoo, Hannah 8 DeCoo, Mary A. Driggs, Frank E. 29 Doraldson, James W. 31 Davidson, Susan 17 Davidson, Harvey 17 Davies, H. L. 4 DeWitt, J. J. 3 Derew, John 13 Engle, Hannah 22 Edman, 0. P. 13 Edwards, James 1 Earl, William 5 French, Calvin 18 Fuller, D. P. 6 Fenn, S. R. 3 Fry, Chas. 14 Ford, Chas. T. 13 Fox, Herbert A. 13 Fox, Amos M. 28 Fhaner, Chas. 35 Fhaner, Andrew 22 Fast, Levi 36 French, Hiram C. 14 French, John H. 1 Garvey, P. H. 34 Godfrey, 0. C. 29 Goodrich, Savy 19 Goodrich, Asa 17 Greggr, Watt 24 Godsmark, William 16 Godsmark, Edward 16 Green, Cynthia 6 Green, Frank 6 Grant, C. H. 11 Griflith, William E. 1 Green, Geo. 11. 2 Gregg, Robert 13 Gregg, Mary 13 Hongh, Geo. R. 20 Hoag, Clayton 8 Halbison, Lewis 19 Henry, T. IK. 19 Hayes, H. P. 19 Haines, G. W. 19 Haines, P. T. 19 Hickox, H. C. 30 Haun, David 30 Hultz, P. A. 31 Heller, C. W. 30 Hewlett, 0. P. 29 Harmon, Henry 17 Harmon, Harry 16 Haunn, Silas W. 33 Halley, Eunice B. 34 Halley, A. D. 27 Hammel, Michael 3 Holden, Monroe 5 Horner, H. W. 1 & 14 Hartell, Lewis 36 Hartell, Frank 35 Hartell, Henry L. 23 Haynes, Perry F. 26 Haynes, H. M. 25 Higby, Lewis E. 1 Heistand, G. W. 10 Hulet, 0. P. 29 Hough, Geo. P. 20 Haunn, A. L. 31 Johnson, Frank J. 10 Johnson, Fayette 3 Johnson, Geo. 34 Johnson, Elizaoeth 34 Johnson, Luther 3 Johnson, Geo. 26 Jones, Chas. 13 Johnson, R. 10 Johnson, M. 10 Jackson, John B. 12 Kingman, William E. 30 Grand Ledge Potterville Charlotte.4 Charlotte Potterville.t Potterville Grand Ledge Grand Ledge West Windsor Potterville Grand Ledge. Charlotte Roxana Grand Eedge West Windsor Potterville Charlotte Potterville Grand Ledge *; Potterville Charlotte 44 44r Potterville Grand Ledge Potterville.. Charlotte I Potterville Charlotte 14 ~ ~ g Charlotte Potte " Klingensmith, M. 33 & 34 erville Kingman, J. 0. 19 " Kinse], Geo. W. 35 " Kinne, John L. 15 & 22 & " Kilmer, J. H. 30 " Kilmer, Cyrus 32 " Kilmer, Lillie 32

Page  5 dataie-illaRr---O-I.qý--lom~W---dEmbw----ý----ýý,ý. a SI King, I King, Lavert; Lett), I Lett, A Locke, Linsle3 Loehr, Landei Lewis, Locke, SLipsey Lipsey Lipsey SLyon,. Ladle, Meyer, Murra' Mitehe IMcIntý MceIntN Miller, NiMcCon Mikese Munge Mann, Maxon SMerrill MeCor McCor A Mulho Motter " Moshe: Mitehc Munge Merril I^T Merril' MecDol Mauk, Marsh; Nortoi SNortoi " Newel Nixon Owen, Owen, 1Otto, '! Olin, I Olin, I Parkei Palme - Perry, Porter Perkix Pierce Parks. Quant Read, |Robin: Rosier Ru ms( Rouse Root, ~ Richa] Rickai Racey Ressec Rossrr:Ream Shane SShanc Shanc Shann Squire ' Squire ' Stewa Spear:. Sheph SStraig Stebb SStebb SShear SSly, E Tow, Tow, Todd, Tubb,; Thorn Terril Thral Thral Tranu STidd, Teinma Trum Uprig Uprig Uprig Undei SUndei Vicke SVicke: Van A Van A VanZi WalIe: Wheal Whea Welch Wigern Wigern W ard, 5 BENrON TOWNSHIP. P. A. 12 Julia F. 1 y, Wheaton 12 [ason 22 & 23 Mlen 22 Jennie B. 23 Y, H. 13 Jacob 15 & 16.s, Geo. W. 28 William G. 20 Geo. 28, James H. 18, John 18, James Sr. 7 Emery 7 John 1 J. G. 10 y, V. D. 29.11, V. Z. 20 yer, H. R. 29 yer, Jerry 29 MA. K. 33 nell, Myron 32 -11, William 33:r, L. C. 16 William D. 34, Franklin 6 1, Fletcher 5 mack, Justin 3 mack, J. W. 3 Hand, Catharina 4 -, William 21 r, Isaac 12 -11, W. A. 11 & 12 r, E. N. 14 J, Frank 12 1, Sarah 1 e, J. E. 36,Geo. 32 all, Sarah L. 13 n, J. B. 28 n, A. M. 21 1, Nathan 26, Jennie 2 John S. 8 Eva M. 8 W. B. 33 \sa L. 14 Frank 11 r, John 14 ter, Ezra 10 I. & H.., Mrs. Alpheus 32 is, J. P. 30, c. V. 30, Samuel 4 rell, W. R. Emily 34 & 35 son, Ann 16,, Chas. 7?y, S. 24, Edward 14 John 36 rds, A. B. 35 rd, P: W. 12, Bethuel 10 Jnie, H. E. 1 ian, H. F. 1,E. 13 e, Paschal 26 & 27 e, 0. C. 35 e, Alfred 26 ion, A. R. 15 e, G. H. 10 e, R. 10 irt, Alfred 34 5, Thomas 24 erd, James 23 Aht, C. M. 33 ins, William 0. 31 ins, Ransom 31, Marcus 30 lla 7 Thomas 7 Harry 6 J. W. 31 s, Geo. H. 28 as, J. C. 9 1i, Lucy, 25 [, H. M. 22 1, David 27,er, Paul 25 Chas. 27 n, Geo. M. 13 bull, Earl 12 ht, Jacob 21 ht, G. T. 16 & 22 ht, E. D. 16 & 17 'hill, A. B. 22 thill, Abraham 14 ry, Arminta 32 ry, Austin 32, kuken, C. F. 26 uken, Henry 26 ile, D. M. 2 r, Hurbert A. 3 ton, 0. H. 4 ton, A. M. 4, Irwin 36 It, F. R. 15 iD. B. 15 David C. 11 Grand Ledge Potterville 44 Charlotte Roxana Grand Ledge Charlotte Roxana Grand Ledge Potterville Charlotte Potterville Grand Ledge Charlotte Potterville Charlotte Grand Ledge Potterville Charlotte West Windsor Potterville it Charlotte Roxana Charlotte Ct ii Grand Ledge Charlotte Charlotte Potterville.. Warren, Frank 14 Weaver, Chas. 21 Weaver, Fred 16 Weaver, Seneca 9 Willis, Emma 27 Waltersadorph, W. J. 3t Wheelan, Elmer 30 Woodworth, John 9 WiRent, G. M. 9 Woolworth, John 4 Woodworth, H. 4 Walsh, Thomas 20 & 21 WNise, David L. 8 Wilson, Mathew 2 Wright Joshua 2 Potterville t4 Charlotte Grand Ledge VILLAGE OF FOT'TERVILI.E. Burns, F. 11., laborer Bennett, Ana, drouggist Barr, E. M.5l, grocer Beals, Frank 0., laborer Bragg, S. A., blacksmith Bennett, Chas., laborer Brown, T. II., laborer Benton, Chas. B., laborer Blodgett, C. A., carpenter Bellows, Ransom J., salesman Carpenter, H. L., miller Conkrite, Caroline, widow Canfield, Elizabeth, widow Croop, J. F,, wagon maker Decan, Jacob, laborer Dyer, F. F., laborer Darling, Alfred, railroad employee Davis, David, laborer Darling, Nelson, laborer Davison, R. P., earpenter Donley, Rebecca, widow Emerson, D. W., jeweler Elmore, Fanny B. widow Edgett. William, laborer Fairchild, U. H., retired Frasier, J. D., retired laborer Fordham, Benjamin. village marshal Ferry, Geo., laborer Gillitt, Amos, retired Gilbert, Geo., barber Goodwin, A. P., post master Hartwell, J. B., grist mill Halsey, M. F., carpenter Hickox, -Harriet, widow SHaner J. C., laborer Holmes, E. P., laborer Hamilton, E. M., laborer, stone mason Higbee, L. E., ML. D. Howe, W. H., shoemaker Johnson, Henry, laborer Johnson, Geo., farmer Johnson, Elizabeth Lock, Thomas, laborer Lincoln, C. D., harness maker Merritt, F. E., harness maker Merritt, H. D., carpenter Merritt, N. 0., grocer Marshall, Chas., painter McDivitt, Hugh, retired Mathews, William blacksmitn Newexi, Nathan, farmer Needham, Alonzo, laborer Odell, Mrs. E. WNV., widow Olmstead, Simeon, laborer Osterout, Isaac, laborer Proctor, A. C. Platt, Lafayette, laborer Paine, Rowland, retired farmer Potter, L. Piticans, Amos, veteran soldier Palmer, M. J., druggist Parker, John Proctor, G. W., painter Questerd, Belinda, widow Roogers, Jay Ross, I. T., building mover Ray, Frank, laborer Rossman, H. F., farmer Redfield, Win., blacksmith Rouse, Edward, laborer Smith, Alvin, laborer Sabin, C. L., retired carpenter Smith, Frank E., barber Spears, Thomas, farmer Sykes. V. R., laborer Sutliff, Theodore, blacksmith Smalley, J. H., retired farmer Stewart, Alvin, railroad laborer Spears, Homer, farmer Thompson, Ida VanAuken, W. H., merchant Van Zile, D. N., retired farmner VanAuken,. Henry, retired farmer Winter, Jacob, engineer Weinshank, Adam, drain commissioner Williams, John, laborer Weliman, A. M., laborer. Winters, Louisa, widow Wilbur, Clara A., widow Weaver, Seneca, farmer Young, Mrs. E., widow TOWvNSI-IIP OF BE1LLEYUE. Abbott, W. J. Bellevue Abby, S. M. Adams, E. " Adams, A. B. " Adams, Nancy Allen, H. M. Anson, James L. Anson, Mrs. J. iM. Andrews, Fred E. Sr. 20 Andrews, Fred E. Jr. 27 Arinstrong, YW. K. Atherton, C. A. 17 Atherton, Tracey 9 Austin, Munson 20 Avery, Martin Avery, C. G. Babcock, Wm. B. "25 Bailey, Thos. 15 Beers, C. W. Baoggerlvy, Reuben 35 Beacraft, F, F. 35 Berkimer, John 25 Berry, E. Barber, Maurice Bond, Annise Bowen, Mrs. A. J. Bisel, Frank 11 SBillingsley, Hlarvey 35 Brown, 0. L. 5 Brown, L. C. 8 Brown, W. A. 14 Butler, A. G. Brirrs, R. S. Burton, Thos. 34 Billman, John 7 Campbell, Mrs. S. A SCampbell, Fletcher 14 Cargo, Wm. Sr. Cargo, Lucy Carrol, Geo. 6 Cayton, Clara 35 Case, Augustus Chinnock, Jas. Chittendon, Sarah Chapman, Martha 25 SCole, S. W. 4 Colby, Dexter 36 Colby, John 36 Cook, Caroline 36 Cooper, Mrs. David 23 Coleman, Frank Coleman, Isabelle Cole, Fred Cook, Wm. Cook, W. H. Cook, L. B. 32 Conklin, John 32 Cronk, W. F. 22 Cronk, N. H. Cronk, Peter 2 Crowell, David 16 Crawford, Mary 10 Cummings, Mrs. H. A. 5 Chapman, I. 5 Crowell, Geo. Cushing, Jerone 22 Davidson, Jerry Davis. Samuel Davis, Theodore 35 Davey, Mrs. Wm. Day, Curtis 1 Day, A. J. 1 Day, L. J. 1 Dolton, John 8 Dickson, Geo. 29 DeRiemer, J. P. 27 DeMNlotte, Wm. DePuy, Jacob 18 SDePay, Frank DePuy, Warren Denniston, W. S. 25 DeRue, Martha 35 Dimmick Lyman 39 Dolph, Chas. 36 Dougherty, John Dolph, W. W. Denniston, Fred Dyer, Chas. Drollett, Mitchell 6 Edwards, A. Elmendorf, L. W. Elmendorf, W. H. SElmendorf, J. 1\1. Emery, Mrs. L. Evans, John SEvans, S. B. Evans, Levi 6 Fisher, NWm. 4 Follett, Willard 9 Folett, Anna 22 Flower, E. F. 11 Flower, A. D. 2 Fitzgerald, A. E. Fitzgerald, Mrs. R. Fitzgerald, D. W. 33 Fisher, A. C. 34 Fraunt, Conrad 9 Foss, Wm. 31 Fruin, R. C. Jr. 31 Fruin. R. C. Sr. 30 Grohe, Jerome 34 Grayson, Sarah 34 Gage, Andie 28 " Gibson, S. W. 28 German, Wmin. 6 Gambol, Margaret 11 Gambol, Frank 11 Bellevue it ci it Olivet Bellevue Olivet Bellevue Olivet cc Bellevue it 44 IL Bellevuno Aincrer Beleu t{ {t t t t t{ Aine Bellevue Olivet Bellevue Olivet Bellevue Ceylon Bellevue it t Gambol, Chas. 11 Gayton, Wm. 10 Griffin, MIerton 3 Greenman, W. -M. 17 Gayton, W. H. 3 Garmes, Geo. 3 Garmes, Jacob 4 German, Geo. 6 Hamilton, Jas. 10 Hall, Nelson P. Hunsicker, Henry Holden, Geo. 32 Hart, H. E. 32 Howe, Wm. 32 Hug'he's, F. F. 33 IH-unsicker, Lucy 33 Hodgerman, H. A. 33 Hull, J. B. 33 Hall, J. R. 33 Hull, H. D. 33 -Hoyt, A. B. 33 Huggcrett, Wm. 33 Hoyt, C. 5A. 33 Higgins' Mary E. 33 Higgins, Cyrus 33 Harris, Lyman 20 Hamlin, Henry 20 Hunter, Mary 20 Hart, Harvey 20 Holland, Sarah Hemenway, P. G. Hire, Mrs. Geo. Hunter, Tim. Hayes, Eugene Hamlyn, Richard Hall, Geo. Holden, J. L. 32 Holt, W. E. Holland, E. J. Huggrett, A. M. Hibbard, Geo. H. 14 Hollenbeck, Moses 15 Hamilton, J. J. 3 Hoyt, Ezra 13 Hoyt, Daniel 12 Hire, Geo. N. 14 Hall. Horatio 24 Hall, Henry B. 24 Hemenway, F. A. 13 Hamilton, J. WNV. 6 Hickman, Levi 5 Hart, Mrs. J. A. 25 Hovey, M. A. 36 Hotchkiss, Lyman 6 Inman, Wm Inselman, J. P. 22 Inselman, Jacob 22 Johnson, Henry Johnson, E. A. 13 Johnson, E. S. Jenks, Royal 32 Johnston, Mrs. Jas. Johnston, Wm. Johnston, Mrs. Thos. Johnston, Ella Johnston, Clara Johnston, L. 0. Johnston, Frank Judd, Emma Jenkins, John Jackson, Mrs. Jas. 8 Jones, Victor 14 Jarvis, Philip 13 Jordon, Elliott 12 Jennings, Oliver 29 Kingsb.ury, Mrs. E. iI. Kimberly, A. J. Kimberly, C. D. Kelley, Joel 21 Knapp, Edwin Keith, Eugrene Kimberly, Orrin Jr Kelley, Andrew 24 Lane, John Latta, Wm. Legge, Henry Lucas, Mary Larrison, D. W. Larr~son, Aurilla Lane, Josephus 22 Lane, Harvey 15 Lane, James 15 Loomis, Mrs. Geo. 10 Lshmer, Freeman 23 Luscomb, W. H. 21 Lennon, Hugh 8 Lennon, W. H. Lehmer, WNn. 18 Lindsley, S. D. 6 Lewis, Loucinda 16 Lankton, G. H. 12 Monroe, Alice McGinn, Hugh Mulvaney, Fred Marshall, Frank TN-eech, Wim. 32 Mason, Horace Morgan, W. B. Morgan, L. B. Manzer, John McCall, S. Monroe, Oscar Martin, Mrs. Winm. Bellevue Ceylon Bellevue Ainger m Bellevue Olivet Bellevue Ceylon Bellevue t Ainger Bellevue 4C Ceylon Bellevue Mahoney, Jno. Meech, Ellen Madison, Jno. Madison, Edward Moon, Geo. Moon, WYm. Monroe, Clark iM. Monroe, G. VW. MfeMannus, Frank 16 MeMIannus, WAm. 16 MeMannus, Catharine 16 MIoon, M.- 'V. 17 McCarthy, Mary J. 15 Mulvaney, James 31 Meech. Mrs. James 23 Morton, Thos. P. Mattison, Jno. 6 Murray, Bernard 7 Murray, Robert 6 Martins, John 7 Newton, Catherine Newton, Warren Nelson, Mrs. David 18 Niles, Geo. 33 Norton, Ruth 25 Owen, A. J. Osmun, Henry 27 Ovenshire, Hiram Owen, E. E. 23 Owen, Chester 23 Pugh, Ruby L. 23 Palmer, H. H. 12 Pixley, W. E. 8 Peaslee, Kittie 32 Pluff, Peter 19 Palmer, E. D. 25 Plum, Geo. 25 Reed, WNm. 19 Robinson, Hiram Robinson, Win. Robinson, Mrs. H. L. Roberts, Johnathan 26 Rounds, Jennie Rogers, Jane Roberts, Mrs. Thos. 2S Ripley, Benj. 11 Rogers, TA. D. 18 Reese, Helmuth 18 Reynolds, E. M. 30 Roberts, James 36 Roberts, Johnathan 26 Roberts, Jacob 36 Spaulding- L. C. Spaulding, Chas. Spaulding, Jno. A. 21 Spaulding, E. R. 17 Spaulding, J. W. Spaulding, Geo. G. 16 Seitler, Jacob 10 Stephens, Mrs. Ed. Stephens, Richard Sherbino, Mrs. P. F. S turg0e, Mrs. A. Sawyer, A. J. Sackett, Rachel Spafford, L. E. Jr 29 Spafford, L. E. Sr. Sackett, Frank Stevens, Geo. P. Stewart, Mrs. Elias 34 Sherwood, Phydelia 26 Showerman, Levi 13 Shum way, D. A. 26 Smith, Carrie 23 Smith, Junior 23 Smead, Ira IK. 12 Spaulding, F. B. 8 Smith, Leonard 7 Shapley, Royal 7 Shapley, Philetus 7 Stevenson, L. 18 Stiles, CarolinelO Sprague, Elmer 7 Spaulding, T. D, 14 Stevens, Frank 10 Stevens, Fred 10 Stevens, Louis 10 Shutterly, David 10 Shutterly, Chas. 10 Shutterly, James 10 Secor, Chas. 11 Sherkey, Jas. 29 Seitler, John A. 9 Seitler, Melvin 9 Seitler, J. A. 9 Simon, Louis 4 Simon, Mrs. Nicholas 5 Simon, W. E. 5 Sargeant, Mary E. 9 Sackett, Alonzo 3 Shipp, Fred 26 Shipp, WYm. 26 Tubbs, L. Tubbs, N. E. Taylor, J. K. Taylor, Martha Trabert, William Trowbridge, P. E. Turner, C. A. Turner, Elmner Tenny, Mary Tucker, S. H. 25 Tulley, E. 5 Bellevue Ceylon Bellevue Olivet Bellevue Olivet Bellevue ": t Ainger Bellevue "^ S 5 * ' 55^ 5'( ( 2w " AV mw Aw ýiw ýpw 7mr7w. W, AWAW hk. ý- I M,%AýCK

Page  6 TrIsket Treat, ] Turner. Thornt' Thortoi SThortoThornt MTillotsc Toole, Van VE Van Va SViemas Viemas MVan Sc( Van Sc Van Si( Vedder Wells, Willis, Willis, Willis, SWood, Wiley, Willsor Wooidr Wilson, West,, Wilson Walkin Way, C Walker Windsc Wood, Wilson Willian Wiles, Wight, Youngcr Young, York, ( York, SYork, J York, ( Young, Young, SAtwooc SAulls, SAnnis, Ayer, J Anness Anson, And rev 3Basle r, Barkda Blood, Ball M 4Bryan, Bramai Blanch Buskir Brimin Brimini Brimin Brimin Bingha Baurn, Burnet Brang-v Beck, I Bickfoi Bryan, Baxter, Ball, W Buchan Batema Brimin Bacon, Braina] Bly, W. ' Boodv, Buckla S Bly, Sa Bly, Sj SBall, B Boody, Cornell Corpen jCreore, Cooper, Chance rCoon, J Conant Coats, ] MCarter, Carrier rCroup, Croup, 1Dickins Dewey, Devons Dingo-n i Dernier SDernier Decker Edick, 3Edick, Edick, Edick, Edick, EschenI 6 TOWNSHIP OF B0 El.LEVUE., J. Ed. 7 Be Dennis 17, A. E. 13 on, J. -M. 1 n, Orrison 1 n, Wm. 1 on, A. B. 1. in, Henry 2 Lawrence Mrs. 30 dlkenburg, Mary ilkenburg, Mrs. A. ter, Henry 5 ter, John 5 otter, S. 35 otter, E. 35 klde, Orrin 11, Levi 19 A. S. 23 Geo. 34 Ida 3t Fred 34 Ida 28 Milo i, Marion ift, Mrs. S. A., Frank Villard 28, Griffin ishaw, James 'has.., G. W. )r, Frank Eliza J., Harriett 36 as, Elijah 23 Henry 7 Mrs. M. A, 12 Claude 11 Harrison 14 Chas. H. John rudson Chas. Chas. S. H. BROOKFIELD TOWNSHIP lievue ~~; Ellitson, Samuel 16 ] Eaton, William 23 Estelle, John G 23 Estelle, Edwin 21 Estelle, Henry 28 Edwards, Albert 15 Englehart, Adam 14 & 23 Eat Brookfield Petibone, R. Est. 33 " Pierce, C. E. 35 ' Peacock, Chas., Est. 36 S Pratt, Lewis 27 S Post, B. W. 13 S Peck, Abbie, 21 "on Rapids Peck, P. M. 2) "4 Post, Josphulis 1 Charlotte Prescott, Joseph 1 " Prescott, Harriett 1 ', Peck, Arthur 13 Ea d, Aldro, Est. 2 Rosaitha 4 William 27 Fohn, Est. 25, James 21 Frank 20 vs, J. G. 31 Martha A. 9 11, J. B. 7 F. A. 5 [arion 17 Horton 7 n, John 8 ard, C. 25 k, James 25 Cl stool, Jas. J. 23 stool, Chas. M. 25 stool, James M. 24 stool, Mary A. 24 m, A. L. 31 & 32 Daniel 24 & 25 Cl t, N. 20 vin, William 20 Robert F. 21 'd, Egbert 9 D. W. 20, John 27 T. A. 22 oan, Alice M.27 EE in, Leonard 12 stool, Minerva 12 Adelbert 2 rd, Zerah 14 illiam H. 12 Christian 1 nd, G. W. 23 muel 13 rlvia 13-22-26-27 & 35 ina 19 Adelbert 25 Ee, Thos. 6 ter John 1 Er John 28, Celia 34, Jared 27 as. A. 22, Frank 30 Elihu 27 L. A. 25 Ch, [I. L. 33 Phillip 7 & 8 G. S. 7-8 & 18 son, Carrie, Est. 5 F. E. 30 & 31 hire, Henry 33 & 34 n, F. L. 18 c, J. B. 3 Ea., A. D., Est: 3, Levi 35 Alex 6 F. A. 6 & 7 Peter 8 & 9 Lewis 8 William 8 bacher, Louis 4 Ch; Broc P: Cha larles Cho harles Bros aton I Broc Lton I Cha Lton I Broc.arles Broc Cha Broc,ton t Sprit Chc,, Epley, H. K. 13 " Fast, J. B. 18 "' Fast, 0. A. 18 "4 Force, Geo. 4 " Frank, John, heirs, 6 " Frank, Mrs. S. M. 6 "4 Fletter, A. IH., Est. 8 "' Freer, Lloyd 27 ' Fordham, Clarence 29 " Finch, Asahel 29 't Ferris, Chas. 22 "4 Finch, A. C. 17 "4 Fox, Edwin 10 S Fox, Martin 3 & 10,' Faullner, John 31 ', Faulkner, Marvin 19-33 &,, Favorite, Thomas 24,' Favorite, John 13,' Favorite, Geo. 24 "4 Fuller, Gilbert 36 "4 Fancher, Mary Jane 29 & 4" Geisbert, Mrs. 5 "4. Goshorn, L. 28 "4 Gibson, Eliza 12 "4 Gilman, Darling H. 14 " Goodrich, Descomn 15 " Gildart, Jas. 26 & 27 " Green, E. B. 23'& 81,, Hall, Chas. 30, ilipp, Fred 3,' Hall, John 4 & 9 S Holbrook, Aruna 10 & 11 ', Holbrook, Ernest 11 ' Horton, Frank 2 S' Higby P. M., Est. 4 & 5,, Hart, Jesse Jr. 6 " Huey, John 8,, Hahn, D. A. 21, Henderson, C. T. 16 Hawley, T. H. 33 Hawley, Henry 17:.-. arlotte Hall, Geo. 30 & 3t "4 Hall, Clarence 18 okfield Hall, James 29 & 30 " - Hotchkiss, G. E. 34 "4 Humphrey, Ira 15 (4 Harris, Chas. 14-15 & 23 artello Heath, Chais. P. 12 irlotte Henry, Lydia 11.4 Huey, Elizabeth 3 " Hutchings, F. L. 30 " Jones, Theodore 29 " Johnson, Ira 17 " Kay, John D. 16 " Kellogg, ID. C. 21 iworth Kuck, E. E. 29 " Krebs, A. 19.... "' Krebs, Eli 8 & 17 " Krebs, Levi 25 " Krebs, Henry 25 arlotte Keesler, Marion 21;worth Leonard, Geo. 2 kfield Leonard, W. S. 2 " Lown, Sebastian 19 " Logan, D. A. 23 "' Lownsberay, Allen 30 " Lownsberry, Judson 29 & " Livingston, Henry 10 " Leightner, Samuel 26~ Rapids Mahan, Henry 18 & 19 cc McDonald, Henry 25 "4 Miller, L. C. 16 & 20 "4 McClintick, Warren 17 "4 Miller, Merton 32 " Moist, Sarah A. 12 " McGowan, James 21 " Myers, Joseph 28 S Mitchell, Rolland 24 " Magron, Chas. 3 )kfield McManns Alfred 1 Rapids Moses, John 32 arlotte McCutcheon, J. P. L. 9-4( Rapids Newton W. M. 21 )kfield Newton, W. S. 27 " Numbers, John 23 " Noviss, L. P. 36 " Nicklis, Julius 35 S Owen, G. W, 30 " Oteney, Richard 23;worth Olger, Philinda 28 )kfield Parr, William, Est. rrlotte Pierce, Mrs. Kate 12 "4 Pruden, J. C. 8 '" Peck, William N. 26 )kfield Payne, Emery 20 " Perry, H. B. 16 "4 Perry, G. A. 21 Rapids Perry, N. J. 17 "4 Pike, Chas. 21 igport Potts, William 21 irlotte Peters, J. M. & Son 32 " Phillips, Walter 29 S Phillips, Otis30 & 1 " Phillips, Wilber 29 " Powers, William 30 ' Powers, Joseph 29 Brookfield Eaton Rapids Partello 31 Charlesworth Springport; 32 Brookfield Charlotte Brookfield Eaton Rapids Brookfield Charlotte Brookfield Eaton Rapids Broo'kfleld <.. Eaton Rapids Brookfleld Charlotte Brookfield Brookfield 4 c Eaton Rapids IDack Lake )-15 Brookfield Brookfield Springport Charlotte Brookfield Charlotte Charlesworth Brookfield n n~ lostt, J \. AV. 13 Post, Henry 14 Post, W. II. 13 Raber, Alvis 7 Rogers, Mrs. W. A. 3 Rcsh, Alonzo 18 Ripley, David 8 Riddle, C. N. 30 Rose, Rufus 31 Reynolds, Frank 35 Rochester, Wilson 23 Raymer, Geo. 24 " Ea Raymond, Mary 14 Rayner, Albert 23 Rochester, Daniel 24 Ch Reese, Chas. 24 & 36 Rose, Elizabeth 2 - Ea Rudesill, Clark 31 Rudesill, J. B. 31 - Starkweather, Geo. A. 6 Starkweather, Geo. M. 6 Shaver, Homer 6 Spotts, Geo. 5 Spicer, Fred A. 5 Spicer, Frank A. 6 Spicer, W. A. 6 Spicer, Alfred 6 Seabolt, A. L. 5 & 8 Spotts, Ed. 3 Shaver, Chauncey 9 Sherman, Fred, 9 Stead, Catherine 31 Sowle, Anne 34 Sowle, Willie 34 Smalley, Mary E. 20 Seabolt, Mrs. 20 S-_,-pears, Ja:~. 20 Stuart, Myron 14-15 & 23 Stevens, Irving 9 & 15 Smith, Thos. E. 16 & 21 Sowle, John R. Estate of 27 Starks, T. H, 28 Stevens, Ann 28 Scott, Eugene 31 Scofield, Geo. 23 Southard, Ed 19 Saulsbury, Mrs. 19 Sheldon, Elmer 28 Stuart, Sarah Jane 23 Seebrist, Eva 16 Snyder, David 1 & 2 Ea Swan, W. W. 11-12 & 14 Swan, Adelbert 14 Swan, Morgan 11 Snyder, Henry, F. 2 Steffey, Henry 2 Shinter, George 12 Saurbrun, Geo. 13 Shiner, Eva 32 Shiderman, Geo. 13 & 14 Short, Thos. 1 Sowles, Chas. 23 Ch Sutton, David 27 Steele, John 24 Sherman, Geo. 36 Shultz, William 36 Starks, Doratus 20 Schrontz, Chas. 19 Thuma George 13 Ea Thuma Simon 23 Thomas, Jay 11 Thomas, Nancy 11 Tolbert, William 15 STaylor, Geo. 22 " Taylor, Thomas 22.. Taylor, John. W. 33. Taylor, David 9 & 15 Taylor, W. H. 27 Tice, J. B. 8 Tolbert, Michael 18 & 19 Topliff, Elijah 15 Troutner, M. S. 20 Tulip, Geo. 4 Tulip, Ed 9 Unterkircher, C. 12 Ea Umbarger, Jas. 2 & 3 Vrowman, Newton 31 Vanande, Catharine 16 Vanande, M. E. 16 Vosburg, Burt Vanauken. Jas. 11 Williams, A. M. 6 Wells, S. P. 19 Williams, Jesse 23 Williams, Levi 27 Wixson, Albert 37 Wixson, Alice 34 Wixson, Willie 34 Walling, David 17 Wiltbanks, I. J. 42 Walker, Julia 20 Webster, Mark 21 Broo Sprin aton R Cha Broo iton 1 iarles' Sprin tton R Pa Cha Broo Cha Broo ton 1 larles Sprin Duck Broo ton R Broo ton R Broo Cha Broo kfield.g-port Uapids riotte lI I otu l t kfield Zapids Webber, Joseph 16 Williams, Mary A. 20 Watkins, J. 20 Westgate, Frank, 25 Whitaker, G. WV. 24 Williams, Laban 24 Williams, Samuel Park 28 Wilder, G. W. 13 Wilton, Wesdey J. 33 Williams',-Mrs. D. T. 20 & Warren, Jo"in 31 Warren, John T. 32 Whittum, Edgar 10 Whittum, C. H.3 & 10 Wehr Reinhart 4.Walworth, John 10-11-14 Walling, John 32 Walker, William 36 Wilber, H. 36 Wagoner, Peter 25 Yeagcr, George 11 Yoximer, Milo 21 Zeigler, Christ 30 Ea ' CARMEL TOWNSHIP. "' Allen, Mrs. Estelle 20 worth Amspacher, Israel 6 & 7 gport Amspacher, C. 7 tapips Amspacher, E. 7 Lrtello Amspacher, Mrs. I. 8 " Ash, Isa-ac 5 rlotte Axtell, Henry 32 "' Benham, Albert 31 "' Bowsher, Edward 19 " Bisel, Chas. 8 4". Bullanger, C. 16 " Brighty, Gregory 9,' Bedell, Emerson 22 "4 Bolock, John 1 "' Blackmore, Mrs. Jamnes 34 "' Baker, Mrs. H. H. 4 kfield Bohn, R. H. 3-2 "4 Beers, Jno. 20 " Blodgett, Geo. 6,, Bower, Palmer 4 " Backus, M. 36 " Baker, Francis 9 S Baker, T. H. 5 &9 " Bisel, G..W. 5 "' Crabtree, Mrs. Elias 17 C Gushing, Frank 27 " Cortirght, H. 21 "4 Chase, Archibald 33 riotte Cameron, Frank 3 kfield Clements, Samuel 5 & 6 "4 Crabtree, Seth 17 S Case, C. H. 21 S Case, W. 28 S Cooper, A. B. 21 " Cooper, Harris 28 b Cooper, J. S. 28 4 Cooper, M. W. 28 Zapids Cooper, James, 32 "6 Cooper, 0. B.18 "4 Corsett, G. P. 30 cc Cole, G. D. 31 44 Dawson, Chas. 23 "4 Dillon, Amos 20 "' Dunning, E. 15 "4 Davis, Russell, 3-10 &11 "4 Dillon, Thomas 27 "4 Davis, Homer 29 " Davis, Warren 18 worth Davis, E. W. 16 4. Dillon, L. T. 23 4" Duiball, Geo. 35 rcport Exander, Alias 36 4 Ells, J. B. 22 Lake Foster, Warren 10 kfield Foster, Mrs. I. J. 17,apids Foster, Ira 10 4" Frace, Isaac 28 4' Frase, Geo. 5 "' Foote, Martin 29 " French, Edmond 20 kfield Fickus, Mrs. M. 17 4' Fergcuson, Stephen 4 ". Fortney, John 3 "4 Fausey, David 17 "4 Frace, Warren 18 "' Foote, Albon 32 "', Griffin, Fred 17 "4 Griffin, John 36 "4 Griffith, J. Q. 33 "4 Green, W. L. 1 4" Griest, Bert 10 rapids Grier, David 10 "4 Griffin, Albert 30 kfield Gag-e, G. H. 30 " Gusey, Chas. 6 "' Griffin, S. H. 36 " Granger, T. 6 "' Gregg, Mrs. John 14 rlotte Griest, C. H. 11 " Halsey, Chas. 36 kfield Hutchings, Giles 12 Halbison, A. 17 "4 Horn, Peter 27 "' Horn, J. P. 27 "4 Horn, David 32 " Hoisington, Martha 18 " Harmon, C. 2 " Harmon, William 2 " Halsey, Chas. 24 & 25 ton Rapids Brookfield i 4 Charlotte Ainaer Carlisle Charlotte Ainger Carlisle Ainger Charlotte 4' ~ Carlisle Ainger Charlotte Carlisle Charlotte 't. ( Love, C. M. 9 Lane, J. N. 11 Lentz, August 20 Lutz, J. P. 2 Laurence, Estate 1 Lawhead, Mrs. J. 29 Love, D. H. 29 Love, H. 29 Mikesell,Frank, 27 -Mikesell, Levi 27 Mount, Will 21 Mount, William 9 Mygrants, S. A. 22 McClintock, Lucius 27 McWethy, Warren 22 Miller, D. S. 9 & 10 Miller, Jacob 9 Miller, Mrs. Jacob 10 McCreery, Mrs. 19 McCreery, Geo. 19 Morris Elva 19 McCreery, Elvin 19 MeCreery, Devillo 19 Mellon, Sarah 19 McUmebr, Chas. 26 Mnlholland, James 11 McClintock, Fred 16 Maurer Richard 27 McBride, Samuel 34 Mulholland, Mrs. F. M. Miller, Orrin 36 Mount, J. B. 9 Mason, P. H. 17 Merritt, W, W. 23 Mason, P. M. 8 McLaughlin, Mrs. J. 8 Maurer, Jos. 33 Morey, Ed 19 McConnell, C. R. 30 Newcomber, Lewis 16 Norton, Phebe, Estate o: Nichols, Geo. 23 Nichols, A. A. 3 Peters, C. D. 32 Pollard, William H. 16 Palmer, Philo 36 Pierce, T. C. 1 Pollard, John 16 Ramsey, David 9 Rounds, Daniel 18 Reynolds, C. L. 14 Reed, Watson 20 Ray, Jos. It Roberts, B. F. 5 Rogers, Marcus L. 4 Raymond, Kingley 2 Randall, Susanna 16 Ripley, M. B. 36 Rich, John 11 Raymond, Henry 11 Stratton, Albert 10 Snyder, Ezra 3 Sykes, C. 17 Stall, James 25 Sprague, Mrs. E. 10 Staley, L. S. 29 Shaver, John 6 SSherman, J. H. 22 & 15 Stlaey, L. S. 30 Schaneckenburger J. 23 Schaneekenburger, Fred Stine, Mrs. Daniel 4 Sternberg, Ellen 25 Sherman, J. H. 21 St. Clair, J. 14 Sprinkle, Amos 3 Silverthorn, Geo. 30 Smith, E. D. 6 Stall, 0. J. 35 Snyder, M. 5 Snyder, J. H. 3 See, Eldridge 23 Smith, P. P. 35 Shaull, David 26 Saunder, William H. 33 Sloan, Herbert 33 Sikes, B. F. 39 Sikes, C. H. 3,) Sikes, J. J. 30 Stewart, D. H. 31 Tower, KInowles 15 & 16 Thornton, Gilbert 30 Thornton, Oscar 28 -2 & Brookfie'd Iledge, Chester 9 "4 Hoot, Elizabeth 21 " Hilborn, J. N. 2 & 3 SI-Haefner, C. E. 1 "4 Hendricks, J. D. 31 " Holden, William 29 Iluber, Daniel 2 & 15 '" Jackson, Henry 11 "4 Knapp, Delos 20 9.' Knapp, Byron 2t." Kelley, Lewis 7 " Kelly, Mrs. A. 7 "4 Kent, Johnson 33 4 Krusen, Geo. 28 '" King, Frank 36 15 " Krebbs, Alex -36 " Krusen, Mrs. Isaac 29 Springport Kent, E. 33 '4 Kreusen, Enoch 32 "4 Klais, Owen 1 Charlotte Ainger Charlotte.. 44. 44 Carlisle:: N Charlotte 23 tt^ 22 " " i CJarlisle Charlotte C4 123 '4 Carlisle Charlotte Carlisle Ainger Charlotte Charott I -MF I --l-l I IR pl'ý". tACC I

Page  7 r7 ' ""CARMEL TOWNSHIP. Fullerton, Alex 35 Chester Rasey, Armon 28 Chester Burr, Roswe Thompson, Frank 35& 36 Charlotte Gallaher, Catharine 34 Charlotte Rich, J. A. 15 Gresham Bertraw, Fr STanner Frank 7 " Garn, Jessie 18 " IRix, Geo. & Co. 1 Roxand Bertraw, MI Todd, Will 8 " Gates, Bert 10 Roxand Robins, Seth 24 Charlotte Barucs, Geo. STerrill, Fred 24 & 25 " Geer, Ashel 1. " Rogers, Samuel 8 Gresham Bank, A. D. T iilJudson '2 " " Gibbons, Edward 36 Charlotte Rogers, Pearl 7 Vermontville.. Casper, V. E "Terrill, Frank 25 " Goodenougn, Mrs. T. 6 Bismark Rogers, Clark 17 Gresham - Casper, Ida Todd, Sylvanus21 " Grant, Mrs. S. 29 Chester Roll, John 4 Roxand Cummings, W" Tanner, John M. 18 Carlisle Grant, Dewitt C.. " Root, Geo. 8 Gresham Caldwell, Jo Tanner, C. H. 18 " Grant, Thom'nas 21 " Russell, Robt. 30 Chester Campbell, H ~ Vanderhoof, Warren 16 Charlotte Green, W. C. 11-22-27 Charlotte Saekett, Edwin S. 22 Gresham Crosby, A. C Whitney, Anson 32 " Griest, Whe at on' 35 " Sackett, J. A. 15 Charlotte Campbell, C SWilkinsJohn 4 4" Haig.h, Daniel 9 Gresham Santee, J. L. Roxan Critehet, L. SWi. W. E. 4 " Hale,iWm. R. 1 Roxand Satterly, J. H.7. Gresham Coven, Jam SWood, L W. 12 (" Hale, T. A 4 " Satterly, R. 8 " Crouch, Fra Wilson, Daniel 2" Hale, Milton S. 35.Charlotte Satterly, Byron " Cupit, Mrs. Whitcomb, Frank 25 "9 " Hampton, Daniel 15 Greshamr Satterly, Frank 8 " Craw, Andr Whitcomb,William 25 " " Hampton, Wm: 3. Roxand Satterly, Newman 10 " Cowles, Hen Watters, Levi 25 - " Hampton, Geo. 3 " " Scott, Anson322 Charlotte Clements, H. Williams, Z. 1 " Hampton,Chas. 1.. " Scott, Edwin 18 Vermontville Clements, G Wile, Daniel 10 " Hampton, Earl 15 Charlotte Scott, Alfred 18 " Crouch, Cab Wade, G. H. 16 " - Hampton, Henry 22 Gresham Scott, L. R. 4- Gresham Crane, W. H Williams, G3o. 31 Ain" er Harrington, Frank 12 Roxand Scott, Chas.: 4 ". Crane, Jona Wilt Wm 19 Carlisle ' Harmon, S. W.-16 Gresham Schrader, J. C. 23 *. Charlotte Cole, Williai S Young, L. W. 10 & 15 Charlotte Harmon, L. L. 9- " Sibbrell, Geo. 25 " Creyts, Mila S Young, C. M. 11,. Henrv, T. K. 24 - " Simpson, Leslie -11 Roxand Carpenter C ^ETE TOWNS. Hicks, Wm. 10 " Simpson, Nelson 14 Gresham Crumb, Ezr CHESTER TOWNSHIP.1..h Hildreth, Hiram 0. 22 Charlotte Shaw, John 27 ". Crumb, Mar Andrews, C. T. d 21 G es Hildreth, Jerinie 17 Gresham Shaw,Chas. Sr. 32 Chester Cupit, Jno. Andrews,2 Ida 19 1 es er House, Lewis-33 Chester Shaver, Jos. W.34 " Cary, J. N SAmes, J. H., Est,, 18-19 & Hubbard, Robt *27-3t Chester Shronatz, Wmn. 26 Charlotte Darling Geo SAmes, Frank 19 Huteh-n;, Lee 35 Charlotte Summers, Jacob 32 Chester Dunn, Willi Ames, James K. 17-19 " Johnson, Mrs. E.A. " Smart, Asa 17 Gresham Dunlap, J.I Ames, Win.. Sr. 18-19 Jordan, Frank 'S. 21 Chester Smart, Cats. Sr. 10 " Decke, Geo. Ames, Wm. Jr. 18,, Arnold, PraM, 20 ' Kirk, Jefferson, 33 Shyder, Jno. Sr. 35 Charlotte Dann, Willi Arnold, Fran, 0 King, Paul 2: Roxand Spafford, Arthur 32 Chester Dann, J. W. A sh, A ustin 33.1 n o a S Barr, laence 23 Charlotte King, J. " Sprague, Randora 18 Vermontville Drake, E. L, -e ~, nKlin, Gee. 19 Chester SLall, James R. 33 Chester Digby, Chas Blair, Wm. 24 CalteC..-lW... KInapp, Silas 25- Charlotte Stall, C..W 15 Gresham Dayton, San Bennett, M. M. 25, Knapp, Geo. 25 " Stall, Rachel 16 Esterby, An BentLucyl 5 Bennett, Luy 5Gresham Lamie, Geo. 29-32 Chester Stoffer, Wm. 19 Chester Eldred, Wee W - Bursley, Wilbur 15 Gresham.M} Elliott, IL. 2A SBursiey,Elizabeth20oLamie, Trs. John 2-) " Strickland, L.hA. Gresham Bissell, Amandt 3 ' Chro Lamont, Seth A. 32 " Tanner, W. A. 33. Chrlotte Felton, A. E SBoyer, E dwin 10 & 11 Roxana Lipsey, James 13 Charlotte Thompson, Thos. 10 Gresham Flitten, Jot SLoomisBoyer, Edwin 10 & 0. C. 4 - Gresham Tow, Jno. 33 CaarlQtte Foster, Mar LoomiPclzC.,4 Aug Boyer, Jorium 10 ~, Lords, James A. 30 Chester Tow, Jos. 35 " Fezke, Aug Beeman, Frank 11 Lords, E. D; 32 ' Treascott, Mrs. C. 22 Greshau Fox, A.C., Bosworthema, GiKelley. 6 Bsmark Lords, Burdette 30 " Treadwell, E. 34 Charlotte Grinnell, Ar " Bosworth, M yr 6ar,. Love, H. T. 1 * Roxand Turner; 0. A. 23 a Fuller, G. 0. ~ a Love, S.-A.-t 1.... Turner, Byron 23 a, Fishell, Joh] S, Bosxvorth, Edwin 5. r otl Loveland, David A. 26 Charlotte Turner, Myron 23 " Felcke, Cha. Beckman, B. p. 6. ermontvlle Loveland, E. E. 31 Chester Tnrner, AMrs. Chas. 27 Gresham Frost, Jason obBradle. Nosle 14 & 23 Greshan Lyon, Mrs3 J. M. 32 Chester Uhi, James 10 P - Fiorean, Jol BrBarker, Gideon 28 Chester Markham, 0. 0.J. 29 Charlotte Uhl, Lura 21 " Foster, Will a -Gaxon, Ira 13 " Uhl, Wim. 17 " Foster, Will Baoer, L. 27. Cr. Y Maxon, R. 1 Vantassell, L. 25 Charlotte Foster, Frai 3Blod a kaxon, Frank 1.. " Vincent, Win. 8 Gresham Franks, Jan " M. Blodgett, LeRoy 34,, Maxon, Wilbur 13. U Waddell, Fenton 15 ', Feleke, Otto S Beeman, M{rs. E. J. 34 ", Martin, E. R. 14 ~ " Waddell, Mrs. E. 34 Charlotte Foster, Mrs..." B.91ok, ano. J. 34, "" McDonald, Frank " Ward, G. H. 15 Lake Oiasva Fry, L. G. 1 "lipW Al 9 Delta Krieger, Henry 14 Lansing ank 25 Milletts. Knapp, Mary L. 32 Milletts ~s. Joseph 25 " -,.Knapp, C. E, 6 Grand Ledge 35 "!'-Kannally, John 2 " 13 Lansing K'night, Albert 33 Lansing. 3 Delta Lenon, Chas. 35 Milletts 3 " Lenon. Mrs. Geo. " A. J. 3 " Lamphere, Lyman 33 " hn 21 Grand Ledge Libbie, A. H. 25 ",ovey.3 Delta La{vrence, S. D. 18 Grand Ledge. 3 " Lowell, Lillian 3. Delta larence 3. Lenon, Ellen 33 Milletts H. 4 " Lee, John H. 4 Delta ts 29 Grand Ledge Lamerson, W. 22 Lansing nk 3 Delta Lee, Geo. N. 9 Delta L. N. 3 " Lee, John 26 Milletts Ew 23 Lansing Lazell, Waterman 10 Delta iry 23 " Ladu, W. 21 Lansing enry 23 Milletts Loomis, James 3 Delta eo. 23, Maseho, Henry 18 Grand Ledge.b 21 Lansing McGee, J. R. 253 Milletts. 35 Milletts Munton, Isaac 39 Grand Ledge than 35 ".McDonald, Fred R. I Lansing n 35 a Miller. S. S. 8 Grand Ledge n 35, Miner, Woolcot 3 Delta -. C. 26 " Mosher, C. E. 11 " L 19. Grand Ledge McClapin, Frank 21 ' Grand Ledge y 19 a 1\aier, Christian 6 " 3 ". Maier, Martin Mrs. 6 " 13 Lansing Martin. Eliza 3 Delta. W. 20 Grand Ledge Master, William 2 " am 35 Milletts Alunson, J. B. 35 Milletts 1. 36 " Moon, A. W. 27 Lansing 23 Charlotte" McKelvev, A. 33 Dimondale in 33 Millets McClapin, John 20 Grand Ledge 33, - McKenzy, Thomas 34 Milletts 33.. M,aier, Geo. 5 Grand Ledge. 34,, Manz, F. 36 Lansing nuel 14 Lansing McRoberts, William 3 " n 31 Grand Ledge Moore, Orrin T. 30 Grand Ledge ley 32. Milletts MIaier, C. F. 4 7, Munroe, Orlow 16 Delta ]st., 1. Lansing Moon, Mrs. M. W. 22 Lansing in 35 Grand Ledge Murray, John, Estate of 12 ' y A. 13 Lansingcr. Moon, R. R. 38 Milletts ust 14 ". Myers, S. P. 16 Lansing i. 3 Delta INixon, Samuel 17 Grand Ledge nelia C. 3,, Neller, Henry 1 Lansing. 27 Lansing Openlander, William 2 Delta n. 5 GrandLedge Openlander, Geo. 12 " s. 9,, O'Connor, Dennis 34 " 9 ".. Parker, Elsworth 29 Grand Ledge mn 8,'. Parker, Earnest 38 " iam 14 Lansing Pureell Andrew 35 Lansing iam A. 14,, Parker, G. D. 19 Grand Ledge ik 14,, Perkins, John 28 M-illetts lee 12,' Perkins, Geo. 35 " I 11 li Plowman, Luther L. 5 Ihgersol James 11. Perkins, Henry 33 Milletts 4,i" Potter, Solomdn 3 Delta. Bolock, Wmi. ""-4 B etta, Allen Chester McCormick, Jeramaih 31-35 " Warner, Asa 19 Vermntville arnsworth Al, ae McGormley, Win. 15 Gresham Waltersdorf, D. J. 36 Charlotte Farnsworth. Biss!lli, (Dafliel 31 R.1 S' Bissel, DaHielr 31., McLaughl-n,--D. 31. Chester Wait, R. L. 16 Gresham Farnsworth BissellHiram31., McCargar, Chas. 4 Roxand Wait, Adelbert 5 " Fishell, MeI BrmrGo.3.aMeCargrar, Chas. 4 Rxn Bremer, Geo. 32., Merritt,-Solomon 10 " Walker, Mrs. Effie 23 Chariotte Fox, A. C., SBauer, Edward 2 Messner, Mrs.- Mary 23 Chester Webster. Mrs. A. E. 23 " Flanders, i M'Bates, James 26... Miller, W. D. 15-. Gresham Wells, Daniel 28 Chester Forest, Will Bottomby, James 30. Vermontville. i Js Oarett, M. 1 Bel Hnry30, Ceser Miller, Jos.ý 33 " Chester Well-, Harvey 23 Bell, Henry 30 ester. Mitchell, David-M1. 1 & 2 Charlotte West, Frank 21 Gresham Gillett, Myr SBoyles.r Wtm. 31 Charlotte Mitchell, Chas. 1 & 12 Roxand West, Wilbur 16 " Gnson, G. SBrinkharn, Wm. C. 31 Chester Moore, Annis 21 Gresham Wheaton, Lemuel 22 & 27 Charlotte Grinnill, P. S Barhyte.R. V. 16 Gresham aMoure, Adelbert 21. Wheaton, Wesley 13 Roxaa Graham, Ge Barhyte, Chas. 5. Moore, Arthur 21. Wheaton, Frank 26 Charlotte Griffith Thu Bursley, Chester, 9 Gresham Moore, Allison 2 Charlotte Wheelan, Anna M. 24 -, Goodrich, M4 Case, J. W. 36 Charlotte. Moore, Philo P. 24. Wheeler, D. D. 27, rattan, Ha Case, Mrs. Lemuel 33 Chester Monroe, Chas. M. 33 Chester Wnite, J. J. 23 Chester enderson, S Carter, Geo. W. 24. Charlotte Mosier, Lee 29 W m " Willinms, James A. 25 Charlotte Hazel, Fran S Carpenter, Cyrus 23 " Moyer, Boyden 3 Roxand Williams, Morris 21 Gresham Harpster, M S".. Carpenter, Francis.13 ". Moyer, W. I. 2 Willims, Brt 21 " amilton, J -Cole, J.-A. 21. Chester Moyer, Henry A. 3 Charlotte Williams, Levi 15 & 21, Huxtable W SCollinsi L.R.21 Murray, James 33 Chester Williams, Geo. A. 21 & 22 Charlotte Holloway, J SsClements, Wm. 9, 2 " Nsh, Burnham 36 Charlotte Wilson, Oscar 33 ". Hallock, E. Cupples, Chas. 32 Vermnontville Newcomer, John W. 36 " Wright, as. Jas. 33 Chester Hayden, Jat M, Crocker, Wm. 39 Chester Nevills, Wm. 31 Chester Wyble, Fred 33 " Huxtable, V Clark, Nathan 928 " Nichols, Robt. 32 " Wyble, Frank 33. H uxtable T " Clapper, Orrin 30 - " Olin, Mark D. 18-20 WybeChas 3 Holly, Chas. S Curry, Mrs: Clarissa 31 Charlotte Olin, Eugene 18 " Young, M.. 30 a Hull, Mrs. I " Colt'in, John 9 ~.. Gresham Olney, Geo. 22 Carlisle I~art, Edwir S Davidson, Henry 8.. " Omspocker,.Ira 31 Chester - DELTA iOWNSIIP Hatchell, G SDavis, Chas. 1 Roxand Omspocker, Emanuel " " Alfalter, J. A. 35 Milletts Hadley, J. i A Dean Chas W. 6 Vermontville Ottaney, Jos. 27 " Atwood, Chas. 15 Lansing Halstead, A SDelad B. E. 2: Roxand Ottaney, ANdrew 13 - " Atwood, W. L. 16 " Haipster, E Dormnan, Julina K. 28 Chester Parr, Herbert 11 Charlotte Ames, Alice 16, Huddleston, S-Earl, Rufus 12 Roxand Parr, Ernum 11 Alexander, A.F.2 Delta Hunter, Mr Earl, Reubin 12 Perkins, Mrs. M. A. 25 " Bathrick, William 3. " - Hazel Euge...Eason, Geo. Sr. 33 Chester Perkins, J. H. 4. Roxand Bamon, Christian 11 * Hume, A. S..,.Elliott, Jno..R. 29 " Pierce, Thos. 19. Vermontville Bird, Hiram 23 Grand Ledge Iazel, Fran SErvay, Eliza 25 Charlotte Pierce, A. J. 20.-- Cheste% Beech, M. P. 8 "... Hamilton, J Ervay, Orrin 23..:. ".. Pitcher, Edmond 10 'Charlotte Briggs, James, 13 Lansing Hamilton, Z SFarrah, Jdmes E. 30 Chester Phelps, Daniel 11t ". Billings, W. R. IS Grand Ledge Halbert, An Farrah, Chas.., Gresham Phelps, Wm. 14 " Buehler, John 18, Heckman, I Ferguson, J. J. 1 Roxand Phillips, Os,-ar 21: Gresham- Bristol, J'rone 2 Delta Huxtable, J Filloo6, Levi 16 Plilips, Mury 22 " Brader, Henry Milletts Harpster, D ^ Field, Jos. 9. - -..t Phillips., Bairlow 7 -. " Brd,.M. H. 35 ' " Hunton, F. Fisher, Otis 2 Roxand Polhemus, Mrs. B. 23 Charlotte B-radcer, Robert 35 Milletts Hart, Geo. Fletcher, Geo. 4 / Greshami Pope, Elijah 33 Chester Brumm. J. H. 31 -. Hance, Luc Fluery, Alvin 33 ~ Charlotte Prindle, H. R. 24 " Blakeslee, 0. 6 Grand Ledge Ingersol, Ja P'Foote, Mrs. T. M. 35 " Prindle, Uri 14 Charlotte Bergin, William 21 Lansing Ingersol, El PFoote, Frank 35.... Prindle, Parintha 14 a Bank, Joseph 21 ". Ingersol, H k~ \ Francis, Lewis 5 J Bismark Pugh, Sheldon 34. Chester Burnrier, David 4 GrandLedge Kirtz, Benj. FPrd, Albrt 3.5 Charlotte Pugh, Alien J. 33 " Benjamin, Darwin 10 Delta Kettle, Geo B. Freed, H. H. 10. - Greshain Quantrell, Chas. H. 35 ", Briggs, P. B. 7 Grand Ledga Ketcham L Fuller, Win. P. 24 Roxand Ransom, Geo. 35 Charlotte Berner, John 7 " Kraft, Albe,. R, 5 Grand Ledge Parker,. D. M. 14 Grand Ledge., C. E. 5." Phillips, Geo. 3 Delta., Mary A. 5 " Parsons, A. T. 21 Lansing rritt 5 " Perkins, Charlotte 26 Milietts Jr, 34 Dimondale Parker, Cornelius 3 " artha 35 Milletts Parker, Normain 17 ' Grand Ledge iam 32 Dimondale Parker, A. L. 3 Delta. 22. Lantsing Parker, J. H. 29 Grand Ledge a 1 " Patterson, Mary 30 Lansing R. 26 6 Richmond, William 35 Milletts C. 17 Grand Ledge Ruhf, Mrs, Lawrence 31W.Grand Ledge o. 12 Lansing Ruhf, Joseph 19 " mas 15 " Rood, Susan D. 35. E. 2 Delta Reeve, Alfred 12 Lansing rvey 3 " Reasoner, P. S. 10 Delta Joseph 10 Lansing Rogers, M.L 23 Milletts k 16 Grand Ledge Ring, Ira 6. Grand Ledge rs. JamesR. 20 ". Rambo, P. F.6 ohn 23 Milletts Roundville, Chas. 3 Delta. Lydia 11 Delta. Rouse, John 25 Milletts ohn 15 ". Robbins, Henry 12 Lansing E. 17 Grand Ledge Robinson, J. R. 19 Grand Ledge nes 16 Reeve, Wil]iam 4 Delta Villiam J. 11 Delta. Roe, William 28 Grand Ledge homas 10 & 3 ". Soper, Jamas 2 Delta A. 20 Lansing. Sanders, E. P. 3 4 ri. E. 24 ' Spangler, Mrs. A. 3: " i3.Delta Space, James R. 4 to. 21 Lansing Smith, Mrs. J. H. 5 " 1. 2 & 3 Delta Sumerix, James 35 Milletts ndrew 30 Grand Ledge. Saurman, H. B. 35 llen 5 "4 Sherman, W. D. 11 Delta D. 19 " 4 Stafford, Alonzo.. s. J. F. 26 Milletts Strikling, Della 13 me 17 Grand Ledge Smith, Hannah 3 ", 13. Lansing Sheets Geo. 20 Grand Ledge k 8 Grand Ledge Shepler, John 17 ames'23 Milletts Slaughter, L. 22, Lansing jenas 18 Grand Ledge Slaughter, A. D. 27 " 3 nos T. 6 " Sherwood,.Henry 21 " Mien 25 Lansing Smith, Amos 14 " Fohn 12 " Slocum, James 13 % aniel 5 Grand Ledge Slocum, C. A. 33 4 W. 1 Lansing Stowell, Win. 22 " D. 29 Grand Ledge Saier, William 3:5 Mill etts y 32 Dimondale Stafford, F. A. 3 Delta mne 29 Grand-Ledge Shipman, Mrs. E. D. 7 Grand Ledge lliott3 Delta Smith, W. H. 8 [arlan 3 " Schneeberger, Fred 16 Lansing. 30 Grand Ledge Seibly, Herman 34 Milletts. 2 Delta Soper, Joshua 2 Delta ucy 3 " Space, John N. Grand Ledge rt 10" Sutliff, L. T. 12 Lansing J --. '..,,....:2. ,,: 'i " V " IIIr

Page  8 Aqllmc--qwtr,- ad., a m n w W gs mb, 1wnrqr 4w - Vr n Sm Sn Sa: Shb Sh Sm St: Sa S I Sni Sn Sh So Sn Sn St St: Sa Sv Sh SIh SISe Se SI Sc St Sr T( T( Ti Ti TI T - T( Ul U U V V w xx xw wx wx wx wx 5 "V NV NV 'W NV Yl Y ^~,1 A A A A A A A A A A B B ]13 B 13 13 B B B 13 13 B 13 B B B c c, N ~ 13 13 13 13 C B B C B C CG I C; AK AK Ar S DELTA TOWNSIHIP bliff, Geo. 12 ow, J. H. 33 nborn, E. P. 17 - Gr ipman, S- W. 7 ipman, Mrs. C. M. 7 nith, Ira J. 7 abler, Chris. 36 ier, John 36 nith, E. P. 25 aith, R. E. 6 Grn nith, B. B. 5 ialler, F. W. 16 per, Mason 10 nith, B. F. 15 nith Bros. 6 Gr: aith, Simeon 5:ace, W. J. 9 beets. Irving 17 Gr; afford, Geo. 9 lwyer, Geo. W. 4 Nan, H. W. 33 Lappell, Jacob 33 ýank, E.- H. 16 Gr: iindinget'r, C. I..ssions, Jane 1. hultz, Fred 29 Gr larp, E. C. 11 bhlee, Fred 36 rong, Geo. E. 22 pace, N. H. 30 Gr ower, Alex 15 ower, J. A. 15 aylor, Chas. 9 Gir aylor, David 8 'homas, Elizabeth 25 aylor, Jane 5 Gr ower, J. H. 6 nderhill, Jane 25 nderhill, Levi 35 nderhill, Henry 35 anderwalker, Mrs. A. E. 3 anderwalker, Ezra 3 Tinters, John 14 bright, Joel 5 Gr rilson, Frank 3 alters, Andrew 35 iliamins, Eugene 2 rardell, J. A, 34 rells, Mary 19 Gr relch, William 21 raldo, A. N. 13 Valdo, Mrs. H. A. 6 Gr Tells, E. J. 29 ralker, Jonathan 26 Toodard, Gardner 3 -rail, G. H. 25 tedge, William 23 rard, Thomas raldron, John 35 rall, John 23 Tarren, Frank 4 Gr Toodward, Marvin 23 rardell, 1. C. 26 Tardell, Frank 26 Talson, Fuller 3 erkes, Wm. E. 7 GO erkes, Win. 3 achariah, Geo. 23 EAT'ON TOWNSHIP. Lansing Milletts mnd Ledge Lansing and Ledge Delta '4 and Ledge Delta and Ledge Delta Milletts and Ledge Lansing and Ledge Lansing 4c Delta and Ledge Lansing Delta and Ledge Milletts and Ledge Milletts.Delta Lansing and Ledge Delta IMilletts Lansing Milletts 'and Ledge Lansing 'and Ledge Lansing Delta.Milletts Land Ledge Milletts Milletts Lansing 'and Ledge Milletts Delta Lansing1 -and Ledge Delta Milletts Lansing' Milletts rand Ledg-e LansingZ-1 rand Ledge T anv--nc NMilletts Clay, James H. 29 Cooley, W. T. 33 Cooley, W. H.. 32 Cox, Lucinda 32 Cox, Merritt 32 Crozier, Irvin 33 Crozier, Chas. 32 Clay, D. H. 33 Curry, Dan 15 Curry, Latimore 14 Childs, James 1 Davis, Mrs. John W. 28 Depne, James M. 14 Dornan, John 26 Dornan, Lemuel 26 Dickinson, Daniel 21 Dickinson, L. D. 21 Eddy, Dennis 11 Fay, Jane A. 14 Fields, Chas. 25 Fields, Albert 25 French, James 31 Force, Frank 20 Flynn, William 16 Fast, Elza 1 Fast, Jesse 1 Fast, Clinton 1 Freeman. Chauncey 10 Foster, Wesley 5 Garvey, James 2 Garvey, William 2 Garvey, Thomas 11 Gidner, Margret 3 Gidner, Agist 3 Greenman, M. A. 11 Groak, J. B. 9 Griffin, James R. 3t Gibls, H. A. 26 Gibbs, Chester 26 Gibbs, Ellen 21 Gibbs, Martin 13 Hill, Mary A. 2 Hartell, Lewis 2 Hartel, Frank 2 Haoffner, Andrew 23 Haoffner, Chas. 23 Hipp, G. F. 33 Huber, Ezra 28 Hart, Thomas 12 Howard, Stephen 14 Hefrfner, Reuben 15 Hale, Oscar 22 Holcomb, Harvey 22 Harned, Gouldie 27 Huey, A. W. 31 Huey, Irvin 31 Holcomb, LeRoy 21 Holcomb, Harry 2t Holcomb, Annet 21 Hall, Merrick 16 Hale, Ezra B. 23 Jewett, Chauncey 36 Kirk, Albert 27 K int, A aron 353.'... * Knapp, Geow-t. 16 Kinsell, G. W. 5 & 3 Kingc. J. G. 5 LeBold, C. H. 25 Long, Ernest 5 Lescher, John 24 Long, John 26 Laverty, Cyrus 4 Linsley, Abigail 1 Long, Elizabeth 14 Long, William 14 Linsley, Will 31 Leak, Eli 31 Lingo, Anna 10 Laverty, Hiram 9 Laverty, G. W. 4 Miller, Josiah 32 Miller, Cornelius 29 Milbourn, Frank 1 McConnell, T. F. 9 Morse, 0. D. 8 Marshall, Alonzo 4 Murray, James 29 Miller, Willis J. 32 McFarland. Ann 27 Merkel Michael33 McClintic, Joseph 10 McClintic, G. W. 10 Miller, Williamn 25 Milbourn, Amanda 13 Moore, Joseph 24 Milbourn Fred 14 Newth, Thomas 11 Newth, Jacob It' Perkey, Henry 22 Puffenbnrger, Sarah 27 Pierce, William 14 Puffenburger, Lyda 27 Pixley, James 23 Perkey, Hannah 25 Parker, Mrs. Agusta 6 Parker, Arthur 6 Parker, Fred 6 Pierson, Miles 34 Perkey, Alfred 4 Qiuantrell, William, Sr.19 Qrantrell, William, Jr.19 Richards, Allen S. 2 Richardson, Frank 2 Charlotte Charlotte Potterville Charlotte it hi Potterville Charlotte t, ti it Potterville Charlotte 44 64 Potterville Charlotte Rice, M. S. 13 -Rochester, Frank 24 Randall, Hattie 32 Royston, Cornelius 12 Riley, H. 0. 21 Richardson, Frank 2 See, Abram 30 See, Eldridge 29 See, Jesse 32 Shaver,'Harriett 32 Shoemaker, Ed. W. 32 Stewart, Julius 5 Sabin, Elmer 4 Summers, Adam 4 Stewart, Benj. 4 Ch~ irlotte Sherman, Alexander 12 Southworth, Alonzo 4 South worth, Chas. 4 Southworth, Susan 24 Southworth, Allen 17 Southworth, M. 20 Stine, W. W. 21 Searles, Sarah 19 Searles, John 17 Shall, Isaac 27 Spotts, Benj. 28 Snow, Thomas J. 19 Smith, Allen A. 33 Smith, W. S. 25 Smoke, Abram 25 Smith, E. M. 23 Smith, Jacob 22 Solomon, Conrad 20 Tubbs, Lafayette 30 Thompson, Geo. 13 Upright, D. C. 21 VanDeusen, James 23 VanDeusen, John 24 VanDeusen, Harvey 23 Wells, Jefferson 14 Wack, Elizabeth 14 Woodman, Henry 13 Wells, David 8 Wickard, Daniel 12 Wickard, Mersa 20 Ward, Mrs. Geo. 18 Wright, Elson 26 Wright, Nathan 24 EATON RLAPIDS TOWNSHIP. Abbey, C. 12 ' Eaton Abbey, T. J. 1i -...... Adams, Milton 12 Alderson, Wmi. 10 Aikins, Lewis 3 Kin Annis, Morris 29 Eaton I Annis, S. A. 29 Annis, James 18 Andrews, J. I. 27 Arnold, Nancy 21 Arnold, H. S, 31 Arnold, J. H. 21 & 16 Ashley, Mary N. 13 & 24 Ashley, Isabella 5 Ashley, Samuel 5 Bancroft, J. D. 26 Barrett, C. I. 14 Barrett, F. S. 15 Barrett, Ora 15 Bartlett, C. M. 30-19 Bates, E. 1 Battly, Geo. 33 Beadle, Rachel 2 Bement, G. M. Bene nt, L. 12 Bement, Win. L. 2 Bennett C. E. 5-6 Bellows, Warren 2 & 3 Kin Bentley, Benj. L. 29-30 Eaton Bentley, John M. 21-22 Bentley, Oscar E. 20 Benton, Wm. Blodgett, Rich Boody, Mrs. A. J. 7-8 Boody, Wm. 7-8-9 Bodeil], Jno. 6 Booth, Geo. 30 Bostedo, Chas. Bostedor, James 31 Bostedor, Fred E. 31 Bradford, A. L. 27 Brandemore, E. 3 Kin; Brainard, Frank M. 27 Eaton ] Bray, H. A. 5 Kin. Bramble, Harrison 14 Eaton I Brewer, Angeline 23 Britten, C. B3righlitman, Ellen N. 19 Brown, Andrew Broughton,. N. Brunton, Robert 16 Bromling, P. K. 11 Bulock, Emery L. 8 Bulock, H. 8. - Bunker, Geo. W. 24 Bunker, Chas. 13 Bush, A. Bush, Willis 36 Cady, Mrs. Geo. 15 Canada., Jno., Est. 13-14 Canada, A. 14 Canfield, P. A. 9-17-18-6-16 Carr, C. L. 28-32 Casler, M. J. 27 Ea g E g 1e " Casler, Benj. 16 S.. Chievelikr, Mrs. M. 23 ' Clark, Geo. 16 " Clark, James 25 ' Conklin, Lee -10 ' Covey, James 30 S Crandall, J. H. 8 " Crocker, H. " Crocker, L. A. 14 S Cross, H. 31 4' Cummings, Jason 1 4 L Cupp, W. C. 17-18-19-30-20-29 " Curtice, M. J. 23 S Datly, C. W. 16 & 35 " Darling, A. C. 26 S Darling, Simon 2 " Decker, Elizabeth 25-26-36 S Densmore, Jno. P. 18 S Depue, Daniel 4 S Depue, Geo. 4 S Depue, Milton 9 '" Depue, Wilson 9 S Dillingham, Mrs. Stephen 11 4' Dillingham, A. 10 S Disbro, Rosalia 2 ' Dodge, Jno. S. 35 S Dorrance, A. G. 19 "' Dwinnell, S. T. 29 " Edmunds, L. M. 33 " Ferris, G. WV. 1 "' Ferris, Job-26 " Ferris, Wesley 30 "' Freer, James 19 " Freer, R. A. 30 " Flaherty, E. 25 Ford, Alice 19 Gallery, Geo. 3) " Garvey, Cath. 7 Gillette, A. E. 6-7 S Gillette, R. 10 Gollnitz, Jno. 32 Green, Alvin S Green, WV. P. 33 Griffin, G. C. 3 S Griffin, G. P., Est. 11 Griffin, Horace 22.. Griffin, Lorenzo 21 Grienenberger, T. 28 Rapids Griswold. Chas. H. 23 4 Gruesbeek, James-16 4 Greusbeck, Daniel Greusbeck, Geo. 16 fsland Gunnell, Wm. 9 tapids Halifax, Ed 3 '4 Halifax, Fred 10 '4 Hoyt, Mrs. E. 11 Hartenberg, Chas. 2 '4 Hicks, Geo. W. 1 4' Hicks, Liberty 27 '4 Holcomb, Sally 11 & 12 Holcomb, Horace 26 Hendershott, A. 15 Hunt, C. M. 26 Huckins, Lucy A. 32 " Harringoton, Elizabeth.. Haywood, W. A. Hodges, Luther 23 Herrick, 0. 20 Hall, F. P. 23 S Holbrook, Mrs. M. A. 3 4' Hoyt, H. F. 26 S Hamlin, D. H. 35 Johnson, Miles 18 Jack, W. A. 26 ' Kelley, T. P. 1 & 12 fsland Kelley, Wmin. 12 Rapids Keeney,, M. F. 21 S Kint, W. H. 31 S Kifer, John 15 - Klotz, David 30 & 31 S Laverock, Wxm. 23 S Lamb, Ross W. 33 S Lamb, F. D. 31 S Laphamn, H. C. 24 " Leach, Anna M. 82 S Leisenring, Jno. W. 21 S Lewis, Sam 22 S Long, Mrs. P. T. 31 S Long-, S. A. 28 rsland Long, Ellsworth 21.apids Lozkwood, Jno. 3 rsland Mahoney, M. 35 tapids Manning, J. 28 " " Martin, Chas. 7 S Martin, H. F. 7 "' MeManus, Elizabeth 32 Eal S McCullough, Thos. 21 " Milburn, Peter 19 Milburn, Fred 7 S Miller, Robt. 18 S Mix, S. C. 30 " Moon, Harriet 2 S Morduff, M. 17 " Moyer, John 5 " Montgomery, Mrs. J. S. 36 " Moses, J. H. " Myers, Mrs. R. H. 35 " Nadell, Clarence 17 '" Naricon, Jas. 23 "4 Nelson, Rteuben 24 S Norton, M\. E. 1-2-14-4 & 5 ton Rapids. 44 '4 i4 4'. 4 4' it..c it (. Sii Norton, Geo. W. 13 Norton, J. R. 11 Norton, Walter 5 Olmstead, S. C. 11 O0ney, E. 31 O'Leary, H. 32 Osborn, E. 0, 23-35 Owens, Wm. Owens, Thos. 24 Ovenshire, R. F. 26 Oxendale, Geo. 4 Parker, Mrs. A. 36 Parker, Guy C. 25 Parker, Frank 35 Peck, Chas. E. 10 Peck, Sophrona 23 Phelps, Lucy 2 Phillips, Win. G. 31 Phillips, Chas. K. Phillips, Z. Pitcher, Grant 8 Pike, Win. 29 Pickworth, Thos. 24 Polhemus, Mary 27 & 28 Porter, Albert 28 Potter, Mrs. D. H. 3 Powers, Calvin 24 Puffenberger, Geo. 29 Pugsley, S. V. 21 Purdy, Mrs. S. 25 Ranney, Carey, 20 Raymer, Chas. 7 Royston, Win. 16-9 Royston, Geo. H. 9 Roe, Wm. 31 Rogers, Levi 15 Rogers, Seth 15 Rogers, Prudence, 4 Rogers, Chas. 26 Rogers, Sarah 13 Rogers, N. S. 26 Root, S. 6 Sanders, Chas. 4 Saxton, A. D. 14 Schofield, J. 11 Schofield, Geo. H.23 Shaul, H. C. 31 Sherman, -H. H. 1 Sheldon, G. W. 9 Seagraves, Jas. 36 Seelye, J. W. 27 Seelye. Steri 27 Smith, J. 22 Smith, Marshall 14 & 23 Smith, Eugene 15' Smith, C. M. 22 Smith, Albert 26 & 27 Smith, John W. 8 Smith, Levi 12 Speer, Mariah Speer, David 2 Spears, E. B. 19 Spears, Perry 19 & 20 Spencer, WYi. 10 Spotts, Daniel 26 Spicer, Wm. 27 & 28 Sprague, Hi. C. 31. Springer, 0. H. P. 26 Springer, Eleeta 26 Sumerix, W. 1 Sumerix, Wm. 1 Steigman, John 4 & 5 Stevenson, John 9 Stevens, C. W. 28-29-80 Sterling), Wm.22 Sterling, F. B. 22 Sweet, Win. A. 5 & 8 Terryll, D. B. 1 Tiffanny, H. 2 Thompson, Myron 22 Thompson, Mrs. Geo. 10 Travis, Jane 17 Troub, J. J. 2 Turner, Fred 16 VanOsdall, James 13 Ward, Wm. 36 Warren, Chancellor 14 Welch, S. J. 18 Welch, Erwin 6 Wellman, W. S. '3 White, Alonzo 18 Winslow, Frank 3 Winslow, Percy 3 Wilbur, W. S. 2 Wilbur, C. H. 12 WilcoxJno. D. 13-14 Wilkinson, Chas. 5 Williston Fred H. 33 Winchester, S. B. 29-32 Williams, C. E. 24 Winn, Lee 28 Willis, 0. 26 Wood, Marshall, 32-31 Wood, Mrs. Julia 33 & 38 Wood, Thos. 23 Wood, Henry 24 Wood, J. M. 31 & 3 Wood, Randall 4 Young, Daniel J. 8-5 Young, 0Geo. Young, Eri Zentmyer, 0. H. Eaton RapidS 44 - '4 4' Kingsland Eaton Rapids Kingsland Eaton Rapids, Charlotte Eaton Rapids SKingsland Eaton Rapids. '4 '4 g{^ ' ,, ... lien, John F. 3 lien, Henry, 3 lien, Andrew 16 lien, Hrimer 12 Ilen, Mrs. Harry 10 lien, Horace 10 Ispaugh, John G. 34 ngle, A. L. 31 ulls, Chas. 12.ustin, S. M. 12 are, Geo. 1 lailey, Fred 11 -all, Jesse 29 3allard, Chauncey 34 lellows, B. F. 25 lennett, Charlotte 36 lennett, A. L. 35 lennett, Hannah 35 llatt, Anthony 12;latt, Sarah 12;latt, Illiad 13 Ilowers, James 14 llackwell, Sarah 25 ishop, Frederick 6;oyer, S. E. 3) Iryner, B. F. 27 iritten, Cordelia 14 iritten, Chauncy 14 Iritten, A. K. 15 asler, John 24 asler, Mary F. 24 anfield, Elizabeth 12 urtis, IHorace 1 - ook, Eli 31 ook, Elizabeth 34 obb, Henry E. 35 ooley, Geo. 28 ooley, Benj. 28 asler, Henry 10 asler, Hiram 9 rane, B. F. 21 rane, Amaziah 24 Charlotte Eaton Rapids Charlotte 6C Potterville Charlotte i tt g mr-mor-Amr-AMP AMV 32W 7W ýMW AMV MW-ýý

Page  9 KKALAMO TOWNSHIP. Grant, Walter 22 Kalamo Rouse, Erwin 27 Kalamo o: l /Ackley, Albert 8 Kalamo Gregg, T. N. 22 " Rouse, Mrs. E 22 " Abbott, Mar Ackley, Warren 21 " Gridley, Orris 22. " Reed, Henry 22 " Allen, Chas. ^mArmstrong, W. 29 & So30 " Greeman, Fred 26 " Rickel, John 20 & 21 " Allen, Mrs. ( Angell, Dianah 14 & 23 " Granger, W. F. 23 & 26 " Roberts, John 18 " Althouse, Jo Ackley, Andrew 14 " Gould, J. J. 23 & 24 " Reynolds, Jacob 10 " Althouse, Ge Andrews, John 6 Nashville Gould, J. V, 23-24-26. l' Roberts, W. A. 29 " Arnold, Geo. Andrews, John 7 " Gould, 0. G. 31 & 32 " Ripley, A. G. 20 " Bailey, W. E Benedict,'Stephen 5 " Green, William 17 " Reid, Harriett 12 Carlisle Bailey, Roen Barnes, T. C. 5 " Griffin, Adaline 6 Nashville Rager, Adelia 14 " Baird, V. L. Barnes, Porter 5 " Griffin, Frank 6 bl Rumsey, Harriett 13 " Bare, M. A. Brown Duane 6 " Granger, Mary 1 Vermontville Rolf, T. J. 13 Baldwin, E. Brown, John A. 6 " Gehman, Cyrus 3, Roach, J W. 5 Nashville Backus & Soi Brown, Eugene 18 " Gusey, C. 1 Chester Sanders, H. C. 22- Kalamo Barton, Mrs. Buck, Phebe 19 Maple Grove Gusey H. 1, Sanders, Win. 22 " Barton, Lew Bradley, T. M. 36 Ainger Hall, Emily 9& 22 Kalamo Snoke, Daniel 22 " Baughman, ] Benson, Isaac 4 Vermontville Hoffman. John 15 " Shuter, Chas. W. 22 " Beck, C. 12 Barland, Andrew 4 " Horr, Mrs. Eben 27, Showalter, Frances 7 Nashville Benjamin, F. Briggs, Mrs. Abel 2 " Harmon, Lena 35; " Slosson, Cyrus 8 Kalamo Beekman, J. Briggs, Ed. 1 4 Hall, T. 0. 22,, Shepherd, Silas 18 " Bement, Ed Briggs, Alonzo 1 " Hayden, Geo. 22 " Shepherd S. A. 18 Nashville Bentley, C. A Briggs, Carmi 2 " Herring, Chas. 21, Stocking, H. J. 18 " Biglow, C. N Benedict, Chas. 3 & 4 " Holman, C. L. 21, Swift,.E. C. 5 & 19 " Biglow, E. C Bordeaux E. 13 Carlisle Hall, Edward 3 & 10, Smith, Geo. 8. Blake, P. R Brendell, Fred 13 " Hurd, John 18, Sheldon, Edwin 20 Kalamo Bobier, Alon Bromberg, Gus'tef 12 i" Hoover, Parmelia 8,, Sweet, Jay 29 " Bowen, Chas |1Baker, Nathan 12 " Harmon, Hannah 4, Spire, Lyman 30 Ceylon Boroughs, Sa Bartig, Frank 2 & 12 " Hunter, William 4 Vermontville Spire, William 30 " Brace, Geo. I Briggs, Nelson 14 " Hills, Geo. 3," Streeter, Ruth S. 19 Kalamo Brandis, Her Baker, C. E. 17 Kalamo Horton, Henry 4 " Scott, H. A. 29 " Brown, Geo. Baker, W. A. 17 " Hartwell, Frank 17 Nashville Sprague, Lewis 10 " Brunger, Fre Brundige, William 18 " Hire, Royal 13 Carlisle Slout, W. P. 11 Vermontville Brunger, Wn Bowen, D. G. 28, 29 & 32 " Hall, S. 0. 24 " Sears, Millard 12 Carlisle Brunger, Jas Bowen, E. E. 28, 31, 32 & 35 " Hubbard, L. B. 4 Vermontville Stockwell, Evan 3 Vermontville Brunger, Ed SBoyd, Chas. 15 " Harwood. W. H. 25 Carlisle Smith, Henry 14 Kalamo Brunger, Jot S. Baker, E. M. 20 " Imes, Andrew 33 Bellevue Sprague, Mrs. Norman 11 Carlisle Brunger, Ch~ Babcock, Fred 22 Imes, Simeon 33,, Sprague, Bert.11 Kalamo Brunger, T. Braceyes0, Di15onb 3uffn Bracey, 0. D. 15 it Iliff, E. W. 1 Chester Sanders, R. A. 4 " Burns, Garre SBaker, John 33 Johnson, W. P. 34& 35 Kalamo Sanders, S. C. 25... " Case, 0. S. 2 M:B.issefl, Lucy 22 t Johnson, Elizabeth 35 Sweet, Levi 27, Chipman, A. Babcock, Frank 21 Johnson, Burwick 21,, Swift, A. B. 26 " Clay, John 3 Bowen, George 22 Jacobson, John 9 Swift, A. P. 25 & 26 Clayton, Jo In Jacobson, John9 Brace, L. H. 27" Johnson, Henry 5 Nashville Scott, 0. J. 26 3 Clark, J. M. Bowen, Frank 33 64 Kelsey, Minerva 19 Kalamo Shepherd, H. B. 13 Clark, Osbert Barley, Henry 27 46 Kent, Leander 21 & 22, Silverthorn, Mary 13 Cole, Devillo Baker, B. F. 27 " Kelsey, Ira-A. 20,, Slossdn, R. J. 22 " Cole, Byron Clemons, Joel 22 " Lyon, T. J. 25 & 26, Slosson, L. Z. 15,'; Cole Peter, Colton, Luther " Lyon, W. L, 22, Slosson, H. D. 22 " Cole, N. B. 2 SCessna, Lovina 21 " Lydy, Samuel 21. 4 Shuter, Herbert 15. Crist, Elmer Chambers, James 34 " Lindsley, Ira S. 12 Carlisle Shuter, Chas. 16,, Davies, M. A. Cooley, C. D. " Link, Andrew 11,, Sprague, Geo. 9 & 10,,. Dewitt, F. J. Collins, C. O. 10 " Leonard, J. H. 36,, Spendlove, John 16 & 17 " Dewitt, Jona CourtrightJ. W. 23 "4 Morris, M. G. 7-9 Kalamo Smith, Daniel 25 Carlisle Devine, Wzn. Campbell, J. F. Carlisle Mason, William 7-8-16,, Smurr, J. S. 25,, Disbro, R. L. Curtis, Levi 20 Kalamo Mattison, R. G. 19,, Swift, James 25,, Disbro, Melv Cronhnrst, R. E. 10 "4 Mead, Willard 35,, Smith, Daniel 36,, Dingier, Jacc Collins, Elizabeth 16 " Mead, 0. E. 35,, Tarbell, S. C. 16 Kalamo Duboise, Jas. Cole, E. H. 34 4" Mead, 0.W.,, Tomlin, Joseph 17 & 20, Dudley, M. F Cole, Frank 34 " Mead Daniel 34,, Tinker, W. P. 23,, Dunn, Jas. 3 NEIDA TOWNSHIP. Hixon, Nathaniel 5 Grand Ledge y 25 Grand Ledge Hitchcock, Win. 29 " G. 25 " - Howard, John 2 4t S14 " Holmes, Anson 5 '4 hn H. 23 H olmes, Sylvia 28 " org.e 23 " Holcomb, Ira P. 36 3 W. 3 " Hulce, Benij. 14. 11 44 Ives, D. L. 9 ' a 6 " Jerome, Susan 1 4 31 " Jenne, Silas 18 " 29 - " Jenne, 0. S. 13 " 7 " Johnson, James 16 4 n, H11. 33 4 Johnson, W. R. E. 6 " M. 7 ' Jones, J. V. 7 ' is 9 " Jones, A. B. 7. E. 44 Jones, H. L. 4 " " Jones, C. H. 4 " SW. 15 Jones, Chloe 9 " C. 28 " Joslin, Lucius 4, 21 " Joslin, L. M. 4 & 22 " 1. 29 " Judson, L. 21 4 16. -Kebler, Chris 2 4. 16 " Kenyon, D. G. 22. 4 5 " Kelsey, Milo zo 30 " Kelley, J. C. 30 4. 7 "44 Krupp, E. 4 - 'muel 19 4 Lankton, D. E. 36 I. 18 44" Lapareal, Joe 34 6' iry 2 " Lawson, Mrs. E. 3 " H. 1 " Lester John 22 ' 1d 15 " Lewis, John 18 4 n. 21 " Lewis, Lucinda 21 '; 21 4 Lewis, F. C. 10 - ' gar 21 " Lewis, J. H. 10 in 3 " Lumore, Frank 31 i t i s. 27 44 Major, Philip 8 4 R. 27 4" Maskle, John 30 " tt 14 "4 Mascho, N. S. 3 " 4 -- " Maltby, C.-S. 24, 4 H. 35 "-4 MaXQA, Horatio3t 1......Roxana ).. " McMullenE. J. 27 Grand Ledge n 7 " McMullen, Jennie 28 28 McMullen, J. M. 27 4 ' b3 " Merritt, Ed. 6 ' 8 " Miner, Glen 3 4, 7 " Miller, C. I. 4 Est. 15 -,, Miles, Eli 16 44 2 " Mitchell, Fred, 15 20 " Mitchell, Newman 44 24 "4 Mitchell, Andrew, 19 ". 5 " Mitchell, Chas. 19 '4 than 5 M Minnick, Win. 25 4" 14 44 Mitchell, Alfred 28 4" 16 44 Mosher, Ed. 19 "4 in 16 " Moon, Marlan 27 44 )b24 & 13 " Moss, J. K. 3 " 4 15 44 Murray, John 26 4, ' ). 22 "4 Murray, A. J. 26 44 6 44 Newkirk, P. 12; " Cunuingham, William 1 Chester Mast, Benj. 19, Tyler, John 10 & 11, Earl, Carl 29. COsgrove, Fred 32 Ceylon Morris, Chas. 28 " Tomlin, Oliver 21. Earl, B. F,2 Conklin, C. H. 33 " McGinnis, Harvey 22 Treiber, Joh-13 --- - Earl, Estela h" Courtright, John 13 Carlisle Mason, A. Ha. 22, TreiberJohb 13,,.B. EadrlEtiaS t MsnA.H. 22 Treibe rý Jco 13" Els Cooper, C. A. 24 4 Me4rriam,4SS..20&29.. Trowbridge, S. -Di0.. Edwards, Z.1 M Conklin, J. R. 25 ' Means, R. P. 29 & 32 " Townsend, Lovisa 7 & 18 " Edwards. Ja: Conklin, Mary 36 ' Mapes, Ira 31 " Tomlin, John 17, Edwards, Eli Campbell, G. A. 36 Mattison, S. G. 30 Ceylon Tiech, E. E. 18 Nashville - Elkins, Jay 2 Corlew, Clare 24 Martins, John 32 Bellevue Tyler, Edgar 2 Vermontville Elkins, Edw; WCorlew, Frank 24 " Martins, Geo. 32 & 33 " Tyler, Fred 2 " Ewing, J. W Detro Clara 25 '4 Murray, John 30 " Tyler, Edwin 3 Eyestone, Mi Dean, Silas 12 9 Martins, William 30 - Tubbs, E.S. 1 Feess, Micha Day, N. E. 36 ioe Diby, N. E. 36 Ainger McCarty, John 3-10 & 11 Vermontville Tubbs, C. W. 11 Kalamo Feess, Wm. 1 Dibble, L. H. 31 Ceylon Matthes, Louis 12 Carlisle Tubbs, L. P. 11,, Feess, Chas. Dye, Etta 31 " Miller, Gustef 1 " VanDyke, Isaac 18,, Feess, Geo. A Davis, William 7 Nashville Montgomery, Robt. 24 " Vandyke, E. 33 " Feess, Chris. MDonaldson, Mrs. G. 17 " McKinnis, L. 6 & 7 Nashville Van Fleet, Roy 21 Feess, Fred 1 SDonaldson, Gilbert 8 Mix, J. D. 6 " Viemaster, Willard 32 Ceylon Flemming, ~ Dean, Martha 13 Kalamo Merritt, C. C. 7 " Wack, Leander 22 Kalamo Flemming, A Mix Driscoll, D. W. 24 ix, Alhassan 7-8 & 18 " Wilson, W. W. 9, Flemming, A DobsFlemJoingh A SDobson, Joseph 22 " Mix, J. B. 7 " Willis, C. 9 Flemming A T^ Donaldson, Mary 16 " Mix, John D. 7 Wilton, L. W. 16 Figg, Sylvest Daugherty, A. D. 22 ' Mix, Dean 7 " Wilton, A. L. 9 Foster, Ira 1 Dodgson, John 10 & 15 Mattison, Asa 18 Nashville Wilson, Margaret 23 Foster, L. S. Ellis, Sarah 10 & 16 " Myers, Daniel, 18 " Wilson, Mrs. J. 10, Foster, Darw Eaton, John 27 8 Mason, Edward 18 " Wilson, James 10 Fultz, Washi Earl, J. M. 28. McConnell, Sophia 36 Carlisle Weed, Eber 15 Fuller, J. K. Q Ehret, JohB n 20 0 Mead, Willard 35 Kalamo Wilson, Mrs. Geo 33, Fuller, E. H. Ellis, Bernard 10 " McLaughlin, Margarett 13 " Wyble, Geo. 13, Fuller, C.V. SEaton, Angelne 15 " Murch, Mrs. C. D. 24 " Widrig, E. 24 - - GatesGeo. ~ Ellis, F. W. 14 & 23 Nye, P. H. 14 " WVyble,- Martha 14 " Greer Mrs. G Ellis, E. E. 13 " Nye, Mrs. P. H. 14 - 44 Wyble, James 14 Glenn, Cris, Edm1oud~s, Samruel.23 Edmndssamuel 23 " Nash, Edward 8 Nashville Winters, Rebecca, 24, Glenn, Cris, SEhret, Nora 8 6Nashville Nelson, A. K. 22 Kalamo Williams, F. 0. 19, Granger, Mrs Fitch, Genette A. 8 Nelson, William 22 & 27 " Wilcox, W. C. 19., Green Wm. ( SFitch, Dell 8 "4 Ovenshire, Earl 31 Bellevue Wilkinson, S. 8 Griffin, M. M. Fowler, Mrs. J. 17 Kalamo Ovenshire, Bert 31 Kalamo Williamson, S. G. 35, Grove, Fred 1 Fowler, William 17 44 kFowler, William 17 4 ' Oaster, W. B. 32 Bellevue Webber, Otis 15 Guinan, Luk Fowler, Mrs. J. 22 & 21 " Ovenshire, Lafayette 25 Carlisle Webber, J. H. 10 & 15 " Guilford, I. ]S Fowlera, J. M. 22 & 21 " Odell, Mrs. J. L. 35 " Wilson, T. L. 27 " Guilford, Ran Flatham, Bertha 4 Pinnock, Frank 13 " Wilson, J. A. 33 " Hahn, Walte Flatham, Carl 4 - Pinnock, Joseph 23 " Wilson, C. W. 27, " Hayes, Mrs. ] Fowler, J. M. 16 " Porter, D.W. 24 " Wilson, Hancy 27. Hancock, Jo Fitch, Dell 8 Nashville Porter, Chas. 123 " iWilson, Chas. 22,, Hatch, Edwa Fails, G. 0. 36 Carlisle Powers, S. W. 21 Kalamo Wildt, Fred Hazleton, J. Feigchner, Frank 23 " Pease, William 29 Wacck, Albert 23 " Hazleton, Wi Fisher, William 13 " Perry, S. A. 27 - Wright, Win. 3 Vermontville Henry, A. J. SGage, Lafayette 25 Kalamo Perry, Chas. 27 " Worden, William 1 & 2 " Hill, N. W. 1 Gould, Mrs. J. J. Kalamo Perkins, E. J. 28 " Wells, C. K. 2, Hiesrodt, Ma Gridley, Reuben 21, 22 & 28 t Powers, Eugene 11 & 14 Carlisle Wells, E. H. 2 & 3 " Hixn, E.J Gridley, E. H. 21 " Pool, E. H. 6 Nashville Wilson, James 4 " Hixon, Emil: ]| Gridley, Mrs. Hiram 21 & 28 " Parker, J. R. 5 " Wells, Mrs. Eli 8 Nashville Hiion, Levi QH Graves, Carrie 22 " Pope, A. C. 3 Vermontville York, Mrs. John 221 Kalamo Hixon, Myro P4 Grant, Mrs. M. M. 22 " Russell, A. J. 21 & 23 Kalamo Hinmon, Myi ~. ^grge ~~ ~~<~~CC~~ ~~~~S " Newlon, Mrs. R. 15 " ) " Nixon, L. J. 35 "4 22 " Nixon, Ed 35 "4 " Nichols, Martin 36 " E. 27 " Nichols, G. W. 25 4 ne 21 ' Nichols, Truman 25 M mer 4 Nichols, J. P. 36 " I- 5 44 Nottingham, Mrs. 30 " ard 25 " Nocker, Oliver 29 4 t.. 21 4" Nocker, Catharine 29 ". rs. E. E. 26 " Oark, Win. 17 ~4 el 9 44 O'Neil, J. H. 19 "4 6 4t O'Neil, Alice A. 18 "t 16 4 Otto, Jos. 33 & 34 " 4. 16 " Paine, Rowland 33 " 23 "t Patterson, C. A. 16 - 6 & 17 ' Pardee, Lorenzo 30 - " [illiam 30 Parsons, S.L. " lfred 17 " Parmenter, Philander 8 4 It. 17 " Parmenter, Fidelia 8.Ibert 17 Parmentr4 A. 9 " er 19 " Pelton, Wm. 17 4" " Place, Daniel "4 1 4 Powell, J. W. 4 in 20 " Preston, C. M. 25 & 36 ": ngton 6 & 7 Putterhill, Hattie - 4" 13 4. Quale, Ed. 22;' 14 4 Quantrell, A. B. 33 " 23 " Reynolds, L. G. 19 V. 24 4 Reynolds, A. - 4 reo. 30 Reynolds, Enos 14 rr. 35 " Reed, A. J. 14 " Sr. 35 " Rice, Allen 15 ",. S. B. 35 " Richardson, Chas. 30 G. 18 " Rogers, I. P. " 4.26 " Root, E. C. 4 SRoth, Ed. 2) " e 18 " Rosier,- Amos 32 " 1. 21 " Rosier, Russell31 4 isom 21 " Russell, Wmin.. E. 2 4 r 33 4 Russell, Mrs. M. 34 " E. M. 1 &2 2 Russell, J. W. 10 " in 32 " Russell, Fred 10 " rd 29 "4. Russell, J. N. 10 ' E. 18 " Russell, A. C. 3 '4 m. 29 "4 Salter, John 26 " 10 "4 Salter, Martin 23 - 3 " Sanders, Sam'l 5 " rtin 18 -.- Sanders, Geo. 5 - 1I.. Sanders, S. C. 5 Y "4 Salisbury, E. J. 24 44 Schoal, Jacob 25 n 17 " Sharp, Richard 24 " -on 20 - - " - Shultz, F. C. 23 "

Page  10 ^y~w~A EE". --_2 ýS-s S757vsv ho A-UM"'ih, ------------- = 10 #4 ONEIDA TOWNSHIP. Shultz, Henry 23 Grand Sheets, M. B. Sherman, Rant 31 Shepherd, L. H. Skinner, P. Z. 29 Skinner, Rebecca 29 Singer, Geo. Smith, Ira J. 23 Smith, Hiram Smith & Smith 26 Smith, J. G. 28 Smith, Emiline 26 Smith, Angeline 21 Snyder, Geo. W. 13 Standish, Miles 23 Starks, John 19 Strange,. J. S. 34 Strange, Daniel 34 Somerville, Robt. 14 Somerville, Frank Sutherland, Peter 17 Sutherland, 0. 17 Sutherland, Carson, 5 &.8 Sutherland, H. D. 8 Sutherland, Elmer S Sutherland, Elihu 8 Sutherland, Erick 8 Sutherland, W. H. 9 Sutherland, Lyman 4 Tanner, M-. B. 22 Taylor, Eli 17, Taylor, T. V. 13 Thomas, M. V. 32 Tinkham, H. J. 15 Toaz, Mrs. Thos. R. 5 Upright, Barbary 14 Van Alstine, Geo. W. 21 Van Alstine, L. Vanloven, Daniel 18 Vogt, Fred 12 Vorce, Ed. 20 Walsh, John. H. 21 & 22 Wall, Chas. Watson, W. J. Watson, Geo. B. 20 Watson, N. G. 18 Watson, Emer 17 Waldo, D. M. 13 Waldo. Silas 13 Waldo, C. J. 13 Waldron Est. 32 Whitney, Chas. Wilkinson, F. M. 13 Williams, Ellsworth Williams, James 30 Winne, Emma L. 18 Wolpert, Homer 19 Wolpert, C. F. 18 Woods, Frank Woods, Wallace 19 Worden, R. E. 3 Young, Geo. W. 6 ROXAND TOWNSHIP. Allen, Albert 23 H Allen, Geo. 23 Ahlem, J. R. 16 Anderson, Mrs. Rosa 28 Anderson,,.H. 28 Austin, Wallace 21 Austin Estate 3 Allen, J. 21 Alsbro, A. 10 Anderson, Andrew 23 Boyer, D.4W. 22 H Boyer, John 27 Boyer, Asa 22 Boyer, E. 22 Boyer, Peter 22 Boyer, W. 15 Boyer, 0. M. 28 Brown, Zeron|2S Brown, Catharine 29 Beinis, Albian 30 Bemis, Frank 31. Bennett, John 29 Bosworth, Leroy 30 Boyer, Jonas 26 Bishop, R. C. 9 Borton, R. 22 Bailey, Mrs. 10 Bailey, 0. S. 10 Bosworth, William:30 Boyer, Morgan 15 Bennett, William 80 I Bird, Chas. 36 Bosworth Bros. 31 Beekman, B. F. 31 Bins, Chas. 3 M Brown, A. D. 3 Brown, H. M. 8 Brovont, Daniel 7 Barlow, J. E. 3 Barlow, Elias 10 Burroughs, Henry 3 Bailey, Roena 4 Boyer, Mary 3 M Bobier, Milton 23 Bobier, Joshua 25 Bedford, Henry 32 Cramer, Mrs. Emma 2 M Cogswell, Alvin 2 Crane, Oscar 3 Ledge it l, I t ti 4t cc Roxana oytville it Bismark Roxana Bismark [ulliken nulliken Roxana ulliken 4 44 Concrite, Manley Mulliken Ingram, William 3 Cryderman, Chas. 3 " Jones, Harris 3 Cryderman, Frank 3 - " Jones, Almond 3 Crist, Elmer 35 Roxana Jones, Frank 3 Crist, William 35 ". Jackson, E. 25 Carman, G.:H. 36 " Jacobs, J. 36 Cogsdill, Clark 35 Jackson, Mann 8IS Collins, James 36 " Jackson, Chas. 7 Carman, Elizabeth " Jackson, Bert 20 SCaulkins, Malinda 17 Hoytville Johnson, Samuel 5 Collins, Alvira 20 " Keefer, Edward 23 Cole, John S. 22 9 King, Henry 35 Caulkins, Mrs. R. 20 " Kingman, R. T. 36 Codding, William 31 Bismark Luther, Frank 29 Codding, Herbert 19 Hoytville Ludbrook, William 2) Dewey, M. H. 31 " Ludbrook, W. W. 28 Dilley, Irwin 19 " Litchfield, D. C. 29 Dilley, Charlotte 19 " Loucks, Jacob 29 Dilley, John 19,, Loucks, Joran 29 Dilley, Florence 18 Loucks, Geo. 29 Davis, Loyal 15 " Litchfield, W. 28 Davis, J. S. 22, Lundquist, Jacob 20 Davis, V. E. 15,, Lyon, Merritt D. 11 Davis, W. H. 21,. Larabee, Mrs. A. 7 Doyle, John 20, Larabee, Martin 8 Depew, Amos 26 " Lyon, Jamines 17 Doxsie, F. R. 22,' Langtry, Samuel 8 Dutcher, David 13. Laign, Mrs. H. 7 Dravenstrat, Mrs. 3 Mulliken Ludbrook, Sanford 3 Davis, Walter H. 3 " Lawrence, Albert 3 David. Chas. 3 " Lyon, Mrs. Sarah 3. Dunham, Chas. 6 " Lockrew, Sarah 36 Dickinson, H. S. 8 " McCausey, Chas. 4 Doolittle, John 3 " Marsh, W R. 3 Dunham, J. WV. 8 3 Merritt, Edward 3 Dilley, Josiah 6 " Morris, A. T. 3 Doolittle, Chas. 10 " Morris, Floy 3 Davis, Edwin 36 * Roxana Mann, Elmer 2 Davis, Henry 35 '. Merritt, Frank 24 Depew, Amos 26 ' Morris, J. C. 3 Depew, Mary A. 24 " Morey, Jno. 1 Depew, David 23 " Mer-itt, E. A. 2-2 Depew, Mrs. Sarah 21 " Mead, E. 14 Ewing, H. H. C. 28 Hoytville Mead, Grant 14 Edgel, Henry 30 ' Mead, Electa 14 Edgel, Sylvestar 22 " Mead, C. 14 Eastman, Hiram 1 Mulliken Mead, Irvin 14 Elsworth, A. E. 8 " Matice, L. R. 11 Eastman, Hiram " Mead, Harvey 14 Eddy, Wallace 36, Roxana Matice Herbert 12 Edmond, Mrs. Lucy 32 "4 Markham, Herbert 27 Fuller, Chas. 35. Miller, Elisha 21 Ferris, Edward 32 " Moody, H. A. 16 Freeman, J. T. 32 Hoytville Moody, S. 16 Freeman, E. 32 "' Moody, H. 16 Fitch, A. W. 1 Mulliken Mead, James 12-14 Feightner, W. Sr. 3 " Markham, Albert 27 Fisher, L. D. 3 "5 Mead, Ezra 15 Feasle, W. E..5 " Moon, Spencer 25 Gardner, Anna 2 " Moon, Francis 24 Gardner, Mrs. A. 3 " * Moyer, Cleon A. 34 * Gardner, Chas. 3 "5 McCargar, Chas. 34 Gardner, S. R., Est. 9 & 10 " McCargar, D. J. 35 Graves, Chas. 3 "., Miller, Olive 36 " Gates, 0. A. 5.'. Moyer, T. E. 33 Gates, E. R. 6 '" Moyer, Leon 32 Gardner, John 5 55 Miller, Geo. 30 Grinnell, Mary E. 19 Hoytville Mead, William 23 Gould, William 29 " Metzear, Jacob 7.. Green, Chas. 20 "4 Myers, Silas 31 Green, C. F. 22 " Merrifield, Geo. 5 Granger, H. 16 " Miller, Mrs. Mary 5 Green, William 13 " Newark, James 33 SGreen, Geo. 13 5 Nickle, Sabina 10 Gregg, B. H. 7 Sunfield Newark, A. W. 26 SGranger, F. 31 Bismark Nickle, J. B. 10 - Hutchings, Martha 31 " Nickle, Sam 10 Haddix. Bisop 33 Roxana Noaker, Calvin 36 SHelm, D. V. 35 " Osman, Henry 3 Hilliker, Dan'l 12 Grand Ledge O'Neil, William 10 SHilliker, Geo. 12 ". O'Neil, Henry 14 Hazelton, J. S. 24 " O'Neil, Mrs. C. 14 Hazelton, William 24 " Osman, William 11 Hazelton, Chas. 24 " Ovit, Alexander 23 Hisrotte, Martin 13 " O'Neil, J. V. 25 SHorner, E. 4 & 6 Mulliken Parker, Alfred 18 Hatch, H. H. 5 " Parker, Jerry 17 Hart, S. F. 3 " Parker, John 17 - Hill, J. J. 3 " Potter, M. 17 Hovey, John 3 " Potter, John 17 Hale, John 3,' Pumphrey, Burton 30 Hay, Elmer 3 ', Parker, Rufus 12 Halenbeck, David 3, Parker, R. J. 23 Halenbeck, Mrs. Lucy 3 " Fitter, Edgar 17 Hagerman, Benj. 9 " Parker, John H. 16 Hart, Austin 2 Parker, A. L. 3 Hagerman, Sam 3 " Peabody, S. 4 & 14i Humphrey, John 21 " Peabody, Hiram 4 & 14 Hart, S. F. 2, Plumb, Frank 3 Haddix, Edland 33 Hoytvilie Potter, Geo. E. 3 Houghton, Oscar|33 " Peabody, Albert 5 Hunt, A. E. 10 & 15 " Partlow, William 3 Halliday, Harlow 16 " Pugh, Frank 31 " Hedge, S. C. 15 " Preston, Ambrose 36 Howell, Wmn. 15 " Quackenboss, Calvin 16 Haddix, John 32 " Root, Mrs. Elsie 25 Hale, R. R. 32 " Rix, Geo. 35 Horton, Lemuel 32 " Rix, Robert 35 Halladay, Mrs. S. 9 " Rix, E. H. 25 Halladay, Harlow 9 " Rice, E. 34 Hisrotte, C. M. 13 " Rice, Mabel 35 Hoag, L. W. 27 " Rice, Ernest 26 Hidlix, William 23 " Rimmell, D. D. 28 Hoytville Mulliken Roxana Hoytviile Roxana Mulliken Roxana Mulliken i 5.loytville.: 55 Roxana 5'.Hoytville. Sunfield... Bismark SMulliken.t / Hoytville 55 Roxana Mulliken Hoytville 5' '5 Mulliken 55 Roxana Hoytville Roxana Hoyville Hotiil Randall, Allen 13 Parker, John 11 Randall, Chas. 3 Root, Win. 34 Randall, William 18 Randall, Chas. 12 Randall, Frank 7 Randall, W. 7 Rimmel, Geo. 23 Reed, D. W. 14 Reed, Rily 4 Reynolds, N. Estate of 4 Reynolds, N. H. 4 Roland, Orin 12 Skinkle, Mrs. C. 10 Sowles, Mrs. May 4 Sowles, Bert 3 Sterns, Henry 10 Sterns, M. 3 Spencer, Henry 3 Starks, Northrop 9 Smith, Eugene 3 Smith, Frank 3 Spore, Jacob 11 Starkweather, S. 14 Sturdivant, Estate of 21 Smock, Elmer 6 Smock, Thomas 6 Sowles, Norman 5 Sanborn, B. F. 3 Stokes, David 3 Southworth, Geo. 3 Strong, C. W. 21 Stevens, Nancy 22 Stall, Jessie 16 Savage, Abramn 15 Savage, A. 3 Snyder, James 29 Sevalt, Geo. 30 Stretch, Hattie 15 Spaulding, Mary 9 Spaulding, William 18 Spaulding, John 18 Shance, Fred 15 Sayer, John 6 Sheets, John 26 Sulivan, G. W. 36 Starkweather Owen 35 Thompson, Samsie 3. Triphagan, Geo. 4 Trim, Mrs. Perry 3 Thomas, Lewis 3 Thomas, Nettle 9 Triphagan, John 3 Triphagan, S. V. It Tubbs, D J. 20 Thomas, Sanford 21 Taylor, James 23 Taylor, Mrs. L. 3 Tubbs, John 20 Vannortwick, J. J. 29 Vannortwick, Geo. 16 Vale, Laura 20 Vader, Jerry, 22 Vannortwick, C. 15 Vanhoutan, John 18 Vanhoutan, F. E. 18 Vickery, Thomas 27 Wallington, C. 2 Wright, Henry 1 Wilcox, L. H. 32 Wells, Mrs. 36 Woolcut, W. 36 Wells, Mary 36 Waterman, Mrs. M. 35 Wilcut, J. J. 19 Warren, Geo. 10 West, Frank -15 Whelpley, F. A. 8 Wheeler, Jerome 29 Wheeler, Hiram 29 Wanser, William 20 Williams, James 311 Wilcut, Jesse 19 Woolpert, Caleb 13 Woolpert, Fred 11 Wakely, Nathan 26 Whelpley, R. I. 16 William, Martha 6 Wise, Anna 31 Wilcox, L. H. 3 Whelpley, B. I. 3 Whelpley, Ida 3 Wing, James 4 Watkins, William 3 Williams, James 3 Webster, C. A. 11 Wellman, C. R. 1 Williams, E. 11 Webster, Chas. 3 Hoytville Mulliken Hoytville Mulliken Grand Ledge. Mulliken Mulliken IHoytville Roxana Mulliken 55 Hoytvilie n 55 '5 Mulliken Roxana Hoytville Roxana Hoytville Mulliken Sunfield Bismark Mulliken, t 55 Barber, E. D. Barber, Daniel Bailey, Frank J. Benedict, William H. Benedict, Fred B. Benedict, Asa Benedict, Geo. Bronson, Myron Barningham, John M. Bodine, Mrs. Emma Briggs, Ellen Briggs, Alfred N. Barnard, David Brown, Sarah A. Benton, Geo. A. Chilson, N. C. Cunningham, N. J. Cross, Mrs. Ellen Cross, Henry E. Cross, 1M.D. - Cross, Arthur' Cross, Herbert G. Collins, W. D. Collins, C. C. Cherry, Chas. Campbell, N. Campbell, Thomas Curtis, Mrs. M. R. Curtis, H. L. Dunlap, Mrs. L. A. Dickinson, Mrs. W. H. Dickinson, H. S. Dickinson, Naomi Downing, J. C. Dikeman, M. W. Dormian, Chas. Fleming, James Fay, 0. P. Finley, D. R. Fleming, James Finley, Joseph Fuller, S. A. French, Mrs. E. A. Gunn, Charlotte E. Green, Dr. P. L. Griswold, Mary B. Griswold, William N. Griswold, Isaac S. Gunn, Robert Hawkins, Don J. Hawkins, A. G. Hawkins, G. W. Hawkins, L. B. Hull, Frank B. Hull, Chas. Hall, Sylvester Hall, H. W. Hall, Mrs. Ellen Hall, Chas. D. Hickey.& Mahar Hickey, William Imes, John Imes, W. E. Irving, H. D. Johnson, William G. Jones, Mrs. V. B. - Jordan, Mrs. A. L. Kelley, Frank W. Kelley, A. J., Kelley, Barney Knowles, F. A. Kidder, Ames Knapp, Mrs. Ezra Kroger, C. J. Loomis, Mrs. S. P. Lake, A. D. Lentz, Mrs. Fred Lackey, J. A. Lee, Mrs. H. W. Lamb, Geo. J. McColter, Mrs. Simeon Morey, G. B. McConnell, Geo. McConnell, Olvier Mead, 0. 0. Martin, Mrs. M. J. Martin, H. J. Mears, Eugene Marble, Calvin Norris, W. K. Norton, H. M. Pullman, Leroy Pullman, Diana Parmenter, Dr. William Porter, Mrs. Cornelia Porter, E. W. Pierce, Mrs. James Park, Chas. Parke, M. H. Paine, Mrs. F. A. Paine, A. B. Pendill, Fred Pendill, Ellen Purchis, D. M. Purchis, L. A. Paul, William A. Purchase, Mrs. L. A. Rawson, Edgar Rawson & Lake Randall, A. P. Rhodes, John L. Rickle, Joseph Smith, Harley I VILLAkGE OF VERMONTYILLE. Ambrose, C. M. Ambrose, F. F. Allen, D. W. Allen, Spencer G. Alderman, Lydia Alderman, A. Andrews, L. V. Brooks, John Brooks, Lewis Boardman, Ed C. Barrett, Hugh Barber, Homer G. n:ý -.ý 5ý JENF-mm ý -ý 3EW Mm MW Amw ý

Page  11 ý> ý ý X2tx]v,,2;x3ý j~j~ VILLAGE OF WEiRMONTYILLE. Spracrue, Argalus Stone, J. B. Smith, H. J. Stiles, M. L. Scott, Mrs. Christena Snell, Dr. C. S. Slout, William Stebbins, 0. G. Stebbins, Mrs. F. Sackett, James Sackett, William Sherman, A. M. Sherman, J. C. & Son Sheriff, Frank Satterlee, J. H. Tubbs, E. F. Tracey, Mrs. E. Tyler, Edwin Whitehearse, Samuel Walworth, Mrs. H. Wood, J. J. Williams, J.,B. Whaling, Eugene Watson, James T. York, John R. Yates, N. A. Young, David Zemke, Herman VERIIMONTVLILLi; TOWNSHIP. Averill, Edward 24 Vermor Bissell, A. S. s18 Benedict, Asa 19 Baker, Seymour 19 Barber, E. -W. 8 Brigham, E. W. 19 Nas Brigham, Allie 19 Briggs, James 34 Vermor Benedict, Libeus36 Bell, Montgomery 36 Barrett, Margaret 15 Beck, Joseph 23 Buehler, Albert 15 Boyer, Adam 14 Barnes, N. R. 32 Brown, H. H. 8 Baker, E. J. 5 Beck, Joseph 23 Baker, Wm. C. 25 0C Briggs, Ira 36 Brown, F. C. 18 Nas C -apo, Asa T. 20 Vermoi Chance, Robert 17 Chance, Eliza 18 Compton, C. I. 20 Childs, Jas. H. 17 Carey, Eugene 25 Carey, Geo. W. 2 Campbell, Wm. 10 Campbell, N. 10 Campbell, E. 4 Cole, A. K. 11 Corey, Sidney B. 16 Childs, Wm. 4 Childs, J. H. 4 Childs, John J. 4 Cross, Joseph 32 Curtis, Leonard 32 Carter, John 31 Nas Darrow, Russell 29 Downing, Manly 18 Denton, A. P. 19 Deer, Mrs. Joseph 21 Vermor Davis, Walter 23 Davis, Mrs. Jonas 23 Dwight, Geo. C. 15 Dikeman, Hollois 1 Diehl, Jeremiah 2 Dunbar, Geo. W. 2 * Dwight, C. H. 11 Dickinson. H. S. 17 Dooling, P. 5 Dooling, Jerry 5 Dooling, Andrew 5 Davis, John 36 C Elsworth, J. B. 3 Vermor Eitel, John 23 Farr, Chas. 35 Farr, Walter A. 35 Foote, Clark 35 Fuller, C. F. 31 French, Warren 34 Fowler, Mrs. C. 1 Farrah, Daniel 2 Fox, Perry 23 Falconer, Eleanor 18 Fashbaugh, E. P. 18 Ferris, William 7 Fuller, C. F. 23 Faust, Barna 35 Freemire, Harrison 6 Grant, Hiram 10 Gates, Austin 11 Gearbart, John S. 19 Griner, P. K. 27 Green, J. L. 13 Green, A. 0. 12 Gardiner, John 18 Grohe, F. W. 6 Nas Granger, Geo. 36 C Gunn, Orlando 14 Vermoi Ilawking, Harvey 3 Hawkins, Jay 3 ttville i. '6 hville itville 66 hester ihville itville 66 ft.hville itrille.6 6' hester itville t6;hville hlester ntville Hay, Frank, 19 Hay. Adam 18 Hyde, Mrs. H. W. Hollenbeck, C. C. 23 Hollenbeck, C. A. 23 Hawkins, Duane 22 Herrick, M. J. 22 Hawkins, Horace 16 Haner, Henry 15 Haner, Rufus 13 Harroune, Geo. B. 16 IHouse, Nelson 35 Hickery, Joseph 6 Hickery, Daniel 6 Hickery, Richard 5 Hickery, William 7 Hager, Harmon C. 9 Ha-er, SylviaJ. 9 Haight, Fannie 3. Haight, Albert 3 Howell, Amanda 31 House, Chauncey 31 Imes, W. E. 20 Jarrett, Ezra 11 IKroger, C. J. 20 Kidder, E. L. 2 Kirby, Robert 32 Kirby, Reuben 23 Ken-worthy, Geo. 9 Lennedy, Talma 30 Lake, B. B. 11 Eake, John A. 32 Lake, Alonzo 2 Lynch, M. 7 Lute, John 34 Loomis, R. A. H. 4 Lemmon, A. B. 25 McGee, S. A. 11 Marks, John 1 McIntyre, John E. 25 Mears, Eugene W. 27 Moore, Chas. Moore, Ed. Mahar. Micheal 7 Mahar, Mrs. John 8 Mowrey, Jacob 8 Muir, Robert 33 Marsh, Levi 34 Morehouse, W. 3 Mull, David 10 Merritt, Mrs. Warren 3 Merritt, John 3 Maxson, W. D. 31 Mix, Joseph 31 McDowell, Chas. 1 McLaughlin, Devill 36 Norton, I. C. 13 Nesmond, Andrew 33 Naglc, Walter 26 Parker, W. J. 27 Perkins, M. D. I8 Purchis, D. M. 20 Purchis. Mrs. L. A. 19 Pendill, J. E. 2) Polmatus, Edward 18 Patterson, Lee 9 Patterson, Hollis Y. 8 Pember, Charity 2 Palmeter, Joseph 18 Quance, Thomas 6 Quance, Geo. 29 Rawson, John 4 Rawson, E W. 5 Rawson, B. F. 5 Remalie, John 10 Reynolds, Silas 34 Riley, Thomas 19 Rogers, Susan 17 Russell, Hiram 30 Rawson, Zera 18 Rawson, Ered E. 18 Reinalie, Jesse 13 Snyder, A. S. 7 Surine, Horace 6 Stevens, John V. 24 Sprague, Ernest 14 Sibbrel, Edward 23 Sprague, Reuben 10 Stevens, G. R. 3 Scott, Geo. H. 16 Sprague, Mason C. 12 Sprague, E. J. 14 Sprague, Wm. H. 12 Spitzer, Ed 1 Stuver, E. J. 18 Sprague, Fred P. 10 Suivley, Win. 9 Smith, Artemrnus 19: Shepherd, Samuel 18 Surine, Emmet 7 Surine, W. E. 7 Schroder, John 4. Surine, Alfred 17 Stine, Win, M. 32 Smith. LeviS. 31 Sprague, P. 32 Sherman, R. E. 32 Srhram, Warren 32 Town, F. W. 2 Tarbell, Wmn. A. 29 Taylor, James 18. Trim, Amanda 4 Tobin, John 5 Vermontvilie 6h l '6 66 Nashville Vermontville 6. 66 Nashville Vermontviile.Chester Vermontville i. tt ti tl. iemo t ill Thayer, D. L. 35 Thompson, W. 24 Viele, Chas. 11 VanVleet, William 3 Wells, Ed. M. 3 Waite, W. A. 31 Williams, A. R. 30 Williams, E. D. 30 Wyble, William 36 Well, William A.4 Well,-Fred I. 5 Weaver, Eugene 18 Wetherbee, S. L. '2 Wells, Perry B. 35 Wells, Clark E. 34 Walker, William 6 Ward, Mrs. Lockwood 22 Zeminke, Mrs. Mary 23 Young, William 3;sUNFIEi,D TOWNSHIP. Allen, Robert 21 Allen, Wm. 15 Allen, Fred 23 Aungst, Daniel 2 Ballon, Abner 31 Vern i Bowser, Stephen 31 Baker, J. C. 31 Bishop,:Chas. 24 Bishop, A. B. 13 Bishop, Wm. 14 Bennett, Amos 25 Bishop, Deloss 13, 23 & 24 Bosworth, Mrs. J. E. 25 Barnum, Wm. 24 Barnum, Chas. 24 Bosworth, Fred 25 Barden, Allen 36 Bascom, E. M. 36 Barnes, G. D. 26 Bark, Aaron 25 Barnum, Wash. 25 & 26 Bale, Gideon, 25 & 26 Bennett, Wm. 25 Bowser, Stephen 30 Bennett, C. A. -30 Bennett, Daniel 18 Baker, Elmer 30 Boston, James Bottomley, Lee Bera, E. D. Bera, Warner Bera, J. H. Barnes, Mrs. 0. L. 11 Berman, J. D. Bliss, S. P. 3 Boyer, Wm. 3 Burns, Tompson Bair, Wm. 10 Burns, Mrs. A. P. Brecker, W. F. Brown, C. H. 6 Brown, Clarence 6 Bateman, H. H. 6 Bennett, J. D. 15 Baisel, Susan Barden, Allen 22 Barden, John 22 Baughman, H. H. 23 Benedict, E. 27 Boiles, James 32 Brown, S. H. 17-18 Brown, Chas. 21 Babcock, H. 17 Bishop, John 14 Brailey, Oliver 11 Beal, John 11 Bosworth, Mrs. 0. S. 36.Bosworth, Fred 36 & 25 Bosworth, Frank 36 Bennett 18 Beckhorn, Daniel 8 Barnes, H. 11 Briggs, John Barnes, Hiram Bowers, Magagie 11 Childs, J. A, Collier, Fred 3 Collier, Edd Collier, Chas. 3 Cogswell, Frank 3 Childs, Joseph 3-4 Collier, Geo. 10 Cheetham, Geo. Childs, John 33 Clark, Floyd 27 Cramer, Mrs. C. 23 Chipps, Win. 31 Cure, James I Crane, J. W. 14 Cure, Amos 1 Carry, J. W. Cheal, Jim 14 Cirpenter, Chas. 14 C.ietliham, G. H. 19-2) - Childs, C. S. 2D Casner, T. B. 14 Chamlin, T. S. Cooley, Mrs. WFm. 7 Clark, Elmer Curtis, W. D. 33 Curtis, Webster 26 Clem. Abram 26-95 Chatfiild Peter 35 I I W I Verl Vern montville Carter, Mrs. 36 S'. Childs, A. D. 35 6,' Cook, Frank 32 "6 Conrad, Geo. 7.t Chatfield, Henry 34 NTashville Curtis, WY. D. 34 6 Cobb, H. H. 7 " Clark, F. Chester Case, Wm. 0. 13 nontville Coy, Henry 36,' Doud, S. C. 18,. Dell, Adam 7 ', Dow, J. C. 24,, Dilley, Robert 12 S. Davis, Margaret 3,, Dunham, John,, Deatsman, D. H. 2,, Day, J. E. 11,, Darrow, J. H. 11 Dickinson, A. L. 36 Sunfield. Davis. Wm. 12,, Davis, A. J. 11 Bismark Dickinson Geo. 20 Sunfield Downs, Amos 21 nontville Downs, R. M. 16 Dellwood Dewel, Jerome 27.. Downing, A. J. 28 Sunfield Dewel, Orlando 27,, Dewel, Nancy 27,, Eckard, Win. 10,, Eldred, John S., Edwins, Wm. 8-,, Fremyre, W. L. 34,, Flewelling, Mrs. J. 35 ', Fay, W. C. 19-20-36,' Fast, J. A. 29 Bismark Fenchar, Louis 6, Fendar, Van 28,, Frantz, Nichols 27, Fremyer, W. L. 34,, Frantz, Benj. 34,, Frantz, Chris 16 Sunfield Frantz, Mose 16 )ellwood Fiog, Alex. 12,, Fleetham, Joseph 1 'oodbury Fleetham, Edd. 1 )ellwood Day, J. E. 11 Sunfield -; Figg.E.e..a.... -.,' Fender, Pete '11-,, Figg, Stephen 1 66 Freese, Geo. ft t Sunfield Bismark Dellwood Sunfield Wo~odbjty> Sunfield Bislnark Woodbury Sunfleld - Sunfield ti Bismark Sunfield Woodb ury Sunfield Bismark i6 Fields, A. J. 3 Frantz, Wm. 23 Frantz, Frank Fryfogle, B. 15 Frith, Wm. 13 Fishel, J. L. 21 Fessman, Win. 20 Fremyre Bros. 34 Guy, Hezekiah 19 & 30 Grant, Isaac 30 Garringer, J. S. 30 Gorham, Dan 21 Garringer, E. L. 32 Gow, D. M. 9 Griffin. J. P. 12 Gross, Henry 6 Gregg, Geo. 12 Gorham, Wm. 21 Gleason, Amanda 36 Gray, James 5 Gray;- Matt 46 Guyi: Jessie:8 Hodcg-kins, M. S. Hammnond, J. H. Hulet Bros. Hart, Henry Hartwell, Ira Hoover, John 22 Hyde, John 15 Hough, Geo. Hildinger, G. V. 7 Hildinger, Jacob Hunt, Edwin 5 Haskins, C. 51. 6 Hager, Milton 4 Hager, Joseph 9 Hale, Sin 18 Hough, Geo. 13 Hawkins, H. Hammond, W. R. 22 Hill, Wm. 19 Hood, Geo. 31 Hlarshey, John 17 Hitt, Geo. 30 Hager, Orson 309 Hecker, Chet. 30 Hammond, Elmer 27 Hammond, Marques 27 Hills, John 28 Hunter, Thos. 33 & 28 Hammond, Wm. R. 32 Harris, Martin 29 Hager, D. A. 28 Hatger, Wmn. 16-17 Hunter, H. S. 2.) Hunter, J. K. 20 Hunter, Allie21 Hunter, Mrs. Jas. 23 Hobbs, Hannah 1 Hay, Geo. 6 Horn, Mrs. Jacob 6 Homes, W. S. Bismark Vermontville Woodbury Vermontville Sunfield Bismark Sunfield Woodbury Hoytville Sunfleld Bismark Sunfield Ilismark 44 Woodbury Sunfield Woodbury Bismark,, Deliwood Woodbury Sunfield Vermontville Bismark Sunfield Sunfield Vermontville Woodbury Deliwood Bismark Dellwood Sunfleld Woodbury Sunfield Bismark Woodbury Sunfield 64 Woodbury Bismark Sunfield Deliwood 44 Woodbury Vermon trille Woodbury Woodland Dellwood Vermon tville Roxana -Bismark Dellwood Suntield Roan Dellwood Sunfleld Woodbury Sunfield Woodbury Vemntil Wodbr Holton, Geo. 27 Ives, Newton 16 Jackson, Chas. James, Geo. James, Jesse 6 Jackson, Chas 12 Jackson, Geo. 13 Jones, 'V. A 8S Jones, Mrs. 8 Jacokes, Leonard 21 Knapp, Eugene Kent, P. 11M. Kearcher, Geo. Knapp, D. W. Knapp, Henry Knapp, Homer Knapp, Mrs. Frank Kramer, Mrs. A. 9 Kramer, A. 4 King, W. R. Kenworthy, W. M. 33 Kinnie, E. H. 33 Kidd, Frank 1 Kent, Wm. P. 2 Krebbs, Wesley 5 & 8 Kimmel, Amos 6 Lozier, T. W. 23 Lyon, W, A. 23 Lamb, Geo. Jr. 20 Laird, Mrs. S. 24 Lovell, L. D. 32 Lowe, E. W. 26 Lusk, G. WV. 1 Litchfield, D. 11 Leigh, S. M. 21 Legge J& Jenkins Lenhart, Burt Lenhart, Frank Lenhart, Otis Lapo, J. H. Lacey, Michael 2 Laird, Wm. 6 Lapo, Chas. 6 Laird, H. M. 6 Laird, Chas. 7 Lowe, E. W. 26-35 Lemmon, L. G. Lemmon, J. M. L. 26 Leigh, F. H. 5 Leigh, C. W. 5 Lumbart, Mrs. 5 Mallory, Mrs. J. D. 18 Mclntyer, Ed 36 Middaugh, Ben 16 Meyers, Daniel 11 Meyers, V. 3 Meyers, Handly Meyers, H. U. McGuyre, Chas. Magden, Frank 16 Magden, Henry 16 Mathews, T. C. 14 Mead, John 6 Morgan, Henry Moore,- David 26 McNabb, J. 35 McWhorter, B. 0. 24 Miller, Fred 7 Mason, Geo. 17 Moore, Mont 25 Middaugh, Martin 6 Morfrod, A. B. Nichols, F. 1M. Neff, H. 3 & 10 Nead, John 7 & 8 Neff, Erwin 34 Nead, Mary 9 Nead, James 9 Park, Jrrie 33 Preston, D. R. 2t Potiry, Horace 27 Phillips, James 27 Phillips, Ira 27 Perkins, Josiah 9-16 Perkins, S. W. 9-8 Perkins, N. 9 Pratt, Geo. 23'. Phillips, Norm 23 Pratt, Thos. 22 Potter, Wm. H. 22 Prescott, Andrew 27 Oster, Henry 34 Orser, H. P. Pifer, Jacob 12 Peck, J. L. 1 Park, Wm. 9 Park, John 9 & 2 Putnam, H. 0. 4 & 9 Palmer, Cassius 5 Putnam, C. M. 9 Peling, Ransler Peabody, Fred Peabody, J. B. Peabody, Lemon,, Poole, Mirs. M. A. Palmer, John H. Rawson, John 33 Richards, Harry Repto, Henry 31 Rogers, J. H. 18-19 Roberts, Frank 18 - Rairigle, John 19 Rafler, John 18 Dellwood Sunfield Wood bury Sunfield Woodbury Sunfield Dellwood Bismark Sunfleld b. "^ Dellwood Lake Odessa Sunfield Deltwood Sunfield Woodbury Woodbury Bismark "^ Woodbury Sunfield Bismark Sunfield 66 ^ -66^ Woodbury Bismark Sunfield Sunfield W0~d~bury Bismak ^ Sunfield Dellwood.ury Bismak Sunfleld Dellwood Bismark Dellwood Bismark Sunfield Bismark 6c Sunfield - Sunfield Vermontville Sunfield Woodbury Woodland ^ mpir mrv ý - jivw - 142~6 1 4 a

Page  12 Ely 12 SUNFIELD TOWNSHIP. Rawson, A. M. 21 Bismark Rulison, Wm. 33 " _ Rawson, John 32 Vermontville Rawson, Frank 82 3 Reeder, Ben 1 Sunfield Richards, Clark 11 " Richards, Mary 1 " Reed, Lyman " Reed, Win. 11 " Rumfield, Mrs. E. 2 Rawson, S. A. 14 " Rosenfelter, Jacob 31 Vermontville Reese, Mahlon -Sunfield Roland, Alvina 18 Woodbury Rupe, John 8 Sunfield Roberts, Frank 18 Richards, Geo. 2-11 " Richards, Frank " Richards, LeRoy * Roginson, Wm. " Ramsey, Mrs. S. 4, Ramsey Bros. Ramsey, W. J. Richardson, Win. E. Ruff, Samuel 23 Seitz, Geo. 34 - Bisruark Switzer, M. 18 i Swick, Geo. 24 *Dellwood Stry, Rev. Wm. 25 Bismark Sackett, S. M. 26 " Sinclair, H. 35 26 6 Smith, David, 6:-Woodbury Smith, Geo. 6 " Shelter, John 5 ". Shelter, John, Jr. 5. Shaver, Joseph 8 " Stuck, Daniel 4 Sunfield Signs, G. W. 5 Woodbury Shaver, Wm I1 Sunfield Spencer, T. J. 2 " Smock, John 12 ". Smith, Jacob 14 6 Steves, Chas. 23 * Shaffer, David 22 " Sanford, Mrs. M. 15 " Shamblin, T. 6 " Stetsick, J - W. 6 Sprague. C. P. 8 * Saxton, Wm. 14 " Sprague, 0. G. Woodbury Stinchcomb, M. Sunfield Snyder, J. L. ".Smith, Sol. 27 Bismark Stinchcomb, T. E Sunfield Stinchcomb, David " Snyder, C. N. "t Smith, Mrs. E. 66 Stout, Henry ",6 Snyder, E. M. *6 Stinchcomb, Asa "6 Shaver, Hugh "* Sprague, Fred 10 " Stember, Jacob 66 Smith, Geo. 10 ' Sperry, L. 66 Shelter, J. H. 6 Woodbury Shelter, Sylvester 6 " Smith, Daniel 6 Smith, Mrs. J. 6 Scheel, Geo. 6 " ShafferCyrus 21 Sunfield Sackett, N. 13 " Smart, C. C. Est. 24 Sackett, Win. 13 " Sherard, Jim Space, H. H. 4. Trobridge, Ira 15 Sunfield Town. C. ~N. 23 " Town, Mrs. S. A. 23 Tomlinson, J. 15 & 22 Teal, Henry 16 " Thorp, Geo. 11 & 14 Town, J. N. " Torpy, W. J. 4- Woodbury Trumour, Peter 6 " Taylor, Edwin 11 Sunfield Turner, T. P. 27 & 34 " Traister, Caleb 29 Dellwood Trim, Amanda Sunfield Turner, W. R. 10 " Thurston, Ozar " Tickner, Geo. "4 Truman,"G. A. 15 " Vanhouton, H. 6 Woodbury Vanande, W. E. Sunfield Vahouton, C. M. 24 Vance, J. H. 29 "6 Van Buren, T. B. 28 " Vanuvleet, Win. 27 Velie, John 34 " West, D. E. 4 " Wager, H, R. Wilson, John " Walch, Tom Wilson, L, 0. Weaver, Sam " Wright, Chas. Wool, John Woolcott, John " Wells, John 35 Bisinmark Waltch Mirs. Th)mis 24, 26 &34 " Welch, P. J. 25 Sunfield Wilcot, Mrs. Sophia 26 Wise, S. A. 30 Winters, Ella 18 Wicks, Schuyler 29 Wells, Win. A. 33 Wright, Mary A. 28 Wright, Geo. B. 28 Wright, Mrs. J. D. 33 Wright, L. B. 29 Witheral, W. R. 14 Wescott, M. W. 23 Weeks, M. S. 22 Woolet, Geo. 9 Wells, W. R. Welch, Rachel Willer, B. F. Wells, Chas. 11 Welch, John 23 Winters, John 11 York, R. J. Bismark Dellwood Woodbury Dellwood Vermontville Dellwood Sunfield Sun-field 11 it VILLAGE OF OLIVET. Allen, Mrs. S. P. Barrovws, John M. Estate of Barrus, Giles J. Beecher, Chas. Blanchard, Mary A. Bianchard, Geo. Blanchard, Flora Blanchard, N. S. Bosworth, F. M. Bracey, Guy Brownson, F. W. Burroughs, Susan Carver, James A. Chapman, Ed Clark, Albert Corts, Chas. R. Cook, Peter V. Cone, Margaret J. Corey, E. B. Demott, Clarence Daniels, Prof. Joseph L. Davis, Randolph Davis, Henry R. Derringer, Robert Dowler, Mrs. Mark Dickson, Prof. Chas. Dewey. Mary Darringer, Orrin Ely, E. N. Ellis, Prof. Geo. N. Emmerson, William Estabrook, Mrs. Eva Edwards, Jesse Ely, Fred N. Follett,:B-enj. Estate of French, E. K. Fuller, H. Farlin, WNm. Gage, Fritz H. Galusha, Geo. Griffin, John Getty, Pamela Gilbert, Whitney Goodwin, Henry Estate of Goodrich, Darius Green, Cyntha Green, H. E. Green, A. P. Hadden, Smith Halstead, Jonas A. Hance, I. A. Hart, D. M. Herrick, Henry Harrington, Jas. Hickok, Georgia E. Horn, Geo. W. Hosford, Oramel Estate of Horn, Benj. Herrick, Martha Insley, William G. Kedzie, Ella N. Keeney, Champlin Keyes, K. D. Knapp, Prof. Geo. A: Kellogog, Prof. J. L. King, Prof. Hamilton Knox, Henry E. Knox, Fred L. Knox, Daniel Kester, Hannah Laughbaugh, Augusta Lee, Albert L. Lockett, Win. Mead, Dr. Chas. H. Mack, Marilla Mapes, S. W. Martin, Mrs. E. C. Martin, I. E. McDonald, Henry Mills, Elvira L. Montague, Chas. Moses, Geo. Montgomery, Prof. Stewart Morton, Emmna E. McDonald, Elmer Nettleton, Emeline Nash, Polly Norton, E.,F. Niles, Mrs. N. J. Pinch, B. W. Pinch, Fannie Peters, Warren'S. Peters, Truman Prosser, Thomas Prosser, Mrs. L. D. Remalia, Henry Ranney, Francis Reed, F. L. Reynolds, Juliet Reniger, 0. J. Shalliar, A C. Savage, Amos T. Shalliar, Henry Shoop, Anna Shumnway, P. E. Storr, Emily J. Sperry, Pres. Willard G. Storr, Frank Storr, R. J. Storr, A. E. Stone, Carrie A. Swint, J. K. Topping, Albert Townsend, John Tubbs, Albert VanGeison, Harriet Warren, Dr. A. K. Waterson, Edward Waddel, Nancy S. Wever, David Warner, Geo. N. Wood, Wallace R. Wetmore, Fay Wise, Prof. Sam'l L. Willis, Miss Anna WALTON TOWNSHIP. Andrews, John 36 Andrews, Chas. 33 Allen, Harvey T. 36 Allen, Earl B. Est. 14 & 23 Bissett, James E. 12 Bryan, James D 12 Bryan, Horton A. 12 Brown, Homer 13 Barber, Emma 13 Butterfield, Orlo C. 14 Bowen, John J. 17 Bowne, Geo. F. 17 Bugbee, Grin 21 Bennett, Lewis A. 22 Burroughs, E. G. 33 Buckland, Orville P. 17 Burroughs, May 0. 33 Beecher, Harriet Est. 28 Butler, L. B. 32 Belding, A. A. 26 & 27 ". Burroughs, Myron 33 Bryant, S. 0. 32 Baldwin, C. M. 25 Burroughs, F. W. 28 Bosworth, Alonzo 33 & 31 Bradley, Otis E. 7 Bradley, Merritt E. 8 Bowen, Malintus 8 Bean, John 18 Bracey, Frank 8 Bradley, J. O. 5& 6 Bradley, Ira D. 6 Cornell, Thomas 1 Cranell, John A. 8 Cooper, James 6 Cole, Sarah S. 6 Crampton, Levi 23 Colby, Dexter 31t Campbell, Geo. A. 6 Cornell, Lewis 2. Cornell, William 22 Curtis, Samuel 22 Carver, Andrew J. 34 Carpenter, Seth 25 Crampton' Oscar 35 Coats, Edwin 35 Claus, D. J. 35 Carver, Richard 27 Conant, Ezra 26 Cornell, Aaron T. 14 Dillon, Otto 4 Day, Albert C. 7 Day, Curtis A. 7 Durner, James 6 Dusenberry, Walter 8 Day, Sylverter Est. 6 & 7 Derby, William L. 26 Davidson, Mrs. Dewitt 15 Donaldson, Frank 25 Deringer, Robert Durby, Julius Est. 34 Edson, Andrew 9 Evans, David 7 Etson, Caleb Mi. 4 & 5 Ely, E. B. 16 & 21 Edson, Philip 3 & 10 Force, Amos 1I Fink. William H. 4 Fraise, Joseph 4 Face, Henry Est. 9 & 16 Foote, Henry 16 Foote, Mrs. A. E. 17 Finch, Willard 22 Francis, Lester P. Est. 21 Foote, Mrs. M. W. 9 & 16 Fisher, Frank A. 3 Fisher, N. E. 15 & 16 Gamble, Ambrose 9 Gorman, John, Sr. 18 SGormian, John, Jr. 8 [Ainger Garity, Thomas 7 66 Gamble, Alex 4 "t Griffin, Orrin 8 & 9 Olivet Griffin, Ed. 9 " Galusha, Warren 27 " Green, William 39 Hobart, Jane 21 6 Hatch, Giles 15 6 Heddon, Geo. H. 13 Hlattis, Willitin 15 6. Hattis, Henry 16 C Harris, Thomas 33 " Hogle, Fayette 18 & 19 " Hoffnagle, William C. 23 HarringtCon, William A. 17 " Hall, C. M. 25 6 Hart, William 34 " Hackstaff, E. K. 23 Harris, John 26 " Hayes, Peter S. 4 Aincrer Hoskins, Merritt 18 " Hann, G. E. 6 Hart, Jesse R. 1 Charlotte Hockenberry, Jay 2 & 11 " Hitchcock, Oscar D. 1 Olivet Hockenberry, Martin 2 & 11 Charlotte Hockenberry, Clinton, 11 & 12 "4 Olivet Partello Charlotte Olivet 46 Alinger 66 Charlotte Ainger 66 Olivet Charlotte 6; C6 66 66 Ainge 66 Chrltt Aince (live 66 Aing-er 66 Ange 66 Charlotte Ainger Olivet.Ainger Alure Ives, Phileta 25 Jewell, Lucy 34 Jewett, MEst. 25 Johnson, Mrs. C. 22 & 23 Johnson, Mark L. 13 Johnson, S. B. 12 & 13 Kunkle, Jacob 10 Kunkle, Michael, Sr. 3 Kunkle, Michael, Jr. 3 Kunklile, Jacob C. 3 Kay, Edmond M. 33 Kelly, Mary A. 25 Kelly, J. A 25 Kay, Edmond M. 31 Kunkle, Jacob E. 9 Lybrook, W. F. 7 Lown, S. 13 Lyon, Mrs. C. C. Mahan, Henry 13 Munger, Joseph 1 Middlin. Joseph 4 Myers, William 4 McCreery, Devillo 4 & 9 McCreery, Elvin 4 & 9 Martin, Frank 3 Miller, A. B. 13 Myers, Fred E. 4 Martin, Chas. 4 & 5 Miller, Mrs. Marie 13 Machin, Stephen Est. 8 Maehin, William 9 McWethy, P. E. 8 May, Sayles K. 8 Moran, Edwin R. 6' Messenger, Mrs. Orrilla 18 Murray, Harvey 36 Eattison, Spencer E. 35 McDonald, Geo. 20 Mack, H. H. Est. 23 Miller, Alden 23 Messenger, David H. 18 Mlack, Jacob Est. 16-20 Mott, Berger 35 Mott, James Z. 35 Meeker, H W. 14, Murch, C. May 25 Martin, E. B. 22 Meeker, H. WV. 14-15 McMerial, William 22 Mattison, Eugene E. 34-35 Marsh, Albert M. 9 Nye, NMartillo A. 12 Nye, Ed. E. 12 Nye, Earl 0. 13 Newland, Mrs. A. N. 32 Newcomb, Carello A. 8 Ogden, William Estate of 8 Osborn, Orton 15 Ochenbein, Meinrod 4 Perry Harwick 7 Perry, Orrin F. 7 Pierce, Loraine 8 Prosser, William 36 Patton, L. C. 17 Pelton, Winfield 14 Robinson, Maryette 13-23-24 Roberts, T. A. 4 Rolfe, Dennis 7 Roberts, William C. 5 Roberts, Roscoe A. 10 & 11 Roberts, Isaac N. 10 & 11 Ruscoe, Don 7, Raidel, J. W. Estate of 3 Rood, Geo. A. 34 Raynor, Edson W. 30 Richards, William E. Est. o Rogers, Win. 34 & 35 Raynor, E. S. 30 Reasoner, Jacob 35 Reynolds, J. W. 16 Smith, Geo. W. 3 Shaver, Chauncey 12 Smith, Albert C. 1 Starkweather Geo. W. 1 Sheldon, David F. 2 Olivet Charlotte Olivet Ainger Charlotte SOlivet Charlotte Ainger Partello Olivet C 66 Charlotte Olivet Ainger Olivet Charlotte Ainger Olivet* Charlotte Blellevue Ainger Charlotte Olivet 44 f 32 " Charlotte it. Charlotte cc cc Shermari, Ellen M. 25 Scott, Wm. 24 Stump, Isiah 10 Swift, F. M. 30 Scott, C. E. 13 & 26 Stone, J. S. Estate of 27 Salisbury, Ezra 25 Stuart, John P. 33 Stine, Samuel J. 9 Scott, Earl B. 26 Storr, Emily J. 27 Storr, Fred 27 Salisbury, Orpha 24 Sexton, Weston M. 20 Stoddard, Burt 26 Sweet, Geo. W. 31 Scott, Elizabeth 24 Stults, Frank 18 Sessions, Hiram 17 Savory, John 8 Thornton, Lucian 5 Taggart, Lester B. 7 Thorn; John 23 & 27 Taylor, Franklin W. 31 Tillotson, Mrs. 20 Volland, Herman 11 Wight, Wellington 5 & Wightman, Allen S. 4 Wight, Phebe A. 8 Woodbury, Chas. 8 Wightminan, J. M. Estat Wickhamra, N. G. 1 Wells, Levi 12 Weeks, Burt Wilson, Chas. 31 * Walker, Alex W. 33 Willis, Sumner 27 Wyble, Rachel 10 Waterson, Edward 36 Willoughby, Chas. 21 Waterson, Thomas 35 Walsh, Patrick 14 & 15 Wagoner, Mrs. Maria 1l Weeks, Elmer 10 Wagoner, Freeman 16 Wagoner, Isaac Estate Whitbeck, Richard E. 1 Wyble, William 36 WINDSOR TOW Albro, Geo. M. 17 Albro, N. B. Est. 17 Ashley, Jabez 25. Armstrong, Mrs. E. 0. Andrews, 0. G. Almond, Thomas 5 Armstrong, M. 10 Ashley, Merritt 22 Brigham, B. F. Butler, E. D. 16 Beers, F. 16 Baker, A. C. 15 Bishop, Jacob 24 Bell, R. J. 16 Baxter, Elias 36 Barnes, L. L. 7 Buckholtz, Albert 6 Baldwin, Geo. 29 Brandeberry, Isaac 19 Bolt, Mrs. Carrie 7 Bateman, N. P. 23 Bailey, Geo. Bramble, Mrs. Caddie Bement, Lorin 16 Beebe, S. J. Berner, A. Berner, A., Jr. Bramble, Chas. Burge, 0. S. Bell, James A. Bryan, Daniel 25 Bryan, J. B. 36 Bishop, E. C. Est. 26-2' Bailey, M. H. 36 Barber, 0. A. 25 Barber, 0. H. 23 Bishop, John 10 Billman, Emma 3 Burnett, Robert 22 Bigrow, Samuel 28 Bailey, Will H. 21 Beckwith, E. G. 14 Bohannon, Maria Bohannon, Reed Bates, Frank 23 Beal, John 12 Buckingham, Mrs. N. Bromeling, H. Est. Barrett, M. H. Corwin, H. J. 12-14 Croy, T. J. 10 Cook, A 12 Carlton, B. S. 23 Courter, J. C. 21 Cogswell, Clark 11 Carlton, A. D. 21 Canedy, Fred 22 Carlton, B. S. 22 Crisher, Edwin Cogswell, James 25 Caprenter, D. G. 13 Carrington, A. W. 9 Carpenter, H. 9 Crall, S. B.*. Aingrer Olivet, Charlotte 8 Aingrer i\ 5 -.eof 7.Charlotte Olivet 66 ofl16 t/^ 18 * Partello A Lansin 6 ".^ " Olivet k 6 ~ o 56 " o:,, ChxP artelott Wet indso '..^^ Charlotte Eaton Rapids, Potterville 66 West Windsor, Dimondale 66 66 " 66 11 "

Page  13 WINDSOR TOWNSIP. Kook, Theodore Dimondale Stvndisli, Mrs. R. S. 15 Dimondale Bahney Ja Carlton, A. D. 20 Dimondale King, John M. 3 " Sage, S. P. R. 15 " Buchanon. SCole, Allen 18 " Kipar, Anthony 27 " Scherinmerhorn, L. " Burlison,, Crane, W. H. " King, Milton 11 Lansing Skinner, C. C. 25 & 23 Bowers, H Cunmmerworth, Frank 26 " Koon, Addison, 33 Eaton Rapids Skinner, Julia 23 " Beasore, S. Clark, A. t 'Lansing King,, Mark 21 Potterville Spitler, J. M. 25 " Butterfield Clark, Mrs. Eliza 4 I " Kellar, Mrs. Jacob 1 Lansing Searles, Lauisa 35 Bradforl, Croy, Henry 7 Potterville Lonsberry, W. E. 12 Dimondale Stanton, Otis 35 Bly, Willia Carman, Richard 19 " Lann)n, James 1 " Stanton, A. 0. 35 Beaman, Creasy, Samuel 31 Lennon, William 1 " Smith, Isaac 4 Benton, Hi aCovey, IL. H. 31 " Longmrnate, Enoch 33 " Schmidt, Mrs. J. 9 " Iidwell. C Carman, II. M. 19 West Windsor Leisenring, J. B. 32-33 " Schmidt, John G. 10 Beatty, Ro Christian, Ida M. 19 ' Leisenring, Oscar32 " See, Jay 9 Bradford, I Christian, Mary 19 " Lamphere, T. C. 4 " Strobel, A. W. 17 ' Bradford, I SCogswell, Mrs. R. 17 " Lampherm, 11. N. 1 " Strobel, Ernest 17 " Bennett, F ~ Cook, Harriett 7 ' Larock, H. A. 3 " Sloan, T. M. 15 " Bargess, B S.Cacnedy, Wm. 26 Eaton Rapids Leisenring, K. B. 21 " Schermerhorn, D. Boatman, SClark, Joseph 33 " Leisenring, Gideon 21 - Suryhne, Mrs. H. " Boatman, SClauim, Henry 23 " Longmate, E. " Smith, 0. " Benson, MJ I Depue, F. E. 27 Dimondale Lane, A. J. 25 " Skinner, F. B. " Betz, Lewi Doane, Ivory 7 Lewis, Chas. E. 24 " Smith, Henry 13 " Bly, Mrs. S! IDisbrow, Mrs. S. " Lockwood, James 34 * Kingsland Skinner, B. H. 13 " Boulster B: I i^Disbrow, M. F. " Little, William 30 Potterville Stiefel, John B. 3 " Biscop, H. Drumm, R. 15 " Lee, John 31 Skinner, James 24 " Boom, S. S *PDorr, Solomon 4 " Little, Daniel 30 " Sweet, Maryette 10 " Burlison, E DeWaters, David 24 " Loomis, Mrs. M. A. 18 West Windsor Sloan, Almira 17 " Clegg, Alb Deits, S. 3 " Lewis, Mrs. Orla 17 " Spaulding, P. E. 36 Eaton Rapids Champlan, Drew, John 6 West Windsor Lewis, J. L. 17 " Springer, Geo. W. 36 " Clay, Simec Ells, Mrs. M. E. 7 " McClintock, Geo. 15 Dimondale Shively, Alice 1 Lansing Chadwick, French, John R. 6 Dimondale. Me Kim, Mrs. S. L. " Seibley, Herman 3 Milletts Chadwick, French, A. E. " Morrison, F D. Stiefel, L. 2 " Conklin, A1 Flagler, Chas. P. Morrison, C. A. " Smith, Horace 31 Kingsland Clark, Tho Fish, J. W. 15 " Merritt, F. A. " Smalley, James 31 Potterville Carter, S. I Fry, Chas. W. 9 " Murphy, Mrs. Stierley, John 30 " Creore, Mrs Pry, Ellis 9 " Murphy, Homer " Smith, Mrs. P. 17 West Windsor Cowan, Th ~ Finnison, Joseph 9 " Minis, Walter " Smith, H. C. 17 " Clay, Fred Finnison, L. 10 Monroe, Julis ' Spears, Frank 19 " Conklin, Ja Flinchbaugh, E. A. " Mathews, Samuel 16. Sabin, Mrs. M. 17 " * Cockroft, V ~e Fish, John W. 15 " Miller, William 15 " Sisco, James 6 "' Cockroft, I Ferris, Chas. 34 Mumby, John 15 " Shotwell, L. L. 18 " Collins, Jo French, Silas 23 " McClintock, Geo. 10 Shotwell, Albert 18 * " Canfield, S. Fancher, Joseph 34 Kingsland McCarty, Tim 1 D Terryll, D. B. 35 " Dimondale Crittenden Frever, Frank 33 Potterville Murray, William 10 " Tiedgen, A. F. 28 " " Curry, A. P! Gilbert, H. Dimondale Marks, Emma 22 Tiedgen, Ditrich 32 Delamaer, SGowdy, M. A. " Morrison, E. F. 23 " Twitchell, F. M. 12;' " Downs, Lec MGilbert, Geo. " Miller, J. P. 10 Torrey, E. 0. 11 " Downs, Mr. Gunderman, Rev. " Moore, S. 3 " Torrey, Chas. F. 14 * Dibble, He] Gregory, J. B. " Mosier, G. W. Estate 20 " Troupe, John 23 " Pe Witt, G Gardner, C. A. " Martin, Samuel 20 ", Twitchel], S. MI. T" De Witt, Cc Gibbs, John P. 34 u Mnnger, Wesley 31 Charlotte Torrey, Chas. S. 14,- De Witt, Cl. Gibbs, Wallace 23 " Maurer, Frank 31 Potterville Twitchekl, Edward 34 " Darling, L. SGilbert, C. B. 12 " Norris, Thomas Estate 23 Dimondale Twitchell, Chas. 34 " Evans, C. I JGardner, WV. D. 1 " INorris, Francis 5 Lansing Traver, Chas. 4 " Elmer, Orri Gladden, A. D. 4 a' Norton, C. E.. Dimondale Treveller, Melvin 4,' Egan, Hem Gentner, John 8 " Oliver, Alex " Tuttle, Mrs. Mhry 17 West Windsor Freeman, S Ge'snhafer, Wm. 13 2" Oxendale, Isaac 33 Kingsland Treat, D. II. 8 & 5,, Freeman, S< Garber, Gideon 35 Eaton Rapids Parsons, S. 27 Dimondale Troub, Jerry 35 Eaton Rapids Fuller, Job Geisenhafer, G. 19 Potterville Pray, Esek 29 " Towsley, Geo. P. 20 Potterville Fuller, Eln Getter, Mrs. Mary E. 31 " Pray, Geo. D. Estate 29 " Terrill, H. F. 30 " Fuller, Tru Lcob 17 & 18 Eaton Rapids Kikendall, Rasila 23 ChaTlesworth, F. T. 13 " Kikendall, Geo. 19, 29 & 30 " Emeline 21 " Kelley, Geo. T. 28 Eaton Rapids' enry 26 '. Knight, Mrs. Geo. 9 " amuel 1 " Knight, Amos 9 " I, Mrs. Frank H. 7 " Long, 0. A. 9 " Elijahl17 " Lair, Albert 27 " tin H. 7 " Lawrence, Ira M. 23 & 29 " M. M. 7 " Leighton. F. S. 27, 23 &33 " enry 7 " Lindlky, Israel 18 " eo. 8 tl Landon, E. A. 29 Springport land 4 " Lalke, Mrs. iulda 14 Eaton Rapids lenry 28 " Lake, 0. B3. 14 " Mlartin 28 Leak, John 11 "4. C. 22 " Mitcheli, Mirinda 5 " en 33 Springport Merritt, C. E. 4 " Dainiel 21 Eaton Rapids Markle, E. L. 26 " WViliam F. 2t " Markle, W. 0. 26 " rs. 29 Charlesworth Mosley, Isaac 24 " s 2) Eaton Rapids McManuas, Geo, 24 ",amuel 20 " McAllister, John 20 " ros. 29 " McLeod, William 19 Charlesworth L. 11 " McAllister, William 14 Eaton Rapids. 10 " Mansfield, Christy 2 " ulihu 26 "' Montgonery, Mrs. Celia 12.rt 34 Otter Creek Montgomery, Mrs. J. S.1 " I Mrs. L. 22 Eaton Rapids McGilvera, Frank 26. " on A. 22 " Mellon, Chas. 8 " Willis 14 M" unn, Andrew 8 "Geo. 13 " Mitchell, Frank 8 " LIen 13-24 " Mellon, Nancy 18 " inas 23 " Milller, John 5 " S. 17, 19 & 20 " Mathias, Erias 20 & 21 Charlesworth.A. Charlesworth Nichol, George 292 " amas 34 & 35 Eaton Rapids Mendel, Frank 21 Eaton Rapids 35 " Mathias, David 21... " ty 24 " Miller, Celestia 1... " Villiam 32 & 33 Springpart Miller, Samuel 2 " levi 32 & 33 " Noble, Gco. B. 22 " aathan 18 Eaton Rapids Norris, Sophrona 13,.. " N. 7 " Newcomb, Geo. W. 8 & 18 " S. R. 17 Novis, L. P. 30.... ". 10 4 Newcomb, Mrs. Geo. 19 Charlesworth Lewis 14 " Noble, J. D. 16 Eaton Rapids ster 19 " Neff, John 22.. " s. Minerva 29 Charlesworth Nisbit, Archibald 12.. 'A ary 6 Eaton Rapids Olmstead, H. B. 14. ordon 14 & 23 " Olmstead, D. D. 14 " )rwin 23 " Osburn, F. A. 15 " ias. 23 "4 Oyer, Hattie 30 Charlesworth B. 11." Parker, F. H. 2 Eaton Rapids 4. 34 Springport Pierce, Henry 2 " in 5 Eaton Rapids Porter, Albert 4 " 4'] ry 18 ~4. Poncha, James 3 "4' itanley 8 - " Pratt, William E. 7 "4 htillman Estate 5 ". Perrine, Rue 16 " ' n T. 6 " Price, James 20 4' ier, 36 Otter Creek Philips, Geo. E. 11.. "' iman 25 Onondaga Perrine, S. C. Estate 1 & 12 " H' AHilliard, Lee 21 Dimondale Pray, F. G. 32 " Terrill, Mrs. C. 30 Fuller, Ste Hilliard, Mark 24 Pray, Andrew 21 Underhill, Elias itzsimoi 4Hetrick,John13 " Parsons, D " Underhill, Geo. ', Foreman, ( 4Holcomb, Chas. 23 " Peek, Mirs. S. M. " Uric, James 16, Fleming, A Holmes, John Q. 13 " Potter, Chas. 9 &16 " Van Osdall, John 25 * Favorite, J Herr, Jacob 12 " Porter, A. F. 10 " Van Osdall, Mrs. S. 27 Finch, San Hetrick, Samuel 11 " " Pierson, J. WN. " Vanderbeck, S. A. 36 ox, Debor Hathaway, W. 1 " Pierson, M. M. A Venton, Geo. 9, Fowler, MA 'He'thorn, Frank 35 " Porter, Mirs. A. F. 16. Venton, Frank 9 " Griffith, Ge Herninger, H. 36 " Phinney, Frank " Van Anken, C. F. 9 West Windsor Grant, Hir HeigrF.". I 36 4' uknC F SHolloway, Ensign 23 " Phinney, Fred " Van Auken, H. H. 20 &30 ' Gilman, J SHunt, E. W. " Partello, Bishop 18 West Windsor Van Anken, W. H. 6 Potterville Giliman, I. Hecock, Alex 8 " Pinch, J. 0. 7 " White, Mrs. Malinda 27 Dimondale Giliman, M Hance, Seymour 5 " Perkins, Geo. 4 Milletts Wright, Mrs. V. Gle. ern Hull, N. P. " Paine, Rowland 4 Whaley, Eugene 16 " Gould, D. \ Hull, Tyler ' Peck, Lucian 8 West Windsor Wakeman, S. W. 15 " Griffith, Ju SHull, Whitman 22 Peck, G. F. 7 * Williams, V. 11 " Grow, Mrs. S.Hull, Eli 21 " Proctor, A. C. 2) Potterville Williams, Ben 1 " Gibbs, Mrs. Hess, Isaac " Potter, J. J. 23 Kingsland Williams, Hiram 2 " Gibbs, Chas RHough, Samuel 15 ' Robinson, C. J. 5 Dimondale Wright, Peter 11 " Griffith, Ge Hyde, William J. " Robinson, Jerome 5 " Wright, C. E. 11 " Gifford, Wi SHuntingtorOMrs. J. Z. 9 Roe, Daniel. Watrus, Chas. 11 " Gifford, Fr J~nntingtnAirs.ChaZs.911 Harris, E. C. 4 " Rann, Mrs. S.. Wy born, William36 Goodyear, I Hull, Joseph 10 10 Rose, Mrs. P. " Wright, Jackson 26 & 34 " Holmes, MA ).;HulltJohn E. " -.R inkle. John - ".;-iv,... White, Samuel 27 " HolmesGe SHutt, Chas. Rse, Geo. WV. 2) " Wright, Asa 35 " Holmes, Ar Hurlbert, W. T. 220 " Rogers, Mrs. Anna - " Wilbur, Albert 35 Eaton Rapids Holmes, J. SHorton, N. B. 4 Robbins, John 15 " Warren, C. H. 29 West Windsor Tolmes, Wi Hull, Miles 2t " Rinkle, Henry 13 " Williams, Mrs. V. 14 Dimondale Hyatt, Chas lHull. Mrs. S. J. 28 ' Rinkle, G.o. 13 " Walford, E. S. " Haight, Mr Ilayter, Samuel 34 " Reeves,.Esther 27 " Wilbur, Mrs. Geo. Potterville Hoag, Mrs. " Hetniorn, William 35 " Re-igle, Jacob 29 " Whitney, Mrs. A. 17 West Windsor Hayward, J Howard, Moses 31 " Rosell, Emmor 23 " Warren, L. R. 17 " Har, ira Huffman, Russell 6 " Redfield, N. 23 " Zacharia, Mrs. Dimondale Hsted, He Howacarardir.,imodae astdHe SHoward Eugene "' Reynolds, Geo. 2 " Zimmerman, H. 4, Holmes, Po Howard, J. D. 22 " Rogers, G. W. 31 Potterville Zimmerman, A. Estate4 " Harshy, Sil: Holmes, A. D. Lansing Root, Sylvanus 31 " IIAMLIN TOWWslIP. Harshy, Na Hulce, Mrs. H. 2 -Grand Ledge Reusch, Geo. 2 -Milletts Arnold, Susan E. 36 Eaton Rapids Hammond, Harmon, Fred 8 West Windsor Reusch, Elias 2 " Allyn, Austin 17 & 18 " Hosier, G. Hunter, Samuel 6 " Roberts, Win. C. 36 Eaton Rapids Allyn, Geo. 17, Hall, Oris 1 Henderson, Mrs. S. W. 18 " Roberts, Eiiza 36 " Allen, E. IH. 8 " Hall, Geo. H-ouchl John 7 " Redfield, Mrs. C. 33 - Armstrong, Chas. 28 " Hobart, Mr SHamilton, Frank 4 Milletts Redfield, Geo. 33 " Abbey, H. F. 16, Hamlin, D. Inselman, T. A. 13 West Windsor Richardson, Frank 2j West Windsor Brewer, L. B. 9 " Hicks, Sam Jaenicke, Henry 2 Dimondale Root, E. C. 3"4 " Bradfor. D. J. 16 ~ " Hale, D. B. James, 0. D. 11 " Randall, A. G. 6 " 'Boatm-n, \Villiamn 16 ' Harder, N. Jones, J. J. 22 " Rogers, Wm A. 7 " - Blod-ett, Rich 16 " Howell, Ne Jlckells, William Rose, Mrs. F. J. 17 " llodzett, C. L. 15 " Jefries, A. 1Jones, H. C. 25. Rumsey, S. F. 17 ' Blodgltt, E. C. 21 "4 Knapp, Hei:[Jones, Orlando 26 ". -Schermerhorn, Mrs. L. 15 Dimondale Blodgett, I. T. 21," Keeler, Ira, K-bSamidl2] 't Seigford, L. W. 15 Brigg-s, J. R. 21,4 Iaylor, Jel - -lKoon, Mrs. Mary 21 " Spafford, Frank 15 " Baum, Mirs. M. 19 Charlesworth Kikendall, SKimball, Frank35 " Standish, Vol " Baum, John, Jr. 19 ' Kikendall, Kelley, Leroy 23 " Shively, Mrs. J. " Bahney, HenrM 18 Eaton Rapids Kikendall, phen 25 " Perrine, D. W. 2." )s, E. L. 25 " Prescott, Joseph 6 " (eo. 14 Eaton Rapids Pierce, D. B. 27 & 32 " Irs. Andrew 23 " Reynolds, William WNY. 34. " " o 29 Charlesworth Rogers, Albert 27... " iuel 33 Springport Randall, Alonzo 23 " *ah 3 Eaton Rapids Randall, J. H. 23... " *s. Emma 32 Springport Rice, Almeron 22. " o. T. 23 & 33 " Rice, Mrs. Chas. 22 " im 8 Eaton Rapids Rice, Anna 2-. " rcob 7 " Rhoades, Marshall 22 " N. 6 44 Rose, James 2J) " rs. I. N. 7, 29 & 32 " Robb, Isaac 12 4 indo 5 " Rhoades, Robert 21 " N. -2 R Hay, Joseph 4 " lius-C. 7 " Rorabeck, S. H. 9 " Elizabeth 10 " Rowley, Ellen MA. 10 Wallace, 22 " Rice,. Almeson 22 ",. 23 " Rothbun, Brace 14 " o. C. 36 Springport RHynolds, H. H. 31 " - illiam B. Eaton Rapids Root, Chas. 3 " ed 20 " Rice, F. \V. 3 " Luther 2D Charlesworth Ramsey, H. W. 24 - 's. Ann 22 Eaton Rapids Rocky, Jacob 13,. " 0.: 22 " Rushton,, James 31-.. isil E. 15 - " Rochester, Joseph 18 - J. 10 " Rockwood, Robert 3.5 Otter Creek illiam F. 10 " Reynolds, Geo. W. 7 Eaton Rapids, 3 " Reese, James 20 Charlesworth s. Lucy 18 " Stocking, Julius 25 Eaton Rapids Anson 17-18 " Swift, Mrs. Mary 25 Otter Creek Joel 5 " Swift, Reuben 36 "4 n 6 " Swift, J. Corrington 33 " nry 5 " Searls, Walman 8 Eaton Rapids Ily 29 Charlesworth Spear, Scott 7 4 as 20 Eaton Rapids Smith, William-K; 7 4t thaniel 20 " Smith, Samuel 8 " Ben 3) " Saums, Eli 18 W. 27 " Seagreaves, James 1 " 6 " Smith, B. M. 12 " 21 " Smith, William 2 " s. Anna 9 " Schlappi, Samuel.3 & 10 " B. 9 " St. John, Elias 14 " uel 9 44 Smith, Mrs. Elizabeth 13 " 10 " Smith, Milo D. 13 " P. 22 " Sayer, John 20 & 21 " Ison 2 " Smith, Chas. I. 21 " J. 18 i" Stump, Barbara 19 & 30 " rman 34 " Shink, Mrs. Jacob 3) " 21 Onondaga Sowles, Isaac 20 Charlesworth lerson 17 Eaton Rapids Smith, William 20 4 Chas. 19 & 30 Charlesworth Sayes, Geo. IV. 20 " Richard 30 " Smith, Mrs. Emma 20 " James 19 & 30 " S1elye, Henry 34 Eaton Rapids 4

Page  14 Spencer, Ed. 16 Eaton Rapids Upham, Caroline 27 & 2-8 Eaton Rapids Walter, Samuel 16OteCrk WlmaR Teeter, Edgar 14 Van Auker, Jacob 19 Clialcjsw"orth Walter, Eli 15"WodThn Teeter, Mrs. C. 23" Van Auker, Albert 19 cc Walter, Chas. 10 *"Wls.3 Talr N.1 Van Dusen. Amos;-5 Eaton Rapids Walter, Marcus 4 "WsAde Taylor, F. P. 11 Vaughan, J. J. 11 4 Wisner, C. D. 16"WodDai Tilf ord, Robert 28" Vaugrhan, Geo. 11 44 Wheeler, Mrs. Lucretia:3 od o ThmWilliam 18" Van Allen, D. D., Wheeler, 1. J. 33 "Wloy a Underdonk, W. H. 27 & 31 " Van Gor-don, Win. 35 & 36 Otter Creek Wheele, Mislron 33S.Wldn2-.' Underwood, Levi 2) Walter, David 16 ~ "Wmn itnS 3:UWlimM Williams, Chas. 201 Calsvrh WhanO }jTECTJONS 1840-Harrison, Whigr,337; VanBuren, Democrat, 229. Total, 566. 1844-Clay, Whig, 410; Polk, Democrat, 376; Birney,Liet,0Toa,8314-T 1120. 1852-Scott; Whig-, 637j; Pierce, Democrat, 786; Hale, Freesoil, 225. Total, 1648. G. 20 Eaton Rapids Wolcott, M. S'. 36 Eaton Rapids as-31 Springport** Wright, V. N. 11 * "Wright, Walter 10 v 5 Eaton Rapids Williams, James 12 * 544 Wise, Mrs. Melvina 17 L4 Whitaker, G4eo. 19 Charlesworth.uel 6" Wilbur, H. 31 Springport.8 "Wilbur FPS.3 S.L. 26" Wilson, W. W. 34 & 35 'en 26 uylor, Whig-, 3,56; Cass, De-mo3rat, 546; VanBur~en, Freesoil, 218. Total, I I 185611 1868. F Bellevue.........*..... B3enton......................... Brookfield..................... Carnmel..................... Chester.,...... e........ Delta........................... Eaton.................. {Eaton Rapids............... Hamlin...................... lialame........................ Oneida......................... Roxand......................... SUnfield........................ V~eri-nontyille.................. Walton......................... Wi-ndsor........................ Bellevue........................ Benton......................... Brookfield.............~...... Carmel......................... Chester......................... Delta........................... Eaton................... (Eaton Rapids............... IHamlin....................... Kalamo......................... Oneida......................... Roxand......................... Sunfleld........................ Vermontville.................. Walton........................ Windsor........................ C IEEMlONT. 151 84 85 142 St 94 829 83 187 103 51 130 159 91 RUCHANAN. 149 42 35 138 47 31 140 265 126 48 35 13 38 58 63 FILLMORE. 2 0 0 2 0 1 0 6 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 Bellevue.................... Benton.......................... Brookfield......... I.......... Carmel......................... Chestei........................... Delta........ *...fi...*0.0.....* Eaton...... i........... 4Eaton Rapids................. ( Hamnlin.................. Kalamo....................... Oneida........................... Roxand..................... Sunfield......................... Vermontville.................... Walton........................... Windsor...............,*. 000s GRANT. 9220 144 120 305 126 149 247 422 173 277 156 113 227 259 150 1872.9 1860. SFvaiOuR. 223 106 77 227 92 68 204 398 139 134 50 58 88 66 106 BLACK. 28 10 4 5 2 12 0 17 7 11 40 1 0 4 13 4 46 Bellevne.................. Ben ton................... Brookfield................. Carmel.................. Ch ester.................... Delta....................... Eaton............... Eaton Rapids............. Hamlin........ Kalamo.................... Oneida..................... Roxand.................... Sunfleld................... Vermontville............. Walton..................... Windsor................... Ch arlotte.................. Eaton Rapids............. Bellevue.................... Benton..................... Brookifield.................. Carmel...................... Chester..................... Delta........................ Eaton....................... Eaton Rapids.......... Hamlin..................... Kalamo..................... Oneida...................... Roxand..................... Sunfleld..................... Vermontville.... 0...... Walton..................... Windsor..................... Charlotte.....T............... Eaton Rapids............... 3LAlNE 269 261 162 176 176 ISO 156 137 165 232 239 230 216 263 309 212 490 254 224 1888. 1AJIRISON. CLEVELAND.FIK 1884.1.[CLEVELAND. 256 199 162 1 68 1.54 183 129 152 103 182 499 144 138 S234 161 235 397 BJ OILE R. ] GRANT. GREELEY. O'CoN-NoR, 218 1743 LINCOLN. 204 88 99 198 100 76 127 337 114 205 102 73 146 171 95 DOUGLAS. 150 56 48 131 63 45 153 288 106 77 38 18 40,53 62 BELL 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 Bellevue.................. Benton.................... Brookfield................. Carmel..................... Chester................... Delta...................... Eaton....................... Eaton Rapids.............a If1amlin.................... Kalamo.................... Oneid a..................... Roxand................0...a Sunfleld.................... Verno-ntville.............. Walton.................... Wind sor................... Charlotte.................. 194 114 115 146 137 109 241 224 160 2;5 8 150 1388 245 238 159 444 73 66 91 82 40 97 207 123 88 155 29 32 86 35 73 118 0 0 0.2 0 0 16 0 4 1 7 1 1 4 14 3 308 234 241 155 185 164 162 145 191 164 208 162 171 127 156 172 192 88 241 180 323 254 285 121 249 106 281 208 320 164 2491 193 566 408 304 221 1892. 4 42 0 26 0 5 0 217 26 24 0 0 21 1 4 1864. 1876. S r. JOHlN., 16 18 13 11 12 14 25 27 9 33 15 13 28 51 13 81 80 STREERTER.. 9 26 14 17 16 40 16 22 43 18 52 25 29.50 44 17 109. 60 BID WELL., '11 23 10 11 6 20 13 14 44 vm HARRISON. CLEVELAND. HATES. TILDEN. COOPEIR. SMITH. Bellevue..................... Bellevue.......................... Benton........................... Brookfield....................... Carmel............................ Chester........................... Delta............................ Eaton......... *O*...... (Eaton Rapids,........ kllamiin............ K alaino............ Oneida-............................ Rox~and.......................... Sunfield............. V ermontville................... Walton........................... Windsor..... LINCOLN. 131 84 58 175 74 96 1-28.ý 241 11$. 189 109 68 123 184 84 MCCLELLAN. 171. 67 38 147 53 54 149 98 87 31 27 45 36 78 Bellevue................... Benton...................... Brookfield................. Carnel..................... Chester.................... Delta................ oq.*. Eaton....................... Eaton Rapids............. Hamllin..................... Kalamo.............. Roxand.................... Sunfield................... Vermontville.............. Walton.................... Windsor...................g Charlotte.................. 237 219 134 159 165 204 237 261 209 344 247 199 296 298 240 417 2430 146 136 159 131 125 138 313 175 162 292 97 92 143 113 155 283 0 22 2 0 0 0 1 13 0 0 0 0 4 1 9 Benton..................... 3- Brookfield.........~....... 0 Carmel..................... S Chester........... 3 Delta.............. 0 Eaton.......... '...... 1 Eaton Rapids.............. 32 Harrlin..................... 11 Kalamo..................... 10 Oneida..................... 1 Roxand.............. 0 Sunfield..................... 0 Veranontville.............. 2 Walton........... 2 Windsor.................... 1 Charlotte................... 20 Eaton Rapids........ *.0.06 251 24:1 205 123 108 144 18 2 118 163 139 178 11 125 113 112 101 124 58 191 138 379 277 197 88 214 113 224 176 231 161 179 107 506 409 272 225 WEAVER. 15 68 40 3 8 36 8 47 37 15 202 39 62 6 20 82 23 19 1880.l GARFIELD. HANCOCK. W VA.VER. B~ellevue.................... Benton..................... Brookfield................. Carmel.................... Chester.................... Delta........................ Eaton..................... Eaton Rapids............. Hamnlin.................... Kalarno.................... Oneida.................... Roxanad.................... Stinfleld.................... Vermontville............. Walton.................... Windsor................... Charlotte............. 250 210 47 272 155 180 181 194 1 69 297.274 220 258 2544 205 296 322 232 437 165 108 142 142 66 145 290 175 179 135 58 114 156 150 lit 335 22 56 16 7 119 3 13 10 17 274 63 14 15 5 7'3 53 Dow. 2 0 3, 3 3 4 11 20 21 10 4, 41 0 0 6 6 13 I - -ýWw --ý imn 5 ýw I -44-ý -r jr< ACC -CC -C -

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