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Title: Notes on the Contributors
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, MI: MPublishing, University of Michigan Library
2008
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Source: Notes on the Contributors


vol. 17, no. 1, 2008
Issue title: New Directions in Medical Anthropology
URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2027/spo.0522508.0017.110
PDF: Link to full PDF [76kb ]

NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS

VIOLA ALLO is a doctoral student in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Michigan. Born and raised in Cameroon, she plans to return to Cameroon to do research on kinship, education, and migration. She has lived in the United States since 1998.

SARA COOLEY is a doctoral student in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Michigan. Her interests include the anthropology of global health, discourses of development, and indigenous political movements. Her dissertation research addresses the role of multi-sectorial collaboration in revealing how practices, beliefs, and health outcomes are inter-related within spheres of meaning and across political spaces of globalization. In addition to continuing her dissertation research, she is pursuing a Master’s in Public Health in Epidemiology at the University of Arizona.

DAISY DEOMAMPO is pursuing her Ph.D. in Anthropology at the City University of New York (CUNY) Graduate Center, with a particular focus on medical anthropology. She is interested in gender and sexuality, reproduction, the social aspects of HIV/AIDS, and the relationship between social inequality, health and disease. She holds a Master´s Degree in International Affairs from the New School for Social Research. Presently she is investigating activist approaches to the syndemic relationship between violence against women and HIV infection in South Africa.

LAURA L. HEINEMANN is a student in the Joint Doctoral Program in Anthropology and Social Work at the University of Michigan. Her general areas of interest include illness, healthcare, kinship, and the home; biomedical technology and science; and social work, social services, and social policy. She is conducting her dissertation fieldwork on organ transplantation, kinship, and healthcare in the Great Plains region of the United States.

HOLLY PETERS-GOLDEN is a Lecturer III in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Michigan. She earned her Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, and completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, before coming to Michigan in 1984 as a faculty member in the Integrated Medical-Premedical Program. Her current research interests include illness narratives, science studies, the construction of self and personhood in illness; the production of medical knowledge; risk; explanatory models of illness, and social construction of disease.

ELISHA P. RENNE is an associate professor in the Department of Anthropology and the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies at the University of Michigan. Renne earned her Ph.D. in Anthropology from New York University in 1990. Her areas of research interest include: African ethnology; medical anthropology; fertility and reproductive health; gender relations; the anthropology of development; religion and social change; and the anthropology of cloth. Her ongoing work includes a study of the international polio eradication initiative in Northern Nigeria, focusing on the historical, cultural, political context of this campaign.

JESSICA C. ROBBINS is a doctoral student in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Michigan. Her areas of interest include medical anthropology, kinship, personhood, memory, and post-socialism. Her doctoral research focuses on aging and memory in post-socialist Poland.

EMILY WENTZELL is a doctoral student in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Michigan. Her research interests include gender and medicalization. Her current research focuses on the social consequences of men’s use of medical treatment for erectile dysfunction in Mexico City.