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Title: Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln. Volume 3.
Author: Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865.
Publication Info: New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 1953.
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• ... solution of this slavery question in all its forms. Clay was the great leader, with Webster on his right and Cass on his left, and sustained by the patriots in the Whig and Democratic ranks, who had ...
• ...ic party both stood on the same platform with regard to the slavery question. That platform was the right of the people of each State and each Territory to decide their local and domestic institutions ...
• ...rsed by the Whig party and the Democratic party in national convention in 1852. In order that there might be no misunderstanding in relation to the principle involved in the Kansas and Nebraska bill, ...
• ...hed, or incapable of restoring the government to the true principles of the constitution, it is the right and duty of the people to dissolve the political bands by which they may have been connected t ...
• ...om Ottawa to Jonesboro? I put these questions to him to-day distinctly, and ask an answer. I have a right to an answer (``that's so,'' ``he can't dodge you,'' etc.), for I quote from the platform of t ...
• ... slave States, and left each State perfectly free to do as it pleased on the subject of slavery. (``Right, right.'') Why can it not exist on the same principles on which our fathers made it? (``It can ...
• ...States, and left each State perfectly free to do as it pleased on the subject of slavery. (``Right, right.'') Why can it not exist on the same principles on which our fathers made it? (``It can.'') Th ...
• ... the granite hills of New Hampshire would be unsuited to the rice plantations of South Carolina, (``right, right,'') and they, therefore, provided that each State should retain its own Legislature, an ...
• ...anite hills of New Hampshire would be unsuited to the rice plantations of South Carolina, (``right, right,'') and they, therefore, provided that each State should retain its own Legislature, and its o ...
• ... all that was local and not national. (Applause.) One of the reserved rights of the States, was the right to regulate the relations between Master and Servant, on the slavery question. At the time the ...
• ...and that it is asserted in the Declaration of Independence. If they think so, of course they have a right to say so, and so vote. I do not question Mr. Lincoln's conscientious belief that the negro wa ...
• ...trary, I hold that humanity and christianity both require that the negro shall have and enjoy every right, every privilege, and every immunity consistent with the safety of the society in which he liv ...
• ...be no diversity of opinion. You and I are bound to extend to our inferior and dependent being every right, every privilege, every facility and immunity consistent with the public good. The question th ...
• ...enies that the negro is or can be a citizen under the Constitution. Now, I hold that Illinois had a right to abolish and prohibit slavery as she did, and I hold that Kentucky has the same right to con ...
• ...inois had a right to abolish and prohibit slavery as she did, and I hold that Kentucky has the same right to continue and protect slavery that Illinois had to abolish it. I hold that New York had as m ...
• ...t to continue and protect slavery that Illinois had to abolish it. I hold that New York had as much right to abolish slavery as Virginia has to continue it, and that each and every State of this Union ...
• ...inia has to continue it, and that each and every State of this Union is a sovereign power, with the right to do as it pleases upon this question of slavery, and upon all its domestic institutions. Sla ...
• ...wer to regulate the qualifications of voters within her limits. I would never consent to confer the right of voting and of citizenship upon a negro, but still I am not going to quarrel with Maine for ...
• ...y upon this great principle of popular sovereignty which guarantees to each State and Territory the right to do as it pleases on all things local and domestic instead of Congress interferi ...
• ... which has flourished for seventy years under the principle of popular sovereignty, recognizing the right of each State to do as it pleased. Under that principle, we have grown from a nation of three ...
• ...ause I told them so. Now I have no means of totally disproving such charges as this which the Judge makes. A man cannot prove a negative, but he has a right to claim that when a man makes an affirmati ...
• ... disproving such charges as this which the Judge makes. A man cannot prove a negative, but he has a right to claim that when a man makes an affirmative charge, he must offer some proof to ...
• ...s which the Judge makes. A man cannot prove a negative, but he has a right to claim that when a man makes an affirmative charge, he must offer some proof to show the truth of what he says. ...
• ...hat he says. I certainly cannot introduce testimony to show the negative about things, but I have a right to claim that if a man says he knows a thing, then he must show ...
• ... knows a thing, then he must show how he knows it. I always have a right to claim this, and it is not satisfactory to me that he may be ``conscientious'' on the subjec ...
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