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Title: Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln. Volume 2.
Author: Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865.
Publication Info: New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 1953.
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• ... he question of the coming Presidential election, and was not unwilling to exchange with all whom he might meet the ideas to which he had arrived. / He then began to show the fallacy of some of th / ...
• ...this declaration did not show what their duty was. If it did we should have no use for judgment, we might as well be made without intellect, and when divine or human law does not clearly point out wha ...
• ...and must be just the man to whom the interests, principles and prosperity of the country might be safely intrusted. He had never failed in anything he had undertaken, although many of his d ...
• ... platform in this point, because unlike all other candidates before him he had not even claimed the right to advise Congress on matters of policy. The proper limitation of the veto, he contended, was ...
• ...nt that every propagandist of slavery in existence, with John C. Calhoun at their head, claimed the right, under the Constitution, and independent of Congress, to carry their ``property'' into any par ...
• ... There would have been a gap in it, so the lie was made big enough to fill the gap that the argument might thereby be made sound and conclusive. / He related a conversation which he overheard at t / ...
• ...do covenant to and with the said party of the second part, that they are lawfully seized, have full right to convey, and will warrant and forever defend the title of said land against the ...
• ... te is recorded. / The CLERK. The vote is recorded in the negative. / Mr. LINCOLN. That is right. / Annotation: ...
• ... istrict, and while there, by the necessary servants of themselves and their families, without their right to hold such servants in service, being thereby impaired. / Section 3. That a / ...
• ...have made no pledge; but if the matter falls into my hands, I shall, when the time comes, try to do right, in view of all the lights then before me. I do not feel authorized to advise any ...
• ...uld be forced to the abandonment of large portions of the public lands to the States for which they might be reserved, without their paying for them. This he understood to be the substance of the obje ...
• ... ividual, or company of individuals, of the new States to expend money in surveying roads which they might know they could not make? [A VOICE: They are not required to make the road.] / Mr. LINCOL / ...
• ...ent. We can never outnumber you. The result is, that all fear of the new States turning against the right of Congress to the public domain must be effectually quelled, as those who are opposed to that ...
• ... [2]   Senate bill No. 415, ``An act to grant the right of way across the public lands, and to dispose of said land in aid of the several States in the / ...
• ...roof, they say, is indispensable. I went back to the Pension office to see if the papers left there might not supply the proof, but the office was so full, I could get no chance. I shall try it again ...
• ... again. He is a young man, as I understand, of unquestioned, and unquestionable character; and this makes me fear some pick-pocket on the boat may have seen me give him the letter, and slipped it from ...
• ...tes may be granted to him therefor, securing to him and to his legal representatives, the exclusive right of making and using, and of vending to others the privilege to make or use, the same, agreeabl ...
• ...ce is not confined to my District, but pertains to the whole state; so that Col. Baker has an equal right with myself to be heard concerning it. However, the office is located here; and I think it is ...
• ...s to the War Department, I would have written Mr. Crawford, but that it might have appeared obtrusive, I having no personal acquaintance with him. I am sure y ...
• ...eclare I have not heard of him. What influence opperates for him, I can not conceive. Your position makes it a matter of peculiar interest to you, that the administration shall be successful; and be a ...
• ... write Ewing, I fear the President would never hear of your letter. This may be mere suspicion. You might write directly to Old Zach; you will be the judge of the propriety of that. Not a moment's tim ...
• ... I do not know that it would, but I can well enough conceive it might, embarrass you to now give a letter reccommending me for / ...
• ...case is decided, I made no reply. If these letters were not before the Cabinet the Judge was nearer right than I supposed. With them I had the State of Indiana clearly; ...
• ...re to speak, partly for other reasons, but chiefly for Mr. Edwards' sake. Losing the office that he might gain it, I was always for; but to lose his friendship by the effort for hi ...
• ...actical printer, has worked constantly, setting type for it, eighteen years. He is tired, and has a right to be. His wife is a ``Scotchman'' and wishes to visit her father-land. Your Obt. Servt A. LIN ...
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