Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln. Volume 3.
Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865.
Hon N B Judd Springfield Nov 15 1858

My dear Sir I have the pleasure to inform you that I am convalescent and hoping these lines may find you in the same improving state of health. Doubtless you have suspected for some time that I entertain a personal wish for a term in the US Senate; and had the suspicion taken the shape of a direct charge, I think I could not have truthfully denied it. But let the past as nothing be.

For the future my view is that the fight must go on. The returnsPage  337 here are not yet completed, but it is believed that Doughertys vote will be slightly greater than Millers majority over Foncy [Fondey]. [2] We have some hundred and twenty thousand clear Republican votes. That pile is worth keeping together. It will elect a state trustee [treasurer?] two years hence.

In that day I shall fight in the ranks, but I shall be in no ones way for any of the places. I am especially for Trumbulls reelection; and by the way this brings me to the principal object of this letter. Can you not take your draft of an apportionment law, and carefully revise it till it shall be strictly & obviously just in all particulars, & then by an early & persistent effort get enough of the enemies men to enable you to pass it. I believe if you & Peck [3] make a job of it begin early & work earnestly & quietly, you can succeed in it. Unless something be done Trumbull is eventually beaten two years hence. Take this into serious consideration. Yours as ever A LINCOLN