Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln. Volume 2.
Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865.

To Philo H. Thompson [1]

Dear Thompson: Springfield April 25, 1849

A tirade is still kept up against me here for recommending T. R. King. This morning it is openly avowed that my supposed influence at Washington, shall be broken down generally, and King's prospects defeated in particular. Now what I have done in this matter, I have done at the request of you and some other friends in Tazewell; and I therefore ask you to either admit it is wrong, or come forward and sustain me. If the truth will permit, I propose that you sustain me in the following manner---copy the enclosed scrap in your own hand-writing, and get everybody (not three or four but three or four hundred) to sign it and then send it to me. [2] Also have six, eight or ten of our best known whig friends there, to write me individual letters, stating the truth in this matter, as they understand it. Dont neglect or delay in the matter. I understand information of an indictment having been found against him about three years ago, for gaming or keeping a gaming house has been sent to the Department. I shall try to take care of it at the Department till your action can be had and forwarded on. Yours as ever A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   Copy, DLC-HW. ALS, IHi, copy enclosed in letter of Thompson's son (Charles H.) to William H. Herndon, October 12, 1866. Philo H. Thompson was a merchant of Pekin, Illinois.

[2]   See letter to Thomas Ewing of May 10, 1849.