Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln. Volume 2.
Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865.

To Elihu B. Washburne [1]

(CONFIDENTIAL)
Hon: E. B. Washburne. Springfield,
My dear Sir: Dec: [January] 6- 1855

I telegraphed you as to the organization of the two houses. T. J. Turner, elected Speaker 40 to 24. House not full. Dr. Richmond of Schuyler was his opponent. Anti-Nebraska also elected all the other officers of the H.R. In the Senate, Anti-Nebraska elected George T. Brown, of the Alton Courier, Secretary; and Dr. Ray [2] of the Galena Jeffersonian, one of the clerks. In fact they elected all the officers; but some of them were Nebraska men elected over the regular Nebraska nominees. It is said that by this, they get one or two Nebraska Senators to go for bringing on the Senatorial election. I can not vouch for this. As to the Senatorial election I think very little more is known than was before the meeting of the Legislature. Besides the ten or a dozen, on our side, who are willing to be known as candidates, I think there are fifty secretly watching for a chance. I do not know that it is much advantage to have the largest number of votes at the start. If I did know this to be an advantage I should feel better; for I can not doubt but I have more committals than any other one man. Your District comes up tolerably well for me; but not unanamously by any means---George Gage is for me, as you know. J. H. Adams is not committed to me but I think will be for me. Mr. Talcott will not be for me as a first choice. Dr. Little and Mr. Sargent are openly for me. Prof--- Pinckney is for me, but wishes to be quiet. Dr. Whitney [3] writes me that Rev: Mr. Lawrence will be for me; and his manner to me so indicates; but he has not spoken it out. Mr. Swan, I have some slight hopes of. Turner says he is not committed; and I shall get him whenever I can make it appear to be his interest to go for me. Dr. Lyman and old Mr. Diggins will never go for me as a first choice. M. P. Sweet is here as a candidate; and I understand he claims that he has 22 members committed to him. I think some part of his estimate must be based on insufficient evidence; as I can not well see where they are to bePage  304 found; and as I can learn the name of one only---Day of La Salle. Still, it may be so. There are more than 22 Anti-Nebraska members who are not committed to me. Tell Norton that Mr. Strunk and Mr. Wheeler come out plump for me; and for which I thank him. Judge Parks I have decided hopes for; but he says he is not committed. I understand myself as having 26 committals; and I do not think any other one man has ten---may be mistaken though. The whole Legislature stands,

Senate --- A.N. 13 N. 12---

H.R. `` 44 `` 31---

57 43

43

14 maj. All here, but Kinney,

of St. Clair.

Our special election [4] here is plain enough when understood. Our adversaries pretended to be running no candidate, secretly notified all their men to [be] on hand; and, favored by a very rainy day got a complete snap judgment on us. In Novr. Sangamon gave Yates 2166 votes. On the rainy day she gave our man only 984---leaving him 82 votes behind. After all, the result is not of the least consequence. The Locos kept up a great chattering over it till the organization of the HR. since which they all seem to have forgotten it.

G's letter to L. I think has not been received. Ask him if he sent it. Yours as ever A. LINCOLN---

Annotation

[1]   ALS, IHi. Writing shortly after the first of the year, Lincoln misdated the month.

[2]   Charles H. Ray, who later became editor of the Chicago Tribune.

[3]   Dr. Daniel H. Whitney of Boone County, Illinois.

[4]   A special election held to fill the vacancy in the legislature caused by Lincoln's resignation (see letter to Matheny, November 25, 1854, supra). Norman M. Broadwell was the defeated candidate.