Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln. Volume 2.
Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865.
J. M. Lucas Springfield,
Dear Sir: Novr. 17. 1849

I have been from home a month, so that your letter of the 17th. of October was not received by me till yesterday. I regret that the elections in the states have gone so badly; but I think there is some reason for hoping that this year has been the administration's ``darkest hour.'' The appointments were it's most difficult task; and this year it has necessarily been viewed in connection with them alone. These are pretty much through with, and next we can get on grounds of measures---policy---where we can unite & rally again. At least, I hope so. I am sorry Don: Morrison has thought fit to assail you; and exceedingly glad Mr. Ewing has sustained you. I am glad of this, for your sake and my own---my own, because I think it shows Mr. Ewing is keeping faith with me in regard to my friends. By the way, I have a better opinion of Mr. Ewing than you, perhaps, suppose I have.

As to the suppression of some of my letters of recommendation for the Genl. Land Office, Addison [2] never said or wrote a word to me, or I to him. After the appointment was made I requested my letters to be returned to me, upon which a sealed bundle was sent to my room. I took it, or rather, brought it home unopened. Some days after I reached here I opened it, and discovered that two letters were missing which I knew ought to be in it. I did not make the matter public here, and I wrote to no one concerning it elsewhere, except Mr. Ewing himself. He answered my letter, and that subject has been dropped for at least three months. Till you mention it, I did not suppose Addison had any knowledge of it. I dont perceive that it would do any harm to any one, but perhaps it will be more prudent for you not to speak of my having mentioned the subject to you. Your friend as ever A. LINCOLN