Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln. Volume 1.
Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865.

Bill Introduced in Illinois Legislature
to Supplement Act Establishing Counties of Menard, Logan and Dane [1]

[February 20, 1839]

A bill for an act supplemental to an act to establish the countries of Menard, Logan and Dane

SEC: 1st. Be it enacted by the People of the state of Illinois represented in the General Assembly: that the officers to be elected under the provisions of the act to which this is supplemental shall hold their offices respectively as long after the next August election as they would do under the general law if they had been elected at said August election.

SEC: 2. In all elections for a Senator or Senators in the district composed of the counties of Menard, Logan, Dane and Sangamon, the clerks of the county commissioners courts of the three first named counties, shall, within ten days after each election, return abstracts of the votes given for a Senator or Senators to the clerk of the county commissioner's court of Sangamon county, who shall, in presence of two Justices of the Peace, compare said abstracts, together with the votes given for such Senator or Senators in Sangamon county; and shall, as soon as convenient, make out, and deliver a certificate of election to the person so shown to be elected.

SEC. 3. In all elections for a Representative to the General assembly, in the countries of Logan and Dane, the clerks of the county commissioner's courts of said counties shall, within ten days after each election, meet at the county seat of Logan county, and shall, in the presence of two Justices of the Peace, proceed to compare the votes given in said counties for Representative; and also toPage  145 make out a certificate of election for the person so shown to be elected; which certificate shall be delivered to such person as soon thereafter as convenient.

SEC: 4. Militia duty shall be performed in the counties of Menard, Logan, Dane, and Sangamon, as if no division had been made.

Annotation

[1]   AD, I-Ar. Introduced on February 20, the bill passed both houses without amendment. It may be found in Laws of Illinois, 1839, p. 205.