Produced by the University of Michigan Center for the History of Medicine and Michigan Publishing, University of Michigan Library

Influenza Encyclopedia

ï~~7f X G. tent the making of posters has bies involved are beyond the the amount of time occupied irs to be out of proportion to )upils have been advised to do; the design to the teacher for the schools, notably the Girls' 3cessfully competed in Govern onal Art Course. Museum of Fine Arts enrolled thom received the benefit of art of charge. The recent exhibi mprovement over the work of tented pupils have continued to ir completing their course in the iem have won free scholarships Normal School. awing in the Boston Normal by members of the Advisory iourse of study has been revised r with that of the primary and believes that the recent appoint s assistants to the head of the school, enabling her to give will assist greatly in dignifying ible continued progress in the b period of transition. Grade -orked with great energy, many e afternoon improvement classes familiar with the new course of e shown is most praiseworthy. lso has been generous of time, feel grateful for the help that public spirited people. y submitted, )DORE M. DILLAWAY, Director of Manual Arts. DIRECTOR OF MEDICAL INSPECTION. 95 APPENDIX H. REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF MEDICAL INSPECTION. MR. FRANK V. THOMPSON, Superintendent of Public Schools, Boston, Mass.: DEAR MR. THOMPSON,- I have the honor to submit the following report of the Medical Inspection Department for the school year 1918-19: In September, 1918, an epidemic of influenza appeared, the greatest calamity that has ever visited our city. During the two months, September and October, 4,023 persons succumbed to the disease. Of this number 211 were children between five and fifteen years., Owing to the number of children and teachers absent on account of influenza or illness in the family, and the demoralized condition of the community, schools were closed by order of the School Committee on September 25, two days before the Governor's proclamation to close schools, theaters, etc. The Boston schools remained closed until October 21. The report on influenza from the Washington District, with a total enrollment of 1,677 pupils, illustrates the prevalence in the city proper: Pupils sick........................................ Pupils died.................................................. Children not of school age sick................................. Children not of school age died................................ Mothers sick....................................... Mothers died................................................ Fathers sick....................................... Fathers died........................................... Total sick............................................... Total died.............................................. 485 2 215 10 141 8 89 6 930 26 The director of medical inspection had charge of the Emergency Hospital at St. John's Seminary, Brighton, during the epidemic and remained on duty at that institution for twenty Y N

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