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Author / [Publication date] Title
[1675?] The cuckcoo of the times. Since cuckcoo is but what mans born to, certain the cuckcoo therefore hopes to please your mind, the fault's not in the woman, but his fortune: and says it comprehends ev'n all mankind. To the tune of, The wandring Jews chronicle.
[1690?] The Cuckold's dream, or, The Comical vision
[between 1670-1696] The cuckold's lamentation of a bad wife. He is tormented, and she tanns his hide, he knows not how to live, nor where to abide; besides she makes him for to wear the horn, and he wishes that he never had been born: to all young batchelours now he does declare, when they goe a wooing for to have a care, there's [sic] is many maids good, but some proves evil, his luck was bad, he met with a she-devil. To the tune of The country farmer. O, Why are my eyes still flow---ing.
[1700] Cuckoldom alamode, or, A comical relation, of an eminent tallow-chandler, who sneak'd off last week with an ale-drapers wife, near Grays-Inn. With the tallow-chandlers wife's lamentation for the loss of her husband, and the ale-drapers sorrow for the absence of his wife. To which is added , the Leicestershire cobbler's misfortune, or, A hue and cry after a lost maiden head in Bell-Yard, near Sheare-Lane, with other pleasant particulars.
[1691] Cuckoo, or, The Welsh embassadour's application to the raven in behalf of the mag-pies and jack-dawes
Mercurius Melancholicus, fl. 1648. / [1648] The cuckoo's-nest a [sic] Westminster, or the Parlement between two lady-birds,: Quean Fairfax, and Lady Cromwell, concerning negotiations of estate, and their severall interests in the Kingdom; sadly bemoaning the fate of their deer and ab-hor'ed husbands. Who buyes a cuckoes-nest, hatch'd in an ayre ... to springe her for her base disloyalty. by Mercurius Melancholicus:
[ca. 1625] The Cuckowes comendation, or, The Cuckolds credit: being a merry Maying song in praise of the cuckow : to the tune of The button'd smocke.
Philo-katoptrono-klastes. / [1657] Culmers crown crackt with his own looking-glass, or, The Cocks-combs looking-glasse broken about his ears and a counter-mirror held forth to all good people, for their undeceiving in the pretended sufferings of that pseudo-martyr, and grand imposter of this age, Blew Dick of Thanet : reflecting from certain pertinent observations upon an impertinent, false and frivolous Apology of his ascribed to his more ingenuous son, but scribled by his most ignominious self : wherein especially all the world may see the ugly face of that prodigious monster ...
[Printed in the moneth of August 1655] Culpeper revived from the grave, to discover the cheats of that grand impostor call'd Aurum potabile. Wherein is declared the grand falsities thereof, and abuses thereby. Published to undeceive the people, and to stop the violent current of such a mischievous designe.
Culpeper, Nicholas, 1616-1654. / [1655] Culpeper's last legacy left and bequeathed to his dearest wife, for the publicke good, being the choicest and most profitable of those secrets which while he lived were lockt up in his breast, and resolved never to be publisht till after his death. Containing sundry admirable experiences in severall sciences, more especially, in chyrurgery and physick, viz. compounding of medicines, making of waters, syrrups, oyles, electuaries, conserves, salts, pils, purges, and trochischs. With two particular treatises; the one of feavers; the other of pestilence; as also other rare and choice aphorisms, fitted to the understanding of the meanest capacities. Never publisht before in any of his other works. By Nicholas Culpeper, late student in astrology and physick.
Culpeper, Nicholas, 1616-1654. / [1659] Culpeper's school of physick, or, The experimental practice of the whole art wherein are contained all inward diseases from the head to the foot, with their proper and effectuall cures, such diet set down as ought to be observed in sickness or in health : with other safe wayes for preserving of life ... / by Nich. Culpeper ... ; the narrative of the authors life is prefixed, with his nativity calculated, together with the testimony of his late wife, Mrs Alice Culpeper, and others.
Logie, Andrew. / [April, 1661. ] Cum bono deo. A remonstrance to the Godly party. Two maine quæries, which stand much usefull fo these our times. ... And a vindication of both. / By Andrew Logie sometime Arch-Deane of Aberdene; Penned by the author, ann. 1654, and printed 1661.
Logie, Andrew. / [1624] Cum bono Deo. Raine from the clouds, vpon a choicke angel: or, A returned answere, to that common quæritur of our adversaries, VVhere was your church before Luther? Digested into several meditations, according to the difference of points. Extorted off the author, for stilling the vncessant, and no lesse clamorous coassation of some patmicke frogges, against the lawfulness of our calling.
[January 16. 1643. i.e. 1644] A Cunning plot to divide and destroy, the Parliament and the city of London.: Made knowne (at a common hall) by the Earle of Northumberland, Master Solliciter, and Sir Henry Vane. The design is fully discovered in the severall examinations and confessions, of Master Riley. Several examinations and confessions, of Sir Basill Brook. Severall examinations and confessions, of Master Violet. Proclamations from his Majesty. Letters from his Majesty. Letters from the Lord Digby. Letters from Colonell Read.
Adis, Henry. / [Printed in the year, MDCLXVIII. 1648] A cup for the citie, and her adherents. Collected by Henry Adis, prisoner in Tower chamber of the Fleet by an arbytrary power.:
[1644] A cup of sack prest forth of the best grapes gathered the last vintage, in the loyall converts new distempered vineyard. Which by frequent using, will make an old lame capon-eater, able to shake his legs, and dance as roundly and as nimbly; as a boy of 18. years of age. Published for the good of those that are so distempered through malignant humours; who may be cured at a cheap rate.
[between 1680-1685] Cupid's court of equity. The scornful lady quickly took, while she her love disdain'd: she was prick'd down in Cupid's book, his vassal she remain'd. Tune of, When first I bid my love good-morrow.
W. B. / [1687] Cupid's court of salutations full of complemental dialogues, and other amorous passages, as well commodious as delightful for young-men and maids to read and exercise.
J. P. / [1695] Cupid's courtesie: or, The young gallant foil'd at his own weapon. He scorned Cupid and his dart, until he felt a wounded heart. To a most pleasant Northern tune, &c.
Marmion, Shackerley, 1603-1639. / [1666] Cupid's courtship, or, The celebration of a marriage between the god of love and Psiche
[between 1670-1677] Cupid's master-piece: or, Long wisht for comes at last: or, the happy meeting of William and Mary. A pretty damsel of sixteen 'tis said, was courted; but of love she was afraid: she slights sweet William (so she call'd his name) he took her first repulse; then she with shame, laments her scornful folly: now she loves, and languishes with grief, till Cupid moves her William once again for to be kind; which soon he did perform: now both are joyn'd in love's strict mutual bands, and marryed, let none, though once deny'd, in love despair. Tune of Caelia's my foe.
[1650?] Cupids cabinet unlock't, or, The new accademy [sic] of complements: Odes, epigrams, songs, and sonnets, poesies, presentations, congratulations, ejaculations, rhapsodies, &c. With other various fancies. Created partly for the delight, but chiefly for the use of all ladies, gentlemen, and strangers, who affect to speak elegantly, or write queintly. By W. Shakespeare.
[1684 or 5] Cupids conquest: or, Will the shepherd, and fair Kate of the green; both united together in pure love. When damsels fair doth thus ensnare, and win their lovers hearts, thus with a frown can run him down. Then Cupid takes his part. To the tune of, As I went forth to take the air: or, My dearest dear and I must part. This may be printed, R.L.S.
[1674] Cupids garland set round about with gilded roses containing many pleasant songs and sonnets newly written.
[between 1674-1679] Cupids golden dart, or, A dainty sonnet here is to be sold, the like whereof was never sung nor told: of a brave girl that had a bag of gold, which she delivered into her sweet-hearts hold. And now they live together lovingly, in joy, in peace, and true tranquility: at first they seem'd to be at mortal strife, but in conclusion were made man and wife. Tune is, Down in an arbour devouted to Venus.
[between 1685 and 1688] Cupids kindness to constant coridon, or, [F]air Silvia vvounded dart when beauties bright, young men can fight, and seek their overthrow, . Then Cupids darts must would their hearts, he will not leave them so. Tune of Charon makeshaft &c.
[1656?] Cupids master-piece, or, The free-school of witty and delightful complements being the art of love refined, and augmented with divers new, pleasant, and delightful comments and discourses of love ...
[1629] Cupids messenger: or, A trusty friend stored with sundry sorts of serious, wittie, pleasant, amorous, and delightfull letters. Newly written
[1674] Cupids posies, for bracelets, handkercers, and rings, with scarfes, gloves and other things. Written by Cupid on a day, when Venus gave me leave to play, verbum sat amanti. The lover sheweth his intent, by gifts that are with posies sent.
[between 1678-1681] Cupids revenge. The captive lover once got free did triumph in his liberty, But storming Cupids mighty power, he did his freedom soon devour. Tune, Now, now the fight's done.
W. B. / [1642] Cupids schoole wherein yong men and mayds may learne divers sorts of new, witty, and amorous complements / newly written and never any written before in the same kinde.
[between 1663 and 1674?] Cupids trappan: or, Vp the green forrest. The scorner scorned, or willow turn'd into cornation, described in the ranting resolution of a forsaken maid. To a pleasant new northern tune, now all in fashon.
H. G. / [1661] Cur percussisti? Or Balaam reproved, for cudgelling the asse.
City of London (England). / [1683] Cur' special' tent' die Lunæ xxix ̊Januarij 1682 annoque regni Regis Caroli Secundi, Angl', &c. xxxiiij.̊
[Printed in the yeare, 1641] The curates conference;: or a discourse betwixt two schollers; both of them relating their hard condition, and consulting which way to mend it.
[1696] A curb for Pegasus, or, Observations on The observator. Number 10. Dated Munday July 6th. 1696. : In relation to the people called Quakers.
[Printed, 1641] A curb for sectaries and bold propheciers: by which Richard Farnham the weaver, Iames Hunt the farmer, M. Greene the feltmaker, and all other the like bold propheciers and sect leaders may be bridled and kept within their own beaten way, and the sacred and weightie worke of the ministery bee reserved to men, whom education fits, God cals, and good order in our church prefers thereunto. A matter very considerable in these present times.
Monck, Thomas. / [1673] A cure for the cankering error of the new Eutychians who (concerning the truth) have erred, saying, that our blessed mediator did not take his flesh of the Virgin Mary, neither was he made of the seed of David according to the flesh, and thereby have overthrown the faith of some / by Thomas Monck.
Mason, Henry, 1573?-1647. / [1627] The cure of cares or a short discourse, declaring the condition of worldly cares; with some remedies appropriated unto them. Penned for the use of all, but is most proper for such as be distressed. By Henry Mason parson of S. Andrews Vndershaft London.
Graunt, John, of Bucklersbury. / [1649] A cure of deadly doctrine; which is death in the pot: or Mr. Royles light proved to be darknesse.: By J.G. a lover and a member of the holy army of God, although the most unworthy.
Vincent, Nathanael, 1639?-1697. / [1695] The cure of distractions in attending upon God in several sermons preached from I Cor. 7.35 / by Nathanael Vincent ...
Pierson, Thomas, ca. 1570-1633. / [1636] The cure of hurtfull cares and fears. By master Thomas Pierson late rector of Brompton-Brian, in the county of Hereford.
Younge, Richard. / [1641] The cure of preivdice, or, The doves of innocency and the serpents subtilty wherein the originall, continuance, properties, causes, endes, issue and effects of the worlds envie and hatred to the godly is pithily laid open and applyed. By R. Junius.
Millwater, Lewis. / [Printed in the yeer, 1651] The cure of ruptures in mans bodie, by physical, and chirurgical meanes, and medicines.: Whereby any person under forty yeers of age, that is diseased in the bodie, with any kind of rupture or burstness whatsoever, may (by Gods assistance, be perfectly, and unfailingly cured. And to whose persons who are above fortie, of declining age, having passed their naturall vigour, maturitie and full strength, present helpe, and desired ease, assuredly procured, for the whole terme of their remaining life, even to their dying day, by the carefull use of some prescribed meanes, and medicines. / By Levvis Millvvater, dwelling in Peterburgh, at the Minster Gate.
R. P. / [Printed October 1. 1648] The cure of the kingdome,: an old fashioned sermon treating of peace, truth, & loyaltie. A discovery of the diseases of the state, with a direction to the true, certaine, and only means for the recovery of health to this distressed nation. / By R.P. ...
Wateson, George, fl. 1598-1607. / [1598] The cures of the diseased, in remote regions. Preventing mortalitie, incident in forraine attempts, of the English nation.
Stanhope, Michael. / [1632] Cures vvithout care, or A summons to all such who finde little or no helpe by the use of ordinary physick to repaire to the northerne Spaw. Wherein by many presidents of a few late yeares, it is evidenced to the world, that infirmities in their owne nature desperate and of long continuance have received perfect recovery, by vertue of minerall waters neare Knaresborow in the West-riding of Yorkeshire. Also a description of the said water, and of other rare and usefull springs adjoyning, the nature and efficacie of the minerals contained in them, with other not impertinent notes. Faithfully collected for the publique good by M. St.
Scudéry, M. de (Georges), 1601-1667. / [1654] Curia politiæ, or, The apologies of severall princes justifying to the world their most eminent actions by the strength of reason and the most exact rules of policie / written in French by the acurate [sic] pen of Monsieur de Scudery ... ; and now faithfully render'd into English ; with the figures of many emperors and kings.
[1695?] A Curious collection of books and pamphlets being the stock of Mr. William Miller, late of London, bookseller : consisting in Hebrew, Greek, Latin, English, French, Spanish, Dutch, Portuguese, &c. : will be sold by auction on Thursday the 2[?]th instant, at eleven a clock in the forenoon, in Westminster-Hall : which sale will continue until the number of 1500 bundles are sold off / by [----]
Verryck, Ferdinando. / [1690] A curious collection of original paintings, and other fine copies, by the best masters of Europe, will (for the divertisement of the gentlemen and ladies at Epsom) be exposed to sale by auction (or who bids most) on Monday, the 4th day of August, 1690. At Tonsor's Old Tavern ner [sic] the Old Bowling-Green in Epsom; which sale will be continued, during the season, on such days in the week as shall be thought most convenient. By Ferdinando Verryck, auctioneer, at Exeter-Exchange, in the Strand, London. Catalogues may be had at the place of sale: at the Coffee-house near the Bowling-Green: at the Coffee-house over against the Crown Tavern: at the Coffee-house at the Wells: at Tonsor's Tavern: and at the Crown Tavern in Epsom. Conditions of sale. I. That he or she who bids most is the buyer, ... IV. That the paintings may be viewed at any time before the sale, by any persons that please to repair thither.
[1690] A curious collection of painting [sic], of the most famous, antient and modern masters in Europe viz. Tintoret ... Wyck with many more great masters, will be exposed to sale by auction, on Wednesday, the 24th. of this instant September, at the house of Mr. Smith Gent. next Bedford-Gate in York-street, Covent-Garden, and are to be seen this Saturday, and Monday, and Tuesday following. Likewise there will be large looking-glasses in rich frames, and rich tea-tables exposed to sale. The sale begins precisely half and hour after two. Catalogues may be had at the place of sale, and to be seen at the principal coffee-houses.
[1690] A curious collection of paintings and limnings, of the most famous, ancient, and modern masters in Europe viz. Raph. de Urben. ... Waggoner. With many more great masters not here inserted. Will be exposed to sale, by way of mineing, (a method of sale not hitherto used in England) on Thursday, the 12th, Friday the 13th, and Saturday the 14th, of this instant March, at Mrs. Smythers Coffee-House in Thames-street, by the Custom-House: the sale beginning each morning precisely at nine of the clock. The said paintings are to be viewed from this day forward until all be sold. Catalogues may be had at the place of sale. Pray read me, but do not take me away from the table.
[1691] A curious collection of paintings and other curiosities; will be sold by auction, at the Barbadoes Coffee-House in Exchange Alley, over against the Royal Exchange in Cornhil. The sale begins on Monday the 21st of December, at four of the clock in the afternoon, and continnes [sic] till all are sold Conditions of sale. I. The highest bidder is to be deemed the buyer. II. The buyers are to give in their names and places of abode, and to pay a third part of the value, if desired, or to be put up again. III. But, if two or more shall claim any lot, then to be put up again. IV. Buyer is to pay for and take away what pictures, &c. shall be bought, within three days after the sale, and to pay for the porteridge. V. No person to bid less than six pence at a time.
[1691] A curious collection of paintings will be sold by auction at the Duke of Glocesters Coffee-House at Charing-Cross, on Friday the 22d. of May. The conditions of sale as usuall, the lots so bought to be fetcht away within 3 days, paying the porteridge if they desire to have their good received home.
[1689] A curious collection of paintings, and drawings, by the best masters. With several books of prints, Roman antiquities, statues, coines, battels, Ogilby's Bible with cuts, &c. Will be sold by auction on Friday the 14th of this instant June, 1689. at Tom's Coffee-House, in Pope's Head-Alley, over against the Royal-Exchange, Cornhill. The sale beginning precisely at four of the clock in the afternoon. Catalogues of which are distributed by Mr. Gilliflower, in Westminster-Hall: Mr. Nott in the Pall-Mall: Mr. Bently in Russel street, Covent-Garden: Mr. Wilkinson in Fleet-street: Mr. Miller in St. Paul's Church-yard: and Mr. Crouch over against the Royal-Exchange, in Cornhill, booksellers. The conditions of sale as usual, and the time of paying [and] fetching away the lots so bought, to be within thr[ee days] after it at the said place.
[1691] A curious collection of paintings, and several other curiosities. By the best masters. Will now be sold by auction, on Thursday the 22th. of this instant Octob. 1691. at three of the clock afternoon, in the Auction-Office in the west-end of the Royal Exchange, and so to continue from day to day till all be sold Catalogues whereof are to be had at the said office.
[1691] A curious collection of paintings, being most originals: by the best antient and modern masters viz. Jordans. ... Dobsone. With many other great masters. Will be sold by auction, (with other curiosities, viz. tables, stands, looking-glasses, cabionets, and scrutores; &c. Most of which belonged to a person of quality, lately deceased,) at the Canary-House, near the east-end of Exeter-Exchange, in the Strand, between the Feathers-Tavern, and Long's Coffee-House, on Tuesday the 29th of this instant December, 1691. and will continue Wednesday and Thursday following. The sale begins at four of the clock in the afternoon. The conditions of sale. He that bids most is the buyer, and none to bid less than six-pence. If any difference ariseth, the picture must be put up again. And the buyer to fetch away their lots within three days after they are bought; paying porteridge, if they will have them carryed home. The paintings may be viewed at the place of sale; where catalogues may be had gratis.
[1691] A curious collection of paintings, being most originals: by the best masters, both antient & modern viz. Paul Brill. ... Adama. Will be sold by auction, at the Spanish-Coffee-House, at the corner of Bromley-Street in Holbourn, on Friday the 27th of this instant November, 1691. The sale begins at four of the clock in the afternoon, and will continue on Saturday, Monday, &c. till all are sold off. The conditions of sale. ... Catalogues may be had gratis at the place of sale, and at the coffee-houses in London and Westminster.
[1692] A curious collection of paintings, being most originals: will be sold by auction, at the Canary-House, near the east-end of Exeter-Exchange, in the Strand, between the Feathers-Tavern, and Long's Coffee-House, this present Thursday, being the 7th of this instant January, 1691. and will continue the Friday, and Saturday following. The sale begins at four of the clock in the afternoon. The conditions of sale. ... The paintings may be viewed at the place of sale; where catalogues may be had gratis.
[1692] A curious collection of paintings, by the best masters, extraordinary fine. A large iron cash chest, and several other curiosities. Will be sold by auction, on Thursday, Friday and Saturday the 17th. 18th. and 19th. of this instant March, 1691/92.. [sic] at four of the clock afternoon, in the Outropers-Office in the west-end of the Royal Exchange. The conditions of sale. ... Catalogues whereof are to be had at the said office.
[1689] A curious collection of paintings, drawings, and prints by the best masters. Will be sold by auction on Friday the 31st of this instant May, 1689. at Tom's Coffee-House, in Pope's-Head-Alley, over against the Royal-Exchange, Cornhill The sale beginning precisely at four of the clock in the afternoon. Catalogues of which are distributed by Mr. Gilliflower, in Westminster-Hall: Mr. Nott in the Pall-Mall: Mr. Bently in Russel-street, Covent-Garden: Mr. Wilkinson in Fleet-street: Mr. Miller in St. Paul's Church-yard: and Mr. Crouch over against the Royal-Exchange, in Cornhill, booksellers. The conditions of sale as usual, and the time of paying and fetching away the lots so bought, to be within three days after it at the said place.
[1689] A curious collection of paintings, drawings, and prints, by the best masters. With several books of Roman antiquities, statues, coines, travels, &c. Will be sold by auction on Friday the 21st of this instant June, 1689. at Tom's Coffee-House, in Pope's-Head-Alley, over against the Royal-Exchange, Cornhill. The sale beginning precisely at four of the clock in the afternoon. Catalogues of which are distributed by Mr. Gilliflower, in Westminster-Hall: Mr. Nott in the Pall-Mall: Mr. Bently in Russel-street, Covent-Garden: Mr. Wilkinson in Fleet-street: Mr. Miller in St. Paul's Church-yard: and Mr. Crouch over against the Royal-Exchange, in Cornhill, booksellers. The conditions of sale as usual, and the time of paying and fetching away the lots so bought, to be within three days after it at the said place.
Bullord, John. / [1690] A curious collection of paintings, most whereof are originals, by the best masters; and the rest very fine copies. Will be exposed to sale by way of auction, on Thursday, the 4th of this instant September, at the Marine Coffee-House, in Birching-lane, near the Royal-Exchange. By J. Bullord. Catalogues are distributed gratis, at Mr. Hensmans in Westminster-Hall: Mr. Notts in the Pall Mall: Mr. Ropers, near the Devil-Tavern in Fleetstreet; Mr. Hargraves, at the Kings-Head, in Holbourn: Mr. Bullords, in St. Paul's Church-yard: Mr. Richard Parkers, at the Unicorn on the Piazza, at the Royal-Exchange; and at the place of sale.
[1690] A curious collection of paintings, of several rare masters, will be sold by auction, at the Middle Exchange; otherwise called Salisbury Change, in the Strand, on Monday the 26th. of this instant May, at three of the clock in the afternoon The conditions of sale as usual, and the time of paying and fetching away the lots so bought, to be within three days after at the said place, and paying portridge.
[1691] A curious collection of paintings, or the most famous, ancient and modern masters viz. Vandyke. ... Van Zoon. With many other great masters. Will be expos'd to sale Fryday December 11th. and continue till all are sold, beginning at two a clock, and hold till nine. at the Vendu next Bedford Gate in Charles-street Covent-Garden. Catalougs [sic] may be had at the place of sale. The conditions are, he that bids most is the buyer, and none to bid less then sixpence. If a difference ariseth, the picture must be put up again. And the buyers to fetch away their lots within three days after they are bought.
[1692] A curious collection of paintings, this present Wednesday the 23th. of this instant March, at four of the clock in the afternoon, will be continued the sale by auction of a curious collection of pictures, with an addition of more pieces very extraordinary fine, with tables, stands and other curiosities, at the Outropers-Office in the west-end of the Royal Exchange, which are there exposed to publick view. The conditions of sale. ... Catalogues whereof are to be had at the said office.
Millington, Edward, d. 1703. / [1690] A curious collection of prints and dravvings, by the best engravers and greatest masters in the world. Fit only for persons of quality and gentlemen, which are the virtuoso's of the age. All fair and curiously preserved. To be sold by auction, on Wednesday the 12th. of this instant November, where the late curious sale of paintings was exposed, next Bedford-Gate in York-street in Covent Garden. To be sold by Edward Millinton. There will be immediately after, a sale of paintings much exceeding the last in that place. To begin at half an hour past two of the clock precisely. To be seen the Tuesday, and each forenoon before the [...].
[1691] A curious collettion [sic] of paintings and limnings, of the most famous, ancient and modern masters in Europe viz. Mich. Angelo. ... Offtigar. With many more famous masters not here inserted. Will be exposed to sale, by way of auction, on Monday the 30th, and Tuesday the 31st of this instant March, and Wednesday, April the 1st, 2d and 3d, at Smythers Coffee-House in Thames-street, by the Custom-House; the sale beginning each afternoon. at three of the clock, the said paintings are to be viewed from this day forwrad [sic]. Catalogues my be had at the place of sale.
[1642] A currant. 12 Julli, stylo novo, 1642. Or, some passages of great and dangerous consequence in France. Also an exact relation of the present state and condition of Germany, between the imperialists Swedes, and others; and of the happy successe and progresse of the said Swedes. With other considerable matters fitting to be known in these times, wherein so many heads are employed against the Parliament of England.
Yonge, James, 1647-1721. / [1679] Currus triumphalis, è terebinthô, or, An account of the many admirable vertues of oleum terebinthinæ more particularly, of the good effects produced by its application to recent wounds, especially with respect to the hemorrhagies of the veins, and arteries, and the no less pernicious weepings of the nerves, and lymphaducts : wherein also, the common methods, and medicaments, used to restrain hemorrhagies, are examined, and divers of them censured : and lastly, a new way of amputation, and a speedier convenient method of curing stumps, than that commonly practised, is with divers other useful matters recommended to the military chirurgeon, in two letters : the one to his most honoured, James Pearse, Esq, chirurgeon to His Royal Highness the Duke of York, and chirurgeon general to His Majestie's Navy Royal : the other, to Mr. Thomas Hobbs, chirurgeon in London / by James Yonge.
Hoby, Edward, Sir, 1560-1617. / [1615] A curry-combe for a coxe-combe. Or Purgatories knell. In answer of a lewd libell lately foricated by Iabal Rachil against Sir Edvv. Hobies Counter-snarle: entituled Purgatories triumph ouer hell. Digested in forme of a dialogue by Nick-groome of the Hobie-stable Reginoburgi.
Ward, Edward, 1667-1731. / [printed in the year, 1698] A curry-comb for a cocks-comb: or, the Trip to Holland detected. By the author of The trip to Jamaica:
[printed in the year 1698 i.e. 1699] The curry-comb turn'd to its right use; or, The powder-monkey to a Jamaica ship, dress'd with it By the author of the Trip to Holland.
[1649] A curse against Parliament-ale. With a blessing to the juncto; a thanksgiving to the councel of state; and psalm to Oliver.
Stone, William, preacher of Gods word. / [1623] A curse become a blessing: or, A sermon preached in the parish church of S. John the Baptist, in the Ile of Thannet, in the country of Kent, at the funerall of that vertuous and worthy gentleman Mr. Paul Cleybrooke Esquire. By William Stone preacher of Gods word: on Tuesday, September 17. 1622.
Meriton, John, 1636-1704. / [1660 i.e. 1661] Curse not the King.: A sermon preached at St. Martin's in the Fields, on the 30th of January, 1660. Being the anniversary day of humiliation for the horrid murder of our late gracious soveraign Charles the I. By John Meriton, M.A. rector of the church of St. Nicholas Acons, London, and lecturer to that congregation.
Brouncker, Edward. / [1630] The curse of sacriledge Preached in a priuate parish church, the Sunday before Michaelmas last. To which are annexed some certaine quære's, which are pertinent to the vnmasking of our homebred church-robbers. D.E.B.
Hickeringill, Edmund, 1631-1708. / [1680] Curse ye Meroz, or, The fatal doom in a sermon preached in Guild-hall Chappel London, before the Right Honorable the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, May the 9th 1680 / by Edmond Hickeringill ...
[1660] A curtain-conference,: being a discourse betwixt (the late Lord Lambert, now) Iohn Lambert Esq; and his Lady, as they lay a bed together one night at their house at Wimbleton. Related by the Lady Lambert to Tom Trim, her gentleman usher, (one well acquainted with all her secrets) and now by him printed for publick satisfaction.
Henric, James. / [Printed MD C XXXII 1632] The curtaine of Church-povver and authoritie in things called indifferent Drawne and laid open, to shew the many infectious sores and maladies they bring in, and cover. Together with sundry infallible reasons, proving that the service of God, and the generall good of the Church and common wealth require that they should be abolished. By Ia: Henric.
[1664] The curtezan unmasked: or, The whoredomes of Jezebel painted to the life. With antidotes against them; or heavenly julips to cool men in the fevor of lust. / Prescribed by a spiritual physician.
Loveday, Thomas. / [printed in the year, 1688] The custom of the mannor of Paynswicke: taken out of the decree in Chancery, and carefully examined for the benfit of the tenants or others that may be concerned. By Thomas Loveday, in the year 1687.
Milles, Tho. (Thomas), 1550?-1627? / [1604] The customers replie. Or Second apologie. That is to say, an aunswer to a confused treatise of publicke commerce, printed and dispersed at Midlebourghe and London, in fauour of the priuate Society of Merchants-Aduenturers. By a more serious discourse of exchange in merchandise, and merchandising exchange. Written for vnderstanding readers onely, in fauour of all loyall merchants, and for the aduancing of traffick in England.
Milles, Tho. (Thomas), 1550?-1627? / [1608] The custumers alphabet and primer. Conteining, their creede or beliefe in the true doctrine of Christian religion. Their ten commandementes, or rules of ciuill life and conuersation, daily grace, generall confession, speciall supplication and forme of prayers. Togither with a pertinent answere to all such, as eyther in iest or in earnest, seeming doubtfull themselues, would faine perswade others, that, the bringing home of traffique must needes decay our shipping. All tending to the true and assured aduancement of his Maiesties customes, without possibility of fraude or couyn. Alwaies prouided, in reading read all, or nothing at al.
Milles, Tho. (Thomas), 1550?-1627? / [1599] The custumers apology. That is to say, a generall answere to informers of all sortes, and their iniurious complaints, against the honest reputation of the collectors of her Maiesties custumes, specially in the out-portes of this realme. Written onely for vnderstanding readers and wise in highest authoritie, to reade and discerne by. Alwaies prouided, in reading reade all, or nothing at all.