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Author / [Publication date] Title
Liby, W. / [1656] Merlinus democritus;: or, The merry-conceited prognosticator : containing, a general judgment of the state of Great Brittain, France, and Ireland; and the great change and revolu[t]ion that will happen in the year of our Lord, 1655. Namely, the turning round of the wheel of fortune, and the calculating of every thing in its own proper center, the setting up of heaven vice-gerent, and the administering of truth in the equal scale of justice, the purging of the Commonwealth from caterpillars, the discarding of knaves, and the putting of honest men in their places, the reclaiming of lawyers from taking of fees, and an antidote prescribed for brokers and usurers, to cleer them of their extortionable malady of shaking whole lordships into a consumption. With the great and ominous eclipses that will be this year visible in our horizon, and the effects thereof. / By W. Liby, student in Astrologie.
Lichfield, William, d. 1448. / [ca. 1510] The remors of conscyence. Here begynneth certayne demonstracyons by our lorde to all synfull persones with the remors of mannes conscynce to the regarde of the bounte of our lorde.
Lichtenberger, Johannes, 15th cent. / [1663] Spectators, make a ring, that you may see the fatal battle which is like to be fought by two pow'rfull combatants:
Liddell, George. / [1699] The traveller's song; or, Pleasant meditations on the way. By George Liddell, in Edinburgh.
Liddell, George. / [1700] Divine meditations: or, A honey-comb to refresh weary travellers. Being a collection of divine sayings out of the Holy Scriptures of truth. Gathered by G.L.
Lidgold, Charles, d. 1701. / [1699] A sermon preach'd in the Cathedral-Church at Ely, July the 24th, 1698 on occasion of His Majesty's proclamation against atheism, and profaneness, &c / by Charles Lidgould ...
Lidgold, Charles, d. 1701. / [1699] Charity to our poor persecuted brethren abroad recommended in a sermon / preached on a fast-day, April 5, 1699, by Charles Lidgould ...
Liford, R. / [1693] England's fair warning to a speedy repentance: being an earnest exhortation to a holy life: or The only deliverer from eternal death and destruction. Wherein is plainly laid down the great duty of speedy repentance; with the wretched state of a sinner, and the blessed state of a saint: shewing how the one (after death) will be cast for ever into the dreadful flames of Hell-fire: and the other will be received up into Heaven, to celebrate eternal halelujah's to the Lord of Lords, who (sitting at the right-hand of his father) will shortly come to judge the world. Likewise, some pithy arguments to persuade men to close with Christ. Preached by R. Liford, a B.D. since the dreadful earthquakes that have lately happen'd; ... And now published, to awaken drowsie sinners, who still lye in security, whilst God's judgements are on the earth.
Lightbody, George. / [1638] Against the apple of the left eye of antichrist, or the masse book of lurking darknesse making way for the apple of the right eye of antichrist, the compleat masse book of palpable darknesse : this apple of the left eye, commonly called, the liturgie, or service book, is in great use both among the halting papists, and compleat papists, and the things written heere are also against the compleat masse book.
Lightbody, James. / [1695] Every man his own gauger wherein not only the artist is shown a more ready and exact method of gauging than any hitherto extant, but the most ignorant, who can but read English, and tell twenty in figures, is taught to find the content of any sort of cask or vessel, either full, or in part full, and to know if they be right siz'd : also what a pipe, hogshead, &c. amounts to at the common rate and measure they buy or sell at : with several useful tables to know the content of any vessel by, likewise a table shewing the price of any commodity, from one pound to an hundred weight, and the contrary : to which is added, the art of brewing beer, ale, mum, of fining, preserving and botling brew'd liquors, of making the most common physical ales now in use, of making several fine English wines : the vintners art of fining, curing, preserving all sorts of wines ... together with the compleat coffee-pan, teaching how to make coffee, tea, chocolate ... / by J. Lightbody ...
Lightbody, James. / [1695] The mariners jewel; or, A pocket companion for the ingenious Being of more general use for officers, seamen, carpenters, boatswains, pursers and stewards, then any thing yet published. Containing an alphabetical dictionary of all the naval terms; a general pay table; with a table of boatswain stores for each rank of shop; the proportion of prizes, with many other useful things both decimal and vulgarly demonstrated from a manuscript of Sir John Narbrough's and methodiz'd by James Lightbody, P.M.
Lightburn, William. / [1661] A thanksgiving sermon preached at Christ-Church before the lords justices and council upon the 23 of October, 1661, by W.L., D.D., chaunter of Christ-Church, Dublin.
Lightfoot, John, 1602-1675. / [1650] The temple, especially as it stood in the dayes of Our Saviovr described by John Lightfoote.
Lightfoot, John, 1602-1675. / [1649] The temple service as it stood in the dayes of our Saviour, described by John Lightfoot
Lightfoot, Peter, 17th cent. / [Printed in the Yeare, 1649] A battell with a vvaspes nest, or, A reply to an angry and railing pamphlet, written by Master Joseph Heming, called Judas excommunicated, or A vindication of the communion of saints &c.: wherein his arguments are answered, his abuses whipt and stript, the question whether Judas received the sacrament debated, and the affirmative proved ...
Ligolnes, Jean. / [1626. Auec permission] Punition de Dieu arrivee a Londres en Angleterre. Du grand nombre des morts en 24. heures, & marquez d'vne main sur le corps, qui remplit de craincte & tremblement les Royaumes d'Escosse & d'Angleterre.
Lilburne, George. / [1649] To every individuall member of the Honorable House of Commons, the humble remonstrance of George Lilburn, Esquire
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [in the yeare the Beast was wounded 1638] A worke of the Beast or A relation of a most vnchristian censure, executed vpon Iohn Lilburne, (novv prisoner in the fleet) the 18 of Aprill 1638. With the heavenly speech vttered by him at the time of his fuffering [sic]. Uery vsefull for these times both for the encouragement of the godly to suffer, and for the terrour and shame of the Lords adversaries.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1648] A whip for the present House of Lords, or the Levellers levelled.: in an epistle writ to Mr. Frost, secretary to the Committee of State, that sits at Darby House, in answer to a lying book said to be his called A declaration, &c. / By L.C. Io. Lilburne, prerogative prisoner in the Tower of London, Feb. 27, 1647.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1653] The upright mans vindication: or, An epistle writ by John Lilburn Gent. prisoner in Newgate, August 1. 1653.: Unto his friends and late neighbors, and acquaintance at Theobalds in Hartford-shire, and thereabouts in the several towns adjoyning; occasioned by Major William Packers calumniating, and groundlesly reproaching the said Mr John Lilburn.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1650] Two petitions presented to the supreame authority of the nation from thousands of the lords, owners, and commoners of Lincolneshire; against the Old Court-Levellers, or propriety-destroyers, the prerogative undertakers.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1647] Two letters the one from Lievtenant Colonell Iohn Lilbourne to Colonel Henry Martin, a member of the House of Commons, with his answer.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1653] The tryall, of L. Col. Iohn Lilburn: at the Sessions House in the Old-Baily, on Fryday, and Saturday, being the 19th and 20th of this instant August. With Lieutenant Collonel Iohn Lilburns speech to the jury before they went together to agree upon their verdict, and the reply of the counsel of the common-wealth thereunto. Together, with the verdict of not guilty brought in by the said jury.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1649] Truths victory over tyrants and tyranny.: Being the tryall of that worthy assertor of his countreys freedoms, Lieftenant [sic] Colonell John Lilburne, defender of the ancient and known laws of England, against men and devills, whether in King, Parliament, Army, or Councell of state. Guild-hall London, Octob. 26. Freed in open court, from his unjust and illegall charge of high-treason, and cruell imprisonment in the Tower, by the unbyassed and just verdict of this jewry, whose names are here inserted; Miles Pettit, Holburn-Condu. Stephen Iles, Friday-street. Abraham Smith, Smithfield. John King Smithfield. Nicholas Murrin, Gosling-str. Thomas Daintie, Cheapside. Edmund Keysar, Holb-bridge Edward Perkins Smithfield. Ralph Packman, Smithfield. William Cummins, Cheap. Symon Weeden, Bredstr. Henry Tooley, Bredstreet. All good men and true.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1646] A true relation of the materiall passages of Lieut. Col. Iohn Lilburnes sufferings, as they were represented and proved before the Right Honourable, the House of Peeres, in Parliament assembled, the 13. day of this instant Feb. 1645. Vnto which is annexed their Lordships order, made upon the bearing of the cause.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1649] The triall, of Lieut. Collonell John Lilburne,: by an extraordinary or special commission, of oyear and terminer at the Guild-Hall of London, the 24, 25, 26. of Octob. 1649. Being as exactly pen'd and taken in short hand, as it was possible to be done in such a croud and noise, and transcribed with an indifferent and even hand, both in reference to the court, and the prisoner; that so matter of fact, as it was there declared, might truly come to publick view. In which is contained all the judges names, and the names of the grand inquest, and the names of the honest jury of life and death. Vnto which is annexed a necessary and essential appendix, very well worth the readers, carefull perusal; if he desire rightly to understand the whole body of the discourse, and know the worth of that ner'e enough to be prised, bulwork of English freedom, viz. to be tried by a jury of legal and good men of the neighbour-hood. / Published by Theodorus Verax.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1653?] To the supreme authority for the common-wealth of England the humble petition of John Lilburn Esquire, prisoner in Newgate.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1646?] To the hon[ble]. the House of Commons now assembled in the high court of Parliament, the humble petition of John Lilburne Leift. [sic] Colonel. In all humilitie.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1646] To the right honourable the chosen and representative body of England assembled in Parliament. The humble petition of L.C. Iohn Lilburne a free man of England.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1650] To every individuall member of the supreme authority of the Parliament of the Commonwealth of England, but more especially to Colonell George Thompson chairman to the committee for regulating the new import of excise, and particularly for that of sope: The humble addresse of Lieutenant Coll. John Lilburne, a freeman of the Common-wealth of England.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1651] To every individuall member of the supream authority of the Parliament of the Commonwealth of England.: The humble addresse of Lieu. Col. John Lilburn, by way of answer to a most false and scandalous printed petition, delivered at the House door against him, by one William Huntington, upon Wednesday the 26 of November. 1651:
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1648] To every individuall member of the Honourable House of Commons: the humble remembrance of Lieutenant Col. John Lilburn.:
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [17 of July, 1649] To all the affectors and approvers in England of the London petition of the eleventh of September, 1648, but especially to the owners of it, by their subscriptions, either to it, or any other petition in the behalf of it; and particularly to the first promoters of it, my true friends, the citizens of London, &c. (continuing unshaken in their principles, by offices, places, or other base bribes or rewards) usually meeting at the Whalbone in Lothbury, behinde the Royal Exchange, commonly (but most unjustly) stiled Levellers.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [Printed 1649] Strength out of vveaknesse. Or, The finall and absolute plea of Lieutenant-Col. John Lilburn, prisoner in the Tower of London, against the present ruling power siting at Westminster.: Being an epistle writ by him, Sep. 30. 1649. to his much honored and highly esteemed friend, Master John Wood, Mr. Robert Everard, ... whose names are subscribed Aug. 20. 1649. to that excellent peece, entituled The Levellers (falsly so called) vindicated; being the stated case of the late defeated Burford troops. And to Charles Collins, Anthony Bristlebolt, ... whose names are subscribed, August 29. 1649. to that choicest of peeces, entituled An out-cry of the young-men and apprentices of London, after the lost fundamentall-lawes and liberties of England. Which said plea or epistle, doth principally contein the substance of a conference, betwixt Master Edmond Prideaux, the (falsly so called) attorney-generall, and Lievetenant-Colonell John Lilburne, upon Friday the 14 of September 1649. at the chamber of the said Mr. Prideaux, in the Inner-Temple.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [Printed in the year, 1649] The second part of Englands new-chaines discovered: or a sad representation of the uncertain and dangerous condition of the Common-Wealth:: directed to the supreme authority of England, the representors of the people in Parliament assembled. By severall wel-affected persons inhabiting the city of London, Westminster, the borough of Southwark, hamblets, and places adjacent, presenters and approvers of the late large petition of the eleventh of September. 1648. And as it is avowed by Lievtenant Colonel John Lilburn, Mr. Richard Overton, and Mr. Tho. Prince, upon perill of their lives; and for which they are now committed to the Tower as traytors.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [printed in the year, 1649] The second part of Englands new-chaines discovered: or a sad representation of the uncertain and dangerous condition of the Common-Wealth: directed to the supreme authority of England, the representors of the people in Parliament assembled. By severall wel-affected persons inhabiting the city of London, Westminster, the borough of Southwark, Hamblets, and places adjacent, presenters and approvers of the late large petition of the eleventh of September. 1648. And as it is avowed by Lieutenant Colonel John Lilburn, Mr. Richard Overton, and Mr. Tho. Prince, upon perill of their lives; and for which they are now committed to the Tower as traytors.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [printed in the year 1653] The second letter from John Lilburn Esquire, prisoner in Newgate: to the Right Honourable John Fowke, Lord Major of the city of London.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1656] The resurrection of John Lilburne, now a prisoner in Dover-Castle,: declared and manifested in these following lines penned by himself, and now at his desire published in print in these words.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1656] The resurrection of John Lilburne, now a prisoner in Dover-Castle,: declared and manifested in these following lines penned by himself, and now at his desire published in print in these following words.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1647] The resolved mans resolution,: to maintain with the last drop of his heart blood, his civill liberties and freedomes, granted unto him by the good, just, and honest declared lawes of England, (his native country) and never to sit still, so long as he hath a tongue to speake, or a hand to write, til he hath either necessitated his adversaries, the house of Lords, and their arbitrary associates in the house of Commons, either to doe him justice and right, by delivering him from his causelesse and illegall imprisonment, and out unto him, legall and ample reparations, for all his unjust sufferings or else send him to Tyburne: of which he is not afraid, and doubteth not if they doe it, but at and by his death, to doe them (Sampson like) more mischief, then he did them all his life. All which is expressed and declared in the following epistle, written by Lieut. Coll. John Lilburne, prerogative prisoner in the Tower of London, to a true friend of his, a citizen thereof, Aprill 1647.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1652] A remonstrance of Lieut. Col. John Lilburn:: concerning the lawes, liberties, priviledges, birthrights, freedom, and inheritances, of the frec-born [sic] people of England; in relation to the sentence denounced against him for banishment. Together with his resolution, to adhere and stand firm to the fundamental lawes of this nation; and inviolably to endeavour the preservation thereof; to the end, that justice and right may not be sold, denied, or deferred to any man. / Published by a well-wisher to that faithful-Lover of his Countrey, and constant sufferer for the liberties thereof, Lieut. Colonel John Lilburn.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [Printed Anno Dom. 1647] Regall tyrannie discovered: or, A discourse, shewing that all lawfull (approbational) instituted power by God amongst men, is by common agreement, and mutual consent.: Which power (in the hands of whomsoever) ought alwayes to be exercised for the good, benefit, and welfare of the trusters, and never ought other wise to be administered: ... In which is also punctually declared, the tyrannie of the kings of England, from the dayes of William the invader and robber, and tyrant, alias the Conqueror, to this present King Charles, ... Out of which is drawn a discourse, occasioned by the tyrannie and injustice inflicted by the Lords, upon that stout-faithful-lover of his country, and constant sufferer for the liberties thereof, Lieut. Col. John Lilburn, now prisoner in the Tower. In which these 4. following positions are punctually handled ... Vnto which is annexed a little touch, upon some palbable miscarriages, of some rotten members of the House of Commons: which house, is the absolute sole lawmaking, and law-binding interest of England.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [Printed 13. June. 1645] The reasons of Lieu Col: Lilbournes sending his letter to Mr. Prin,: humbly presented to the Honorable Committee of Examinations. Making my appearance (upon summons) before this Honorable Committee, to answer, to the complaint of Mr. Prin, for publishing in print a letter which I had sent unto him. And having upon demand, acknowledged the publishing thereof, I humbly intreated that I might have the favour, to render the reasons for my so doing: which you were pleased to grant, and to injoyn me to bring them in writing; for which I esteeme my self farther obliged unto this Honorable Committee. Unto whose grave considerations I humbly present my said reasons as followeth. Wherein I humbly intreat I may not appear arrogant or vain-glorious, though I enlarge my self in relation of my own condition and actions, it being a necessitie enforced upon me by my accuser Mr. Prinne.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1647] Rash oaths unwarrantable: and the breaking of them as inexcusable. Or, A discourse, shewing, that the two Houses of Parliament had little ground to make those oaths they have made,: or lesse ground to take, or presse the taking of them, being it is easie to be apprehended, they never intended to keep them, but onely made them for snares, and cloaks for knavery, as it is clearly evinced by their constant arbitrary and tyranicall practices, no justice nor right being to be found amongst them; by meanes of which they have declaratorily, and visibly lost the very soule and essence of true magistracy, (which is, the doing of justice, judgement, equity ... In which is also a true and just declaration of the unspeakable evill of the delay of justice, and the extraordinary sufferings of Lievtenant Colonell John Lilburne, very much occasioned by M. Henry Martins unfriendly and unjust dealing with him, in not making his report to the House. All which with divers other things of very high concernment, are declared in the following discourse, being an epistle, / written by Lievtenant-Colonell John Lilburne, prerogative prisoner in the Tower of London, to Colonell Henry Marten, a member of the House of Commons of England ... May 1647.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1647] Proposition of Liev. Col. John Lilburne prisioner in the Tower of London, made unto the Lords and Commons assembed at Westminster, and to the whole kingdome of England, October 2. 1647.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1648] The prisoners plea for a habeas corpus, or an epistle writ by L.C. Joh. Lilburne prerogative prisoner in the Tower of London the 4. of Aprill, to the Honourable Mr. W. Lenthall Speaker of the House of Commons.: In which is fully proved, that the judges are bound by law and their oaths to grant a habeas corpus to any prisoner ... and to deny it ... is to forsweare themselves, for which they may be in law indicted for perjury, and upon conviction, are for ever to be discharged of their office, service and councell. In which is also declared the usurpation of Mr. Oliver Crumwell, who hath forcibly usurped unto himselfe the office of L.G. in the Army, for almost 12. moneths together, and thereby hath robbed the kingdome of its treasure, under pretence of pay, which he hath no right nnto [sic], and by the power of the said office hath tyrannized over the lives, liberties, and estates of the freemen of England ... all which John Lilburne will venture his life according to the law of the land to make good, unto which he hath annexed his epistle which he writ to the prentices of London the 10th of May 1639 ...
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1653] The prisoner's most mournful cry against the present oppression and tyranny that is exercised upon him. Or, An epistle written by John Lilburn Esq; prisoner in New-gate, July 1. 1653. unto the Right Honorable John Fowke Lord Maior of London.:
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1648] The prisoners mournfull cry, against the Iudges of the Kings Bench.: Or an epistle writ by lieut. col. John Lilburne, prisoner in the tower of London, unto Mr. Iustice Roll : declaring the illegall dealing of himself, and Mr. Justice Bacon with him, in reference to his habeas corpus. Vnto which is annexed his two petitions to the said Iudges, and the petitions of Mr. William Thompson, and Mr. Woodward &c. in which are contained a lash for Mr. Oliver Cromwell and other his spaniolised creatures. With divers other remarkable things worth publique view.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1649] A preparative to an hue and cry after Sir Arthur Haslerig, (a late Member of the forcibly dissolved House of Commons, and now the present wicked, bloody, and tyrannicall governor of Newcastle upon Tine) for his severall ways attempting to murder, and by base plots, conspiracies and false witnesse to take away the life of Lieutenant Colonel John Lilburn now prisoner in the Tower of London: as also for his felonious robbing the said Lieut Col. John Lilburn of betwixt 24 and 2500 l. by the meer power of his own will, ... In which action alone, he the said Haslerig hath outstript the Earl of Strafford, in traiterously subverting the fundamentall liberties of England, ... and better and more justly deserves to die therefore, then ever the Earl of Strafford did ... by which tyrannicall actions the said Haslerig is become a polecat, a fox, and a wolf, ... and may and ought to be knockt on the head therefore, ... / All which the said Lieutenant Col. John Lilburn hath cleerly and evidently evinced in his following epistle of the 18 of August 1649, to his uncle George Lilburn Esquire of Sunderland, in the county of Durham.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1639] The poore mans cry. Wherein is shevved the present miserable estate of mee Iohn Lilburne, close prisoner in the fleete. Also an humble petition to his Maiesties honorable privy councill, for meantenance that I famish not.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1648] A plea, or protest, made by VVilliam Prynne, Esquire, and by him sent unto J.M. Knight, one of the eleven impeached Members.: Wherein he declares the injustice and illegality of the Lords, Commons, and grandees of the Armies proceedings against him. Whereunto is annexed the case of A.B. (a citizen of London, and a free commoner of England) truly stated, in reference to a pretended impeachment of treason depending in the House of Peers against him : with an answer to certain queres framed thereupon : unto which is annexed the answer of the said A.B. unto the Lords assembled in Parliament in point of law, ... in which it is fully proved, that the House of Lords ... hath not the least jurisdiction in the world over any commoner ... with a full answer to all their presidents in such cases; and that it is not safe for the said A.B. to kneel at the Lords barre, because it is stooping and submitting to their jurisdiction. / Published for the common good of all honest Englishmen, by Lionel Hurbin Gentleman, March 17. 1647.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1647] Plaine truth without feare or flattery, or, A true discovery of the unlawfulnesse of the Presbyterian government it being inconsistent with monarchy, and the peoples liberties, and contrary both to the protestation and covenant : the end of establishing the militia of London in such hands as it is now put into by the new ordinance, the betraying votes and destructive practices of a traiterous party in the House of Commons concerning certain petions for liberty and justice : also, a vindication of His Excellency Sir Thomas Fairfax, concerning certaine scurrulous words uttered by some of the said faction : with the meanes and wayes that must be used to obtaine reliefe against the said cyrannous usurpers, and for reducing the parliament to its due rights, power and priviledges, in the preservation of the kingdomes laws and liberties / written by I.L.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1649] The picture of the Councell of State, held forth to the free people of England by Lieut. Col. John Lilburn, M. Thomas Prince, and M. Richard Overton, now prisoners in the Tower of London for bearing testimony to the liberties of England against the present tyrants at White-Hall, and their associates, or, a full narrative of the late extrajudiciall and military proceedings against them ; together with the substance of their severall examinations, answers, and deportments before them at Darby-house, upon March 28 last.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [Printed in the year, 1649] The picture of the Councel of State,: held forth to the free people of England by Lievt. Col. John Lilburn, Mr Thomas Prince, and Mr Richard Overton, now prisoners in the Tower of London. Or, a full narrative of the late extra-judicial and military proceedings against them. Together with the substance of their several examinations, answers and deportments before them at Darby house, upon the 28. of March last.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [Printed in the yeare, when some of the mercinary officers and souldiers of Sir Thomas Fairfaxes Army, that were pretendedly raised for to fight for the liberties and freedomes of England, avowedly drew their swords at the House of Commons doore, to destroy those that really stood for their lawes and liberties, 1647 i.e. 1648] The peoples prerogative and priviledges, asserted and vindicated, (against all tyranny whatsoever.) By law and reason.: Being a collection of the marrow and soule of Magna Charta, and of all the most principall statutes made ever since to this present yeare, 1647. For the preservation of the peoples liberties and properties. With cleare proofs and demonstrations, that now their lawes and liberties are nigher subvertion, then they were when they first began to fight for them, by a present swaying powerfull faction, amongst the Lords, Commons, and Army, ... so that perfect vassalage and slavery (by force of armes) in the nature of Turkish janisaries, or the regiments of the guards of France, is likely (to perpetuitie) to be setled, if the people doe not speedily look about them, and act vigorusly for the preventing of it. / Compiled by Lievt. Col. John Lilburne, prerogative prisoner in the Tower of London, and published by him for the instruction, information and benefit of all true hearted English-men.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1647] The out-cryes of oppressed commons.: Directed to all the rationall and understanding men in the kingdome of England, and dominion of Wales, (that have not resolved with themselves to be vassells and slaves, unto the lusts and wills of tyrants.) Fron Lieut. Col. John Lilburne, prerogative prisoner in the Tower of London, and Richard Overton, prerogative prisoner, in the infamous gaole of Newgate. Febr. 1647.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1646] London's liberty in chains discovered.: And, published by Lieutenant Colonell John Lilburn, prisoner in the Tower of London, Octob. 1646.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1647] The opressed mans opressions declared: or, An epistle written by Lieut. Col. John Lilburn,: prerogative prisoner (by the illegall and arbitrary authority of the House of Lords) in the Tower of London, to Col. Francis West, Lieutenant thereof: in which the opressing cruelty of all the gaolers of England is declared, and particularly the Lieutenant of the Tower. As also, there is thrown unto Tho. Edwards, the author of the 3 vlcerous Gangrænes, a bone or two to pick: in which also, divers other things are handled, of speciall concernment to the present times.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1647] The oppressed mans oppressions declared: or An epistle written by Lieut. Col. Iohn Lilburne, prerogative-prisoner (by the illegall and arbitrary authority of the House of Lords) in the Tower of London, to Col. Francis West, lieutenant thereof: in which the oppressing cruelty of all the gaolers of England is declared, and particularly the lieutenants of the Tower. As also, there is thrown unto Tho. Edwards, the author of the 3d. ulcerous gangræna, a bone or two to pick: in which also, divers things are handled, of speciall concernment to the present times.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1648] The oppressed mans importunate and mournfull cryes to be brought to the barre of iustice, or, An epistle writ by Lievt. Col. John Lilburne (without all shadow of law and iustice, imprisoned in the Tower of London) ...
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1647] A new complaint of an old grievance, made by Lievt. Col. Iohn Lilburne, prerogative prisoner in the Tower of London. Nove. 23. 1647. To every individuall member of the Honourable House of Commons.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1649] A new bull-bayting: or, A match play'd at the Town-Bull of Ely:: by twelve mungrills. Viz. [brace] 4 English 4 Irish 4 Scotch [brace] doggs, Iohn Lilburn, Richard Overton, Thomas Prince, and William Walwyn, to stave and nose. ; With his last will and testament, and several legacies bequeathed to the Iuncto, the Councel of State, and army.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1653] More light to Mr. John Lilburnes jury
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1645] A more full relation of the great battell fought betweene Sir Tho: Fairfax, and Goring. on Thursday last, 1645.: Made in the House of Commons by Lieut: Col: Lilbourne, the last messenger that came from the army. With the manner of the fight, Goring cut on the eare. The Lieutenant Generall of the ordnance taken, and the particulars of what losse was on both sides. And the routing of a party of Gorivgs [sic] forces by the club-men. Also foure propositions presented to the House of Commons in the behalfe of the army. Commanded to be printed, and is published according to order.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1649] A manifestation from Lieutenant Col. John Lilburn, Mr. William Walwyn, Mr. Thomas Prince, and Mr. Richard Overton (now prisioners in the Tower of London) and others, commonly (though unjustly) styled Levellers : intended for full vindication from the many aspersions cast upon them, to render them odious to the world, and unserviceable to the Common-wealth, and to satisfie and ascertain all men whereunto all their motions and endeavours tend, and what is the ultimate scope of their engagement in the publick affaires : they also that render evill for good, are our adversaries, because we follow the thing that good is.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1653] Malice detected, in printing certain informations and examinations concerning Lieut. Col. John Lilburn, the morning of his tryal; and which were not at all brought into his indictment.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [Printed in the yeare, 1638] A light for the ignorant or A treatise shevving, that in the nevv Testament, is set forth three kingly states or governments, that is, the civill state, the true ecclesiasticall state, and the false ecclesiasticall state.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1653] Lieu. Col. John Lilburn's plea in law,: against an Act of Parliament of the 30 of January, 1651. entituled, An act for the execution of a judgment given in Parliament against Lieu. Col. John Lilburn. Contrived and penned, on purpose for him, by a true and faithful lover of the fundamental laws and liberties of the free people of England, ... all which compels and forceth the penman to be very studious of his own good and preservation, ... and therefore, for his own good and benefit, the honest readers information, and for Mr Lilburns the prisoners advantage, he presents these ensuing lines to thy view, and his, as the form of a plea; that the penman hereof, as a true well-wisher of his, and the people of England, would have him to ingross into parchment, and to have ready by him to make use of (in case his own braines cannot contrive a better) when he is called up to answer for his life before the judges of the upper-bench, or any other bar of justice whatsoever; and the said form of a plea for him thus followeth verbatim.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [Printed in the yeare 1646] Liberty vindicated against slavery.: Shewing, that imprisonment for debt, refusing to answer interrogatories, long imprisonment, though for just causes. Abuse of prisons, and cruell extortion of prison-keepers, are all destructive to the fundamentall laws and common freedomes of the people. Published for the use of all the free-borne of England, whom it equally concernes, by occasion of the House of Lords commitment of Lieut. Col. John Lilburn, close prisoner, first to New-gate, and next to the Tower. / By a lover of his country, and sufferer for the common liberty.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1643] A letter sent from Captaine Lilburne,: to divers of his friends, citizens, and others of good account in London, wherein he fully expresseth the misery of his imprisonment, and the barbarous usage of the Cavaliers towards him. Desiring them (if it were possible) to use some means for his releasement.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1651] A iust reproof to Haberdashers-Hall: or, An epistle: writ by Lieut. Colonel John Lilburn, July 30. 1651. to four of the commissioners at Haberdashers Hall, viz. Mr James Russell, M. Edward Winsloe, M William Mellins, and M. Arthur Squib, wherein is set forth their unjust and unrighteous dealing in severall cases; with the relations of the said John Lilburn, and their captiving their understandings to the tyrannical will of Sir Arthur Haslerigge, who hath most unjustly endeavoured a long time together, the exterpation of the family of the said John Lilburn.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1651] A letter of Lieutenant Colonel John Lilburns,: written to Mr. John Price of Colemanstreet London, (and a member of Mr. John Goodwins congregation) the 31. of March 1651. about the harsh and unequal dealing that his unckle Mr. George Lilburn, and several others of his family findes from the hands of Sir Arthur Haslerig. Unto which is annexed Mr. John Price his answer thereunto.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1648] The lawes funerall. Or, An epistle written by Lieutenant Col. John Lilburn,: prisoner in the Tower of London, unto a friend of his, giving him a large relation of his defence, made before the judges of the Kings bench, the 8. of May 1648. against both the illegal commitments of him by the House of Lords, and the House of Commons, ...
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [Printed in the year, 1654] The last vvill & testament of Lieutenant Col. John Lilburn:: with his speech to some friends in Jersey a little before his death: also certain legacies given to divers persons of note. Together with his elegy and epitaph. First taken in short-hand by Sister Abigail Lemmon, and since published by Ruth Dox.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [Printed in the yeare 1653. In March] L. Colonel John Lilburne revived.: Shewing the cause of his late long silence, and cessation from hostility against alchemy St. Oliver, and his rotten secretary; as also of the report of his death. With an answer in part, to the pestilent calumniation of Cap: Wendy Oxford (Cromvvels spie upon the Dutch, and upon the English royallists, sojonrning [sic] in the United Provinces) closely couched in a late delusive pamphlet of the said Oxfords, called The unexpected life, & wished for death, of the thing called parliament in England All vvhich, vvith many historicall passages, giveing light into the unvvorthy practises of the English grandees, is contained in three letters (The first to a friend in the United Provinces, The second to a friend in Scotland. And the third, to the honourable, Colonel Henry Martin, in England VVritten by L. Colonel John Lilburne.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1647] The ivglers discovered,: in two letters writ by Lievt. Col. John Lilburne, prerogative prisoner in the Tower of London, the 28. September, 1647. to his Excellency Sir Thomas Fairfax, Captaine Generall of all the forces in England and Wales, discovering the turn-coat, Machiavell practises, and under-hand dealings of Lievt. Gen. Cromwell, and his soone in law, Commissary Generall Ireton, and the rest of their hocus pocus faction in his Excellencies Counsell of Warre, the first of which letters thus followeth. Unto which is annexed some advice to the private soldiers.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1647] The just mans justification: or A letter by way of plea in barre;: written by L. Col. John Lilburne. to the Honrble Justice Reeves, one of the justices of the Common-wealths courts, commonly called Common Pleas wherein the sinister and indirect practises of Col. Edward King against L. Col. Lilburne, are discovered. 1. In getting him cast into prison for maxy [sic] weekes together, without prosecuting any charge against him. 2. In arresting him upon a groundlesse action of two thousand pound in the Court of Common Pleas; thereby to evade and take off L. C. Lilburns testimony to the charge of high treason given in against Col. King, and now depending before the Honourable House of Commons hereunto annexed. In which letter is fully asserted and proved that this cause is only tryable in Parliament, and not in any subordinate court of justice whatsoever.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1653] The just defence of John Lilburn, against such as charge him with turbulency of spirit.:
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [Anno Dom. 1649] An impeachment of high treason against Oliver Cromwel, and his son in law Henry Ireton Esquires, late Members of the late forcibly dissolved House of Commons,: presented to publique view; by Lieutenant Colonel Iohn Lilburn close prisoner in the Tower of London, for his real, true and zealous affections to the liberties of his native country. In which following discourse or impeachment, he engageth upon his life, either upon the principles of law ... or upon the principles of Parliaments ancient proceedings, or upon the principles of reason ... before a legal magistracy, when there shal be one again in England ... to prove the said Oliver Cromwel guilty of the highest treason that ever was acted in England, and more deserving punishment and death then the 44 judges hanged for injustice by King Alfred before the Conquest; ... In which are also some hints of cautions to the Lord Fairfax, for absolutely breaking his solemn engagement with his souldiers, &c. to take head and to regain his lost credit in acting honestly in time to come; ... In which is also the authors late proposition sent to Mr Holland, June 26. 1649. to justifie and make good at his utmost hazard ... his late actions or writings in any or all his books.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1646] The iust mans iustification: or A letter by way of plea in barre;: Written by L. Col. John Lilburne, to the Honourable Justice Reeves, one of the justices of the Common-wealths courts, commonly called Common Pleas. Wherein the sinister and indirect practices of Col. Edward King against L. Col. Lilburne, are discovered. 1. In getting him cast into prison for many weekes together, without prosecuting any charge against him. 2. In arresting him upon a groundlesse action of two thousand pounds in the Court of Common Pleas; thereby to evade and take off L. Col. Lilburns testimony to the charge of high treason given in against Col. King, and now depending before the Honourable House of Commons. In which letter is fully asserted and proved that this cause is only tryable in Parliament, and not in any subordinate court of justice whatsoever.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1647] Ionahs cry out of the whales belly: or, Certaine epistles writ by Lieu. Coll. Iohn Lilburne, unto Lieu. Generall Cromwell, and Mr. John Goodwin:: complaining of the tyranny of the Houses of Lords and Commons at Westminster; and the unworthy dealing of divers (of those with him that are called) his friends. To the man whom God hath honoured, and will further honour, if he continue honouring him, Lieu. Generall Cromwell at his house in Drury Lane, neare the red-Lion this present.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [Printed in the yeare, 1645 i.e. 1646] Innocency and truth justified. First against the unjust aspersions of W. Prinn, affirmed in the 17th. page of his pamphlet, called A fresh discovery of prodigious new wandring blazing stars and fire brands, ineight lines of which there is above a dozen of uutruths [sic], cleerly laid open. Next, by a just moderate reply, to his other pamphlet, called The lyar confounded, in which the case of Leiu. [sic] Coll. Lilburns imprisonment is truly stated, legally discussed, and vindicated, from the miserable misstatedness thereof by William Prinn. As also by a cleere manifestation of the strong and malitious indeavour of W. Prinn, unjustly to take away L.C. Lilburns life, by groundlesse accusing him of high treason, in designing and plotting to suppresse and cut of [sic] this present Parliament by force of armes; ... Unto which ... is annexed a coppy of a letter written by L.C. L. to one of his special friends when he was in his cruell close imprisonment, ... published now for the incouragement of the saints, cheerfully to suffer afflictions and sorrowes for the sake and cause of their lord and master.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1645] In the 150 page of the book called, An exact collection of the Parliaments remonstrances, declarations, &c. published by speciall order of the House of Commons, March 24. 1642 we find there a question answered fit for all men to take notice of in these times.:
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1645] In the 150 page of the book called, An exact collection of the Parliaments remonstrances, declarations, &c. published by speciall order of the House of Commons, March 24. 1642 we find there a question answered fit for all men to take notice of in these times.:
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [Anno Domini, 1649] The hunting of the foxes from New-Market and Triploe-Heaths to White·Hall, by five small beagles (late of the Armie.) Or The grandie-deceivers unmasked (that you may know them.) Directed to all the free-commons of England, but in especiall, to all that have, and are still engaged in the military service of the Common-Wealth. / By Robert Ward, Thomas Watson, Simon Graunt, George Jellis, and William Sawyer, late members of the Army.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1653] The humble and further demand of Iohn Lilburne Gent. prisoner at the bar, in order to the inabling of him to plead to the bill of indictment preferred against him; whereunto he is required to this day (being the thirteenth day of August. 1653.) to plead. The said John Lilburne prisoner at the bar having formerly demanded oyer or hearing of the Act of Parliament in the said indictment mentioned, and thereupon a paper purporting an Act of Parliament being read unto him, in these words, viz. An Act for the execution of a judgement given in Parliament against Lieutenant Colonel John Lilburn.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1653] An hue-and cry after the fundamental lawes and liberties of England: occasionally written upon the stealing of one of the grand assertors of them out of Newgate, by a party of men on horseback, pretending themselves to be souldiers, raised and paid by the people of England (not for the subversion,) but the preservation of the said lawes and liberties, &c. Together with some queries, and brief resolves, touching the present state of things, written for the consolation of the saints now reigning. By a well-wisher to the saints now reigning on earth, had they had the patience to have staid till the people had chose them, or that Christ the King of Saints above --- had setled the government upon them.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1647] The grand plea of Lievt. Col. John Lilburne, prerogative prisoner in the Tower of London,: against the present tyrannicall House of Lords, which he delivered before an open committee of the House of Commons, the twenteth day of October, 1647. where Mr. Iohn Maynard the lawyer had the chaire.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1646] The free-mans freedom vindicated. Or A true relation of the cause and manner of Lievt. Col. Iohn Lilburns present imprisonment in Newgate,: being thereunto arbitrarily and illegally committed, by the House of Peeres, Iune 11. 1646. for his delivering in, at their open barre, under his hand and seal, his protestation, against their incroaching upon the common liberties of all the commons of England, in endeavouring to try him, a commoner of England, in a criminall cause, contrary to the expresse tenour and forme of the 29. chap. of the great charter of England, and for making his legall and iust appeal to his competent, propper and legal tryers and judges, the Commons of England, in Parliament assembled.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1648] Foundations of freedom; or An agreement of the people: proposed as a rule for future government in the establishment of a firm and lasting peace. Drawn up by several well-affected persons, and tendered to the consideration of the general Councel of the Army; and now offered to the consideration of all persons who are at liberty, by printing, or otherwise, to give their reasons for, or against it. Unto which is annexed several grievances by some persons, offered to be inserted in the said agreement, but adjudged only necessary to be insisted on, as fit to be removed by the next repesentatives [sic].
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [Printed Octob. 1645] England's birth-right justified: against all arbitrary usurpation, whether regall or parliamentary, or under what vizor soever. With divers queries, observations and grievances of the people, declaring this Parliaments present proceedings to be directly contrary to those fundamentall principles, whereby their actions at first were justifyable against the King, in their present illegall dealings with those that have been their best friends, advancers and preservers: and in other things of high concernment to the freedom of all the free-born people of England; by a well-wisher to the just cause for which Lieutenant Col. John Lilburne is unjustly in-prisoned in New-gate.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1653] For the worshipful, Mr. Steel the recorder of London To be communicated to the rest of the bench or goal-delivery at Guild-hall: these with speed.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1647] For every individuall member of the honourable House of Commons
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1653] The exceptions of John Lilburne Gent. prisoner at the Barre, to a bill of indictment: preferred against him, grounded upon a pretended act, intituled, An Act for the execution of a judgement given in Parliament against Lieutenant Collonel John Lilburn: which judgement is by the said Act supposed to be given the 15 day of January, 1651.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [Printed in the Yeere 1648] Englands weeping spectacle:: or, The sad condition of Lievtenant Colonell John Lilburne : crying to all who have any conscience or compassion, for assistance and deliverance from his unjust, long and cruell sufferings. Wherein (as in a glasse) all Englishmen may see the slavish condition, unto which (after so much blood, time and treasure spent) they are yet by perfidious men (who vowed and promised to deliver them from all tyrannie and oppression) still most wofully subjected.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1649] Englands new chains discovered; or The serious apprehensions of a part of the people, in behalf of the Commonwealth;: (being presenters, promoters, and approvers of the large petition of September 11. 1648.) Presented to the supreme authority of England, the representers of the people in Parliament assembled. / By Lieut. Col. John Lilburn, and divers other citizens of London, and borough of Southwark; February 26. 1648. whereunto his speech delivered at the bar is annexed.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1650] The Engagement vindicated & explained, or The reasons upon which Leiut. [sic] Col. John Lilburne, tooke the Engagement.: Published by a well-wisher to the present authority, on purpose to satisfie scrupulous minds in the lawfulnesse of taking the said Engagement. January 22. 1650. Licensed according to order, and entered into the register book at Stationers Hall.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [Printed in the yeer 1649] A discourse betwixt Lieutenant Colonel Iohn Lilburn close prisoner in the Tower of London, and Mr Hugh Peter: upon May 25. 1649. Published by a friend, for the publick benefit.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [Jan. 1648] A defiance to tyrants. Or The araignment of two illegall committees. viz. The close committee of Lords and Commons appointed to examine the London agents. And the committee of plundered ministers. In two pleas made by L.C. Lilburne prerogative prisoner in the the Tower of London. Wherein is clearely declared the unjustness, arbitrariness, and absolute unlawfulness of the late proceedings of that close committee of Lords and Commons against the London agents. And also, proving all the proceedings of the committee of plundered ministers in summoning and imprisoning severall citizens of London, for refusing to pay tythes, to bee an absolute subversion of the fundamentall lawes of the land, and treason of as high a nature as any the Earle of Strafford lost his head for; they making their will a law unto the kingdome; there being no law at all in the kingdome, whereby the London-Priests can claime tythes, or recover them from any of their parishoners.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1653] A defensive declaration of Lieut. Col. John Lilburn,: against the unjust sentence of his banishment, by the late Parliament of England; directed in an epistle from his house in Bridges in Flanders, May 14. 1653. (Dutch or new still, or the 4 of may 1653. English or old stile) to his Excellency the Lord General Cromwell, and the rest of the officers of his Army, commonly sitting in White-hall in councel, managing the present affairs of England, &c. Unto which is annexed, an additional appendix directed from the said Leut. Col. John Lilburn, to his Excellency and his officers, occasioned by his present imprisonment in Newgate; and some groundless scandals, for being an agent of the present King, cast upon him by some great persons at White-hall, upon the delivery of his third address (to the councel of State, by his wife and several other of his friends) dated from his captivity in Newgate the 20 of June 1653.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1645] The copy of a letter, from Lieutenant Colonell John Lilburne, to a freind:
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1651 i.e. 1652] A declaration of Lieutenant-Colonel John Lilburn to the free-born pcople [sic] of England.: And his speech to the Parliament, on Tuesday last; in answer to the sentence denounced against him by Mr. Speaker, by speciall order and command together with his resolution (come life come death) not personally to yield active submission to the said sentence. And divers other remarkable things, worth the knowledge of all the free-men, not only of London, but of all England. Subscribed, John Lilburn.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1645] A copie of a letter, written by John Lilburne Leut. Collonell. To Mr. William Prinne Esq.: (Upon the coming out of his last booke, intituled Truth triumphing over falshood, antiquity over novelty) in which he laies down five propositions, which he desires to discusse with the said Mr. Prinne.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [Decemb. 18. 1646] The charters of London: or, The second part of Londons liberty in chaines discovered.: In which by the ancient, rationall, and fundamentall charters of the famous City of London, is proved and declared, that it is the true and undeniable right of all and every the barons, burgesses, free-men, or commoners of London, to have their free vote in chusing out, annually from amongst themselves, a lord major, two sheriffes, and all their alder-men; ... with divers other things worth the knowledg of all the free-men, not only of London, but of all England. For whose good this is published by Lieut. Col: John Lilburn, prisoner in the Tower of London, for the common liberties of the kingdome against the usurpations of the House of Lords.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1651] The case of the tenants of the Mannor of Epworth in the isle of Axholm in the County of Lincoln.: Truly stated in brief by Lieu. Col. John Lilburn, and others of the free-holders there, on purpose to inform every man in the justice and equity of their case. And to prevent the many mis-informations of M. John Gibbons, and the drainers, and their participants.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [Printed in the yeare of our Lord, 1645] An answer to nine arguments. Written by T. B.: Wherein is plainly from the scriptures shewed, the weaknesse of his arguments, whereby he undertakes to prove both the Church and Ministry of England true; as likewise describing the nature and properties of a true Church and Ministry. Written long since by that faithfull servant of God and his countrey, John Lilburne Lieftenant [sic] Collonell: and now published for further good, by a well-willer to him and the truth.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [May 1652] As you were, or, The Lord General Cromwel and the grand officers of the armie their remembrancer wherein as in a glass they may see the faces of their soules spotted with apostacy, ambitious breach of promise, and hocus-pocus-juggleing with the honest soldiers and the rest of the free-people of England : to the end that haveing seene their deformed and fearfull visage, they may be returning to doe their first pretended workes, wipe of their spots, mend their deformities & regaine their lost credit : in a word, save themselves and the gaspeing libertyes of the surprized and enslaved English nation : least enlargement and deliverance arise to the English from another place, but they and their fathers house shall be destroyed : Ester 4. and 14. : all which is contained in a letter directed to the Lord Generall Cromwel, to be communicated to the grandees of his army / written by L. Colonel John Libvrne May 1652 ...
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1646] An anatomy of the Lords tyranny and iniustice exercised upon Lieu. Col. Iohn Lilburne, now a prisoner in the Tower of London.: Delivered in a speech by him, Novem. 6. 1646. before the honorable Committee of the House of Commons, appointed to consider of the priviledges of the commons of England: the originall copy of which, he in obedience to the order and command of the said Committee, delivered in writing to the hands of Col. Henry Martin, chairm-man of the said Committee: Nov. 9. 1646 and now published to the view of all the commons of England, for their information, & knowledge of their liberties and priviledges.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1653] The afflicted mans out-cry, against the injustice and oppression exercised upon; or, An epistle of John Lilburn, gent. prisoner in Newgate, August 19. 1653. to Mr. Feak, minister at Christ Church in London.:
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [Printed in the yeare of hope, of Englands purgation, & the prelates dissolution. Anno 1639] [Come out of her my people] or an ansvver to the questions of a gentlevvoman (a professour in the Antichristian Church of England) about hearing the publicke ministers vvhere it is largely discussed and proved to be sinfull and unlavvfull. Also a iust apologie for the way of total separation (commonly but falsely called Brownisme) that it is the truth of God, though lightly esteemed in the eyes of the blinde world. With a challenge to dispute with them publickly before King & Counsell: to prove whatsoever I said at the pillery against them. Viz. that the calling of them all is jure diabolo: even from the divell himselfe. By mee John Lilburne. Close prisoner in the Fleete for the cause of Christ.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657. / [1647] The additionall plea of Lievt. Col. John Lilburne, prerogative prisoner in the Tower of London, the 28. of October, 1647.: Which he sent unto the committee of the House of Commons, where Mr. Iohn Maynard the lawyer hath the chaire, with a letter, which letter thus followeth.
Lilburne, Robert, 1613-1665. / [1651] Tvvo letters from Col. Robert Lilburne.: The one to the Honourable William Lenthall Esquire, Speaker of the Parliament. The other to his Excellency the Lord Generall. Containing the particulars of the totall rout and overthrow of the Earl of Derby, and the forces under his command in Lancashire on the 25 of August 1651. By the Parliament forces under the said Colonel Robert Lilburne. Imprimatur Hen. Scobel Cleric. Parliamenti.
Lilburne, Robert, 1613-1665. / [Sept. 23. 1645] Col: Lilburnes letter to a friend:: published to vindicate his aspersed reputation.
Lilburne, Robert, 1613-1665. / [1652] Lillies ape whipt: by Philastrogus.
Lilburne, Robert, 1613-1665. / [in the year 1653] By the Commander in Chief of the forces in Scotland. Whereas His Excellency by his proclamation of the fifth day of November, 1650. heretofore published (remaining still in force) requiring plenary satisfaction for goods, and life for life taken from any of the English army ...
Lilly, William, 1602-1681. / [printed in the year 1660] William Lilly student in astrologie, his past and present opinion touching monarchy in these nations: and his decision of the controversie between the Normans and the Long-Parliament.
Lilly, William, 1602-1681. / [1647] The vvorld's catastrophe, or Europes many mutations untill, 1666.: The fate of Englands monarchy untill its subversion. Government of the vvorld under God by the seven planetary angels; their names, times of government. An exact type of the three suns seen in Cheshire and Shropshire, 3 April 1647. Their signification and portent, astrologically handled. / By VVilliam Lilly student in Astrologie: who is, amicus patria, & veritas amator. To which is added, A whip for Wharton.
Lilly, William, 1602-1681. / [1688] A very strange prediction of liberty of conscience, foretold (in the year 1652.) and published by our late famous English astrologer VVilliam Lilly, tho then not vulgerly understood, and was therefore the less taken notice of, tho presaging things of great weight and worth, such as the things following may be. First, a church way, laws and orders decreed of God for this kingdom of England in time to come, and by what kind of people to be carried on, and how they shall be qualified for their said work, and how the people in this kingdom may be fitted to receive the same. Secondly, that in favour thereof the then present chief or head magistrate in the kingdom shall respit the execution of the penal laws, by the name of his sharp laws. Thirdly, that about that time the terestial Jerusalem shall be recovered out of the hands of the Turks, the Jews converted, and the fullness of the gentiles brought in, as the scriptures of the Old and New Testaments do declare. With allowance
Lilly, William, 1602-1681. / [1688?] Two famous prophesies and predictions of Mr. William Lilly, the most judicious and learned astrologer of the age taken from his secret writings, penned by him in 1644 : the former of which, exactly pointing at the times, by foretelling the mischief, danger and misery these, and other Protestant kingdoms, should be exposed to, by the crafty counsels and treacheries of the Romish priests, and by what means their deliverance should be wrought.
Lilly, William, 1602-1681. / [1644] Svpernatvrall sights and apparitions, seen in London, June 30, 1644 interpreted with a mathematicall discovrse of the now imminent conjunction of Iupiter and Mars, 26 July, 1644, the effects which either here or in some neere countries from thence may be expected / by Will. Lilly.
Lilly, William, 1602-1681. / [1677] Strange news from the east, or, A sober account of the comet or blazing-star that has been seen several mornings of late giving a relation of its time of rising, colour, magnitude and other circumstances : with an historical discourse of the most eminent comets that have been seen for some hundreds of years, and the effects that followed / by W.L.
Lilly, William, 1602-1681. / [Printed in the year MDCLXXVI. 1676] Some further remarks upon Mr. Gadbury's defence of Scorpio by way of addition, to a just reward for unreasonable service. Wherein not only Mr. Gadbury's pretentions to astrology are dissipated; but even his title to learning and right reason (which by virtue of his horoscope he challenges) is shaken. By the Man in the Moon.
Lilly, William, 1602-1681. / [1644] A prophecy of the white king, and dreadfull dead-man explaned to which is added the prophecie of Sibylla Tibvrtina and prediction of Iohn Kepler, all of especiall concernment for these times / by William Lilly ...
Lilly, William, 1602-1681. / [1649] A peculiar prognostication astrologically predicted according to art: VVhether, or no, His Majestie shall suffer death this present yeere 1649. / The possibility thereof discussed and divulged, by William Lilly, student in astrologie.
Lilly, William, 1602-1681. / [1678] Mr. Lilly's new prophecy, or, Certain notable passages in his writings observed to which is added, an astrological account of the future plenty or scarcity, dearth or cheapness of most sorts of fruits of the earth, merchandize, and commodities : as also, of the great floods, extraordinary snows, and other remarkable alterations of weather, and the diseases like to be predominant in peoples bodies this winter and the spring following.
Lilly, William, 1602-1681. / [Printed in the year, 1667] Observations for this present year, 1667: By William Lilly student in astrology.
Lilly, William, 1602-1681. / [1673] News from the heavens, or, New prophecies and astrological predictions relating to the present state of Europe, and other most important affairs of our age. / By Mr. Lilly, and other able artists. ; Together with the said Mr. Lillies prophesie or prediction of a general peace, and most glorious time of prosperity, that shall shortly be establisht throughout the world.
Lilly, William, 1602-1681. / [1681] Mr. Lilly's new prophecy, or, Several strange and wonderful predictions of such things that have and are yet to happen, as well in England, Scotland, and France as in remote countrys being left as his last legacy to the world, the like not having been published before.
Lilly, William, 1602-1681. / [1679] Mr. Lilly's new prophecy touching the notable actions of this instant September and the ensuing three months of the year (viz.) October, November, and December with an astrological account of the future plenty or scarcity, dearth or cheapness of most sorts of fruits of the earth, merchandize, or commodities : as also of the remarkable alterations of weather during all the remaining part of this year, 1679.
Lilly, William, 1602-1681. / [1675] Mr. Lillies new prophecy, or, Sober predictions of a peace between the French and Dutch, and their allies, speedily to be concluded drawn from some astrological considerations of the general assembly of the planets happening in Sagitary, in the month of December, this present year 1675, etc. : together with some probable conjectures of the success of the King of Poland, against the Turks and Tartars : from the several configurations of the heavens in the approaching year, 1676.
Lilly, William, 1602-1681. / [1673] Mr. Lillies new prophecy, of the white-Easter, and its effects. With an account of the new blazing-star : being a full account of a strange comet lately seen in the heavens, its shape, place in the zodiack, motion, their time of continuance, and probable portents or matters thereby signified to happen in the world.
Lilly, William, 1602-1681. / [in the year, 1674] Mr. Lillies nevv prophesie of a general peace Together with the uniting of all different persuasions of religion, in principles of love and mutual condiscention. To which is added a strange and wonderful prophesie lately discovered in Holland, relating to the grand affairs of our present age. Faithfully translated & communicated from the original by a person of quality.
Lilly, William, 1602-1681. / [1673] Mr. Lillies late prophecy come to pass. Concerning the present vvar, and the late unseasonableness of the weather. Wherein it is made manifest, whatsoever he has prognosticated of the present year, 1673. Is in great probability of proving true, from the events that have already been observed. Licensed, according to order, Iuly 10. 1673.
Lilly, William, 1602-1681. / [1677?] Mr. Lillies astrologcal [sic] predictions for the year, 1677 Wherein is plainly expressed, and by the rules of astrology proved; the happy condition of this our nation for the year ensuing. As first, the peace of our nation. Secondly, the happy return of our merchants. Thirdly, the great blessing of God upon our harvest. And fourthly, the safe delivery of women with childe, who will this year be very fruitful. With several other questions for young-men and maids. With allowance.
Lilly, William, 1602-1681. / [1676] Mr. Lillie's predictions concerning the many lamentable fires which have lately happened. With a full account, not onely of all the great fires in England this present year, 1676. As at Cottenham near Cambridge, Southward, Blanford in Dorsetshire, Witiham by Oxford, Abington in Bark-shire, Nightingale Lane, &c. But also beyond the sea: as at Mosco, where ... dwelling houses were burned down April 22. The cities of Starguard, and ... Brandenburgh in Germany, May 21. And several towns in Burgundy, the French countee, and Picardy, belonging to the French King, consumed in May last. Published for the general satisfaction. With allowance, June 23. 1676. Ro. L'Estrange.
Lilly, William, 1602-1681. / [1681] Lillys strange and wonderful prognostication being a relation of many universal accidents that will come to pass in this year, 1681, according to the significations of the celestial bodies, as well in this our English nation, as in parts beyond the seas : with a sober caution to all by speedy repentance to avert the judgments that are impendent.
Lilly, William, 1602-1681. / [1651] Monarchy or no monarchy in England. Grebner his prophecy concerning Charles, son of Charles, his greatnesse, victories, conquests. : The Northern Lyon, or Lyon of the North, and chicken of the eagle discovered who they are, of what nation. : English, Latin, Saxon, Scotish and Welch prophecies concerning England in particular, and all Evrope in generall. : Passages upon the life and death of the late King Charles. : Ænigmaticall types of the future state and condition of England for many years to come. / By William Lilly ...
Lilly, William, 1602-1681. / [1680] Lilly's strange and wonderful prophecy being a relation of many universal accidents that will come to pass in the year 1681. According to the prognostications of the celestial bodies, as well in this our English nation, as in parts beyond the seas : with a sober caution to all by speedy repentance to avert the judgments that are impendent. As likewise a strange and wonderful discovery at a place called Leek, in Stafford-shire : by men digging in the earth for stones to pave two streets, where they found a pavement of smooth stone, several pots of ashes and mens bones ... as also an account of the great stream of light, by some termed a blazing-star, which was seen in the south-west on Saturday and Sunday the 11th and 12th of this instant December, between six and seven in the evening, with sever judicial opinions and conjectures upon the same.
Lilly, William, 1602-1681. / [1670?] A groats worth of wit for a penny, or, The interpretation of dreams ... by Mr. Lilly.
Lilly, William, 1602-1681. / [1653] Englands monethly observations and predictions, for the yeare of our blessed Saviour, 1653. Fore-told by those two famous astrologers of our age, Mr. William Lilly, and Mr. Culpeper. The tune is. Faire angel of England.
Lilly, William, 1602-1681. / [1652] An easie and familiar method whereby to iudge the effects depending on eclipses, either of the sun or moon. By William Lilly student in astrologie
Lilly, William, 1602-1681. / [1672] The dangerous condition of the United provinces prognosticated and plainly demonstrated, by Mr. William Lilly, in his observations of that comet which appeared in the year of our Lord, 1652. And published in his annual predictions in the year 1654, &c. Together with some hints, and touches, of the most inhumane and unparaleld crueltyes committed by the Dutch upon our English-men at Amboyna, Polaroone, and Lantore in the East-Indies. With several proofs of their insolencies, ambition, and avarice. Written for the satisfaction and incouragement of all such as have not already been convinst of their perfidious dealings. With allowance,
Lilly, William, 1602-1681. / [1648] An astrologicall prediction of the occurrances in England, part of the yeers 1648. 1649. 1650. concerning these particulars, viz. 1. The effects depending upon the late conjunction of the two malevolent planets Saturn and Mars. 2. What successe may be expected from the present intended treaty between his Majesty and the Parliament. 3. The standing or falling of this Parliament, and the army under the command of his Excellency the Lord Fairfax. 4. Our imminent disturbances generally handled, together with many contingencies to the whole kingdom, London especially. 5. The product of the Scots army: with some observations upon Duke Hamiltons nativity. 6. What may succeed the apparition of three suns in Lancashire, seen of many, the 28. Febr. last. By William Lilly, student in Astrologie.
Lilly, William, 1602-1681. / [1652] Annus tenebrosus, or The dark year Or astrologicall iudgements upon two lunar eclipses, and one admirable eclips of the sun, all visible in England, 1652. Together with a short method how to judge the effects of eclipses. / By William Lilly, student in astrologie.
Lily, Peter, d. 1615. / [1619] Two sermons viz. 1. A preseruatiue lilie to cure soules. And 2. How to seeke to finde Christ. Preached by that famous and iudicious diuine, Peter Lilie, Doctor of Diuinitie, and sometime fellow of Iesus Colledge in Cambridge.
Lily, William, 1468?-1522. / [1522] Of the tryu[m]phe, and the 'vses that Charles themperour, [et] the most myghty redouted kyng of England, Henry the. viii. were saluted with, passyng through London.
Lily, William, 1468?-1522. / [1621] A short introduction of grammar generally to be vsed: compiled and set forth for the bringing vp of all those that intend to attaine to the knowledge of the Latine tongue.
Lily, William, 1468?-1522. / [ca. 1630] The fairest fairing for a schoole-bred sonne whereby praise, ease, and profit may be wonne : that is to say, The schoole- masters precepts, or, Lillies lesson to his schollers, teaching them good manners / translated by Iohn Penkethman louer of learning, and by him dedicated to all the laureat Lillies of these times.
Limerick, Thomas Dongan, Earl of, 1634-1715. / [1701?] The case of Thomas Earl of Limerick, lately call'd Colonel Thomas Dongan.
Linaker, Robert, 1550 or 51-1618. / [1595] [A comfortable treatise for the reliefe of such as are afflicted in conscience].
Linch, Sam. / [1662] Rebellion painted to the life in three choice sermons upon the horrid murther of our gratious soveraign Charls the I. Of blessed memory. By Sam. Linch B.D. and preacher of Gods Word at Blackemore in Essex.
Linche, Richard. / [1596] Diella certaine sonnets, adioyned to the amorous poeme of Dom Diego and Gineura. By R.L. Gentleman.
Lindesay, Thomas, 1656-1724. / [1692] A sermon preached at the anniversary meeting of the Dorset-shire gentlemen in the Church of St. Mary-le-Bow. Dec. 1. 1691. By Tho. Lindesay, A.M. Fellow of Wadham Colledge in Oxon; and Chaplain to the Right Honourable the Earl of Essex.
Lindley, Benjamin, d. 1723. / [1700] A treatise of election and reprobation in vindication of the universal grace and love of God to mankind by B.L.
Lindley, Benjamin, d. 1723. / [1678] The shiboleth of priest-hood wherein it is debated and proved by the evidence of Scripture and right reason, to be absolutely impossible for any unholy man to execute the office of a gospel minister.
Lindsay, David, 1565?-1627. / [1622] An heavenly chariot layde open for transporting the new-borne babes of God, from time infected vvith sin, towards that æternitie in the which dwelleth righteousnesse. Made up of some rare pieces of that purest golde which is not to bee found but in that ritchest thesaurie of sacred scripture. By M. David Lindsey, ministerr of Christs Evangel at Leith.
Lindsay, David, d. 1641? / [1625] A treatise of the ceremonies of the church vvherein the points in question concerning baptisme, kneeling, at the sacrament, confirmation, festiuities, &c. are plainly handled and manifested to be lawfull, as they are now vsed in the Church of England : whereunto is added a sermon preached by a reuerend bishop.
Lindsay, David, fl. 1681-1685. / [1690] A supplication directed by Sir David Lindsay of the Mount, in contemption of side-tailes, and muzzled-faces.
Lindsay, David, Sir, fl. 1490-1555. / [Anno. Do. M.D.LXVIII. 1568] The warkis of the famous and vorthie knicht Schir Dauid Lyndesay of the Mont, alias, Lyoun King of Armes. Newly correctit, and vindicate from the former errouris quhairwith thay war befoir corruptit: and augmentit with sindrie warkis quhilk was not befoir imprentit. The contentis of the buke, and quhat warkis ar augmentit, the nixt syde sall schaw.
Lindsey, Montague Bertie, Earl of, 1608?-1666. / [Printed in the yeare M,DC.XLII. 1642] The Earle of Lindsey his declaration and iustification who is now prisoner in Warwicke Castle: wherein he declares the iustice of His Majesties cause in taking armes for the preservation of His royall person and prerogative. Being a patterne of loyalty, and mirrour of obedience, for all His Majesties loving subjects to be rightly guided by.
Lindsey, Robert Bertie, Earl of, 1582-1642. / [1650] A relation of the proceedings & causes of complaint, between the undertakers with the Earle of Lindsey, in the levell of Fenns in Lincolnshire betwixt Bourne and Kine Eae, and the owners and commoners there.
Line, Francis, 1595-1675. / [1650] A sharp, but short noise of warr, or, The ruine of Antichrist by the sword of temporall warr, hinted.: Written, by Francis Lin,
Line, Francis, 1595-1675. / [1673] An explication of the diall sett up in the Kings garden at London, an. 1669 in which very many sorts of dyalls are conteined : by which, besides the houres of all kinds diversly expressed, many things also belonging to geography, astrology, and astronomy, are by the sunnes shadow made visible to the eye, amongst which very many dialls, especially the most curious, are new inventions, hitherto divulged by none : all these particulars are shortly, yet clearly sett forth for the common good / by the Reverend Father Francis Hall, otherwise Line, of the Society of Jesus, professor of mathematicks.
Line, Francis, 1595-1675. / [1685] An appendix to Clavis horologiæ, or, An explication of the pyramidical dyal set up in His Majesties garden at White-Hall, anno 1669 in which very many sorts of dyals are contained ... / by the Reverend Father Francis Hall, otherwise Line, of the Society of Jesus ...
Ling, John. / [Printed in the yeare 1648] A short ansvver of Iohn Ling to the 16. quæres of Ioseph Heming, about Christmas.: Wherein all the care that can be is taken to avoyd expence of paper, so much having beene spoyled already ...
Lingard, R. (Richard), 1598?-1670. / [1668] A sermon preached before the King at White-Hall, July 26, 1668, in defence of the liturgy of our church by Richard Lingard ...
Lingard, R. (Richard), 1598?-1670. / [1670] A letter of advice to a young gentleman leaveing the university concerning his behaviour and conversation in the world / by R.L.
Linton, Anthony. / [1609] Nevves of the complement of the art of nauigation. And of the mightie empire of Cataia. Together with the Straits of Anian. By A.L. The principall contents whereof follow in the next page.
Lipeat, Thomas. / [1651] A true ministery anatomized: Where it is clearly proved by scripture, I. What a true ministery is, and what a ministery God set in the church. II. A ministery not so set, is not the ministery of Christ. III. Our ministers of England have not the gift of tongues. IV. Truth is not obtained by studie. By Thomas Lipeat, not the author, but the actor.
Lippomano, Luigi, 1500-1559. / [1556] A copye of a verye fyne and vvytty letter sent from the ryght reuerende Levves Lippomanus by shop of Verona in Italy, and late legate in Polone, from the moste holy and blessed father Pope Paule the Fourth, and from his moste holy sea of Rome translated out of the Italyan language by Michael Throckmerton.
Lippomano, Luigi, 1500-1559. / [1556] A copye of a verye fyne and vvytty letter sent from the ryght reuerende Levves Lippomanns byshop of Verona in Italy, and late legate in Polone, from the moste holy and blessed father Pope Paule the fourth, and from his most holy sea of Rome. Translated out of the Italyan language by Michael Throckmerton.
Lipsius, Justus, 1547-1606. / [1672] VVar and peace reconciled, or, A discourse of constancy in inconstant times containing matter of direction and consolation against publick calamities / written originally in a foreign language and translated for the benefit of the gentrie of this nation.
Lipsius, Justus, 1547-1606. / [1688] Miracles of the B. Virgin, or, An historical account of the original, and stupendious performances of the image entituled, Our Blessed Lady of Halle viz. restoring the dead to life, healing the sick, delivering of captives, &c. / written originally in Latin, by Justus Lipsius ; afterwards translated into French, then into Dutch, and now rendred into English.
Lisle, Francis. / [1649] The kingdoms divisions anatomized,: together with a vindication of the Armies proceedings. By Franciscus Leinsula.
Lisola, François Paul, baron de, 1613-1674. / [1667] The buckler of state and justice against the design manifestly discovered of the universal monarchy, under the vain pretext of the Queen of France, her pretensions translated out of French.
Lister, Martin, 1638?-1712. / [1682] A letany for St. Omers
Lister, Martin, 1638?-1712. / [1699] A journey to Paris in the year 1698 by Dr. Martin Lister.
Littleton, Edmund. / [1616] A briefe catechisme containing the summe of the Gospell of Iesus Christ, and his life, declared more at large by the foure euangelists, Mathew, Marke, Luke, and Iohn / written by Edmund Littleton, of Sittingborne in Kent, preacher.
Littleton, Edward Littleton, Lord, 1589-1645. / [1641] A true and full relation of the horrible and hellish plot of the Iesuites Popish priests and other papists in Ireland,: for the massacring of the two chiefe justices, and all the Privie Councell and Protestants in that kingdome. As it was related by my Lord Keeper in the house of Commons November the first. 1641.
Littleton, Edward Littleton, Lord, 1589-1645. / [1641. i.e. 1642] The Lord Keepers speech to the House of Commons, at the passing of two bills.: Togeter [sic] with the Kings Majesties message to both Houses, concerning the raising of men for Ireland, the taking away of the bishops votes out of the House of Peeres, the banishing of popish priests, and the setling of the governement and liturgie of the church.
Littleton, Edward Littleton, Lord, 1589-1645. / [1642] A submissive and petitionary letter subscribed. To the right Honourable the Lords of Parliament, in the upper House of Parliament assembled.: And intituled The humble submission and supplication of the Lord Littleton, Lord Keeper of the Great Seale of England.
Littleton, Edward, b. 1626. / [1696] A short discourse about our keeping our money shewing that our money may be kept among our selves, and yet our confederates strongly assisted, by a descent upon France. By E.L.
Littleton, Edward, b. 1626. / [1690] The management of the present war against France consider'd in a letter to a noble lord by a person of quality.
Littleton, Edward, b. 1626. / [1692] A proposal for maintaining and repairing the high ways by E. Littleton.
Littleton, Edward, b. 1626. / [M DC XCI] A project of a descent upon France by a person of quality.
Littleton, Edward, b. 1626. / [1696] A preservative for our money; or A way proposed, whereby some money may be kept in England which otherwise will all be gone or How we may carry on the war against France with vigour, and with much better effect than hitherto, and yet keep our money. By E.L.
Littleton, Edward, b. 1626. / [1689] Observations upon the warre of Hungary
Littleton, Edward, b. 1626. / [MDCLXXXIX 1689] The groans of the plantations, or, A true account of their grievous and extreme sufferings by the heavy impositions upon sugar and other hardships relating more particularly to the island of Barbados.
Littleton, Edward, b. 1626. / [1693] The descent upon France considered, in a letter to a member of Parliament
Littleton, Thomas, Sir, d. 1481. / [the xvi. day of April the yere of our lord M.D.V.I. 1556] Littleton tenures in Englishe
Lively, Edward, 1545?-1605. / [1597] A true chronologie of the times of the Persian monarchie, and after to the destruction of Ierusalem by the Romanes. Wherein by the way briefly is handled the day of Christ his birth: with a declaration of the angel Gabriels message to Daniel in the end of his 9. chap. against the friuolous conceits of Matthew Beroald. Written by Edvvard Liuelie, reader of the holie tongue in Cambridge.
Livesey, James, 1625-1682. / [1674] Pneumat-apologia. Or, An apology for the power & liberty of the Spirit as at first to give a being to, so still to give a blessing by his ordinances. In three sermons preacht at Great Budworth, to some persons of honour, and several of the clergy then present to communicate in reference to the late act. By James Livesey, A.M. & vicar of Budworth.
Livesey, John. Enchiridion judicum, or, Jehosaphats charge to his judges, opened, in a sermon before the Right Honourable, the judges, and the right worshipful, the sheriffe of the county palatine of Lancast. Together with Catastrophe magnatum, or, King Davids lamentation, at Prince Abners incineration. In a sermon meditated on the fall, and preached at the funeral of the Right Worshipful John Atherton of Atherton Esq; high-sheriffe of the county palatine of Lanc. / By John Livesey minister of the Gospel at Atherton.
Livie, John, fl. 1654-1659. / [1659] The bloody almanack: or, Astrological predictions, and monethly observations, for the year, 1659.: From the motions and configurations of the cœlestial bodies, three great eclipses, one of the Sun, and two of the Moon: wherein is fore-told, the most eminent actions in Europe, ... Further denoting, and setting forth, 1 The victorious proceedings of the English against the Spaniards, ... 2 The strange revolutions and changes, that will attend the affairs and councels, ... 3 The high and magnanimous transactions, of the most illustrious and serene Prince, Charles Gustavus Adolphus, ... 4 The great and glorious victories, obtained by His Royal Majesty, against the Poles and Germans; ... Together with a paraphrase upon His Majesties nativity. 5 The great and wonderful things that are incident both to men, women, and children; the several diseases ... that are most predominant; and sundry rules ... for the preservation of health, the increase of trade, both in city and countrey; and the general good of all trades whatsoever.
Livie, John, fl. 1654-1659. / [1654. i.e. 1653] The bloody almanack; or, Monethly observations and predictions, for the year of our Lord, 1654.: Fore-telling I The great and wonderful mutation of times, and change of government, in England, Scotland, and Ireland. II The proclaiming of open wars by the Christian kings and princes, and the setting up of their royal standards. III Their proceedings touching the King of Scots, and the lamentable and unparallel'd engagement that will happen between the two mighty fleets of England and Europe. IV. The event and success of this great and memorable sea fight; and the dying of the curled waves with the bloud of princes and nobles, &c. V The advance of the King of Scots, ...; and the total vanquishing and dispersing their great armado. VI The calling to an account the officers of the nation; and the beheading of divers great ones, ... VII The taking off all oppressions and burdens from the people, ... VIII The taking away and extirpating of the power, rule, and government of the tyrannical Norman sword. IX The sad and woful condition that women with child will be exposed unto, if not prevented, by the ensuing potions here administred. Published for the general good of the Common-wealth of England, by a cordial lover of his native-countrey's rights and liberties; and freely exposed to the view of all cities, towns, and corporations,.
Livingston, John, 1603-1672. / [1671] A letter, written by that famous and faithful minister of Christ Mr John Livingstoun unto his parishoners of Ancram in Scotland, dated Rotterdam October 7. 1671.
Livingstone, Patrick, 1634?-1694. / [1670] To the King both Houses of Parliament friends remember, you must all come to judgement for the one everlasting judge from whom there is no appeal to any other : who is no respecter of persons, he is the one judge of the conscience.
Livingstone, Patrick, 1634?-1694. / [1670] To all friends everywhere to whom this may concern, to go abroad among them to be read in the fear of God by them
Livy. / [1686] The Roman history written in Latine by Titus Livius. With the supplements of John Freinshemius and John Dujatius from the foundation of Rome to the middle of the reign of Augustus.
Livy. / [Anno MDLI 1534] An argument wherin the apparaile of women is both reproued and defended