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Author: Phillips, Edward, 1630-1696?
Title: The beau's academy, or, The modern and genteel way of wooing and complementing after the most courtly manner in which is drawn to the life, the deportment of most accomplished lovers, the mode of their courtly entertainments, the charms of their persuasive language in their addresses or more secret dispatches, to which are added poems, songs, letters of love and others : proverbs, riddles, jests, posies, devices, with variety of pastimes and diversions as cross-purposes, the lovers alphabet &c. also a dictionary for making rhimes, four hundred and fifty delightful questions with their several answers together with a new invented art of logick : so plain and easie that the meanest capacity may in a short time attain to a perfection of arguing and disputing.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Library
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: The beau's academy, or, The modern and genteel way of wooing and complementing after the most courtly manner in which is drawn to the life, the deportment of most accomplished lovers, the mode of their courtly entertainments, the charms of their persuasive language in their addresses or more secret dispatches, to which are added poems, songs, letters of love and others : proverbs, riddles, jests, posies, devices, with variety of pastimes and diversions as cross-purposes, the lovers alphabet &c. also a dictionary for making rhimes, four hundred and fifty delightful questions with their several answers together with a new invented art of logick : so plain and easie that the meanest capacity may in a short time attain to a perfection of arguing and disputing.
Phillips, Edward, 1630-1696?

London: Printed for O. B. and sold by John Sprint at the Bell in Little-Britain, 1699.
Subject terms:
Courtship -- England -- Early works to 1800.
Logic -- Early works to 1800.
Epithets -- Early works to 1800.
Letter writing -- Early works to 1800.
English language -- Rhyme -- Early works to 1800.
Questions and answers -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/B09731.0001.001

Contents
frontispiece
title page
The Preface
To those Cruel Fair ones, that triumph over the dis∣tresses of their loyal Lovers, the Auther wisheth more Clemency; and to their afflicted Servants, more magnanimity and Roman Fortitude.
A short Advertisement to the Reader, by way of introduction, for his better under∣standing of the Mysteries of Eloquence and Complementing.
THE MYSTERIES OF Love and Eloquence; OR, The Arts of WOOING and COMPLEMENTING, &c.
The Mode of Hide Park.
discourse
In the Ring.
The next variety is that of the Horse-Races, the general Terms of which Art, are exprest in these following Dia∣logues.
dialogue
The Gentlemen to the Jocky.
Gentlemen.
After Starting.
The Loser.
Upon the fatal disaster that befell the Gallants upon May-day last in Hide-Park.
The Mode of Balls.
The Dancing Master.
At the entry of the Ladies, the Master of the Ball thus accosts them one by one.
address
To another.
To another.
To another.
To another.
To another.
To another.
discourse
To the Musick.
To a Lady taking her forth to Dance.
To a Gentleman, desiring him to take out his Lady.
The Applause at the end of the Dance.
At their going to dance Countrey Dances.
To his Lady, desiring her to name her Dance.
An offer to give over.
At giving over.
Answer.
Return of Thanks.
Answer.
interval
Questions and Commands.
questions
Their Commands consisted more of Ʋnluckiness then Wit.
By this time 'tis very late, and they resolve all to depart, which makes the Master of the Ball put on all his gravity, with which he thus accosts his departing guests.
address
Reply.
An address to a Company of Ladies.
To enter into Discourse with a Lady being in Company.
An Address, to make known an Affection for his Mistriss.
Addresses of Salutation.
dialogue
On her Face.
On her Eyes and Lips.
On her Beauty.
On her Hair.
Her Locks
Her Forehead
Her Face
Her Looks
Her Eyes
Her Smiles
Her Cheeks
Her Breath
Her Lips
Her Chin
Her Tongue
Her Brow
Her Neck
Her Words
Her Voice
Her Arms
Her Hands
Her Breasts
Briefly, in the Abstract of her Self.
An Address of Courtship to his Mistress.
To discourse concerning the noise of a Match.
Several Addresses of perfect Courtship.
The Departure.
The Return.
Demand of Assurance.
The Trial.
Full Satisfaction.
An Amorous Complement.
The Discourse of a Gentleman bringing his Friend into Company.
address
The Company.
The Stranger Replies.
The Ladies.
To them the Stranger.
The Ladies.
The Stranger.
Another Gentleman.
The Stranger.
The Ladies.
The Stranger.
A Lady.
The Stranger.
To him one of the company answers.
The Stranger.
The Ladies.
The Stranger.
To offer Service and to begin a Friendship
To make an Acquaintance
A Visit.
To request a Courtesie.
To give thanks for a Courtesie received.
To invite a Friend to Dinner.
Another form of Invitation.
Before Dinner.
After Dinner.
To take leave of his Friends Wife.
To take leave of a Lady with whom you are familiar.
A Private Intercourse between the Trunk-breech'd Page and the waiting Gentlewoman in her Ladies Chamber.
Mock-Complements, or Drolling-Complements.
A Complement between a Gentleman and a Gentlewoman before a Riband-Shop in the Exchange.
A Horse Courser courting a Parsons Widow.
An Apprentice and a young Lady at a Boarding-School.
At the Cake-house.
At Parting.
A Passado Complement between a Gentleman and a Lady, meeting in two several Coaches in the High-way going to Hide-Park.
Between a Gentleman and a Sempstress.
dialogue
Then the Gentleman lolling over the Counter thus proceds.
Between a Journeyman-Haberdasher of small Wares, and a Ladies Chamber-maid.
Between a Gentleman Ʋsher, and a Waiting Gentlewoman.
Between a Lawyers Clerk and his Masters Daughter.
Between the Countrey Bumkin and his Mistriss going to a Fair.
dialogue
In the Fair.
At the Inn.
Between the Coach-man and the Kitchin-maid.
The Picture of the Poets Mistress.
precepts
introduction
The Choice of a Gentleman Ʋsher.
How he must be fitted for Service.
His Behaviour in the House.
His Dressings.
The Diseases incident to Gentlemen Ʋshers, and their Cures.
poems
To his Mistriss.
Song.
Plurality in Love.
A description of his Mistriss.
The Melancholy Lover.
To his Mistriss falsly accusing him.
To his false Mistriss.
Resolution to Love.
Tyranny in Love.
Against Love.
The Maiden-head.
A Fond Design.
On his Mistress Singing.
Parting.
Not to be Alter'd.
Loves Martyr.
Protestation of Love.
The Golden Age.
On the perfections of his Mistress.
Her Chastity.
On her Beauty.
On a fair and richly attir'd Lady at a Mask.
Song.
The Queen of Fairies.
Cupid Contemn'd.
Bootless Complaint.
The Departure.
To a Laedy in Prison.
To Sorrow.
Constancy resolved.
Lose no time.
Song.
Song.
Dying to Live.
Who his Mistress is.
In praise of Fools.
The Impolitick Beauty.
poem
The Hector's Farewell.
part
The Second Part.
On the Death of Jo. W.
The Song of the Caps.
The Jolly Ale-Drinker.
The Shepherd's Song in praise of his God Pan, who prefers him before the Sun.
Song on Women.
On an Excellent Race-Horse.
The Clown's Description of his Mistress.
The Watch-mens Song.
The Jovial Companion.
A New Ballad of St. George for England, and the Dragon.
New Song.
The OLD GILL.
The PUDDING.
A Parly, between two WEST-COUNTRIMEN on sight of a WEDDING.
The OLD and NEW COURTIER.
The FRYER and the MAID.
TOM a BEDLAM.
Alas poor Scholar, Whither wilt thou go? OR Strange Alterations which at this time be, There's many did think they never should see.
letters
Superscriptions for Letters.
letters to titled persons
To a Duke.
superscription
superscription
superscription
superscription
superscription
note
In the writing of familiar Epistles, there are sundry varieties, which ingenuity will easily apply to his occasion.
superscriptions
subscriptions
superscriptions
superscriptions
subscriptions
Forms for the concluding of Letters.
letters
To his Mistriss recover'd from an Ague.
To his retired Mistriss.
To his Mistriss, being disoblig'd by her.
To his Mistress, acknowledging the kindness of her Letters.
To excuse to his Mistress his too easie believing of false Reports,
To his Mistriss thanking her for the acceptance of his Service.
To his Mistriss, desiring her Picture.
The Reply.
To his Mistriss, desiring a Lock of Hair from her.
The Reply.
To his Mistress, an Acknowledgment for being belov'd by her.
A Lady to her Servant accusing him of Inconstancy.
To request a Favour from his Mistress.
To his long absented Mistress.
To his Mistriss upon the death of her Brother.
To her Servant accepting his Service.
The Answer.
From a Lady consenting to her Servants Requests.
To her Servant, resolving not to Marry.
To his Mistress, Sick.
To his Mistriss, despairing of her Favour, though unjustly offended against her.
A Letter of Consolation to a Mistress, upon the death of her Servant.
Letters.
To his Absent Friend.
To his Friend complaining of Neglect.
The Answer.
Return of Thanks.
The Answer.
To desire a Curtesie.
The Answer.
On the same Subject.
The Answer.
To congratulate the good Fortune of his Friend.
The Answer.
To his Accomplish'd Friend.
To his Learned Friend.
To his Friend at Court.
To his Friend, upon the renewing of their Correspondence.
A Familar Return of Thanks.
To his Friend, inviting him into the Country.
To his sick Friend.
A Letter of Resolution.
To his Mistress, desiring Enjoyment.
A Letter from a Lady with Child.
A Perswasive Letter to his Mistress.
Best Wishes from a Lady.
A Letter of Acceptance from his Mistress.
Taffy to his Mistress.
mock letters
Superscription for the Drol∣ling-Letters.
Subscriptions.
MOCK LETTERS And Drolling Letters.
A Souldier to his Mistress.
A Pedagogue to his Mistress.
A Cockney to his Mistress
A Sea-man to his delight in Wapping.
A Hector to his Mistress.
A Lawyer to his Young Mistress.
A Passionate Love Letter.
The Mountebank's Letter to the Chyrurgeons.
A Broom-man in Kent-street, to a young Lay of quality, whom he fell in Love withall, behold∣ing her in a Belcony.
The Ladies Answer
A Country Parson to a rich Farmers Daughter in the same Village.
A Letter of Smiles from a young conceited Scrivener to his beloved Mistress, Mistress D. C. Spinster.
A Countrey Bumpkin to his Mistress.
Posies for RINGS.
PROVERBS.
MISCELANIA.
Wit and Language.
Select Sentences.
A DICTIONARY FOR The more expeditious finding out of any Rime, being useful for that pleasing Pass∣time called CRAMBO.
THE ART of REASON IN THE ART of LOGICK.
The first Book of the Art of Logick.
CAP. 1. What Logick is.
CAP. 2. The parts of Logick, and kinds of Arguments.
CAP. 3. The Efficient, Procreant, and Conservant Cause.
CAP. 4. The Efficient alone and with others
CAP. 5. The Efficient by it self or an Accident.
CAP. 6. The Matter.
CAP. 7. The Form.
CAP. 8. The End.
CAP. 9. The Effects.
CAP. 10. The Subject.
CAP. 11 The Adjunct.
CAP. 12. Diverses.
CAP. 13. Disparates.
CAP. 14. Relates.
CAP. 15. Adverses.
CAP. 16. Contradicents.
CAP. 17. Privants.
CAP. 18. Equalls.
CAP. 18. Greaters.
CAP. 20. Lessers
CAP. 21. Likes
CAP. 22. Dislikes.
CAP. 23. Conjugates.
CAP. 24. Notations.
CAP. 25. Distribution.
CAP. 26. The distribution from the Cause.
CAP. 27. The distribution from the effects, also the genus and species.
CAP. 28. Distribution from the Subject.
CAP. 29. Distribution from Adjuncts
CAP. 30. Definition.
CAP. 31. Description.
CAP. 32. Divine Testimony,
CAP. 33. Testimony from humane Law and Sentences.
THE SECOND BOOK OF THE Art of Logick.
CAP. 1. What Judgement is.
CAP. 2. An affirmative or negative axioma.
CAP. 3. True and false.
CAP. 4. The Simple Axioma.
CAP. 5. The copulative Axioma.
CAP. 6. The Connexed Axioma.
CAP. 7. The Discreet Axioma
CAP. 8. The disjunct Axioma.
CAP. 9. The Syllogism and its parts.
CAP. 10. The simple contracted syllogism.
CAP. 11. The first kind of the simple explicated Syllogism.
CAP. 12. The second kind of the simple explicate syllogism.
CAP. 13. The first connexed Syllogism.
CAP. 14. The second Connexive Syllogism.
CAP. 15. The first disjunct Syllogism
CAP. 16. The second disjunct syllogism.
CAP. 17. The only method according to Aristotle.
CAP. 18. The first illustration of methods by illustration of arts.
CAP. 19. The second example of Method by example of Poets, Orators, Historiographers.
CAP. 20. The Secrets of Method.
GENEROSI LƲDENTES
A brief Description of the sport of Cross Purposes.
The Description of the sport called the Lovers Alphabet.
note
The Description of the sport of the Bird in a Tree.
The Description of the sport of Gliphing.
A Description of a sport, called the Cra, or a thing done, and who did it.
A Description of the witty sport of Substantives and Adjectives.
The Triall of wits, a new invented Alpha∣bet of Epithets, properly applyed to their severall subjects, that they may be rendered no lesse usefull on the suddain occasions of discourse, or writing; then delightfully pleasant in the witty sport commonly named Substantives and Ad∣jectives.
A GARDEN of TULIPS OR, The Pleasant Prospect.
A general Table of the Con∣tents of this Book.