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Author: Pictet, Benedict, 1655-1724.
Title: An antidote against a careless indifferency in matters of religion. Being a treatise in opposition to those that believe, that all religions are indifferent, and that it imports not what men profess. / Done out of French. With an introduction by Anthony Horneck, D.D. Chaplain in ordinary to their Majesties.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Library
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: An antidote against a careless indifferency in matters of religion. Being a treatise in opposition to those that believe, that all religions are indifferent, and that it imports not what men profess. / Done out of French. With an introduction by Anthony Horneck, D.D. Chaplain in ordinary to their Majesties.
Pictet, Benedict, 1655-1724., Horneck, Anthony, 1641-1697.

London: Printed for Henry Rhodes ..., and John Harris ..., 1694.
Alternate titles: Traité contre l'indifférence des religions. English
Subject terms:
Apologetics -- Early works to 1800.
Religions -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/B04702.0001.001

Contents
title page
The Introduction.
The PREFACE.
ERRATA.
A TREATISE
CHAP. I. Wherein, after we have suppos'd that there is a God, we shew that God is most perfect. That he is the Author of all the Good which is in the Crea∣tures, and that we ought to Fear and Honour him.
CHAP. II. That Religion is not the Invention of Politicians.
CHAP. III. Of the Indifference of Religions.
CHAP. IV. Against those who deny a Providence.
CHAP. V. Against those who believe, that Providence does not concern it self in Affairs of Religion.
CHAP. VI. Of the Immortality of the Soul.
Of the Judgment to come.
CHAP. VIII. Where it is prov'd, that altho' we had no certain Proofs of a Judgment to come, yet we ought to live in such a manner, as if we were assur'd of one.
CHAP. IX. Wherein is examin'd, whether there be any thing True or False, Just or Ʋnjust.
CHAP. X. Against those who believe, that the Truth is Conceal'd.
CHAP. XI. Of the Divinity of the Scripture.
CHAP. XII. Of the Clearness of the Holy Scripture.
CHAP. XIII. Against those who believe, that although the Truth be clearly explain'd in Scripture, yet that it ought to be indifferent to us what Religion we embrace.
CHAP. XIV. Three Arguments against the Indifferent-Men.
CHAP. XV. Against those who believe they make Profession of a Religion, though they believe it to be false.
CHAP. XVI. An Answer to some Objections.
CHAP. XVII. An Answer to the Examples brought from Nicodemus, Naaman, and St. Paul.
CHAP. XVIII. An Answer to some Reasons which are brought by our Antagonists.
CHAP. XIX. Against those who maintain, that we ought to believe what the Magistrates will have us believe.
CHAP. XX. Against those who believe it sufficient to live, ac∣cording to the Rules of Moral Honesty.
CHAP. XXI. That the Opinion of Indifferenay in Religions has displeased almost all People.