For full access to this item, please  Login

Add to bookbag
Author: Armin, Robert, fl. 1610.
Title: Foole upon foole, or, Six sortes of sottes. A flat foole, a leane foole, a merry foole, [brace] and [brace] a fatt foole, a cleane foole, a verrie foole. Shewing their liues, humours and behauiours, with their want of wit in their shew of wisdome. Not so strange as true.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Library
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

This keyboarded and encoded edition of the work described above is co-owned by the institutions providing financial support to the Early English Books Online Text Creation Partnership. Searching, reading, printing, or downloading EEBO-TCP texts is reserved for the authorized users of these project partner institutions. Permission must be granted for subsequent distribution, in print or electronically, of this text, in whole or in part. Please contact project staff at eebotcp-info@umich.edu for further information or permissions.

Print source: Foole upon foole, or, Six sortes of sottes. A flat foole, a leane foole, a merry foole, [brace] and [brace] a fatt foole, a cleane foole, a verrie foole. Shewing their liues, humours and behauiours, with their want of wit in their shew of wisdome. Not so strange as true.
Armin, Robert, fl. 1610.

London: Printed for William Ferbrand, dwelling in Popes-head Allie neare the Royall Exchange., 1605.
Subject terms:
Fools and jesters -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/B01234.0001.001

Contents
title page
TO THE READER as much health as to my selfe.
How Iacke Oates playde at Cardes all alone.
How Iacke hit a Noble-man a boxe on the eare.
How a Minstrell became a foole artificiall, and had Iacke Oates his reward for his labour.
How Iacke Oates eate vp a Quince Pye, being of choyse prouided for Sir William.
A Fat Foole
The Description of Iemy Camber, A Fat Foole Naturall.
How Iemy Camber this Fat Foole, gaue his Chayne of Golde from his necke to war∣rant his life.
How Iemy Camber gaue fiue French Crownes for a Sallet of an atchison price, which in our money was three farthings.
How Iemy this fat Foole, swet almost to death, and neuer knew the reason.
How this fatte Foole Iemy Camber, ran with the Kings best Foote-man for a wager, and won it.
How this fat Foole Iemy was stung with nettles, and how after vnknowne to himselfe, helped to make his owne graue.
A Leane Foole
How Leanard a leane Foole, playde at slide groate by himselfe after dinner, when his belly was full.
How this leane Foole Leanard, eating his belly full, was reuen∣ged of one that clapt corziars waxe to his head.
How Leane Leanard eate vp his Maisters Hawke, and was almost choaked with the Fethers.
How the Leane Foole set fire on the Wheele-barrow that he loued so, vnknowne to himsalfe.
A Cleane Foole
How Iacke Miller simply burned the hayre of his head and face.
How the cleane foole was loth to foule his shooes, or foule his band.
How Iack Miller the cleane foole, ventred ouer the Seuerne on foot in great danger.
How Iack the cleane foole sung his song of Derries faire in diuers places, where he made good sport.
A merry Foole
A description how this merry Foole, being VVill Sommers (the Kings naturall Iester) was, as report telles me.
How the merry foole, Will Sommers, brought his vncle to the King, and got him twenty pound a yere.
How this merry foole Will Sommers, to make the King merry, asked him three questions.
How Will Sommers the merry foole borrowed ten pounds of Cardinall Wolsey, to pay where the Cardinall owed it.
How this merry Foole Will Sommers eate a messe of Milke without a spoone.
A very Foole
❧ How Iohn of the Hospitall, the very foole, walkt and preacht in Paules Church, and was bidden to dinner.
How Iohn towled the Bell for his Nurses Chicken.
How this very foole Iohn of the Hospital, sold a gentlemans paire of boots for a groat, that cost the Cobler fiue shillings.
How this very foole Iohn, lost himselfe on Easter Munday at the Spittle Sermon, amongst all the people.