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Author: Willsford, Thomas.
Title: Natures secrets. Or, The admirable and wonderfull history of the generation of meteors.: Particularly describing, the temperatures and qualities of the four elements, the heights, magnitudes, and influences of the fixt and wandring stars: the efficient and finall causes of comets, earthquakes, deluges, epidemicall diseases, and prodigies of precedent times; registred by the students of nature. Their conjecturall presages of the weather, from the planets mutuall aspects, and sublunary bodies: with the proportions and observations on the weather-glass, with philosophicall paraphrases rendred explicitely, usefull at sea and land. / By the industry and observations of Thomas Willsford, Gent.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Library
2012 November (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: Natures secrets. Or, The admirable and wonderfull history of the generation of meteors.: Particularly describing, the temperatures and qualities of the four elements, the heights, magnitudes, and influences of the fixt and wandring stars: the efficient and finall causes of comets, earthquakes, deluges, epidemicall diseases, and prodigies of precedent times; registred by the students of nature. Their conjecturall presages of the weather, from the planets mutuall aspects, and sublunary bodies: with the proportions and observations on the weather-glass, with philosophicall paraphrases rendred explicitely, usefull at sea and land. / By the industry and observations of Thomas Willsford, Gent.
Willsford, Thomas., Vaughan, Robert C., engraver.

London: Printed for Nath. Brook at the Angel in Cornhill, 1658.
Subject terms:
Astronomy
Earth sciences
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A96648.0001.001

Contents
frontispiece
title page
A DEDICATION TO The Right Honourable, the Lady Stafford, Sister to the Lord Henry Stafford deceas'd, Li∣neally descended from the eminent and ancient Earles thereof, and sole Heir sur∣viving the most illustrious Dukes of Buckingham.
A GENERAL PREFACE TO The Ingenious and Judicious speculators of Nature, illustra∣ting here the Antiquity of this Meteorological subject, in prog∣nosticating their effects.
To his honoured Uncle Mr. Thomas Willsford upon his Book of Meteors.
text
AN INTRODUCTION TO THE WORLDS EPITOMY, AND THE Generation of Meteors.
Hypotheses of Astronomers, concerning the heights and magnitudes of the fixed Stars and also the Planets in their mean motions, with the distance of the four Elements from the Earth's centre.
The 7 Planets, or wandring Stars, with their Characters, colour, motion, period and courses.
The mutual Aspects, or positions of the 7 Planets.
The natures and qualities of the four Elements.
Fire.
Air.
Earth and Water.
To prove the Earth's roundnesse.
The concord and disagreement of the four Elements.
The nature and temperature of the 4 Seasons.
The Complexions in Man are these.
The 4 Seasons.
Definitions of some few terms that are used by Astronomers.
The use of these Tables.
To find the Sun's right Ascension.
To find the right Ascensions, Declinations and Magnitudes of these Stars.
To know at any time of the year, in what hour either of day or night, any of these Stars will be South.
The severall Aseentions and Descentions of the fixed Stars and Planets.
continuation of text
AN INTRODUCTION TO THE Second Part of Meteors.
The second Part. A brief discourse of Meteors: im∣perfect mixt bodies, and their causes.
Of the severall divisions and dispositions of the Air.
The middle Region of Air and what is there generated.
The lower Region of the Air, and the effects it produceth.
The nature of Dews in general are these.
The Virgins thread.
Mell-dews.
The nature of Rain water:
Thunder and Lightning, and the causes from whence they proceed.
Apparitions in the Air made by reflections of the Sun, Moon, fixed Stars, or Planets, upon condensed Clouds.
Of Circles about the Sun, Moon, or Stars.
Impressions in the Clouds representing the Sun or Moon.
Of the Rain-Bow, and the causes thereof.
The causes and diversities of Winds.
The generation of Waters.
The wonderful vertues and effects of Waters.
Conjectures of the Seas saltnesse, with the Ebbs and Flouds.
Of Earth-quakes, and their causes from whence they do proceed.
continuation of text
AN INTRODUCTION TO The Third Part. Predictions of the Weather.
The Third Part. Of the Weathers Prediction.
Aphorismes, or selected places out of Car∣danus.
Stadius, and the later observers collects these properties of the 12. Signs, of the first mover and 8. Sphere, conformable to this Age.
The natures, properties, and operations of the 7. Planets upon sublunary bodies, in causing Meteors.
Proper and peculiar observations of the wea∣ther, in every one of the four Seasons, or Quarters of the Year.
Spring.
Sommer.
Autumn.
Winter.
The names of the most tempestuous and re∣markable Asterismes and Stars observed in former Ages, as at this present.
The Cosmical and Acronycal rising and setting of the Stars, observed in presaging the Airs Vicissitude, as in former Ages by Pliny, and at this present time.
Observations of the weather, by Ptolomy, colle∣cted from the ascentions of the fixed Stars with the Sun.
The observations of Maginus, selected from the Ascentions of the Sun and fixed Stars.
Observations of the weather by the influence of the fixed and wandring Stars, united and collected by Na. Durret.
Prognostications of the winds, collected from the observations of Pliny and Maginus.
Generall Aphorisms in Prognosticating storms and tempests, selected out of Cardanus, Ma∣ginus and Durret.
Prognostications of the weather by the mutual Conjunctions and Aspects of the Planets, according to Maginus, Argoll, &c.
Saturn conjoyned or aspected with Jupiter.
Saturn conjoyned or aspected with Mars.
Saturn conjoyned or aspected with the Sun.
Saturn conjoyned or aspected with Venus.
Saturn conjoyned or aspected with Mercury.
Saturn conjoyned or aspected with the Moon.
Jupiter in conjunction or aspected with Mars.
Jupiter in conjunction or aspected with the Sun.
Jupiter in conjunction, or aspected with Venus.
Jupiter in conjunction or aspected with Mercury.
Jupiter in conjunction or aspected with the Moon.
Mars in conjunction or aspected with the Sun.
Mars in conjunction or aspected with Venus.
Mars in conjunction or aspected with Mer∣cury.
Mars in conjunction or aspected with the Moon.
The Sun and Venus in conjunction.
The Sun and Mercury in conjunction.
The Sun and Moon in conjunction or aspected.
Venus and Mercury in conjunction.
Venus in conjunction or aspected with the Moon.
Mercury in conjunction or aspected with the Moon.
Observations in Agriculture.
Presages of the weather by Experience, colle∣cted from the inflamation of Comets, fiery impressions, influences: and apparitions of the Stars reflecting on sublunary Meteors.
The effects of Comets.
By Thunder and Lightning.
By the Sun.
A Paraphrase.
By the Moon.
By Rain-bows.
Of the Ignis fatuus.
By terrestial fires.
A Paraphrase.
By Air, Winds, Clouds, and Mists.
By Water and Earth.
Presages of Earth quakes.
A Paraphrase.
By sensitive Creatures; but first by Beasts and Reptiles.
By winged Creatures.
By Fishes.
By Vegetables.
A Paraphrase.
By Minerals.
Natural signs of the four Seasons.
Spring.
Sommer.
Autumn.
Winter.
Signs presaging good or bad Years.
A Conclusion with a Paraphrase upon the presages by sensitive Creatures in general.
A PERPETUAL KALENDER, OR Diurnal for the weather, with ge∣neral and particular observations dili∣gently selected, and compendiously inserted, demonstrating perspicuously in a Glasse the Airs mutability and the weathers vicissitude; with the present temper and Season of the year, obser∣ving the water on serene days at these degrees.
A Paraphrase upon the Weather GLASSE.
continuation of text
AN INTRODUCTION TO The Fourth PART. Shewing The direful effects of some prodigi∣ous Meteors, Epidemical diseases, and Memorable accidents; with brief Historical observations, of their events, and final causes, as just motives to the love and fear of God.
THE FOURTH PART. Shewing The opinions of some Men concerning Blazing Stars, with a compendi∣ous Historical observation of their events; with divers other prodi∣gies epitomiz'd.
Of fiery Impressions.
Of Parelii, Lunary Rain-bows, and some stu∣pendious Eclipses of the Luminaries; also light nights and dark days.
Portentious Stormes of Rain.
Of Deluges and portentious irruptions and courses of the Waters.
Of Earth-quakes and their wonderfull effects.
Plagues and Epidemical Diseases.
A Compendium of Meteors, and Signs observed in former Ages, as at this present, most prodigious in Nature, stupendious to Mortals, and portentious in their dismal events.
A CONCLUSION TO This Book of Meteors.
Manuscripts prepar'd for the Press.
The faults escap't are thus corrected.
Reader, These Books following are Printed for Nath. Brook, and are to be Sold at his Shop at the Angel in Cornhil.