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Author: Sanderson, Robert, 1587-1663.
Title: Ten lectures on the obligation of humane conscience: Read in the divinity school at Oxford, in the year, 1647. By that most learned and reverend father in God, Doctor Robert Sanderson, Bishop of Lincoln. &c. Translated by Robert Codrington, Master of Arts.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Library
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
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Print source: Ten lectures on the obligation of humane conscience: Read in the divinity school at Oxford, in the year, 1647. By that most learned and reverend father in God, Doctor Robert Sanderson, Bishop of Lincoln. &c. Translated by Robert Codrington, Master of Arts.
Sanderson, Robert, 1587-1663., Codrington, Robert, 1601-1665.

London: printed by Tho. Leach, and are to be sold by John Martin, James Allestry, and Tho. Dicas, at the Sign of the Bell in St. Pauls-Church Yard, 1660.
Subject terms:
Conscience
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A94173.0001.001

Contents
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To the most Noble Robert Boyle, Son to the Right Honourable Richard Earl of Cork, deceased, and Brother to Richard Earl of Cork now living.
To the Courteous READER.
The Summary of the first Lecture.
THE FIRST LECTURE▪ In which the Definition of Conscience is propounded, and unfolded.
THE SECOND LECTURE. In which it is declared that in the Con∣science of a good Intention there is not such a Protection, that a man might safely rest therein.
THE THIRD LECTURE, In which is declared that neither in the examples of good men, nor the judgment of experienced men, there is protection e∣nough to secure the Conscience.
THE FOURTH LECTURE, In which it is both Discussed, and Stated, what is the Adaequate Rule of Conscience.
THE FIFTH LECTURE, In which the Question is thorowly handled, concerning the Obliga∣tion of Humane Laws in general.
THE SIXTH LECTURE, Of the Obligation of Humane Laws in reference to their material Cause.
THE SEVENTH LECTURE Concerning the obligation of humane Laws, in relation to the Effici∣ent Cause thereof.
THE EIGHTH LECTURE Of the Obligation of Humane Laws from the Formal Cause: where,
THE NINTH LECTURE Of the Obligation of Humane Laws, in respect of the Final Cause thereof.
THE TENTH LECTURE In which that most vulgar Speech (The safety of the People is the Su∣preme Law) is more largely ex∣amined, and unfolded, that it may more rightly be un∣derstood.
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