For full access to this item, please  Login

Add to bookbag
Author: J. S. (John Shirley), fl. 1680-1702.
Title: The accomplished ladies rich closet of rarities: or, The ingenious gentlewoman and servant-maids delightfull companion: Containing many excellent things for the accomplishment of the female sex, after the exactest manner and method, viz. (1.) The art of distilling. (2.) Making artificial wines. (3.) Making syrups. ... (14.) The accomplished dairy-maids directions, &c. ... To which is added a second part, containing directions for the guidance of a young gentle-woman as to her behaviour & seemly deportment, &c.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Library
2011 April (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

This keyboarded and encoded edition of the work described above is co-owned by the institutions providing financial support to the Early English Books Online Text Creation Partnership. Searching, reading, printing, or downloading EEBO-TCP texts is reserved for the authorized users of these project partner institutions. Permission must be granted for subsequent distribution, in print or electronically, of this text, in whole or in part. Please contact project staff at eebotcp-info@umich.edu for further further information or permissions.

Print source: The accomplished ladies rich closet of rarities: or, The ingenious gentlewoman and servant-maids delightfull companion: Containing many excellent things for the accomplishment of the female sex, after the exactest manner and method, viz. (1.) The art of distilling. (2.) Making artificial wines. (3.) Making syrups. ... (14.) The accomplished dairy-maids directions, &c. ... To which is added a second part, containing directions for the guidance of a young gentle-woman as to her behaviour & seemly deportment, &c.
J. S. (John Shirley), fl. 1680-1702.

London: printed by W.W. for Nicholas Boddington in Duck-Lane; and Joseph Blare on London-Bridge, 1687.
Subject terms:
Cookery, English
Home economics
Women -- Conduct of life
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A93181.0001.001

Contents
frontispiece
title page
license
THE PREFACE TO THE READER.
The Accomplished Ladies Rich Closet of Rarities, &c.
CHAP. I.
A distilled Water, good to prevent the Danger of Infectious Air, Plague, Pestilence, &c.
The Famous Water, called Dr. Stevens's Water is made to the best advantage; thus.
Cinamon-Water is properly made thus.
To make Rosemary-Water.
Spirit of Wine, how to make it.
To make Treacle-water excellent good, in case of Surfeits, or the like disorders of the Body.
A Cordial Mint-Water is thus made.
An excellent Water for Sore Eyes, or to Restore the sight.
An excellent Water for a Canker.
A Water very good for a Fistula.
An excellent Water to cleanse any filthy Ulcer.
An excellent Water for the Heats and Inflamma∣tion of the Eyes.
An excellent Water for a sore Leg, or for a Can∣ker in any part or place.
A Water to turn back the Rheum that afflicts the Eyes.
An excellent Water to cool the Liver and Heart as also in case of a Feaver, Surfeit, or Ill di∣gestion.
An excellent Water for an Internal Bruise.
An excellent Water for the Stone, to provoke Urine, and prevent Stoppage, &c.
Poppy-Water, how to make it.
Cordial Angelica-Water is made thus.
Aquamirabilis is thus made.
The Water prevents the Putrefaction of th Blood; is good in case of the swelling of th Lungs; removes the Heart-burn, and pur¦geth Flegm and Melancholy, &c.
CHAP. II.
To make Cherry-Wine.
Hypocras is made thus.
To make Wormwood-Wine.
To make the best sort of Mead.
To make Steponey, a Liquor formerly much in use.
Cock-Ale is thus made.
To make Rack, an Indian Liquor.
CHAP. III.
To make Syrup of Clove-Gilliflowers.
To make Syrup of Violets.
To make Syrup of Wormwood.
To make Syrup of Lemons.
An Excellent Syrup to preserve the Lungs, and for the Astma.
An Excellent Syrup to open Obstructions, and help the shortness of Breath.
To make Syrup of Roses by Infusion.
How to make Catholicum Majus.
Syrup of Radish; how to make it.
Syrup of Vinegar compound; how to make it.
Oxymel simple; how to make it.
Syrup of Barberries is made thus.
To make Syrup of Cowslips.
To make Syrup of Maiden-hair.
To make Syrup of Licoris.
To make Syrup of Cittron Peels.
To make Syrup of Harts-horn, or rather Harts-tongue.
To make Syrup of Cinamon, (which is excellent good in case of Faintings or cold Distem∣pers.)
To make the Syrup of Quinces.
To make Syrup of Hysop.
To make an Excellent Syrup for a Cough or Cold, or to restore decaying Lungs.
To make Syrup of Elder, now greatly in use.
To make Syrup of Roses.
To make Syrup of Vinegar.
To make Syurp of Saffron.
To make Syrup of Mint.
CHAP. IV.
To Preserve Mulberries.
To Preserve Gooseberries.
To preserve Cherries.
To Preserve Apricocks.
To preserve green Walnuts.
To preserve green Pippins.
To preserve Barberries.
To Preserve Pears.
To preserve Black Cherries.
To Preserve Eringo-Roots.
o Conserve or keep any sort of Flower, as Roses, Violets, Cowslips, Gilleflowers, &c.
To Conserve Strawberries.
CHAP. V.
To Candy Ginger.
To Candy Orange-peel.
To Candy Cherries.
To Candy Elicampane-Roots.
To Candy Barberries.
To Candy Grapes.
To Candy Eringo-Roots.
To dry Plumbs, Pears, Apples, Grapes, or the lik
CHAP. VI.
To make Marmalade of Oranges.
To make Paste of Cherries.
To make Marmalade of Grapes.
To make Honey of Mulberries.
To make Jelly of Quinces, Currans or Gooseberries
To make Lemon-Cakes, or Cakes of Lemons.
Artificial Walnuts are thus to be made.
To make Artificial Oranges and Lemons.
To make red Quince-Cakes.
Clear or transparent Quince-Cakes are ma thus.
To make Marmalade after the Italian fashion.
To make white Quince-cakes.
To make Maccaroons.
To make a Leach of Almonds.
To make Sugar smell like Spice.
To make a Quiddany of Plumbs, Apples, Quin or any other Fruit that is proper.
To make a Conserve for Tarts of any Fruit th will keep all the Year.
To preserve Medlers.
To make Sweet-meats of any Apples.
To make each sort of Comfits, vulgarly called Covering-seeds, &c. with Sugar; observe as followeth.
CHAP. VII.
CHAP. VIII.
If Hair, that comely Ornament of your Sex, be wanting, occasioned by Sickness or defect of moisture, &c. To recover it.
To preserve the Hair from falling off.
Of Hair grow too thick or unseemly in any part of the Body.
To make the Hair fair and beautifull.
To cleanse the Skin of the Face and make beautifull.
To take away Freckles.
To make a clear, white and smooth Skin.
To take away Sun-burn.
To take away Wrinkles, and make the Face look youthfull.
To take away the Red Spots, occasioned by the Small Pox.
To take away Pimples and Redness in the Face▪
To take away the hot swelling of the Face.
To Restore a Ruby Face to its former Complexion▪
To make the Hands soft and white.
To make an Excellent Wash-ball for the Hands and Face.
To prevent marks of the small Pox, in the Face.
To make Teeth white and continue sound.
To cause a sweet Breath.
If your Eyes are Blood-shot, to remove that un∣seemly grievance.
by the Wind, or sharpness of the Air, clefts hap∣pen in your Lips.
To restore a singular Complexion in the Face where it is wanting.
To remove any ill scent from out of the Nostri
To make a sweet Water to be used by Gentlew∣men on sundry occasions.
To take away Warts, very troublesome, on sundry occasions.
o kill Black-headed Worms in the hands or face.
To take away Freckles, Morphew or Scars in the face.
In case of a Ring-worm in the Face.
To cleanse the Body and make it comely.
To Curl the Hair.
To make Hair black.
Gentlewomen, your Breasts be over-large, (and by that means troublesome) to reduce them.
To make a sweet Bath.
make Musk-bags to lay amongst your Cloaths.
To make Musk-balls.
To make burning Perfume.
To make a scent of Rosemary.
Another excellent Perfume; how to make it.
An Excellent Perfume good against Infectious Air, and exceeding pleasant; how to make it
To make Musk-Cakes.
CHAP. IX.
For Pains in the Head.
In case of an Ague.
For the yellow Jaundice.
For the black Jaundice.
For a dry Cough.
To make a green Ointment.
To break an Imposthume or Swelling.
To remove the humour that occasions the Green sickness in Virgins and young Widows.
Sir Philip Parry's Emplaister; how to make it, and its Virtue.
A most Approved Plaister for the Rupture.
A Salve Excellent to draw and heal, &c.
An Excellent Emplaister for a new or old Sore.
Dr. Morsus Emplaister, commonly called Oxe∣crotium.
Oyl of Rosemary-flowers; how to make it, with its Virtual Operation.
An Excellent Powder to provoke Urin, and send forth the Gravel and Stone.
A Powder to ease the Pains of the Gout.
A Water for easing the Pains in the Teeth.
An Excellent Water for the Ulceration of the Yard.
An Ointment to cleanse Sores either old or new.
Flos Unguentorum; how to make it; together with its Excellent Virtue.
For a Scald, or any Burn, an Excellent Ointment
An Excellent Ointment to asswage Pain, and coo any extraordinary Heat by what means soever it happen.
A Tobacco-Salve for any fresh Wound.
For the shrinking of the Nerves or Sinews, a Plaister.
A Dredge Powder, that purgeth Choler, Phlegm and Melancholy.
An Excellent Powder to purge the Head by Sneezing.
An Excellent Powder for the Falling-sickness.
An Excellent Powder for hollow Ulcers.
A Powder to Incarnate any Wound.
An Excellent Powder to stay the bleeding of Wounds, &c.
An Excellent Poultis for any Ach, Sprain or Dis∣location.
An Excellent Powder in case of the Small Pox, or any Infectious distemper.
An Excellent Confection to preserve against t Plague, or any Pestilential disease; as al from the effects of bad Airs.
For the Consumption, an Excellent Receipt.
An Excellent Drink for the Windiness of the Sto∣mack or Spleen.
The Lord Denise's Excellent Medicine for the Gout; how to make and apply it.
To make Gascoign-Powder.
For the Dropsie.
To make an Excellent Water for any Disease in the Eyes.
To break the Wind.
To prevent spitting Blood.
To stay bleeding at the Nose.
To kill a Fellon.
make an Excellent Salve for a Scald, Burn, Cut or any old Sore.
To remove the Pain of the Tooth-ach.
For the Feaver.
CHAP. X.
CHAP. XI.
For the Epilepsis or Convulsion.
For the Chasing of the Hips.
To remove the Stoppage of Urine.
For the Strutting of the Navel.
For the Inflamation of the Navel.
To destroy Worms.
For Vomiting.
For the Hickets.
For Hard breeding of Teeth.
For the Bladder in the Gums.
To prevent Squint-Eyes.
For a Scald Head.
In case of a Feaver.
CHAP. XII.
To make a French Barley-Posset after the new¦est fashion.
To make an Excellent Broth.
To make Pottage of French Barley.
To make Pannado, after the best fashion.
To make an Excellent White-pot.
To Pickle Cucumbers, so that they may wear a lasting Green.
To make French Beans a lasting Green.
To Pickle Barberries.
To Pickle Mushroons.
To Wash Tiffanies.
To Wash Sarsnet.
The Modish way to Wash and Starch Point-Laces.
To take a Spot or Stain out of Silks, Worsted or Woollen.
To take Pitch, Rosin, Tarr, or soft Wax, out of Stuffs or Woollen.
To take the Stain of Fruit, Ink, or the like, out of Linnen.
To cleanse Silver or Gold Lace.
An Excellent way to Perfume Gloves, is this.
To cleanse all sorts of Plate.
CHAP. XIII.
A Capon, or Chickens and white Broth, being frequently the first dish, dress it after this manner.
Red or Fallow Deer, how to Roast.
Neats-Tongues roasted.
Neats-Tongue and Udder, how to boil.
How to boil Land or Sea-Fowl.
To roast a Hare.
To roast a Shoulder of Mutton the best way.
To boil Pigeons with Rice.
To roast an Udder.
To Stew a Carp.
To bake Steaks in the French fashion.
To boil a Fore-Loin of Pork the best way.
dress a Leg of Mutton to the best advantage.
To boil a Brisket, Surloin, Chine, Rump, Flan Fillet or Buttock of Beef, to the best advantag
To Stew a Leg of Lamb the best way.
To boil a Leg of Veal and Bacon the best way.
A Rump of Beef to Stew the best way.
To bake a Hare the best way.
To roast a Rabit with Oysters, the best way.
To Carbanado Hens or Pullets, the best way.
To set off a dish of Marrow, &c.
To stew a Pheasant, the best fashion or way.
To Carbinade Mutton, the best way.
To roast a Pig.
To stew Venison, the best way.
To make a Fricacy of Chickens, the best way.
To Stew a Fillet of Beef, the newest way.
The newest way to boil a Wild-Duck.
To bake a Pig the best way.
boil a Pullet, Capon or Chicken, the best way.
To boil a Capon or Chicken with Sugar-pease.
To hash a Capon or Pullet, the best way.
To boil a Pullet or Capon with Asparagrass.
To fry a Rabit with sweet Sawce.
To Stew a Mallard.
To fry a Neats-Tongue the best way.
To boil a Haunch of Venison in the best manner.
To roast a Goose in the newest fashion.
To boil a Pike the best way.
To Stew a Pike the best way.
To boil a Salmon the best way.
To roast an Eel the best way.
To roast a Lobster the best way.
To roast a Pound of Butter.
To make Sauseages the best way.
To dress a dish of Anchoveys the hest way.
How to dress a dish of Caveer the best way.
The best way to dress a dish of Pickle-Herrings.
To set out a dish of Pickles.
How to Pot Fowl in order to their keeping by Sea or Land, &c.
To dress Kid with the colour and taste of Venison.
An Excellent way of Hashing any sort of Meat.
How to roast a Salmon the best way.
To fry Salmon the best way.
How to recover tainted Venison, and make Mutton, Beef or Lamb, pass for Venison.
To roast a Carp the best way.
To Stew a Carp the French way.
To Stew Oysters after the best manner.
To Stew Flounders.
To roast an Eel the Dutch way.
To Stew Breams.
To boil a Mullet the best way.
How to dress a Cods-head the best way.
CHAP. XIV.
To make an Oyster-Pye.
To make a Veal-Pye the best way.
The best way to make a Carp-Pye.
The best way to make a Chicken-Pye.
To make a Warden-Pye the best way.
o make a Pye with Sweet-breads and Lamb-stones.
To bake a Turkey the best way.
To make an Artichoak-Pye the best way.
To make a Marrow-Pudding the best way.
The best way to make a Custard.
To make an Umble-Pye the best way as has bee Approved.
A Venison-Pasty, the best way to make.
To make an Excellent Minced-Pye.
To make an Eel-Pye the best way.
The best way to make a Gooseberry-Tart.
To make a Pippin or Codling-Tart, or of any such like Fruit.
To make a Paste of Marrow, &c.
To make a Pye of Calves-feet, the best way.
To make the best Cakes.
To make the best Cheese-cakes.
CHAP. XV.
To make an Excellent Green-Sawce, to serve o any occasion wherein it is requisite.
For all sorts of small Birds roasted.
CHAP. XVI.
March.
Second Course.
April.
Second Course.
May.
Second Course.
Iune.
Second Course.
Iuly.
Second Course.
August.
Second Course.
September.
Second Course.
October.
Second Course.
November.
Second Course.
December.
Second Course.
Ianuary.
Second Course.
February.
Second Course.
CHAP. XVII.
To make fresh Cheese of Cream.
Cream and Codlings, how to order in the best manner.
To make an Excellent Junket.
To make a Whip'd Syllabub.
To make Cream of Codlings.
To make a Cream-Tart.
To make Curran-Cream.
To make Cream of Eggs.
To make Curd-Cakes.
To make fresh Cheese.
To make Gooseberry-Cream.
To make a Cream Fool.
To make Clouted Cream.
To make a Gooseberry-Fool.
To make a Tansey.
To make Snow-Cream.
To make a pleasant Syllabub.
To make a Cream, called Quince-Cream.
To make the best Jumballs.
How to make an Angellet.
To make Sage-Cream.
Messeline, or Mixture, of rare and curious Receipts, Things and Mat∣ters; Added as an Appendix to this Impression, for the better encou∣ragement of the Buyer, not any of them being to be found amongst the Curiosities of the first Edition of this usefull Book.
Most Approved Physical Receipts.
n Excellent Balm for the Epilesie, Vertigo, Palfie, Cramp, and Pain in the Back; and all cold Afflictions of the Nerves and Joynts.
A Receipt to make Orvetine, or the famous An¦tidote against Poyson, Infection, by being a¦mongst diseased persons, or suddenly coming in¦to infections or noysome Air, and to prevent o eraducate any contagious Disease, disperse Cold and prevail against Agues and Feavers.
An Excellent Wine, or Medicinable Drink, against the Pox, Plague, Measles, Small Pox, Spotted Feaver, or any infectious disease.
Rare Curiosities, not before made Publick.
Marmalade of Pruins, Raisins, Currans, &c. how to make it of an Amber Colour, capable of keeping a Year.
A Perfume wherewith to Perfume any Confect¦ons, &c.
To make a Dish seem a pleasant Garden, or plea¦sant Hill of Fruits and Flowers.
e Approved way to keep Gooseberries, Cherries, Currans, Cornelian-Berries, Plumbs, Apricocks, Grapes, and the like, all the Year, in their sub∣stance, colour, and proper taste, in order to make Tarts, or the like, at any time of the year, as if it were at the proper season.
To make Frayse appear like Rashers of Bacon▪
Curiosities, rare and new, for th Beautifying and Adorning thFemale Sex, with other matte of moment.
To make a young Face exceeding Beautifull, an an old Face very Tollerable.
A sweet Wash to cause the Body to cast a fra∣grant scent when washed therewith.
Excellent Oyntment to Beautifie the Hands and Face, and take away any Deformity: ne∣ver before Published.
To make a Rough Skin smooth, and Wrinkles d appear.
Rare and new Experiments rela∣ting to Lawndering, &c. never before Published.
To restore Linnen that is scorched by hanging, or being too near the fire, &c.
To make Cloaths that have been abused in Washing, Yellow or Mildewed by lying in damp places, white and fair.
To recover Lawn, Tiffany, Musling or Lace, when they are faded.
CHAP. XVIII.
Additional Experiments, or the Judici∣ous Midwives farther Instructions, not published in the former Edition.
And first of Weakness, &c.
New and rare Experiments in Cookery, not before made Publick; as also in Dairying.
To roast a Salmon whole the Italian way.
To roast a Turky, Swan, Heron or Bittron, the French way.
To make a Spanish Syllabub the best way.
The Dutch way to make Orange-Butter.
THE SECOND PART, OR, Appendix to the foregoing Work. Containing Directions for Behaviour, as to what relates to the Female Sex, on all occasions, &c.
The Author's Admonition to Parents, or such as have the Tuition of Children, &c.
CHAP. I.
CHAP. II.
CHAP. III.
CHAP. IV.
CHAP. V.
CHAP. VI.
CHAP. VII.
CHAP. VIII.
CHAP. IX.
CHAP. X.
CHAP. XI.
CHAP. XII.