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Author: Shirley, James, 1596-1666.
Title: The rudiments of grammar.: The rules composed in English verse, for the greater benefit and delight of young beginners. / By James Shirley.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Library
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: The rudiments of grammar.: The rules composed in English verse, for the greater benefit and delight of young beginners. / By James Shirley.
Shirley, James, 1596-1666.

London: Printed by J. Macock for R. Lownds, and are to be sold at his shop at the white Lyon in Paul's Church-yard, 1656.
Subject terms:
Latin language -- Grammar
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A93177.0001.001

Contents
title page
Letters in Latine.
Capital.
Small Letters.
Vowels.
Consonants.
Dipthongs five.
Accents three.
Points.
The Argument.
Rudiments.
Eight Parts of Speech.
Two kinds of Nouns, Substantive, and Adjective.
Numbers Two.
Cases Six.
Genders three.
Declensions five.
Nouns of the first Declension.
Terminations of the first Declension.
Examples of Nouns in As, Es, and E, Which come from the Greek.
Terminations of the second Declension.
Terminations of the third Declension.
Terminations of the fourth Declension.
Terminations of the fift Declension.
The Termination of Cases in every Declension.
Felix, [happy] is a Noun Adjective of one Ter∣mination, and third Declension.
Tristis, [sad] is a Noun Adjective of two Ter∣minations, and third Declension.
Bonus [good] is a Noun Adjective of three Ter∣minations, of the second and first Declension.
Acer [sharp] is a Noun adjective of three Ter∣minations, of the third Declension.
Three Degrees of Comparison.
An Adjective of the Comparative Degree hath two Terminations, or, and us.
Irregular Comparisons.
Comparisons Defective.
Pronouns nineteen.
Of a Verb.
Persons three.
Of Verbs Personal there be four kinds.
Moods four.
Gerunds three. Supines two.
Tenses five.
Passive Signs.
Verbs Impersonal.
Participles four.
Conjugations four.
Examples of the Conjugations in o.
Indicative Mood of the first Conjugation.
Imperative Mood.
Subjunctive Mood, ut that, si if, utinam I would.
Infinitive Mood.
Gerunds.
First Supine.
Participles.
The first Conjugation Passive.
Indicative Mood.
Imperative Mood.
Subjunctive Mood.
Infinitive Mood.
Last Supine.
Participles.
The second Conjugation Active.
Imperative Mood.
Subjunctive Mood.
Infinitive Mood.
Gerunds.
First Supine.
Participles.
The second Conjugation Passive.
Indicative Mood.
Imperative Mood.
Subjunctive Mood.
Infinitive Mood.
Last Supine.
Participles,
The third Conjugation Active.
part
Subjunctive Mood.
Infinitive Mood.
Gerunds.
First Supine.
Participles.
The third Conjugation Passive.
Indicative Mood.
Subjunctive Mood.
Infinitive Mood.
Last Supine.
Participles.
The fourth Conjugation Active.
Imperative Mood.
Subjunctive Mood.
Infinitive Mood.
Gerunds.
First Supine.
Participles.
The fourth Conjugation Passive.
Indicative Mood.
Imperative Mood.
Subjunctive Mood.
Infinitive Mood.
Last Supine.
Participles.
Anomalies.
Indicative Mood.
Imperative Mood.
Subjunctive Mood.
Infinitive Mood.
Participle future.
Eo to go.
Indicative Mood.
Imperative Mood.
Subjunctive Mood.
Infinitive Mood.
Gerunds.
Supine.
Participles.
Indicative, Mood.
Imperative Mood.
Subjunctive Mood.
Infinitive Mood.
Gerunds.
Supines.
Participles.
A Scheme of the Active and Passive Verbs.
Some general Rules for the Preterperfect Tense, and Supines of VERBS.
Exception.
Adverbs.
Conjunctions.
Prepositions.
Interjections.
Concords three.
Conc. I.
Conc. II.
Conc. III.
Questions and Answers when Schollers are examined in their Lectures.
Some necessary Rules of Syntax in English, for young Com∣posers.
Substantives.
[Of] before the latter Substantive, sign of a Genitive.
Substantives together without a Signe.
Adjectives with the signe [of] govern a Genitive.
Adjectives and Verbs of Plenty or Want, a Genitive or Ablative.
[Then] after Comparatives a sign of the Ablative.
[To] and [For] after Verbs and Adje∣ctive, signes of a Dative.
Vebs that have a Nominative after them.
[VVhom] or [VVhat] signs of an Accu∣sative after Verbs.
Except. 1.
Except. 2.
Except. 3.
Except. 4.
Participles, Gerunds, &c.
Measure and Space, Accusative or Ablative.
Manner, Cause, Instrument, Ablative.
Price, Ablative.
An Ablative absolute.
Time.
Place in, or at which, Genitive or Ablative.
Place to which, Accusative,
Place from, or by which, Ablative.
Use of the Participle in rus and dus.
Use of the Gerunds di and dum.
The Rule of Construing.