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Author: Sharrock, Robert, 1630-1684.
Title: The history of the propagation & improvement of vegetables by the concurrence of art and nature:: shewing the several ways for the propagation of plants usually cultivated in England, as they are increased by seed, off-sets, suckers, truncheons, cuttings, slips, laying, circumposition, the several ways of graftings and inoculations; as likewise the methods for improvement and best culture of field, orchard, and garden plants, the means used for remedy of annoyances incident to them; with the effect of nature, and her manner of working upon the several endeavors and operations of the artist. Written according to observations made from experience and practice: / by Robert Sharrock, Fellow of New Colledge.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Library
2012 November (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: The history of the propagation & improvement of vegetables by the concurrence of art and nature:: shewing the several ways for the propagation of plants usually cultivated in England, as they are increased by seed, off-sets, suckers, truncheons, cuttings, slips, laying, circumposition, the several ways of graftings and inoculations; as likewise the methods for improvement and best culture of field, orchard, and garden plants, the means used for remedy of annoyances incident to them; with the effect of nature, and her manner of working upon the several endeavors and operations of the artist. Written according to observations made from experience and practice: / by Robert Sharrock, Fellow of New Colledge.
Sharrock, Robert, 1630-1684.

Oxford: Printed by A. Lichfield, printer to the University, for Tho: Robinson, 1660 [i.e. 1659]
Subject terms:
Vegetables
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A93046.0001.001

Contents
title page
TO THE HONORABLE ROBERT BOYLE Esq The most worthy pattern of true Honor. AND Learned Promoter of true Science.
To the Author on his two late publisht Pieces, The Hypothesis of the Law of Nature, and, The History of Propagation.
A Gratulation unto the Author, upon his History of the Propagation of Vegetables.
The CONTENTS.
CHAP. I. Of Propagation by Seed.
CHAP. II. Of Propagation by Off-sets.
CHAP. III. Of Propagation by Stems, Cuttings or Slips.
CHAP. IV. Of Propagation by laying.
CHAP. V. Of Insitions.
CHAP. VI. Of the ways for, and Seasons of setting Plants.
CHAP. VII. Of the means for the Improvement and best culture of Corn, Grass, and other Vegeta∣bles belonging to Husbandry; and of the ways for removing the seve∣ral annoyances that usually hinder such advantage.
CHAP. VIII. Of the Means of Improvement and best culture of of such Plants or Flowers as are usually cultiva∣ted in Gardens or Orchards, and of the ways u∣sed for the removing such annoyances as are com∣monly incident to them.
ERRATA.
THE HISTORY OF Artificial propagation of Plants.
CAP. I. Of Propagation by Seed.
Num. 1. Of Propagation of Vegetables in general, with a Preface to the Discourse.
N. 2. A Catalogue of Plants that may be encreased by Seeds.
N. 3. The Seasons of Sowing.
N. 4. Examples of Sowing with some particular directions for some choice Vegetables.
Examp. 1. From Mr. Parkinson; directing skillfully the ordering of Tulips in their propagation by seed.
Example 2. Of Anemone's
N. 3. Clovergrasse being esteemed as great an improve∣ment as any our ground is capable of: I shall adde such speciall directions as are given for the ordering there∣of: Sir Richard Westons observations and rules are as falloweth.
N. 4. The Generall observations for the manner of sowing.
N. 5. Of variety of kindes, different in colour, taste, smell, and other sensible qualities, proceeding from some seeds, and what plonts they are that bring seeds yeild-such va riety.
N. 6. Some other relations of transmutation, and the possibility of a change of ones species into another exa∣mined.
N. 7. Of Provision for seed.
N. 8. The manner of growing by seed.
N. 9. Of the cause of Greenness in the leaves of Ve∣getables.
Chap. 2. Of Propagation by offsets.
N. 1. A Catalogue of Plants which may be propa∣gated by offsets and suckers arising with Roots from the stool and Roote of the Mother Plant.
N. 2. The way of making Offsets by Art.
N. 3. Rules for direction in taking off Suckers, or Offsets.
N. 4. Examples of planting by Offsets.
N. 3. Variety of colours, in what flowers, from what offsets.
CHAP. 3. Of propagations by stemmes, cuttings or slippes.
N. 1. A Catalogue of plants this way propagable.
N. 1. Explication of the Manner of propagation by stemmes cut off from the Mother-plant, or slip't by example and Rules for particular direction.
Experiments made of the succcsse of the cuttings off di∣ves plants set in water.
N. 2. The manner of growing by cuttings.
N. 3. Of propagation by the sowing small and almost insensible parts of Vegetables.
Chap. 4. Of Propagation by laying.
N. 1. What plants are this way encreased.
The example of this manner of Propagation.
Requisites for the manner of laying.
N. 1. Of propagation by Circumposition.
illustration
N. 5. Of the manner of growth by Circumposition, and whether thence an argument may be made for the de∣scention of Sap.
Chap. 5 Of Insitions.
N. 1. Of Grafting in generall and particularly of should∣er-grafting, Whippe-Grafting, Grafting in the cleft and Ablactation.
N. 6. What Plants take on different kinds.
N. 2. Rules for Grafting.
N. 2. Of Inoculation
N. 3. Kirckers Experiments concerning Insitions examined.
Num. 4. The maner of growing by Grafts.
CHAP. VI. Of the ways for, and Seasons of setting Plants.
N. 2. Of the setting of Woods Fruit-Trees, and Plants uncultivated.
N. 3. Whether any Vegetables may be set so as to grow in the Air.
CHAP. VII. Of the means for the Improvement and best culture of Corn, Grass, and other Vegetables belonging to Husbandry; and of the ways for removing the several annoy∣ances that usually hinder such ad∣vantage.
Num. 1. Of the Annoyances to Land, and the Impe∣diments that usually distemper it, to the disadvan∣tage of the Husbandman.
N. 2. Of the remedies proper to cure the excessive cold∣ness and moisture in Lands, and the ways of Im∣provement thereby, in Grounds subject to these di∣stempers, by draining, Pigeons and Poultry dung, Urine, Soot, Ashes, Horse and Sheep dung: Of Ground cold and dry, and how these Soyls may be applyable thereto.
N. 3. The ways of Improvement of dry, light, sandy, gravelly, flinty Lands, by floating, Marl, Chalk, Lime.
Num. 4. Remedies for accidental annoyances and hin∣drances of Improvement, particularly the ways to destroy Fern, Heath, Ant-hills, Moss, Rushes, Rest-harrow, Broom, or any such Weed or Shrubs that infect the ground: Whether liming of Corn prevents blashing, the effects of that and Brine in Improvement: Concerning Moles, and the ways to destroy them or drown them; a way of Antipathy, as to this effect, in Animals and Vegetables to the Bodies of their own kinde, when they are in the way of corruption: Mr. Blith's way of preserving Corn from Crows, Rooks, &c.
CHAP. VIII. Of the Means of Improvement and best culture of such Plants or Flowers as are usually culti∣vated in Gardens or Orchards, and of the ways used for the re∣moving of such annoyances as are commonly incident to them.
Num. 1. Of the annoyances in general incident to Garden Plants.
N. 2. Of defences for choice plants from cold.
Num. 3. Of shades requisite to sundry Plants, especi∣ally when young, for their defence from the Sun and Winde.
Of watering.
N. 4. Examples of the best Culture of Hops, and ways of ordering them after they are first set, taken out of Mr. Blith.
N. 4. Mr. Parkinsons way of ordering the seedlings of Tulips grown.
Num. 5. Of annoyance by Plants growing too thick and neer together, and of the remedy thereof, and im∣provement by pruning Trees, and setting them at great distances; plucking off the yong Germens of Garden-flowers, to make the rest more fair; of the sizing of Turneps, Carrots, Parsneps; of Weed∣ing.
N. 6. Of Pismires, Earwigs, Canker and rottenness in choice Plants, Catterpillars, Mossiness, Bark∣binding, Bursting of Gilly-flowers.
Num. 7. Of improvement and melioration of divers Sallad Herbs, by blanching or whiting, from the French Gardiner, and Mr. P's Observati∣ons.
N. Of Acceleration and Retardation of Plants, in re∣spect to their Germination and maturity.
Num. 8. Of melioration by Richness, or other conve∣nient Minera in the Soyl, for the feeding and better nourishment of several Plants: Of artificial Begs, and the change of Seed, as a means to bring fair Flowers: Of Exossation of Fruit, or making it grow without Stones.
N. 9. The conclusion of the Treatise, with one or two choice observations of the wise and good Providence of God, which may be seen in the admirable make of Vegetables, and fitness to their ends, which are not generally taken notice of, but are, with many more, overseen by men busie in the affairs of the world.
A Catalogue of some Books Printed for, and sold by Tho: Robinson.