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Author: Potter, William.
Title: The key of wealth: or, A new vvay, for improving of trade : lawfull, easie, safe and effectuall : shewing how a few tradesmen agreeing together, may both double their stocks, and the increase thereof, without 1. Paying any interest. 2. Great difficulty or hazard. 3. Advance of money. 4. Staying for materialls. 5. Prejudice to any trade, or person. 6. Incurring any other inconvenience. In such sort, as both they and all others (though never so poore) who are in a way of trading, may 1. multiply their returnes. 2. Deale onely for ready pay. 3. Much under-sell others. 4. Put the whole nation upon this practice. 5. Gain notwithstanding more then ordinary. 6. Desist when they please without damage. And so, as the same shall tend much to 1. Enrich the people of this land. 2. Disperse the money hoarded up. ... 23. Incorporate the whole strength of England. 24. Take away advantages of opposition. All which in this treatise in conceived by judicious men to be fully proved, doubts resolved, and objections either answered or prevented.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Library
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: The key of wealth: or, A new vvay, for improving of trade : lawfull, easie, safe and effectuall : shewing how a few tradesmen agreeing together, may both double their stocks, and the increase thereof, without 1. Paying any interest. 2. Great difficulty or hazard. 3. Advance of money. 4. Staying for materialls. 5. Prejudice to any trade, or person. 6. Incurring any other inconvenience. In such sort, as both they and all others (though never so poore) who are in a way of trading, may 1. multiply their returnes. 2. Deale onely for ready pay. 3. Much under-sell others. 4. Put the whole nation upon this practice. 5. Gain notwithstanding more then ordinary. 6. Desist when they please without damage. And so, as the same shall tend much to 1. Enrich the people of this land. 2. Disperse the money hoarded up. ... 23. Incorporate the whole strength of England. 24. Take away advantages of opposition. All which in this treatise in conceived by judicious men to be fully proved, doubts resolved, and objections either answered or prevented.
Potter, William.

London: Printed by R.A. and are to be sold by Giles Calvert at the black spread Eagle neer the West end of Pauls, 1650.
Subject terms:
Finance, Public -- Great Britain
Commerce
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A90881.0001.001

Contents
title page
TO THE SUPREME AUTHORITY OF ENGLAND, The present PARLIAMENT ASSEMBLED.
To the ingenious Reader.
In Commendation of this Enterprize.
Another.
THE CONTENTS OF THE Foure Bookes, belonging to the ensuing Treatise.
book 1
LIB. I. SECT. I.
LIB. I. SECT. II.
LIB. I. SECT. III.
LIB. I. SECT. IIII.
LIB. I. SECT. V.
LIB. I. SECT. VI:
LIB. I. SECT. VII.
book 2
LIB. II. SECT. I.
LIB. II. SECT. II.
LIB. II. SECT. III:
LIB. II. SECT. IV.
LIB. II. SECT. V.
book 3
LIB. III. SECT I.
LIB. III. SECT. II:
LIB. III. SECT. III.
LIB. III. SECT. IV.
LIB. III. SECT. V.
LIB. III. SECT. VI.
LIB: III. SECT. VII.
book 4
LIB. IIII. SECT. I.
LIB. IIII. SECT. II.
LIB. IV. SECT. III.
The Conclusion.
LIB. IV. SECT. IV.
First, To Inrich the people of this Land.
Secondly, To disperse the money hoarded up,
Thirdy, To Import Bullion from Beyond-Sea.
4. To raise Banks of money in divers places.
5. To settle a secure and known credit.
6. To make such Credit current.
7. To extend such credit to any degree needfull.
8. To quicken the revolution of money and credit.
9. To diminish the Interest for monies.
10. To make Commodity supply the place of money.
11. To ingrosse the Trade of Europe.
12. To fill the Land with Commodities.
13. To abate the price of Commodity.
14. To provide store against Famine.
15. To relieve and imploy the poor.
16. To augment Custome and Excise.
17. To promote the sale of Lands.
18. To remove the causes of imprisonment for Debt.
19. To lessen the hazard of Trading on Credit.
20. To prevent high-way-Thieves.
21. To multiply Ships for defence at Sea.
22. To multiply meanes for defence at Land.
23. To incorporate the whole strength of England.
24. To take away advantages of opposition.
The Conclusion to the whole Treatise.
To the Honourable COUNCELL, for Ad∣vancing and regulating of TRADE.
Errata.
Page 60. line 3. read