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Author: Planis Campy, David de.
Title: Phlebotomiographia: or, a treatise of phlebotomy. Demonstrating the necessity of it in diseases; the time for elections. And likewise of the use and application of cupping-glasses, and leeches. Whereupon is added a brief and most methodicall tract of the crisis. Written originally in French, by Da de Plumis Campi chirurgion. And now faithfully rendred into English, by E.W. well-wisher to physick and chirurgery.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Library
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: Phlebotomiographia: or, a treatise of phlebotomy. Demonstrating the necessity of it in diseases; the time for elections. And likewise of the use and application of cupping-glasses, and leeches. Whereupon is added a brief and most methodicall tract of the crisis. Written originally in French, by Da de Plumis Campi chirurgion. And now faithfully rendred into English, by E.W. well-wisher to physick and chirurgery.
Planis Campy, David de., E. W.

London: Printed by John Streater, for John Place, at Furnisalls-Inne Gate; and William Place, at Grayes-Inne Gate, next Holburn, 1658.
Subject terms:
Phlebotomy
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A90743.0001.001

Contents
title page
To the most High and Puissant Princess, Mary De Medici Queen, Mother to the King of France.
To the Benevo∣lent Reader.
docket title
A TREATISE OF Phlebotomy.
CHAP. I. What Phlebotomy is. Its property, and of that which is to be obser∣ved particularly for the good per∣formance thereof.
Man is more miserable then al Ani∣mals and the reasons therefore.
The diligence of the Learned Chir∣urgion praised.
The derivation of the word Phle∣botomy.
For what causes one should open a Vein.
How far Phlebotomy doth extend its self.
Phlebotomy more safe then purg∣ing Physick.
What Plethore and Cacochymy is.
Galen in the 5. of his Meth. Ch. 5.
Observations concerning blooding.
The Charity of the Authour.
The great errour and Covetousnesse of some Phlebotomists.
Condition of the Phlebotomist.
What Instruments are to be used in Phlebotomy.
Default in Phlebotomists.
The time of necessity from whence taken.
The time of Election from whence taken.
Protestation of the Authour.
CHAP. II. How the Chirurgion ought not to be Ignorant of Astrologie, and the profit that proceeds there∣from, as well for Phlebotomy, as for all the diseases which happen to humane bodies, The Sympa∣thy of the Starres therewith, and other discoveries most profitable to Chirurgions.
The Auntients great Astrologers.
Ex quovis ligno non fit Mercu∣rius.
The Common opinion of heading, re∣jected.
Medicaments prepared by Chymical art, are more wholsome then Common ones.
The Harmony which the heavenly bodies, have with our humane bodies.
You must draw Metalique Medi∣cines, for the Maladies of the same kinde.
CHAP. III. Of the time of necessity, wherein are shewn the Maladies, in which Phlebotomy doth necessarily fall.
Chirurgery is the most certain part of Physick.
In what Maladies blooding is use∣full.
Observations in blooding, for the difference of the disease.
Necessity hath no set time for bloo∣ding in.
Times of Election divided into two.
CHAP. IV. Of the time of Election for the in∣feriour root, and of the superiour root, which reaches to the know∣ledge of the Starrs, as well in the concurrence which they have to the parts of our bodies, as upon the humours and Maladies which happen therein.
Observation concerning the time of Election.
A Digression.
A prety observation, upon the winds and our bodies.
The Region must be observed in blooding.
Upon what maladies the Planets rule.
The Aspects of the Stars ought to be observed in blooding.
Division of the times of the Moon.
The propriety of the twelve Signes, upon the humane bodies.
The parts wherein the Signes rule together, with their property concerning blooding.
Division of the Signes.
The rising and setting of the Signes.
The Chirurgion must Encounter the Starrs.
CHAP. V. That it is necessary that the Chi∣rurgion have the Astronomicall figure in his study, or in his shop; and of the profit that proceeds therefrom, as well for the sick per∣sons as for those who exercise it; which is proved by a History, and other examples. As also, that it is better to keep & cleanse the blood then to evacuate it. With the de∣scription of two admirable reme∣dies, for this end.
The good desire of the Authour.
The ignorance of Astronomy is, cause of great evils.
A Remarkable History.
In Lunar purgations, the vein of the Arme must not be opened.
Objection.
Accidents ariving in blooding, through ignorance of the Starrs.
Objection.
Objection.
Advertisment of the Authour.
Definition of the Pleurisy.
A Remedy for the externall Parts.
A proper Reme∣dy for the Inter∣nall parts.
CHAP. VI. Of Veins to be blooded for several Infirmities which come upon mens bo∣dies; also of the use and benefit of Cup∣ping-glasses, with scarrification, and without scarrifica∣tion; what must be observed in that Operation; & last∣ly, of Horsleeches.
Of Cupping-glas∣ses, and of the benefit of the use of them in gene∣rall.
Intentions for which one should ap∣ply Cupping-glasses.
Of the use of Cupping-glasses, as to the parts or places, as well with scarrification, as without it.
Those things which ought to be ob∣served, before applying of Cup∣ping-glasses.
Here followeth the use of Horse∣leeches.
A Brief Treatise, Or, discourse concerning Cri∣sis's. Wherein is shewn how people do de∣ceive themselves, in their judge∣ments upon them, being ignorant of the Motion of the Starrs.
All things have a regular motion.
The humors have a Limited course.
Division of the Sun in its Circular Motion.
Division of the Seasone with the Elements.
Division of the day for the Elements and humors of the body.
Maladies occasioned by the Signes, are healed by the opposing of contrary Signes.
Wherein consisteth the one-day Feaver.
How the fits of the Feaver appear.
A Considerable reason.
Definition of the Crisis.
Two sorts of Crisis.
A pritty similitude of Avicen, con∣cerning Crisis.
The Common Criticall judgment, of no value.
The Common opinion concerning the Crisis, is fallacious:
A most true signe concerning the Crisis.
The Charity of the Anthour is Commendable.
Example concerning the above named opinion.
A too Common errour.
To the Benevo∣lent Reader. A Quadrine.
A TABLE OF THE Chapters.