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Author: Pecquet, Jean, 1622-1674.
Title: New anatomical experiments of John Pecquet of Deip.: By which the hitherto unknown receptacle of the chyle, and the transmission from thence to the subclavial veins by the now discovered lacteal chanels of the thorax, is plainly made appear in brutes. As also an anatomical dissertation of the motion of blood and chyle. Together with the further description of the same lacteal chanels newly discovered in the body of man as well as brutes. Being an anatomical historie, publickly propos'd by Thomas Bartoline, Dr. and Reg. Professor both in Physick and Anatomy, to Michael Lysere, answering.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Library
2011 April (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: New anatomical experiments of John Pecquet of Deip.: By which the hitherto unknown receptacle of the chyle, and the transmission from thence to the subclavial veins by the now discovered lacteal chanels of the thorax, is plainly made appear in brutes. As also an anatomical dissertation of the motion of blood and chyle. Together with the further description of the same lacteal chanels newly discovered in the body of man as well as brutes. Being an anatomical historie, publickly propos'd by Thomas Bartoline, Dr. and Reg. Professor both in Physick and Anatomy, to Michael Lysere, answering.
Pecquet, Jean, 1622-1674., Bartholin, Thomas, 1616-1680. De lacteis thoracicis et vasis lymphaticiis., Lyser, Michael, 1626-1659.

London: Printed by T.W. for Octavian Pulleyn, and are to be sold at his shop at the sign of the Rose in St. Paul's Church-yard, 1653.
Subject terms:
Human anatomy
Thoracic duct
Chyle
Blood -- Circulation
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A90352.0001.001

Contents
title page
TO THE READER.
The new Anatomick Experiments of the Learned John Pecquet of Diep.
CHAP. I. Both Asellius who was the first dis∣coverer of the Milkie Veins in the Mesentery, and the rest of the Anatomists were ignorant of the place of their meeting. The Receptacle of the Chyle above the Loyns, and the passage from it, not to the Liver, but to the true source of blood, the Heart, is discovered.
CHAP. II. The Chyle being found on the Con∣fines of the Heart and Vena cava, is discovered to be convey'd thi∣ther by the Subclavian Branches; And the Insertion thereof is plainly perceived at the concourse of the Axillar and Jugular Veins.
CHAP. III. The double way of the Milkie Veins discovered within the Breast, from the discharge of the Chyle into the Subclavian Veins down to the fourth Verteber of the back; beyond which insertion there is no Twig of the Milkie-Veins stretched to the upper parts.
CHAP. IV. The double way of the Lacteal Veins is cleared from the fourth Verteber of the Back to the Cen∣ter of the Diaphragm.
CHAP. V. The Receptacle of the Chyle till this day unknown, is searched af∣ter. 'Tis demonstrated that the Chyle floweth not towards the Liver, neither the Lacteal-veins tend thither. The Receptacle of the Chyle is discovered under the Center of the Mesentery. This receives the Chyle from the con∣fluence of Asellius his Lacteals. Asellius his Pancreas is not al∣waies in all, nor the same, neither one. The Milkie Veins lack not their own Valves through the Breast.
CHAP. VI. Not onely a Dog, but other Do∣mestick Beasts have their Milkie Veins and Receptacle; and 'tis shewn 'tis not lacking in man. The Testimonies of Grave men are called to witness the truth of this Book.
The Exposition of the Figures.
title page
An Anatomical Dis∣sertation concerning the Circulation of the Blood, and Motion of the Chyle.
part
CHAP. I. The motion of the Blood from the Heart by the Arteries to the Extremities of the Body, and from the Extremities by the Veins a∣gain to the Heart, is asserted by Experiments.
CHAP. II. The Vena porta doth discharge it self by the Liver into the Vena cava of the Blood it receives from the Coeliack Artery; and hence the Gallant Harvey's Opinion is confirm'd.
CHAP. III. That the Blood floweth out of the Right Ventricle of the Heart through the Lungs into the Left Ventricle.
CHAP. IV. The Circulation of the Blood in the Child in the Womb.
CHAP. V. That the Arterious Blood is partly by Synanastomosies poured out of the Arteries into the Veins; partly being extravasated by the Anastomosies of the Arteries, returneth again into the Veins.
The OBJECTIONS against the Extravasation of the Blood, answered.
CHAP. VI. The beginning of the Blood's mo∣tion is inquir'd after; the innate weight of the Blood, though the Arteries should pay the part of a Syphon with the Veins, is shewn not to be enough for its Circula∣tion.
CHAP. VII. The impulse of the Systole alone is not enough for the Circular mo∣tion of the Blood. In a Diastole there is no Attraction.
Of the Impulse of the Systole.
Of the Diastole's Attraction.
CHAP. VIII. 'Tis shewn by Experiments, that there is not onely a Weight in the Air, but likewise a rarefactive Elatery.
Experiments PHYSICO-MATHEMATICAL OF VACUITY.
The first Experiment. A little Bladder being emptied of its own accord at falling down of Quick-silver, rarifying in the high Viol of the Pipe, declareth the Rarefactive Elatery of the Air.
The second Experiment. The divers falling of Quick-silver according to the sundry heights of a Hill, proveth that the lower parts of the Air by degrees are more compact than those that lean on them.
The third Experiment. The equality of weight of the out∣ward Air with the internal Cy∣linder of the Quick-silver, is shewn.
The fourth Experiment. The Water onely by its weight com∣presseth the Earth-watry Globe; But the Air compresseth it, not onely by its weight, but by its Elatery.
CHAP. IX. The Engins drawn to the assistance of Attraction, are demolished.
That the Water entreth into Water-works, not for fear of Vacuity, but by necessity of an equal weight is cleared by the period of the Waters ascent in them, and Ex∣periments.
That Bellows do not draw the Air, but onely receive it thrust in them from without.
The force of Aerial dilatation, which it hath from its proper Elatery, doth languish, but by an external cause becometh firm.
The Weather-Glass doth demon∣strate, that not onely the Air, but that the Water also is ex∣tended by the accession of Heat.
How the Flesh and Blood is thrust into the Cupping-Glasses.
How Water is thrust into the hot Aeolipila.
Other waies of drawing Air out of Aeolipilaes are propos'd and explain'd.
CHAP. X. The true Causes of the Blood's Mo∣tion are discovered.
Of the Spontaneous Contraction of the Vessels.
Of the Violent Contraction of the Vessels.
Of the Compression of the Vessels.
OF THE MOTION OF THE CHYLE.
CHAP. XI. It is demonstrated, that the Chyle is also thrust into the Lacteal Veins, and is driven towards the Heart, and that it is not sucked.
That the Chyle is not drawn.
Of the Contraction of the Intestins.
Of the Compression of the Guts.
OF RESPIRATION. 'Tis declar'd how Respiration is wrought, and what it availeth the Motion of the Chyle. That the Lungs are not a pervious Tu∣nicle, is known by Experiments.
OF THE MOTION OF THE DIAPHRAGM.
THE OBJECTIONS AGAINST RESPIRATION Answered.
CHAP. XII. Of the Transcolatory use of the Liver.
THE OBJECTIONS Answered.