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Author: Marnettè, Mounsieur, 17th cent.
Title: The perfect cook: being the most exact directions for the making all kinds of pastes, with the perfect way teaching how to raise, season, and make all sorts of pies, pasties, tarts, and florentines, &c. now practised by the most famous and expert cooks, both French and English. As also the perfect English cook, or right method of the whole art of cookery, with the true ordering of French, Spanish, and Italian kickshaws, with alamode varieties for persons of honour. To which is added, the way of dressing all manner of flesh, fowl, and fish, and making admirable sauces, after the most refined way of French and English. The like never extant; with fifty five ways of dressing of eggs. / By Mounsieur Marnettè.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Library
2011 April (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: The perfect cook: being the most exact directions for the making all kinds of pastes, with the perfect way teaching how to raise, season, and make all sorts of pies, pasties, tarts, and florentines, &c. now practised by the most famous and expert cooks, both French and English. As also the perfect English cook, or right method of the whole art of cookery, with the true ordering of French, Spanish, and Italian kickshaws, with alamode varieties for persons of honour. To which is added, the way of dressing all manner of flesh, fowl, and fish, and making admirable sauces, after the most refined way of French and English. The like never extant; with fifty five ways of dressing of eggs. / By Mounsieur Marnettè.
Marnettè, Mounsieur, 17th cent.

[London]: Printed at London for Nath. Brooks at the Angel in Cornhil, 1656.
Alternate titles: Patissier françois. English
Subject terms:
Cookery
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A89547.0001.001

Contents
title page
half title
frontispiece
TO The Right Honourable the Lady Dethick, Lady Mayorels of the Noble, Ancient, and most Renowned City of London, and the Right Worshipful Ladies, the Ladies Tenson, and Frederick, the Wives of the Right VVorshipful Sheriffs of the afore∣said City, &c.
The French Epistle to the Reader, Translated.
The Contents.
THE FRENCH Pastry Cook
CHAP. I.
CHAP. II.
CHAP. III.
CHAP. IV.
CHAP. V.
CHAP. VI.
CHAP. VII.
CHAP. VIII.
CHAP. IX.
CHAP. X.
CHAP. XI.
CHAP. XII.
CHAP. XIII.
CHAP. XIV.
CHAP. XV.
CHAP. XVI.
CHAP. XVII.
CHAP, XVIII.
CHAP. XIX.
CHAP. XX.
CHAP. XXI.
CHAP. XXII.
CHAP. XXIII.
CHAP. XXIV.
CHAP. XXV.
CHAP. XXVI.
CHAP. XXVII.
CHAP. XXVIII.
CHAP. XXIX.
CHAP. XXX.
CHAP. XXXI.
CHAP. XXXII.
CHAP. XXXIII.
CHAP. XXXIV.
CHAP. XXXV.
CHAP. XXXVI.
CHAP. XXXVII.
CHAP. XXXVIII.
CHAP. XXXIX.
CHAP. XL.
CHAP. XLI.
CHAP. XLII.
CHAP. XLIII.
CHAP. XLIV.
CHAP. XLV.
CHAP. XLVI.
CHAP. XLVII.
CHAP. XLVIII.
CHAP. XLIX.
CHAP. L.
CHAP. LI.
CHAP. LII.
CHAP. LIII.
CHAP. LIV.
CHAP. LV.
CHAP. LVI.
CHAP. LVII.
CHAP. LVIII.
CHAP. LIX.
CHAP. LX.
CHAP. LXI.
CHAP. LXII.
CHAP. LXIII.
CHAP. LXIV.
CHAP. LXV.
CHAP. LXIV.
CHAP. LXVII.
CHAP. LXVIII.
CHAP. LXIX.
CHAP. LXX.
CHAP. LXXX.
CHAP. LXXXI.
CHAP. LXXXII.
CHAP. LXXXIII.
CHAP. LXXXIV.
CHAP. LXXXV.
CHAP. LXXXVI.
CHAP. LXXXVII.
CHAP. LXXXVIII.
CHAP. LXXXIX.
CHAP. XC.
CHAP. XCI.
CHAP. XCII.
The Translators additionall observati∣ons, concerning Wafers.
CHAP. XCIII.
CHAP. XCIV.
CHAP. XCV.
The Translators additionall description how to make excellent Pan-cakes, according to the Flemish and Hollaxd Fashion, and the which as it seems, was omitted in this Treatise.
CHAP. XCVI.
CHAP. XCVII.
CHAP. XCVIII.
CHAP. XCIX.
CHAP. C.
CHAP. CI.
CHAP. CII.
CHAP. CIII.
CHAP. CIV.
CHAP. CV.
CHAP. CVI.
CHAP. CVII.
CHAP. CVIII.
CHAP. CIX.
CHAP. CX.
CHAP. CXI.
CHAP. CXII.
CHAP. CXIII.
CHAP. CXIV.
CHAP. CXV.
CHAP. CXVI.
CHAP. CXVII.
CHAP. CXVIII.
CHAP. CXIX.
CHAP. CXX.
CHAP. CXXI.
CHAP. CXXII.
CHAP. CXXIII.
CHAP. CXXIV.
The Second manner of Poaching of Eggs.
A Third manner of Poaching Eggs.
The Fourth manner of Poaching Eggs.
The Fifth manner of Feached Eggs.
The Sixth manner of Poached Eggs.
The Seventh Fashion of Poached Eggs.
The eighth Fashion of eating Poached Eggs.
The Ninth manner of eating Poached Eggs.
The Tenth manner of eating Poached Eggs.
The Translators additional description how to poach or butter a dish of Eggs without any butter at all.
CHAP. CXXV.
The First manner.
The Second manner.
The Third manner.
The Fourth manner.
The Fifth manner.
CHAP. CXXVI.
CHAP. CXXVII.
CHAP. CXXVIII.
CHAP. CXXIX.
The Second manner, being an Omelet according to the Celestines or the Saints fashion.
The Third manner, being a crisped O∣melet.
The Fourth manner, being the way to make a Pancake or Omelet with Apples.
The fifth manner, being an Omelet according to the newest mode, Oxford Cates, or the Co∣vent Garden guise.
The sixth manner, being an Omelet with Lemmon-peels.
The Seventh manner, being an Omelet with Bacon.
The eight manner, being another kind of Omelet with Bacon.
The Ninth Manner, being an Omelet made with Cream.
The Tenth manner, being another kind of Omelet with Cream.
The eleventh manner, being an Ome∣let of Herbs.
The Twelfth manner, being an Omelet with Parsly.
The Thirteenth manner, being an Omelet of Leeks.
The Fourteenth manner, being an Omelet stuffed with Succory.
The Fifteenth manner, being an Omelet made with Cheese.
The Sixteenth manner, being an Omelet of Cowcumbers.
The Seventeenth manner, being an Omelet according to the Turkish mode.
The Eighteenth manner, being an Omelet made of Calves kindnies.
The Nineteenth manner, being an Egg Tart, and a minced compo∣sure of Fish.
The Twentieth manner, being an Omelet made with stuft Herbs.
The one and Twentieth Manner, be∣ing an Omelet made with Sparagus.
The two and Twentieth manner, being an Omelet only made with flower, in the form of an Egge-tart.
The three and Twentieth manner, being an Omelet called in French a Mi∣roir, that is, a dainty, light, thin, and clear Omelet.
The Four and twentieth manner, be∣ing an Omelet of Eggs made in brown butter.
The Five and twentieth manner, be∣ing a way how to dress Eggs and Milk exqusitely together, otherwise called, a broth of Eggs and Milk.
CHAP. CXXX.
The Second manner, being Eggs stirred both with Verjuyce, and Butter.
Or otherwise.
The Third manner, being Eggs stir∣red with Verjuyce in the Grape.
Another manner.
The Fourth manner, being Eggs stirred with meat broth.
The Fifth manner, being Eggs stirred with Cream.
The sixth manner, being Egges stirred with Cheese.
The eight manner, being stirred Eggs with succory.
The Eighth manner, being Eggs stir∣red with Cowcumbers.
The Ninth manner, being stirred Eggs with green sauce.
The Tenth manner, being another kind of Marmalade made of stirred Eggs.
The Eleventh manner, being Egges stirred with Almonds.
The Twelfth manner, being yet ano∣ther kind of stirred Eggs.
The Thirteenth manner, being Egges stirred according to the Po∣lonian Fashion.
The Fourteenth manner, being exqui∣site, and Courtly, but∣tered Egges.
The Fifteenth and last manner of stirring of Eggs, called in French ala Huge∣notte, or the Pro∣testants man∣ner.
The Perfect English COOKE.
To make a Lumbar Pye.
To bake Chickens or Partridges.
To make a Fregacy of Lamb or Veal.
To Season Venison Pasties.
A Flank or Surline of Beef.
A Pigeon Pye.
A Chicken Pye.
The Liquor for the Chikin Pye.
Another way of a Chikin Pye.
A Lamb Pye with fruit.
A Veal Pye with fruits.
A Calves-foot Pye.
A Chowthern Pye.
An Ʋmble Pye
Minc'd Pye of Veal.
To bake Pullets.
To bake a Goose or a Turkey Phesant or Capon cold.
A Neats tongue cold.
A Venison Pye cold.
A Pippin Tart.
A Warden or Quince Tart.
A Quince Pye, a Warden Pye, or a Pippin Pye, or a Pear Pye.
To make an Apricock Tart.
A Marrow Florentine.
To make Florentines of Almonds.
To make a Florentine of kidneys of Veal.
To make Florentines of Apples.
Other Florentines.
Other Tarts.
To make an Olive Pye.
Sauces.
Sauce for a Capon roasted.
Sauce for a Feldefare, which will serve divers other birds.
Sauce for a Woodcock.
Another.
Sauce for roasted Larks.
To make Gallendine or sauce for Venison or Turkeys.
Sauce for a roast shoulder of mutton.
Sauce for a Carpe.
Sauce for a Barbile.
To boyl Flownders after our best English fashion.
To souce a Gurnet.
To boyl Salmon, Thornback, Conger, &c.
To stew a Trout, a rare dish.
To murine Carps.
Another excellent way to dress divers sorts of fish.
To boyl a fresh fish, as a Carp, &c.
To pickle Oysters.
To souce a Carp.
To souce an Eele.
To souce a Pig.
To make the best sort of minc'd Pyes.
A Potato Pye.
A Hartichoke Pye.
A Skerret Pye.
An Oyster Pye.
Au Eele Pye.
For to boyl Rubits.
To stew Oysters.
A Sauce which will serve for Cocks, or Purtridges, or Phesants, or Ducks.
To make White broth.
To make a Florentine of Spinage.
Reader, These Books following are Printed for Nath. Brook, and are to be sold at his shop at the Angel in Cornhil.