For full access to this item, please  Login

Add to bookbag
Author: Marguerite, Queen, consort of Henry II, King of Navarre, 1492-1549.
Title: Heptameron: or the history of the fortunate lovers; written by the most excellent and most virtuous princess, Margaret de Valoys, Queen of Navarre; published in French by the privilege and immediate approbation of the King; now made English by Robert Codrington, Master of Arts.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Library
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

This keyboarded and encoded edition of the work described above is co-owned by the institutions providing financial support to the Early English Books Online Text Creation Partnership. Searching, reading, printing, or downloading EEBO-TCP texts is reserved for the authorized users of these project partner institutions. Permission must be granted for subsequent distribution, in print or electronically, of this text, in whole or in part. Please contact project staff at eebotcp-info@umich.edu for further further information or permissions.

Print source: Heptameron: or the history of the fortunate lovers; written by the most excellent and most virtuous princess, Margaret de Valoys, Queen of Navarre; published in French by the privilege and immediate approbation of the King; now made English by Robert Codrington, Master of Arts.
Marguerite, Queen, consort of Henry II, King of Navarre, 1492-1549., Codrington, Robert, 1601-1665.

London: Printed by F.L. for Nath: Ekins, and are to be sold at his shop at the Gun, by the west-end of St. Pauls, 1654.
Subject terms:
Marguerite, -- Queen, consort of Henry II, King of Navarre, -- 1492-1549
Henry -- King of France, -- 1553-1610
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A89527.0001.001

Contents
title page
To the truly Honourable, the true Lover of all good Lear∣ning, Thomas Stanley Esquire, &c.
The Translator to the Reader.
To the most Illustri∣ous and most Virtuous Princesse, Madam Jane De Foix Queen of NAVARR.
The true and lively Pour∣traicture of the most Illustrious and most Excellent Princess Margaret of Valois, Daughter to Henry the II. Sister to Henry the III. and Wife to Henry the IV. of France.
On the two Margarets.
sonnet
sonnet
The PREFACE
THE NOVELLS Of Queen MARGARET.
A Gentlewoman of Alençon had two friends, the one for her pleasure, and the other for her profit. Of the two, she procured him to be murdered who first detected her, for which she obtained pardon for her self, and her fu∣gitive husband, who afterwards to save a little money did resort unto a Negromancer, and their Enterprise was discovered, and punished.
The Lamentable and Chast Death of the Wife of one of the Keepers of the Mules of the Queen of Navarre.
A King of Naples abusing the Wife of a Gentleman, did in the end carry the Horn himself.
The rash Enterprise of a Gentleman to incounter a Princess of Flanders, and the hurt and shame which he sustained.
A Beat-mans wise escaped from two Friers, who would have forced her, and play'd her part so well that their sin was discovered to all the world.
The fultilty of a wife who helped her Friend to escape, when her Husband that had but one eye thought to have surprized them.
A Merchant of Paris deceived the Mother of his Sweet∣heart to cover their fault.
A certain Man having lain with his Wife, instead of his Chamber-maid, did send his Neighbour to her, who made him a Cuckold, and his Wife perceived nothing at all.
The Lamentable Death of a Gentleman in Love, who too late received comfort of her whom he affected.
The Love of Amadour and Florinda, wherein is con∣tained many great subtilities and dissimulations, and the admirable chastity of Florinda,
The Second Dayes Work of the Novells of the Queen of NAVARRE.
THE NOVELLS Of Queen MARGARET.
The facetious passages of a Frier in his Sermons.
The Inconvenience that b fell a Duke, and his im∣pudence to arrive to his Intentions, with the just punishment of his ill∣laid Designe.
A Captain of a Galley, under the pretence of De∣votion, became amorous of a young Lady, and what Fortune he incountred.
The Subtilty of a Lover, who under the pretence of a true Friend, did gather of a Lady of Milan the fruit of his passed labours.
A Lady of the Kings Court perceiving her self disdained by her Husband, who made love to another, did by the like love revenge her self.
A Lady of Milan approved the hardiness and con∣rage of her Friend, which was the reason that afterwards she loved him with all her heart.
King Francis shewed his Generosity to Count William, who would have been the Author of his Death.
A fair young Lady made trial of the Faith of a young Scholar her Friend, before she would permit him to intrench too far upon her Honour.
Of two Lovers, who despairing to be married the one unto the other, did betake themselves to two places of Religion, the one to a Covent of St. Francis, and the other to S. Anne of Clare.
A Gentleman unexpectedly is recovered of the malady of Love, finding his Mistresse, too severe unto him, in the Arms of her Horse-Keeper.
The Third Dayes Work of the Novells of the Queen of NAVARRE.
THE NOVELLS Of Queen MARGARET.
The honest and wonderfull Love betwixt a young Lady of an honourable Descent, and a Bastard, and the Ob∣structions which the Queen made in their mar∣riage, with the wise Answer of the young Lady to the Queen.
A Prior, a great Reformer of the times, under the shaddow of Hypocrisie, did by all means attempt to seduce a re∣ligious Virgin, whose wickednesse at last was discovered.
Three Murders committed in one House, that is to say, of the Gentleman who was Master of it, of his Wife, and his Child, oc∣casioned by the wickednesse of a Frier.
The fine Invention of a Gentleman to declare his love unto a Queen, and what be∣came of it.
The subtilty which a great Prince used to delight himself in the Company of the Wife of an Advocate of Paris.
The pleasant discourse of a great Signior, and the fine in∣vention which he used to delight himself with a Lady of Pampelone
The rashnesse of a foolish Secretary, who sollicited the Wife of his Companion, by the means whereof he received great shame.
A certain Secretary was resolved to be too hard for a Merchant who was too hard for him, and what befell him thereupon.
An honest Labourer in the Village, who did suffer himself to he easily deceived by his Wife, who was amorous of the Curat.
A marvellous Example of humane frailty in a Lady who to have her Honour concealed did fall from bad into worse.
The Fourth Days Account of the Novells of the Queen of NAVARRE.
THE NOVELLS Of Queen MARGARET.
The Execrable cruelty of a Frier to obtain his de∣testable Desires, and the punishment which he endured.
The punishment more rigorous than Death, which a Husband inflicted on his Wife, having taken her in Adultery.
The abhomination of an incestuous Priest whose Si∣ster under the pretence of a holy life was great with child by him, and of the pu∣nishment that did follow there∣upon.
Two Friers too curious to listen to what did not belong unto them, were so well recompenced for their vain curiosity, that they thought they both should have dyed.
The Endeavour and Success of a wise Husband to divert the Love which his Wife did bear unto a Preacher.
A President of Grenoble being adverised of the inordinate affection of his Wife, did so well ma∣nage the business, that his honour was not interested in it, and he himself was thoroughly revenged.
The Discretion of a Lady to retire her Husband from a fond love, which did too much torment him.
The memorable Charity of a Woman of Tours towards her Husband who was a whoremaster.
A good invention to drive away an evill Spirit
The Excellent Relation of a Lord who caused his Brother-in-law to be put to death, not knowing the nearness of the Allyance.
The Fifth Days Account of the Novells of the Queen of NAVARRE.
THE NOVELLS Of Queen MARGARET.
The strange, and wild penitence, imposed by a Frier Confessor on a young Lady.
The Continence of a young Maid, against the obsti∣nate and amorous Sute of one of the greatest Lords of France, and the happy Successe which the Damsell did obtain.
The Hypocrisie of a Lady of the Court was discovered by the misdemeanours of her Loves which she thought cunningly to have concealed.
Of two Lovers who subtilly did enjoy their Loves, and of the happy issue thereof.
A Husband chastising his Chambermaid did deceive the Simplicity of his Wife.
Of a Frier, whose Custom it was to bring his complaints to several Husbands, which was the occasion that they did beat their Wives.
A Gentleman of Percha unjustly suspecting the love of his Friend, did provoke him un∣willingly to put in practise the Cause of his Suspition.
Of Two Grey-Friers who on the Wedding-Night did one after the other usurp the place of the Bridegroom, for which they were severely punished.
The Subtilty of a Countess, privatly to have her pleasure of Men; And how she was discovered.
One in love having been let blood received the gift of Mercy by which he died, and his Sweet∣heart killed her self for the losse of him.
The Sixth Days VVork of the Novells of the Queen of NAVARRE.
THE NOVELLS Of Queen MARGARET.
The perfidiousnesse and cruelty of an Italian.
The Slovenly Breakfast prepared by an Apotheca∣ries man for an Advocate and a Gen∣tleman.
The personal diligence of a Prince to remove an importunate Lover.
A Gentle woman of so good a disposition, that seeing her Husband to kisse her Chambermaid, did nothing but laugh at it, and being demanded the reason of it, she made an∣swer, that she only laugh∣ed at his shadow.
The Subtilty of a Spanish woman to defraud the Friers of the last Testament of her Husband.
One Frier fraudulently did marry another Frier who was one of his Companions to a fair young Gentlewo∣man, for which they were both after∣wards severely punished
A ridiculous account of a Lord of England, who on his Habiliments did wear the Glove of a Lady.
A Lady of the Court did pleasantly revenge her self of her Servant for his Love.
A Gentleman thinking in secret to kisse one of the Maid-servants of his Wife, was taken by her in the manner.
A Citizens Wife of Paris did abandon her Husband to follow a Chanter, and afterwards counterfei∣ting her self to be dead, he caused her to be buried.
The Seventh Days VVork of the Novells of the Queen of NAVARRE.
THE NOVELLS Of Queen MARGARET.
The Marvellous obstinacy of the most impudent and bold Love of a Woman of Burgundie to a Canon in the City of Autun.
A Gentlewoman giving an account of her own loves, and speaking of it in a third Person, did unadvisedly de∣clare her self.
The notable Temperance and Chastity of a French Lord.
A Gentleman being disdained for an Husband, did take upon him the orders of a Grey Frier, by rea∣son whereof his Sweet-heart not long after∣wards did undergo the same pu∣nishment.
The simplicity of an antient Woman who presented a ligh∣ted Candle to Saint John of Lyons, and fastned it to the Forehead of a Souldier who was fallen asleep on one of the Sepul∣chers, and what ensued thereupon.
A merry Account which happened to the King and Queen of Navarre.
The Extreme Love and Austerity of a Woman in a strange Land.
A Woman caused her Husband to eat Can∣tharides, to delight her self the more with him in the wanton exercise of Love, on which he thought he should have dyed.
An Italian suffered himself to be cajoled by his Chambermaid, who caused, that instead of her Servant, her Mistresse should take her Husband bolting.
The Excellent History of the outragious incontinence of a Dutchesse, which was the occasion of her death, as also of the Deaths of two perfect Lovers.
The Eighth Dayes Iournal of the Novells of the Queen of NAVARRE.
THE NOVELLS Of Queen MARGARET.
A woman being sick, and at the point of death, did grow into such a passion seeing her Husband did kiss her Chambermaid, that by the Extremity of her Rage she was restored to her health.
The continual Repentance of a Nun having lost the Flower of her Virginity neither by force or love.
A Table of the Sum∣mary of the Novells of the Queen of Navarre.