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Author: Languet, Hubert, 1518-1581.
Title: Vindiciæ contra tyrannos:: a defence of liberty against tyrants. Or, of the lawfull power of the prince over the people, and of the people over the prince. Being a treatise written in Latin and French by Junius Brutus, and translated out of both into English. Questions discussed in this treatise. I. Whether subjects are bound, and ought to obey princes, if they command that which is against the law of God. II. Whether it be lawfull to resist a prince which doth infringe the law of God, or ruine the Church, by whom, how, and how farre it is lawfull. III. Whether it be lawfull to resist a prince which doth oppresse or ruine a publique state, and how farre such resistance may be extended, by whome, how, and by what right, or law it is permitted. IV. Whether neighbour princes or states may be, or are bound by law, to give succours to the subjects of other princes, afflicted to the cause of true religion, or oppressed by manifest tyranny.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Library
2012 November (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: Vindiciæ contra tyrannos:: a defence of liberty against tyrants. Or, of the lawfull power of the prince over the people, and of the people over the prince. Being a treatise written in Latin and French by Junius Brutus, and translated out of both into English. Questions discussed in this treatise. I. Whether subjects are bound, and ought to obey princes, if they command that which is against the law of God. II. Whether it be lawfull to resist a prince which doth infringe the law of God, or ruine the Church, by whom, how, and how farre it is lawfull. III. Whether it be lawfull to resist a prince which doth oppresse or ruine a publique state, and how farre such resistance may be extended, by whome, how, and by what right, or law it is permitted. IV. Whether neighbour princes or states may be, or are bound by law, to give succours to the subjects of other princes, afflicted to the cause of true religion, or oppressed by manifest tyranny.
Languet, Hubert, 1518-1581., Walker, William, 17th cent.

London: Printed by Matthew Simmons and Robert Ibbitson, in Smithfield, neer the Queens-head Tavern, 1648.
Alternate titles: Vindiciae contra tyrannos. English
Subject terms:
Political science
Kings and rulers -- Duties
Despotism
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A88696.0001.001

Contents
title page
THE Emperors, Theodosias and Valentinian TO VOLƲSIANƲS, Great Provost of the Empire.
treatise
The first Question. Whether Subjects are bound and ought to obey Printes, if they command that which is against the Law of God.
The second Question, Whether it be lawfull to resist a Prince which doth infringe the Law of God, or ruine his Church, by whom, how, and how far it is lawfull.
Whether private men may resist by Armes.
Whether it be lawfull to take Armes for Religion.
THE THIRD QUESTION. Whether it be lawfull to resist a Prince which doth oppresse or ruine a publike State, and how far such resistance may be extended, by whom, how, and by what right, or law it is permitted.
Kings are made by the People.
The whole body of the people is above the King.
The Assembly of the three Estates.
Whether prescription of time can take away the right of the people.
Wherefore Kings were created.
Whether the Kings be above the law.
Kings receive Lawes from the people.
If the Prince may make new lawes.
Whether the Prince have power of life and death over his Subjects?
Subjects are the Kings Brethren, and not his slaves.
Whether the goods of the people belong to the King,
Whether the King be the proper owner of the Kingdom.
Whether the King be the usufruictuor of the Kingdom.
The fourth question. Whether neighbour Princes may, or are bound by law to aide the Subjects of other Princes, peasecuted for true Religi∣on, or oppressed by manifest tyranny.