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Author: Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657.
Title: The prisoners plea for a habeas corpus, or an epistle writ by L.C. Joh. Lilburne prerogative prisoner in the Tower of London the 4. of Aprill, to the Honourable Mr. W. Lenthall Speaker of the House of Commons.: In which is fully proved, that the judges are bound by law and their oaths to grant a habeas corpus to any prisoner ... and to deny it ... is to forsweare themselves, for which they may be in law indicted for perjury, and upon conviction, are for ever to be discharged of their office, service and councell. In which is also declared the usurpation of Mr. Oliver Crumwell, who hath forcibly usurped unto himselfe the office of L.G. in the Army, for almost 12. moneths together, and thereby hath robbed the kingdome of its treasure, under pretence of pay, which he hath no right nnto [sic], and by the power of the said office hath tyrannized over the lives, liberties, and estates of the freemen of England ... all which John Lilburne will venture his life according to the law of the land to make good, unto which he hath annexed his epistle which he writ to the prentices of London the 10th of May 1639 ...
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Library
2011 April (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: The prisoners plea for a habeas corpus, or an epistle writ by L.C. Joh. Lilburne prerogative prisoner in the Tower of London the 4. of Aprill, to the Honourable Mr. W. Lenthall Speaker of the House of Commons.: In which is fully proved, that the judges are bound by law and their oaths to grant a habeas corpus to any prisoner ... and to deny it ... is to forsweare themselves, for which they may be in law indicted for perjury, and upon conviction, are for ever to be discharged of their office, service and councell. In which is also declared the usurpation of Mr. Oliver Crumwell, who hath forcibly usurped unto himselfe the office of L.G. in the Army, for almost 12. moneths together, and thereby hath robbed the kingdome of its treasure, under pretence of pay, which he hath no right nnto [sic], and by the power of the said office hath tyrannized over the lives, liberties, and estates of the freemen of England ... all which John Lilburne will venture his life according to the law of the land to make good, unto which he hath annexed his epistle which he writ to the prentices of London the 10th of May 1639 ...
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657.

[London: s.n., 1648]
Subject terms:
Habeas corpus -- England
Detention of persons -- England
Civil rights -- England
Cromwell, Oliver, -- 1599-1658
Lilburne, John, -- 1614?-1657 -- Imprisonment
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A88240.0001.001

Contents
The Prisoners Plea for a Habeas Corpus, Or an Epistle writ by L. C. Joh. Lilburne prerogative prisoner in the Tower of London the 4. of Aprill, to the Ho∣nourable Mr. W. Lenthall Speaker of the House of Commons. In which is fully proved, that the Iudges are bound by Law and their Oaths to grant a Habeas Corpus to any prisoner whatsoever that craves it, by whomsoever committed, and to deny it (whosoever com∣mands the contrary) is to forsweare themselves, for which they may be in Law indicted for perjury, and upon conviction, are for ever to be discharged of their office, service and councell. In which is also declared the usurpation of Mr. Oliver Crumwell, who hath forcibly usurped unto himselfe the Office of L. G. in the Army, for almost 12. moneths together, and thereby hath robbed the Kingdome of its treasure, under pretence of pay, which he hath no right unto, and by the power of the said Office hath tyrannized over the lives Liberties, and estates of the freemen of England in a higher manner then ever Straford or Canterbury did, all which John Lilburne will venture his life according to the Law of the Land to make good, unto which he hath annexed his E∣pistle which he writ to the Prentices of London the 10th of May 1639 when he was like to be murdered in the Fleet by the Bishops, as now he is like to be murdered in the Tower, by Crumwell and his tirannicall fellow Grandees.
To all the brave, couragious, and valiant Apprentizes of the honourable City of London, but esp¦cially those that appertain to the worshpfull Company of Cloth workers, (of which company, if J lve I hope to be a Free man.)