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Author: Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657.
Title: Lieu. Col. John Lilburn's plea in law,: against an Act of Parliament of the 30 of January, 1651. entituled, An act for the execution of a judgment given in Parliament against Lieu. Col. John Lilburn. Contrived and penned, on purpose for him, by a true and faithful lover of the fundamental laws and liberties of the free people of England, ... all which compels and forceth the penman to be very studious of his own good and preservation, ... and therefore, for his own good and benefit, the honest readers information, and for Mr Lilburns the prisoners advantage, he presents these ensuing lines to thy view, and his, as the form of a plea; that the penman hereof, as a true well-wisher of his, and the people of England, would have him to ingross into parchment, and to have ready by him to make use of (in case his own braines cannot contrive a better) when he is called up to answer for his life before the judges of the upper-bench, or any other bar of justice whatsoever; and the said form of a plea for him thus followeth verbatim.
Publication info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Library
2011 April (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: Lieu. Col. John Lilburn's plea in law,: against an Act of Parliament of the 30 of January, 1651. entituled, An act for the execution of a judgment given in Parliament against Lieu. Col. John Lilburn. Contrived and penned, on purpose for him, by a true and faithful lover of the fundamental laws and liberties of the free people of England, ... all which compels and forceth the penman to be very studious of his own good and preservation, ... and therefore, for his own good and benefit, the honest readers information, and for Mr Lilburns the prisoners advantage, he presents these ensuing lines to thy view, and his, as the form of a plea; that the penman hereof, as a true well-wisher of his, and the people of England, would have him to ingross into parchment, and to have ready by him to make use of (in case his own braines cannot contrive a better) when he is called up to answer for his life before the judges of the upper-bench, or any other bar of justice whatsoever; and the said form of a plea for him thus followeth verbatim.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657.

[London: s.n., 1653]
Subject terms:
Great Britain -- History
England and Wales -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A88235.0001.001

Contents
Lieu. Col. John Lilburn's Plea in Law, Against an Act of Parliament of the 30 of January, 1651. Entituled, An Act for the execution of a Judgment given in Par∣liament against Lieu. Col. John Lilburn. Contrived and penned, on purpose for him, by a true and faithful lover of the Fundamental Laws and Liberties of the free people of England, a great deal more then of the person of Lieu. col. John Lilburn, though now he be a pri∣soner for the said Lawes, and Liberties, and his own innocency, in Newgate: All which compels and forceth the Penman to be very studious of his own good and preservation, very much concerned, and very much incroached upon, in that harsh, unjust, and illegal dealing, that at present is exercised upon him: And therefore, for his own good and benefit, the honest Readers information, and for Mr Lilburns the prisoners advantage, he presents these ensuing lines to thy view, and his, as the form of a Plea; that the Penman here∣of, as a true well-wisher of his, and the people of England, would have him to ingross into Parchment, and to have ready by him to make use of (in case his own braines cannot contrive a better) when he is called up to answer for his life before the Judges of the Upper-Bench, or any other Bar of Justice whatsoever; and the said form of a Plea for him thus followeth verbatim.
The illegal Mittimus of the Lord Major.
postscript
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