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Author: Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657.
Title: The peoples prerogative and priviledges, asserted and vindicated, (against all tyranny whatsoever.) By law and reason.: Being a collection of the marrow and soule of Magna Charta, and of all the most principall statutes made ever since to this present yeare, 1647. For the preservation of the peoples liberties and properties. With cleare proofs and demonstrations, that now their lawes and liberties are nigher subvertion, then they were when they first began to fight for them, by a present swaying powerfull faction, amongst the Lords, Commons, and Army, ... so that perfect vassalage and slavery (by force of armes) in the nature of Turkish janisaries, or the regiments of the guards of France, is likely (to perpetuitie) to be setled, if the people doe not speedily look about them, and act vigorusly for the preventing of it. / Compiled by Lievt. Col. John Lilburne, prerogative prisoner in the Tower of London, and published by him for the instruction, information and benefit of all true hearted English-men.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Library
2011 April (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: The peoples prerogative and priviledges, asserted and vindicated, (against all tyranny whatsoever.) By law and reason.: Being a collection of the marrow and soule of Magna Charta, and of all the most principall statutes made ever since to this present yeare, 1647. For the preservation of the peoples liberties and properties. With cleare proofs and demonstrations, that now their lawes and liberties are nigher subvertion, then they were when they first began to fight for them, by a present swaying powerfull faction, amongst the Lords, Commons, and Army, ... so that perfect vassalage and slavery (by force of armes) in the nature of Turkish janisaries, or the regiments of the guards of France, is likely (to perpetuitie) to be setled, if the people doe not speedily look about them, and act vigorusly for the preventing of it. / Compiled by Lievt. Col. John Lilburne, prerogative prisoner in the Tower of London, and published by him for the instruction, information and benefit of all true hearted English-men.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657.

London: [s.n.], Printed in the yeare, when some of the mercinary officers and souldiers of Sir Thomas Fairfaxes Army, that were pretendedly raised for to fight for the liberties and freedomes of England, avowedly drew their swords at the House of Commons doore, to destroy those that really stood for their lawes and liberties, 1647 [i.e. 1648]
Subject terms:
Civil rights -- Great Britain
Great Britain -- Politics and government
Magna Carta
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A88231.0001.001

Contents
title page
To all the peaceable and well minded people of the Counties of Hartfordshire and Buckingham∣shire, who desires present peace, freedome, justice, and the common right and good of all men, but more particularly, to all those honest Nown substantive men, that were the promoters and managers of that affectionate Petition for my self, and Mr. Richard Overton, to the House of Common, (about 12. moneths agoe, which is printed in the 10. and 11. pag of the second editi∣on of our book called the Outcryes of oppressed Commons.) But in a most especiall manner to my honest friends, in and about Watford, that lately were in trouble severall Sessions at St. Albns, for not comming to their parish Church to heare Common prayer, &c.
A proeme, to the following collection and discourse.
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In the third yeare of the reign of Charles, King of England, Scotland, France, and Ireland.
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Englands Freedome, Souldiers Rights: Vindicated against all Arbitrary uniust Invaders of them, and in partcicular against those new Tyrants at Windsore, which would destroy both under the pretence of Marshall Law. OR, The just Declaration, Plea and Protestation of William Thompson, a free Com∣moner of England, unjustly imprisoned at Windsore. Delivered to his Excellency Sir Thomas Fairfax, and that which is called his Councell of Warre, the 14. of December, 1647. Unto which is annexed his Letter to the Generall, wherein the said Plea was inclosed. Also a Petition of the rest of his Fellow-Prisoners to his Excellency.
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