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Author: Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657.
Title: The lawes funerall. Or, An epistle written by Lieutenant Col. John Lilburn,: prisoner in the Tower of London, unto a friend of his, giving him a large relation of his defence, made before the judges of the Kings bench, the 8. of May 1648. against both the illegal commitments of him by the House of Lords, and the House of Commons, ...
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Library
2011 April (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: The lawes funerall. Or, An epistle written by Lieutenant Col. John Lilburn,: prisoner in the Tower of London, unto a friend of his, giving him a large relation of his defence, made before the judges of the Kings bench, the 8. of May 1648. against both the illegal commitments of him by the House of Lords, and the House of Commons, ...
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657.

[London: s.n., 1648]
Subject terms:
Habeas corpus -- England
False imprisonment -- England
Lilburne, John, -- 1614?-1657 -- Imprisonment
England and Wales. -- Parliament -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A88211.0001.001

Contents
The LAWES Funerall. OR, An Epistle written by Lieutenant Col. JOHN LILBURN, Prisoner in the Tower of London, unto a friend of his, giving him a large rela∣tion of his defence, made before the Judges of the Kings Bench, the 8. of May 1648. against both the illegall commitments of him by the House of Lords, and the House of Commons, and how that the Judges in open Court, were ne∣cessitated to confesse, there is by neither of the commitments any crime in Law laid unto his Charge, yet though he was imprisoned for nothing, being committed by a superiour Court the Lords, and that upon a Sentence, they could not release him, but remanded him back again Prisoner unto the Tower, which is a full Declaration, there is no Law left in England now, but that the people thereof must be governed by the lust, will and pleasure of the House of Lords, &c. and though they deale never so unjustly with them, to the cause∣lesse destruction of their Lives, Estates, and Families, yet the Judges of Eng∣land (being in deed and in truth meere Ciphers) cannot remedy it, because it is done by their superiours, the House of Lords; wherefore the said Iohn Lil∣burne doth declare his sorrowfulnesse in his great mistake, in zealously stirring up the people of England to stand up to maintain their Lawes, seeing they have none in being, but the will of the Lords, and therefore according to his promise, to the Judges in open Court; he provokes all the Commons of Eng∣land out of all the Counties thereof, to hasten up to Westminster to the Lords house, and there suffer the Lords (who now have conquered and subdued all their Lawes) to bore them through their eares as their vassalls and slaves, if they can beare it with patience.
body of order
To the Lieutenant of the Tower of London.