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Author: Hudson, Michael, 1605-1648.
Title: The divine right of government:: [brace] 1. naturall, and 2. politique. More particularly of monarchie; the onely legitimate and natural spece of politique government. VVherein the phansyed state-principles supereminencing salutem populi above the Kings honour: and legitimating the erection of polarchies, the popular elections of kings and magistrates, and the authoritative and compulsive establishment of a national conformity in evangelical and Christian dutyes, rites, and ceremonies, are manifested to be groundlesse absurdities both in policy and divinity. / By Mich: Hudson.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Library
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
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Print source: The divine right of government:: [brace] 1. naturall, and 2. politique. More particularly of monarchie; the onely legitimate and natural spece of politique government. VVherein the phansyed state-principles supereminencing salutem populi above the Kings honour: and legitimating the erection of polarchies, the popular elections of kings and magistrates, and the authoritative and compulsive establishment of a national conformity in evangelical and Christian dutyes, rites, and ceremonies, are manifested to be groundlesse absurdities both in policy and divinity. / By Mich: Hudson.
Hudson, Michael, 1605-1648., Stent, Peter, engraver. fl. 1640-1667,

[London: s.n.], Printed in the year 1647.
Subject terms:
Divine right of kings
Monarchy -- Great Britain
Great Britain -- Politics and government
Charles -- King of England, -- 1600-1649
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A86678.0001.001

Contents
frontispiece
title page
To his most Sacred Majesty, Charles, by the grace of God, King of Great BRITTAINE, France and Ireland; defendor of the Faith, &c.
The Analysis of the Whole Government 1. Naturall, which is the subject of the first book. Analysis Lib. 1.
Treatise, manifesting the Divine Right of 2. Politique, (the onely Legitimate spece whereof is Monarchie) which is the subject of the second book. Analysis Lib. 2.
The Scope and Substance of the whole TREATISE.
An Introduction to the Treatise, decla∣ring the Nature and Species of Jus Divinum.
THE FIRST BOOK OF THE Divine Right of Government in its Gene∣rall acception, as it relates to the three Jm∣mediate species of the Ʋnivers. viz. Angels, Men, and naturall Agents.
CHAP. I. Of the nature of Government in generall.
CHAP. II. Of the diverse kind of Government, and first of Internall.
CHAP. III. Of the resolution of some doubts arising from this Doctrine of Gods Internall Regiment.
CHAP. IV. Of Externall Regiment, wherein First of Miraculous Regiment.
CHAP. V. Of Ordinary Regiment.
CHAP. VI. Of the second sort of Externall and Ordinary Government which An∣gels do exercise over all other Creatures.
CHAP. VII. Of Mans Dominion and Power over Naturall Agents.
CHAP VIII. Of that Government which is observed by the society of Angels, Na∣turall Agents, and men in their particular and Mutuall Relations.
THE SECOND BOOK Declaring the DIVINE RIGHT of MONARCHIE.
CHAP. I. Of the Nature of Monarchie and that Jus Divinum whereof it doth Participate.
CHAP. II. Of the six several sanctions whereof Monarchie doth participate.
CHAP. III. Of the Nature of Polarchie, and the Divine Maledictions Incident thereunto.
CHAP. IV. Of the sixth Malediction Incident to Polarchy.
CHAP V. Of the Resolution of two Quaeries concerning a mutual transmutation betwixt these two opposite kinds of Government.
CHAP. VI. Of the true ground and cause of that Supremacy from which all Monarchs do Derive their Titles to the Crown, where first of the Title of popular Election.
CHAP. VII. Of the Title of Birth-right.
CHAP. VIII. Of the Title of CONQƲEST.
CHAP. IX. Of the nature and species; of the ends of Monarchie.
CHAP. X. Of the due limitation of the Kings Power.
CHAP. XI. Of the due extension of the Subjects obedience.
CHAP. XII. What influence Oathes and Covenants, ought to have upon the duties, either of King or Subjects.