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Author: Fidge, George.
Title: The English Gusman; or The history of that unparallel'd thief James Hind.: Wherein is related I. His education and manner of life; also a full relation of all the severall robberies, madd pranks, and handsom jests done by him. II. How at Hatfield he was enchanted by a witch for three years of space; and how she switch'd his horse with a white rod, and gave him a thing like a sun-dial, the point of which should direct him which way to take when persued. And III. His apprehension, examination at the councel of state, commitment to the gatehouse, and from thence to Newgate; his arraignment at the Old Baily; and the discourse betwext his father, his wife and himself in Newgate. With several cuts to illustrate the matter. / Written by G.F.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Library
2011 April (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: The English Gusman; or The history of that unparallel'd thief James Hind.: Wherein is related I. His education and manner of life; also a full relation of all the severall robberies, madd pranks, and handsom jests done by him. II. How at Hatfield he was enchanted by a witch for three years of space; and how she switch'd his horse with a white rod, and gave him a thing like a sun-dial, the point of which should direct him which way to take when persued. And III. His apprehension, examination at the councel of state, commitment to the gatehouse, and from thence to Newgate; his arraignment at the Old Baily; and the discourse betwext his father, his wife and himself in Newgate. With several cuts to illustrate the matter. / Written by G.F.
Fidge, George.

London: Printed by T.N. for George Latham Junior; and are to be sold at the Bishops-Head in Paul's Church-Yard, 1652.
Subject terms:
Robbery
Great Britain -- History
Hind, James, -- d. 1652.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A85253.0001.001

Contents
Vpon the English Gusman.
illustration
title page
To the Reader.
An Advertisement to the Reader.
to the reader
THE English Gusman; OR THE HISTORY Of that Unparallel'd Thief JAMES HIND.
The PROLOGƲE
How Hind run from his Master.
What befel him when he came to London.
How Allen instructs his new servant, and sets him to rob a Gentleman.
How Hind sold his Horse to a Citizen of London.
Hinds return home to Allen, and what hapned afterward.
How Hind parted from his Company, and appointed to meet them at a certain place; and how he robbed two Gentlemens ser∣vants; and caused a Parson to be apprehended for a high-way-man, and escaped himself.
How Hind came to his Company shewing them the money; and what hapned to them at the same time.
How Allen caused his men not to go to bed, but to sit up and drink, fearing least a plot should be laid to take him: and how in the morning he would have robbed a Steward to a Noble man.
How Hind Robbed a Gentleman on foot, and furnished himself with a horse, money and cloaths.
How Hind after he had left his company, Robbed a Doctor of Phisick of forty pound in Gold.
How Hind was betrayed by two whores: who sent two highway men to take his money: undhow he killed one of their horses, and robd the other of his money.
How Hind was Inchanted by a cunning woman, who after some discourse switched him with a Charmed Rod▪ not to be taken or harmed during the time this Charm should last; which was for Three years.
How Hind robbed a Captain upon Chaulk hill in Buckingham-Shire.
How Hind robbed a Gentleman of one hundred and fifty pounds, near Nottingham.
How Hind robbed a Farmer.
How he jested with a Butcher that was his friend.
How Hind served two Bailiffs and a Ʋsurer:
How Hind fought with a Gentleman, and after gave him his mo∣ney again.
How Hind was made a Captain at Colchester.
How Hind got a gallant horse, having spoiled his own by an unfortunate leape.
How Hind robbed a Gentleman in Yorkshire, and afterwards came to the Inn where he lay to sup with hm, but did not.
How some of Hind's Companions robbed a Gentleman: and, how Hind met him, and gave him mony to bear his char∣ges, and afterward met him in London, and paid him the rest.
How Hind served a Committee man, who disguised himself for fear of robbing.
How Hind borrowed money of a Tobacco-seller, who sold his To∣bacco at Fairs, and to great Inns, and afterward paid him.
How Hind robbed two Captains that had received money to pay their Troops, and after he had conveyed away the money, came back and robbed them of what money they had about them.
How Hind neatly robbed a Parson of forty pounds in gold, which he had hid in the Coller of his Doublet; after he was rob∣bed of all his silver the day before.
How Hind robbed two Lawyers.
How Hind overtook a Hop Merchant, being informed before that he had received money, and what hapned.
How Hind robbed a Gentleman in Hide-Park.
His voyage into Holland, and from thence to Ireland.
How Hind lived in the Isle of Man.
How Hind came to the Isle of Man; and went thence into Scotland to the Scotch King to Sterling.
The true Relation of the taking of Captain James Hind in London.
His Speech at New-gate.
The humble Petition of James Hind, to the Right Ho∣norable the Councel of State; and their proceedings thereupon.
The discourse between his Father, His Wife, and himfelf, in Newgate, the 28. of November.
The Tryal of Captain James Hind, in the Old Bayley with his Examination, and Confession.
The Contents.