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Author: E. F. (Edward Ford), fl. 1630?-1660.
Title: Fair play in the lottery, or mirth for money.: In several witty passages and conceits of persons that came to the lottery. / Represented by way of droll By E F. Gent.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Library
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: Fair play in the lottery, or mirth for money.: In several witty passages and conceits of persons that came to the lottery. / Represented by way of droll By E F. Gent.
E. F. (Edward Ford), fl. 1630?-1660.

[London]: Printed by H. Brugis at the signe of the Sir Iohn Oldcastle in Pye-corner, [1660]
Subject terms:
Lotteries -- England
Political satire, English
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A84678.0001.001

Contents
title page
TO THE Right Worshipful and In∣genious, Sir EDWARD FORD Knight, the Author wishes much health and happiness.
On Lotteries.
On a Gentlewoman with child, that long'd to draw a peice of plate and could not.
Of a blind Maid that came to see the Lotteryr.
On a handsome Sempstris that came to the Lot∣tery to put in her White hand into the Box
Of one that got a Silver Tankerd.
Of one that murmured at his hard mis∣fortune.
On a Cook that came to the Lottery.
On a humourous Gentelman that complained to a Lady what mony he had lost.
On a poore Labourer that got two peices of plate for two shillings.
On a Lady that asked if there were ever a stew pot in the Lottery or no.
On a Taylor that came to the Lotteriy.
Of a merry Gentelman that lost some mony at the Lottery.
On a Bailf that came to the Lottery.
On a merry Gentleman and his Lady that came to the Lottery.
On a Whore that came to the Lottery.
Of one that said the Lottery was a mere Cheate.
On an old Woman that came to the Lottery with Spectacles.
On a Pickpocket that came to venture his mony at the Lottery
On an honest woman that won a Silver Flagon at the Lottery.
On a Cookes wife that did dream she won a peice of Plate
On a Player that came to the Lottery.
A few Lines upon the breaking up of Sir Ed∣ward Fords Lottery at the Crown in Smithfield.
On Jack Adams innocent of Clarkenwell
On a drunckenman that came to venture his Mo∣ny at the Lottery
On a Merry Cobler living in Smithfeld
On a poor man that came to the Lottery.
On a Capt. that got two pieces of Plate for Twenty Shillings
On a Sparke
Of an old Usurer that came to the Lottery
The Embleme of a Lottery.