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Author: Well-willer to the publique weale.
Title: Chaos: or, A discourse wherein is presented to the view of the magistrate, and all others who shall peruse the same, a frame of government by way of a republique, wherein is little or no danger of miscarriage, if prudently attempted, and thoroughly prosecuted by authority.: Wherein is no difficulty in the practice, nor obscurity in the method; but all things plain and easie to the meanest capacity. Here's no hard or strange names, nor unknown titles (to amaze the hearers) used, and yet here's a full and absolute power derivative insensibly from the whole, and yet practically conveyed to the best men: wherein if any shall endeavour a breach, he shall break himself: and it must be so, that cats shall provide supper, here they shall do it suitable to the best palats, and easie to digest. By a well-willer to the publique weale.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Library
2012 November (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: Chaos: or, A discourse wherein is presented to the view of the magistrate, and all others who shall peruse the same, a frame of government by way of a republique, wherein is little or no danger of miscarriage, if prudently attempted, and thoroughly prosecuted by authority.: Wherein is no difficulty in the practice, nor obscurity in the method; but all things plain and easie to the meanest capacity. Here's no hard or strange names, nor unknown titles (to amaze the hearers) used, and yet here's a full and absolute power derivative insensibly from the whole, and yet practically conveyed to the best men: wherein if any shall endeavour a breach, he shall break himself: and it must be so, that cats shall provide supper, here they shall do it suitable to the best palats, and easie to digest. By a well-willer to the publique weale.
Well-willer to the publique weale.

London: printed for Livewel Chapman, at the Crown in Popes-head Alley, 1659.
Subject terms:
Great Britain -- History
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A78571.0001.001

Contents
title page
introductory poem
PREFACE. CHAOS
tract
The first days Work.
The Second Days Work.
The Third Days Work.
The Fourth Days Work.
The Fifth Days Work.
The Sixth Days Work.
APPENDIX.