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Author: Meres, Francis, 1565-1647.
Title: Palladis tamia Wits treasury being the second part of Wits common wealth. By Francis Meres Maister of Artes of both vniuersities.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, MI ; Oxford (UK) :: Text Creation Partnership,
2011-12 (EEBO-TCP Phase 2).
Availability:

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Print source: Palladis tamia Wits treasury being the second part of Wits common wealth. By Francis Meres Maister of Artes of both vniuersities.
Meres, Francis, 1565-1647., N. L. (Nicholas Ling), fl. 1580-1607., N. L. (Nicholas Ling), fl. 1580-1607. Politeuphuia.

At London: Printed by P. Short, for Cuthbert Burbie, and are to be solde at his shop at the Royall Exchange, 1598.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A68463.0001.001

Contents
title page
THE SECOND part of Wits Com∣mon-wealth.
¶ Of God.
God is inuisible and incom∣prehensible.
God is not the Authour of sinne.
The patience and longanimi∣ty of God.
Gods Prouidence.
The mercie and loue of God.
The iustice of God.
Christ.
The Holy Ghost.
Heauen.
Angels.
The worde of God.
The Church.
Preachers.
Sermons.
A Christian.
Man.
Good Men.
The giftes of men are diuerse.
So many men, so many mindes.
Wicked and vngodly men.
VVomen.
The Soule.
The Minde.
The goods of the Minde.
The diseases of the Minde.
The Heart.
Conscience.
Doctors and Doctrine.
Artes and disciplines.
Education.
Parents.
Children.
Cockering.
Youth.
Vertue.
Faith.
Hope.
Charity.
Prudence.
Iustice.
Fortitude.
Temperance.
Abstinence.
Praier.
Almes deedes.
Deuotion.
The feare of the Lord.
Perseuerance.
Pietie.
Goodnes.
Humility.
Patience.
Obedience.
Repentance.
Truth.
Concord.
Decency.
Hospitality.
Liberality.
Silence.
Mediocrity.
Chastity.
Virginity.
VVisdome.
A wise man.
Friendship.
The friendship of many.
The friendship of a few.
Friendship neglected.
Friendship broken off.
Friendship reconciled.
The choyse and tryall of Friendes.
A true Friend.
A fained Friend.
The comparison of a friend and a flatterer.
Mariage.
A wife.
Matrimoniall Society.
Loue.
Selfe-Loue.
Affections.
Brethren.
Admonition.
Beautie.
In bodyes of lesser stature and cor∣pulencie commonlie there is greater va∣lour and more wit, then in those that be huger and vaster.
Time, Age.
Benefits.
Beneuolence.
Businesse.
Exercise.
Perturbations.
Commodity.
Assiduity.
Assiduity taketh awaie admiration.
Adoption. Abdication.
Emulation.
Exhortation.
Endeuour.
Correction.
Chaunce.
Ceremonies.
Comfort
Labour.
Imitation.
Mourning.
Maners.
Nature.
Newes.
Recreation.
Reprehension.
Sorrow.
Praise:
Praisers of them selues.
The Tongue:
Contrarietie.
Cunctation.
Choyse.
Glorie.
Vaine Glory.
Braggers:
Gratitude.
Ingratitude
Chiding.
Affliction.
Prosperity.
Tribulation.
Debt.
Defence.
Custome.
Conuersing and liuing togither.
Feare.
Olde age.
Olde mens counsell.
Counsell.
Euill counsell is the worst vnto him that giueth it.
Rash Counsell.
Fortune.
The vse and abuse of a thing.
Riches.
Rich men.
Pouerty:
Those things are difficult which are excellent.
Dignitie.
Honour.
Nobilitie.
A good name:
An ill Name.
A Courtly life.
Courtiers.
Kings.
A Kingdome.
Princes.
The education of a Prince.
A good Prince.
An euill Prince.
Empire.
Power.
A Common-wealth.
A Captaine.
VVarre.
Victorie:
Lawes.
Lawyers.
A Iudge.
Iudgement.
Magistrates.
Vengeance.
Punishment.
Banishment.
Trauailing.
The world.
The loue and vanitie of the worlde.
The contempt of the worlde.
Reason.
Schollers.
Studie.
Contemplation.
Sophisters.
Memorie.
Learning.
The maner of learning.
An Orator.
Eloquence.
Speech.
Pronunciation.
Hearing.
An Auditour, and his Dutie.
Breuiloquence:
Disputation.
Examples of life.
Zeale.
VVit.
Diuersitie of VVits.
Bookes.
Reading of bookes.
A choice is to be had in reading of bookes.
The vse of reading many Bookes.
Philosophie.
Philosophers.
Poetrie.
Poets.
A comparatiue discourse of our English Poets, with the Greeke, Latine, and Ita∣lian Poets.
Painters.
Musicke.
Sinne.
Pride.
Couetousnesse:
Luxurie.
Enuie.
Gluttonie.
Anger.
Idlenesse.
Vice.
Pleasure.
Drunkennesse.
Adultery.
Iealousie.
Inconstancie.
Ambition.
Flatterers and Parasites.
Hypocrisie. Hypocrites.
Vsurie.
Heresie, Heretikes.
Death.
The Deuill:
Hell.
A Table of the Common places into which these Similitudes are digested.