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Author: Lady, fl. 1701.
Title: The whole duty of a woman: or a guide to the female sex. From the age of sixteen to sixty, &c. Being directions, how women of all qualities and conditions, ought to behave themselves in the various circumstances of this life, for their obtaining not only present, but future happiness. I. Directions how to obtain the divine and moral virtues of piety, meekness, modesty, chastity, humility, compassion, temperance and affability, with their advantages, and how to avoyd the opposite vices. II. The duty of virgins, directing them what they ought to do, and what to avoyd, for gaining all the accomplishments required in that state. With the whole art of love, &c. 3. The whole duty of a wife, 4. The whole duty of a widow, &c. Also choice receipts in physick and chirurgery. With the whole art of cookery, preserving, candying, beautifying, &c. Written by a lady.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 April (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: The whole duty of a woman: or a guide to the female sex. From the age of sixteen to sixty, &c. Being directions, how women of all qualities and conditions, ought to behave themselves in the various circumstances of this life, for their obtaining not only present, but future happiness. I. Directions how to obtain the divine and moral virtues of piety, meekness, modesty, chastity, humility, compassion, temperance and affability, with their advantages, and how to avoyd the opposite vices. II. The duty of virgins, directing them what they ought to do, and what to avoyd, for gaining all the accomplishments required in that state. With the whole art of love, &c. 3. The whole duty of a wife, 4. The whole duty of a widow, &c. Also choice receipts in physick and chirurgery. With the whole art of cookery, preserving, candying, beautifying, &c. Written by a lady.
Lady, fl. 1701.

London: printed for J. Gwillim, against the Great James Tavern in Bishopsgate-street, 1696.
Alternate titles: Guide to the female sex
Notes:
Imperfect; stained, frayed and tightly bound, with some loss of print; B6-7 (pp. 11-14), C5-8 (pp. 33-40), D3-10 (pp. 53-68) and F5-8 (pp. 105-112) are lacking.
Reproduction of the original in the Bodleian Library.
Subject terms:
Women -- Conduct of life -- Early works to 1800.
Cookery -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A65957.0001.001

Contents
title page
imprimatur
THE PREFACE, TO Ladys, Gentlewomen, and others, of all Degrees.
THE Whole Duty OF A WOMAN.
CHAP. I. Directions how to Obtain the Divine and Mortal Vertues of Piety, Meekness, Mo∣desty, Chastity, Humility; Compassion, Temperance, and Affability; with their Ad∣vantages: And how to Avoy'd the opposite Vices, as Impiety, Obstinacy, Immodesty, Ʋncleanness, Pride, Ʋncharitableness, In∣temperence, and Disdain; with the Mischiefs that attend them.
CHAP. II. The Duty of Virgins: Directing them what they ought to Do, and what to Avoid, gaining all the Accomplishments Requir in that State. With the Whole Art of Love Being Directions how to Receive the Ad∣dresses either of a Nobleman, Gentleman, o Tradesmen, with that Prudence, as not be accounted Scornful, Morose, or Fond Whereby Persons of the Meanest Rank, ma Raise their Fortunes to the highest pitch o Honour and Greatness.
The whole Art of LOVE
CHAP. IV. The Duty of a WIDOW.
CHAP. V. I hysical Waters, and Cordial Drinks, con∣ducing to a Healthful Constitution, from the Choicest and Approved Receipts, of the most Eminent Persons of this and former Ages: With their Proper Virtus how they ought to be taken, and the Dis∣tempers they are Good in, &c.
Apoplectick Water.
Aqua Mirabilis, to make.
Elixir Salutis.
Antinepretick Water.
Elixir Proprietatis.
Dr. Butler's Ale.
Purl-Royal.
Spirit of Scurvey-Grass.
Pligue Water.
Surfeit-Water.
Ʋsquebaugh.
Dr. Stephen's great Cordial Water.
Metheglin, White.
Mead.
For the Chollick.
For pains in the Teeth.
For an Ague.
Noise in the Head.
For a Fellon.
Lasks to stay.
For the stinging of any Venemous thing.
Bloodshot Eyes, or Sore Eyes.
For a Burn, or Scald.
For Blasting, or St. Anthony's Fire.
Small Pox to Prevent, its Scarring the Face, &c.
To Prevent Hair falling off, in the Small-Pox.
Sore Mouth, or Throat.
To procure Sleep or Rest.
For the Weakness of the Sight.
Ague to Cure.
To Refresh the Senses, and Restore the Memory, &c.
For the Scurvey.
To Expel Sadness, or Melancholly.
To Cure the Head-Ach.
For the Plurisie.
For the Green-Sickness.
To Stench Bleeding.
For a Prick under the Nail.
Melancholy to Suppress.
For the Megrim.
For a Feaver.
Falling Sickness.
Diseases in the Eyes.
For the Evil.
For the Dropsie.
To help Hearing.
For a Consumption: an Excellent Receipt.
Biles to Break and Cure.
CHAP. VII. Cookery: Or, the Art of Dressing Fish, Flesh, and Fowl, after the Newest and Exactest way, with their Proper Sawces, Garnishes, and manner of Serving up.
To make a Strengthning Jelly of Flesh.
Lobster Stewed.
To hash a Lobster.
To Collar Beef,
To bake a Wild Coose, or Mallard,
To Souce a Pig.
To Souce a Pike, Carp, Breem, Tenth, Trout, or Barbel,
Woodcock, Larks, Blackbirds, or Sparrows, to Bake, the best way.
Red Deer to make: Or make Beef look like it.
Neats Tongues to Hash.
To Collar Eles.
Giblets to Dress with Herbs, and Roots, &c.
Chickens and White Broath.
To Hash Deer, Sheep or Calves Tongues.
To Boyl a Wild Duck or Mallard.
Pigeons or any small Fowl to Boyl.
Sausages to Boyl.
To Stew Trouts, Carp, Tench, &c.
Lamb to make like Venison.
A Shoulder of Mutton with Oysters.
Chikin in Whito-Broath.
To make China Broth.
A Hare Hashed.
Carp to Roast.
To Stew a Carp.
A Cods Head to Dress.
To Roast a Salmon.
To Fry Salmon.
To Stew a Tnrbut.
CHAP. VIII. The Terms and Art of Carving, of Fowl, Fish, Flesh, &c. With Proper Sauces, and Garnishings, more Particularly, than Sweetracats, and other Rarities.
To Lift a Swan.
To Cut up a Turkey, or Bustard.
A Horn to Dismember.
A Mallard to Ʋnbrace.
To Wing a Partridge.
To Ʋnjoyn a Bittern, or Wing a Quail.
To display a Crane.
To untach a Curlew
To Mince a Plover of any Kind.
To Thigh a Woodcock
To Cut up a Snite.
To Sauce a Cock, Capon or Pullet.
To Allay a Phesant.
To Rear a Goose.
To Thigh a Pigeon.
The madner of Carving, Fish, with their Proper Sauce, &c.
To Ʋnlace a Coney.
To break a Hare.
Pickles for Sauces; and keeping Summer-Fruit, all the YEAR.
Cucumbers to Pickle.
To Pickle Barberries.
Mushrooms.
Clove Gilly Flowers.
To keep Fruit for Tarts as they Grew, &c.
To Pickle Oysters.
CHAP. IX. The Art of Pastery: Or, Direction for mak∣ing Pyes, Tarts Custards, &c.
Custards to make.
A Pear Pye.
A Pigeon Pye.
A Pork Pye.
Quince Pye: Or Tart.
An Oyster Pye.
A Rice Tart.
A Tongue Pye.
A Venison Pasty.
A Lumber Pye.
A Minced Pye.
Putt-Past to make.
A Hern Pye.
Cheesecakes.
Gooseberry Tart.
Chicken Pye.
CHAP. X. The Currous Art of Candying, Preserving. Conserving, Drying, and Confectioning, of Flowers, Fruits, Roots, Stalks, Peels, Seeds, &c. Making of Pasts, Marmalades, &c.
Flowers to Candy.
Rucket, Orange, or Lemon-peel, Citrons, Erigngo-roots, or Lettice-stalks to Candy &c.
Barberrys, Grapes, or Gooseberrys to Candy.
Rock Candy very Clear.
Cherries to Preserve.
To Preserve Quinces
Marmalade of Quinces.
Marmalade of Oranges, Lemon, or Citrons, &c.
Past of Oranges, and Lemons. &c.
Past of Plumbs.
To Conserve any hard Fruits, &c.
Conserve of Tender Fruits
To Preserve Fruits Green.
To preserve Ripe Plumbs, or other Fruit.
To Dry Pippins, an Amber Clearness.
Princes Bisket.
To make March-pane of Rashers of Baon.
Comfits to make of any small Seed, as Carraway, Annis, Coriander, &c.
Rowl-Wafers to make.
A Cake-Royal, with Comfits.
To Blanch Almonds.
Syrup of Roses.
Cordial Syrup of Poppeys.
A Syrup for any Cold, Cough, or Cattar.
Honey of Raisins to make.
To make Marchpanes.
To make Makroons.
To make French Bisket.
To make Naples Bisket
CHAP. XI. Artificial Embellishments: Or, the Art of Beautifying the Hands, Face, or any other part of the Body; Restoring a good Co∣lour, taking away Freckles, Spots, or any Deformities in the Skin, &c. Making Per∣fumes, Essences, Sweet-bags, Sweet-balls, Pomatums, Washes, &c.
To Beautifie the Hands and Face.
To make the Skin soft, and White.
To take away Morphew, Scurff, or o∣ther Deformities of the Skin.
To take away Redness, or Pimples from the Face.
To take away Freckles.
To cause a curious White, Shining Complection.
To make the Hands or Face Plump.
A curious Perfume against ill Scents.
A Sweet-Bag to Scent Cloaths &c.
Sweet Balls to cary in ones Hand, for the Prevention of ill Airs or Scents.
Sweet Powder.
A Perfume to Drive away Vermin,
A Bath, to soften, Cleanse, and Refresh the Body.
Water of Talc, a great Beautifier.
To take Spots, or Stains, out of Silks or Stuffs, &c.
To take out Pitch, Wax, Posin or Tar.
To take Spots, or Stains out of Linnen.
To Source, or Clean, Gold and Silver Lace.
Faided Linnen to recover.
How to make a Starch, that will preserve Linnen.
To make your Teeth as White as Ivory.
To take Spots out of the Face, or Hands.
A Pomatum for the Hands, to Pre∣vent Chopping, or Roughness.