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Author: Whitby, Daniel, 1638-1726.
Title: An historical account of some things relating to the nature of the English government and the conceptions which our fore-fathers had of it with some inferences thence made for the satisfaction of those who scruple the Oath of allegiance to King William and Queen Mary.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2012 November (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: An historical account of some things relating to the nature of the English government and the conceptions which our fore-fathers had of it with some inferences thence made for the satisfaction of those who scruple the Oath of allegiance to King William and Queen Mary.
Whitby, Daniel, 1638-1726.

London: Printed for Awnsham Churchill ..., 1690.
Notes:
Half-title page title: An historical account of the English government.
Advertisement: prelim. p. [1].
Reproduction of original in Huntington Library.
Subject terms:
Great Britain -- History -- 1066-1687.
Great Britain -- Constitutional history.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A65708.0001.001

Contents
Books lately printed for Awnsham Churchil.
title page
THE PREFACE.
THE CONTETNS.
AN HISTORICAL ACCOUNT OF THE ENGLISH GOVERNMENT.
SECTION I. That from the Norman Conquest, to this present time, there was an Original Compact or Esta∣blishment of Laws, by which the Kings of England were to Govern, and the People to be governed.
SECT. II. That they thought it absolutely necessary, that who∣soever would be their King, should make this Compact with them, and be as much obliged by Oath to grant these Priviledges to them, as they were to swear Allegiance to him.
SECT. III. That when the ancient Laws of their Country were wholly violated, they constantly complain'd of the Injustice of the Action, required the observation of them; and when they could not prevail by fair means, they sought to recover their Right by Arms. Where an account is given of the Barons Wars for the preserving of the Magna Charta, and the Charta de Forestis.
SECT. IV. That we find throughout the History of our Kings, that their Election, or else their Compact with the People, hath ge∣nerally been conceived a thing proper to strengthen their Title to the Crown, or at the least to satisfie their People.
SECT. V. That we find mention in History of divers Acts of Parliament, or of the Nobles of the Kingdom, continuing the Name and Honour of a King to him, who, by their own confession, had not the immediate Title to the Kingdom, and only Pro∣claiming him, who had the Right by Proximity of Bloud, Heir Apparent to the Crown.
SECT. VI. The Inferences from the Resolutions of the best Casuists, to prove that the Oath of Allegiance, and of the Coronation, are reciprocal; and consequently that the obligation of the Oath of Allegiance doth cease, when the Original Compact is Fundamentally violated.