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Author: Twells, John, b. 1651 or 2.
Title: Tentamina elegantiarum bina: or, Two essays of elegancies in order to the bringing of scholars, after they can read and write true grammatical Latin, to a full and clear understanding and writing of terse and polite Latine. Principally intended for accomplishing the more adult youths in the frree-school at Newark upon Trent. By John Twells, school-master. Licensed, March 17. 1685[/]6. Rob. Midgley.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2012 November (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: Tentamina elegantiarum bina: or, Two essays of elegancies in order to the bringing of scholars, after they can read and write true grammatical Latin, to a full and clear understanding and writing of terse and polite Latine. Principally intended for accomplishing the more adult youths in the frree-school at Newark upon Trent. By John Twells, school-master. Licensed, March 17. 1685[/]6. Rob. Midgley.
Twells, John, b. 1651 or 2.

London: printed by T.M. for Benjamin Crayle, at the Peacock and Bible at the West end of St. Pauls in Ludgate-street, 1686.
Alternate titles: Tentamina elegantiarum bina Two essays of elegancies. Scholastick prolusions to the art of oratory.
Notes:
Scholastick prolusions to the art of oratory has a separate divisional title page; pagination and register are continuous.
Reproduction of the original in the Bodleian Library.
Subject terms:
Latin language -- Instruction and study -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A63984.0001.001

Contents
title page
dedication
De Libelli hujus Utilitate ad Eloquentiae Studiosum Dactylicum Heroicum cum Iambico Dimetro.
The Author to the Bookseller.
epigraph
A GENERAL EXAMINATION OF THE Elegant Grammar.
half title
epigraph
Scholastick Prolusions TO THE Art of ORATORY.
CHAP. I. What means we are to use, to make a Sentence Elegant.
CHAP. II. How the Obscurity of a Sentence is to be avoided.
CHAP. III. That the Comparative and Superlative Degrees are very elegantly set after their Substantives.
CHAP. IV. That Numerals, or those Nouns which signifie Number, are set after their Substantives.
CHAP. V. That dissyllable Adjectives are to be postpon'd to plurisyllable Substantives.
CHAP. VI. That the word Omnis loves to be placed after its Substantive.
CHAP. VII. That Nullus uses not unelegantly to be placed after the Substantive it agrees with.
CHAP. VIII. That Alienum, Aliud, Alterum, U∣trum{que}, Solum, Ullum, Tale, Sin∣gula, and other such-like Adjectives, are to be put after their Substantives.
CHAP. IX. When Tale and Aliud are set before.
CHAP. X. That a Pronoun Adjective may be put after its Substantive.
CHAP. XI. That a Pronoun Adjective is to be placed between the Noun Adjective and its Substantive.
CHAP. XII. The place of Omne, Nullum, and nu∣meral Adjectives, in company with other Adjectives.
CHAP. XIII. That if any thing interpose between the Adjective and Substantive, 'tis no matter whether be set first, but that the Substantive does more frequently lead the way.
CHAP. XIV. That to other Adjectives their Substan∣tives are often postpon'd.
CHAP. XV. That Nouns of Measure and Weight ought to be put in the Accusative case, or in the Genitive.
CHAP. XVI. That Nouns signifying Time are put ve∣ry venustly in the Accusative, and when in that signification they are to be put in the Ablative.
CHAP. XVII. That Nouns signifying Time, conjoyned with some Nouns that signifie Num∣ber, are to be used in the Accusative Case; with others, in the Ablative:
CHAP. XVIII. In what Case Nouns signifying Time are to be put, when the Particles Ante and Post do precede, succeed, or inter∣vene betwixt the Substantive and Ad∣jective.
CHAP. XIX. The Division and Use of Numerals.
CHAP. XX. That Nouns of Number are divided by Poets, compounded by Orators.
CHAP. XXI. That Mille and Sexcenta use to be spo∣ken, one by Orators, the other by Poets.
CHAP. XXII. That some Words and Phrases have been polluted by the use of the ignorant and unlearned.