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Author: Tate, Nahum, 1652-1715.
Title: Poems written on several occasions by N. Tate.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2012 November (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: Poems written on several occasions by N. Tate.
Tate, Nahum, 1652-1715.

London: Printed for B. Tooke ..., 1684.
Alternate titles: Poems. Selections
Notes:
Errata on p. [14].
Reproduction of original in Harvard University Libraries.
Subject terms:
Occasional verse, English.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A63114.0001.001

Contents
title page
TO Her HIGHNESS THE Princess ANN, &c.
THE CONTENTS.
These Mistakes are to be corrected, being destru∣ctive to the Sense.
POEMS, &c.
On His Royal Highness's Deliverance from Shipwrack in the Gloucester, the Sixth of May, 1682.
Indisposed.
On a Diseased Old Man, who Wept at thought of leaving the World.
TO Mr. FLATMAN, On his Excellent POEMS.
ON THE Present Corrupted State OF POETRY.
The Search.
The Prospect.
The Request.
The Installment.
The Penance.
Laura's Walk.
The Ʋsurpers.
The Amusement.
The Amorist.
The Surprizal.
The Ʋnconfin'd. SONG.
DIALOGUE, Alexis and Laura.
The Restitution.
The Escape.
The Politicians.
The Vow-Breaker.
The Tear.
The Discovery.
The Parting.
On an Old Miser that Hoarded His Treasure in a Steel Chest, and bu∣ry'd it.
The Vision.
ODE.
The Banquet.
The Match.
The Disconsolate.
Sliding on Skates in a hard Frost.
Strephon's Complaint on quitting his Retirement.
The Gold-hater.
The Mistake.
Disappointed.
Lib. 1. Epigr. CX.
The Confinement.
On Snow fall'n in Autumn, and dis∣solv'd by the Sun.
Melancholy.
On a Grave Sir, retiring to Write in Order to undeceive the World.
On a deform'd Old Bawd, designing to have her Picture drawn.
Advice to a Friend, publishing his Poems.
The Ignorant.
The Beldam's Song.
The Inconstant.
Of the Ape and the Fox.
The Round.
The Male-Content.
The Dream.
Amor Sepulchralis.
The three First Verses of the 46th Psalm Paraphas'd.
The Mid-Night Thought.
The Counter-Turn.
The Voyagers.
The Choice.
On Sight of some Martyrs Sepulchres.
Of Vice and Vertue.
To a Desponding Friend.
Disswasion of an Aged Friend from leav∣ing his Retirement.
Recovering from a Fit of Sickness.
The Challenge.
The Cure. A DIALOGUE, Claius and Coridon.
The Hurricane.
The Grateful Shepherd.
On the Assembling of a New Parliament the 6th. of March, 1682.
The Despair.
MEDEA TO JASON.
Ʋpon the Marquess of Worcester's de∣fending his Seat of Ragland Castle; the last Garrison that held out for the King.
Catullus. Epigr. II.
After beating his Mistress.
Propert. Lib. 1. Eleg. 4.
To the Conceal'd Author of ABSALOM and ACHITOPHEL.
On the Meddal.
To my ingenious Friend Mr. Creech, on his Translation of Lucretius.
The Battle of the B—d's in the Theatre Royal, December the 3d 1680.
Hor. Ode 5th. lib. 3.
To the Translator of Father Simon's Critical History.
The Charge.
PROLOGUE.
EPILOGUE.
EPILOGUE.
The PROLOGUE.
EPILOGUE.
To Mr. L. Maidwell, on his New Grammar.
An Attempt on the Ode of Assumption, By Mr. Crashaw.
The Three First Chapters of Job.
The First Chapter.
The Second Chapter.
The Third Chapter
The Charnell-House.
To the Memory of Sir Richard Rayns∣ford, Lord Chief Justice.
Prhoris. From the Metamorph. of Ovid. Lib. 7
VIRGIL.
THE Third ECLOGUE OF VIRGIL CALLED,
TO His Friend that absconded Catullus, Epigr. 56.
From Petronius Arb.
To Mr. Gibbons on his incomparable Carved Works.
On the Translation OF EƲTROPIƲS, By Young Gentlemen, Educated by Mr. L. Maidwell.
The First ELOGY OF TIBULLUS: