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Author: One of the Society of the Port-Royal.
Title: The modest critick, or, Remarks upon the most eminent historians, antient and modern with useful cautions and instructions as well for writing as reading history : wherein the sense of the greatest men on this subject is faithfully abridged / by one of the Society of the Port-Royal.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: The modest critick, or, Remarks upon the most eminent historians, antient and modern with useful cautions and instructions as well for writing as reading history : wherein the sense of the greatest men on this subject is faithfully abridged / by one of the Society of the Port-Royal.
One of the Society of the Port-Royal.

London: Printed for John Barnes ..., 1689.
Notes:
"Licensed, October the 9th, 1688. Rob. Midgely"--P. [1].
Reproduction of original in Yale University Library.
Marginal notes.
Subject terms:
History.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A58060.0001.001

Contents
license
title page
THE PREFACE.
TO THE READER.
THE Modest Critick: OR, REMARKS Upon the most Eminent HISTORIANS.
introduction
I.How to write History.
II. What to write nobly is.
III. To write sen∣sibly.
IV. To write purely.
V. To write with Simplicity.
VI. The Matter in History.
VII. The Form.
VIII. The End of History.
IX. That Truth is the only mean through which History comes to its end: and how it is to be found.
X. The Style fit for History.
XI. Which is the properest for History, the Great or the flourish'd Style?
XII. The Narration.
XIII. Transitions.
XIV. The Circum∣stances of a Narration.
XV. The Motives.
XVI. Figures.
XVII. The Passions.
XVIII. The Descripti∣ons.
XIX. Speeches.
XX. The Characters of Persons.
XXI. The Reflections and Sentences.
XXII. Digressions.
XXIII. Eloquence fit in History.
XXIV. The other Orna∣ments which one may apply in History.
XXV. The Sentiments which ought to be allow'd in History.
XXVI. How the Genius of an Historian must be.
XXVII. The Historians Morality.
XXVIII. Judgment of Historians.