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Author: Rabisha, William.
Title: The whole body of cookery dissected, taught, and fully manifested, methodically, artificially, and according to the best tradition of the English, French, Italian, Dutch, &c., or, A sympathie of all varieties in naturall compounds in that mysterie wherein is contained certain bills of fare for the seasons of the year, for feasts and common diets : whereunto is annexed a second part of rare receipts of cookery, with certain useful traditions : with a book of preserving, conserving and candying, after the most exquisite and newest manner ...
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: The whole body of cookery dissected, taught, and fully manifested, methodically, artificially, and according to the best tradition of the English, French, Italian, Dutch, &c., or, A sympathie of all varieties in naturall compounds in that mysterie wherein is contained certain bills of fare for the seasons of the year, for feasts and common diets : whereunto is annexed a second part of rare receipts of cookery, with certain useful traditions : with a book of preserving, conserving and candying, after the most exquisite and newest manner ...
Rabisha, William.

London: Printed by R.W. for Giles Calvert ..., 1661.
Notes:
Dedication signed: Will. Rabisha.
Reproduction of original in Bodleian Library.
Pages 27-28 are torn in the filmed copy. Pages 20-45 and 140-165 photographed from John Crerar Library copy and inserted at end.
Subject terms:
Cookery -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A57071.0001.001

Contents
title page
To the Reader.
In Commendation of the Author.
bills of fare
A Bill of Fare for an Extraordinary Feast, on a Flesh day in the Spring.
First Course.
Second Course.
A Bill of Fare for a Fish-Dinner in the Spring.
First Course.
Second Course.
A Bill of Fare on a Flesh-day for the Summer Season.
First Course.
Second Course.
A Bill of Fare on a Fish-day, for the Summer season.
First Course.
Second Course.
A Bill of Fare for a Flesh-Dinner in Autumn.
First Course.
Second Course.
A Bill of Fare for the Winter Quarter, for a Flesh-day at Dinner.
First Course.
Second Course.
A Bill of Fare for three Courses for the Winter∣season, of Fish and Flesh, in February and March.
First Course.
Second Course.
Third Course.
THE TABLE.
BOOK I.
BOOK II.
BOOK III.
BOOK IV.
BOOK V.
BOOK VI.
BOOK VII.
BOOK VIII.
BOOK IX.
BOOK X.
BOOK XI.
BOOK XII.
BOOK XIII.
BOOK XIV.
BOOK XV.
THE TABLE.
The TABLE.
Certain old useful Traditions of Carving and Sewing, &c.
The whole Body of COOKERY DISSECTED.
BOOK I.
How to pickle Cowcumbers.
How to pickle Mushroms.
To pickle the tops of Elder.
To pickle Elder-buds in March, before the tree leaves.
To pickle Clove-Gilly-flowers.
To pickle Pursland stalks.
To pickle Artichokes.
To pickle the tops of Turnips.
To pickle green Figgs.
To pickle Barbaries red.
To pickle Sampier green.
To pickle stalks of Thessell or Sherdowns.
To pickle Reddish tops.
To pickle Taragon.
To pickle Cowslips.
To pickle Fennell or Dill.
To pickle Red Cabbage.
To pickle Burdock-Roots.
To pickle Lemmon and Orange Pill.
To pickle Ashen Keyes.
To pickle curled Endive.
To pickle Charnell.
To pickle Quinces.
To pickle Bramble-Fruit.
To pickle Broom-buds.
To pickle Bog-berries.
To pickle Grapes.
To pickle Red and White Currans.
To pickle Elder, or many other budds of trees in the Spring, that useth to serve for Spring-sallets.
To pickle Cabbage-stalks.
To pickle Shampinnions.
To pickle Sleep-at-noon.
To pickle the stalks of March-Mallows.
To pickle Alexander-Buds.
To pickle Mallagatoons.
BOOK II.
To Coller and Sowce Brawn.
To Coller Venison.
To Coller Beef Red.
To Coller Veal.
To Coller Pigg.
To Coller Porck.
To Coller Mutton.
To Coller Goats flesh.
To Coller Geese.
To Coller Swan.
To Coller Brand Geese or Wiggens.
BOOK III.
To Coller Eeles.
To Sowce a Tench, to be served in jelly.
To pickle Smelts white or red.
To Marble Sowls, Plaice, Flounders, Smelts, or any other fish that is fitting to Marble.
To pickle Lobsters, and to preserve them.
To pickle a Conger-Eele.
To Pickle and Sowce Sturgeon.
To pickle Caveer.
To Coller Sowls.
To Coller Salmon.
To Sowce Lumps.
BOOK IV.
Cold Baked meats of Flesh.
To make Paste of Rye-Flower.
To Bake Venison in Crust, or in Pots.
To bake a Fillet of Veal to be eaten cold.
To bake a Calves head to be eaten cold.
To bake a Fawn or Kid to be eaten cold.
To bake a Hare.
Another way to bake a Hare.
To bake Pork to be caten cold.
To bake Brawn to be eaten cold.
To bake Rabbets to be eaten cold.
To bake Pigeons so be eaten cold.
To bake Bran-Geese, or Wild-Geese.
To bake a Turkey.
To bake Herns.
To bake a Swan.
How to bake a Goose.
Cold Baked meats of Fish.
To bake a Lamprey Eele pye.
To bake a Turbert.
To bake a Salmon.
To bake an Eele to be eaten cold.
To bake a Pike.
BOOK V.
To make Jellies.
How to season and run Chryst•…l Jellies.
How to run Colours.
To make Jellies of Oranges.
To make Harts-horn Jelly.
How to make Leach.
How to run your Leach into colours.
The use of your Jelly and Leach.
To make divers sorts of Creams.
Another way.
To make Apple-Cream.
To make Quince-Cream.
To make a Cream called Sack and Pottage.
To make a Sack-Posset the best way.
To coddle Codlings green, to serve up with Cream.
To make Barley Cream.
To make Rasberry Cream.
To make Red Currans Cream.
To make Cabbage Cream.
To make Snow Cream.
To make Almond Leach Cream.
To make Goosberry Cream.
To make Rice Milk or Cream to be eaten hot.
To boyl Milk or Cream with French Bread, to be eaten hot.
To make Spring Pottage.
To make Water-Grewell.
To make Punnado.
To make Barley-Grewell.
To make a Pearmane Cawdle.
To make a Lemmon Cawdle.
To make a Florendine, or Made-dish of Rice.
To Butter Rice.
To make a Florendine, or Made-dish of Apples.
To make a Florendine, or a Made-dish of Spinnage.
To make Pasties to fry.
To make a Florendine or Made-dish of Kidney of Veal.
To make toasts of a Kidney of Veal, called Marrow toasts.
To make a Florendine, or a Made-dish of a Calves Chaldron.
To make a Made-dish of Apples and Red Currans.
To make a Made-dish of Artichokes.
To make forced meats.
To make part of the said forced meats green for your use.
Another forced meat.
BOOK VI.
To make Strong Broth for your use in dressing of meat.
An excellent Cordial Broth.
To make a Pottage of broth, to serve up with a Bisk, or grand boyled meat.
Another way.
To make a Broth or Pottage, called Skinck.
To make white Broth.
To make Stewed-Broth.
Another, a Consumption Broth.
To make Red Pottage.
Another Broth.
How to draw gravie.
How to draw Butter.
How to Recover it.
How to make Barley Broth.
BOOK VII.
How to make a Bisk.
To make a brown Bisk.
To make an Olue.
How to force all manner of Meats.
Your Leare for your sweet forced meats.
How to make a forced boyled meat.
Your Leare and garnish for sweet forced boyled meat of the same kinde of Fowl.
To boyl Capons or Chickens in white Broth.
To boyl a Hanch of Venison.
To boyl Legs, Necks, or Chines of Mutton, four wayes.
Another way.
Another way.
Another way to make a Leare for the said meat.
To boyl a leg of Veal and Bacon.
To make your Green-sauce two wayes.
To boyl a breast of Veal.
To boyl a Knuckle of Veal, with the Neck cut in five pieces to be served in Broth.
To boyl a leg of Pork.
To boyl Capons or Hens for the Winter-season.
Another way with Mushroms.
To boyl Chickens.
Another way.
Another way.
Another way.
Another way to boyl Pulletts and Chickens for the Winter.
Another way.
To boyl wild-Ducks, Wigeons or Teal.
Another way.
To boyl Rabbets.
How to boyl Pigeons.
To boyl Plovers.
To boyl Caponets or Pullets.
To make a forced boyled meat.
To Boyl Ʋdders and Tongues.
A Boyled meat after the French fashion.
Another way according to the French fashion.
BOOK VIII.
How to make a Quaking Pudding.
Another way.
To make a dish of Puddings of several Colours.
To make Marrow Puddings to boyl in Skins.
To make Black Puddings to be kept.
To make Polony Sassages to keep all the year.
Another way for Sassages.
To make a Pudding of Hogs-Liver.
To make a baked Marrow Pudding.
To make an Oatmeal Pudding.
To make a Pudding of Rice flower.
To make a hastie Pudding.
To make Andolians.
BOOK IX.
Contains Hash, Stewed, Broyled and Car∣bonadoed meats.
To farce a Fillet of Beef.
To stew a breast of Mutton.
To farce a Fillet of Veal.
To stew Venison.
How to stew Calves feet.
To hash a shoulder or leg of Mutton.
How to make a raw Hash of a more excellent way, new invented.
To Hash a Calves head.
To Hash Hens or Pullets with eggs.
To make a Hash of Capons.
To Hash Partridges.
To Hash Ducks, or other water-fowl.
To Hash a Rabbet.
For Carbonadoes and Broyled meats.
To Carbonado a Goose.
To Carbonado Turkies.
To Carbonado Henns.
To Carbonado Veal.
To Carbonado Mutton.
A dish of Collops of Mutton, Broyld.
Steakes of Pork Broyled.
To Carbonado a Calves head.
To Broyl a Chine of Pork.
BOOK X.
How to fry all manner of Garnishing.
How to fry Oysters in Batter.
A Frigacy of a Henn or Capon.
To make a Frigacy of Chicken brown.
Another way for Chickens or Rabbets.
To smear Collops of Veal.
To fry a dish of Lamb stones and sweet breads.
How to make a Frigacy of Lamb.
A Frigacy of Veal.
A dish of Collops of Mutton with a savoury hogo.
To fry Collerd Pork.
Another way.
A Frigacy of Partridge or Woodcocks.
A Frigacy of Ducks or Widgeons.
A Fryed meat of Bacon.
To make a fryed meat, called an Amlett.
Another way.
To fry Primose-leaves in March with eggs.
To fry Clary.
To fry Apples.
How to make an Orangado Phraise.
A Tanzie of Cowslips or Violets.
A Tanzie of Spinnage.
To fry Artichokes, or Spanish Potatoes.
To make Fritters.
To make Pancakes.
Another way to dress a dish of Collops of Veal.
To fry Calves Feet, or Sheeps Trotters.
How to Frigacy Neats Tongues and udders.
To potch a dish of Eggs for a weak stomach.
Another way rich and strengthening.
Another way.
How to Butter Eggs.
Another way.
To fry Collops and Eggs.
BOOK XI.
To make Sallets.
To make a Grand Sallet for the Spring.
The Flesh Sallet of a Capon or Turkey.
A made dish of Parmyzant.
A Sallet of a dryed Neats-Tongue.
A Sallet of Fennell.
A Sallet of green Pease.
A Sallet of boyled Spinnage.
Rules how to Roast meats, with their several Sauces.
To roast a Hanch of Venison.
To roast a Jegget of Mutton.
To roast a shoulder of Mutton with Oysters.
To roast a Chine or Neck of Veal.
To roast a breast of Veal.
A Fillet or Leg of Veal Farced.
To roast Olives of Veal.
To roast a whole Lamb or Kid.
To make a Kid of a Pig, and a Pig to be roasted.
To roast a Calves-head.
To roast Leverets, and Rabbets.
To roast a Lambs head.
To roast Venison.
Several sauces for your Fowl in general.
For Capons.
For Hens.
For Turkie.
For Chickens.
A sauce for roast Pigeons.
Sauce for Rabbets.
Sauce for Feasants, Heath-Poots, or Cocks of the wood.
Sauce for Woodcocks.
Sauce for Quailes.
Sauce for Ducks, Wigeons, Teal, or Plover.
BOOK XII.
How to boyl, or stew fish, to be eaten hot.
To boyl a Pike.
To stew a Carp.
Another way to boyl Carps.
To stew a dish of Flounders.
Another way.
To Boyl Perches.
How to make a Bisk of Fish.
To dress a Codds head te best way.
To make an Olve of Fish.
To boyl Mullet or Base to be eaten hot.
To stew, or make broth; with Whitings, or Smelts.
How to stew or boyl Eels.
Anothr way.
To dresh a dish of small Jack.
To stew a dish of Breams.
BOOK XIII.
How to make Sawce or Lear without Butter, or thickning with Eggs.
To fry Fish, and all manner of Garnishing with Oyl.
Another way, how to thicken your lear for fish without eggs.
To stew a dish of Trouts.
To boyl, and serve a whole Salmon.
To Roste a Pike.
To Roast Eels.
To Rost Porpus.
To Rost a Carp.
To roast a Salmon whole.
How to Spitchcock an Eele.
For Broyling.
To broyl Flownders or Plaice.
How t fry a dish of Maides.
To fry a dish of Ling for first course.
How to Frigacy or Butter Crabs or Lobsters.
How to Frigacy Shrimps, Perriwinkles, Pranes, Crawfish, &c.
A Phraise of Cockles.
How to broyl Oysters.
To broyl Scollups.
How to Bake certain Fish.
To make an Eele Pie.
To bake a Turbet.
To bake a Salmon Pie to be eaten hot.
To bake a Joll of Ling in a Pie.
Another way.
To bake a Pike in a Coffin.
To bake a Lump in a Coffin.
To bake Flounders or Plaice.
To bake an Oyster Pie.
To make a Batillye of Pie of Fish.
To make Peteets of Shrimps or Pranes.
To Marrinate a Carp, to be eaten hot or cold.
To Hash a Carp.
A Frigacy of fresh Salmon.
To Frigacy great Plaice or Flounders.
To make Chewits of Salmon.
To broyl a Carp.
To force an Eele.
BOOK XIV.
To bake a Gammon of Bacon, to be eaten hot, with the Ingre∣dients.
To make a steak Pye of Mutton.
Another way.
For a sweet Lamb Pye.
Another way for a savory.
Another way.
To bake a Henn to be eaten hot.
How to bake a Henn another way.
Another way to bake a Henn in a patty pan.
To bake a Capon or Turky in a patty pan.
How to season and bake a pasty of Venison.
Another way to bake Venison, to be eaten hot.
To make a Battlely, or Bisk Pyes in the spring.
To make a Sherdoon Pye in the Spring.
To make a Lumber Pye.
To make a dish of Chewits.
To make an Ox cheek Pye.
To make a Calves head Pye.
To make a Neats Tongue Pye, to be eaten hot.
To make a Chicken Pye for the Winter.
Another way.
Another way.
To make a Calves foot Pye.
To make an Olive Pye.
To make an Artichoke Pie.
To make a Skerret Pie.
To make a Pota•… Pie.
To make Marrow Pasties to fry.
To make egg Pies.
To make a Trotter Pie, and Taffatie-Tarts.
To make an Orangado Pie.
Another way.
A hot baked meat of compounds.
To make a Pigeon Pie.
Another way.
To make a Kid Pie.
Another way.
Two other wayes.
To make a Pastie of an old Goat.
To make a Lamb-Pastie.
To bake a Fawn, or young Roe.
To make Pasties of Pies to fry.
BOOK XV.
How to make a Bacon Tart.
To make an Almond Tart.
To make a Pine apple Tart.
Another Tart of Pistaches.
To make a Spring Tart.
To make a Cowslip Tart.
To make a Cheese Tart.
To make a Prewen Tart.
To make Cheese Cakes.
To make a dish of Puffs.
To bake a set Custard.
To make Tarts of the Jelly of Pippins.
To make a Goosberry Tart green, and clear as Crystal.
To make Puff Paste.
To make a laid Tart for preserves.
To make a Warden or Pear-Pie.
To bake a Quince Pie.
To make a Pie with whole Pippins.
A set Tart.
RARE RECEIPTS IN COOKERY. Part II.
To make a Bisk divers wayes.
To boyl a Capon in Rice.
A Bisk another way.
To boyl a Leg of Mutton the French fashion.
To boyl Partridges.
Capons in Pottage in the French fashion.
To make a boyled meat, much like a Bisk.
To boyl a Neck, Loyn, or Chine of Mutton, or a Neck, Legg, Fillet, Knuckle of Veal, Legg or Loyn of Lamb.
To boyl a Chine of Veal whole or in pieces.
To bake a Pigg to be eaten cold, called a Maremaid Pie.
Another way.
To bake Steaks the French way.
A Pudding stewed between two dishes.
To make French Puffs with green herbs.
To Baks all manner of Land-fowl; as Turkey, Bustard, Pea∣cock, Crane, &c. to be eaten cold.
To fry Sheeps-tongues, Deers-tongues, or Calves-tongues.
To bake a Pigg to be eaten hot.
To bake all manner of Sea fowl, as Swan, Whopper, to be eaten cold.
To Hash a Carp.
For the Stock for Jelly.
To make a Jelly as white as Snow, with Jordan Almonds.
To make some Kick-shaws in Paste, to fry or bake in what form you please.
To make a Pottage.
To make a small Bisk of flesh roasted.
A Jelly for service of several colours.
To bake Apricocks green.
To make an Oatmeal Pudding.
To make an Oatmeal Pudding boyled.
Oatmeal Puddings, otherwise of fish or flesh blood.
To make white Puddings an excellent way.
To make an Italian Pudding.
To make Metheglin.
How to make Ipocras.
To Jelly Lobsters, Crawfish, or Prawnes.
To Stew Crabs.
To force Crabs.
To make water Leach.
To make a boyled Pudding.
Another way.
A baked Pudding after the Italian fashion, corrected.
To blanch Manchet in a frying-Pan.
Another way.
To boyl Pigeons the French Fashion.
To boyl Mullet, or Pike with Oysters.
To boyl Carps an honourable way.
Another way to boyl a dish of great Flownders.
To make a Hash of Partridges or Capons.
A rare Friggasy.
To make a Bisk of Carps and other several fish.
To dress eggs in the Spanish fashion.
To dress eggs in the Portugal fashion.
To dress eggs called in French A la Hugenotte or the Protestant way.
To dress eggs in fashion of a Tansey.
To dress Poach Eggs.
To butter Eggs upon Toasts.
An excellent way to Butter eggs.
To make Cheese-cakes.
To make Dowsets.
How to make a congealed meat, to be eaten cold.
How to congeal a Turkey or Capon.
How to make small Pindents to fry for first course.
How to make rich Pancakes.
Another way to make them crisp.
How to fry a leg, breast or neck of Lamb.
How to make a green Friggasy of Chickens.
A fryed meat in haste for the second course.
How to make a Pudding with Whey.
How to make Apple-pyes to fry.
How to make a boyled meat, a forced meat, a dish of Collops, and a roast meat, and a baked meat, of a leg of Veal, with some other small ingredients.
A Fridayes dish made with Barley.
For Friday, to make a dish of fryed toasts.
Another Friday or Lent dish.
A second course dish in the beginning of the Spring.
To make a made dish.
An excellent way how to broyl Eeles.
How to butter a dish of eggs with Anchovies.
How to fry a dish of Cheese.
How to broyl a leg of Porck.
How to roast the said Collops.
How to make a Palate pie.
Very rare and most choice RECEIPTS For all manner of Preserving, Conserving and Candying, &c.
section
To Preserve Pippins.
Another way.
Another way to preserve them Green.
To preserve Apricocks.
Another way.
Another way to preserve them ripe.
To preserve Pippins red.
To preserve Pears.
Another way for white Pippins.
To preserve Medlars.
To preserve Peaches.
Another way.
Another way.
To preserve Quinses.
Another way to preserve them white or red.
To preserve Goos-berries.
Another way.
Another way.
To preserve Mellacatons.
To preserve Damsins.
Another way.
To preserve Grapes.
Another way.
To preserve Cherries.
Another way.
Another way.
To preserve Barberries.
To preserve Raspberries.
Another way.
To preserve your Pomcitrons.
To preserve Oranges and Lemmons.
To preserve Saterion roots.
To preserve red Rose-leaves.
To preserve Enula Campana roots.
To preserve Currans.
To preserve Mulberries.
To preserve Eringo roots.
To preserve green Walnuts.
To preserve Angelica roots.
The time to preserve green fruits, according to other Authors.
Here begins your Conserves.
Conserve of Barberries.
Another way.
To make Conserve of Violets.
To make a Marmalade of Quinses.
To make Conserve of Borage flowers.
To make Conserve of Rosemary flowers.
To make Conserve of Bugloss flowers.
To make Pectoral rolls for the Cough.
To make Conserve of Strawberries.
To make Conserve of Prunes or Damsins.
To make Conserve of Red and Damask Roses.
To Conserve Cowslips, Marigolds, Violets, Scabions, Sage, and Roses, &c.
To make a Pomander.
Another way to Conserve Strawberries.
To make Conserve of Cichory flowers.
Here follows the Sirrups.
To make sirrup of Pomcitrons.
To make sirrup of Liquorish.
To make sirrup of Hoare-hound.
To make sirrup of Hyssop.
To make sirrup of Violets.
Another rare way.
To make sirrup of Mulberries.
To make sirrup of Clove-Gillyflowers.
To make sirrup of Roses solutive.
Another way to make sirrup of Damask Roses.
To keep your liquor of Roses all the year.
To make sirrup of Cowslips.
To make sirrup of Lemmons.
To make sirrup of Maiden-hair.
To make sirrup of dry Roses.
To keep Cherries all the year, and to have them at Christmass.
Candying.
To Candie Violet flowers.
To Candie Pears, Plumbs, Apricocks, to look clear, &c.
To Candie Borage flowers.
To Candie Rosemary flowers.
To Candie all sorts of flowers after the Spanish way.
To make Manus Christi.
To Candie Goos-berries.
To dry Apricocks.
To Candie Enula-Campana.
To Candie Eringo-roots.
Another way.
To dry Pippins.
To Candie Rose-leaves as natural, as if they grew on trees.
To Candie all sorts of Flowers, Fruits and Spices, the clear Rock-Candie.
To Candie Marigolds in Wedges, the Spanish fashion.
To Candie all manner of flowers in their natural colours.
To Candie Ginger.
PASTES.
To make Paste of Pippins the Genua fashion, some with leaves, some like Plumbs with stalks, and stones in them.
To make Paste of Oranges and Lemmons.
To make Paste of Goos-berries.
Certain old useful Traditions OF CARVING and SEWING, &c.
Terms of a Carver.
The Office of the Butler, Pantler, Yeoman of the Sellar, and Eury.
section
Of the Sewing of fish.
Service.
Of Carving of flesh.
Service.
Sauce for many sorts of fowls and flesh.
Of the Feasts and Service from Easter unto Whitsuntide.
General Directions for the Carving up of Fowl.
Lift that Swan.
Rear that Goose.
To cut up a Turkey or Bustard.
Dismember that Heron.
Ʋnbrace that Mallard.
Unlace that Coney.
Sauce that Capon.
Allay that Pheasant.
Wing that Partridge.
Wing that Quail.
Display that Crane.
Dismember that Heron.
Unjoynt that Bittern.
Break thas Egript.
Ʋntach that Curlew.
Untach that Brew.
Break that Sarcell.
Mince that Plover.
A Snite.
Thigh that Woodcock.
From the Feast of Whitsuntide unto Midsummer.
From the Feast of Saint John the Baptist, unto Michaelmas.
From the Feast of Saint Michaelmas, unto the Feast of Christmass.
section
Sewing of Fish.
First Course.
Second Course.
Third Course.
Of Carving of Fish.
Sauces of all fish.
section
An excellent way for making Ipocras.
An approved Receipt for a Consumption, that hath long remained.
To Coller Flounders.
To roast a shoulder of Mutton in blood.
To make a Portugal pie.
To stew a Carp.
To make a Bacon Tart.
To make Vever Ollie, or Cheese Pottage.
record
introduction
A great Feast made by George Nevill Chancel∣lor of England, and Arch-Bishop of York, in the dayes of EDVVARD the Fourth, 1468.
bill of fare
order of table
The great Officers.
Estates sitting in the Hall.
At the high Table.
At the second Table.
At the third Table.
At the fourth Table.
At the fifth Table.
At the sixth Table.
At the last Table.
Estates sitting in the chief Cham∣ber.
At the first Table.
At the second Table.
At the third Table.
Estates sitting in the second Chamber.
At the first Table.
At the second Table.
At the third Table.
In the low Hall.
In the Gallery.