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Author: Pynchon, William, 1590-1662.
Title: The covenant of nature made with Adam described and cleared from sundry great mistakes. And thereby proving, I. That the kind of death that was threatned in that covenant, in Gen. 2.17. ought not to be understood of any other kind of death but of a double spiritual death, 1. By depriving Adam of Gods concreated image: and 2. By corruption of nature that followed thereupon. II. Proving that the said covenant was totally extinguished and made utterly null, as soon as Adam had but tasted of the forbidden fruit, and received the said threatned punishment. III. Expounding Gal. 3.10. and proving that the curse therein threatned must not be understood of the curse of the said covenant of nature, but of that curse that is threatned in the covenant of grace to the fallen posterity of Adam, for their not doing of Moses law by faith in Christ, which was given to them for the covenant of grace and reconciliation only. ... VIII. Expounding Rom. 8.1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 6, 8. in ch. 25. By William Pynchon.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: The covenant of nature made with Adam described and cleared from sundry great mistakes. And thereby proving, I. That the kind of death that was threatned in that covenant, in Gen. 2.17. ought not to be understood of any other kind of death but of a double spiritual death, 1. By depriving Adam of Gods concreated image: and 2. By corruption of nature that followed thereupon. II. Proving that the said covenant was totally extinguished and made utterly null, as soon as Adam had but tasted of the forbidden fruit, and received the said threatned punishment. III. Expounding Gal. 3.10. and proving that the curse therein threatned must not be understood of the curse of the said covenant of nature, but of that curse that is threatned in the covenant of grace to the fallen posterity of Adam, for their not doing of Moses law by faith in Christ, which was given to them for the covenant of grace and reconciliation only. ... VIII. Expounding Rom. 8.1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 6, 8. in ch. 25. By William Pynchon.
Pynchon, William, 1590-1662.

London: printed for the author, and are to be sold at the Bishops-head in St. Pauls Church-yard, 1662.
Notes:
Includes bibliography beginning on pg. 13.
With tables of chapters and scriptures, an index, and a page of errata at end of text.
Text appears continuous despite pagination and register; register begin with signature "aaa" on pg. 369.
Reproduction of the original at the Bodleian Library.
Subject terms:
Bible -- Commentaries -- Early works to 1800.
Bible -- Criticism, interpretation, etc. -- Early works to 1800.
Christian literature -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A56361.0001.001

Contents
title page
To the Judicious READER, Grace and Peace.
Authors cited.
CHAP. I.
SECT. II.
SECT. III.
Conclusion.
SECT. IV.
SECT. V.
CHAP. II.
Object. 1. It is objected by some eminent Divines, that a bodily death was only threatned in Gen. 2. 17. because God could not be the Author of inflicting a Spiritual death in sin: but say they, Adam pul'd that upon himself, by his wilful sin (in eating the forbidden fruit) as if God had said thus to Adam; If thou killest thy self by thy wilful eating of the forbidden fruit, thou shalt be killed: but say they, the death threat∣ned in Gen. 2. 17. imports such a death as was inflicted by the just hand of God, and that can be no other (say they) but a bodily death.
Object. 2. Symachus Translation doth make the death threatned in Gen. 2. 17. to be no other but a lingering bodily death: for he doth thus translate that Text; In the day thou eatest thereof, thou shalt become mortal; namely, from that day forwards thou shalt become mortal, by a lingering kind of death, until thy soul be separated from thy body.
Object. 3. Others do labour to confirm the said exposition of a lin∣gering bodily death, by the unlimited circumstance of time, which they thnk is expressed under the word Day: they say the word Day is a time certain put for an uncertain; that is to say, for a time to come: and so they make a lingring bodily death to be threatned in the day or time to come.
Objct. 4. Though you have made it clear to my understanding, that a bodily death was not threatned in Gen. 2. 1. 7. for the punishment of Adams first sin in eating the forbidden fruit; yet I think it is held by all, that Adam was liable to a bodly death, and to an eternal death in Hell, ipso facto, for his second new degree of sinning against every branch of the moral Law of nature, which fell upon him before the Covenant of grace and reconciliation was declared in Gen. 3. 15. namely, in the en∣tervale, or in the middle space of time between the execution of his Spi∣ritual death, and the declaration of the Covenant of grace: for as soon as Adam was deprived of his concreated life of moral perfections, he could not stand still from further sinning, but instantly fell of his own accord into the new degree of Original sin: and the Scriptures tell us, that God inflicted a bodily death, as soon as he was guilty of Original sin; and therefore he was liable to a bodily death, before the Covenant of grace was declared.
CHAP. III.
SECT. II.
Conclusion.
CHAP. IV.
SECT. II.
SECT. III.
Object. 1. P. Martyr maketh this objection in pag. 187. If mans will was not evil by creation, but by deprivation; what shall we say as touching the sin of the First man? for in him nature was good; grace and the help of God was not wanting, and yet nevertheless he sinned.
Object. 2. Some that I do much honour for their godliness have ob∣jected, That Adam sinned in soul through unbelief of the threatning; and that Sathan being a lying Spirit did imbreathe unbelief into his soul.
Object. 3. You affirm that Eve sinned not in soul, when she desired to eat of the forbidden fruit; you say that nothing else was her sin, but her bodily act of eating only: but it seems to me that it was a sin to touch it with the hand; for Eve told the Serpent, in Gen. 3. 3. that God com∣manded, Ye shall not eat, nor touch it, lest ye die: and to this sence doth Austin understand the prohibition in the City of God, l. 13. c. 20. And hence it followes, that seeing it was against Gods command to touch it with the hand, why should it not be a sin likewise to touch it with the de∣sire of her soul?
Conclusion.
CHAP. V.
SECT. II.
These following instances, or at the least some of them, will evidence the truth of my said assertions.
Conclusion.
SECT. III.
Therefore Christs performance of the Law is given to Adam in in∣nocency, (whatsoever its extent be more or less, as given to him after the fall) received by faith, is that whereby we are justified evangeli∣cally.
Conclusion from the premises.
This necessary rule of a right exposition doth sufficiently confute Mr. Nortons threefold consideration of the word Law at mount Sinai.
From this last clause, no type of Christ, It follows that Mr. Ruther∣ford could not hold the tree of life to be a type of Christ (as Master Norton doth) and therein he doth agree with Mr. Shephard and others before cited.
Conclusion.
consideration
Conclusion.
consideration
Conclusion.
SECT. IV.
SECT. V.
Conclusion.
It is observable, that the said typical pattern was a teaching School-master of true justification, in three particulars.
Conclusion.
reply
Conclusion.
observation
Conclusion,
CHAPTER VI.
Conclusion.
Sect. 2.
Sect. 3.
Sect. 4.
Sect. 5.
Sect. 6.
Conclusion.
CHAPTER VII.
Sect. 1.
Sect. 2.
Conclusion.
CHAPTER. VIII.
Sect. 2.
Conclusion.
Sect. 3.
CHAPTER IX.
Sect. 2.
Sect. 3.
Sect. 4.
Sect. 5.
Sect. 6.
Sect. 7.
Object. Mr Norton doth holdly and constantly affirm,
Object. 2. But Mr Norton doth oppose this interpretation of the word Law, in Rom. 10. 4. and doth affirm in pag. 199, 214, 225, &c.
Sect. 8.
A necessary Digression to shew Luthers judgement about the word Do, in Gal. 3. 10. That it means the doing of Moses Law by Faith in Christ.
CHAPTER X.
Conclusion.
CHAPTER XI.
Sect. 2.
Conclusion.
Sect. 3.
Of Punishment properly so called.
Conclusion.
observation
Conclusion.
CHAPTER XII.
Sect. 2.
Conclusion.
Sect. 3.
Sect. 4.
CHAPTER XIII.
Sect. 2.
Sect. 3.
Sect. 4.
Sect. 5.
Sect. 6.
CHAP. XIV.
SECT. 1.
SECT. 2.
SECT. 3.
QUest. 1.
Quest. 2.
SECT. 4.
SECT. 5.
Quest. 1.
Obj. It is objected by Mr. Norton, that this course will make the Scripture to be full of Equivocation?
SECT. 6.
SECT. 7.
Quest. 1.
SECT. 8.
SECT. 9.
SECT. 10.
QUest. 1.
Quest.
SECT. 11.
SECT. 12.
SECT. 13.
SECT. 14.
SECT. 15.
SECT. 16.
SECT. 17.
SECT. 18.
Quest.
SECT. 19.
SECT. 20.
Conclusion of Dan. 9. 24.
Dan. 9. 25. Is thus translated in Bro. Hanaw Edition: Know then and understand, from the out-going of the word, to restore and to build Jerusalem unto Messias the King, shall be seven sevens, and sixty twosevens (In the other) it shall be restored and builded, street and wall: And troublous shall these times be.
2. The out-going of the Word.
3. Shall be seven-sevens, and sixty and two sevens, (in the other) it shall be restored and builded.
4. And troublous shall these times be.
5. Sixty and two sevens.
6. To Restore, and to build Jerusalem.
7. Unto Messias.
8. The King.
Dan. 9. 26. is thus translated in Mr. Bro. Hanaw Edition, In that after sixty and two sevens Messias shall suffer, but not for him∣self: thereupon the City and holy place shall he destroy; the Kings own people to come: and their End shall be with a flood, and at the end of war it shall have a final judgement to desolation.
1. In that, after sixty and two sevens.
2. Messias shall suffer.
3. NoFor himself.
4. And thereupon the City, the hoy place shall he destroy.
5. The Kings own people to come.
6. And their end shall be with a flood.
Quest.
7. At the end of war it shall have a final Judgement to Desola∣tion.
8. From this Exposition of ver. 26. observe these inferences.
Daniel 9. 27. is thus translated in Bro. Hanaw Edition: But he shall confirm the Testament for many: The last seven; when in half that se∣ven he shall end Sacrifice and Oblation; afterwards, by an Army of In∣fidels, he shall make a desolation, even till utter destruction and final Judgement come flowing upon the desolate.
1. He shall confirm the Testament.
2. o many.
3. The last seven: when in half that seven he shall end Sacrifice and Oblation.
4. He shall end Sacrifice.
5. Oblation.
6. Afterwards by an Army of Infidels.
7. He shall make a Desolation.
8. Even till utter destructon and final judgement come flowing upon the desolate.
Conclusion from the Premises.
CHAP. XV.
SECT. 1.
SECT. 2.
Conclusion,
SECT. 3.
Conclusion.
SECT. 4.
CHAP. XVI.
CHAP. XVII.
CHAP. XVIII.
CHAP. XIX.
CHAP. XX.
CHAP. XXI.
CHAP. XXII.
CHAP. XXIII.
CHAP. XXIV.
CHAP. XXV.
SECT. 1.
SECT. 2.
Object. 1.
Object. 2.
SECT. 3.
SECT. 4.
SECT. 5.
SECT. 6.
SECT. 7.
SECT. 8.
SECT. 9.
Conclusion:
A Table of Chief Heads.
CHAP. I.
CHAP. II.
CHAP. III.
CHAP. IV.
CHAP. V. Proving,
CHAP. VI.
CHAP. VII.
CHAP. VIII.
CHAP. IX.
CHAP. X.
CHAP. XI.
CHAP. XII.
CHAP. XIII.
CHAP. XIV.
CHAP. XV.
CHAP. XVI.
CHAP. XVII.
CHAP. XVIII.
CHAP. XIX.
CHAP. XX.
CHAP. XXI.
CHAP. XXII.
CHAP. XXIII.
CHAP. XXIV.
CHAP. XXV.
ERRATA, Good Reader▪ if thou desirest not to mistake the Authors true meaning, th be pleased to correct these Errataes, before thou read, for many of them pervert my sense.
A Table of Scriptures Expounded or Illu∣strated, by being joyned with such as are Expounded.