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Author: Pratt, Samuel, 1659?-1723.
Title: The regulating silver coin made practicable and easie to the government and subject humbly submitted to the consideration of both Houses of Parliament / by a lover of his country.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: The regulating silver coin made practicable and easie to the government and subject humbly submitted to the consideration of both Houses of Parliament / by a lover of his country.
Pratt, Samuel, 1659?-1723.

London: Printed for Henry Bonwick ..., 1696.
Notes:
Written by Samuel Pratt. Cf. DNB.
Reproduction of original in Huntington Library.
Subject terms:
Coinage -- England -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A55640.0001.001

Contents
title page
THE REGULATING Silver Coin, &c.
DEFINITIONS.
CHAP. I. Of the present badness of our Coin
CHAP. II. Of the present Scarcity of Silver Coin in England.
CHAP. III. Of the Importation of Silver.
CHAP IV. Of Altering our Coin.
CHAP. V. Of Exportation of Coin'd Silver.
CHAP. VI. Of melting down the current Coyn of England by our Goldsmiths and other Artificers.
CHAP. VII. Of Hoarding up of the Silver Coyn.
CHAP. VIII. Of Regulating our Silver Coyn.
POSTULATA.
Now the Axioms I shall build upon are chiefly these.
AX. I.
AX. II.
AX. III.
AX. IV.
AX. V.
PROPOSITION.
Theorem.
Corol. I.
Corol. II.
Corol. III.
OBJECT. I. Now, if it be Objected, That Five Pounds per Cent. for want of Silver, in an Hundred Pound is too little, seeing an Hundred Pound Bagg-full is entitled to no more than Twen∣ty Shillings a Year:
I Answer,
Object. II. These Ends may as well be pursued by transferable Notes or Bills with In∣terest.
Object. III. That if this Method will hold, the intrinsick Value of Money may be but half as little as I propose, and the Subject will be al∣ways in fear of farther Alterations.
Object. IV. The Money of England will be too much for 300 Men to receive in one Day.
Object. V. It will be a great Trouble to carry 100 l. 10 Miles for 20 s.
Object. VI. The want of a less Intrinsick Value, than 20 l. per Cent. will answer all the aforesaid Ends.
Object. VII. This will be forcing Foreigners then, to Ex∣port our Commodities.
Object. VIII. Five Millions will not be half enough for our In-land Trade.
Object. IX. The new Coined Money will appear very small to the Eye.
Object. X. The Mint is the Pulse of the Common-Wealth, and this would discover us to be in a weak Condition.
CHAP. IX. Advantages and Conveniencies most of which may be expected from this Method.